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What to look for in a Day Care Fashion Jacana Kids

Postnatal Depression Awareness ISSUE 62 -NOVEMBER 2016 november 2016 | mychild

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8 CONTENTS COVER STORIES

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WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT POSTNATAL DEPRESSION WHAT TO LOOK FOR IN A DAY CARE ENDING THE TODDLER FOOD FIGHT

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EVERY MONTH

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RECIPES

EDITORS LETTER

YOUR CHILD

EDITOR PICKS

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WHAT TO DO WHEN YOUR CHILD IS ‘PLAYING DOCTOR’

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WHY DOES MY CHILD CRY AT DAY CARE DROP OFF?

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SUN AND WATER SAFETY

BOOK REVIEWS THE MUMMY BLOG SAY WHAT NOW?! TOY REVIEWS


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REAL READS

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PERINATAL DEPRESSION WEEK ENCOROUGES SUFFERING MUMS TO SEEK SUPPORT

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PANDA - JANE AND BEN USE THEIR JOURNEY TO INFORM OTHERS

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CARING FOR SOMEONE WITH POSTNATAL DEPRESSION

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SUPPORT AND SELF CARE FOR POSTNATAL DEPRESSION

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DON’T GIVE UP EVEN PEOPLE TELL YOU ITS A BAD IDEA

DAD READ

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POSTNATAL DEPRESSION IN DADS

RELATIONSHIPS

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MUMMY AND DADDY TIME OUT

SHOPPING

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FASHION JACANA KIDS BABYSENSE2 FROM ORICOM SHOP KIDS FASHION GET THE LOOK INTERIORS

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EDITOR BIANCA MEDINA

ASSISTANT EDITOR JANA ANGELES

  ART DIRECTOR CRAIG BURKILL

SALES DIRECTOR KATALIN CSARDAS

CONTRIBUTING EXPERTS  APRIL DAVIES LIZZY FOWLER LEAH SHANNON OLIVIA ARROW SHIREE ECHLIN CATH HAKANSON LISA MARIE D’ALONSO GENIE PRICE

EDITORIAL ENQUIRIES  EDITORIAL@MYCHILDMAGAZINE.COM.AU

ADVERTISING ENQUIRIES  ADVERTISING@MYCHILDMAGAZINE.COM.AU

CONTACT: CRE8 PUBLICATIONS  PHONE: 0411 572 877 8 GROSE ST, PARRAMATTA, NSW 2150

My Child magazine and mychildmagazine.com.au are wholly owned by Cre8 Publications (ABN 70 141 165 675). No other parties or individuals have any financial interest in the company or in My Child or mychildmagazine.com.au. My Child contains general information only and does not purport to be a substitute for health and parenting advice. Readers are advised to seek a doctor for all medical and health matters. The publisher and authors do not accept any liability whatsoever in respect of an action taken by readers in reliance on the recommendations set out in this magazine. Reproduction of any material without written permission by the publisher is strictly forbidden. We cannot accept responsibility for material lost or damaged in the post or for any unsolicited manuscripts and photographs. All reasonable efforts have been made to trace copyright holders.

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NEW! Baby Carrier One Air www.babybjorn.com.au The Parallel Line Design is a sign of a genuine BABYBJÖRN product.

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EDITOR’S LETTER Hi Everyone, I use to hear from mums all the time how time pass by to quickly once you have kids and I never really understood that until now. November is here already, I just can’t believe it! What happened to 2016? It feels like a blur! I cant believe that I’m going to have to start Christmas shopping any day now…...Holly Molly. In my last letter I got so carried away with introducing myself that I forgot to introduce the amazing team that work with mychild Magazine and help us with making it what it is today. Our amazing Jana Angeles who is the Assistant Editor and office all rounder, we really couldn’t live without Jana and we love her to bits. The all so talented Mr Craig Burkill who we never have to really worry about with the design of the magazine. Its like he’s a mind reader and seems to know exactly what the mychild vision is. We also have an amazing team of contributors: April Davis – Toy Reviews, Sheree Echlin – Mummy Blogger, Lizzy Fowler – Book Reviews, Leah Shannon – Interiors, Olivia Arrow – Writer, Cath Hakanson – Writer, Lisa-Marie D’Alonzo – Writers, Genie Price – Writers I just wanted to say a big “Thank You” to the team, your patience while I get up to speed on everything is appreciated. Now let’s take a look at what’s in the November Issue. This month is Postnatal Depression (PND) awareness month. It’s a really important topic and we have some great articles about PND so please make sure you check them out. We also have some super helpful articles about what to look for in a day-care and why your child cries every time you drop them off at day-care. Also make sure you also check out ending the food fight with your toddler and playing doctors, these are fantastic reads. We have 2 inspirational reads that you must read. All the usuals, interior, reviews blog and much more can also be found in this issue too. Until next month

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Bianca and the mychild Team xxx 6

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editor

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WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT

POST NATAL DEPRESSION By Jana Angeles It’s not uncommon that postnatal depression affects new mothers after the birth of their baby. There are times where we will experience unexpected mood swings, feeling low about ourselves and feeling like we are incapable of raising our kids due to the uselessness we feel after the pregnancy journey has ended. Being a new mother is not easy work and one thing not many new parents look out for is their health post-pregnancy. We explore the ways in which you can identify if you have postnatal depression and what to do when you are showing symptoms after childbirth.

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AWARENESS

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WHAT IS POSTNATAL DEPRESSION? Postnatal depression (PND) is the tendency of having the blues post-pregnancy. Many new mothers find the lifestyle of having a baby quite difficult to adjust to so they tend to either blame themselves, their partners or baby for feeling down during this period of time. There are more than 15% of women who suffer from Postnatal depression and 10% of men who suffer from it too. Though most women try and snap out of feeling depressed, they find it very challenging to overcome this feeling of sadness and have no understanding to why they have no control over how they are feeling. This is the case where they need to go to the doctors to confirm if they have PND and what treatment options are available to help overcome this unexpected feeling of sadness. THERE ARE OTHER KINDS OF MOOD DISORDERS THAT LIE UNDER PND. THESE INCLUDE: • Baby blues: This normally affects 80% of new mothers. This usually happens between the third and the tenth day after giving birth. Symptoms include anxiety, mood swings, and irritability. Normally this feeling passes through with a little understanding and support from family and friends. • Postnatal psychosis: This type of mood disorder comes from the very end of the spectrum. 1 in 500 mothers are affected by postnatal psychosis and need to be hospitalised if they do experience this. It is a serious condition and the mother may not actually be aware of her illness. She can pose as a risk as the behaviour during postnatal psychosis is considered unsafe if it has not been recognised or treated. Symptoms include inappropriate responses to the

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baby, bizarre thoughts, severe mood swings (being depressed or elated or in-between), insomnia and being unable to think clearly. HERE ARE SOME FACTS YOU DIDN’T KNOW ABOUT PND: • If a mother has not recovered from PND after giving birth and has another subsequent pregnancy, the condition will continue to worsen as she starts her journey of having a baby. • It can happen to any women from all different kinds of backgrounds and cultures. Age doesn’t matter too because women who are child-bearing can experience PND. • PND mainly happens after the birth of the first child. However, any case of PND can be experienced throughout another pregnancy after that. • Different generations perceive PND as something different because of their unique views on the mental disorder. 50 years ago, most would’ve noted it as a “nervous breakdown” for new mums. • PND can happen after a caesarean delivery, natural birth, stillbirth or miscarriage. • The symptoms of PND can range from mild, moderate to severe. WHAT ARE THE CONTRIBUTING FACTORS OF PND? There are a range of contributing factors for PND. This can come from a variation of Biological, Psychological and Social factors. When it comes to managing PND, these various factors need to be addressed in order for appropriate intervention and assessment.


You can view the contributing factors in the table below:

Biological • If you have a history of PND or conditions of mental illness in your family • Genetics • A history of premenstrual tension • Undergoing unexpected changes in pregnancy hormones • Going through challenging pregnancy or childbirth experiences • Lack of sleep and having nutritional deficiencies within body

Psychological

Social

• Not coming to terms with previous loss and grief. For example, not being able to accept a miscarriage • Being infertile and having to use other fertility solutions such as IVF • Unable to communicate effectively (social and emotional) • Having a traumatising/ difficult experience with childbirth. For example, experiencing an emergency caesarean or emergency intervention • Having a controlling or perfectionistic personality • Having previous relationship issues with mother, both problematic and unresolved • Experience with sexual abuse in childhood

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS OF PND? Experiencing symptoms of PND can happen anytime from 24 hours of giving birth to several months after the event. Women are much more likely to seek help if they show a case of abrupt symptoms of PND. It can sometimes be difficult for new mums to distinguish the difference between PND and adapting to the changes that come with

• Experiencing stressful life events. For example losing a job or death of a loved one • Lack of support from family and community • Being younger or older for giving birth to a child • Having relationship difficulties with current partner. For example, they may work long hours and new mum feels disconnected and stressed with their absence • Having a lack of close friends, minimising any support from people • Difficult family relationships. For example, members of the family have not spoken in years, having grudges against certain family members etc • Financial instability. Not being able to make ends meet and feeling stressed that you can’t go back into work after having a baby or being in a low income family etc • Not being able to access efficient transport and feeling isolated most of the time

having a baby. Some may not seek help, resulting in PND lingering into the second year post-pregnancy. Here are some of the symptoms of PND. Some men can experience these symptoms too: • Not feeling confident about themselves and having low self-esteem. This is a very

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Mothers experiencing PND may feel guilty of not doing enough for their babies and they may not have the confidence in believing that they are adequate enough to take on the role as a parent. . common thing to feel when a woman has just given birth. Due to changes in their physical appearance and the stress that comes with motherhood, taking care of a little one can dramatically change their life and they may not accept the several changes that happen post-pregnancy. Feeling like they’ve lost confidence and being insecure about their appearance are common for women that have just given birth. • Experiencing a lack of sleep (unrelated to baby’s needs). Normally women that have given birth try and catch up on sleep wherever they can. Mums experiencing PND may feel anxious and have concerns on their baby’s sleep. This results in them being up for several hours a night.

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and stress they’ve been experiencing post-pregnancy. • Not being able to concentrate and losing memories. Women may find it difficult to tackle on a simple task and finding focus can be challenging. They may seem a lot more forgetful than usual and struggle with new information. • Crying is another symptom for women with PND. Some may cry for no apparent reason and the tears come out easily, day or night. • Fearful in being alone. Many women suffering from PND may become scared in being alone. This results in them not being able to stay home alone unless someone is with them, following their partner on a daily basis when they’re out and about. • Women struggle with coping everyday things they used to do daily. This may be your basic cleaning and cooking duties. Women suffering from PND may feel tired all the time and have no motivation to do normal household chores.

• Feeling guilty and inadequate. Mothers experiencing PND may feel guilty of not doing enough for their babies and they may not have the confidence in believing that they are adequate enough to take on the role as a parent. Even if they have done positive things for their babies, they will still feel like they have done something wrong.

• Irritability, anxiety and negative thoughts. Women with PND will panic over no apparent reason, feel anxious on things they shouldn’t be anxious about and being obsessive over something negative. They will also have some crazy mood swings too, causing them to feel extremely irritated or anxious over something small.

• Loss of appetite. After giving birth, mothers may have difficulty feeding themselves due to the loss of appeal in food. Feeling down can discourage them from eating. Others may find that they are overeating due to the amount of anxiety

HOW CAN YOU HELP SOMEONE WITH PND?

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• If you’re a loved one of someone with PND, make sure you’re ready to give out emotional support. Any form of depression is scary and being there for


someone with PND can really help them feel safe and secure at all times. • If you or someone you know are showing symptoms of PND, make sure you speak with your local GP or health professional. They can help prescribe you with appropriate antidepressants and can teach ways to manage the disorder. Make sure you seek help as soon as possible. • People with partners of PND may feel neglected and isolated due to the change in attitudes of their significant other. If you feel this way, discuss with your local GP or health professional and make sure you show support by attending all scheduled appointments with your partner suffering from PND. This will help them feel loved and cared for.

• Nobody can simply ‘snap out’ of depression. It takes a combination of therapy, medication and patience to make the effects of depression seem less severe. Do not feel pressured in feeling like you need to recover quickly from PND. With lots of support and being open to treatment options, you can battle PND at your own pace. Overall, any form of depression forms a lot of challenges along the way for people, especially new mums suffering from PND. Always remember that even though it may not feel like it, there will be at least one person out there willing to help. You are loved and cared for by people so despite any of the negativity you’ve been feeling lately, you can only do your best to overcome PND and try to live the life you used to.

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WHAT TO LOOK FOR IN A DAY CARE Written by: Genie Price

Haunted by the day-care decision? Learn how to choose the right one. Finding childcare or even occasional care for your child can be a daunting, overwhelming event, which is often - no family vacation. It’s normal to be plagued by a million questions when considering such an investment. Understandably so, you want what is best for your bundle of joy, and you need to be at ease with your choice.

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PREGNANCY

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A recent publication produced by the Menzies School of Health Research identifies the first five years of a child’s life as being the most critical. The findings indicate the positive impacts a child’s early learning experiences within their family, community and early learning environments – has on early brain development. Therefore, establishing the foundation for their future health, learning and behaviour. So, why wouldn’t you want quality care for your child? You would. But how do you know which centre is right for you? Here are some important points to consider when you start out on the hunt for the right centre. DISCUSS YOUR IDEAL SETTING: Before you dive into calling all manner of centres, start by making a list of questions you and your family consider to be important benchmarks towards your pintsized person’s care. QUESTIONS TO THINK ABOUT: • Are you wanting an in-home care service (Family Day Care), or a larger, more structured setting (Long Day Care)? • How does the centre support and encourage breastfeeding mothers? Is there a private space for doing so? • What are the sleep routines and options? Does the centre provide meals? Or, do you have to provide these? Does the menu include a variety of nutritious foods? • What illnesses are excluded and for how long? (Ask to see all policies and procedures). • • How many days, and what hours of care do you need? • What is the daily fee, and are government rebates available? • Are nappies and wipes included with

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the fee, or are these provided by the parent? • Is location important, or can you negotiate this? Writing a list will help narrow down your search. It will also decrease stress, and give you a reference point to work from. START EARLY: It is not unheard of for many centres, particularly the more popular names – to have a waitlist. Popular centres will have families scrambling for spots, so start your search early, even while you are pregnant.


This will increase your chances of securing a spot, and allow you time to make a wellinformed decision. RESEARCH: Google is a great tool. Don’t be afraid to be a keyboard warrior, and research. Shop around to compare centres which fit your criteria and ask friends and other families for recommendations. Asking for recommendations can be another way to narrow your search options. Centres which carry a recommendation

are a good place to start. Remember each centre is different, so be prepared to negotiate changes to your list in order to find a suitable place. Another useful tool to simplify the hunt is www.careforkids.com.au. Centres here are listed by area and postcode. You can apply to be waitlisted, and have email alerts sent, to keep you updated about upcoming spots. MAKE A TOUR BOOKING: Childcare is not all snotty noses and children snatching toys, in fact, it can be quite the opposite. Over 75% of centres in Australia have been assessed as either meeting or exceeding expectations by the Australian Children’s Education and Care Quality Authority (ACECQA), therefore, taking the tour will help ease worry, and finalise your decision. Call the centre, and discuss your needs. Use your list of questions to help. Were you happy with the responses? If so, make an appointment to have a tour. If not, keep looking. WHEN YOU FIRST VISIT: Don’t be put off by wild children, as the purpose of the first visit is to meet the staff, view teaching practices, space and resources, and again - ask questions. Any staff you come across should be professional in both their appearance and their approach to you. Expect a senior Educator from your child’s room to speak to you, while another, takes your child for a look around, and play. Use this time to discuss your home routines, and what interests your child. It’s important to make time to delve into policies and procedures also. Some of the most common are the unwell child and minimising infections, menu options and allergy management, disciplinary and

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grievance procedures, as well as staffing arrangements for unwell educators.

will be relying on the Educator to tell you about their day.

If you have inclusive needs, discuss these at this point also. It is important to be transparent from the get go. If you feel even the slightest bit of reluctance to leave your child here, move on.

It’s important that you can communicate comfortably with each other, and ideally, you should not be fighting for attention. In order to build the long-standing partnership you need, clear communication is critical. Go with your gut:

STAFF - CHILD INTERACTIONS: Trusting others with your child is a huge decision. We have all been there. When visiting the centre watch your child with the Educators. Interactions should be positive and encouraging. The Australia Institute defines quality as staff who show genuine interest, use openended questions and display nurturing, reciprocal connections with the children. So, rest assured when you find such a place, you might very well call it perfect. CURRICULUM: Skip centres that either has no daily program displayed or offer one that is unchallenging. Your child’s development relies on the program. Babies’ spaces should be free from clutter, and be well supervised. Interactions should be calm and happy. If babies are spending long periods in jolly jumpers, or infant seats, with little interaction – cross this facility off your list. Acecqa confirms a quality centre will display a curriculum which incorporates a variety of social, physical and creative play. As well as both individual and group activities, quiet and rest times, and scheduled meal times. Your child will thrive in a setting where they are supported to explore and make new discoveries. COMMUNICATION: Until your precious treasure can talk, you

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Every parent knows when something doesn’t feel quite right. If a centre has had bad reviews or a so-so reputation, be wary. It’s perfectly ok to say “no thanks.” Your child deserves, and will succeed under good, responsive and nurturing care. If something doesn’t feel right about the situation, advocate for your child and continue to investigate other options. Credits: http://www.acecqa.gov.au/ http://ccde.menzies.edu.au/sites/default/ f il e s /re s ou rce s /S il b u r n % 2 02 0 1 1 % 2 0 First5YrsStartingEarly%20No.%202.pdf www.careforkids.com.au ABOUT THE AUTHOR: With a passion for Education and Care in the Early Years, I never stop researching! I am excited to be combining my passion for writing and early childhood development by contributing to MyChild Magazine. Originally from New Zealand, with two onthe-go boys, I have worked as a qualified Teacher in the Education industry for over 10 years. I have an interest in paediatric health and well-bring also, and look forward to delivering you all some fun, and easy to read articles on stimulating topics. To get to know me better, you can visit my new blog at: http://genies1.wixsite.com/ thekiwihummingbird


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KIDS

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WHAT TO DO WHEN YOUR CHILD IS ‘PLAYING DOCTOR’

WRITTEN BY CATH HAKANSON

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Playing doctor’ or “I’ll show you mine if you show me yours’ has been around for generations. We did it as kids, and our parents did as well. So what should parents be doing when they catch their child inspecting their friend’s genitals? WHY KIDS LOOK Children become curious about the differences between our bodies between the ages of 3-6. They have noticed that some of us have different parts ie the genitals. So when playing, it can be quite natural for them to be curious about whether their friend is different. So it is only natural that they want to have a look. WHAT’S NORMAL Normal is when children look out of curiosity. They will be of a similar age (+/- 2 years), be someone that they know, will have both agreed (ie no forcing), be spontaneous and will happen infrequently (not every time). Secrecy can be common as children rightfully suspect parental disapproval. If you’re not sure, the Traffic Lights App by True Relationships & Reproductive Health is a fantastic tool that parents can use to work out ‘when to worry’ or not. WHEN CAUGHT Walking in on children inspecting each other’s genitals, can be pretty confronting for a number of different reasons! It is common to wonder where you have gone wrong, to think sexual abuse and to overreact. So what should you do when you catch them?

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1. Take a deep breath – don’t panic and don’t get angry. They are just curious. 2. Distract them with another activity – ‘How about we go and have something to eat’ or ‘Let’s go outside and jump on the trampoline’. Don’t sound angry – keep a casual tone. 3. Talk about it after ie once the other child has gone home and you have calmed down. PICK UP TIME On pick up, casually mention what you found to the parent of their friend. Explain that you understand the innocence and the normality of their curiosity, but that you’ll try to prevent it from happening again. Be open, honest, and matter-of-fact. Don’t assign blame, and try to not worry


about upsetting your adult friendships. You would want to know if you were in their shoes! You could try saying - ‘I caught the kids having a peek at each other’s genitals (or private arts) today. I distracted them with another activity and they have been busy doing other things. I’ll have a chat with mine about the differences between boys and girls. And I’ll may sure that doors are kept open the next time they play together.’ LATER ON Later that day, try to find an opportunity to chat about what happened. You need to take a very gentle conversational approach with this – if you turn it into a lecture, you will lose the opportunity to find out what really happened.

• Gently enquire about what happened (bathtime is a good opportunity to casually chat about this) • ‘When I walked into your bedroom today, I noticed that you and your friend were looking at each others private parts. So what was happening?’ • Confirm that it was innocent (consensual, spontaneous, not happened before) and that your child is unconcerned by it all. • Tell your child that it is normal to be curious about another’s body parts and that you understand their curiosity, but that ‘its not okay to touch anyone else’s private parts or let them touch yours’. Monitor playtime discretely and minimise the opportunity for any recurrences - keep doors open, be in the background and watch out for sneaky behaviour. WHAT NEXT? ‘Playing doctor’ is a sign that your child is curious about the differences between us and is wanting to learn more. This is the perfect opportunity to start talking about: • the names of the private parts • the differences between boys and girls • body safety ie being the boss of your own body, and public & private Books are a great way to start these conversations. Some great Australian books to start with are Everyone’s Got a Bottom by Tess Rowley or these 3 from Jayneen Sanders - My Body! What I Say Goes, No Difference Between Us or No Means No!.

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BOOK

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Molly And Mae

Home In The Rain

Danny Parker and Freya Blackwood

Bob Graham

Train journeys, like friendships, are often long. And, as Molly and Mae embark on their very own train ride across the countryside, they discover that they may at times be boring. In this beautiful new picture book, Danny Parker expertly highlights the ups and downs of camaraderie and friendship, weaving between anger and forgiveness, quiet and excitement. Featuring illustrations by one of Australia’s most successful and recognisable illustrators, Molly & Mae offers a special portrait of friendship that children aged 3 and up will devour.

There’s A Snake In My School David Walliams and Tony Ross Coming from the number one bestselling picture book team, Tony Ross and David Walliams, this new title will inject some hilarity into your child’s library. Written for children aged three and up, There’s A Snake In My School features Miranda, who just loves to be different. And ‘Bring-Your Pet-To-School-Day’ gives her the perfect opportunity to show off her unique personality (even if her headmistress doesn’t think school is the right place for pet pythons!). As always, Tony Ross does a faultless job of depicting the wild antics that ensue, and this book is sure to send your child to sleep with a warm heart at bedtime.

In this beautifully touching observation of a simple car journey, Bob Graham shows us exactly why he is so awarded as an author and illustrator. It’s an uneventful tale, but one that cleverly depicts and celebrates how inspiration can – and does – strike even at the most unlikely of moments. With rain pouring down outside, the car windows steam up. Francie uses her finger to draw her family on the window… Mummy, Daddy, Francie. But who will the new baby be? If your family has a baby on the way, this is a delightful book to read with your toddler or pre-schooler.

Artie And The Grime Wave Richard Roxborough Making his debut as a children’s book author, much-loved Australian actor Rich ard Roxburgh tells the exciting tale of Artie and Bumshoe, who stumble across a CaveO f - Po ss i b l y- S to l e n - S t u f f. Adept at dealing with bullies, will they also be able to take on the likes of scary Mary, a fang-toothed funnel web and the devious Mayor Grime? Jam-packed with daring adventure, laugh-out-loud hilarity and curious characters, Artie And The Grime Wave is a wacky tale that ultimately celebrates friendship. With 240 pages, including lively illustrations by the endlessly talented Roxburgh, this is a great read for children aged 7 and up.

by

REVIEWED

bookwormz.com.au november 2016 | mychild

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SAY WHAT NOW?! WRITTEN BY: SHEREE ECHLIN

I’m convinced my daughter’s ears are possibly painted on. Or maybe they aren’t real. Surely they must be just purely for decoration as she never seems to hear me, or listen for that matter. That is, unless I mention something she really likes of course. You know, the usual suspects like chocolate, playtime or in general her favourite word of “yes” always seem to get me somewhere. I know she’s only three-years-old and I’m not expecting a full blown conversation every time we chat, but some days I feel like I’m pretty much talking to myself. I was almost tempted a couple of months ago to get her checked out by a doctor (I’m serious), in fact I’m still considering it. But a few conversations with other mums of toddlers set me a little bit more at ease. “They’re testing you” is a very common response. Why?! Because toddlers are little turds?! Well that is one explanation but I guess it’s purely their way of finding their position in the world. While that sounds pretty straightforward, it doesn’t necessarily feel so good to be on the receiving end. Patience has been well and truly tested of late in this house! And I know most of the time (probably more like every bloody time) she can actually both hear me and even understand me. It’s the mischievous gleam in her eye that often gives her away. Quite often this is followed by devilish laughing and her running away giggling uncontrollably. Ahhhhhh, the fun never ends.

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And her (now not so) little sister is fast moving up the ranks as devil in disguise number two! It’s cheeky grins by two now and they are starting to gang up on me. I can already feel a battle of the wills erupting in the future. Not necessarily just between the girls either! My parents like to laugh at what is ahead of me as they reminisce what is behind them. Was I really that bad mum and dad??! I swear my older brother was the rebel in the family but apparently I win hands down in the attitude department and it seems karma is definitely on the way to bite me on the bum. They say you never really know what something is like until you have lived it yourself. I’ve already spent years apologising to my mum for being such a cow as a teenager, but now I’m starting to think I might have to continue saying sorry for the many years preceding that!! Motherhood is frantic, chaotic, possibly even hypnotic (maybe wishful thinking?) at times. Sometimes there are no words (ahhhhh don’t we all love the sound of silence) and other times plenty of words and toys get thrown around. I’m not sure how I survive some days and yet I still pick myself up and keep going, that’s half the battle isn’t it? I’m more than happy to admit I’m not always a huge fan of challenges but parenting is one “challenge” I’m having to tackle head on with two hands tied behind my back and pretty much standing on my head.


I can’t help but feel like Miss Izzie and I are already starting to become locked in a battle of wills, often on a daily basis. She doesn’t give up easily and I’m certainly not backing down. I fear that if I give in she knows that she has won. And we can’t have that now can we??! So instead stubbornness or maybe stupidity prevails. I’m already dreading the thought of this battle once again in two years when Miss Phoebe is the same age. I keep telling her not to listen to her older sister throwing tantrums and to stay as my “good” child. Geez who am I kidding!! A toddler is a toddler, there isn’t much hope of winning there…..ever! Maybe I should just give up now and save myself the trouble . A friend and I were chatting recently about the idea you have in your head of

parenting and what you actually experience. Looking back, having a newborn really was the easy part, sleep deprivation feels like torture but at least it’s somewhat tolerable. A toddler is next level times a hundred, or maybe a thousand or more depending on your experience! They are little weapons of mass destruction with attitude but a mere added bonus! Nothing prepares you for what they will literally throw at you. Always expect the worst and you won’t be disappointed. With two girls keeping me on my toes (who has time to sit down?), I have a few more stories up my sleeve, so head over, have a read and enjoy a giggle or two at shereeechlin.com.

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RELATIONSHIP

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MUMMY AND

DADDY

t u O e Tim Written by Olivia Arrow A key factor in having happy kids is for them to see their parents in a happy and healthy relationship. If you and your partner are supportive of each other and are close, your kids will have a sense of security. As much as you love your kids, having time with your partner is very important in maintaining a happy and healthy relationship.

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It’s easy to get lost in the madness that comes with parenting and making time for just the two of you can sometimes be difficult, but you have to find a way to make the time. Have a family relative, grandparents are a good choice, come over and look after the kids so that they are in their own environment while your spending some quality mummy daddy time out. Your little ones may not be impressed and might even have a mini meltdown when the two of you walk out the door, but try and not feel guilt - I know that’s easier said then done. Remember that this time that your taking for yourselves will make you better parents which means that they will be happier kids. DATING WHEN YOU HAVE KIDS There are some parents that are committed to taking some time out weekly, fortnightly or monthly, however most of us will sacrifice time together to spend the time with our families instead. Here are some suggestions for time poor and exhausted parents: • Go and see a movie in the afternoon followed up by an early dinner. You’ll still have the morning with the kids and get home in time to tuck them in for the night. The grandparents could have them feed and bathed by the time you get home as to not disrupt your routine and you’ll still be read to them and kiss them goodnight not to mention get in an early night too. • Going out once the kids have gone to bed is another idea that might work for you. You’ll still be home to cover the routine and wont miss out on any family time so to speak. • If you’re on a tight budget, you can still go out and spend time together.

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Pack a picnic lunch and head to a park to enjoy a lunch. Go for a walk together or anything that allows you to spend time just the two of you. You might not be able to date as regularly as couples without children, but there are are plenty of things you can do together Choices Choices Although it may be tempting to stay in a hotel, find a bed and breakfast that has no TV in the room. This is a better option. You will have a meaningful conversation to reconnect, this is a great way to to ensure that you are actually taking. Getting Away Without Your Kids Getting away for more than 1 or 2 nights is tricky when you have kids, so make sure that you are making the most of the time out you have together. Don’t wait until they are older to spend some time away, going away for even just 1 night to relax and enjoy a romantic dinner without the kids can be refreshing. Grandparents are great overnight babysitters. They generally love the one on one time that they get with their grandkids and usually give in to their wants. Don’t be upset if you came home in the morning to the kids bouncing off the walls because Grandma gave them ice cream for breakfast, just say thanks and remind yourself of why you went away. Establishing some time out will be hard. It takes dedication to establish this into your already cramped routine. Remember that if you miss a week, a fortnight or a month, don’t give up! Keep at it until it’s not something that’s so hard to do anymore. The best advice I can give is to start small, make choices that are easy like a movie and dinner and work yourself up for a night away.

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DAD READ

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Postnatal Depression in

Dads Written by: Oliva Arrow We hear all the time about how new mothers can suffer from postnatal depression (PND), but it is often not talked about how PND can affect new dads too. Having a baby is one of life’s best gifts, but this change in life can also change the way you feel. Studies indicated that 1 in 10 dads will suffer from PND after the birth of their baby. There is no single answer as to why some new dads are affected by depression and not all new dads.

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Generally speaking, having a baby can be a challenging experience. The increased pressures that come along with fatherhood, like more financial responsibility, the changes in your relationships and worrying about your partner, not to mention the changes in your lifestyle may all contribute to a new dad’s mental wellbeing. Some common feelings you may notice are:

There are many symptoms of PND and can be similar to those found amongst new mums that are experiencing PND. Symptoms include:

• Fears of Fatherhood

• Feeling like you can’t cope.

o Being worried about your new responsibilities now that you have a family

• Feeling guilty about not loving your baby enough.

o Adjusting to the loss of freedom that occurs when you have a baby

• Loss of appetite

• Money Worries o Feeling stressed about financially being able to providing for your family o Feeling stressed about managing expenses on a single income • Anxieties o If your childhood was unhappy, the arrival of your baby can trigger memories o Wanting to be a different type of parent from your father o Worrying about whether you’ll be a good dad. PND usually occurs within a 3 to 6 month period after the baby’s arrival, however it can start earlier or later than this.

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• Feeling exhausted and anxious • Being consumed with finances • Begin to withdraw from your family • Being irritable intolerant or angry • Sleeping poorly or oversleeping

• Crying a lot or constantly • Comfort eating. • Having obsessive fears about baby’s health or wellbeing, or about themselves and other members of the family. • Having disturbing thoughts about harming themselves or their baby. • Having thoughts about death. Every dad has different symptoms and some of them may not be listed above. But if you don’t feel quiet right and you know that somethings wrong try talking to someone about how your feeling. Share your feelings with people you trust. It may be hard at first, but speaking Recognising that you may have PND and require the help of a professional is nothing to be embarrassed or ashamed of. . .


with your partner is a good starting point and you’d be surprised by how many concerns you commonly share. One of the key benefits of speaking to your partner about these feelings is that it also allows you both to formulate a plan on how you can support each other on your new parenthood journey. If you don’t feel comfortable speaking with your partner, try speaking with a family member or friend (one that has kids and can relate might be more suitable). PND recovery is gradual and will get better with the right help. If you’ve had any of these feelings and they don’t seem to be getting better after a couple of weeks, its best to make an appointment with your GP to seek help or be given a referral. Clinical depression is serious and it’s very treatable. Recognising that you may have PND and require the help of a professional is nothing to be embarrassed or ashamed of. Getting help from a therapist or psychiatrist for depression of any type is vital in tackling the problem and getting your health back on track. Just like new mums, new dads need a network of supportive family, friends and or professionals to talk to in a safe environment to about concerns and how you’re are feeling. Remember that you, too, will need some extra TLC and attention during this transition, don’t be afraid to ask for it!

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BABY

WHY DOES MY CHILD CRY AT DAY CARE DROP OFF? Written by Genie Price

Are my baby’s day-care days over, though we have only just begun? It’s a new, yet challenging experience when you’re a parent and you are considering childcare for the first time. Children bring so much joy and laughter, yet also an overwhelming sense of responsibility and often, tears too. There is no manual to parenting, especially when it comes time to let your little ones go and explore a place so wild, such as day-care.

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So, why does your child cry at daycare drop off? 1. STRANGER ANXIETY: Children with stranger anxiety may cry when an unfamiliar person, in an also unfamiliar place - approaches them. This type of anxiety is normal when: • It begins at about age 8 to 9 months • It resolves by age 2 years Stranger anxiety is related to when infants’ learn to distinguish the familiar from the unfamiliar. How strong these reactions are and how long it lasts will differ greatly. Research by the Australian Psychological Institute indicates that 90% of infants, aged from 10-months are likely to become upset, and many babies will react negatively to what is unfamiliar, therefore may display stranger anxiety by crying in these circumstances.

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waiting for things always seems to take forever - regardless of whether it’s for 2 minutes or 20 minutes. Adults however, are aware of the length of a separation, and until a child reaches around the age of 3, they will require a series of consistent, repetitive experiences where they are left by a parent, and the parent again returns before they can understand the separation is only temporary. Deborah Jepsen from the School Psychology Services of Melbourne Child Psychology, recommends instead of telling your child that you “will be back soon”, phrases such as “Mummy will be back after lunch”, are more appropriate terms for helping your child to start making predictions about time and routine.

Only 50% of those children will become upset if they are given adequate time to become familiar with the new surroundings first.

3. THE DAY-CARE DOESN’T MEET THE NEEDS OF YOUR CHILD: It’s important the care service you choose has a curriculum which is full of interesting, varied activities and positive interactions - which your child engages in.

Anne Stonehouse, a leading expert in education explains in her journal entry for Child Australia how stranger anxiety is a developmentally appropriate milestone, which reveals that important cognitive skills are beginning to cultivate and is also a signal that secure attachments with the adults in a child’s life, have developed.

Under the National Quality Standards section 2: Childrens Health and Safety, it clearly indicates all service providers should implement a program which is responsive of all babies, infant and young childrens individual needs and interests, as well as each child’s individual comforts must be accommodated for throughout the program.

2. LITTLE CONCEPT OF TIME: Very young children do not have good concept of time, and how long things take. Telling a young baby to be patient is unfair, let alone incredibly difficult for them to understand, because for them -

Ensuring the service provides an appropriate program which encompasses the physical, social and emotional needs of all the children, and that of your baby, should help with settling your child into care.

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4. SEPARATION ANXIETY: You leave the room, and suddenly your baby is inconsolable. Adapting to new care arrangements can be a difficult time for children, which can lead to separation anxiety. Separation anxiety is a stage of normal development also. During this stage, your child may develop anxiety when they are separated from you, an important person or primary Educators, and once separated from these important people, (more so when away from home), they begin to feel threatened and unsafe.

Kids Matter Australia suggests many children may experience separation anxiety in some form. It is a stage which first develops at about 7 months of age, once object permanence has been established by your child. It is at its strongest at 10-18 months of age and usuall y subsides by 3 years of age. The combination of fear of parents not returning, mixed with little understanding of time can result in a particularly challenging situation.

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SO, WHY IS SEPARATING DIFFICULT? Strong, secure relationships are the foundation for future health and wellbeing, and the attachments made particularly within the first twelve months of life, become the most important to your child.

• Leave your child with family or friends occasionally to “practice” being apart from you - with people you already know and trust. Games like Peek-a-Boo and Hide and Seek can support separations also, as they help your baby understand that you will come back.

Even after these people and places become familiar, separation can still be tough. It’s important to acknowledge these feelings, for both yourselves, and your child. Acknowledgement can be achieved by understanding the cause of distress and then learning to respond with care. There are some ways in which you can help your child get through this challenging time.

• Build on your child’s sense of security by allowing them to take something from home, a comforter - a dummy, teddy or blanket, to help ease the farewell. • Be reliable. Always come back when you say you will. If for some reason you can’t get back on time, let the centre know, so that your child will be made aware where appropriate.

TIPS FOR A SUCCESSFUL DROP OFF:

• Try to adjust your routine so that you can give them extra time with you in the evenings.

• Choose a service where you feel comfortable. Your child will pick up on any anxieties you have on leaving them. If you are happy with the setting, then baby can feel settled here too. Show that you trust and like the Educators, it will help your child to know it is safe. • Use the orientation process to visit as often as needed before you start full time. This will help with the transition to leaving your child in the hands of this service.

At some point in life, separations are experienced, but however difficult, these situations can be overcome with careful, considerate reponses. Your child will soon learn to enjoy others, explore the world and thrive in the day-care environment, just as you had hoped. Credits: www.psychology.org.au/public/ed_dev/

• Always say goodbye, even if you have to go while your child is upset. This builds trust. Sneaking out or trying to get away is not recommended, and may prompt feelings of mistrust. • Once you have said “goodbye” do not prolong your departure by hanging around - this is unlikel y to be helpful.

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www.cyh.com/HealthTopics/ HealthTopicDetails. aspx?p=114&np=141&id=1848 www.kidsmatter.edu.au/early-childhood www.school-psychology.com.au/about/ deborah-jepsen/ www.acecqa.gov.au/childrens-healthand-safety


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AWARENESS

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CARING FOR SOMEONE WITH POSTNATAL DEPRESSION Written by Jana Angeles Being new parents calls for new demands on a daily basis. There aren’t enough hours during the day where you can relax and do the stuff you used to do before you had kids, and it becomes even more complicated when your partner is diagnosed with Postnatal Depression (PND). It can be very difficult for new mothers to adjust to a lifestyle post-pregnancy. It can also be very hard to determine whether or not you’re helping your partner in getting through PND.

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Although you feel responsible in cheering them up, you can only do so much in your role as a new parent, so it’s really important you speak to your doctor or a health professional in caring for someone with PND. Otherwise, all you can do is show love and support in this difficult time. There are a lot of concerns surrounding PND, and not many people realise how caring for someone with the disorder can impact their life in such a way. Often times, we feel pressured into fixing up someone’s low mood or showering them with things that used to make them happy. As with anyone suffering from mental illness, it’s really important to understand that your partner may not be feeling themselves when they suffer from PND. Sometimes we’ll feel guilty for having them feel this way but just remember you’ll be spending most of your time reassuring them you’re not leaving them behind. There are a couple of ways to show support and care for your partner. SHOW SUPPORT WHEN IT COMES TO TREATMENT When it comes to something medicalrelated, this can make your partner feel uncomfortable and reluctant in taking any further medications or therapy to help her condition of PND. It’s important to show up to all doctors appointments and know when she has to take prescribed medication. Being involved when it comes to her treatment for PND can help your partner feel safe and comforted at all times. Furthermore, it can also help her realise how much support she’s getting through this tough journey battling a mental illness.

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When it comes to attending all doctors appointments, always stay curious and find out any important information you need to know about the medication (dosage, side effects etc) and learn more facts on PND. This will help you be aware of your partner’s condition and what to do if any problems arise when it comes to treatment. PROVIDE EMOTIONAL SUPPORT FOR YOUR PARTNER Even if you don’t know how she feels or have the right words to say, always be there to comfort your partner. You being there for her means more than you know so do your best to have conversations with her even if she isn’t in the right state of mind to be happy like she used to be. Of course, there will be some challenging times where you would like to withdraw from her presence so do your best to not seem like you’re disinterested or irritated. Because of her strong dependence on you, you will be spending lots of your time reassuring her that everything is okay and that she shouldn’t be constantly feeling down on herself. During the time where she has PND, avoid making ma jor life decisions (buying a house, taking out a loan etc) to avoid more added stress. It’s important to prioritise her recovery rather than taking on new ma jor assets and events that could potentially make her feel more isolated and depressed. Never let her feel discouraged in talking to you about her thoughts and feelings. Let her open up at her own pace. HELP AROUND WITH HOUSEHOLD DUTIES

COOKING

AND

You might’ve been used to walking in the house after work, smelling a gorgeous


pot-roast in the kitchen. With your partner having PND, this may not be the case anymore. As she is unable to do much cooking and cleaning around the house, aim to do those things while she slowly recovers from PND. If there comes a situation where she feels bad for you that you’re taking on more duties around the house, reassure her that doing more chores has made you realise how satisfying it is to be surrounded by a clean environment, and how thankful you are you’re saving her from stress in her life. We understand cooking may be exhausting for some partners so having a cheeky take-out every few nights a week can help you relax a little from cooking duties. TAKE CARE OF YOURSELF It’s very stressful and challenging to take care of your partner when they have PND. With added responsibilities, while trying to take care of the baby, most people will feel overwhelmed with this situation. It’s okay to feel extremely exhausted at times but if it’s gotten to the point where you’re feeling a little low about the situation, it helps to know that there are people out there willing to support you through this tough time. If you feel like juggling a job and taking care of your partner with PND almost feels impossible, speak to your employer about your situation and arrange a way in which you can spend more time at home. This could mean having days where you can work from home and working fewer hours. Your well-being is just as important so if you feel unsupported, the rest of the family or your closest friends can help you. Also remember there are counsellors out there willing to hear you out when it comes to your problems.

Getting professional help is always a good idea. There are some danger signs you should look out for when taking care of your partner with PND. Follow your gut instinct if you feel like you or your child may be put at risk if: • She says statements like, “You’re better off without me” etc • Wanting to harm herself or the baby • Having extreme feelings of despair • Show signs of risk-taking behaviour, having bizarre thoughts (something out of the ordinary) • Withdrawing from everyone; avoiding any social contact • Mood swings become more extreme If you feel like you or your baby are in danger, do not hesitate to call 000. Otherwise, speak to your local doctor or health professional if your partner is showing any mild symptoms from the list above. Overall, taking care of someone with PND is not an easy task. You may feel like you’re failing at times but just remember you’re doing your best to provide as much support to your partner. Caring and loving someone with mental illness can be disheartening and you will find yourself struggling to cope sometimes. Just remember that if you have supportive family and friends, you will get through this hurdle much easier if you seek the help of other people rather than do everything on your own.

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SUPPORT AND

SELF CARE FOR POSTNATAL DEPRESSION

Written by Jana Angeles

When women suffer from Postnatal depression (PND), it’s almost impossible to get back how we used to live. There will be times where it’s difficult to get out of bed each morning, going outside to get some daylight or simply spending the day with our loved ones. Any form of depression has its moments of struggle and it’s not uncommon to feel like nothing’s going your way. Even if you are suffering from mild to moderate symptoms of PND, it’s still difficult to maintain the lifestyle you did have before giving birth to your child. When mothers suffer from PND, it is strongly encouraged that they do everything they can to help them recover at their own pace and maintain that initial mother and child bond they have with their baby.

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AWARENESS

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Even if you feel like PND is taking over your life, there are ways in which you can slowly get better from the illness. We understand the struggle of depression and in no way should you feel obliged to take on board these tips on your own. Always remember there is help out there for you! SECURE ATTACHMENT WITH YOUR BABY BY LEARNING HOW TO BOND WITH HIM/ HER

important to designate some couple time where you can bond and communicate with each other. Having couple time will not only emphasise the substance you have in your relationship but it will help you reconnect with each other in a meaningful way. Make sure you get a babysitter for the night or a relative to take care of your little one while you both enjoy your time together. GET HELP FROM YOUR SUPPORT NETWORK

Mothers with PND struggle to bond with their baby because of their struggle in providing emotional support. There are times where they feel like they’re unable to attend to their baby, especially when they are upset and crying. Most mothers will use their maternal instinct by carrying their babies to keep close to them, creating a much stronger bond between the child and their mother. Those with PND may struggle in picking up their child when they are upset, creating a disconnect between the baby and the mother. It helps to interact with your baby from time to time by making them laugh, talking or simply smiling at them. Do your best to create that strong bond with your baby even if there are days where PND seems to be taking over your life. It may be the cheer up you need, spending more time with your baby. ALWAYS STRIVE TO HAVE SOME COUPLE TIME WITH YOUR PARTNER With mothers struggling with PND, this can put a strain on the relationship with their partner. Dealing with any mental illness can create distance between couples and you’ll find that you’re spending less time together especially if you have a little one you need to take care of. It’s really

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Spending time with your family and closest friends can do wonders if you’re a mother with PND. You don’t necessarily have to be socially going out. This could mean making the effort of coming to someone’s house and having a quiet dinner, going to your local cinemas or a casual lunch by the water. It’s refreshing to get out of the house and be active with your loved ones instead of being cooped up at home and feeling lethargic to do anything around the house. Also, it’s encouraged to communicate openly with your friends and family. This could help you in the long run if you’re honest with your thoughts and feelings. It’s also important to recognise when you need help the most. Having a strong support network can get you through the tougher days of PND. SPEND QUALITY TIME WITH YOURSELF It’s almost impossible to have time to yourself nowadays with the baby. With more added weight to your soldiers, having ‘me’ time might’ve slipped away down the tracks since giving birth. Find the time to meditate or spend a relaxing time doing what you love. This could mean going to the library and reading a good book, having a nice, long stroll around the neighbourhood or simply


taking yourself out on a solo date to your favourite restaurant. Spending quality time with yourself will not only give you peace of mind, it will also keep you active, benefiting both your physical and mental health. If you feel like the options above do not help you cope with PND. There are also some treatments available. These include: • Therapy or marriage counselling: You might want to see a qualified psychologist if you need to talk to someone about your individual problems. If it comes to you and your partner, seeing a marriage counsellor can help you discuss your problems in a much open way. • Hormone therapy (known as estrogen replacement therapy): Although this is a risky procedure, hormone therapy

combines an antidepressant to help with PND. If you need more information on hormone therapy, speak to your local doctor or health professional. • Antidepressants: Medication can help with PND and its symptoms. However, dosage needs to be carefully monitored by doctors. Ensure that if you are taking any medication for PND, you’re aware of any side effects or requirements for safety use. There are times where you’ll feel like you’ll never get through PND; the world is slipping from your shoulders and you feel like the struggle is long-lasting. Remember that no feeling of sadness is ever permanent and there is help available to you if you need it. Always take the time to breathe, make time for yourself and treasure the moments you have with your loved ones.

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END THE

Food Fight Written Lisa-Marie D’Alonzo

Me: What would you like for breakfast today? Terror: Lollies Me: Lollies is not a breakfast food. How about toast topped with banana and honey? Terror: Toast with chocolate Me: Scrambled egg? Terror: Fruit platter please. Awesome! I prepare a fruit platter. Place in front of Terror aged four, first tantrum of the day commences 7:05am. “I didn’t say I wanted fruit platter!” Me: Is it too early for vodka?

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TODDLER

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I know I am not the only parent across the nation constantly facing the same battle each morning. So how do other parents overcome it? My pre-schooler was the perfect toddler – he ate everything in sight. Broccoli, swedes, gherkins and zucchini. His meals were always colourful, full of texture and he literally would lick his fingers with satisfaction. Then at some point after his third birthday, our food fights started. He won’t eat anything green, he thinks chips and nuggets are part of a staple diet and he asks for ‘fuzzy’ drinks on a daily basis. Do I blame the grandparents who succumb to his every desire? Does he give the carers at day care grief like he does to me? Is it just a phase? Sources tell us that the behaviour of children at mealtimes is a common source of stress for Australian parents. Common preschooler behaviours at mealtimes can include running around, wasting food and making a mess - all in an attempt to display their independence.

“It’s important children form healthy eating habits early on to prevent the risk of chronic disease later in life,” Shannon said. “The classroom is the perfect environment to promote this message and put it into practice.” Government research shows that while most Western Australian kids are eating enough fruit, only one in six is eating the daily recommended intake of vegetables. Gael Myers, Accredited Practising Dietitian at Cancer Council WA says vegetables are full of vitamins, minerals, fibre and phytonutrients that promote healthy growth and development. “Eating plenty of vegetables also reduces the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease and some cancers,” Gael said.

But while this behaviour may be common, how do we instill healthy eating habits in our children and not fall into the trap of letting our children eat anything they like as long as they eat.

“If your child is reluctant to eat vegetables, try introducing your child to sweeter vegetables like red capsicum or cherry tomatoes and let kids get involved in cooking at home.

Schools Nutrition Coordinator at Cancer Council Western Australia Shannon Wright says providing a diet with plenty of fruit and vegetables is one of the most important ways parents and carers can ensure their children remain healthy.

“Children will follow your lead eventually. Make sure you show them how much you enjoy eating vegetables.”

Shannon coordinates the Crunch&Sip schools program which has been put in place in nearly 400 WA primary schools and has been implemented in New South Wales by the Healthy Kids Association.

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Crunch&Sip is a set break to eat fruit or salad vegetables and drink water in the classroom, assisting physical and mental performance and concentration in the classroom.

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Nutrition advocates and scientists agree that a balanced diet and healthy eating is crucial for normal growth, cognitive development and can make a difference to children with behavioural issues. Poor nutrition in preschoolers can lead to: • Inattentivness • Forgetfulness


Here are ten handy tips from Shannon Wright that will help you provide your kids with healthy food options, especially lunchbox ideas: 1.

Vegie sticks such as carrots, celery, capsicum and cucumber last well in the lunch box and can be pair with cream cheese or healthy dips like hummus or tzatziki for a delicious healthy snack. 2. Freeze grapes, or cut fruit into unusual shapes to entice fussy eaters. Fruit kebabs are also a yummy colourful snack. 3. Rub a little lemon or orange juice onto cut apples or bananas to stop them going brown, or look for the new varieties at the shops that stay white when cut. 4. Substitute white bread for wholemeal, grainy, rye bread or wraps or put some leftover dinner like pasta salad or home-made vegie rice in a container. 5. Cook and freeze a batch of healthy muffins or savoury pikelets on the weekend and add one to your lunchbox each day. 6. Freeze scoops of yoghurt into a small container and freeze overnight for an icy treat. Add berries if you have some available. 7. Avoid packaged snack food which is often high in sugar, salt and fat and make trail mix consisting of air popped popcorn, dried fruit and seeds, or rice crackers with cheese or tuna. 8. Make sure to pack a full water bottle and that children know to fill it up throughout the day. Staying hydrated, particularly during hotter months like February and March is really important and can prevent headaches and irritability. 9. There’s nothing worse than a warm sandwich so try and keep the lunchbox cool. A frozen water bottle or milk box will help and if school bags are kept outside, you could put the lunchbox in an insulated bag with an extra ice brick. 10. Be consistent – get your kids used to eating healthy foods by putting it in their lunch box every day.

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• Lack of organisation • Acting impulsively and • Hyperactivity. The key to healthy eating is to encourage children to enjoy a variety of nutritious foods from each of the five food groups; dairy, fruit, grains, lean meats and poultry, fish, eggs, tofu, nuts and seeds and vegetables, legumes and beans. Children should maintain hydration by drinking plenty of water, fuel the day with a hearty breakfast, eat meals at the table with the television switched off and participate in at least 60 minutes of physical activity a day. Based on scientific evidence and research, the National Health and Medical Research Council Australian Government’s Australian Dietary Guidelines outline the principles to ensure our children are eating a nutritious, balanced diet: • Dietary guideline1 - Children and adolescents should eat sufficient nutritious foods to grow and develop normally. They should be physically active every day and their growth should be checked regularly • Dietary guideline 2 - Enjoy a wide variety of nutritious foods from the five groups every day • Dietary guideline 3 Limit intake of foods and drinks containing saturated fat, added salt, added sugars. Feeding our children is an ongoing responsibility as a parent. We can help our children build healthy foundations by encouraging a love of good food, good nutrition and help them make the right choices for themselves. For more information, visit www.eatforhealth.gov.au.

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PANDA A downward spiral: Jane and Ben use their journey through perinatal anxiety and depression to inform others As a social worker with almost two decades worth of experience working with people dealing with mental health issues, Jane understands the impact a mental illness can have on a person and a family. However, living through it herself brought home to her just how devastating the reality can be. “I had perinatal anxiety and depression with each of my three children, and it was devastating,” she says. “With William, our first, it hit around the six week mark. I was sleep deprived, exhausted, constantly sobbing, and overwhelmed looking after him. He had this milk protein intolerance and refused to feed and was really unwell, and by the time that was properly diagnosed, I was in a horrendous state.”

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“I found myself talking to my best friend and saying William would be better off with a different mother. I was also having suicidal thoughts.”

once again. She felt terrible stress over what would happen if Meg didn’t sleep properly, or feed properly, or if anything unexpected happened.

Jane’s husband Ben also identified that something completely out of the ordinary was going on.

“It was terrible, I was really tired, and I went into that downward spiral very quickly,” she says. “I was so anxious I couldn’t eat. I was running on adrenaline, bouncing around, had knots in my stomach and all those what-ifs constantly going around my head.”

“I could see the battles going on in Jane’s head, the struggles she was going through,” he says. “Not just the exhaustion, and the stress – it was much worse than that. We soldiered on for a few months, but then it just got to the Jane saw her GP, who diagnosed her perinatal depression and began her treatment, and she also started seeing a counsellor. She also felt supported by her husband Ben. “He was just phenomenal,” she says. “And so was my mum.” Terri Smith is CEO of PANDA – Perinatal Anxiety and Depression Australia, an organisation which operates a national helpline to support families experiencing perinatal anxiety or depression. PANDA conducts around 12,000 conversations a year with expecting and new parents who are dealing with complex mental health issues, and therefore has a vast reserve of personal experiences to draw upon when talking about perinatal anxiety and depression. “It is a serious illness and needs to be treated as such,” says Terri. “Recognising the symptoms, seeking help and receiving appropriate treatment minimises the risk of potentially devastating outcomes for new parents, their baby and the broader family unit. So Jane and Ben did exactly the right thing in seeking help as soon as they recognised the signs.” However, for Jane and Ben, it was just the beginning. Recovery for Jane was a long, slow process, and then, with her next child, Meg, Jane experienced perinatal anxiety

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Jane and Ben sought help earlier this second time around, and once again began the long road to recovery. However, once their third, Evie, arrived, it was worse again. This time, in addition to all the other feelings of despair, anxiety and devastation, Jane also experienced the added layer of shame, which can cause some women to suffer silently and delay seeking help, putting the health of both mum and bub at risk. “I’d been so sure it wouldn’t happen again, and I was embarrassed that it had,” she says. Ben, watching his wife go through all this, was so shaken he started referring to her perinatal anxiety and depression as “The Beast”.


“It wasn’t her, it was the illness, it would overwhelm her,” he says. “It’s like there’s no clarity, no light at the end of the tunnel, the Beast is in control.” Like many men, Ben was used to being able to fix things. “It took me a while to get used to the idea that all I could do to help was to support, to listen, and to try to understand.” Now that Evie is six months old, and after another arduous period of recovery, Jane and Ben feel like they have seen off the worst of the illness and are ready to launch into the next phase of their lives. However, they want to use their experiences with perinatal anxiety and depression to become Community Champions for PANDA and speak out about the illness so others in their community could be better informed and better prepared. “It was such a serious and altering experience for us that we want to speak out so others don’t have to go through what we went through,” says Jane. With Perinatal Depression and Anxiety Awareness Week coming up in November, PANDA and its Community Champions all over the country are striving to raise awareness about the illness, which affects one in seven new mums, and one in twenty new dads; and one in ten pregnant women. A key message to all expecting and new parents is to learn what signs to look for in identifying perinatal anxiety and depression and to seek help early if you are experiencing difficulties.

100,000 Australian families will struggle with perinatal anxiety and depression this year. Know the signs, seek help early. Visit panda.org.au for more information. PANDA National Helpline

1300 726 306

“You can’t get help if you don’t know something’s wrong,” says Terri Smith. “If you know what signs to look for, you can get help and get better more quickly.” Perinatal Depression & Anxiety Week runs from 13 – 19 November For more information visit panda.org.au

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REAL READ

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PERINATAL DEPRESSION AWARENESS WEEK ENCOURAGES SUFFERING MUMS TO SEEK SUPPORT MUM OF TWO SPEAKS OUT ON LIVING WITH POSTNATAL DEPRESSION In the lead up to Perinatal Depression Awareness Week (15-21 November), mother of two Claire Bednall, who was diagnosed with Postnatal Depression 2.5 years ago, is sharing her story to show other mums suffering from the condition that there’s a light at the end of the tunnel. Like so many mums, Claire anticipated her pregnancy and early days with her baby to be filled with joy and euphoria. When she was faced with a lack of excitement, and a constant state of tiredness, after the birth of Noah in 2012, Claire felt she was battling motherhood alone.

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“I had a particularly stressful delivery with Noah,” she said. “I was rushed in for an emergency C section when his heartbeat started dropping but as he had already started crowning, there was a rushed and forced forceps delivery instead, and then a few hours without seeing my son whilst I was in recovery. “Since then, every day felt like a struggle it was an uphill battle just to reach the end of the day,” she said. It took Claire about a year to feel herself again when she fell pregnant with her second child Rosie, and the perinatal depression took hold of her again. Claire sought support from her doctor who prescribed anti depression medication and engaged a psychologist and along with various support groups, but Claire said it was the online resources offered at the Parental Stress Centre of Australia which made a lasting difference. The blogs, live webinars, online courses, seminars and books give parents access to both private and public tools to support stressed parents in the way they need, when they need it most. Founder and Director Jackie Hall said the online centre offered an immediate resource for both mums and dads in an anonymous format, 24 hours a day, as well as interactive, face to face options. The author and qualified counsellor said the solution is in empowerment. “Many mums in particular feel ashamed of their condition. They feel pressured to be happy, glowing and on top of everything. The 24 hour access to information means

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those parents who don’t feel comfortable talking about their issues can seek support in the comfort of their own home. “The Parental Stress Centre of Australia empowers mums and dads to learn how to retrain the brain to think and feel differently about the challenges of parenting and life, and how to focus on solutions. “Most parents don’t know that re-training the brain is an option, or how to do it. We empower parents with the knowledge to take back the reins of their own mindset,” she said. Claire said while she sought a number of support areas, it was the “Be the Change” course at the Parental Stress Centre that was the most effective resource for helping her turn her life around. “I had some real ‘aha’ moments during the Be the Change course and the live webinars in particular,” she said. “Learning how we view life through different lenses made me realise I can change how I perceive my situation to be. “Stress comes from our perception of reality, not reality itself! When you know that, issues such as crying babies or temper tantrums aren’t so overwhelming.” Over 1800 parents are diagnosed in Australia each week with antenatal or postnatal depression. 1Claire said there was a real pressure placed on mums to do it all, and have it all. “Today’s mums feel expected to raise a family, keep on top of household chores, do the night shift with the baby and maintain a career, all at a high standard. “We put so much pressure on ourselves to be the perfect parent, when perfection doesn’t even exist!” she added.


Claire said through her support channels, she has learnt that having more trust in her intuition and being more present with her children makes a good parent. “I felt totally overwhelmed by the fact I was responsible for these two lives and I often felt like I was a useless mother! “However, I have now retrained my brain to deal with stress differently. I still have my bad days where I don’t recognise my thoughts as quickly as other days, but these are becoming far less common than they once were.” The Parental Stress Centre was founded in 2006 when Jackie Hall, mother of two, realised there was no easily accessible information to take her out of her negative thinking with her own account of postnatal depression and anxiety. Jackie’s career took a turn to help empower other mums as she became a qualified counsellor, coach and author on stress and parenthood. Parents suffering from perinatal depression are encouraged to speak to their doctor, and seek support from leading organisations and support services such as the Parental Stress Centre of Australia to complement traditional methods of treatment. 186,000 stressed out parents sought support from the Parental Stress Centre of Australia last year. Visit www.parentalstress.com.au

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Oricom’s

Infant Respiratory Monitor offers peace of mind for every mum. Australia’s first infant breathing movement monitor to be included as a medical device on the Australian Register of Therapeutic Goods. Babysense2 is an integrated system comprising of two ma jor parts: firstly, the control unit; this is placed on the outside of the cot or bassinet and connects to, secondly, the sensor pads placed under your baby’s mattress. The unit as a whole works to continually monitor the breathing movements of your sleeping baby.

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REVIEW

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Babysense2 is more than just a movement monitor, if your baby’s breathing movement slows to a rate of less than 10 breaths per minute, or cannot be detected for more than 20 seconds, an audible alarm is activated, potentially alerting you sooner. No parent can go without sleep for long. Repeated wakeful nights, listening for sounds of distress or being awakened by an infant’s cries quickly takes it’s toll on a parent’s health and patience. This is an unhealthy situation for both parent and child. Using Babysense2 breathing movement monitor in crib, cradle or cot have helped hundreds of thousands of parents get the rest they need. Parents can enjoy much needed rest knowing that should there be a change in their child’s breathing pattern, Babysense will immediately alert them. This can mean the difference between sleep and no sleep. “We continually receive wonderful feedback about this product with some truly heart-warming stories, the Babysense2 has been sold across the globe for over 20 years.” says Oricom’s Managing Director Kevin McDonnell. Babysense2 is suitable for healthy infants from birth to one year of age. It features proven technology, used around the world for over two decades. Its design is compact, portable and easy to operate with simple, one button activation. The two sensor pads cover the entire crib or cot area and a red flashing light and audio alarm sounds if your infant is in distress.

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The monitor operates on regular AA batteries (typically providing up to six months of use with high quality alkaline batteries), with a battery indicator light that flashes when it is time to replace the batteries. Babysense2 continues to provide the same functionality and reassurance parents have come to rely upon. As Australia’s most trusted name in baby care, Oricom pride themselves on being able to provide families with the best choice in quality baby monitoring equipment. Three reasons why Babysense2 helps you sleep with greater peace of mind: 1. Babysense2 included as a medical device on the Australian Register of Therapeutic Goods 2. Alarm sounds if baby’s breathing movement slows to a rate of less than 10 breaths per minute, or cannot be detected for more than 20 seconds 3. Battery powered – no unnecessary cables Babysense2 is a unique monitoring system which gives families comfort, by advancing the path to intervention in the event of slow or irregular breathing movement. Babysense2 is an additional aid to the normal precautions taken by families in the care of their infant. Babysense2 Benefits: • Gives peace of mind as it continually monitors the breathing movement rate of your sleeping baby. • The highly sensitive sensor pads are not in direct contact with the baby


therefore the infant’s movements are not limited nor restricted. • The patented sensor technology captures even the slightest breathing movements in deep sleep. Babysense2 can be used in conjunction with any of the Oricom Video/Audio monitor range giving you the ability to listen to and see (with the video units) what is happening in the nursery, for the ultimate in peace of mind. With a full range of Audio and Video

Digital Baby monitoring products designed and engineered in Australia, for Australian families, Oricom is the baby care specialist with ideas and designs to make your life easier. Babysense2 is intended for use as an Infant Apnoea Alarm. ALWAYS READ THE LABEL AND USER GUIDE, USE ONLY AS DIRECTED. The Babysense2 retails FROM $299 and is available through leading baby stores. For more details visit: www.oricom.com.au.

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FASHION

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HEARTIE TEE - $39.95 Sizes 2-3, 4-5, 6-7, 8-9 74

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ALPHABETIE TEE - $39.95 Sizes 2-3, 4-5, 6-7, 8-9


DINO & FRIENDS TEE - $39.95 Sizes 2-3,4-5,6-7,8-9

ROYAL CROWN HOODIE - $59.95 Also comes in Black Sizes 2-3,4-5,6-7,8-9

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ROYAL CROWN TEE - $39.95 Also comes in Copper, Gold and Silver Sizes 2-3, 4-5, 6-7, 8-9

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HEARTIE HOODIE -PINK - $49.95 Sizes 2-3,4-5,6-7,8-9


SKATE BOARD STAR TEE - $39.95 Sizes: 2-3,4-5,6-7,8-9

This T-Shirt was drawn by Nyah who is 13 years old.

Nyah says “This drawing was inspired by heavy rain in winter. The raindrops reflect tress and mountains to represent the winter theme.”

WINTER RAINDROPS TEE - By Nyah $44.95 Sizes 2-3,4-5,6-7,8-9 november 2016 | mychild

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shop

KIDS

fashion

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shop

KIDS

WHAT’S IN OUR STORES THIS MONTH BABY

GIRLS

Baby Pinafore Set $20.00 rrp Baby Caris Prewalker Ballet Flats $12.00 rrp

20

UNDER

$

Short Sleeve Sequin Icecream T-Shirt $10.00 rrp Piping Hot Wide Brim Straw Hat $15.00 rrp Geometric Print Piping Trim Harem Pants $20.00 rrp

TARGET.COM.AU

TARGET.COM.AU

50 UNDER

$

SPLURGE

Embroidered Dress $49.95 rrp Baby Lace Up Ballerina $19.99 rrp

Mixed Print Maxi Dress $49.95 rrp Fringe Gladiator Sandal $32.00 rrp PUMPKINPATCH.COM.AU

PUMPKINPATCH. COM.AU

Baker By Ted Baker Textured Floral Dress $89.95 rrp Origami - Glitter Butterfly Hairclips $9.95 rrp MYER.COM.AU

Billieblush Mexican Fair Dress $89.95 rrp Milkshake Flower Lurex Trilby Hat $18.95 rrp MYER.COM.AU

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shop

KIDS

WHAT’S IN OUR STORES THIS MONTH BABY

20

BOYS

UNDER

$

Baby Shortall And T-Shirt Set $20.00 rrp Baby Barrett Prewalker Boat Shoes $20.00 rrp

Impact Palm Tree T-Shirt $10.00 rrp Straw Trilby $15.00 rrp Printed Flip Flop $10.00 rrp TARGET.COM.AU

TARGET.COM.AU

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Author Striped Tee $19.99 rrp Boys Classic Slip On Shoe $24.99 rrp Belted Chino Shorts $36.99 rrp

UNDER

$

PUMPKINPATCH.COM.AU

Check Mock Tee Shirt $32.00 rrp Boys Classic Velcro Sneaker $34.99 rrp Roll Up Linen Pant $32.99 rrp PUMPKINPATCH.COM.AU

Guess Core Shirt With Roll Up Sleeve $49.95 rrp Guess Core Flat Front Belted Short $54.95 rrp

SPLURGE

MYER.COM.AU

Fred Bare - Reversible Shirt $69.95 rrp Indie Kids By Indusrtrie Malba Short Dungaree $59.95 rrp MYER.COM.AU

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AWARENESS

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SUN AND WATER

Safety Written by Jana Angeles With Summer only one month away, it’s an exciting time for families around the country. Australia being well-known for their incredible beaches, going away and frequently visiting the local pool seems the best way to cool off with the little ones. Some of us are lucky enough to own a pool so dunking in the water in our very own home is a bonus for some families, however, Sun and Water safety always come first..

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Not many people realise how dangerous it is to leave kids in the pool unattended as one glance away can risk everything. As parents, we have the responsibility of looking after our kids, providing protection and support no matter what. It should be a no-brainer that Sun and Water safety is imperative to all families but being reminded every now and then can help us become more cautious of the factors that could lead to danger. So how do we keep our children safe from the dangers of the Sun and Water? SUPERVISION IS A MUST Part of being a parent is looking after your children, meaning always constantly looking out for them wherever they go. You’d be surprised how many parents can easily lose sight of their kids when they get distracted over something. Have you lost your child at your local supermarket while you were deciding over two brands of the same item? Those seconds of turning away can turn into a disaster when you’re by the pool. Unfortunately drowning is one of the leading causes of death for children. So it’s really not worth the risk turning your back on them while they’re playing in the pool. Also, you should never entrust your older children the responsibility of supervising the kids in the pool. At the end of the day, you’re accountable for their safety! STAY UNDER THE SHADE WHERE POSSIBLE (IN VERY HOT CONDITIONS) When the weather is over 30 degrees, there’s no way being out is an option for some people. But for those that love to be out and experience the warmth of the glowing sun, staying home isn’t a viable option. When you are going to the beach or to the local pool, encourage

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your children to stay under shade where possible. Bring a beach umbrella during those hotter days because it will provide a little shelter for your family when they aren’t swimming. You’ll enjoy your fish and chips break even more when you’re not melting in the sun, avoiding those nasty sunburns. DOING A FIRST AID COURSE CAN BE LIFESAVING Some of us are lucky enough to have our workplaces pay for our first aid courses depending on what career we do (teachers, childcare workers etc) but if we have time on the weekends, spending a couple hundred dollars on a first aid course is worth it. This is recommended for parents owning a pool as learning CPR can be really beneficial in the case of emergency. Having a first aid course is optional for most of us but knowing how to save a person after they have drowned can make a difference in keeping them conscious until an ambulance arrives. So


if you have time to spare during the week, go and get your first aid qualification and if you already have one, make sure you do a CPR refresher course at least once a year! WEAR PROTECTIVE CLOTHING AND APPLY SUNSCREEN WHEREVER POSSIBLE Make sure you and your children wear protective clothing. When temperatures begin to peak at around early mornings to the late afternoons, it’s really important that you all have the protection you need from applying sunscreen every few hours and wearing clothing while letting your skin breathe in extreme weather conditions. Make sure you opt out for clothing made from cotton. Wearing loose-fitted longsleeve tops and bottoms covering most of their skin are recommended for young children. Avoid layering them and make sure the clothing isn’t too thick. Using an SPF30 sunscreen works best before going outside so make sure when

you apply sunscreen, do it 20 minutes before you leave home. Afterward, apply sunscreen every two hours. Regardless if the bottle says every four hours, you’re better protected with increased use. This will benefit you and the children when you take a day trip to the beach or a day at the park. TAKE EXTRA SECURITY MEASURES AROUND THE HOUSE AND WHEN OUTSIDE NEAR WATER When you see the baby pool isn’t in use, empty it. Even if the bird fountains are small, if you have a little toddler around the house, make sure to leave it empty until they are old enough to go to school. Kids are very curious and like to wander about so it’s best to leave small koi ponds empty as well to prevent any drowning incidents from occurring. Make sure your pool is properly fenced and has a lock when not in use. If possible, ensure that this lock isn’t visible to the children and if you can, set an alarm that if accessed without permission, you’ll be able to hear a warning signal go off. When you are planning on going to the beach, make sure you supervise your children at all times. When going near the water, always hold your child’s hand and stay in the shallow part of the water. Stay between the flags and nearby a lifeguard where possible. The more visible you are, the better! Stay safe this Summer and always remember to never lose sight of your children. The worst thing that can happen is regretting not taking better care of them when you’re out at the beach or the local pools. Remember to have fun and to always slip, slop, slap with your little ones!

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GET THE LOOK:

interiors

Leah Shannon is a designer and owner of Parade and Company, a lifestyle brand specialising in decor for children’s rooms. She has 15+ years experience in design and a passion for creating children’s spaces that inspire, educate and spark the imagination. 88

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INTERIORS

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@brookecastelstylist 90

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Sting Lights -Norsu Interiors $199.00 rrp norsu.com.au

Wings by Numero 74 Leo and Bella $62.00 rrp leoandbella.com.au

Wand by Numero 74 Leo and Bella $23.00 rrp leoandbella.com.au Bunny Print Olive et Oriel from $25.00 rrp oliveetoriel.com

Sleepy Wall Sign Ziink Interiors $25.00 rrp ziink.bigcartel.com Building Blocks Little Strong Co. From $15.00 rrp littlestrongco.bigcartel.com Personalised Basket - Ziink Interiors $42.00 rrp ziink.bigcartel.com

Garland Grimesy and Rat $102.00 rrp etsy.com/grimesyandrat Star Cusions - Little Bambino Bear $25.00 rrp littlebambinobear.com

Floor Cushion – Little Connoisseur $180.00 rrp littleconnoisseur.com.au november 2016 | mychild

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Oh Baby its a Wild Word Print - Black Type Design $18.00 rrp blackandtype.etsy.com

Felt Mobile - Sproutling Co $99.00 rrp etsy.com/shop/sproutlingco

Grey Romper Little A Handmade $38.00 rrp littleahandmade. bigcartel.com Personalised Name Blanket - Petunias $90.00 rrp etsy.com/shop/petunias

Star Garland My Seet Little Room $35.00 rrp mysweetlittleroom. etsy.com L Art Print - Yorklee Prints $43.00 rrp yorklee.com.au

Wooden Peg Set Wild River $64.00 rrp wildriver.bigcartel.com

Light Up Letter L Little Letter Lights Co $129.00 rrp littleletterlights.com COT - Leander Furniture $1,400.00 rrp leander.com

Star Cushion and Crown Essi and Co $30.00 (cushion) $25.00 (crown) rrp essiandco.com. 92

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Wooden pull along toys Sarah Bendix Kids $18.00 rrp sarahbendixkids.com


Interior Styling by Angela Strong @_honeypunch

interiors GET THE LOOK:

Cross Blanket $299.00 rrp norsu.com.au

BOLD GRAPHIC november 2016 | mychild

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TOY

Reviews

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TOYS

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TOY

Reviews

REVIEWED BY APRIL DAVIS

5/5

JELLYCAT TOOTHY PIG

The Jellycat Toothy Pig has a super-soft fleecy tummy and is chilled and cheery with its bubblegum pink colouring. If you gently tug his curly tail it will spring right back, and you’ll quickly learn that children love snuggling up with a bright colourful toy that makes them feel warm and safe. Our verdict Soft, cuddly, and safe for children, what’s not to love about this cute cuddly pig? This stuffed animal is the perfect bed time buddy, and is bright an attractive to ensure it catches your child’s eye. .

RRP $40.95 – AVAILABLE FROM WWW.BELLACASAGIFTS.COM.AU

ISGIFT FLAMINGO WATERING CAN Bright pink and super cute, watering the garden has never been so much fun! With an easy to grip handle that is the perfect size for little hands and a hole in its beak to pour water from, the Flamingo Watering Can is the perfect addition to your child’s gardening kit Our Verdict With the prevalence of video games, smart phones, tablets, and streaming services, encouraging children to play outside, or help out in the garden is harder than ever. With the help of a fun watering can, your children will happily follow you outside to give you a helping hand.

RRP $ 21.95 - AVAILABLE FROM WWW.LARKSTORE.COM.AU

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5/5


childs FROM A VIEW

4/5

NPW FINGERNAIL FRIENDS Little girls everywhere rejoice! A fun and playful manicure is now at the tip of their fingers with these colourful nail tattoos and stickers. Suitable for children aged three and over, each pack comes with 25 stickers and tattoos in a range of playful designs and sizes. Our Verdict These stickers will keep your children entertained and give them pride over their nails. One of the biggest benefits of these stickers is that it will keep your kids from biting their nails - because who wants to ruin beautifully decorated nails?

RRP $9.95 AVAILABLE FROM WWW.SEEDHERITAGE.COM

LAGOON PAPER AEROPLANE KIT With 60 planes to make and fly, this Paper Aeroplane Kit will provide hours of crafty fun. Each plane has easy to follow instructions, with the design printed on every sheet. Suitable for children over the age of eight, your children will soon be throwing aeroplanes all around the house.

Jack

Mum helped me make these and they were a lot of fun! Although my little brother kept ruining them by putting them in his mouth, so I had to play with them outside where he couldn’t reach them. Most of them were easy to make, but I got stuck with a few of them, so mum had to help me. Our Verdict Fun, interactive, and entertaining, these planes are great for keeping kids busy on the weekends. They also encourage them to get creative and teaches them the importance of following instructions. The only downside is that you might have planes flying into the back of your head all afternoon!

RRP $19.95 AVAILABLE FROM WWW.KIDSTUFF.COM.AU

4/5

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“DON’T GIVE UP EVEN IF PEOPLE TELL YOU IT’S A BAD IDEA” advice from mumpreneur Tamar Krebs Tamar Krebs is a mum to four children, including twins. She is also the founder and CEO of start up, Group Homes Australia. Tamar was only seven years old but she remembers her great-grandfathers final words. He said to her “I love you doll.” Tamar always remembered her great-grandfathers end of life journey surrounded by his family and friends. This stirred a passion deep within and prompted her to become a nurse.

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INSPIRATIONAL READ

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As a child, Tamar always believed that when people die, they pass away at home, surrounded by their loved ones. After completing her studies, she realised that this wasn’t true. She told her husband Gad that her dream was to create a home for people with dementia that looks, feels and smells like a normal home.

why we as a society feel the need to warehouse our elderly? If we live our entire life in a community surrounded by friends and family then why at a persons most vulnerable point in their life do we lock them away from society, their familiar suburb and why do we focus on their disability? All this lead to the search for people to be able to age in a HOME that LOOKS, feels and smells like a home in a person’s familiar suburb. Tamar ensures that the homes are nestled within local communities. The local communities are friendly and warm to residents. She ensures that homes are modern yet safe. The homes are beautifully designed and decorated. Residents can choose to eat together a one of the lovely dining areas or they can eat alone or in their rooms if they chose to do so. They can still enjoy tasks like cooking or baking, visiting the shops to purchase ingredients for a favourite recipe, assisting with hanging washing on the line, gardening and even hosting a BBQ with assistance.

In 2012, her dream became a reality. The first group home was set up in St Ives, NSW. The homes have no logos or signs. Tamar sets up the homes to be just thathomes. She wants them to blur into the leafy suburb and street and not stand out. She wants the residents to live with dignity and respect. She wants families to feel that they are simply visited a residential home. Tamar worked in aged care for over 18 years managing nursing homes, and dementia units. She started to ask herself

Dementia advocate and sufferer of early onset dementia, Kate Swaffer, recently visited three of Tamar’s homes. Kate was so overwhelmed and grateful to Tamar Krebs for bringing such a compassionate and nurturing ‘residential care home’ to Australia. In an open letter of gratitude, Kate states: “I would, quite happily live in one of their homes… They have somehow found a way to ensure autonomy and safety are working in harmony, in a way that does not


seem to demean anyone, or make anyone feel locked up. “This style of residential accommodation and care is the best I have seen in Australia.” Kate expected to see the logo emblazoned on the gate or door of each home. However, the homes are indistinguishable and blend into their individual suburbs and streets providing dignity to those living there. Kate exclaims: “I definitely had no sense I was visiting a ‘facility providing residential care’. There were people in rooms folding up the washing, staff and residents in the kitchen preparing meals; smells of cooking, and not a hint of urine. Doors that opened out onto gardens and recreational areas, with washing lines, and one even with a swimming pool. Laundries in working order, various areas to sit and relax or play cards or watch television.”

She then adds: “Staff who sounded and looked like family members. Family members sitting around relaxing waiting for a mother to return from some shopping… Dining rooms, allowing for mingling and shared meals, and smaller eating areas allowing for more privacy.” Kate concludes: “ This is the FIRST time, and ONLY time, I have felt I would or could move into ‘residential care’. As a person living with a diagnosis of dementia, I cannot tell you how much of a relief it felt to see someone who ‘gets’ it, and who has taken such a risk (financial, and professional) by refusing to do it as everyone else is doing it, and following their intuition, their heart, and actually ‘doing it’ so well. Tamar founded Group Homes Australia in 2009. The first home opened in 2012. Today there are eight homes and the company is growing rapidly.

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Fast

FOOD

GET THE LITTLE ONES INVOLVED TO HELP CREATE MASTER MEALS USING OUR RECIPES THAT ARE KID FRIENDLY & CAN BE MADE WITH LITTLE EFFORT.

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breakfast pikelets & POACHED PEARS 0.20 Prep 0.10 Cook

Serves 4

INGREDIENTS 1 1/3 cups (200g) plain flour 1 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda 1/4 firmly packed cup (50g) brown sugar 1 egg, plus 1 egg separated 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 300ml buttermilk 25g unsalted butter, melted, cooled Sliced poached pears, to serve 1/3 cup (115g) Seville orange marmalade, warmed

METHOD 1. Sift flour and soda into a bowl, then stir in sugar. Place egg and egg yolk in a large bowl with vanilla and buttermilk, whisking with a hand whisk to combine. Add to the dry ingredients and whisk to combine. 2. Whisk the eggwhite and a pinch of salt in the bowl of an electric mixer to soft peaks, then fold the eggwhite into the batter. 3. Heat a non-stick crepe pan or frypan over medium heat and brush base with a little melted butter. Using 1 tablespoon of batter for each pikelet, add 3-4 spoonfuls to pan and cook for 1-2 minutes until bubbles appear on the surface. Turn carefully and cook for a further 1 minute or until golden. Keep warm in a low oven while you cook remaining pancakes, brushing pan with more butter in between batches. 4. Divide pancakes among 4 serving plates. Top with poached pear slices and a scoop of the marmalade and yoghurt ice cream (see related recipe). Drizzle with the warmed marmalade and serve with freshly brewed coffee.

Photo: Ben Dearnly november 2016 | mychild

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muesli & mango YOGHURT PARFAIT 0.10 Prep

Serves 4

INGREDIENTS 1 1/4 cups of toasted muesli 3 mangoes 1 1/2 cups natural yoghurt 1 tablespoon of honey

METHOD Step 1 Divide muesli among 4 tall parfait or sundae glasses. Thickly slice mango flesh and add to the glasses, then divide yoghurt among each. Drizzle honey over the top of each parfait and serve.

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Photo: Mark Roper


chicken & coleslaw SANDWICHES 0.10 Prep

Makes 2 sandwiches

INGREDIENTS 1/2 cup finely shredded cabbage 1 small carrot, grated 1 green onion, thinly sliced 2 tablespoons mayonnaise 1 teaspoon lemon juice 4 baby cos lettuce leaves 4 slices wholegrain bread, buttered 60g shaved chicken

METHOD Step 1 Combine cabbage, carrot and onion in a large bowl. Add mayonnaise, juice, and salt and pepper. Toss to combine. Step 2 Arrange 2 lettuce leaves over 2 slices of bread. Top with chicken and coleslaw. Top each sandwich with another lettuce leaf, then remaining bread. Cut in half and wrap tightly in plastic wrap.

Photo: Steve Brown

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kumara & feta FRITTATA 0.10 Prep 0.55 Cook

Serves 4

INGREDIENTS 1kg kumara (orange sweet potato), peeled and chopped 1 1/2 tablespoons olive oil 1 small onion, chopped 150g reduced-fat feta, crumbled 6 eggs 80g baby spinach leaves, to serve

METHOD Step 1 Preheat oven to 200°C. Spread kumara on a baking tray. Toss with 2 teaspoons of oil. Bake for 40 minutes or until tender. Step 2 Heat remaining oil in a non-stick frying pan over medium heat. Add onion. Cook for 3 minutes. Stir in kumara and feta. Step 3 Whisk eggs and pepper in a jug with a fork. Pour over kumara mixture. Reduce heat to low. Cook for 5 minutes or until base is set. Step 4 Preheat grill to medium-high. Place frittata under grill and cook a further 7 minutes or until golden and cooked through. Cut into wedges. Serve with spinach leaves.

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Photo: Steve Brown


one-pot chicken &

PUMPKIN PENNE Serves 4

0.05 Prep 0.25 Cook

INGREDIENTS 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil 1 brown onion, chopped 2 cups salt-reduced chicken stock 535g can creamy pumpkin soup 250g dried penne 1 zucchini 2 1/2 cups chopped cooked chicken 1 cup frozen baby peas

TARROGON GREMOLATA

1/3 cup finely grated parmesan 2 teaspoons chopped fresh tarragon 1 garlic clove, crushed 2 teaspoons finely grated lemon rind 1 tablespoon chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

METHOD Step 1

Heat oil in a large heavy-based flameproof casserole dish or non-stick saucepan over medium-high heat (see note). Add onion. Cook, stirring, for 3 minutes or until just starting to soften. Add stock, soup and 1 cup cold water. Stir to combine. Increase heat to high. Cover. Bring to the boil. Add penne. Reduce heat to medium-low. Simmer, covered, stirring occasionally, for 20 minutes or until penne is just tender. Step 2 Meanwhile, make Tarragon gremolata: Combine parmesan, tarragon, garlic, lemon rind and parsley in a bowl. Step 3 Using a vegetable peeler, cut zucchini into ribbons. Add zucchini, chicken and peas to penne. Stir well to combine. Cook for 2 minutes or until chicken is heated through. Season with salt and pepper. Serve penne sprinkled with gremolata. Photo: Guy Bailey & Andrew Young

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eggplant burgers PARMIGIANA 0.20 Prep 0.25 Cook

Serves 4

INGREDIENTS 1/2 cup plain flour 1 egg 1/3 cup milk 1 cup polenta 1 large eggplant, cut into 8 slices 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 1 cup tomato passata 2 tablespoons fresh basil, shredded 1 garlic clove, crushed 1/2 cup mozzarella, grated 4 x 2cm-thick slices ciabatta, toasted 40g baby rocket 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar

METHOD Step 1 Place flour on a large plate. Whisk egg and milk in a shallow bowl. Place polenta in a bowl. Toss eggplant in flour to coat, shaking off excess. Dip in egg mixture, then toss in polenta to coat. Transfer to a plate. Step 2 Heat oil in a large non-stick frying pan over medium-high heat. Cook eggplant, in 2 batches, for 2 to 3 minutes each side or until golden and crisp. Transfer to a plate lined with paper towel to drain. Step 3 Preheat grill on high. Combine passata, basil and garlic in a small bowl. Season with salt and pepper. Place eggplant on a baking tray. Top with passata mixture. Sprinkle with mozzarella. Grill for 2 to 3 minutes or until passata mixture is heated and mozzarella is golden and bubbling. Step 4 Top toasted ciabatta with rocket. Drizzle with vinegar. Top each with 2 eggplant parmigianas. Serve 108

november 2016 | mychild

Photo: Andrew Young


creme

CARAMEL 6.40 Prep 0.50 Cook

Serves 6

INGREDIENTS 1 1/4 cups caster sugar 300ml thickened cream 1 1/2 cups milk 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 6 eggs

METHOD Step 1 Preheat oven to 170°C/150°C fan-forced. Combine 3/4 cup sugar and 1 cup cold water in a saucepan over low heat. Cook, stirring, for 5 minutes or until sugar has dissolved. Increase heat to high. Bring to the boil. Boil, without stirring, for 5 to 7 minutes or until golden. Remove from heat. Set aside for 2 minutes to allow bubbles to subside. Pour sugar mixture into six 1 cup-capacity, ovenproof dishes. Set aside to set. Step 2 Combine cream, milk and vanilla in a saucepan over medium heat. Cook, stirring, for 6 to 8 minutes or until small bubbles form at edge of pan. Remove from heat. Step 3 Whisk eggs and remaining sugar in a bowl until pale and creamy. Slowly add cream mixture, whisking constantly. Strain mixture into a jug. Divide between dishes. Step 4 Place dishes in a large baking dish (see tip). Pour boiling water into baking dish until halfway up the sides of smaller dishes. Bake for 30 minutes or until just set. Remove baking dish from oven. Remove dishes from water. Set aside to cool. Refrigerate overnight. Run a thin knife around edge of each dish. Turn out onto 1cm-deep plates. Serve.

Photo: Mark O’Meara

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bread &butter PUDDING 0.15 Prep 0.30 Cook

Serves 6

INGREDIENTS 4 eggs 2 cups milk 300ml pure cream 1/4 cup caster sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon 8 thick slices white bread, crusts removed 40g butter, softened 1/2 cup sultanas 2 tablespoons demerara sugar

METHOD Step 1 Preheat oven to 180°C/160°C fan-forced. Grease a 5cmdeep, 17cm x 28cm (base) baking dish. Whisk eggs, milk, cream, caster sugar, vanilla and cinnamon in a bowl. Step 2 Spread both sides of each bread slice with butter. Cut each slice in half diagonally. Arrange half the bread in rows in prepared dish. Sprinkle with half the sultanas. Repeat with remaining bread and sultanas. Step 3 Pour egg mixture over bread. Sprinkle with demerara sugar. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes or until golden and set. Serve.

All recipes sourced from taste.com.au

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Photo: Mark O’Meara


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november 2016 | mychild


mychild Magazine November 2016 Issue