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MICHAEL BEENE PORTFOLIO _ 2009 / 2012


contents

MICHAEL BEENE PORTFOLIO _ 2009 / 2012

1 2 3 4 5 6

p1

void(house){ spring 2011

p 11

learning tool spring 2009

p 15

prd cargo terminal fall 2011

p 31

urban power gauge summer 2011

p 37

fudan university spring 2012

p 47

curriculum vitae


1-2

1 void(house){ spring 2011 academic work graduate studio university of texas at austin

Many multi-family housing projects since the 19th Century have used large-scale massing strategies to ensure that each dwelling unit would receive adequate access, light, and air. Typologies like the courtyard block and cruciform plan facilitated the efficiency with which these needs could be met by allowing the architect to design fewer, wellfunctioning units that could be repeated ad infinitum. Today, as the desire for individual expression underlies nearly every facet of our culture, the primary disadvantage of this approach becomes clear: its reliance upon repetition does not recognize the heightened role of the individual in today’s society. This project explores an alternative to the large-scale massing approach of multi-family housing. By breaking down each unit into its most primary components (bedroom, kitchen, terrace, etc.) and procedurally reassembling them with regards to access, light, and air, the resultant building provides a limitless variety of experiences without sacrificing functional performance. A computer algorithm was written that

begins with the program requirements, site dimensions, and site location (latitude and longitude), along with a desired minimum of direct daylight hours for each unit’s living room window. The algorithm proceeds to build units individually, ensuring that each floor plan is completely unique. With each unit, the algorithm monitors whether performance conditions are met (i.e. the unit itself has adequate sunlight and does not impede the sunlight of other units). If conditions are satisfied, the algorithm continues forward with the design; otherwise, it tries a different solution. Service and public programs are interspersed along circulation paths and covered with terraformed park spaces for use by the residents. Like the cells of an organism, the components of the building react to their immediate contexts according to basic rules, allowing larger patterns to emerge naturally. The lack of reliance upon unit repetition creates an environment that fosters individual experiences while excelling functionally


void(house){ 1.1 le corbusier presenting a model of villa radieuse. while large-scale massing strategies ensured adequate access, light, and air, they fell out of favor

1.1


//adjustable program parameters int numResUnitXL = 25; int numResUnitL = 50; int numResUnitM = 75; int numResUnitS = 100; int numCircCore = 2;

void draw() { //export .dxf if (record == true) { beginRaw(DXF, “output.dxf”); // Start recording to the file }

//calculate adjacencies for (int i = 1; i < numGridLinesX; i++) { for (int j = 1; j < numGridLinesY; j++) { for (int k = 1; k < numGridLinesZ; k++) { //building parameter variables background(255); int adj = 0; float siteWidth = 340; lights(); if(prog[i + 1][j][k] != 0) { float siteDepth = 280; //draw site lines adj++; float buildingW = 340; stroke(0,0,0,50); } float buildingD = 280; noFill(); if(prog[i - 1][j][k] != 0) { float buildingH = 150; rect(0,0,siteWidth,siteDepth); adj++; float gridSpaceX = 14; } float gridSpaceY = 14; //draw building if(prog[i][j + 1][k] != 0) { float gridSpaceZ = 10; for (int i = 1; i < numGridLinesX; adj++; int numGridLinesX = int(buildingW/ i++) { } gridSpaceX) + 1; for (int j = 1; j < if(prog[i + 1][j - 1][k] != 0) int numGridLinesY = int(buildingD/ numGridLinesY; j++) { { gridSpaceY) + 1; for (int k = 1; k < adj++; int numGridLinesZ = int(buildingH/ numGridLinesZ; k++) { } gridSpaceZ) + 1; if(prog[i][j][k] == 1) { // numAdj[i][j][k] = adj; float[]gridX= new draw resUnitXLEntrance } float[numGridLinesX]; pushMatrix(); } float[]gridY= new translate(gridX[i - 1], } float[numGridLinesY]; gridY[j - 1], //calculate sunlight 1. gridZ[k - 1]); float[]gridZ= new noFill(); float inc = (12 * 60) / initial 12’x 12’ organizational grid float[numGridLinesZ]; stroke(0,150,180); solarTimeIncrement; int[][][] prog = new rect(0, 0, gridSpaceX, for(int i = 0; i < inc; i++) { int[numGridLinesX + 1][numGridLinesY gridSpaceY); float azimuth = (PI/inc) * i; + 1][numGridLinesZ + 1]; if(renderMode == 1) { float elevationAngle = map(1 + int[][][]unitID = new translate(gridSpaceX/2,gr cos(PI + map(i,0,inc,0,2 * PI)),0,2,0,r int[numGridLinesX + 1][numGridLinesY idSpaceY/2,gridSpaceZ/2); adians(solarNoonAngle)); + 1][numGridLinesZ + 1]; stroke(0); stroke(0); fill(255); int solarAccess = 1; int unitStep = 0; box(gridSpaceX,gridSpaceY for(int k = 0; k < int roomStep = 0; ,gridSpaceZ); solarAccessAccuracy; k++) { int fail = 0; } for(int m = 0; m < int[][][] numAdj = new popMatrix(); resUnitSCounter; m++) { //check int[numGridLinesX + 1][numGridLinesY } intersections with small units + 1][numGridLinesZ + 1]; if(prog[i][j][k] == 2) { // if(resUnitSX[j] + resUnitSW[j]/2 draw resUnitXLLive1 + (k * solarAccessDistance/ //extra large residential unit pushMatrix(); solarAccessAccuracy * cos(-azimuth)) > variables translate(gridX[i - 1], resUnitSX[m] && int resUnitXLCounter = 0; gridY[j - 1], gridZ[k - 1]); resUnitSX[j] + resUnitSW[j]/2 int resUnitXLEntranceX; noFill(); + (k * solarAccessDistance/ int resUnitXLEntranceY; stroke(0,150,180); solarAccessAccuracy * cos(-azimuth)) < int resUnitXLEntranceZ; rect(0, 0, gridSpaceX, resUnitSX[m] + resUnitSW[m] && int resUnitXLLive1X; gridSpaceY); resUnitSY[j] + (k* int resUnitXLLive1Y; if(renderMode == 1) { solarAccessDistance/solarAccessAccuracy int resUnitXLLive1Z; translate(gridSpaceX/2,gr * sin(-azimuth)) > resUnitSY[m] && int resUnitXLLive2X; idSpaceY/2,gridSpaceZ/2); resUnitSY[j] + (k* int resUnitXLLive2Y; stroke(0); solarAccessDistance/solarAccessAccuracy int resUnitXLLive2Z; fill(255); * sin(-azimuth)) < resUnitSY[m] + int resUnitXLTerrace1X; box(gridSpaceX,gridSpaceY resUnitSD[m] && int resUnitXLTerrace1Y; ,gridSpaceZ); resUnitSZ[j] + resUnitSH[j]/2 int resUnitXLTerrace1Z; } + (k * solarAccessDistance/ int resUnitXLTerrace2X; popMatrix(); solarAccessAccuracy * 2. int resUnitXLTerrace2Y; } sin(elevationAngle)) > resUnitSZ[m] && circulation cores and pathways int resUnitXLTerrace2Z; if(prog[i][j][k] == 3) { // resUnitSZ[j] + resUnitSH[j]/2 int resUnitXLTerrace3X; draw resUnitXLLive2 + (k * solarAccessDistance/ int resUnitXLTerrace3Y; pushMatrix(); solarAccessAccuracy * int resUnitXLTerrace3Z; translate(gridX[i - 1], sin(elevationAngle)) < resUnitSZ[m] + int resUnitXLKit1X; gridY[j - 1], gridZ[k - 1]); resUnitSH[m]) { int resUnitXLKit1Y; noFill(); solarAccess = 0; int resUnitXLKit1Z; stroke(0,150,180); } int resUnitXLKit2X; rect(0, 0, gridSpaceX, } int resUnitXLKit2Y; gridSpaceY); } int resUnitXLKit2Z; if(renderMode == 1) { } int resUnitXLBed1X; translate(gridSpaceX/2,gr //DEFINE RES UNIT EXTRA LARGE int resUnitXLBed1Y; idSpaceY/2,gridSpaceZ/2); if(unitStep == 0) { //define extra int resUnitXLBed1Z; stroke(0); large residential unit int resUnitXLBed2X; fill(255); if(roomStep == 0) { // define int resUnitXLBed2Y; box(gridSpaceX,gridSpaceY entrance int resUnitXLBed2Z; ,gridSpaceZ); resUnitXLEntranceX = int resUnitXLMBed1X; } int(random(1,numGridLinesX)); int resUnitXLMBed1Y; popMatrix(); resUnitXLEntranceY = int resUnitXLMBed1Z; } int(random(1,numGridLinesY)); int resUnitXLMBed2X; if(prog[i][j][k] == 4) { // resUnitXLEntranceZ = int resUnitXLMBed2Y; draw resUnitXLKit1 int(random(1,numGridLinesZ)); int resUnitXLMBed2Z; pushMatrix(); if(prog[resUnitXLEntranceX] translate(gridX[i - 1], [resUnitXLEntranceY][resUnitXLEntranceZ] //large residential unit variables gridY[j - 1], gridZ[k - 1]); == 0 &&

*

*


if(rand == 1) { void keyPressed() { childCareX = resUnitLLive1X = if(keyCode == ENTER) { int(random(1,(numGridLinesX + 1) resUnitLEntranceX - 1; for(int i = 1; i < numGridLinesX childCareW)); resUnitLLive1Y = + 1; i ++) { childCareY = resUnitLEntranceY; for(int j = 1; j < int(random(1,(numGridLinesY) resUnitLLive1Z = numGridLinesY + 1; j ++) { childCareW)); resUnitLEntranceZ; for(int k = 1; k < childCareZ = } numGridLinesZ + 1; k ++) { int(random(1,(numGridLinesZ) if(rand == 2) { unitID[i][j][k] = 0; childCareW)); resUnitLLive1X = prog[i][j][k] = 0; boolean validAttempt = true; resUnitLEntranceX; } for(int j = 0; j < childCareW; resUnitLLive1Y = } j++) { //if any cells are already resUnitLEntranceY + 1; } occupied resUnitLLive1Z = // define circulation core for(int k = 0; k < childCareD; k++) { resUnitLEntranceZ; for(int i = 0; i < numCircCore; for(int l = 0; l < } i++) { childCareH; l++) { if(rand == 3) { circCoreGridX = int(random(1, if(prog[childCareX + j] resUnitLLive1X = numGridLinesX - 1)); [childCareY + k][childCareZ + l] != 0){ resUnitLEntranceX; circCoreGridY = int(random(1, validAttempt = false; resUnitLLive1Y = numGridLinesY - 1)); } resUnitLEntranceY - 1; boolean validAttempt = true; } resUnitLLive1Z = for(int j = 0; j < } resUnitLEntranceZ; numGridLinesZ; j++) { } } if(prog[circCoreGridX] if(prog[childCareX][childCareY if(prog[resUnitLLive1X] [circCoreGridY][j] != 0) { 1][childCareZ] != 37 && [resUnitLLive1Y][resUnitLLive1Z] == validAttempt = false; prog[childCareX - 1] 0 && } [childCareY][childCareZ] != 37){ resUnitLLive1X > 0 && } validAttempt = false; resUnitLLive1X < if(validAttempt == true) { } numGridLinesX && for(int j = 0; j < if(validAttempt == true){ resUnitLLive1Y > 0 && numGridLinesX + 1; j++) { for(int m = 0; m < childCareW; resUnitLLive1Y < for(int k = 0; k < m++) { numGridLinesY) { //if conditions to numGridLinesZ + 1; k++) { for(int n = 0; n < place program here are satisfied prog[j][circCoreGridY] childCareD; n++) { prog[resUnitLLive1X] [k] = 37; 3. for(int o = 0; o < [resUnitLLive1Y][resUnitLLive1Z] = } childCareH; o++) { 14; public program and running track } prog[childCareX + m] roomStep ++; for(int j = 0; j < [childCareY + n][childCareZ + o] = 39; fail = 0; numGridLinesY + 1; j++) { } } for(int k = 0; k < } else { numGridLinesZ + 1; k++) { } fail++; prog[circCoreGridX][j] } else { if(fail == 20) { //if a [k] = 37; i--; working solution cannot be found, } } destroy this unit entirely and try } } again } //define park prog[resUnitLEntranceX] else { for(int i = 0; i < numPark; i++){ [resUnitLEntranceY] i--; parkX = [resUnitLEntranceZ] = 0; } int(random(1,(numGridLinesX + 1) roomStep = 0; } parkW)); fail = 0; //define track (may overlap parkY = } circulation) int(random(1,(numGridLinesY) - parkW)); } for(int i = 0; i < numTrack; i++) parkZ = int(random(numGridLinesZ } { - 4, numGridLinesZ - parkH)); if(roomStep == 2) { // define trackZ = boolean validAttempt = true; kitchen 1 int(random(1,numGridLinesZ - 1)); for(int j = 0; j < parkW; j++) { int rand = int(random(12)); boolean validAttempt = true; //if any cells are already occupied if(rand == 0) { if(prog[1][1][trackZ + 1] == for(int k = 0; k < parkD; k++) resUnitLKit1X = 40){ { resUnitLEntranceX + 1; validAttempt = false; for(int l = 0; l < parkH; resUnitLKit1Y = } l++) { resUnitLEntranceY; if(validAttempt == true){ if(prog[parkX + j][parkY + resUnitLKit1Z = for(int m = 0; m < k][parkZ + l] != 0){ resUnitLEntranceZ; numGridLinesX; m++) { validAttempt = false; } prog[1 + m][1][trackZ] = } if(rand == 1) { 40; } resUnitLKit1X = prog[1 + m][numGridLinesY } resUnitLEntranceX - 1; 1][trackZ] = 40; } resUnitLKit1Y = } if(prog[parkX][parkY - 1][parkZ] resUnitLEntranceY; for(int m = 0; m < != 37 && resUnitLKit1Z = numGridLinesY; m++) { prog[parkX - 1][parkY][parkZ] resUnitLEntranceZ; prog[1][1 + m][trackZ] = 4. != 37){ } 40; placement and testing of residential units. validAttempt = false; if(rand == 2) { prog[numGridLinesX - 1][1 + } resUnitLKit1X = m][trackZ] = 40; if(validAttempt == true){ resUnitLEntranceX; } for(int m = 0; m < parkW; m++) resUnitLKit1Y = } else { { resUnitLEntranceY + 1; i--; for(int n = 0; n < parkD; resUnitLKit1Z = } n++) { resUnitLEntranceZ; } for(int o = 0; o < parkH; } //define theater o++) { if(rand == 3) { for(int i = 0; i < numTheater; resUnitLKit1X = i++){ prog[parkX + m][parkY +

*

*


5-6 1.2 level 8 plan. since the building is broken down into programmatic components as opposed to entire dwelling units, each of the 250 homes are completely unique in plan and offer different experiences.

1.2 N


void(house){ 1.3 view of park space. the curvilinear forms provide a tongue-in-cheek â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;escapeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; to the surrounding Hill Country and are differentiated from the non-public program.

1.3

1.4

1.4 view from street


7-8

1.5

p_living

s_platform

p_kitchen/utility

s_box_nocrossbracing

p_dining

s_box_crossbracing_1

p_master bedroom

s_box_crossbracing_2a

p_bedrooms

s_box_crossbracing_2b

p_terrace_2

s_box_crossbracing_3


void(house){ 1.5 the building is composed entirely of programmatic â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;pixelsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; which are encased in one of six structural components, each selected based on the structural context of that particular cell.

1.6

1.6 building section


9 - 10

1.7


void(house){ 1.7 view of interior courtyard. the seemingly random arrangement of spaces is the result of millions of iterations by the computer while testing for fitness.


11 - 12

2 sierpinski blocks spring 2009 academic work undergraduate studio arizona state university

In 1915, Waclaw Sierpinski captured the infinite and self-similar nature of mathematics with a simple fractal. A triangle is subdivided in to four equal parts by connecting the midpoints of its sides. This is then repeated ad infinum, much like how the rules of logic and mathematics operate consistently at different scales. To help teach this concept to young children at a local Montessori School, the Sierpinski Triangle was translated

into a series of different-sized building blocks. Sierpinski Blocks are hollow tetrahedrons constructed of stained basswood. Magnets are concealed inside the blocks so that they snap together in geometrically â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;correctâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; locations. The faces are then color-coded to represent their polarities. The ratio of the different blocksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; dimensions is designed so that each triangular face is itself a Sierpinski Triangle.


sierpinski blocks 2.1 successive subdivisions of a triangle according to sierpinskiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s method..

2.1


13 - 14

2.2


sierpinski blocks 2.2 a child builds a church with sierpinski blocks. in addition to expressing the self-similar nature of mathematics the blocks require the children to associate the different colors with the polarity of the magnets

2.3

2.3 possible configuration of blocks


15 - 16

3 prd air cargo terminal fall 2011 academic work graduate comprehensive studio university of texas at austin collaboration with Conner Bryan

Emerging manufacturing-based megacities require a new airport typology: the first airport dedicated to non-human travel. The Pearl River Delta (PRD) Air Cargo Terminal, located in Chinaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s busiest manufacturing city, allows for unparalleled efficiency in the transportation of cargo while removing industrial waste from the delta itself. This rapid expansion of manufacturing facilities in the region has caused tremendous environmental repercussions. There are twenty-eight industrial parks in the Guangdong Province, and none of them utilize sewage treatment facilities; they simply dump their waste into the water and allow it to wash downstream. The PRD airport is positioned to facilitate the clean up of industrial wastewater through a natural phytoremediation process. Plants called hyperaccumulators have the ability to tolerate large quantities of heavy metals, carcinogens, and other toxins. By implementing a hydroponic treatment system with these plants on site, the river watercan be treated without the use of carbonintensive industrial equipment. Once the river water enters the

site, it flows through a series of constructed wetlands, where the hyperaccumulators absorb the toxins through their root structures. Once the plants have become saturated with heavy metals, they can be collected and incinerated, whereby the heavy metals can be captured, recycled, and re-used, eliminating them from the natural ecosystem of the region. In this way, the PRD airport can serve as a model for the entire region, addressing the rising need of cargo transport for the manufacturing sector, while also alleviating the environmental issues facing China today. The building itself consists of two main elements: a series of modular processing bays and an elevated network of administration bars. This loosely defined network provides space for both administrative uses and workersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; facilities. The confined nature of the bar-shaped rooms, paired with views of the horizon, creates a more personal experience to complement the working spaces below. The modular bays can be expanded when the airport reaches capacity, clipping onto the elevated taxiway structure above.


BAIYUN INTL AIRPORT AIRPORT

GUANGZHOU INTL AIRPORT AIRPORT

GUANGZHOU POP 12,700,800

DONGGUAN

POP 8,220,237

FOSHAN

POP 7,194,311

SITE

HUMENZHEN POP 577,548

SHENZHEN

POP 10,357,938

JIANGMEN

POP 4,448,871

SHENZHEN INTL AIRPORT

HONG KONG POP 7,061,200

MACAO

POP 544,600


17 - 18

3.1

1965

1970

1970: SR-71 reaches mach 3

BOEING 377 (1953) wingspan: 141 ft 3 in length: 110 ft 4 in empty weight: 83,400 lbs cruising speed: 301 mph max range: 4,200 miles seating capacity: 84

1975 1976: Concorde begins commecial operation

1960

1961: First manned space flight

1955

AEROPOSTIAL wingspan: length: empty weight: cruising speed: max range: seating capacit

212,906

118,144

70.35

71.62

CHINA GDP (BILLIONS USD, UNADJUSTED)

HONG KONG

CHINA 1976: Hua Guofeng

CULTURAL1946: REVOLUTION Riots break outby followers of Cultural Revolution

BOEING 747 (1970) wingspan: 224 ft 7 in length: 250 ft 2 in empty weight: 472,900 lbs cruising speed: 570 mph max range: 8,000 nm seating capacity: 467 required runway: 10,138 ft

GREAT LEAP FORWARD

1946: First production commercial jet airliner

1950

407,652

182.94 133.36

100.07

300,630

195,840 138,400

351,871

ELECTRICITY PRODUCTION (MILLIONS kWh)


prd air cargo terminal 3.1 economic/avionic timeline - the most critical event in china’s recent history was the formation of its SEZs (special economic zones) which promoted manufacturing and trade along China’s coastal cities.

1990

1995

2000

GUANGDONG SEZ

2005 2003: First privately funded space flight

10,357,983 (47.8% growth)

AVIATION

MACAU INTL AIRPORT (1999) runways: 1 x 11,221 ft passenger capacity: 6,000,000 passengers/year cargo capacity: 220,000 tons HONG KONG INTL AIRPORT (1998) runways: 2 x 12,500 passenger capacity: 87,000,000 passengers/year cargo capacity: 3,000,000 tons destinations: 154

2,499,564

304.46

410,690

0

1

SHENZHEN POPULATION

444.6

621,204 1,214,800 (245.2% growth)

1,007,798

1,356,240

2003: Sars epidemic

2002: Hu Jintao

792.79

1997: “The Handover”

Hong Kong stock market crashes

MACAU

1989: Jiang Zemin

1987: Zhao Ziyang

1981: Hu Yaobang

602,593

904,842

1999: Transfer of sovereignty to PRC

1198.48

906,557

1,917,621

1889.43

7,008,428 (476.9% growth)

LE-BAC CONCORDE (1976) 84 ft 0 in 202 ft 4 in : 173,500 lbs : 1,320 mph 4,500 miles ty: 120

2010

2004: Baiyun International Airport

1985 GUANGZHOU SEZ

SHENZHEN SEZ

1980

BAIYUN INTL AIRPORT (2004) runways: 2 x 12,500, 2 x 11,8 passenger capacity: 45,000,000 passe cargo capacity: 1,000,000 ton/ye destinations: 100


19 - 20 3.2 proposed site. the rapid introduction of industry and its pollution to the farmland on the site has made traditional cultivation impossible.

3.2


prd air cargo terminal 3.3 exploded site diagram: elevated runway structure (a) water filtration infrastructure (b) constructed wetlands (c)

(a)

(b)

(c) (a) (d)

CARGO FACILITY

(b)

(e)

(f) (c) (g)

3.3

3.4

3.4 exploded cargo facility diagram: elevated runway structure (a) uld conveyance system (b) administrative program (c) administrative building (d) cargo facility building (e) uld storage/conveyance structure (f) constructed wetlands/building foundations (g)


N


RG

CA O IL

FA C IT Y


23 - 24

2 4.0.1

1 4.0.1

2 4.0.0

2 4.0.0

1 3.0.0

1 4.0.0

1 4.0.0

1 5.0.1

1 5.0.0 2 3.0.0

2 4.0.1

1 4.0.1

3.5

N


prd air cargo terminal 3.5 level 1 floor plan - the cargo facility is composed of six identical modules to be leased to various tenants. additional modules may be added as the cargo facility demands growth

2 4.0.1

3.6 level 2 floor plan - the narrow bars of the administrative building encourage individual experiences to counter the large spaces of the cargo facility below

1 4.0.1

2 3.0.0

2 4.0.0

2 4.0.0

1 4.0.0

1 4.0.0

1 3.0.0

2 4.0.1

1 4.0.1

3.6

N


25 - 26

3.7


prd air cargo terminal 3.7 interior view of office ‘tube‘ structure. the vertical shifting of the tubes allows for horizontal views to the sea while differentiating the offices from the rectilinear forms of the cargo facility below.

+ 90’0”

+ 58’0”

+ 43’0” + 32’6”

1 3.0.0 + 0’0” F.F.E.

2 4.0.0

1 4.0.0

+ 90’0”

+ 58’0”

+ 43’0” + 32’6”

1 3.0.0 + 0’0” F.F.E.


27 - 28


prd air cargo terminal


29 - 30 3.8 (a) administrative building wall to roof joint (b) administrative building wall to floor joint (c) cargo facility skylight detail (d) cargo facility wall to foundation detail (e) cargo facility wall to foundation detail

3.9 section perspective. the concrete circulation cores support the office structure above.

3.8

(a)

(b)

(c)

(d)

(e)


prd air cargo terminal

3.9


31 - 32

4 urban power gauge july 2012 personal project open competition - 3rd place

The Trinity River bisects Dallas, TX, separating the CBD from the lower income neighborhoods of the western side. In 2005, the city commissioned Valencian engineer Santiago Calatrava to design a trio of bridges uniting the two sides. The new bridge is anchored on the east side by the towers of downtown, and on the west by an unsightly electrical substation. Hence the second step in this revitalization effort was to reintegrate the substation into the community and create a more welcoming entrance into the West Side neighborhoods. In June 2011, the city held an international ideas competition to propose conceptual solutions through a park space design in front of the substation. My proposal, along with two others, were each awarded $8000 stipends to further the design.

The premise for this proposal posits that the substation is not considered an urban blight because of its form or materials, but because of the general lack of understanding of its vital role in our city. By drawing a connection between electrical infrastructureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s existence and the everyday needs of the community, this proposal sheds a new, positive light on the substation. This project introduces an interactive light wall in front of the substation that reacts in real-time to the current power usage of the community. Pathways intersect with the wall offering shared experiences for the parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s visitors: a menagerie of light and silhouettes that are rooted in the everyday activities of the local community.


urban power gauge 4.1 site before construction of new bridge

ON

ATI

ST SUB

TRI

4.1

N

RIV ITY

ER

SITE


33 -34

4.2


urban power gauge 4.2 evening view of light wall from the substation side. an ever-changing display of colored light on the wall reflects the current and historical electricity usage of the community.


A

B

35 - 36

4.3

EXISTING SUBSTATION

A

B 4.4

C


urban power gauge 4.4 park sections

C

4.3 park plan

N


37 - 38

5 fudan university january 2012 - july 2012 professional work Miralles Tagliabue Architectes collaborative work

This project accounts for my participation in the design development of a complex of university buildings during a six month internship at Miralles Tagliabue Architectes in Barcelona. Fudan University is one of the oldest and most selective universities in China. In June, 2011, the university held an international competition for the expansion of its business school, a complex of buildings totalling to over 58,574 m² (630,485 sf). The overall massing of the buildings was tightly controlled by the campusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; masterplan and allowed for very little negotiation. EMBTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s winning proposal thus focused on connections between these buildings as well as the residual spaces between them.

My participation with this project began after the competition had already been won and the design intent had already been established. During my six month internship I worked with a team of architects and other interns to develop the technical aspects of the design alongside the engineers and client. Much of the design at this level involved maintaining the original design intentions while investigating more detailed parts of the building not covered in the original competition entry. This phase also required us to realize the structural plans of the building with the help of the engineering team located in Shanghai.


fudan university 5.1 street view from original competition entry

5.1


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//new ParticleSystem( float gx, float gy, float gz, float drag ) physics = new ParticleSystem(0,0,-.5, 0.01); particles = new Particle[gridSize][gridSize]; //float gridStepX = (float) ((width / 2) / gridSize); //float gridStepY = (float) ((height / 2) / gridSize); for (int i = 0; i < gridSize; i++) { for (int j = 0; j < gridSize; j++) { particles[i][j] = physics.makeParticle(0.2, j * (100/gridSize), i * (100/gridSize), 0.0); if (j > 0) { physics.makeSpring(particles[i][j - 1], particles[i][j], SPRING_STRENGTH, SPRING_DAMPING, 100/gridSize); } } } for (int j = 0; j < gridSize; j++){ for (int i = 1; i < gridSize; i++){ physics.makeSpring(particles[i - 1][j], particles[i][j], SPRING_STRENGTH, SPRING_DAMPING, 100/gridSize); } } particles[0][0].makeFixed(); particles[0][gridSize - 1].makeFixed(); particles[gridSize - 1][0].makeFixed(); particles[gridSize - 1][gridSize - 1].makeFixed(); } void draw() { background(20); stroke(0); noFill(); //rect(0,0,100,100); //line(0,0,0,0,0,height1); //line(0,100,0,0,100,height2); //line(100,100,0,100,100,height3); //line(100,0,0,100,0,height4); /*pyramid top A = y1 (z2 - z3) + y2 (z3 - z1) + y3 B = z1 (x2 - x3) + z2 (x3 - x1) + z3 C = x1 (y2 - y3) + x2 (y3 - y1) + x3 - D = x1 (y2 z3 - y3 z2) + x2 (y3 z1 x3 (y1 z2 - y2 z1) */

5.2 my first task with this project involved writing a computer algorithm that would economize the roof design, an abstraction of the local vernacular clustered housing. this program uses a physical simulation to generate the optimal catenary arches that would define the final roof structure.

(z1 - z2) (x1 - x2) (y1 - y2) - y1 z3) +

//pyramids for(int i = 0; i < gridSize - 1; i++){ for(int j = 0; j < gridSize - 1; j++){ float x1 = (particles[i][j].position().x()); float y1 = (particles[i][j].position().y()); float z1 = (particles[i][j].position().z()); float x2 = (particles[i][j + 1].position().x()); float y2 = (particles[i][j + 1].position().y()); float z2 = (particles[i][j + 1].position().z()); float x3 = (particles[i + 1][j + 1].position().x()); float y3 = (particles[i + 1][j + 1].position().y()); float z3 = (particles[i + 1][j + 1].position().z()); float A = y1 * (z2 - z3) + y2 * (z3 - z1) + y3 * (z1 - z2); float B = z1 * (x2 - x3) + z2 * (x3 - x1) + z3

5.2


fudan university 5.3 view of central courtyard with roof structure shown.

5.3

5.4 (reverse) plan of pedestrian bridge. several investigations were undergone to design a pedestrian bridge that resolved the formal characteristics of the two neighboring buildings.


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5.4

N


fudan university 5.5 aerial view of pedestrian bridge.

5.5

5.6

5.6 view atop proposed bridge design


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classroom structural studies

5.7

4.

axonometric view - above

section perspective axonometric view - below

classroom structural studies

3.

axonometric view - above

section perspective axonometric view - below


fudan university

classroom structural studies

5.7 these diagrams were created to visualize the effect that different structural module designs had on the interior of the classrooms.

2.

axonometric view - above

section perspective axonometric view - below

classroom structural studies

1.

axonometric view - above

section perspective axonometric view - below


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5.8


fudan university 5.8 eastward view of interior lobby. the use of a simplified 3d model and scale figures allowed for quick improvisational changes to the form while suggesting how spaces may be occupied.

5.9

5.9 westward view of interior lobby


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6 curriculum vitae michael w. beene b. 10/15/1986 nationality: USA 512-909-9566 mwbeene@gmail.com www.michael-beene.com 801 West Lynn #204 Austin, TX 78703

My interests lie at the cross-section of technology and how we interpret and conceive the space around us. My undergraduate degree in design at Arizona State University was highly interdisciplinary with a heavy focus on contemporary urban challenges such as suburbanization and regional identity. During my graduate education, I have

focused on more architectural concepts such as ordering systems, aesthetics, and performance. My internship at Miralles Tagliabue Architectes in Barcelona in during the spring of 2012 further developed my architectural interests by exposing me to architectural approaches that reached beyond our current time and place.


curriculum vitae

education 08/2010 - 05/2013 (anticipated)

m.arch | university of texas of austin

08/2005 - 05/2010

b.s. design |arizona state university graduated cum laude

practice 01/2012 - 07/2012

architectural intern |miralles tagliabue arquitectes barcelona, spain

03/2006 - 08/2010

architectural intern | architekton tempe, arizona

teaching fall 2011

teaching assistant | arc308 - architecture and society the university of texas at austin

spring 2011

teaching assistant | ugs303 - creative problem solving the university of texas at austin

publication 05/2012

issue: 008 ‘prd air cargo terminal’

05/2012

issue: 008 ‘void(house){’

07/2011

“the dallas observer” ‘urban power gauge’

05/2011

issue: 007 ‘campus reading room’


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recognition 12/2011

design excellence | university of texas at austin ‘prd air cargo terminal’

07/2011

dallas power art competition, 3rd place | city of dallas ‘urban power gauge’

12/2009

design excellence | arizona state university ‘sunnyslope library’

05/2009

end of year show | arizona state university ‘hide-and-seek’

12/2008

design excellence nominee | arizona state university ‘alley house’

other skills languages

english, spanish

software

2d adobe creative suite 3d 3d studio max rhino sketchup parametric/scripting bentley generative components grasshopper processing max script documentation autocad revit


2012 Portfolio  

A portfolio of my creative work, mostly from my time spent at the School of Architecture at UT Austin.

2012 Portfolio  

A portfolio of my creative work, mostly from my time spent at the School of Architecture at UT Austin.

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