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AUSTRALIA’s BEST PREGNANCY, BABY & PARENTING MAGAZINE ISSUE 37

* OCTOBER 2014

11 Toddler top tips

feeding

& KIDS COMPUTERS

Keeping them safe

Birth bonus

How to make labour easier

BOTTLEFEEDING

GUILT FREE!

FAMILY TRAVEL special Tips & tricks

best-ever

Nursery

design ideas

Pregnancy sleep woes // Kids & chores // Model agency guide


growing babies organically. Made with love for your baby, the nature baby range always respects the best ethical and environmental practices. With a fresh modern take on all the essentials you will need for your baby, our range includes 100% certified organic cotton and merino wool baby clothing, sleepwear and bedding. A luxurious botanical skincare range for mothers and babies and unique toys to inspire the imagination.

www.naturebaby.com.au 2

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Editor’s column

S

LISE TAYLOR

ummer’s nearly here and I’m sure you’re putting plans in place for a getaway with your family. Well, no matter whether it’s camping, cruising, staying in a resort or simply having a holiday at home (that’s what we’re doing this year), this issue’s travel special will help you with ideas, tips and tricks to make your vacation a success! We’re also featuring some wonderful warm-weather inspired fashion finds for babies and kids along with nursery and children’s room design ideas to suit the season. To top it all off, you’ll love our mouth-watering, homemade ice-cream flavour ideas. Now you’re all set for a summer of fun – enjoy!

loves I’ve always loved dress-ups and am super impressed by these Sparrow & B raven wings, $70, and headdress, $60. Head over to sparrowandb.com.au for more of their fabulous costumes.

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contents COVER STORIES 30 58 112 118 124 138 144 150 160

Family travel special Tips & tricks Kids & chores Good for them or not? Pregnancy sleep woes Best-ever nursery design ideas Birth bonus How to make labour easier Model agency guide What to watch out for when selecting an agency Bottle-feeding guilt free! 11 top tips Toddler feeding Kids & computers Keeping them safe

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Editor’s picks Bits & bobs News & reviews My 5 favourites Corryn Barakat from Milk & Love shares her top product picks What we love about... Pink Coyote Talking design Meet Marlene Sandberg from eco baby-care brand Naty by Nature Behind the brand Tania Alves from Mater Health Services shares her baby range

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style 66 70 74 78 84 90 92

Keep it calm Seek serenity with blues Gone troppo! Kids get set for summer Interiors report Whimsical nursery ideas Interiors my space Pastels, please! Party A fox-themed first birthday Cooking Tasty meatballs with a twist Cooking Mouth-watering ice-cream

win! 96 98

Subscribe for free! Win one of six The Gro Company packs worth $160 each Register now! To enter the My Child Excellence Awards 2015 aUSTRalIa’S BEST PREgnanCy, BaBy & PaREnTIng MagaZInE ISSUE 37

ON THE COVER Photography Nick Rieve Model Ella wears organic-cotton growsuit, $34.95, and matching headband, $14.95, both by Purebaby. See purebaby.com.au.

* OCTOBER 2014

11 Toddler top tips

feeding

& KIDS COMPUTERS Keeping them safe

Birth bonus

hOw TO MaKE laBOUR EaSIER

BOTTLEFEEDING

GUILT FREE!

FAMILY TRAVEL SPECIAL Tips & tricks

BEST-EvER

Nursery design ideas

PREgnanCy SlEEP wOES // KIdS & ChORES // MOdEl agEnCy gUIdE


Collection The NUK Baby Rose & Blue Collection is made with love. Coordinate your favourite accessories with the NUK Baby Rose & Blue Collection, especially designed for those bundles of pink and blue. Enjoy the peace of mind knowing all NUK products meet the highest quality standards. For the best start to life.

Available from www.nuk.com.au

and all leading pharmacies

NUK AUSTRALIA ,PO Box 5199 Chittaway Bay, NSW 2261 | NUK is a registered trademark of MAPA GmbH/Germany

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contents PREGNANCY & BIRTH 104 106 110 112 114 118 124

News Mum’s health & wellbeing News The problem with heparin, super smoothies and pregnancy guide video Shopping 5 reasons why… sleep can be difficult Risky business Ectopic pregnancy facts Nursery works Top 10 design tips 8 ways to make labour easier Advice on how to create a calmer birth experience

BABY & TODDLER 128 132 136 138 140 144 150

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News Healthy custards, the importance of tummy time and baby milestone cards Shopping 5 reasons to… massage your baby 5 tips to… choosing a modelling agency Just a hunch? Becoming intuitive How to bottle-feed – guilt free! No fuss! Feeding advice for toddlers

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preschooler & big kids 152 154 156 160

News First aid & the pros of stuttering Shopping The cost of lack of play Dangers behind a push for formalised education Keeping kids safe Kids and internet use

travel special 30 32 38 42 46 50

Can you fly when pregnant? Travelling with littlies Tips to prep kids Let’s escape! Family holiday ideas Away we go Trendy travel items On the move Practical and fun products Shopping compare Baby carriers

family 52 54 58 62

The MOB The myth about “me-time” In my view Are boys being left behind? Family matters Children’s chores Reality Check Mummy bloggers


Little Bo peep fell fast asleep And dreamt she heard them bleating, When she awoke, she found it a joke For they were all still a f leeting!

M E R I N O theK natural I D S choice TM

Our NEW Limited Edition Range

Look what ’s back! After popular demand this Spring we are re -releasing our much loved embroidered sheep Go Go Bag, adding background spots for an even more adorable option. You can purchase online or from our selected retailers. Limited time only. E N T E R C O U P O N C O D E ‘ S P OT T E D ’ W H E N S H O P P I N G O N L I N E TO R E C E I V E 1 5 % O F F YO U R F I R S T O R D E R .

+64 (0) 9361 6941 • 1800 643 056 • i n f o @ m e r i n o k i d s . c o m

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PUBLISHER & EDITOR LISE TAYLOR DEPUTY EDITOR & online editor CASSANDRA HOLLAND ART DIRECTOR & STYLIST SAMANTHA CAMPBELL NEWSLETTER EDITOR & WRITER EMILY JAY sub-editor writer

CASSANDRA HOLLAND

HANNAH SAUNDERS

EDITORIAL ENQUIRIES editorial@poppetgroup.com.au CONTRIBUTING EXPERTS DR MICHAEL CARR-GREGG, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR GEORGE CONDOUS, MAGGIE DENT, JENNIFER GRANGER, BRENDA JANSCHEK, JESPER JUUL, INNA SEGAL, HAYES VAN DER MEER, KELLY WINDER

STOCK PHOTOGRAPHY iStock ADVERTISING DIRECTOR LISE TAYLOR m 0410 660 578 e lise@poppetgroup.com.au

CONTACT 61 2 4929 5771 mychildmagazine.com.au Shop 2, Ground Floor, 111 Scott Street (entrance via Bolton Street) Newcastle NSW 2300

MANAGING DIRECTOR LISE TAYLOR

GENERAL MANAGER BRIAN TAYLOR MY CHILD IS PRODUCED & PUBLISHED BY POPPET GROUP PTY LTD ABN 93 120 831 021 My Child magazine and mychildmagazine.com.au are wholly owned by Poppet Group Pty Ltd (ABN 93 120 831 021). No other parties or individuals have any financial interest in the company or in My Child or mychildmagazine.com.au. My Child contains general information only and does not purport to be a substitute for health and parenting advice. Readers are advised to seek a doctor for all medical and health matters. The publisher and authors do not accept any liability whatsoever in respect of an action taken by readers in reliance on the recommendations set out in this magazine. Reproduction of any material without written permission by the publisher is strictly forbidden. We cannot accept responsibility for material lost or damaged in the post or for any unsolicited manuscripts and photographs. All reasonable efforts have been made to trace copyright holders.

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ideas

editor’s picks ALL KINDS OF PRODUCTS CROSS lise’s DESK EACH DAY. HERE ARE a few of her favourites

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The sweetly whimsical print on this Hybrid Shell nappy, $24.50 by GroVia and Wee Gallery, is a limitededition. So be quick! See grovia.net.au. Toy bag, wet bag, library bag… Little Alligator’s cute handmade drawstring bag, $32, does it all. Go to madeit.com.au/littlealligator. Jellystone Designs’ sister company, Jellybones, produces this groovy lunchbag, $28. See jellybones.com.au. Available at tigertribe.com.au, Petit Collage’s Nesting Blocks, $29.95, will encourage hours of tumbling fun. The ideal toy for your bag! My Little Giraffe’s handy Balloon Ball Cover is $14.95 at madeit.com.au/mylittlegiraffe. Kaleidoscope’s pull-along toy, $44.95, is the best pull-along I’ve ever seen! Head to kaleidoscope.com.au. Biodegradable and non-toxic, this Mother’s Corn Baby Self-Training Mug, $11.99, is the ultimate in eco baby care. Get it at kidsberry.com.au. Hot orange is my favourite colour so I really do lust after this aptlynamed Lust nappy bag by Total Bag Envy, $119.95! See totalbagenvy.com.au.

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Time for bed

PRODUCT

OF THE MONTH

Keep baby close at bedtime with the Bednest, $599.95. Designed to aid co-sleeping without the risk of SIDS, the bassinette has mesh sides that can be positioned fully enclosed, half-folded or down to suit you and your baby. It comes with a stand, mattress, attachment straps and bag, and can also be used as a standard cot in the nursery. See danishbydesign.com.au.

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ideas

BITS&BOBS

Comic genius

Heather’s Head is a comic strip created by animator and designer Rob Macdermid, based on the humorous quips of his three-year-old daughter, Heather. Check out more at heathershead.com!

keep your kids busy

Looking for a way to entertain the children on a long trip? Joe Rhatigan’s All you Need is a Pencil: The Stuck in a Car, Plane or Train Activity Book (Random House, $12.99) is filled with puzzles, quizzes, games and more to keep the kids busy – and avoid them asking, ‘Are we there yet?’ To purchase, head to random house.com.au.

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loves They’ve been in the baby and children’s fashion market for five years and their edgy, eye-catching styles just keep getting better! Available in sizes 0000-7, Milky’s pieces have a refreshing colour palette that little ones will love. Check out their site at milky clothing.com.au, with online sales starting soon.


carry on‌

This year marks the fifth annual celebration of Australia and New Zealand Babywearing Week. Launched to promote the benefits of using slings and baby carriers instead of prams, the event will run from October 5 to 11 2014 in parallel to International Babywearing Week. And this year, Babes in Arms is offering $5,000 in community grants for the awards, having previously contributed $12,000 worth of grants since the program started in 2010. The categories for 2014 include the Biggest Babywearing Group Award, Babywearing and Breastfeeding Award, Babywearing and Regional Communities Award and more. To find out about hosting an event and to register, go to babywearingweek.com.au.

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my child promotion

THE BEST IN WEBSIT

shopping online for pregnancy, baby and kids’ ge

just for mums koolamandesigns.com.au babynappybags.com.au newbeginnings.com.au loveloops.com.au metromum.com.au littlesilverprints.com.au manthaandyou.com.au healthymummy.com.au lassig.com.au thestorknest.com.au

baby care difrax.com.au pigeonbaby.com.au medela.com.au yourcheekymonkey.com.au essentialbabyneeds.com gelpack.com.au bambooty.com.au keepmecosy.com.au peapods.com.au stokke.com

eco friendly earlybirds.com.au masterandmiss.com.au ittybittygreenie.com.au moltex.com.au ettitude.com.au babyluvdesigns.com.au naturaltransition.com avidiva.com.au raindropsandlollipops.com.au petitarmoir.com.au

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out & about babybjorn.com.au gear4baby.com.au haggusandstookles.com.au hugglebabycarriers.com.au bumbo.com.au tooshcoosh.com.au fridge-to-go.net.au hugabub.com limetreekids.com.au bambooty.com.au

toys/parties/gifts thebabyshowershop.com.au misskikiofcherryblossomlane.com happylittlehippos.com.au brightstarkids.com.au babyvegas.com.au zimmerjee.com.au tinypolkadots.com.au donnerandblitzen.com.au papereskimo.com.au novelgifts.com.au

sweet dreams snugglebum.com.au louandolly.com bambinipronto.com.au sleepywings.com.au babyo.com.au babydonkie.com.au merinokids.com.au marquise.com.au ergopouch.com.au alfredandmaize.com.au


ITES

ear? give these great sites a go!

baby fashion oishi-m.com plumcollections.com.au puretots.com.au brightbots.com.au maxandtilly.com.au angelfishdragonfly.com.au skiptomylou.com.au buddhababy.com.au gaiaorganiccotton.com.au littlefrenchy.com.au

Gifts/fun/learning solvejswings.com donnerandblitzen.com.au maxandella.com.au brainychild.com.au littlebeba.com.au thebabyshowershop.com.au uberkate.com.au vtechkids.com.au urbanbaby.com.au moowoo.com.au

nutrition/feeding qubies.com.au fridge-to-go.net.au wholekids.com.au philips.com.au/avent raffertysgarden.com onlyorganic.com.au waterbuddies.com.au boobiebikkies.com.au cheeki.net.au losebabyweight.com.au

Children’s fashion koolamandesigns.com.au platypusaustralia.com nestling.com.au babydonkie.com.au designchild.com.au purely4kids.com.au eternalcreation.com eenimeeni.com tinytribe.com.au naturebaby.com.au

GO NATURAL bambooty.com.au littleinnoscents.com.au motherscorn.com.au mambinoorganics.com.au ittybittygreenie.com.au merinokids.com.au kidsecostyle.com.au littleeconest.com.au naturebaby.com.au aromababy.com.au

smart interiors leafydreamsnurserydecals. com.au speckledhouse.com.au siroccohome.com.au petit.com.au myfirstroom.com.au thelittlekidzcloset.com.au stuckupkids.com.au danishbydesign.com.au 41orchard.com.au

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IDEAS

art greco breastfeeding dress $145.95 in sizes XS-L by Mothers En Vogue milkandlove.com.au

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My favourites Corryn Barakat, owner of breastfeeding and maternity wear boutique Milk & Love, shares some of her all-time favourite products

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Sangha Waterfall Wrap This lovely bamboo wrap is so soft – it is simply divine to wear and so multipurpose! I love to throw it on over one of my favourite nursing tops as I’m heading out the door. It’s great to know that I have a stylish wrap, a nursing cover and (if needed) a wrap for my baby, all in one! You can check it out and much more at milkandlove.com.au.

Ergobaby Organic Carrier Of all the products I have bought since first falling pregnant, our Ergobaby carrier has been the most useful and the most used. With my first baby, my husband and I wore it with him in it for every nap… for about 18 months! My second baby is now nine months old and it’s still the first thing I pack every time I leave the house. This product has saved my arms and back through two chubby babies!

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Coconut oil butter I love this stuff. I use it for the kids if they’re getting dry patches or, most recently, for a teething rash. It’s also great for me when I’m developing any dry skin on my hands, elbows or lips. It feels gorgeous, works beautifully and, best of all, we all smell deliciously “coco-nutty” afterwards… a bit like a Bounty bar. Yum!

The Alchemy of Sound meditation music I have two CDs from The Alchemy of Sound on my iPod, Gently Now and Peace Within. With two highly active little boys who have difficulty winding down, I love to put this on in the evening, turn off the main lights, and watch them slow right down as we have dinner and read books. Bedtime is so much easier since we started using this music. They fall asleep quite quickly with it playing in the background!

Food Connect weekly groceries Once a week we go and pick up our fruit and vegie boxes from a local house. We get a little newsletter about the local farmers who have sent us their goodies and often there is something quite bizarre in the box that we get to try out. It’s all ecologically grown by local farmers so I feel like I’m part of a lovely little community. The seasonal produce is always excellent quality and we create our meal plan based on what is in season, which is brilliant.

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IDEAS

What we love about‌

Children’s interior illustration service PINK COYOTE

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rawing upon her studies in children’s illustration, printmaking and fine art, graphic designer Maryanne Deans Kolek established Pink Coyote so that she could create handpainted, personalised furniture for babies and children. Clients can choose from a selection of chip-resistant furniture, such as benches, chairs and keepsake boxes, or they can opt to have their own items decorated. The service works by allowing clients to

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select a design including names, poems and personalised sentiments, or illustrations such as teddy bears and dragonflies. Once the final design has been chosen, Maryanne then handillustrates it onto the furniture. She also offers a full interior design service should customers wish to have a complete room finished with personalised details.* Visit pinkcoyote.com.au to discuss a quote or check out the range of products and designs available.


r u o y e v o l ! I s e h Taylor t o l c - LiseEditor

Soft Ruffle Maternity & Breastfeeding Dress ($79.95)

Find out why the Editor of this Magazine is buying our clothes

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IDEAS

Talking design THIS PAGE: NATY BY NATURE SUMMER COLLECTION FROM $30 in sizes 6M-4

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Founded by Swedish mum Marlene Sandberg, the Naty By Nature babycare range is a natural choice for eco-conscious parents


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ideas | talking design

JUMPSUIT $40 in sizes 6M-2

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round 20 years ago, mother of two Marlene Sandberg went through a period of environmental awareness that saw her investigating eco nappies as a business venture. After five years of research and development, she launched an ecofriendly disposable nappy onto the market.

what is your design philosophy? Our designs are clean, simple and highly functional. We strive to simplify life for our consumers and our approach is a natural one. We provide environmentally-friendly products and clothing for babies, children and parents throughout the world.

what are the benefits of your products? We aim to design products that help to create a healthier life, with no added chemicals. I don’t believe in compromises or shortcuts. I believe a “green” product has to perform at least as well

as ordinary ones while incorporating the best available components and technology. As much as possible our materials come from natural resources. Using organic products wherever possible in our product range, while maintaining high performance, is extremely important to us. For example, our nappies are based on natural and renewable materials. We’ve spent many years perfecting our eco nappies by eliminating as much of the nonbiodegradable materials as possible while maintaining performance and comfort. The leakage barrier in our nappies is based on GMfree corn and is as effective as plastic. Our absorbent pulp is from sustainably harvested Scandinavian forests. Our eco nappies are also completely unbleached, contain no fragrance, latex or TBT (tributyltin) and are hypoallergenic. With our wipes, it took us years of intense work and development to make the first 100 percent biodegradable, high-performance baby eco wipe. Nature Babycare eco wipes are made

Visit naty.com for more information

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TEE $45 & SHORTS $40 both in sizes 6M-2

from carefully harvested, unbleached wood pulp and are moistened with purified water, making them good for your baby. Our wipes are hypoallergenic, completely free of chlorine and contain no alcohol. When we decided to extend our product range with children’s clothes, we also decided that we wouldn’t take any shortcuts. Being an environmentally conscious company, it was therefore a natural decision to use only 100 percent certified-organic cotton that conforms to the world’s toughest eco-labelling: Good Environmental Choice. But being eco-friendly was not enough; our clothes are, of course, also practical and comfortable, and feature an appealing Scandinavian design.

the key features? Our goal is to provide a range of products that are high performance and healthy to babies and parents. I work closely with our research and development team to ensure we consider the effect on the environment in everything we make. Our products are good for both your family and nature. * october 2014 | mychild

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IDEAS

Behind the brand Tania Alves, director of brand and marketing projects at Mater Health Services, explains what it takes to operate a maternity- and baby-care product company

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ater Mothers’ Hospitals, Australia’s largest maternity service, delivers more than 10,500 babies each year. With facilities at South Brisbane and Redland in Queensland, Mater Mothers offers a selection of integrated services including obstetrics, gynaecology, neonatology and maternal foetal medicine. With this maternity focus in mind, Tania Alves and her team launched a range of gentle maternity and baby products.

About the collection After four years of consumer research and a co-creation product development model with over 3,000 Mater midwives and mums, Mater has launched eight products: Mater Body Balm for Pregnancy, Mater Baby Wash, Mater Baby Moisturiser and Mater Nappies in five sizes. The products are dermatologically tested for newborns and mums, and are made from lowirritant ingredients that are safe for pregnant women and newborn babies. Their range of high-quality nappies are designed to quickly absorb liquid and draw away moisture to help keep baby’s delicate

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skin dry all day and overnight. Made from an ultra-soft, breathable material, Mater Nappies are proven not to cause any skin irritation. ‘In the development process, our midwives and mums found that most newborn babies weigh less than 3.5kg and are too small for a traditional newborn nappy. In response, we developed our Newborn First Weeks nappies to provide a smaller, high-performing nappy for these babies,’ explains Tania. In addition, proceeds from the sale of the products support Mater Little Miracles to help fund specialist life-saving care for seriously ill and premature babies.

The business side of things ‘Mater Mothers’ Hospitals maternity- and babycare product range operates with a team of engaged co-creators and is led by Mater staff who are dedicated to the development of a safe, ethical, quality and affordable range of products specially designed for newborns and mums,’ says Tania. Mater has successfully launched the range into the consumer market and Tania says it >


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ideas | behind the brand has had an overwhelmingly positive reception: ‘All the products in the range were shortlisted in the Australian My Child Excellence Awards 2014 (as voted by consumers), with our Mater Body Balm for Pregnancy winning bronze in the Favourite Mum’s Product category.’ They have also been recognised globally, receiving a Bronze Stevie for Best New Product (Consumer Products) in The International Business Awards, the world’s premier business awards program. Mater Nappies have recently been trialled by thousands of Australian mums, with product reviewers highly rating the nappies via social media and online forums. ‘The feedback has been extremely positive, with mums saying they intend to switch to the

Mater brand and categorising them as a great overnight nappy,’ explains Tania.

Future endeavours The Mater maternity- and baby-care range will continue to grow with the introduction of Mater Nappy Balm, Mater Baby Wipes, Mater Maternity Pads and Mater Nursing Pads in the near future. ‘Ultimately, Mater’s future in the maternityand baby-care product market is in the hands of our experts, the Mater midwives and mums, and the families around Australia,’ says Tania. ‘We will be led by our co-creators as to what they need and how as a brand we can support them – whether it’s through innovative new products, education or expert advice.’ *

View the Mater maternity and baby care range priced from $11.99 at matermothers.org.au

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TRAVEL

Can you fly when pregnant? Although it is perfectly safe to fly with a baby on board, there are a few things that you’ll need to keep in mind. Hannah Saunders reports

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or the majority of people, flying can be challenging and slightly uncomfortable at the best of times, but for pregnant women, catching a flight with a baby on board can encompass a few more hurdles, especially as there are safety issues to keep in mind!

more than 28 weeks along, you may require a doctor’s certificate confirming your due date. Be sure to check with the airline’s policy on pregnancy and don’t forget you will have a return trip to make too.

FIRST & SECOND TRIMESTER

Okay, so flying while pregnant may be safe for baby, but will mum be able to cope? The most common complaints your body will encounter will be swollen feet and ankles, cramped legs and dehydration. As preventative action, as soon as it is safe to remove your seatbelt, take off your shoes. You can keep your blood circulating by standing up every now and again, and stretching and massaging your calves, circling the ankles and wiggling your toes. If you are lucky enough to have an empty seat beside you, put your feet up. Support stockings are also an option. They will help relieve swollen veins and keep your circulation flowing. Drink plenty of water, and be sure to take along a snack to keep your energy levels up. Most importantly, enjoy your holiday! *

It is always best to check with your doctor before heading off, but especially if you have experienced spotting or suffer from diabetes or high blood pressure. The second trimester (weeks 14 to 27) is generally considered to be the safest and most comfortable time to travel. Take advantage of saying goodbye to your morning sickness and welcoming your holiday – and cherish your last chance to sleep in!

THIRD TRIMESTER Again, checking with your doctor is essential but so long as you are aren’t experiencing any medical conditions, are not carrying twins and have not undergone any previous premature deliveries, it should be safe to travel by air until up to 36 weeks of pregnancy. If you are

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STAYING COMFORTABLE


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TRAVEL

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Travelling with littlies Headed overseas with your family? preparation is the key to no-fuss holidays with kids and these tips will have you set to go! Hannah Saunders reports

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verseas travel is fun: amazing sights, exotic food and friendly locals. But when you have young children, it is important to be prepared. A long flight needs careful planning and a very long flight is much better if it is broken with an overnight stopover. Dress everyone in layers, even if it is hot when you leave. Planes can get cold and have been known to run out of blankets and pillows.

LONG FLIGHTS Check first If you can be flexible with your timing, before making your reservation it’s worth asking which flight days and/or times are more likely to have extra seats available. Your flight will be much more comfortable if you don’t have to have a toddler sitting on your lap. Or ask when you are checking in – you could be lucky! Bassinettes If your baby weighs under 10kg and you can arrange for bulkhead seating you can get a bassinette (they normally cost more). Only a limited number are available. However, they can’t be used during take off and landing – you will need a baby lap belt for this. Toddler seating If you are booking a seat for your toddler (under the age of two they may sit on your lap), ask about taking a car seat when you make the booking. You can’t turn up at the

airport with a car seat and expect to be able to use it. These are a much safer alternative, more comfortable for your toddler, and you can use the seat when you get to your destination. Ask about a stroller It is worthwhile asking the airline whether you can be provided with a stroller, particularly if your flight has a number of stops and layovers. Bring a carrier If you have a baby, you’ll find carriers are super handy for flying, especially when you’re going through customs and don’t

“If you are booking a seat for your toddler, ask about taking a car seat when you make the booking” have a stroller. Try a carrier such as the Stokke MyCarrier, the BabyBjorn We, the Ergobaby or the Minimonkey – these are all good brands. Slings and woven wraps such as Little Frog and Neobulle can work well too. Woven Wraps Australia do a great range. Be prepared with food The last thing you want is a hungry child! Baby and toddler meals are provided on many airlines, but it is important to request these and to advise the airline of the age of your child. However, even if meals are provided, it’s worth taking along drinks and >

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travel snacks anyway as these may not be available when you want them. Try non-messy options like grapes, blueberries and sultanas, along with crackers and cheese sticks. Food pouches like those by Rafferty’s Garden are also very handy. There are breakfast, lunch, dinner and snack options available, all in durable packaging that is perfect for planes. Bottle-feeding Airlines do not provide infant formula, which will not be a concern if your baby is breastfed. If you will need to bottlefeed, put the formula in a separate container and take bottles of boiled water. Never take pre-mixed formula. Apart from the problem of leaking in pressurised cabins, pre-mixed formula can be a health hazard. If your baby doesn’t finish the bottle discard the leftover milk as you would at home.

Keep hydrated Don’t forget a sippy cup or bottle. These will all pass through security OK because they are for babies. Give them something to suck Take-off and landing can be difficult on little ears. It helps to breastfeed or bottle-feed babies. Your toddler will also find that a drink, such as a fruit popper, will help their ears to pop. The swallowing motion can assist in reducing the build-up of pressure in their ears, which is quite painful for youngsters. Dry cabin air The dry air in an airline cabin is dehydrating and can irritate nasal passages. Pack a buffered isotonic saline nasal spray for infants such as Fess Little Noses. These reduce discomfort and the chance of picking up bugs. Baby’s cabin bag Be sure to take a change kit, including a few disposable nappies (airlines >

Don’t lose the kids when you’re distracted and have small children in tow, it’s easier than you think to lose track of them Be bright Dress them in bright colours so they’ll be easier to spot. Use labels Have your contact details in at least two places, such as on their wrist and stitched onto clothes. Don’t forget country codes and never put their name in a visible place. Ensure one parent is always on duty One of you takes care of the passports, finding the gate or train station, and the other handles the kids. Rein them in Consider a harness for busy places, near rivers or steep drops or when travelling alone with your child. Picture this Carry a recent photo of your child in your wallet or handbag. Hold hands Make a habit of always holding your child’s hand. Teach your child what to do Teach your child to stop and stand still if they feel lost. If they can’t see you, explain to them they should go to the nearest shop or counter, without stopping to talk to anyone, to ask for help. Follow your own advice If you lose your child, do the same thing: go to the nearest shop or counter and ask them to contact security staff. Contact the police if your child hasn’t easily been found. Alert authorities If your child hasn’t been found within several hours, alert the Australian consulate or embassy, which will have direct contact with the local authorities.

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travel sometimes run out midair) – try night-time ones, which last longer – a change of clothes, a wrap, a pair of socks, a bib or two, baby wipes and spare dummies if you use them. Packing baby’s items in clear plastic sealable bags may help in the event of airport security emptying out the bag; small items won’t spill everywhere. Toddler’s cabin bag Your toddler will also need a change of clothes, a favourite toy or their cuddly, a storybook, and slippers and PJs if you like for night-time flights. Older children They also need some of these things and will enjoy bringing along their own backpack. Most airlines provide kids’ activity packs and these, together with the in-flight entertainment, can provide hours of fun. Extra toys To keep your child contented, bring along a new toy, their favourite book, their doll, Matchbox cars, sticker books, and your iPad for a range of games and movies. Limit yourself to one carry bag On your flight back, you’ll most likely end up with an extra bag of purchases you’ve made on your trip so if you limit yourself to just one carry-on bag to start with, you won’t be overly weighed down on your way back. Backpacks are great for this.

HEALTH ESSENTIALS Complete a first-aid course You may want to undertake a paediatric first-aid course so you know how to deal with emergencies. St John Ambulance (stjohn.org.au) or the Australian Red Cross (redcross.org.au) are good to try. Check ups Ensure everyone in the family has a medical and dental check-up before departure. Don’t forget the vaccinations Visit a travel medicine clinic to ensure that you all have the necessary vaccines – particularly hepatitis A as this is not part of the childhood vaccine schedule – at least six to eight weeks before departure. Parents should also consider a flu vaccine (often kids have no sympathy for sick mums and dads and still need care!). Buy a first-aid kit Take a well-stocked medical kit with antibiotics for diarrhoea, paracetamol

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and, of course, bandaids. Whatever you do, don’t give kids Imodium unless advised by a doctor and never give them Stemetil. Get set for travellers’ diarrhoea Depending on where you are going, travellers’ diarrhoea can sometimes be inevitable. To avoid it, drink bottled water and try not to eat raw foods or food that has been sitting around. If it hasn’t been boiled, cooked or peeled stay away. In case diarrhoea strikes, keep a rehydrating solution like Hydralyte handy. Be prepared Practise safe travel techniques before departure like not drinking bathwater, brushing teeth with bottled water and not

“Ensure everyone in the family has a medical and dental check-up before departure” leaning on balconies. Also consider bringing along flushable toilet seat covers. SeatEase produce packs of 110 for $16.50 and they are available with a free travel pack of 10 from bluelinehygienics.com. Avoid accidents Be vigilant around waterways and unfenced pools, and conscious about falls, poisoning and burns. Beware mosquitoes These are public enemy number one! During the day, apply an insect repellent with 30 percent DEET and wash it off at night before bed. Protect from the sun In hot countries, always use a good 30+SPF sunscreen on your children, dress them in loose cotton clothing and hats, drink plenty of fluids and keep out of the sun between 10am and 2pm. Watch out on the roads Make sure children take extra care when crossing roads when the cars are on the “other side” of the road, and keep shoes on when outside. Stay away from animals Don’t go near or touch local animals, especially monkeys and dogs, and seek a rabies vaccine immediately if anyone is bitten. * See thetraveldoctor.com.au for more information.


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TRAVEL

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Let’s escape! if you’ve been longing for a relaxing break, read on to discover just how many family-friendly holiday options are available. hannah saunders reports

P

lanning a family holiday? Don’t let being unorganised ruin your getaway. Take a look at these great trip ideas plus tips for preparing, packing and getting to your destination.

be prepared Getting away on a family holiday is as easy as picking a destination and packing, right? The truth is, whether it’s camping, a week at the beach or an overseas vacation, careful planning will make the trip memorable for all the right reasons. Begin by writing a list of what everyone wants and go from there. With babies and little children, consider the options that will make your holiday easier and more enjoyable for them, as well as for you.

Camping Camping is a great family holiday. Children, from toddler age, find it a real adventure and a huge learning experience. However, if you have never been camping before you can save yourself a lot of trouble and expense by hiring or borrowing most of the equipment you need. Your trip will also be more enjoyable if you go with another family who are experienced

campers. Some families like to return to the same camping grounds each year and get to know other families doing the same. Making a list of everything you will need is crucial. Setting up camp and finding you don’t have anything to boil water in for that muchlonged-for cuppa is not a good start. Little things can make all the difference too. For example, a transportable cot can keep bubs and toddlers in a safe spot while preparing meals, but you can also go overboard and pack too much – another reason for a thorough list! Many camping grounds offer cabins as well as campsites and this could be an alternative for your family. There are sites with children’s activities, playgrounds, pools and all facilities, but standards vary so it’s important to check the site’s rating, or go on a recommendation. Or you may want to get completely back to nature – however, this is not recommended for first-timers on their own.

Resorts & hotels Many resorts are geared towards families, offering extensive pool areas, playgrounds, kids’ clubs and games rooms for teens. They can provide parents with the opportunity >

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travel for much-needed rest and relaxation but can also be noisy and crowded in high season. It is important to shop around when choosing a resort, not just on price and taking into account added extras, but also on their facilities, including style of accommodation. The usual options are either an apartment with a kitchen and laundry or a hotel room. Look for special deals with buffet breakfasts or all meals included. Travelling outside school holidays can reduce the price of family holidays, which is ideal if your child hasn’t started school yet.

“Travelling outside of school holidays can reduce the price of family holidays, which is ideal if your child hasn’t started school yet” Think carefully before skimping on room size or trying to put the whole family in a one-room apartment. If you are going to be at a resort for a number of days, it can be worth paying a little extra for some more space and a chance for a bit of peace and quiet.

Overseas destinations With so many fantastic holiday deals on offer, many families head overseas on their holidays. Fiji and Vanuatu are two popular destinations at the moment. Once again, there are high seasons and low seasons, and in tropical areas low season may mean it is the cyclone season. When you are travelling outside Australia, there are special considerations. Each member of the family needs a passport (and sometimes a visa as well). A full birth certificate is required before obtaining a passport. Information can be found at passports.gov.au. Although it is possible to book overseas holidays on the internet, there is much less likelihood of problems if you book through a travel agent, who can advise on the best

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resorts and/or hotels to suit your family and budget, on whether you will require visas or vaccinations, on travel insurance and on the best time of year to travel. If you would like to check on the internet first, take this information to a travel agent and let them do all the work – you’ll probably get a better deal in the long run. If you’re flying don’t forget to check with each airline you will be travelling with to determine whether there will be restrictions on hand luggage, and carrying baby and toddler food and drinks as well as other personal items.

Cruises With the rise in popularity of cruises, cruise lines have developed ships that cater especially to families. These ships offer similar services and facilities to many of the resorts and can provide families with a relaxingly different type of holiday. Most travel agents will have brochures on the family ships.

Long-distance car travel If your destination means a long car trip, you will want to ensure you’re all as comfortable as possible. Babies and young children often sleep for long periods while travelling, which will make the trip easier. Here are a few ideas to help keep the kids entertained: • CDs/tapes with lots of lively kids’ songs and stories can work well • magnetic board games, books and drawing boards can be good for older children • for children prone to carsickness, games such as I-spy, which have them looking outside the car, are best • portable DVD players can be hung from the back of a car seat and are perfect for keeping kids entertained. An overnight stay will break up a very long trip, and low-cost motels can usually be found along the way. But if you are travelling in peak time do book ahead. And, of course, stop and revive every two hours. *


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away we go just because you’re on the road doesn’t mean you can’t be stylish! here’s our pick of handy items

THIS PAGE: SATCHEL $99.99 by Babymel babymel.com

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1| stroller bag $199 by Mamas & Papas

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4| eye mask $16.95 by Bobble Art

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5| indie STROLLER $699.95 by Bumbleride

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6| BACKPACK $24.95 by Hello Kitty

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7| GO GO BAG from $99.95 by Merino Kids

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8| BABY CANOPY $99.95 by Fly Babee

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9| SNACK STACK $10.99 by Dandelion

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10| JEwel handbag $151 by Carmelina Bags

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on the move from practical products to pure fun, make your family getaway easier with this selection of great gear

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3| nappy wallet $34.95 by B.Box

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4| Colouring set $11.95 by Tiger Tribe

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5| squidgy pillow $21.95 by Annabel Trends

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6| spoon $7 for two by Closer to Nature

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7| Booster seat & tray $139 by Mamas & Papas

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9| bee stroller from $949 by Bugaboo

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bugaboo.com

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The Budu collection marries comfort and quality with fashion and style. The Budu Baby Carrier & Nappy Bag offer clever, practical & stylish designs, made from the best materials including breathable organic bamboo fabric & genuine leather.

budu.com.au

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SHOPPING COMPARE

carry on it’s easy to head out and about with this collection of cosy and comfortable carriers

THIS PAGE: BABY CARRIER $299 by Budu budu.com.au

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CABOO NCT Carrier $89.95 storkmaternity.com.au

BRITAX Organic Carrier $149 britax.com.au

LAMBINI Papoose $395 lambini.com.au

FERTILE MIND Manduca $169.95 fertilemind.com.au

MINIMONKEY Baby Carrier $129.90 kiekaboo.com.au

STOKKE MyCarrier $269 stokke.com

COMBI Baby Carrier $169.99 nihontrading.com

ERGOBABY Performance $239 babesinarms.com.au

BABYBJORN Miracle $209.95 babybjorn.com.au

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the mob

The myth about “me-time”… since when was spending time with family not a good use of time? asks my child columnist kylie kaden. isn’t time alone outside of the toilet good enough?

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s parents, we hear a lot about how important “me-time” is. How to get it. What to do with it. But while I agree it’s essential to have time alone (outside the toilet), I’m starting to wonder if this elusive concept of carving out “me-time” is helpful. Even the label makes it sound selfish. For

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most with young kids it’s practically difficult, burdened by pressure to make the most of it, or paired with a side of guilt. There’s even the risk that after you’ve had it, everything seems duller than before (here I am again with these little humans, counting the hours till my “metime again”…). So is the secret scheduling more


escape time or finding solace in the everyday moments? I think it’s both. I’m of the view that once you decide to take on being a parent, time is no longer your own. It belongs to the little people in your life (or finding their socks) – at least for a while. But didn’t we know that going in? Since when was spending time with family not good use of time? Okay, dealing with the relentless dirty dishes/ bottoms may not be my choice of hobby, but that’s all part of the deal. My happiness depends on theirs and (most of the time) when I’m with my children, even though I whinge about it, I’m right where I want to be; body close, grazing suede-soft cheeks against mine, wrapping sausage arms around my shoulders, savouring the precious moments (and surviving the rest). But at the same time, we all acknowledge that it’s imperative for your sense of self to find moments of alone time in the corners of your life, whatever you might like to call it. But it doesn’t always mean escaping (at least in a physical sense). For me, my sanity saver is writing; the little something I do for me in-between the morning rush and afternoon hum of managing a sticky brood of boys. It started out as a housework avoidance strategy, and is the perfect creative outlet to put some variety in my life. When no-one’s watching, I skulk away to my laptop (sometimes in the bathroom so I can’t be found) and purge out the product of the day’s fermented thoughts. It’s not ideal; piecemeal snippets of stolen time. The process lacks any continuity and planning (I can cut a paragraph, defer world war three and return to find I forgot where I was pasting it). But it’s the piece of the day I own. It’s the piece that’s only for me. It’s a little like the sand around the pebbles in the glass jar of life. There’s the essentials (work/family/chores), these are the pebbles that fill up our jar. Then there’s the small stuff that filters around the substance in our lives. The leftovers. The gaps. The 20 minutes here or there when no-one

notices me escape the real world. The scribbled idea on the back of a receipt while jostling for a seat on the train. The ad breaks (there’s enough of them to write War and Peace!). That hour of think-time before the whinge-fest commences over who ate who’s toast and where’s your library book? Even if the essentials in your life are boulders, they all have curves and crevices that grains of sand can meander through if you let them. But jars, as with life, are not infinite, so there are plenty of things we can’t fit in. I’m no Wonder Woman. My children’s drawers have been replaced by a perpetual pile of unfolded washing. My house looks like it has just been burgled. My three-year-old is rarely wearing pants. I have boycotted ironing, rarely watch the news (I usually can’t hear it above the cacophony of noise) and scrambled-eggsand-ham is a regular for my kids’ dinner. As parents it can be hard to fit that lid on, so I pick my battles. And sometimes, it just doesn’t seem like there’s anything left to give to the relationship you have with yourself. But without that little something for you, that glass jar of life can seem like a bunch of rocks weighing you down, and leave you out of balance and feeling empty. Whether it’s yoga, yodelling or alpaca farming, if you haven’t already found your passion, I hope you do so soon. It can be found in whatever gives you joy and maintains a sense of self. Try not to rely on organised me-time to take a moment for yourself or you will probably go batty waiting for it. Acknowledge it’s all your time, the good bits and the bad, and make the most of it. Savour that tea while it’s hot. Linger in the garden. Enjoy your baby’s smile. But also find time for your own thing – even if it’s a humble trash mag over half-ahead of foils… * Kylie Kaden’s novel Losing Kate is available now from Random House (paperback $32.99). Also in e-book and IBooks format. Visit kyliekaden.com.au.

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IN MY VIEW

Parenting boys with the world trending in favour of girls, Are our boys being left behind? Here transformational coach Jennifer Granger says parents need to encourage the masculine and honour the feminine in our sons

O

ur little boys are vulnerable but most parents are not aware that this is the case. The world is trending in favour of girls over boys in a number of ways. In the US, Canada and Australia, for instance, more girls than boys are graduating from high school and university every year. This means fewer young men are qualifying for well-paid jobs, jobs that would make them the breadwinners for their families. At the same time, let’s consider some other trends. More women than ever before are the sole breadwinners for their families. It is not uncommon for married women today to earn more than their partners compared to past decades. Clearly women are not as dependent on men as they once were.

A BRAVE, NEW WORLD So where does that leave our boys in this new and changed world? It means that, as parents of boys, we need to alter our approach. We need to recognise that girls are much more strident because their mothers are far more “masculineoriented” than ever before in recorded history.

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The newfound “maleness” of women today has affected their parenting style. How can mothers be so “male” you might ask? Well, it’s because as human beings, we all carry two energies within us: masculine and feminine. So a woman can choose to

“…girls are far more strident because their mothers are far more ‘masculine-oriented’ than ever before in recorded history” access more of her inner feminine or more of her inner masculine, depending on what needs to be done. When she is busy with a career, parenting, running a house and all the other little things, she is overworking her “masculine” side, the “doing” side. Unless she takes time for herself, to just sit and quietly reflect once in a while, or pamper herself, she can lose touch with her feminine side altogether. She will be out of balance internally, because it is the balance of our two internal energies that creates the people we are. >


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in my view

OPPOSITES ATTRACT

THE MAN OF THE FUTURE

Here’s another interesting fact. A busy, active woman whose masculine energy is dominant will attract a life partner who is internally the opposite of her: he will be far more feminineoriented than traditional males were years ago. Being opposite in internal gender causes attraction and fuels intimacy, however it also means that these new men – these fathers today – are not going to be as masculine as they might have been in previous generations. The odds are that if you are a masculine woman and you are raising both a son and a daughter, your daughter will probably carry more masculine energy. You are her role model. That leaves your son with the more feminine role within the two children. I know it sounds quite bizarre if you have not encountered this concept before, however you be the judge – observe your kids and watch who is displaying more masculine energy.

Remind your sons that they are men-in-training and men must protect themselves and those who are dear to them. Explain to them that men need to take initiative and take action. In that way, your son will have the makings of what we call the “sensitive man”. The “sensitive man” is balanced and strong, and he is the man of the future. He can be sensitive at times, but knows how and when to use his masculine energy to direct and

MASCULINE VS FEMININE ENERGY The traits of the masculine energy are more directional. Male-oriented individuals (boys or girls) take initiative and are far more active. Feminine traits, which appear in both boys and girls, are more internal, more receptive and tend towards “being” rather than “doing”. You also have to be aware that “feminineoriented” kids (boys or girls) are more often bullied, whether at school or even at home by their more “masculine-oriented” siblings. To correct this, kind little boys need to have their masculine aspect strengthened by their fathers and mothers. They should be encouraged to be active, and to develop useful hands-on skills and leadership skills. Boys need to understand how to use their masculine aspect and be proud of it. It’s OK, of course, for boys to explore their sensitive side, but they also need to be taught how to protect that “sensitivity” by accessing their strong, honorable “masculine” essence. They should never have to apologise for being male.

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“The ‘sensitive man’ is balanced and strong, and he is the man of the future” protect not only his own life, but also the lives of those who are in his care. Show your son how to be a man who can take back the self-respect that many men are losing. If your son is shown how to be a masculine person in the world, with all the responsibilities that this entails, then he will be able to help balance out a world that is currently becoming out of balance. He will be the author of his own life; not cowering while the women who are his peers beat him to the post. He will be wholeheartedly and equally in the race of life with just as good a chance as anyone of winning. That is how we want to raise our little boys in these times when success might appear to be stacked somewhat against them. * Jennifer Granger is a transformational coach from Melbourne, Vic, and the author of Feminine Lost: Why Most Women are Male (Weinstein Books, $19.99). In it she discusses the state of affairs between men and women today and explains how maintaining a healthy inner energetic balance improves your intimate relationships, your ability to parent and all aspects of your life. For more information visit femininelost.com.


FINALLY, A DIFFERENT WAY OF PARENTING!

in

If you feel uncomfortable with the traditional authoritarian parenting style then Raising Competent Children is a “must-have”. It is full of inspiration on how to raise competent children and how to develop relationships based on equal dignity, integrity and authenticity, and how to support your children developing self-responsibility – both personal and social. Raising Competent Children is easy to read and draws on examples from everyday life. The author, Jesper Juul, is the founder of FamilyLab and a renowned authority on the family. He has written a number of best-sellers and must-have books.

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J ESPER JUU L october 2014 | mychild

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FAMILY MATTERS

Should children have chores? This issue, FamilyLab family therapist Jesper Juul and Hayes van der Meer offer their perspective on getting kids to help out around the home

S

ome parents accept the unstructured and spontaneous life that children bring, while others wish to structure things and give children chores. If you belong to the latter category and everything works well without any conflict or the need for you to use your power, then there is no need for any changes. If the chores cause uncomfortable friction and arguments, it’s a good idea to ask yourself whether it is a child you want or a helper. When we talk about children and chores, we need to consider these things, as simply talking about these questions may solve the problems with chores: • For whose sake do the children have chores – for them or for you? • Are we talking about chores or tasks? • Can anyone thrive as part of a community when they only receive?

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Many parents feel it is important for their children to have chores at home. They say, ‘It is good for the children!’ However, there is no evidence that this is true when we look at the development of young children. In fact, on the contrary. We know it is much better for their development to play as much as possible. Play promotes later learning ability and equips kids to better cope with life’s challenges. The fact that children need opportunities to play does not mean they should not contribute at home as well. However, it is our experience that the fewer chores or responsibilities kids have, the more helpful they become…! If you believe it is important that your children have certain chores, you need to look at how much friction and how many arguments follow and then ask yourself, ‘Is it really worth it?’ It may be a good idea to reconsider your approach. >


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family matters

‘We made a deal!’ Many conflicts happen simply because parents forget to consider the children’s developmental stages and their capabilities. We often forget that young children do not have a particularly well-developed future perspective. When kids say ‘Yes!’ to tidying their room three times a week, they won’t take into consideration that this is a long-term commitment. Children’s willingness to co-operate and their lack of future perspective will collide. Parents see an annual calendar where life is divided into terms, months, weeks and hours. Children only see the “right here and right now”. When kids refuse to do their chores, parents often say: ‘We had a deal and you were part of making that deal!’ However, this “deal” was not made between equal partners. If you believe chores are important, you must be prepared to review these “deals” frequently – probably once a month.

‘Can I help you?’ If a parent becomes a single parent, they will frequently find that the problems surrounding children’s helpfulness very quickly changes. They will become helpful simply because it is more meaningful to help when the adult has a real need for help. If Grandpa says: ‘When I was young, there was no discussion, we just did what we were asked!’ he is right. Back then there was a real need for everyone’s help with the household chores. This is not often the case today. Kids will certainly meet their parents’ need for help but they hold a healthy sense of scepticism for things that are meant to be “good for children”.

‘Don’t you understand...?’ Early on, it’s a good idea to define the situation something like this: ‘We are four crew members on this ship. The ship needs four people to sail and we are not willing to accept stowaways. So we must all help out.’ Children must know exactly what is expected

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of them. And this requires that their parents know exactly how to take on a leadership role. Perhaps you have said something like this: ‘It’s not good enough! I’m really tired and all you want to do is to watch TV. Can’t you help out with the simplest things?’ In that case you will need to define the chores more accurately. Children might say: ‘Why is it always me?’ or ‘I also did it yesterday!’ or ‘Why do I have to do everything?’ It’s a good idea to go through your expectations as clearly as possible. You might write up a list covering the things that he or she needs to take care of. Your child must be able to have some impact on the list but this does not mean the chores are simply distributed according to what they feel like doing. If you treat them with equal dignity they will understand this. They are smart enough to try to avoid the chores they do not like: ‘I want you to set the table twice a week.’ ‘I don’t want to!’ ‘Is there anything else you’d rather do?’ ‘Nope!’ In this situation you could say: ‘Right, if you find a similar chore you prefer to swap with, let me know. Until then, you set the table!’ It is important to be clear and personal, and to avoid moralising criticism.

Helpfulness of a different kind If the question of chores has not come up yet you could try this: do not make your children do chores at all. Within a few years (or perhaps just months) you will be amply rewarded in the form of helpfulness, which is significantly more energetic and constructive than if your children were forced to do their chores. If you have already had friction about chores, duties and tasks, there is only one effective cure: sit down with the children and say: ‘For some time we thought it was good for you and good for our family that you had chores. But we have learned that it doesn’t make anyone happy – it leads to more conflicts. So you need


to know that we were wrong. As of today, you don’t have to do any chores. Not because we do not want you to help but we’ve realised it’s better if this happens when you are ready for it. Now you will hear them cheer: ‘Fantastic!’ Then comes the real test for you. In the next few months they will, in response to having been forced to do chores, stop helping. If you can survive for a little while without criticising them or each other, they will slowly begin to help again. However, this time it will be on their initiative and completely different.

Chores & pocket money Parents often link chores with pocket money. They do this because they think their children must learn to earn the money – work for their money. Another view is that kids are entitled to pocket money simply because they’re kids (and have pockets!) The amount must obviously suit the family’s financial situation. Sometimes parents feel pressured into giving more pocket money than they are financially able to. Then they might say: ‘All right then, but now I also expect that you help out at home.’ This is a juxtaposition of two very different phenomena: business and family life. If you would like your children to perform contract work, you could do the following: give them a certain amount of pocket money and then allow them to earn extra money for doing various extra chores, which you define. This provides clarity for your children and for you. The scheme relieves the children of the sense of guilt they feel when everything is provided for. The scope of their chores will be clearly defined and you will also avoid the otherwise inevitable conflicts related to the concept of “helping” at home. * The FamilyLab book Raising Competent Children (Rockpool, $24.99) is available in most baby shops and bookstores. To read 10 pages for free see familylab.com.au.

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MUMMY BLOGGERS

Reality check Reading blogs is a great way to discover what other mothers’ lives are really like. Each month we feature mummy blogs of all kinds so read on to find your favourites to follow. Hannah Saunders reports renovations and experiences like holiday trips. So I figured I’d document them too so I have one source for all that information to share with those who want to know.

GEN-Y MUM

With two children, three-year-old Eli and ninemonth-old Kai, Sydney-based Camielle Honrade at gen-y-mum.blogspot.com has been with her husband, Ian, for six years.

Tell us about your blog I used to have a secret blog in my teens where I journalised my feelings and experiences. Later I stopped because after I met my best friend, I didn’t feel the need to document my feelings secretly anymore. I now had someone to share and express those thoughts with. However, once I became a mum, I faced new challenges, and even though I talked about them with my husband I still felt he didn’t quite get it. I’ve always been better at expressing myself when I write things down, so I started stringing my feelings and thoughts onto a new blog. Then a few more friends had kids and so I started sharing my blog with friends to reassure them that they’re not alone. Next, people asked me about other aspects of my family life like home

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How do you find the time? Ideas come to me all the time. I’m inspired when I interact with my kids, chat with friends and watch the news! But finding the time to complete the post is the trouble with two kids. Like most mums, I wait until they’re asleep and some chores are completed. Then I can write uninterrupted and in peace and quiet.

What do you love about blogging? Reading other blogs. I enjoy personal blogs and reading about a moment in the writer’s life or what’s making them tick right now. I like reading blogs that inform and educate. I find blogging to be entertaining, encouraging and informative.

Any advice for beginners? Write about things you’re passionate about and the content and followers will come.

Which is your favourite post? What to expect when you’re expecting… another.


What do you love about blogging?

MOTHER DOWN UNDER

Originally from New York City in the US, where she met and fell in love with an Aussie, Caitlin Dyer has been calling Brisbane home for the past seven years. She and her husband Richard have one little boy, three-year-old Charlie, and Caitlin is pregnant with number two. Her blog is motherdownunder.com.

Tell us about your blog I started my blog as a way of keeping in touch with my family and friends back home, letting them know what I was up to. However, when I had my son, I found myself blogging less and less about me and more and more about my experiences of being a mother… my thoughts and emotions. As my son has grown, the focus of my blog has changed again. It used to be about sleep, constantly questioning whether I would ever sleep again, how to survive teething, and babyled weaning. Now it is more about finding my way back to me as a person and not just as a mother – although I think with the arrival of number two, I’ll likely be blogging about not sleeping once again!

How do you find the time? I used to blog when my little guy was napping. Now that a midday nap is a thing of the past, it’s much more difficult to find time. Blogging is such an important outlet for me though that I always manage it! I’m constantly writing in my head so I find that when I do have a few moments to sit down in front of the computer, all those thoughts come pouring out in the form of a blog post.

The community. I have met so many lovely women through blogging and I’ve been able to meet many of these in real life. Some are now dear friends. I also love that I am documenting my feelings about motherhood; both the joyous moments and the more nitty gritty aspects of raising a child. And, of course, I hope my son one day looks back at it as an amazing record of his life – the most detailed baby book ever!

Any advice for beginners? Just start! I had no idea what I was doing when I began… and I cringe when I read through old posts. But I’m so glad I did. It can be a steep learning curve and it can be overwhelming but overall I love it and don’t think I will ever stop.

Which is your favourite post? The beginning of this year was full of selfrediscovery. My son was two-and-a-half and not needing me in the way he had previously. I spent a lot of time thinking about myself as a mother and as a person, and decided there were a few simple aspects of my life that, if changed, could lead to a big improvement in my wellbeing, and so the Little Things, Big Changes series was born. Of those posts, Wearing a watch is my favourite.

MUMMA TELLS

Rebecca McGregor calls herself a kid wrangler to one illogical two-and-a-half-year-old and a delightfully edible six-month-old. She lives in Melbourne with her husband and you can read her blog at mummatells.blogspot.com.

Tell us about your blog Through Mumma Tells, I aim to be a truthful and relatable voice of motherhood, offering >

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mummy bloggers a glimmer of hope to recovering perfectionists and other glass-half-full-in-training recruits, sharing my tales of tears and triumphs from the Mumma Front Line. What’s different? These tales are mine – a reflection of this mothering caper through my eyes and from my heart. While commonality through theme binds the mummy genre, the perspective divides us. This perspective, this journey, this collection… it’s uniquely my own.

How did you first get into blogging? What once was a life filled with marking essays and debating current events is now one of scrubbing coloured pen off walls and debating the existence of fairies in rose gardens. And while I wouldn’t have it any other way, a love of words runs deep within my veins. Moments happen and memories pass, all too quickly. There is so much magic in the everyday just waiting to be captured, be that through words or images. Becoming a mum has been by far my greatest, most fulfilling accomplishment. To document these days and the childhoods of my kids is to appreciate the extraordinary in the ordinary and serves as a gift. It was this that called me to begin and fuels me to continue.

living began. Beyond this, I have found myself immersed in an inspiring community. One I did not know existed. There I have found a sense of connection. A knowing nod. A hand of support. Motherhood, particularly for those who stay at home, can be quite an isolating experience, and blogging has opened the door to a village of people behind and around me.

Any advice for beginners? Just do it. But begin with clarity. I love this advice from Christine Kane: Clarity doesn’t always mean you know exactly what you’re doing. It does mean you know exactly who you are being and why. Write with clarity. Write with heart. And immerse yourself in the blogosphere.

Which is your favourite post? Reflecting on the moment our family of three became four and the impact of that on our toddler and our family dynamic. It’s a tale that’s close to my heart: Sharing love.

How do you find the time? Writing is my “me-time”. I use words to reflect. To unwind. As a release. And while I hit the publish button on a new piece between two and four times a week, I carve out time every single day to write. If I am blessed to have two little people who nap at the same time, I’ll use some of those precious silent minutes to write. If not, I’ll steal a moment at the end of the day, after the girls are tucked in for the night, to clear my head. And I’m a better mumma for investing this time in myself.

honey, you baked!

Based in quiet semi-rural bliss just north of Hobart, Mel Boerma is one half of the blogging duo at honeyyoubaked.com. She has two children – Miss E, five, and three-year-old Master O – and says she’s what seems like half a country away from her blogging partner, Danni, who lives on Sydney’s Northern Beaches.

What do you love about blogging?

Tell us about your blog

On a surface level, I love that it enables me to encapsulate the present moment… a legacy for my kids of the time before their conscious

Danni and I used to work together in Sydney, where we kept our workmates fuelled with baked goodies and the occasional office lunch

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ergobaby ergobaby

TM

spread. Now parents to young children, we still love sharing food but it’s also about organising and simplifying your life to make parenting easier. We have a very yin/yang relationship. Danni is super organised (the quintessential Super Mum – you’ll love her printables) and I’m more of a fly-off-the-seatof-your-pants, last-minute kind of girl, so there is something for everyone.

NEW

3D-Mesh Ventus

How did you first get into blogging? We decided to blog together after I moved back to Tasmania from Sydney. We wanted a way to keep in touch with each other, to motivate ourselves to stay creative in the kitchen – even when we couldn’t hit the food markets together – and to share the ups and downs of parenting our kids (and husbands)!

How do you find the time? Stolen moments such as in the school carpark before pick-up while Master O is napping in his car seat. You’ll also often find me writing posts at around 3am when I’ve been woken by one of the kids and can’t get back to sleep!

What do you love about blogging? The community. I’m pretty sure we’ve all had those days where we don’t want to head out the door and face the world. I love that we can share experiences and that this could help someone. Being a mother can be isolating at times but the internet (and blogs) can provide connections no matter where someone is.

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Any advice for beginners? Be true to yourself. Write regularly. We’ve found it easier to have set days that we post– Monday/Wednesday/Friday – that deadline is a good motivator. The best thing about sharing your blog with a friend is it halves the workload!

Which is your favourite post? It has to be Get organised for 2014 with our printable family calendar. *

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FASHIOn

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keep it calm seek serenity by balancing baby, slate and royal blues with soft beiges and whites

THIS PAGE from left: Tee $29.95 & Jeans $54.95 in sizes 000-3 GROWSUIT $34.95 in sizes 0000-1 all by Purebaby purebaby.com.au

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fashion

1

3 2

5

6

4

9 8

7

1| SHORTS $49.95 2-14 by Havoc Denim

2| SANDALs $64.95 28-35 by Walnut Melbourne

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2-10 by Coco & Ginger cocoandginger.com

4| tEE $39.95 6M-5 by Eeni Meeni Miini Moh

5| PLAYSUIT $54 0-12M by Alex & Ant

6| SKIRT $64.95 6M-10 by Minti

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7| SUNHAT $26.95 XXS-M by Bebe

8| shoes $23.99 1-13 by Pumpkin Patch

9| CHINO shorts $34.95 3M-24M by Bebe

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3| DRESS $77


Summer 2014

AVAILABLE AT

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& LEADING BOUTIQUES NATIONALLY

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FASHIOn

gone troppo! get the kids set for a summer of fun with hot hues and striking patterns

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THIS PAGE from left: playsuit $40.77 in sizes 2-10 Dress $52.85 in sizes 2-8 both by Isossy isossychildren.com

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fashion

2 3

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5

4

6

9

7 8

1| SKIRT $24.95 1-8 by Maxomorra

2| TEE $32.95 2-10 by Fox & Finch

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1.5-12 by Boden bodenclothing.com.au

4| SHORTS $39.95 2-7 by Petit Lem

5| DRESS $110 2-10 by Coco & Ginger

6| sUNGLASSES $14.95 by Hootkid

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7| SHIRT $39 12M-2 by Eternal Creation

8| sANDALS $49.95 24-35 by Skeanie

9| Denim shorts $49.95 2-14 by Havoc Denim

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3| PINAFORE DRESS $48


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INTERIORS REPORT

Dream on! create an illusion of magic and whimsy by mixing eccentric patterns and soft pastels in your little one’s NURSERY

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Inspiring life

“A beautiful appearance and great functionality are the essence of objects used every day. Aesthetic design radiates quality of life, appealing to our senses and acting as a source of pleasure day after day� - Stig Leander, founder & designer

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interiors | report

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GET TH LOOK 1

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WORD CHAIN $40

by La De Dah Kids laded

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chevron rug from $

by Rug Republic zanui.co

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bunting $46

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clown crochet toy

by Jole Home jolehome.c

print $30

by Sarah Tamblyn Desig sarahtamblyndesigns.co

cushion $27.95

by Kaleidoscope kaleido

BED & canopy $209 by Ikea ikea.com.au

STOOL $99

by The Family Love Tree

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12 PREVIOUS PAGE: nursery furniture FROM $45 by Littlephant littlepiestreet.com.au

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wall organiser $3

by 3 Sprouts coolkidz

cloud rug $495 by Homely Creatures

pillowcase $14.95 &

by Cotton On Kids cot

dresser $1,995

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Interiors MY SPACE

Pastels, please! mum of two and interior designer belinda kurtz loved creating homemade pieces with her daughter, holly, for her vintage-inspired bedroom 78

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interiors | my space

• Shelving for Holly’s treasures

W

hen Belinda Kurtz, owner of interior design company Petite Vintage Interiors, went to design her fouryear-old daughter Holly’s bedroom, she knew it had to reflect her fun and bright personality. ‘Holly’s room is a truly joyous space,’ explains Belinda. ‘It’s filled with items she loves and projects that we worked on together.’

• We bought a great-quality Incy Interiors bed

next to go up. I chose a bed that was neutral and would last Holly into her teens. From there, I completed DIY projects when time permitted, finishing off with my braided rug project, which was so time-consuming but worth it!

what about BUDGETS & TIMING?

TELL US ABOUT THE COLOUR SCHEME

what are the key elements?

The walls were already painted this taupe/grey colour when we moved in, and I really disliked it! Funnily enough, once we added decals, the wall became an amazing feature and one of the most asked-about elements! I am naturally drawn to pastels and loved the colours in the Uimi blanket on the bed. I couldn’t be happier about how it all came together.

The elements I love most of all in the room are the paper chandelier that Holly and I made together, obviously the painted cane furniture pieces, and the cushions that I had custom-made for the space. I chose these pieces because they added interest to the room as well as colour and texture.

what steps did you take?

My design rule for children’s rooms is pretty simple: there are no rules! It has to be fun and your little one has to enjoy it.* Find out more at petitevintageinteriors.com.au.

what WAS YOUR INSPIRATION?

We started by placing the decals on the walls. I knew I wanted book storage and shelving for Holly to display her treasures so they were the

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do you have a design mantra?

PHOTOGRAPHY vellum studios

Holly’s room was directly inspired by my love of finding and re-finishing vintage furniture. I discovered the little peacock chair on eBay and the side tables on Gumtree, and painted them with regular spray-paint. From there, the rest of the room unfolded to suit those pieces.

My budget was small but what I saved on DIY projects, I spent on things I really adored. The Uimi blanket was a complete splurge and we bought a great-quality Incy Interiors bed. Holly’s doll’s house was a Christmas gift. On and off, the room took about six months to complete. This included waiting for just the right vintage finds and completing all of the DIY projects around other commitments.


• Holly’s room is a truly joyous space… filled with items she loves and projects that we worked on together

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interiors | my space

• The paper chandelier that Holly and I made together‌

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www.littlebonbon.com.au

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PARTY

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Foxy lady When Wren Wilson turned one, her mother Kate went wild with a fox-inspired birthday party

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party

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• Zucchini cake with cream-cheese icing

B

efore baby-shoe designer Kate Wilson from PaperKrane had her daughter, Wren – she didn’t know whether she was having a boy or girl – she says, ‘I found a cool picture on Etsy of a sleeping fox by the artist Hanna Karlzon. This one image inspired Wren’s nursery and then her first birthday.’  Held during the winter months, the party’s colour scheme matched that of Wren’s “foxy” nursery: orange, black and white. ‘Orange isn’t my favourite colour,’ explains Kate, ‘but it’s growing on me!’ Here’s how Kate pulled the party together.

How did you organise the party? Using Pinterest! At first I thought I could do all the decorations by myself… but once I realised that wasn’t possible I contacted a few creative mothers with small businesses that I had met through my own Facebook business page. One of the mothers in our group is really interested in baking, so I talked with her about some ideas for a cake, cookies and other sweet treats for food for the party. I knew I didn’t want to be behind the camera all day so I also asked Katie Cook Photography to come and take pictures of everything and everyone. That’s really the biggest thing, I guess,

and we now have some beautiful shots of the day, but we got to enjoy ourselves as well.

How much time did it take to pull together?  I made sure to get the decorations in the works about a month before, so a few hours were spent going back and forth via email. I had a lot of work on with my business in the two weeks leading up to the party, so that left me with only two frantic days beforehand to have time to pick up the decorations, shop for all the ingredients and make the food. Luckily my parents arrived the day before so my mother was able to help cook a few things. It wasn’t as well organised as I had hoped it would be but it came together in the end! 

What was your budget? All up around 30 adults, children and babies attended but I didn’t want to go overboard… my budget was to not spend more than $1,000 on everything. This might sound like a lot, but when you factor in food and drinks for that many people, paying others to make and do things for you, the cost of the helium balloons and making up all the favour bags… it does start to add up! >

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party

• Some of the Pinterest-inspired decorations

Tell us about the key elements My big thing was that I wanted to have a nice party table to hold the cake and a few other sweet things. I knew I was going to go with the foxy theme so I browsed Pinterest and found a few tutorials that explained how to do things  I liked the look of for decorations. For the hanging backdrop I contacted Lauren at Boo & Bear Designs. She works with paper and was able to bring my vision to life. We had some cool hanging geometric gems over the table and they were made one “crafternoon” with some of my mothers’ group.  I bought 3m of black-and-white striped fabric from Spotlight, hemmed one side and made the tablecloth. I had ordered some of my Instagram photos from a Sydney business called Origrami, and put together a photo board of Wren’s first year of life. As busy as it all sounds, I just wanted to create a fun and vibrant space for the party and have as many handmade elements as I could. My friend Nicky made a great job of the foxy cake, cookies and some cupcakes. I wanted these to be semi-healthy so the cake was zucchini cake with cream-cheese icing and the cupcakes were banana muffins.  In the living room we popped up a playpen

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• Homemade fox-shaped cookies

and filled it with the balloons. Above that we had a number of helium balloons in various shades of orange. The babies had fun and the mothers had a break! I made a special pair of foxy shoes for Wren and another Facebook business (BrayK Designs) made the geometric fox for her party shirt. 

Describe Wren’s reaction The best reaction we had was when Wren woke up that morning and her dad and I had spent the night before blowing up a bunch of balloons. They covered the living room floor and when she crawled in, her eyes grew wide, and she just full-speed-ahead crawled from one side of the room to the other, bumping balloons left and right out of her way! It was awesome to see. She loved the hanging decorations as well and was captivated by her candle (which was a sparkler formed in the shape of a number one) while we sang Happy Birthday to her. 

What’s next? Ha ha… don’t tell my husband but I have a few ideas for Wren’s second birthday already! * Visit paperkrane.com.au to see Kate’s shoe designs. Photography by Katie Cook Photography.


“I just wanted to create a fun and vibrant space for the party and have as many handmade elements as I could”

KATE’s PARTY TIP

Don’t stress about it; get somebody else to make the cake or to help with the food. The guests are (hopefully) not coming to judge you on your decorating skills. They are there to celebrate the occasion. Enjoy the day and, if you can, organise for someone else there to take pictures for you. 

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COOKING

Play ball This “spaghetti” and meatballS recipe from Stacey Deutscher at A Healthy Mum is a kiddie favourite with a super healthy twist. Enjoy!

ZUCCHINI PASTA & MEATBALLS PREP TIME 15 minutes

COOKING TIME 15 minutes

INGREDIENTS 3 large thick sausages, ideally pasture-fed and organic 500g washed zucchini ½ cup tomato passata 1 green spring onion, roughly chopped 1 large stem fresh basil, roughly chopped 1 tbsp balsamic vinegar 1 carrot, grated 1 celery stalk, roughly chopped 3 large kale leaves, finely diced salt and pepper, to taste Parmesan cheese, grated METHOD • Heat a large non-stick frypan over medium heat. Remove the sausage meat from the casings and roll into meatballs, a little smaller than a golf-ball size. Add to the pan and allow

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SERVES 4

to brown by turning every now and then. This should take a few minutes. • Meanwhile, grate the zucchini into “pasta” ribbons until you hit the seeds and then leave both the ribbons and the zucchini seed sticks to the side. • In a blender, combine the passata, spring onion, basil, balsamic vinegar and 1 of the zucchini seed sticks you left to the side, until it’s puréed. • Add the sauce along with the carrot, celery and kale to the meatballs, and allow to cook until the sauce thickens. You may want to add some salt and pepper at this point. • Very lightly warm the zucchini pasta in a separate pan then plate with the meatballs. TO SERVE • Sprinkle with grated Parmesan.


NUTRITIONAL TIP

Shredded zucchinis are a great low-carbohydrate, glutenfree alternative to wheat pasta when looking for something to serve with meatballs. They’re low in calories, high in water and contain more potassium than a banana.

BABY VERSION

Steam the remaining zucchini seed sticks and once soft purĂŠe with 1 meatball and a little of the sauce mixture.

TODDLER VERSION

Cut the zucchini ribbons and meatballs into manageable size chunks for serving.

Stacey is a mum of one who is dedicated to developing and sharing healthy and easy-to-make recipes that the whole family can enjoy. She is currently studying to be a health coach with a major emphasis on nutrition for mothers and children. To find out more go to ahealthymum.com, email stace@ahealthymum.com or head to facebook.com/ahealthymumpage.

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COOKING

Cool stuff! Now SUMMER is ALMOST here, try these mouth-watering ice-cream recipes from Lawrence Harris at Harry’s Ice Cream Co. They’re great to make with kids too!

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EQUIPMENT REQUIRED

BASE ICE-CREAM RECIPE

Double saucepan Temperature gauge Ice-cream maker

COOK & PREP TIME Depends on your ice-cream maker

INGREDIENTS 300ml pure cream (at least 35% butter fat) 300ml full-cream milk 175g sugar 3 medium egg yolks chilled mix-ins such as nuts or butter biscuit (pieces no larger than a 10-cent piece)

NOTES

• If you’re adding a very sweet mix-in such as white chocolate or rosewater, consider reducing the amount of sugar that you use in the base mix to ensure the end product isn’t overly sweet. • If you prefer a more custard-like ice-cream, add two extra egg yolks. • Mix-in quantities are dependent on taste and personal preference – more or less may be added of each element as long as the total doesn’t surpass 40-50g. • Mix-ins such as tart, biscuits and torte can be shop bought for ease.

MAKES 1 Litre

METHOD • In a double saucepan on a low- to mediumheat, add the cream and milk and heat to 40°C, checking with your temperature gauge. • Add the sugar and eggs. Whisk continuously until the temperature reaches 80°C. Remove from the heat and put the bottom of the pan in a bowl of ice water to prevent the mixture heating further. • Let the mix cool to room temperature and then refrigerate to 4°C. • When you’re ready to make your ice-cream, remove the freezer bowl from the freezer and assemble your machine. Turn the machine on first then pour in the mixture. • The ice-cream will take 15 to 30 minutes to thicken (depending on the machine). You can add your choice of mix-ins after 12 to 15 minutes, when the ice-cream is just starting to solidify. Once churned, it should hold its shape when scooped with a spoon. • Transfer the mix to a freezer-safe container immediately and then place in the freezer. Freeze to your desired consistency or until ready to serve. >

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cooking

FABULOUS FLAVOUR IDEAS HONEY, PISTACHIO & ROSEWATER Add 40g ground pistachios, 1 tsp rosewater and a drizzle of honey to the ice-cream base prior to churning.

LIME & GINGER CHEESECAKE Add 1 tsp lime juice, some lime zest, a little ginger powder and 40g crushed biscuit of your choice to the ice-cream base before churning. The ginger would be best suited as a powder but fresh crushed ginger can also be used. Butter biscuit pieces will help to create the cheesecake taste.

ROASTED HONEY- & MAPLEGLAZED GRILLED NECTARINE Coat 40g nectarines with honey and an ample amount of maple syrup. It is important that the nectarines have a sufficient coating as this acts as a protective layer to help to make sure that moisture doesn’t migrate from the base mix into the nectarines. Doing so may, over time, break down the nectarines or they can become quite moist. Grill until the nectarines are heated through, turning occasionally for about 4-5 minutes. Add to the ice-cream base before churning.

JASMINE, PEAR, APPLE & CINNAMON For a smooth-textured ice-cream, peel and place 20g apples and 20g pears in a pan and lightly cover with water. Simmer (but don’t boil) the fruit until it is tender but not too soft. Drain and then add to the ice-cream base. As simmering the apples and pears will cause them to release juices, reduce the milk to 250g (instead of 300g) to ensure the ice-cream consistency is just right.

APPLE & ALMOND TORTE Peel and place 15g apples in a pan and lightly cover with water. Simmer (but don’t boil) the apples until they are tender but not too soft. Drain the apples and then add 10g chopped or blended almonds and 15g buttery torte pieces to the ice-cream base before churning. The quantity of the apple and almonds can vary as long as they equate to 40g total.

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LAWRENCE’S TOP 10 TIPS Here’s how to make the best home-made ice-cream!

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Keep it simple Use a maximum of three additions. My best rule of thumb when it comes to creating flavour combinations, is not to overcomplicate it. You want to be able to taste each flavour. watch the sugar If you’re adding a very sweet mix-in such as honeycomb or white chocolate, consider reducing how much sugar you use in the base mix. While ice-cream should be sweet, you don’t want it to be sickly and it’s easy to underestimate the impact mix-ins can have. Also too much sugar lowers the freezing point.

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USE SMALL PIECES Mix-in ingredients and flavours should be no larger than a 10-cent piece. The ice-cream should be the hero and the mix-ins the accompaniment. If the additions are too large, the ice-cream flavour takes the backseat.

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be careful with flavours Ensure that all the flavours complement each other. I’m really open minded about alternative flavour combinations, and while weird and wacky flavours are very on-trend, you want each flavour to complement the others, not compete. Match flavours that have a natural affinity to each other or reflect an existing dessert that works well.

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FREEZE THE BOWL BEFOREHAND It is important to freeze the mixing bowl for 24 hours prior to starting because domestic icecream makers won’t work properly if it isn’t completely frozen. Be prepared and put the bowl in the freezer the day before.

PREVENT ICYNESS When you’re ready to freeze your ice-cream, cover the surface with plastic wrap or wax paper before closing the container. There’s nothing I hate more than icy ice-cream. The layer of wrap helps prevent ice crystals forming on the surface. EAT IT SOON Home-made ice-cream only keeps well for up to a week, after which it will lose its flavour and change texture, so eat it quickly; you can always make more and experiment with different flavour combos!

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KEEP IT FRESH & HIGH QUALITY Use only the freshest and highest quality ingredients available to you. You can really taste the difference of cream quality when eating home-made ice-cream. Use a pure cream with at least 35 percent butter fat content and make sure the eggs are fresh.

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avoid OVERDOing IT Don’t fill your icecream maker more than three-quarters full. It might look a little empty but if you fill the bowl up to the top, the ice-cream won't aerate properly and it will end up sloppy.

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MAKE IT EASY TO SCOOP Freeze the ice-cream in a rectangular container or pan to make it easy to scoop. If you’re after that perfect scoop, you’ll need room to drag the ice-cream scoop from back to front. * Head to harrysicecream.com to find out about local stockists for fabulous flavours such as Raspberry Cheesecake with Butter Biscuit Pieces, Sticky Date Pudding with Toffee Ripple & Fudge Pieces, Pavlova with Crushed Meringue & Passionfruit Swirl, and Lamington with Chocolate, Strawberry & Coconut!

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my child promotion

SUBSCRIBE FO

For your chance to win one VALUED AT $160 each

Receive My Child magazine direct to your inbox every month! Our digital format allows you to interact with informative articles, scroll through for great shopping and fashion trends, read and share inspiring stories, party ideas and more – all with just the click of a button. Better still, by signing up to our free digital magazine you have the chance to win one of six The Gro Company packs valued at $160 each! The prize pack includes newborn sleep essentials such as the original Grobag, new Grohush and Grolight. The Grobag is an easy-to-use and safer

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alternative to loose bedding and provides both parents and baby quality and comfortable sleep, while the Grohush safely delivers soothing white noise directly to your baby at a safe 75 decibel level. In addition, transforming from a normal light into a nightlight, the Grolight provides a comforting glow for young children and the perfect amount of light for checking on your baby – without waking them up. To view the range head to au.gro-store.com or check out their facebook page at facebook.com/ TheGroCompanyAUS.


OR FREE!

e of six The Gro Company packs

CLICK HERE to SIGN UP • ENJOY Australia’s best parenting mag • SHARE with family & friends • DELIVERY straight to your inbox • NEVER miss out on a great read!

Terms & conditions Prizes will be sent by post approximately six weeks after this offer closes on 24 October 2014. In the instance where a prize company forecloses or is unable to fulfil a prize commitment, My Child will not be held liable for reimbursements in the form of cash or subsidiary prizes. These circumstances fall outside the bounds of My Child’s responsibility as the giveaway promoter. If your details are not provided for prize fulfilment within five working days of notification of win, your prize will be forfeited.

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MY CHILD PROMOTION

Register now!

~ 2015 ~ Excellence Awards 2012

Calling all businesses! Register now to be in the running for our Excellence Awards 2015

EXCELLENCE AWARDS

We are excited to announce that we are calling for entries for our My Child Excellence Awards 2015. Now in their fourth year, these reader-voted awards recognise marketleading products, fashion labels and stores in the pregnancy, baby and children’s categories. Celebrating Australian and New Zealand businesses, they offer a fantastic opportunity for companies – no matter whether big brands or small businesses – to showcase their achievements. VOTING Readers will be offered the opportunity to vote on the entries by way of a “New Baby Shopping Guide” that will run in the March 2015 issue of My Child. The shopping guide will also be promoted via the My Child site, newsletters and social media pages.

ELIGIBILITY For companies to be eligible to enter, their products must be available in Australia and/ or New Zealand at September 23 2014 and for the duration of the Awards. Please note that only manufacturers and distributors may register products – not retailers.

WINNERS Gold, Silver and Bronze winners for each category, along with the overall winner, will be decided by the highest number of votes and will be announced in My Child’s June 2015 issue. Winners will also receive an awards badge and the right to display this on their marketing material.

INFORMATION PACK Prior to registration, it is essential that you read the My Child Excellence Awards 2015 Information Pack. This includes information on categories and eligibility along with full terms and conditions. It can be downloaded via the My Child Excellence Awards banner on the home page at mychildmagazine.com.au.

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Categories OUT & ABOUT Favourite Pram Favourite Stroller Favourite Baby Carrier Favourite Portable Chair/Booster Seat Favourite Baby Travel Product Favourite Baby Travel Cot Favourite Children’s Travel Product NURSERY Favourite Cot Favourite Change Table Favourite Nursery Decor Product BREASTFEEDING Favourite Breast Pump Favourite Breastfeeding Product FEEDING Favourite Highchair Favourite Baby Bottle Favourite Baby Feeding Product Favourite Baby Feeding Utensil Favourite Baby Cup Favourite Baby Food Storage Product BABY CARE Favourite Teething Product Favourite Baby Haircare Product Favourite Baby Skincare Product Favourite Baby Bath Wash

Favourite Baby Bath Product Favourite Baby Wipes Favourite Nappy Brand Favourite Nappy Rash Product Favourite Toilet-Training Product Favourite Baby Safety Product Favourite Health Product Favourite Baby Thermometer Favourite Baby Care Product SLEEP Favourite Swaddle/Wrap Favourite Sleeping Bag Favourite Baby Sleep Aid MUMS Favourite Nappy Bag Favourite Mum’s Product TOYS Favourite Baby Toy (0-18 months) Favourite Children’s Toy (18-36 months) Favourite Educational Product FASHION Favourite Baby Fashion Label Favourite Children’s Fashion Label ONLINE STORES Favourite Mixed-brands Online Store Favourite Own-brand Online Store Favourite Fashion Online Store

TO ENTER Entries must be registered by means of the online entry form available on the My Child site at mychildmagazine.com.au. Simply click on the My Child Excellence Awards banner on the home page and then follow the instructions. Registration costs $40 for each individual entry and must be paid by credit card or Paypal at registration. Registration closes at midnight AEST on Friday December 19 2014.

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MY CHILD PROMOTION

WHAT’S IN STORE

Make your mark

His & hers

Add a splash of colour with decorations from Stuck On You. This Height Chart, $49.95, is made from quality artist’s canvas and is a great way to track your child’s growth. You can also personalise their space with the easy-to-remove Wall Art, $19.95, which is suitable for walls, doors and windows. Check out their full range of labels, gifts and homewares at stuckonyou.com.au.

Feed in style with the Baby Rose and Blue collection by NUK. The 150ml bottles include an orthodontic silicone teat, $9.95, while the 150ml training bottles, $13.95, feature a spill-proof silicone spout for bubs learning to drink independently. Also available in the collection is the silicone soother, $10.95, and soother chain, $6.25. NUK has been designing safe baby products since 1956. See nuk. com.au to learn more.

On the lookout

Nibble & dribble

Keep a close eye on your baby from any room in the house with the VTech BM3500 Safe and Sound baby monitor, $189, which includes pan and tilt video and audio. You can hear every sound your baby makes and watch every step they take from up to 300m away. Rest easy knowing that your bub is sleeping safe and sound without having to disturb them. Head to vtech.com/au/tel and check out their range of video and audio monitors.

Make teething a messfree experience with the Neckerchew’s Chewy Dribble Bib, $19.99, a fully reversible and absorbent bib. The Neckerchew combines the dribble bib with an attached chewy teether designed to sooth sore gums. Made from soft jersey cotton with an absorbent middle layer to lock moisture away from the chest, it comes in 12 patterns including Dino Friends, Uni-Stripe and Flutterby. See littlem.com.au.

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Get organised

Nailed it!

Made with polyester and polyethylene filling, 3 Sprouts’ Stroller Organiser is wipeable and contains two insulated drink holders – ideal for a sippy cup or bottle. It also has a back pocket with a velcro closure and features a collapsible design so it does not interfere when you go to fold your stroller down. It is priced at $29.95 at coolkidz.net.au.

Petit’s uniquely safe Snails nail polishes are made without harmful chemicals so parents can have peace of mind when their little girls glam up their nails. They’re completely water based, so to remove the polish, all your daughter will need to do is rinse it off with soap and water – no harsh nail polish remover required. This also means that you no longer have to worry about the polishes ruining clothes, carpets and floors as they are entirely soluble. Priced at $14.95 each, see petit. com.au for more details.

Sun safe

flower power

Finally a pair of sunglasses to suit babies and toddlers! Roshambo Baby’s range of shades, $32.50 each, block UVA/B rays and are made in Italy from flexible but durable plastic. They are BPA-free and designed to withstand the rough and tumble play of little tots. Head to petit.com.au.

La De Dah Kids create sweet crocheted toys for little ones and items for the home, such as this cute pink Flower Rug, $230. It can be used as a floor mat, or over the end of a single or double bed as a decorative piece. The rug is made from cotton, measures 120cm wide and comes in green and pink, blue and green or pink and peach. Check out ladedahkids.com.au.

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what’s in store

Soothe & settle

Ease your little one’s blocked nose with FESS Little Noses, $12.95, a gentle saline solution that loosens and thins mucus to help clear the nose. It is suited for newborns and can be used as often as required. Available in a 15ml spray or 25ml drops, it includes an aspirator made up of a rubber bulb syringe with a soft tip so it is delicate enough to use on your bub. Go to fesslittlenoses.com.au.

Provide comfort with the Cuski comforter, $29.95. Suitable from birth, the comforters are soft, machine washable and tumbledry safe. Keep it close to you for a few days as it absorbs your familiar scents, and then introduce it to your child as a soothing tool. See more Cuski products at thesleepstore. com. au, such as the Swandoodle, $44.95, which is a bamboo muslin designed to lightly swaddle your baby, or for use as a bed throw in your bub’s nursery in the warmer months.

Bub bolster

Sterile seats

Support yourself with Bellybean’s Maternity Pillow, $89. Made from organic cotton, the Bellybean pillow range has been designed with new covers to reduce chemical dying and processing. Available in green tea, dusky pink, natural and latte, head to bellybean. com.au for more information.

Visiting public toilets when travelling can be a more pleasant experience with these SeatEase covers, priced at $3.25 for a pack of 10. Made from flushable paper, the seat covers provide the comfort of separating you from the public toilet seat. Grab a pack for increased hygiene when you’re out and about at bluelinehygienics.com.

Clear & free

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directory

An organic range of health and beauty products that won’t cost the earth or your health. Spend $150 or more on your initial Contact Lindsay on order to get 20% off this and all future orders. 0434 644 353 www.naturalbeauty.miessence.com

SIT WITH EASE PROTECTED ON A HYGIENIC BARRIER • RECYCLED PAPER • BIODEGRADABLE AT WOOlWORTHS & INDEPENDENT SuPERmARkETS, TOIlET PAPER AISlE

www.bluelinehygienics.com

SAVE $1000’s per child • EnVironmEntAlly Friendly EASy to Use • BAmBoo Absorber Included

onE SiZE with adjustable leg elastic!

www.peapods.com.au

100% bamboo liners

• Flushable • Antibacterial • 100% Biodegradable

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NEWS

MUM’S WELLBEING Juice up!

How to grow young

The Queensland Government’s new Healthier. Happier. campaign aims to get people moving to lower their health and fitness age, and they have launched a range of free videos. Designed for different levels of fitness and easily downloaded from the healthier.qld.gov.au website, they have been created by accredited exercise physiologist Katie Williams, and have been designed to do on alternate days. Three levels of workouts are available – beginner, low-intensity and moderateintensity – and all are ideal for busy mums!

RECIPES FROM A Healthy Mum & FRIENDS

Our resident foodie, Stace from IN10 10 A Healthy Mum, has launched a BREAKFASTS free e-book, 10 in 10 Breakfasts. It’s full of breakfast recipes the whole family will enjoy and, best of all, they can all be prepared in under 10 minutes! Pop over to ahealthymum.com to purchase a copy and to sign up to Stace’s newsletter. All the recipes are ready in less than 10 minutes. Best of all, they can be enjoyed by the whole family, even the tiny little ones. So go on, get cooking.

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Free to range?

With the term “freerange” not all it’s cracked up to be, working out which eggs are truly free range and which aren’t isn’t easy. The Domestic Poultry code says the maximum stocking density for free range eggs should be no more than 1,500 birds per hectare however Egg Corp, the industry body representing egg producers, has admitted that around a third of their “free-range” egg producers are stocking hens at more than 20,000 birds per hectare. If you want to purchase the “real deal” the founders of Consume With Care recommend only buying cartons of eggs that are Humane Choice-, FRPA- or FRFA-certified or eggs that are certified organic. For more information see consumewithcare.org.

written By jo hegerty & hannah saunders

Breakfast bonus…

In addition to their well-known nutritional benefits, fresh juices made in a juicer at home (we recommend the Hurom coldpress slow juicer) really do taste great! If you’re looking for juicing ideas for your family pick up a copy of Juicing for Beginners (Exisle Publishing, $19.99), which has 100 recipes, advises on healthy add-ons like wheat grass, and explains how juicing can help to fight diseases and common health ailments.


turn your ordinary light into an extraordinary night light

Time for a spring clean?

Do you or your family members suffer from asthma and allergies? Here are six top tips from the National Asthma Council Australia on springcleaning your home to reduce triggers: Use a damp or electrostatic cloth to dust hard surfaces (including floors) to reduce dust. Make sure mattresses and pillows are low allergy or encased in mite-proof covers. If possible, remove old soft toys and furnishings. Soft toys can be placed in the freezer overnight to kill dust mites (washing in temperatures above 55°C is better, if possible). Vacuum carpets regularly, however as this increases allergens in the air for up to 20 minutes you may need to ask someone else to do it for you and wait before re-entering the room. Clean your curtains and blinds as these may have picked up pollen and dust. Change or clean all old filters such as on air conditioners or air purifiers. Wash bedclothes weekly in hot water with a temperature of over 55°C. Visit the National Asthma Council Australia’s Sensitive Choice website at sensitivechoice.com for recommended house cleaning products. For more information on managing your asthma and allergies and to download the Asthma Buddy app, visit nationalasthma.org.au.

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The Grolight transforms a normal overhead light or lamp into a night light and bright light in one. Providing a comforting glow for young children and the perfect amount of light to check on your baby without waking them. Ideal for: breastfeeding comforting young children toilet training nighttime checks

scan to find out more

www.gro.co.uk

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NEWS

PREGNANCY&BIRTH

Watch out!

UK celebrity trainer James Duigan has released his Clean & Lean Pregnancy Guide Video. Including key breathing and visualisation exercises along with stepby-step yoga stretches to strengthen the body, this 40-minute video offers mums-to-be the opportunity to stay healthy and strong during their pregnancy. It’s available for download for $9.95 from bodyism.com.

AMBA celebrates It’s complicated 40 years

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With 40 years of supporting thousands of families with multiple babies behind it, the Australian Multiple Birth Association has seen many changes over this timeframe. Here are five classic insights into birthing from decades gone by: If a multiple birth pregnancy was suspected an x-ray was ordered. Formula was around in 1970 but, incredibly, medical advice was that Carnation Milk was just as good! Births were generally by vaginal delivery rather than Caesarean. Medical teams were often surprised by the arrival of a second or third baby. There were no disposable nappies and most people couldn’t afford tumble driers. There are now 50 clubs Australia wide. To find one in your area, visit amba.org.au/clubfinder.

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written By jo hegerty & hannah saunders

It seems an anti-blood clotting treatment that has been used for more than 20 years to prevent serious pregnancy complications such as clotting of the placenta, pre-eclampsia, low birth weight babies and recurrent miscarriage is not effective. The results of a 10-year international study involving the University of Adelaide, SA, and published in The Lancet has revealed that the use of expensive low molecular weight heparin offered no real difference in pregnancy outcomes. The study’s co-author Professor Hague says, ‘Given our evidence, we cannot recommend the continued use of this treatment for all pregnant women with a clotting tendency.’


First 1,000 days crucial

A survey for Danone Nutricia has found that 32 percent of women have no understanding of the importance of nutrition during the period from conception to the age of three to the development of obesity, type-two diabetes and food allergies in later life. Neonatologist Associate Professor John Sinn says early-life nutrition practices include both parents being a healthy weight at conception, taking supplements such as folate for at least one month before conception, avoiding too much weight gain in pregnancy, breastfeeding for as long as possible, introducing babies to solids between four and six months, and giving babies and toddlers a wide variety of foods.

Evidence suggests the best positions for giving birth are upright‌ yet 78 percent of women push lying down

the only calming device that delivers soothing white noise directly to baby, at the safe 75 decibel level as recommended by The Children Hearing Institute in New York. Another innovative safer sleep product from the makers of the

Ideal for: breastfeeding, parent and child bonding, reducing parental and child anxiety and relaxing baby by mimicking familiar sounds experienced in the womb

scan to find out more www.gro.co.uk

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news | pregnancy & birth

super nutritious smoothie Simone Denny from Nourishing Hub, an online resource devoted to women’s health, shares this recipe for a nutritious smoothie for expecting mothers. Simply blend all ingredients and adjust the texture with the liquid of your choice: 1 banana This natural fatigue-fighter is a rich source of potassium and B vitamins. B6 is said to reduce nausea. 1 kiwifruit Packed with vitamin C. 1 mango or ½ cup organic berries Mango is high in folate while berries are high in vitamin C and an excellent antioxidant. ½ cup liquid Choose from milk, rice milk, almond milk or coconut water. ½ cup natural organic yoghurt or kefir yoghurt Yoghurt is a natural probiotic, plus offers calcium for bone growth and iodine for baby’s brain and nervous system. ½ cup finely chopped raw kale or spinach These vegies include vitamins C and K along with A for

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embryonic growth and post-partum repair for mum. They’re also a natural source of folate. 2 tsps Synergy Super Greens
or Lifestream Spirulina Provides many of the key vitamins and minerals, plus protein, iron and calcium. 1 tbsp Gen 1:29 Pregnancy Superfood Mix This is a carefully balanced formula of ground nuts and seeds, and is loaded with fibre, omega 3 and 6, B-group vitamins and folate. 1 tsp Nordic Naturals fish oil DHA actually sets the foundations for a healthy brain, eyes and nervous system for your baby, and helps mum’s mood. 2 tsps chia seeds These are an excellent source of omega 3, protein and calcium. a few tsps coconut oil (optional) Coconut oil is immunity-boosting and a rich source of lauric acid, which is a medium chain fatty acid also found in breastmilk. Check out nourishinghub.com au for tasty recipes and a Pregnancy Smoothie Pack for $124.15.


Pure Tots

Beautiful handmade crochet toys, clothes & accessories

Designed for newborns to 12 years, with a focus on using 100% organic fair-trade cotton, Pure Tots offers beautiful handmade, eco-friendly crochet toys, accessories and clothes – all created in Western Australia. Our range brings you old-world charm with a modern twist.

puretots.com.au

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shopping

PREGNANCY&BIRTH

sort it out

feed time

Since first being introduced in 1974 in Japan, Hello Kitty has become a staple character in pop culture. Start preparing for baby with this Shape Sorter, $34.95, from the Hello Kitty collection. It is suitable for littlies aged one and over. Go to the amazingbabycompany. com.au to find a stockist in your area.

Mimijumi’s baby bottles are designed for aid in a seamless transition to bottle-feeding. The 240ml Very Hungry feeding bottle, $29.99, and the 120ml Not So Hungry feeding bottle, $27.99, feature an innovative nipple design to create a natural feeding and latching experience. You can pick these up at mimijumi.com.au.

one-stop shop Little Pie Street stocks a range of unique pieces from Swedish children’s interiors brand Littlephant. Created by designer, author and illustrator Camilla Lundsten, Littlephant’s collection uses 1950sinspired colours and graphics. Decorate your baby’s playroom or nursery with their popular Crochet Play Balls, $58, Pram Necklace, $65, or Rain Print, $45. And for something more practical, pick up their Baby Blanket, $65. Head to littlepiestreet.com.au.

on the go

all in one

Get active together with the new Chicco Activ3 Jogger. Suitable for babies from six months to 24kg, the Activ3 frame is made from lightweight aluminium, folds up easily and features FlexCore suspension wheels. You can pick one up in red wave or anthracite for $799. For stockists, see chicco.com.au.

Carry all bub’s needs in this Ellena nappy bag, $459.99 by Storksak, for ease and organisation when on the go. This boho-inspired bag is made from twisted leather and features silver hardware, a detachable shoulder strap and the usual baby paraphernalia. Visit storksak.com.

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red alert

soft friend

Nova Harley’s Amsterdam nappy bag, $535, has been made from leather cowhide and includes a detachable labelled storage section, which can hold a thermo insulated bottle, padded change mat, tote, keys and loads more! See their full range of designs, such as the Madrid, $579, and New York, $535, at boutiquebrands.com.au.

Treat your baby with this Grey Knit Bear by Micky and Stevie, $29.95. Made with cotton knit on the outside, it is the ideal soft toy for your child to cuddle and play with. Head to mickyandstevie.com. au to see more of their gorgeous soft toys in both neutral and bold colours.

keep it clean Avoid a mess during feeding time with the shoulder bib by Silly Billyz. Available in two-packs, $22.95, they are made with a soft towel fabric on one side and organic cotton on the other, so they’re gentle on your baby’s skin while keeping their clothes clean. You can purchase the packs from bpmchildcare.com.au, and while you’re there, check out the bandana bibs, $9.95.

neat nappies

home & away

Family owned and operated brand Pea Pods produces reusable nappies that are created from sustainable resources and are comfy for babies. Each nappy has an absorbent insert that’s made from antibacterial bamboo. The one-size nappies, $19.95, have adjustable leg elastic and come in many colours. Head to peapods.com.au.

Lightweight and with a push-button folding mechanism, the Lullaby LX Portacot, $399, is handy and functional, plus it can be turned into a play gym with music and nature sounds. Find stockists at chicco.com.au.

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PREGNANCY TIPS

5 reasons why sleep can be difficult Disturbed sleep is a common occurrence in pregnancy. Hannah Saunders reports on why this happens

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ou know you won’t be getting much sleep once your baby comes along but who’d have thought mums-to-be would be struggling too? While most women have no trouble sleeping in the first trimester because they’re so tired, by the third trimester getting an uninterrupted night’s sleep becomes more difficult because so much is going on physically and emotionally during pregnancy. THE NEED TO PEE As your kidneys work harder to filter the extra blood that’s now moving through your body, you will need to pee more. In addition, as your baby grows, this places pressure on your bladder, making you need to go more too. HEARTBURN OR INDIGESTION One of the main causes of sleep loss during pregnancy is heartburn or indigestion. Sleeping in a semiupright position can help in keeping acids down.

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BACKACHES & LEG CRAMPS Avoid sleeping on your back as this can create pressure on a major vein that returns blood to your heart. This can lead to lightheadedness and numbness, and puts pressure on your back and intestines. Lying on your side with a pillow between your thighs and knees relieves pressure, while supporting your belly. The extra weight you are carrying can also lead to leg cramps. HEART RATE During pregnancy additional blood is pumped to the uterus and as a result your heart rate increases. This can keep you from sleeping soundly. SHORTNESS OF BREATH As your uterus expands with your baby, the pressure on your diaphragm can lead to shortness of breath. It can be uncomfortable to feel like you’re struggling for air. *


the hotmilk essential facts As a mother it’s your job to provide the essentials of life for your new baby. At Hotmilk we believe it’s our job to provide you with the essentials for motherhood.

de Use this co t at discoun % 5 1 t e g o t erie.com g n i l k l i m t www.ho MYCHILD15 xx

why you need a specialist nursing bra... WIDER BRA STRAPS graduated from an A-H cup to ensure maximum support for larger sizes.

SOFT COTTON LINING ensures absolute comfort and support of tender areas & breathability.

TWO STRAP OPTIONS cotton backed for comfort, or fully adjustable for flexibility of length.

TWO OPTIONS FOR BREAST FEEDING MOTHERS A-frame construction for support and modesty or Side Sling support for great skin-toskin contact.

POWER FABRIC PANELS FOR EXTRA SUPPORT especially at the breast-feeding stage as breasts become heavier.

SEAM FRIENDLY CUPS means there are no seams across the nipple which can cause chafing and irritation.

ONE-HANDED MATERNITY CLIPS provide a fuss-free release at feeding time.

NO UNDERWIRE to restrict milk flow & changes in breast size/volume which can lead to infection.

SEXY & FEMININE STYLING made from exquisite fabrics & laces.

BACK ADJUSTERS six rows of hook and eyes allows room for the diaphragm to expand during the months of pregnancy. With a wider depth of triple hook and eyes for larger bra sizes.

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Risky business An estimated one in every hundred pregnancies is ectopic. Here Associate Professor George Condous explains the risk factors, symptoms, treatment – and effects on your fertility

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he number-one cause of maternal deaths in early pregnancy, an ectopic pregnancy occurs when a fertilised egg is implanted outside the cavity of the uterus or the womb. Most ectopic pregnancies occur in the fallopian tube, therefore the name “tubal pregnancy”. Approximately one in every 100 pregnancies results in an ectopic pregnancy. Importantly, most of these cases do not involve a developing baby inside the tube but instead only pregnancy cells growing, albeit in the wrong location. Unlike the womb, the fallopian tube cannot grow to accommodate a developing pregnancy. Therefore, if left untreated, the fallopian tube can rupture, resulting in internal bleeding, lower-abdominal pain, shoulder-tip pain and in some cases even death.

Who is at risk? Any woman can have an ectopic pregnancy but there are certain risk factors that can increase the likelihood. These include: • women aged over 35 years • previous ectopic pregnancy • previous chlamydia or gonorrheoa infection

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• previous pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) • previous tubal surgery (including sterilisation) • documented tubal pathology • previous infertility • cigarette smoking. Those who conceive using the following are also at greater risk: • ovulation induction or ovarian stimulation, IVF, ICSI, GIFT and other ARTs • copper or Mirena intra-uterine contraceptive devices (IUCD) • progesterone-only contraception • emergency hormonal contraception, which was previously called the “morning-after pill”. Women who conceive utilising any of the above factors should be referred to have an early transvaginal ultrasound so that an ectopic pregnancy can be excluded. In the most recent Saving Mothers’ Lives report (2006–2008) recommendations in relation to deaths in early pregnancy included: • all women of reproductive age presenting to emergency departments with gastrointestinal symptoms should have a pregnancy test • gastrointestinal symptoms, in particular diarrhoea and dizziness, in early gestation >


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pregnancy are important indicators of ectopic pregnancy. These features need to be emphasised to all clinical staff.

Symptoms Abdominal discomfort is very common during pregnancy and it can have a whole range of causes, especially in the early months. Lower abdominal pain can have a more serious cause, such as ectopic pregnancy. If you are pregnant and have any lower abdominal pain, with or without vaginal bleeding, in the first trimester, you must see your GP and arrange to have an ultrasound of the pelvis to rule out an ectopic pregnancy. This applies to all pregnant women – regardless of when your last period occurred. A transvaginal scan or internal scan is the best way to exclude an ectopic pregnancy. In experienced hands, a transvaginal ultrasound can detect more than 90 percent of ectopic pregnancies. The vast majority of women who experience lower abdominal pain during early pregnancy, however, will not be found to have an underlying ectopic pregnancy.

Surgical treatment Most women with a tubal ectopic pregnancy will need to undergo laparoscopic (keyhole) surgery. Keyhole surgery is preferable to openabdominal surgery because it is associated with a lower risk of infection, less bleeding, a shorter hospital stay and a quicker return to normal activities. There are two types of tubal surgery for tubal ectopic pregnancy: removal of the tube as well as the pregnancy (salpingectomy) or removal of the pregnancy while conserving the tube (salpingostomy). Most surgeons will perform a salpingectomy, and although this sounds aggressive, there are reasons for this. The rate of recurrent ectopic pregnancy is lower in the salpingectomy group, at 10 to 15 percent, compared to 18 to 22 percent in the other group. The chances of falling pregnant in both groups is approximately 70 percent,

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therefore salpingectomy is the preferred option for women – it reduces your rate of recurrent ectopic pregnancy without dramatically reducing your fertility.

Non-surgical treatment Select women can be managed non-surgically or “conservatively”. This means you can avoid hospital admission and general anaesthetic as well as preserving your fallopian tube. Nonsurgical approaches are suitable for up to onethird of women. The key to being able to offer these treatment approaches is early ultrasound recognition of your ectopic pregnancy. Non-surgical approaches encompass either “expectant” or “medical” management. These treatments are most effective during very early pregnancy, when levels of the pregnancy hormone are still fairly low, there is no sign of internal bleeding on ultrasound and the tube has not ruptured.

expectant management As tubal ectopic pregnancies are being detected earlier and earlier through the use of advanced ultrasound technology, more women are now eligible for expectant management. Expectant management means just that: a “watch and wait” approach is implemented to see if the pregnancy resolves itself. Ten to 15 percent of tubal ectopic pregnancies miscarry naturally and can therefore be managed expectantly. Women who are selected for a “watch and wait” approach need to be followed up very closely by their early pregnancy medical team with blood tests for pregnancy hormone levels known as hCG. The levels of hCG need to fall to pre-pregnant levels for expectant management to be successful. Close monitoring is mandatory as there is a small possibility that the tubal ectopic pregnancy can rupture and lead to internal bleeding, despite falling hCG levels. If at any time during expectant management signs of this are detected, then surgery will need to be arranged.


pregnancy

medical management Some women who are not eligible for expectant management can be managed medically as another way to avoid surgery. It means giving you an injection of methotrexate. This drug has been used since the 1980s as an alternative to surgery for some ectopic pregnancies. Twenty to 25 percent of women with a tubal ectopic pregnancy can be managed in this way. Methotrexate is used in very low doses, and works by stopping the pregnancy cells from dividing, thereby ending the pregnancy and conserving the tube where the pregnancy implants. Under these circumstances, the tubal pregnancy is absorbed and disappears after successful methotrexate management. Methotrexate is given as a single injection into the muscle. Again, women who are selected for this treatment will be followed up closely by the early pregnancy medical team checking their pregnancy hormone or serum hCG levels. As is the case with expectant management, in rare instances tubal ectopic pregnancy can rupture despite falling hCG levels. Should this be the case, surgery will be arranged. Women who have had methotrexate will be advised not to get pregnant for at least three months following the initial injection.

can i get pregnant again? Yes. Around 70 percent of women will conceive again within a period of 18 months. Sometimes, both fallopian tubes are damaged, and under these circumstances you may need to consider IVF treatment. But remember that IVF itself can also result in tubal pregnancy.

Will I have another ectopic pregnancy? Most women who have one ectopic pregnancy do not get another ectopic pregnancy. The risk of recurrent ectopic pregnancy is 10 percent. While this may seem high it means that there is a 90 percent chance that the next pregnancy

will be implanted correctly in the lining of the womb. All women who have had an ectopic pregnancy should have a scan early on in their next pregnancy, at five to six week’s gestation, to check that the pregnancy is positioned correctly inside the uterus. If you have had an ectopic pregnancy, it is important to see your GP or consultant obstetrician to ask for advice about future pregnancies.

When can I try again? There is no “right� time to try for another baby. It depends on the type of treatment you have had, your individual circumstances and, most importantly, how you feel. Most women who have had an ectopic pregnancy will go through a grieving process, both for the loss of their pregnancy and in some cases also for the loss of their fallopian tube. It is important to give you and your partner time to grieve. You need to give yourselves time to acknowledge, understand and accept the outcome of your recent pregnancy. Everyone is different and different couples react differently. I always tell my patients that it is OK to start trying again when they feel that they have recovered from the loss of their recent ectopic pregnancy. As the psychological impact of this event should never be overlooked, if you have any concerns about how you are coping, it is important to seek counselling and advice from your GP or obstetrician. In summary, ectopic pregnancy is a serious condition that, if it is diagnosed early, can be managed safely. Educating women about the possible risk factors, symptoms and the need for an early transvaginal ultrasound will go a long way towards reducing the potential harm caused by it. * George Condous is Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at Sydney Medical School, Nepean, University of Sydney and the director of OMNI Gynaecological Care. For more information call 1300 851 968 or visit omnigynaecare.com.au.

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Nursery works The key to furnishing and decorating a great nursery is in the planning. here nicola conville shares these essential design tips for parents-to-be

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aving a baby changes a lot of things: it changes your focus, it changes your body and it changes your budget. It will also change your outlook on life – you will know this once your new baby is in your arms. ‘When preparing for baby’s arrival, it is easy to just focus on the first few months,’ explains Gillian Rose from baby furniture distributor Danish by Design. ‘After all, the thought that your baby will soon become a child and then a teenager is quite a daunting one so, at this early stage, most of us simply prefer to focus on the short term. However, there are a few advantages to looking ahead in terms of the products you buy for your baby’s nursery.’ We all have our own individual style and there are enough products out there to satisfy every taste. Unfortunately taste and budget do not always go hand in hand, so it is important to prioritise your purchases. Everybody needs a cot, pram, a car seat and highchair. Every other product is pretty much optional, although there are many other items

that will make your life much easier, it’s just about choosing the right ones. Read ahead for 10 top tips to designing a nursery.

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Choose a Great Cot Let’s start with what’s probably the most important item – the cot. With such an essential piece, simple is best. Consider whether you want a standard cot or one that can convert to a toddler bed. If you plan on having more children, then a goodquality, well-designed cot can be handed down from one bub to the next. Safety is the most important feature when choosing a cot. First, make sure it’s certified to the Australian safety standard and that if it’s been re-designed then it’s also been re-certified. Second, make sure it’s sturdy and durable – it should be permanently fixed, or require the use of tools to take apart. Make sure the mattress fits snugly around the sides. If there’s more than a 40mm gap between the mattress and the edges, your baby is at risk of suffocation if they roll face first into one of the gaps. >

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Think about Function It’s important to consider the function of the room in the short and long term. If you’re planning on having more kids, will you keep this nursery for your next child, or will you reorganise the room around your child as they grow? Maybe you’ll need bunk beds eventually, if your kids will be sharing the room later down the track. To keep a room multi-functional, go for simple decor and minimal furniture with an ample amount of storage space. Also, rather than painting the walls, opt for removable wallpaper or wall decals, which can be easily swapped or transferred to another room later on.

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Decorating Your Nursery When it comes to the look and feel of the nursery, there are no rules! As Rose says, ‘My Danish heritage is strong and I like to keep everything simple: neutral tones with accent colours, but only a few and they must match. Don’t be afraid to mix old with modern as long as the colours work together and there is a theme. If you keep

“A soft, low light in a baby’s room… can create a really soothing environment for them, as well as keeping you from banging against furniture” everything too modern, you risk not giving the space soul and if all is older style, then you may not get the desired “new life” feel. It’s supposed to be fun and there is no right or wrong! The most important thing is that you walk into your baby’s nursery and you love it.’ During the nesting period, it might be easy to slip into gender decorating your room, but when decorating a nursery, it is often best to go for unisex, neutral colours. It doesn’t have to be all green and yellow either – try white with colourful accessories, or a gorgeous palette of beige, brown and cream. When looking for a theme, try focusing on

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one particular element that appeals to you for inspiration, otherwise you run the risk of creating a cluttered atmosphere. It could be a vintage toy, a particular fabric, a wall feature or a style you love such as vintage, country, rustic or contemporary. Keep a scrapbook full of ideas and inspiration, or start a Pinterest account to see what’s out there in terms of nursery decor and DIY ideas. And remember, in the first few months, at least, you are the one enjoying the nursery, so make sure it’s a lovely, calm space for you too!

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Choosing Lighting Ensure the room has adequate blinds or curtains so your baby can get used to sleeping during the day without sunlight streaming in and keeping them awake. Similarly, though, a soft, low light in a baby’s room or sleeping area can create a really soothing environment for them, as well as keeping you from banging against furniture when you sneak in to check on your child or during night-time feeds.

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Change Time While change tables are handy – particularly if they have shelves underneath for storing nappies, wipes and creams – they are not essential. If you’re short on money or space you could use the top of a large dresser as a changing station. A changing pad can sit on top of the dresser then when your baby is older, you can use that space to store books, photos and other display items. Consider hanging a mobile over your change area to distract bub while you’re changing them. This is a fun way to add some colour to the room, because mobiles above cots can hinder sleep for some babies and also pose a safety issue as they get older and start to stand.

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Nursing Chair A lot of mums say a rocking or nursing chair is an absolute essential in the nursery. If you’re going down that route, rather than nursing your bub on the couch or in another room, choose a chair >


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pregnancy that’s comfortable for you, and will also last for years and become a staple item in your child’s room. Will it become the feature in a cosy little reading corner for your toddler? Position your nursing chair close to the cot for an easy transition to bed after feeding. Consider placing a little side table next to it

“Consider a shelving system that will hold books and boxes of toys. These age well with your child and hide a multitude of sins” for a glass of water, your phone and tissues. Later, it could hold a reading lamp and some of your child’s favourite books. Comfort is essential when nursing, and you are going to be spending a lot of time in that chair – particularly in the beginning. Ensure it has an adequate footrest, back support and arm rests. If it doesn’t have a high enough back for you to rest your head on, keep a comfy pillow or cushion handy.

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Storage Probably the most essential store item is a great chest of drawers. Kids’ clothes are so tiny that it’s easier to fold and stack them rather than hanging everything up, so a wardrobe probably won’t be necessary until much later. Consider a shelving system that will hold books and boxes of toys. These age well with your child and hide a multitude of sins. If you’re short on space, buy boxes that can be stored under beds for holding linen or toys. Shelving is great for displaying photos, vintage toys and other little knick-knacks.

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Accessories When it comes to the addons, less is definitely more as children’s bedrooms can become cluttered very easily. A few well-chosen prints in clean white frames look beautiful on nursery walls and images can be switched around as your child gets older and

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the room evolves. Try your local op shop for old children’s books and use the illustrations for prints. Add colour and texture with a beautiful blanket, soft rug or some striking cushions.

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Comfort Keeping your child’s nursery at the right temperature is vital to their comfort and sleep. A baby who is too warm or cold will wake frequently as they try to get comfortable. A heater in winter and fan for summer may be necessary to keep the room at the right temperature. According to SIDS and Kids, it is not necessary to monitor the room temperature or to leave the heating or cooling on all night as long as the baby is dressed appropriately for the room temperature.

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Safety First As we all know, the first thing a child does with a new object is place it into their mouth. Their oral sensory technique is the first to develop and is the way they learn about the world. Keeping that in mind, when decorating a nursery, you’ll need to think about the texture, shape and size of materials kept within reach, as well as the safety. Go for non-toxic products in a baby’s room, making sure that bedding, cots, toys and other furniture are safe for little mouths. These days, there’s a plethora of eco items for bubs, with sustainable, safe and organic options for almost every product. If you are painting, think about using low-VOC paints. If you’re using wall decals, go for designs that use eco-friendly materials and low-toxic colour dyes. Even books for bubs are available in tastefriendly options, made from eco materials! Once they get older, you’ll need to think even further about the safety of their room – as well as the rest of the house. Ensure that blind cords are not within baby’s reach, all furniture is fixed and can’t topple over, and power points and electrical sockets are babyproofed with plastic and non-shock covers. * For more information about Danish by Design head to their website at danishbydesign.com.au.


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BIRTH

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ways to make labour easier It’s natural to feel anxious about giving birth, but there are plenty of things you can do to ease your own comfort. Doula Kelly Winder shares her tips for a calmer, less painful birth experience

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Avoid lying on your back Not only does lying on your back put all the weight of the baby and your uterus on your back, which is not great for blood supply, but your uterus contracts forward, so you’re not working with gravity – you’re working against it. At all costs, avoid positions where you’re lying on your back during labour. Instead, choose upright, forwardleaning positions where possible. It’s OK to rest on your side if you need a break – but just keep off your back. Reclining should also be avoided where possible, unless it’s for a break.

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Consider hiring a doula Some women and/or their partners worry about having an extra person in the room during the birth. However, a doula is a trained birth support person who has the ability to change the birth couple’s experience from a painful, stressful event to a more relaxed, highly supported one. In fact, studies have shown that a doula is more effective than hospital staff or the mother’s friends or family due to a support trifecta she can provide that’s unlike anyone else: she is

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known to the woman, she is trained and she can provide continuous support – meaning she won’t leave the mother’s side. Doulas not only build a relationship with you and help to educate you before the birth, but they have learned many skills to help you cope with pain. This includes comfort measures for the mother, specific tools for coping with pain, positions to help move baby when he or she is in a tricky or painful position, and how to help everyone feel at ease. Studies have shown that women who use a doula use less pain relief, are happier with their birth and fathers feel more satisfied with their role too. A doula supports the partner so he can better support her too.

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Reduce the fear What has fear got to do with it? When we are fearful, we tense up. When we’re tense, we don’t breathe deeply, our body is tight and we are more susceptible to pain. So how do you combat the fear? The best things a woman can do for herself (and her partner) to prevent fear is become informed and educated with good quality information >


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birth and surround herself with excellent support. This includes obtaining independent birth education, reading books, hiring a doula or independent midwife, joining pregnancy or birth groups that are supportive of your choices, and considering attending Hypnobirthing or Calmbirth classes – plus ignoring horror stories or spending time around negative people.

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Aim for a calm birth environment Things that can cause a stressful birth experience can include a noisy environment, a doctor or midwife with a bedside manner that is lacking in some way, or having a lot going on around you. And as we have said, stress

“The team around you need to be able to rally together, getting you through your toughest moments in labour, and protect your needs in labour” causes tension so you’ll end up not coping as well with the pain. Make sure you’ve chosen great support people so that these things don’t happen. The team around you need to be able to rally together, getting you through your toughest moments in labour, and protect your needs in labour. A woman in labour cannot hold together her birth support team.

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Try to avoid induction Sometimes an induction becomes necessary due to the health of the mother or baby, in which case it is very important that you trust your doctor and make the decision that’s best for you. However, if there is no urgent medical need and you can avoid an induction, your body will be able to labour in a more natural way. While it can be lifesaving for some, being medicated with a drug that was designed to really ramp the labour up to get the baby out quickly can be quite painful for many women. I would not say all, as I have worked with a

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couple of doula clients who have required an induction with Syntocinon, but not asked for pharmaceutical pain relief. But many find it challenging. Syntocinon or Pitocin is for those who need to get the baby out now, and you are committed to doing what it takes to get the baby out once you’ve started. This will involve other interventions, so weigh up if the risks are worth it for you. Your decision is yours and yours alone.

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Research natural pain-relief options Where possible, it’s best to start with natural pain-relief options rather than medical ones – some are particularly effective. After attending births, it’s been surprising to hear what has helped my clients best cope with pain. One told me how the simple action of breathing with her made a massive difference, because it gave her something to focus on. Another said she was so happy to hear me suggest getting into the birth pool, because she wasn’t sure if it was too soon (it’s more effective as pain relief later in labour). Once she got in, she relaxed and baby was born soon after. Natural pain-relief options can certainly help relieve pain.

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Turn a posterior baby Many women with posterior babies (where baby’s spine is against the mother’s spine) find “back” labour to be challenging. This is because on top of normal labour pain, they feel strong back pain. However, there are several things you can do about a baby who is positioned this way. As a preventative, look into optimal foetal positioning, which can help encourage baby into an anterior (front) position. It involves simple positioning activities and tools and tricks – for example, when you sit, sit in a way that your bum is above your knees, which changes the position of the pelvis. You might like to find out if the centre you are birthing at offers sterile water injections, which can take away all the back pain for some


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women, and a significant amount for others. It doesn’t work for everyone but it’s a fantastic, natural option. If your centre allows you to bring in your own acupuncturist during labour, this is another way to help with back pain. Keep active in your pregnancy as best you can. Even a 30-minute walk every day at your own pace will help your body, mind and your birth. Keeping active during labour – changing positions and working with your pelvis will help to keep baby turning and moving until he or she is ready to be born. Acupuncture is also a great option for turning babies, as well as general pregnancy wellbeing and birth preparation. Osteopathic and chiropractic check-ups are worthwhile too to make sure your body is aligned and primed for birth. It’s definitely worth booking yourself in with experienced practitioners to prepare you for the best birth possible.

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Stay hydrated Not drinking enough water and being dehydrated can cause problems in labour, because when you are dehydrated, your uterus doesn’t contract as efficiently. Every single cell in your body relies on water to function properly, and when you don’t have enough, things start to break down – even your energy levels, concentration and focus can suffer when you’re dehydrated, regardless of whether you’re in labour or not. You don’t have to throw back a heap of water; little sips often are ideal. Make sure you have bendy straws in your birth bag so your support team can offer you drinks easily without you having to hold the cup. If you place a piece of tape across the cup to hold the straw in place, this can help stop the straw from moving around while you are trying to drink. The little things make a big difference. * Kelly Winder is a mum, doula (birth attendant)and the creator of the BellyBelly website. You can check out bellybelly.com.au for a range of informative and supportive articles about conception, pregnancy, birth and baby.

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NEWS

BABY&TODDLER

A solid start

New on the market, Australian Five:am Baby Yoghurt, $2.45 for a 170g resealable tub or $1.59 for a 70g squeezie, is a natural yoghurt that contains no added sugar. Made only from whole organic milk and live cultures, it’s available in major supermarkets.

Healthy custard treat Memories are made of this Now with their strawberries-and-cream variety, Rafferty’s Garden has four types of baby custard to choose from. With the goodness of milk and made from all natural ingredients, custard can be a nutritious treat option for babies, especially as it also contains calcium for growing bones. Try it as a dip for whole strawberries once your little one progresses to finger foods. Priced at $1.99 each, head to raffertysgarden.com for stockists.

Capture your young one’s milestones with baby cards by Nest Accessories. The cards, available in packs of 21 for $35 in boy and girl designs from nestaccessories.com.au, are thick and laminated so they’re safe from little hands. They’re ideal for documenting special times.

Struggling to get your infant to sleep? White noise is one of the most effective sleep aids because it drowns out everyday disturbances. Now with the new, unique Grohush by The Gro Company, $55.95, it’s even easier to calm your bub down. This portable device transmits soothing white noise directly to your baby. The bonus? Only they can hear it so you won’t be disturbing anyone else! It’s also comfy to hold, battery powered and has a washable cover. Go to au.gro-store.com.

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written By hannah saunders

Hush little baby…


BEAUTIFUL QUALITY BABYWEAR CLOTHES, ACCESSORIES & TOYS

why is tummy time so vital?

Essential from day one of your baby’s birth (you can lie your newborn skin-to-skin on your chest to start with), giving your baby tummy time each day offers a wide range of benefits for their development. Not only does it teach them how to push up, roll over, sit up, crawl and eventually learn to stand up, according to SIDS and Kids it also helps to ensure your baby doesn’t develop flat spots on their head from always being placed down to sleep lying on their back. However, not all infants enjoy the experience, partly because they get so used to sleeping on their backs! So what can you do in this case? Experts recommend starting off with very short periods of play, allowing your bub to gradually build up their strength so they can move more easily. Other tips include: • lying down on the floor facing your baby and talking or singing to them • placing them on their tummy lying across your lap and gently massaging them • trying different textured items for them to lie down on such as blankets or lambskin • popping a toy or a rattle within their reach.

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news | baby & toddler

Bathing tips for bubs with eczema Also known as atopic dermatitis, eczema is an inflammatory condition that causes your child’s skin to become itchy, red, dry and scaly, especially on their cheeks, forehead and scalp. There is no cure however treatment can assist. Here Michelle Vogrinec from GAIA Skin Naturals offers her tips to bathing your bub: • keep the bath water at body temperature or below using a bath thermometer as a guide (about 34-36°C) • gently apply a cleansing product that does not contain any trigger ingredients such as soap,

sulphates, artificial perfumes or harsh chemicals, that is pH balanced and preferably contains moisturising ingredients • do not rub the skin vigorously, and if using a washer ensure it is soft and thoroughly wet • gently pat the skin dry with a soft towel – again do not rub as this may further irritate the skin • apply a moisturiser while the skin is still slightly damp to lock in the moisture • for extra moisturisation use a plant-based baby oil in the bath water. Head to gaiaskinnaturals.com.au for more details.

Did you know... A Turned

Head Means A Full Belly

Your newborn didn’t just see something interesting. If they turn their head at a spoonful of food it’s because they’re full. This is also where shaking your head to say ‘no’ comes from.

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BABY&TODDLER

shopping

On the go Your baby’s necessities can be packed neatly in this comfortable and functional backpack. The Lässig Backpack Multimix, $149.99, is the ideal companion for active parents. It features a zip pouch, an insulated bottle holder to keep bottles cool or warm, and easy-to-manoeuvre inner compartments. This bag comes with a water repellent wet pocket and a change mat. Lassig’s children’s range also includes Mini Backpacks, $39.95, Mini Washbags, $24.95, Trolley Bags, $69.95, and Messenger Bags, $39.95. Check out lassig.com.au.

Back to nature

pull-along pal

Inspired by nature, NUK has designed these glass bottles in two new colours, Bamboo and Sand. Available in 120ml for $17.95 and 240ml for $18.95, the bottles feature an orthodontic silicone teat to train bub’s jaw, tongue and lips. Head to nuk.com.au.

Designed and produced under the watchful eye of Voytek Bajor in his workshop in Southern Poland, the Rolling Chook is part of the BAJO wooden toy range. Priced at $29.95, it is available in three colours from bajo.com.au. BAJO uses quality local materials and vibrant colours to make their wooden toys fun and durable for kids.

stroll on You can customise your bub’s ride with the new Joolz stroller. Select the fabric base and chassis from black, grey or denim; choose your wheel colour, and then your colour accent to create a unique pram. Priced at $1,899, it includes a rain cover and nursery bag. See my-joolz.com.au.

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Nice & Neat New to Little Innoscents’ range is this Hair Fudge, $10.99 for a 75ml tube. Made with orange infusions and rosewood, it is alcohol-, paraben- and SLSfree. With natural ingredients, including aloe vera, beeswax and sunflower oil, it’s formulated to give your child’s hair a strong hold without the harm of toxins. Get it at littleinnoscents.com.au.


gnaw away Your baby is bound to have fun with Jellystone Designs’ jChews moustache, $12. This quirky teether is ideal for your teething tot and is made from BPA-free silicone that is gentle on gums. Jellystone Designs’ range also includes bangles and pendants. Go to jellystonedesigns.com.

Difrax S-Bottle

Get your fix The Fix Me gift pack by Milk & Co, $32.95, contains the Snotty Grotty room spray, Spotty Tots skin cream and Sleepy Bubs massage oil, which are ideal for when baby is feeling under the weather. See milk andco.com.au.

Difrax “S-bottle” is specially designed to reduce the risk of colic as the unique S-shape means the teat is always full with milk.

whale of a time Dress your infant in this trendy Whale Watching Growsuit, $29.95 by SOOKIbaby. Available in sizes 000 to 1, the growsuit is designed in Australia and made from quality cotton, allowing your baby to move comfortably and freely. The print is also available in a tee or leggings at tinytribe.com.au.

Difrax Microwave Steriliser

Difrax S-Bottles

Difrax Soother

www.difrax.com.au

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shopping | baby & toddler

Keep cosy Complement your baby’s nursery, while keeping them warm, with this grey Bobby Blanket by Lucky Boy Sunday, $499, made from baby alpaca. Lucky Boy Sunday is a brand run by Danish designers who produce modern knitted toys and soft furnishings for the home. To purchase, check out littlepiestreet.com.au.

move along The Bamboo Bouncer by Bombol, $299.95, is created to promote motor skill growth in babies. Designed by Belgian industrial designer Frederic Gooris, the bamboo frame is light, durable and strong, and responds to your baby’s movements. It comes in three colours at danish bydesign.com.au.

WATCH OUT!

Getting warmer …

Keep an eye on baby from a distance with the VTech BM2500 Safe & Sound full colour video and audio baby monitor, $99.99. It features 2.4GHz FHSS technology for secure connection and clear sound. The baby unit also has digital zoom capabilities. Go to vtech.com/au/tel.

Using a swirling bath of warm water to thaw and warm your baby’s meal, the Kozii breastmilk and bottle warmer by Kiinde, $99.95, is specifically designed to gently warm and preserve the delicate nutrients, antibodies and proteins in breastmilk. Included in the range is the 20-pack of twist pouches, $19.95. See the full collection at kiinde.com.au.

reach new heights

Step by step

With a unique three-position lumbar adjustment feature, the Lumbar Highchair by Safety 1st, $199, brings the tray closer to baby to avoid mess. It can adjust to six different heights and fits a range of table sizes, while the removable tray is dishwasher safe. Safety 1st began in the 1980s with the Baby On Board sign, $3.99. Visit safety1st.com.au.

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Encourage development with the Kid O Tree Push, $44.95, from tigertribe.com.au. Your little walker pushes the handle, which causes the leaves to twirl up and spin around the tree trunk. It is designed to entertain, while reinforcing the use of gross motor skills. Available in pink and blue, it is suitable for children aged one and over. The range also consists of bath toys, games, party favours and more!


More than just nappies!

Old fashioned service with expert advice

Natural skincare ranges Chemical-free cleaning products Chemical-free baby products

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BABY TIPS

5 reasons to massage your baby Learning the basics of infant massage has a heap of benefits for both you and bub says Hannah Saunders

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Enhances the parent-infant bond Massage offers the opportunity for special one-on-one time – an activity you can do with your baby and enjoy together. It’s also great for fathers to do, helping them to develop a closer relationship with their child, and giving you a chance to have a break. Improves sleep When baby massage is included in their bed-time routine, it will help your baby regulate their sleep pattern by increasing serotonin levels and regulating the amount of melatonin. This means they’ll sleep more at night and be more active in the day. ASSISTS WITH POSTNATAL DEPRESSION Learning how to massage your baby with a certified infant massage instructor will allow

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you to understand your baby’s body language and therefore cope better. Baby massage is also known to assist with both mild and deep depression because performing it stimulates the release of oxytocin, which is your body’s natural feel-good hormone. Strengthens the immune system Massage increases the antibodies that help fight off infection and reduces stress hormones, helping to make your baby healthier. Relieves PAIN If it is performed regularly, massaging your infant’s abdomen using specific strokes and exercises may help relieve abdominal wind, colic and constipation. * See matermothers.org.au/babymassage for a video on baby massage.

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5 tips to choosing a modelling agency so you think your child is model MATERIAL? Hannah Saunders asked bettina management for their ADVICE ON FINDING THE RIGHT AGENCY

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t My Child we receive many requests from parents wanting to find out how best to introduce their children into modelling. Here we cover off five important points to keep in mind when deciding which agency to choose. reputation An agency’s client list is key! The quality and quantity of brands is what you should be looking for. A talent agency with a large client list ensures they’re professional and increases the chances of your child having success in the industry. Likewise, ensure they have been around for a long time and are not a start-up or a fly-by-night agency with little interest in building a long-term client list. UNDERSTAND HOW IT WORKS  Ensure you understand the application process, joining costs and what you need to do during the year. Often agencies will invite you in for a short interview or a meet and greet, which is where you are given an introduction into the industry and a rundown of how registration with that agency works. Some agencies charge fees to meet you while others don’t. This is your chance to ask as many questions as you like to understand the industry and the agency. Also seek out agencies that provide a lot of free information on their sites and blogs. This can give you an insight into how transparent they will be after joining.

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KNOW THE FACTS Do your research but don’t believe all you read (especially any anonymous posts). An Australian agency that requires a fee or a payment to start up is not a scam, nor is it illegal. Without them you can’t contact or deal directly with clients! Also steer clear of any agency that guarantees that your child will get a job. Agencies cannot and should not do so. Agents can only submit your child for consideration. It is the clients who choose the talent to best fit their brief or campaign. If it sounds too good to be true, it is! NOT FOR ALL! Apart from ensuring your child is keen, make sure you’re committed to the cause. You will be ferrying your kids to castings and jobs so it is vital to be punctual and organised – and enthusiastic about your child’s career. Also be prepared to be available at short notice as castings occur quickly and can require next day or even same day attendance.  ADDITIONS Some agencies offer or include additional skill-building opportunities such as workshops and classes. An agency that offers kids complimentary industry related workshops that will help their career development, skills and ability, or recommends that your child attends them, is a great sign that the agency has your child’s best interests at heart and wants to see your children grow.* For more information head to bettina.com.au.

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BABY

Just a hunch? questioning your mothering skills? unsure about what to do? intuitive healer and author Inna Segal explains how to go with your sense of intuition

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hether you need to heal your body, make a significant decision, connect with an important person, safeguard your life, find a solution to a work challenge or understand your children, a major key is in the effective use of your intuition. As a mum I’ve had to make many decisions about my children’s wellbeing based on my intuitive insights along with some research. This intuitive guidance has allowed me to use positive visualisations along with natural remedies to treat my children’s aches and pains and help them improve their confidence. To be intuitive means to be able to access the wise, all-knowing aspect of yourself and then to decipher the messages you receive and make empowering choices. As a parent, learning to be in tune with your baby can help you to create a stronger bond as well as assist you to be more perceptive about what your little one needs. Intuitive insights can come to you when you are awake, while meditating, dreaming, taking a shower, exercising, connecting to your body, feeding your baby or simply relaxing. While you may be more likely to access your intuition when you are in a meditative state, it can arise

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at any point, including during a time of crisis. Mona Lisa Schulz, in her book Awakening Intuition, writes, Intuition is an internal form of perception of things that are not directly in front of us in the world. It’s an inner sight, a form of hearing, body sense and emotion. It’s actually common to all the other senses and an enhancement of them. What differentiates intuition from the other senses is the unique form of expression it takes in each individual.

The Difference between Regular ThoughtS & Intuition The difference between regular thoughts and intuition is the quality of information that you receive. Thoughts come and go while intuition is often a persistent feeling. Thoughts change; intuition is more profound and feels like an inner knowing. Thoughts are often based on linear thinking; intuition is spontaneous and natural. Thoughts are fleeting, but intuition is often accompanied by bodily sensations and unexplained occurrences. In other words, you can sense that something is happening with your child, even though they can’t talk to you, and know how to soothe them, tell them the exact words they need to hear or offer them the food they are asking for etc. >


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baby Your intuition will not necessarily give you the message that you want to receive. This is one of the reasons you may tend to ignore it. I’ve always encouraged young mothers to listen to their inner wisdom. If you feel that your baby needs your attention and for you to hold, massage or feed them, do it. Connect to your bub by holding them close to your chest and breathing slowly while focusing on relaxing your body. Your baby will relax along with you. Then ask yourself, What does my baby need right now? Take a few moments to wait until you sense what they need. Trust your instinct. You are the one who will know your baby best. Intuition develops when you are willing to pay attention to your feelings and follow your hunches. Like exercising a muscle, the more you use your intuition, the more confidence you instil in yourself and the stronger your instincts become. The greatest power of intuitive insights is their ability to change the course of your actions and hence your life. Your intuition awakens when you allow yourself to embrace your sensitivity, feel your emotions and connect with nature. As you relax and allow yourself to get in touch with your body, you start to see the world around and within you from a different perspective. You begin to pay attention to messages from your body as well as the intelligence of the universe and your soul.

how to recognise intuition Whenever I have inquired from my Visionary Intuitive Healing workshop participants how they recognise an intuitive insight, most have said they experience a feeling of certainty, a knowing that is often sudden, emotional and not based on logic or prior knowledge. They may receive an unexpected understanding, a vision, the cause of a particular health or life issue, the answer to a question they have been pondering or guidance of what they have to do. Some also talk of tingling sensations, feeling changes in temperature, smelling scents or

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experiencing a particular taste in their mouth. Others hear sounds, receive guidance through universal signs or use astrology, numerology, cards, dreams and other methods. Everyone receives information in their unique way. Your intuition becomes your compass: a navigating device that helps you to be flexible, adjusting your course based on internal wisdom as well as the external life circumstances.

watch out for signs Signs can appear in your life in many different ways in order to guide you. Paolo Coelho, the author of The Alchemist, shared with me that when he finds a white feather, it is his sign to write a new book. Several of my workshop participants have talked about various signs that let them know if they are on the right track. For instance, Sue shared that when she dreams about flying she knows abundance is coming into her life. Tom told me three people offered him the same book within a week, which led him to understand about his physical condition. Carly was scared of giving birth and kept dreaming of needles. She did some research and realised that she needed acupuncture to help her balance her body and with the help of an acupuncturist gave birth naturally without much pain. To receive signs you may ask a question such as: Universal intelligence or the wisdom of my body please show me the next step I need to take. Then wait and be aware of any unusual events or persistent messages. They can come from dreams, people, a song you hear, a book etc. Be aware of your feelings and if your message or sign feels good then take steps forward. * Inna Segal is an internationally renowned intuitive healer and author. Her new book, The Secret Life of Wellness (Rockpool Publishing $29.99), is now available at good book stores and online at rockpool publishing.com.au. To find out more about Inna and the work she does head to innasegal.com.


PHOTOGRAPHY BY Nicole Proy of Mockingbird Photography

The

T H IN K ING WOM AN’S website

For Conception, Pregnancy, Birth and Baby

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How to bottlefeed – guilt free! not every new mother can breastfeed and the breastis-best campaign only makes it harder for these women. Madeleine Morris explains what to do if you can’t

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o you’ve made it through the birth, taken your precious bundle home, and you’re set to start living up to all those dreams you had while you were pregnant. Top of your list, of course, is breastfeeding, because that’s what everyone has told you is the single-most important thing you can do for your newborn.   But what if things don’t go so well? What if breastfeeding isn’t the natural, easy expression of motherhood that all of the pamphlets and books make it out to be? What if, despite great support from your family, help from health workers and you giving it your damnedest, it just doesn’t work out?   For most mums the answer will reluctantly be turning to formula, generally served up with a healthy side helping of guilt. Sadly, one side effect of the very valid push to increase rates of breastfeeding over the past 40 years has been the demonisation of formula. We have become caught up in the concept that good mothers breastfeed and bad mums bottle-feed, even

though the vast majority of Australian babies will have some formula before they are six months of age. In our new book Guilt-Free Bottle Feeding, my paediatrician co-author, Dr Sasha Howard, and I are on a mission to show mums that they are not failures if they don’t exclusively breastfeed.   We want women to ditch the guilt that burdens so many of us when breastfeeding doesn’t work out. Guilt, after all, achieves nothing, and as we explain, there is no need to feel guilty for not breastfeeding because you have done absolutely nothing wrong.   To help you on your own path, here are our top 10 emotional and practical tips for guiltfree bottle-feeding.  

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LISTEN TO YOURSELF In our quest to be the perfect mother it is easy to listen to every baby expert, every mummy blogger, everyone, in fact, except yourself. Breastfeeding is challenging for many >

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baby mums, and there will be times when you will need help and encouragement to keep going. There may also come a time when you know in your heart of hearts that you’ve done all you can, and for your own health or for your baby’s you need to bring in a bottle. The tricky thing is that no-one knows when this time is but you. Midwives like to tell war stories of mothers who’ve breastfed through repeat bouts of mastitis or whose nipples have bled for months on end and went on to nurse for years. But only you can know the lengths you are prepared to go to meet your goals, so make sure that in all the advice you seek, you listen to yourself above all.  Remember, feeding is a relationship – how you feel about it counts as well. In modern parenting we too easily forget that a mother’s feelings and physical and emotional health also matter. In the end, what a baby needs more than any form of milk is a contented, unstressed mother.  

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INFORM YOURSELF ABOUT FORMULA There’s no denying that breastmilk is great stuff, packed full of everything your baby needs to thrive including bioactive properties that boost her immune system. What is also true is that modern formula is a very good alternative.  While statistically, breastfed babies are, in the main, slightly healthier than formula-fed babies, the practical reality is that in a country like Australia, the differences between a wellcared-for formula-fed baby and a breastfed baby are actually very minimal.   As we explain in depth in Guilt-Free Bottle Feeding, many of the supposed health benefits of breastfeeding are actually a function of better parenting, and are smaller or less clearcut than we have been led to believe. In areas where there is an undoubted benefit, such as in reduced gastrointestinal infections, and fewer chest and ear infections, the actual statistical benefit could, in practice, mean as little as one or two fewer illnesses a year.

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SEEK SUPPORT It can feel very lonely when everyone in your mothers’ group is breastfeeding and no health professionals will give you any help or advice on formula. Fortunately, the internet is a wonderful place. Fantastic communities like bottlebabies. org and fearlessformulafeeder.com as well as our own website guiltfreebottlefeeding.com provide practical and emotional support when you need it most.   Join one of these online groups or ask for advice from other mums you have seen bottlefeeding. Some maternal and child health nurses can be supportive (though others can be judgemental) and formula companies also provide help lines to deal with the practical side of things. There’s no need to feel alone.

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DITCH THE UNSUPPORTIVE WEBSITES & MUMMY FRIENDS The other side of the internet is the plethora of mummy blogs and sites that judge parents who formula feed. You’ll soon figure out which ones fit the bill (hint: it’s most of them, sadly). Do not go there! Not only will these sites make you feel bad (because that’s their aim), any attempt to try to engage in sensible but balanced conversation will often result in a nasty troll-off. Especially if you’re still feeling vulnerable, it’s best just to leave well alone and stick with the sites that provide support.  The same goes for your mummy friends. Hopefully you’ve got a mothers’ group full of supportive women, but often there can be a sense of competition, and nothing seems to promote more competition than who is best at breastfeeding. Remember – no-one ever wins in these “mum-offs”. We’ve all got our own challenges and burdens; some are just better at hiding them than others. 

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WASH YOUR HANDS! This is so important when you have a new baby, especially if you’re formula feeding. Hands are the numberone way infection spreads, so washing them >


Maxi-mum benefits for you and your baby Swing maxi & Calma

The new double electric breastpump Swing maxi offers proven advantages: gain more milk with a higher energy content in less time. Thanks to the innovative breastmilk feeding solution Calma, switching from breast to bottle and back to the breast has never been easier. Benefit from precious time to care, relax and enjoy the most peaceful moments with your lovely baby. www.swing-maxi.com

Learn more about our Breastfeeding solutions at www.medela.com.au, and join the ‘Medela Australia’ Facebook community

“Pumping and feeding made easy with the medelaMe iPhone app, available on the App Store for free!” october 2014 | mychild

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baby often and thoroughly every time you feed your baby or handle their bottles should become second nature.  

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LEARN HOW TO SAFELY PREPARE FORMULA & STERILISE BOTTLES It’s not rocket science but learning how to safely sterilise your baby’s bottles and prepare their formula is important. In fact, bottles should be sterilised until your baby is at least six months old. Powdered formula should only ever be made with pre-boiled water, and preferably every bottle should be made up only as needed. It’s important to follow the formula manufacturer’s guidelines exactly when making a bottle, as too much or too little powder can make your baby sick.  

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FEED WITH LOVE & ATTENTION This is so important. Feeding is a wonderful way to promote bonding, and it doesn’t have to be from the breast in order for you both to benefit. Look into your baby’s eyes when you give her a feed and really try to tune into her. This helps to establish trust and closeness.  One of the ways in which both babies and mothers benefit from breastfeeding is through the hormones that the skin-to-skin contact stimulates. Bottle-feeding mums can promote this too through taking off your and your baby’s tops and cradling her close while you give her a feed. You might be surprised at how much you enjoy the experience, even if you feel a little awkward to begin with.  

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ALWAYS THROW OUT UNFINISHED FORMULA AFTER AN HOUR Formula is FOLLOW YOUR BABY’S HUNGER CUES not sterile, and despite your best efforts at It’s much easier to overfeed a bottle-fed baby than a breastfed one, so always make sure sterilising, small amounts of bacteria can be found in bottles. This is not harmful, however you follow your baby’s hunger signals. If she bacteria can quickly multiply in slightly chilled, doesn’t appear to want a feed (she is turning her head away or pushing out the teat with her room-temperature or warm bottles, which is tongue) stop, even if it’s just at the start of the why it is important to throw out any unused feed. You can offer it again in 15 minutes or so.   formula after an hour. Don’t put the bottle back in the fridge. Make a new bottle next Just as with breastfeeding, your baby will need little breaks as she drinks her bottle. This time you need it.

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“Feeding is a wonderful way to promote bonding, and it doesn’t have to be from the breast in order for you both to benefit. Look into your baby’s eyes when you give her a feed…” gives her an opportunity to digest what she’s had and sense if she needs more. It also offers a chance to burp her. Also, never make a baby finish a bottle if she doesn’t appear to want to, and never, ever prop up a bottle.   Following these guidelines will help to avoid overfeeding and reduce the risk of your baby becoming overweight.

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LISTEN TO YOUR BABY Finally, the best judge of whether you’re doing the right thing is your baby. In trying to fulfill everyone’s expectations of us, not least our own, we can sometimes forget that the person we should be listening to most closely is the little gurgling one in front of us. Is she happy? Is your baby healthy and thriving? If yes, then you’re being the best mum you can be, no matter how she is being fed. * Guilt-Free Bottle Feeding: Why your Formula-fed Baby can be Happy, Healthy and Smart by Madeleine Morris with Dr Sasha Howard (Finch, paperback $24.99 and e-book $9.99). Head to finch.com.au for details.


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TODDLER

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No fuss! Does your toddler turn their nose up at what’s offered every mealtime? Health coach Brenda Janschek shares her 11 top tips for getting your child to eat

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roviding kids with a nutritious diet is an important responsibility for parents, but it can also become the bane of your existence. What do you do when the rascals refuse to try anything? Don’t stress. Here are some strategies that introduce variety, fun and appreciation into mealtimes. Serve a wide range of foods Research suggests that introducing a variety of food straight from weaning means it will be more readily accepted as a way of life. Focus on foods they already enjoy Relate the food to something important to them: green smoothies give you energy like The Hulk, avocado helps make the skin and hair shiny, and meat helps to build big muscles! Prepare food in different ways A child may prefer blueberries in a smoothie rather than alone or dislike steamed carrot but love it raw. Offer the food in different ways. Make it tasty! Splashes of flavour make food more appealing. Butter over steamed vegies adds nutrients, making the vitamins bioavailable. A drizzle of olive oil strengthens the immune system. Raw garlic makes dips tasty and has antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal properties. Serve one meal Don’t make separate meals. Studies show that children who eat the same as their parents have healthier diets and it saves you time, too!

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Celebrate mealtimes together The ritual of eating great food and connecting as a family at least once a day helps instil positive feelings around food. Try & try again Research indicates new foods might need to be offered up to 100 times before it will be accepted so don’t be dissuaded – just keep offering new foods at every opportunity. Make it fun Create little faces, animals or cars out of cut-up fruit and vegies. Fun and food is a tremendously positive association. Offer choices Give them a choice between healthy options. For example, cucumber or carrot, apple or orange, chicken or fish? You are still in control, but kids feel empowered and confident when given options. Kids in the kitchen Children who choose and prepare meals are more likely to eat what they have created. Get your kids into the kitchen as early as possible! Pick your times wisely Introducing new, healthy foods when children are hungry increases your chances of success. Battles with kids and food are almost a given in life, but you now have a toolkit to make meal times easier (and healthier!). * Brenda Janschek is a qualified health and lifestyle coach, blogger, presenter and spokesperson. Visit facebook.com/bjhealthandlifestyle, twitter.com/ bjanschek and brendajanschek.com.

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NEWS

PRESCHOOLER&BIG K Pigs can’t fly! Learning to share can be a big challenge for little kids, which is where Aaron Blabey’s Pig the Pug (Scholastic Press, $16.99) may assist! In this vividly illustrated and funny tale, greedy Pig never wants to share his toys with poor Trevor the sausage dog… until one day an unfortunate accident leads to a timely end – and a lesson learned!

First aid for kids

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Stuttering OK

There’s good news for parents concerned about their child’s stuttering. According to new analysis of two pre-existing studies, the Early Language in Victoria Study (ELVS) and the ELVS Stuttering Study, young children who stutter may have stronger language ability than their peers. However, even if they don’t, the study’s co-author Amy Watts, says, ‘The most important point is that… the children who stutter, as well as the control group, have developmentally appropriate language skills.’

written By hannah saunders

A first-aid course designed for preschoolers is now available from First Aid For You. Created to be held in a group childcare setting and run by trainers located within 100km of any capital city CBD, these short courses teach elementary first aid so that young children know what to do in an emergency. Founder Mary Dawes offers these tips to parents: • when teaching your child emergency phone numbers, sit them down and try to keep distractions to a minimum • get them to recite your address and phone number so, if required, they give the correct information to emergency services • show your kids the first-aid kit in your home and explain what each item is used for. To book and for pricing information head to firstaidforyou.com.au or call 1300 853 050.


KIDS

Sock it to pocket money

The financial habits children form in childhood and their parents’ attitude to money can have a huge impact on the financial wellbeing of our kids as they grow up. Recent research from lifeinsurance company TAL reveals 52 percent of seven- to 10-year-olds are expected to help around the house to earn pocket money, while 23 percent of parents pay pocket money as a reward for good behaviour. Average earnings for this age group is $8.50 a week and grows to $14.30 for 11- to 14-year-olds. Jim Minto from TAL explains, ‘No matter what the arrangement is, the important point is that families have conversations about the value and importance of money to help achieve financial wellbeing.’

The more a child watches TV, the more toys they will want and ask for

A great reason to get fit

US researchers have discovered there is a direct link between physical exercise and brain activity. The American University of Illinois study reveals that aerobically fit children are brainier than their unfit peers. The study’s scientists say fit 10-yearolds have denser regions of white matter in their brains, making them better at paying attention, reasoning and retaining memories. Seeing as this phenomenon can function across a person’s lifespan, here are six tips to getting more active with your kids: Walk or ride bicycles with your children to and from school. Work towards participating in an activity challenge together such as a local fun run or walk for charity. Take your dog for a walk together each day – or a neighbour’s dog. Encourage your child and support them to participate in team sports such as netball, cricket, nippers, rugby or soccer. Set aside time each weekend to share an activity together. Kite flying, hiking, kayaking, playing frisbee or indoor climbing are fun for kids and adults alike. Buy your child gifts that encourage them to be active such as bats, balls and skateboards.

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shopping

Preschooler&big k h20 on the go

hang out Decorate your child’s room with Mr Strong Bunting, $20, by Charlie Loves Pearl, which displays original pages from the iconic Mr Men books. There are lots of themed buntings including Little Miss Chatterbox, $20, Thomas the Tank Engine, $15, and Alice in Wonderland, $20. Purchase from madeit.com.au/charlielovespearl.

Bobble Art produces a range of Australiandesigned bags, accessories and stationery for children in 12 fun and unique designs. This Circus drink bottle, $24.95, is made from stainless steel, is recyclable and keeps 400ml of liquid refreshingly cool. The bright and colourful cap is designed to avoid spillage, making the bottle practical to carry in backpacks. Why not match it with the circus lunch box, $24.95, or backpack, $39.95? Available for purchase at bobbleart.com.au.

blast off! Let your little man enjoy a tea party with this Rocket Man tea set, $29.95 by Baby Vegas. Included in the wicker-style basket are four cups, saucers and plates, one serving tray and a teapot. Explore more of the range, which includes the Pink Princess, $39.95, I’m a Little Tea Pot, $37.95, and Central Park, $34.95, sets. You can also see the Baby Vegas collection of toys and dressup outfits at baby vegas.com.au.

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tidy up Designed by Mor-Stor, these Charlie Canvas Storage Cubes, $14.95 each, are available in red, navy, hot pink and white. Produced from durable nylon canvas fabric, they’re ideal for separating toys, dress-up clothes and craft supplies. See more at mor-stor.com.au.


kids around the world

pack it in

Eating can be educational with this Map Plate, $12.95 by Education on a Plate. Available from educationonaplate.com.au, it highlights the oceans and continents. Suitable for children aged five to 10, the border of the plate is filled with useful facts such as the highest mountain in the world, the coldest continent and the biggest ocean. Also available are clock, time-table and alphabet plates, to name just a few!

Priced at $34.99, this Truck Backpack by Babymel is the perfect companion for your little explorer. Featuring adjustable shoulder straps, quilted back lining, an external bottle pocket and an external velcro front pocket, it is available in Rocket, Tea Party or Buzzy Bee designs. Pair it with the matching food bag, $29.99. Go to babymel.com.

sleepy heads

jazzy jars This set of three large Wild Jars, $39.99, has been handcrafted by Made by LT. Kids will love storing all their marbles, pencils, craft supplies and more in these colourful jars, which come with animal figurines on the lids. See more fun finds at madeit.com.au/MadebyLT.

Designed in Australia and recently launched in the UK, Europe and Northern America, Mini ZZZ’s PJ range is ideal for summer, keeping your child cool and comfy while they snooze. Available in sizes 2 to 7, this cotton Planes pyjama set, $24.95, is machine washable and comes in a range of prints including Race Car, Jet Fighter and Boat for boys. Girls’ designs include Rainbow, Carousel and Puppy. Visit minizzz.com.

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preschooler

The cost of lack of play Educator Maggie Dent questions whether our kids are missing out on essential skills because of a push for more formalised education at younger ages

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s an author, I’m constantly researching best practice in children’s early years and adolescence, and it staggers me to see the push down towards formalised learning that is happening across Australia when there is no evidence or research that validates that this can have a positive influence on children. Indeed, the only evidence I have seen shows the negative effects it has on young lives. The current emphasis on formalised learning in kindergarten and preschool is something that worries me deeply. This trend has come from the UK and US, and is partly driven by decision-makers who are unaware of the key developmental stages of early childhood. Our children are not brains sitting on a seat waiting to be tested. They have minds, bodies, hearts and souls and all of these levels must be nurtured, especially in our early years’ centres and classrooms. This is a concern shared by many experts around the world. In Australia, the changes that have come about in the past six years under the former Labor Government have had a disastrous effect on the health and wellbeing of the children of Australia. The unintended negative side effects of NAPLAN and the subsequent posting of the

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school results on the My School website has created an insidious pressure to push formal learning down to four- and five-year-olds in the pursuit of improved outcomes in numeracy and literacy by Year 3. This is what I hear regularly from parents and other sources: • massive increase in suspensions of under sixyear-olds from kindy/prep for inappropriate behaviour (mainly boys) • many examples of repressed and regressed behaviours of five- to six-year-old children – signs of significant distress • meltdowns in the car after school or at home • reluctance to attend preschool/kindy – and within six weeks of starting school • significant increase in ADHD (in NSW the number of children taking medications has increased 133 percent since 2005) • increase in anxiety and mental health issues in children and adolescents • four-year-olds getting homework and sevenyear-olds with two hours homework a night • more need for specialised behaviour schools for children who are unable to mix well with other children in mainstream school • increases in Autism Spectrum Disorder and these kids in classrooms without support >


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preschooler • early years’ educators being directed to teach in ways that are out of alignment with their education and experience as to what is best for young children • removal of play from four- to five-year-old learning environments both inside and outside • more inside activity with no movement and little student autonomy • more depression and self harm in children from age four • more children needing assistance from allied health professionals. Erik Jensen, one of the world’s leading brain experts in terms of education, would argue that unless kids are engaged in novel, challenging and meaningful learning that includes physical activity and a degree of coherent complexity – which means there’s no boredom or chaos, and there is a healthy level of stress – then it’s impossible for the brain to learn, to remember, and to repair and maintain neural circuits. We are expecting today’s young children to learn in brain antagonistic environments. For indigenous children, for the vast majority of our boys, for children who have English as a second language and for children who have additional needs, we are creating environments that make it impossible for them to do well. We must revisit this as setting children up to fail like this has lifelong consequences. Perhaps this is a contributing reason why the COAG Reform Council report on education, released in October 2013, showed that the gap for indigenous children and disadvantaged children is growing ever wider under the new system, despite some noted improvements in “outcomes” overall.

NOW FOR SOME GOOD NEWS I believe many educators and communities are swinging back in their approach to play – from play being ridiculously boring, safe and demonised as benign and unimportant in kids’ lives, to something that is valued in all its glory, as a profoundly important part of every child’s

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growth and development on every level. There is an urgency about this movement because we are losing children to the screen world and this will lead to developmental delays to children under five if they are doing screen activities instead of physical childdirected activities more than 20 percent of the time. Play environments that encourage kids to move, explore, model, play, problem solve, create, build, question and have fun will create children who are not only capable to cope with school, they will be more than able to cope with life. When a child is immersed in play, so much so that they do not notice time go by, they reach a place of incredible significance. Firstly it is a moment of transcendence from the ordinary world. Natural, drug-free, chemicalfree transcendence is very healthy for later life. Secondly, that absorption is often a clue in later life about life purpose, what is important to them. For some children the activity can be watching ants, playing nurses or maybe building in the sandpit. It has a soul connection that needs to be honoured, if not treasured.

BRING MORE PLAY INTO their LIVES Let babies and children direct their own play – everything is interesting! • friendship is shaped by early connectedness, so give your children lots of opportunities to play with cousins, close family friends and other children they see often • exploratory, undirected play is important as it stimulates the “seeking mechanism” • unstructured play gives children a sense of early autonomy and of having a sense of control in their world, and is vitally important in helping to shape the innate character and personality of children • cerebellum play (tumbling, spinning, rolling and balancing) enhances the sensory system • absorbed play is magic – never interrupt a child in this state • children need more play in the natural world:


they can play more creatively, there is better social cohesion along with better problem solving and negotiation skills, and deeper immersion in the play experience • vigorous play helps diffuse excess energy and emotions, and stimulates “feel good” chemicals in the body • games help to build emotional competence such as learning to lose, to wait your turn, to concentrate and to finish things • the more play the better! • the more families play together, the better connected, healthier and stronger they are • modelling play and sport when children are young gives them a better chance of being healthy and active in life and also helps avoid obesity • catching and throwing balls with young children helps develop skills that help them achieve well in school • “rough and tumble” play with fathers in particular is healthy.

PUTTING PLAY BACK INTO POLICY The evidence is in – the erosion of play in kindergarten and preschool can be damaging not only to our young children’s cognitive and psychological growth and development, it can also hinder their ability to function as social beings, which is still our key biological drive. The rise in aggressive behaviour being exhibited by many younger children, mainly boys, is a sign they are unable to cope with environments that offer barely any opportunity to play, no fun and little movement along with developmentally inappropriate tasks – and we then penalise these children by suspending or expelling them! We are failing them – they are not failing school. Low social competence tends to follow right throughout life and sets children up for mental illness in adolescence and adulthood. To ensure that play is valued and encouraged I believe we need to train parents, teachers and our school leaders about the key aspects

of exploratory play, competitive and noncompetitive play, imaginary play, modelling play, cognitive play, child and adult-directed play, and using play to help develop a love of reading, language, dance, movement and music in our children. There are many teachers focused on childcentred learning in our existing system and they are nurturing student growth on all levels within the mainstream schooling system. Yet a teacher at a school two kilometres away can be doing the opposite – setting homework for four-year-olds, expecting children to complete endless hours of worksheets and sitting at their desks. I question why there is such scope for disparity, despite these schools teaching the same curriculum. Basically, it comes down to a lack of understanding about play-based learning, not only in policy but at the coalface. However, there are many shining examples of best practice. I am hoping that you now have a greater understanding of why movement is just so important in babies’, toddlers’ and children’s lives. Passivity is the new enemy! Please ensure that you do all you can to allow your children to have lots of fun, plenty of laughter and play, especially in the early years. It helps them build their physical fitness, as well as their psychological wellbeing and their capacity for self-regulation, all of which is so important in learning and integrating into social environments like schools. Please become a champion for your children and tell other people that physical movement and play is incredibly important on so many levels. * This is an edited extract from Maggie Dent’s 9 Things: A Back-to-Basics Guide to Calm, Common-Sense, Connected Parenting Birth-8 (Pennington Publications, ($29.95). Maggie is the author of seven books, an educator, speaker and mother of four sons. Visit maggiedent.com.

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BIG KIDS

Keeping kids safe At what age can children have an email account? And what about facebook? How do you protect them when they’re online? Psychologist Dr Michael Carr-Gregg answers all these questions and more

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hese days kids are practically born with a mouse in their hand. They see no distinction between the online world and the real world – to them the online world is as real and relevant as the offline one. This ceaseless, 24/7 connection involves an everchanging list of communication platforms, including email; phone text messages; instant messaging on Skype, Facebook and online games; posts on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, YouTube and Foursquare… the list is endless. Social networking’s appeal to adolescents is obvious. When you couple this appeal with children’s characteristic inability to predict the consequences of their actions, you have a recipe for young people over-sharing personal information on digital platforms in what is essentially an adult world. However, don’t buy into the moral panic about the internet. It’s perfectly usual for young people to want to share information about themselves online. Remember, too, that all young people have a sensitivity to being controlled, so resist the temptation to lecture or to preach, or to scare them straight by labouring the dangers of the internet, which they will undoubtedly reject as

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adult overreaction. Instead, try sharing practical information and protective strategies. Each social media site, search engine and online game has privacy and safety information for users – some with parent information pages.

What do our kids know about online safety? Australian kids are pretty switched on when it comes to online safety, if the results of the 2012 study commissioned by ACMA are anything to go by. The report titled Like, Post, Share: Young Australians’ Experience of Social Media concludes that our kids and young people are generally aware of the importance of protecting their online privacy and are ‘actively taking steps to stay in control of the personal information that they make public’. The study found that the majority of 12to 17-year-olds claimed to know how to find internet safety information, block people and change privacy settings. The proportion of kids surveyed who had completed at least one of the privacy management actions ranged from 51 percent of 12- to 13-year-olds to 68 percent of 14- to 17-year-olds. They were most likely >


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big kids to delete people from their network or friends list or delete comments made on their profile (either by themselves or others). While a large proportion of young people reported having shared their device’s password with someone else, it was largely with a trusted adult or sibling. Around 10 percent of eightto 11-year-olds reported having shared their password with a friend, and children were less likely to share as they got older, as shown by the fact that more than half of 16- to 17-yearolds had never shared passwords with anyone. The study also found that the vast majority of young Australians had discussed cyber safety issues with someone, usually their parents (ranging from 78 to 87 percent) while the most popular topics included: why sharing personal information online is a bad idea, safe ways to use the internet and the risks of using social networking services. That said, only half of the eight- to 11-year-olds had discussed cyber safety issues with their parents. The researchers also found the majority of children had not engaged in the surveyed risk behaviours – only a minority had deliberately

Safety tips When you share things online you need to protect your reputation – think before you post, chat, download or upload, and be very careful when connecting with a smartphone. Don’t become friends with people who you don’t know. Don’t share passwords with anyone, except trusted adults like your parents. Don’t give anyone personal information like your phone number, home address or email address (that includes stripping it from your Facebook profile). Double-check your privacy settings so that the information you share is only

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provided strangers with any personal details, sent a selfie to someone they had never met or had pretended to be someone “different”.

Should my child have an email account? For many primary-school aged children, their first experience of email will be setting up an account through their school website, often as early as Year 2 or 3, to enable communication with teachers and parents. If your child asks to set up their own webmail account with a client such as Gmail or Yahoo!, you need to think about whether they are old enough and mature enough to have an account that will give some independence online. If your child is setting up an email account, here are some simple steps you can take to help them use it safely and securely: • set up the account with them so that you get a good idea of what personal information has been asked for and the functionality of the account • ask your child to only email people who they know and trust in the real world

seen by people you want to see it. Learn how to block contacts you don’t want to talk to. Don’t use a webcam with strangers as what appears can be recorded by your watchers and shared with others. Respect your friends’ privacy too. Check with them before you tag them in photos or post a location. Look into what location services are enabled on your mobile phone and switch off all unnecessary ones. Be very careful about checking in from your mobile phone; this lets people know where you are and what you’re doing. Don’t display your location to those nearby who you might not know.

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• warn them about never opening attachments from an unknown sender as it could contain a virus, a trojan or another malicious program that harms the computer • tell them not to click on links they don’t recognise as it might take them to a site with inappropriate content • check if the email client offers any parental controls to assist you with the moderation of the account or, for younger children, if it is possible to have a family account with a shared password.

what about facebook? There is a tendency by some parents and educators to demonise social networking sites, particularly Facebook, because of the number of underage users (with all the implications for child safety), the proliferation of hate speech (permitting racist, homophobic or sexist pages), and the length of time that Facebook takes to terminate accounts following abuse. However, everyone just needs to take a deep breath and realise that Facebook is not satanic. Like many other social networking sites, Facebook requires users to be older than 13 because the site enables children to share an incredible amount of information about themselves and to have conversations with strangers. However, increasing numbers of children are registering by claiming to be older than they are, and are doing so behind their parents’ disapproving backs. In my opinion, it is far better for a child of 11 or 12 to register with your involvement, rather than have them hide what they are doing from you. Just recently, Facebook decided to relax its rules for teens. Thirteen- to 17-year-olds now have the option to share photos, updates and comments with the general public on Facebook. This means that strangers, not to mention companies collecting data for advertisers and marketing companies, can see select posts. Disturbingly, your kids are now able to turn on the “follow” feature on their profile, which

allows anyone they are not friends with to see their public posts. Having been around for nine years, Facebook stopped being a hip place for children when it became populated by parents and grandparents and the company must work hard to hang onto the lucrative teen market! Here are some things you can do to help your child set up a Facebook account safely: • help them to set it up so you can ensure they don’t include any unnecessary personal information • if your child is 11 or 12, ensure that they’re registered as a 13-year-old rather than any older, as Facebook has separate security settings in place for younger users • go through the privacy settings together, step by step, making sure the privacy settings are set to “friends only” • ask them to only accept friend requests from people they know and trust in the real world • limit the amount of adult “friends” they have – these could be family members or friends of yours – as these users may post content that you would not want your child to see! • talk to them about some of the things that can go wrong, such as bullying, unwanted contact and inappropriate content. Tell them sometimes so-called friends can be mean online and it’s important that a child is aware of what they can do to block or report this • ask them to talk to you about anything that makes them feel worried or unhappy • learn how to report any issues directly to the website • if your child is already an underage user, join Facebook yourself and ask your child to be their friend. This is one way to see who is posting what on their profile. Alternatively, revisit their profile with them at a later date to check privacy settings. * This is an edited extract from Beyond Cyberbullying: An Essential Guide for Parenting in the Digital Age by Michael CarrGregg (Penguin, $19.99).

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Not all those who wander are lost. JRR Tolkien

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My Child Magazine October 2014 Issue  

At My Child Magazine, we pride ourselves on providing a Free Parenting Lifestyle publication to help you on your parenting journey! It's use...

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