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JOHN ROBSHAW ROBIN WILSON

+ MARCH / APRIL 2014

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*MASERATI QUATTROPORTE S Q4 BASE MSRP $102,500, NOT INCLUDING GAS GUZZLER TAX, DEALER PREP AND DESTINATION CHARGES. DEALER PRICE MAY VARY. TAXES, TITLE, REGISTRATION FEES AND ADDITIONAL OPTIONS NOT INCLUDED. ©2014 MASERATI NORTH AMERICA, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. MASERATI AND THE TRIDENT LOGO ARE REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OF MASERATI SPA. MASERATI URGES YOU TO OBEY ALL POSTED SPEED LIMITS.

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HOME

The ISSUE FEATURES 52 |

MAD ABOUT MARY

96 |

HOUSE OF JULES

106 | 116 | 122 |

Los Angeles designer Mary McDonald’s identity extends beyond interiors and into furnishing collections, books and television appearances. Daring and colorful living takes on new meaning with fashion designer Jules Reid’s Virginia Beach home.

TOUCHÉ CROCHET Spring into white. Ethereal designs are a breath of fresh air with delicate embroidery and technical cotton.

TURNING OVER THE TAPESTRY Home textile and apparel companies utilize fair trade fabrics to satisfy the market’s demand for ethical global manufacturing.

LUSH LIFE A simple guide created by landscape architect Fernando Wong helps turn any dull backyard into a colorful and relaxing retreat.

MUSES & VISIONARIES MAGAZINE magazinemv.com


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INSIDE

JULES REID’S BEACH HOUSE

MARY MCDONALD

JOHN ROBSHAW ROBIN WILSON

+ TOUCHÉ CROCHET

FRESH SPRING FASHION

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INSPIRE

INFORM

21 | THE GOODS

60 | BIG PICTURE

26 |

EYES AND EARS

64 |

INDULGE OR NOT

66 |

MAKING WAVES

70 |

ON THE EDGE

73 |

ROOM FOR DEBATE You decide: Homeschooling

Carefully curated wish lists

30 | 32 | 38 | 46 |

News from around the world

A cultural roundup of new releases Intuitive listening gadgets Area women to watch

Pg. 23

UNPLUGGED

Oh glorious Madrid

MASTER CLASS

Robin Wilson on sustainable living

Pg. 21

BUSINESS UNUSUAL

All in the family

Hoarder helpers

AT HOME

Get ‘neat’ and clutter free

Pg. 23

Pg. 25 Pg. 25 Pg. 25 Pg. 30

IMPACT

NURTURE 78 | PROJECT ME

124 | RAISE YOUR GLASS

80 |

GATHERINGS

126 | R.S.V.P.

LITTLE ONES

134 | VISIONS

Bright ideas for a better you

88 | 90 | 92 |

Dinner at home, Florida style Early learning tools

Investing for the greater good

Highlights and happenings Becky Straw’s wishing well

ON THE COUCH

Answers to life’s dilemmas

GROWING PAINS

Dealing with angst and anxiety

Pg. 79

Pg. 27

ON THE COVER MARY MCDONALD SHOT IN BEVERLY HILLS PHOTOGRAPHY BY NINELLE EFREMOVA MAKEUP BY ALICIA MIZRAHI SILLER


MEET THE TEAM

ROY ASSAD

LOLA THÉLIN AMY LAGAE

ERIN ROSSITTO

SASHA JOZEFCZYK MOLLY GREENE

NICOLE FAHRENHOLZ


Publisher ERIN ROSSITTO Editor in Chief AMY LAGAE Creative Director MOLLY GREENE Managing Editor LOLA THÉLIN Marketing Manager SASHA JOZEFCZYK

+ Guest Editors JULES REID, JOHN ROBSHAW Copy Editors LINDA CULBERTSON, TRACY DE LA FEUILLIEZ, ROBIN BRADLEY HANSEL Contributors MELANIE BLONSHINE, TESS GHILAGA, MARISSA HAGMEYER, ROBIN BRADLEY HANSEL, EMILY MARRAH, STYLIANA RESVANIS, ELLEN SCHMIDT, BECKY STRAW, TRÉMENE TRIPLETT, SANDRA WATSON, FERNANDO WONG Photographers NINELLE EFREMOVA, TONY GIAMMARINO, ANDREAS ORTNER, PATRICIA NASH

+ Chief Operating Officer ROY ASSAD 561.515.4552 ext. 800 roy@magazinemv.com Operations Manager NICOLE FAHRENHOLZ 561.515.4552 ext. 805 nicole@magazinemv.com Senior Account Managers

JAY BREWER 561.515.4552 ext. 810 jay@magazinemv.com KELLY CUSHING 561.515.4552 ext. 808 kelly@magazinemv.com ROBIN GRUBMAN 561.515.4552 ext. 807 robin@magazinemv.com NATALIE LAMBERT 561.515.4552 ext. 813 natalie@magazinemv.com

+ For editorial or advertising correspondence Muses & Visionaries Magazine 201 S. Narcissus Ave. Suite 2 West Palm Beach, FL 33401 e-mail editorial@magazinemv.com phone 561.515.4552 magazinemv.com


CONTRIBUTORS JOHN ROBSHAW earned a fine arts degree at Pratt and studied traditional block printing in China. John “I-Caught-the-Asia-Bug” Robshaw then journeyed to India to find natural indigo dye for his paintings. Instead, he fell in love with the local artisans’ fabric-making traditions, and there, his signature dynamic look was crafted: an updated spin on the exotic, handmade object and a vibrant mix of sophistication and romantic allure. Robshaw has become a pioneer of Southeast Asian textiles, managing to incorporate the exoticism of the handmade into the world of luxury home goods. EMILY MARRAH (right) is founder and managing partner of EMC3, a creative culinary catering service based in West Palm Beach, Fla. Marrah, a South Florida transplant from Michigan, fortified her talent at luxurious hotels and restaurants, including Café Boulud and The Breakers, both in Palm Beach, Fla. She brings a keen eye and knowledge in event coordination to the ensemble. MELANIE BLONSHINE (left) is the EMC3 associate manager. Originally from D.C., Blonshine helped launch Equinox Restaurant’s off-site catering program. Her career and sophisticated design style has taken her into the homes of Washington’s elite politicians.

TREMÉNE TRIPLETT is a freelance journalist passionate about the written word. She wrote her first book at age seven, and later pursued her God-given gift to earn a master’s in print journalism from the University of Miami. She has written for a variety of local, regional and national magazines, newspapers and online outlets. Triplett enjoys writing health and wellness, travel and life enrichment pieces. Triplett also co-owns a public health consulting firm and treasures loving her son and family.

TONY GIAMMARINO is a commercial and design photographer with more than 25 years of experience and published work to his credit. Giammarino collaborates with producer-stylist Mona Dworkin. This creative team brings their love of design, passion and dedication for photography to every assignment. Giammarino and Dworkin combine their artistic talents for creative lighting, balanced composition and technical knowledge to produce crisp, memorable images.

NINELLE EFREMOVA is a fashion and music photographer, originally from Belarus, currently splitting her time between Los Angeles, New York and Paris. With her cinematic style and focus on natural light, Efremova is continuously exploring the meaning of ‘less is more’ through her work. Self-taught, Efremova began photographing subjects for her painting work, leading her to work on portrait and fashion projects which have graced the pages of many publications worldwide such as L’Officiel Paris, Vogue Japan, Marie Claire, Rolling Stone, Spin and Billboard Magazine.


THE ONLY NAME YOU NEED TO KNOW IN REAL ESTATE PA L M B E AC H | W E S T PA L M B E AC H W W W . S A M F I S C H . C O M


Letter from the Editor

“Life takes us to unexpected places. Love brings us home.”  —anonymous For some people, home is a city, place or physical structure. For others, it’s a person, a moment or an ideal. For me, it’s wherever I am with my family. It is the feeling of being completely accepted. It’s comfort, happiness and love. Our Home issue honors those sentiments and draws from the world of possibilities that define the word home. We are thrilled to feature Mary McDonald on our cover this issue. As a Los Angeles-based interior designer, Mary has the amazing opportunity to go into a client’s house and create a sanctuary for the client and their family, and isn’t that the real goal of every home? In my profile “Mad About Mary” (page 52), she shares personal struggles about building a career and how her vision came together. Our readers will fall in love with Mary’s honesty and drive. M&V also visited the Virginia Beach home of fashion designer Jules Reid. “House of Jules” (page 96) captures life, family and color. Jules proves that even with a house full of growing boys, décor and vision do not have to suffer. This story illustrates the whimsy and fun elements she puts into her namesake fashion collections. Of course, we can’t forget the importance of the eco-friendly movement. Remember when our sole earth-friendly fabric choice was rough beige hemp? Writer Robin Bradley Hansel takes us into the world of green textiles, filled with materials that are colorful, soft and healthy for both the earth and consumers (page 116). We take it one step further with leading expert Robin Wilson’s recommendations for sustainable living (page 64). She will inspire you to make healthy choices for your own home. I hope you enjoy this issue dedicated to shelter, surroundings and comfort, and thank you for bringing M&V into your home. With gratitude, Amy


Sexy. Stylish. Sophisticated. From the restaurateurs and culinary masterminds behind South Florida favorite hotspots such as YOLO, O Lounge, Tarpon Bend and Vibe Las Olas, S3 – where sun, surf and sand uniquely fuse with steak, seafood and sushi – provides the ultimate in modern oceanfront dining, offering fresh coastal cuisine and the closest spot to the ocean anywhere on beautiful Fort Lauderdale beach.

Reservations:954.523.SURF or OpenTable.com/S3 At the Hilton Fort Lauderdale Beach Resort 505 N. Fort Lauderdale Beach Blvd. S3Restaurant.com


INSPIRE

"Without leaps of imagination, or dreaming, we lose the excitment of possibilities. Dreaming, after all, is a form of planning."

Gloria Steinem


INSPIRE

The GOODS

Indigo: The Color that Changed the World Catherine Legrand $46.45 barnesandnoble.com

"On one of my first trips to India, I found a clay resist block printer in Bagru, a small town outside of Jaipur. The process involved printing with clay then dipping the printed fabrics into natural indigo vats. I immediately went indigo mad." Guest Editor John Robshaw

Vionnet Spring 2014 vionnet.com

THE INSPIRATION John Robshaw Textiles Indigo Turban Quilts & Shams $460 johnrobshaw.com

John Robshaw Textiles Indigo Dipped Paper $400 johnrobshaw.com

Mondelliani Blu visit mondelliani.it for details

Christopher Spitzmiller Ming price varies on customization christopherspitzmiller.com

Fernando Jorge Ocean Ring $7,540 barneys.com Jin Soon Blue Iris $18 barneys.com

Christian Louboutin Pigalle Python Pump $1,345 neimanmarcus.com

Smythson Panama Collection iPad Air Sleeve $380 smythson.com

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BEAUTIFUL SKIN NATURALLY Optimal Skin ProSerum helps maintain smooth, supple, youthful looking skin naturally.


INSPIRE

The GOODS "A charming backyard party is the perfect opportunity to show off your new Yellow Leaf Hammock (its sale employs artisans in rural northern Thailand). Your guests will clamor for this favorite spot. And whilst they wait their turn, dazzle them with your casual yet decadent ‘green’ garden soirée." Marketing Manager Sasha Jozefczyk

L'Objet pour Fortuny Pleats Candle $125 fortuny.com

Supergoop Everyday Lotion $14 supergoop.com

THE INSPIRATION

Yellow Leaf Hammocks Southampton $179-$249 yellowleafhammocks.com Straight from the Earth Myra Goodman & Marea Goodman $27.50 amazon.com

Z Gallerie Teardrop Beverage Dispenser $59.95 zgallerie.com Jason Wu Resort 2014 jasonwustudio.com

ABC Carpet & Home White Tree Vase $525 abchome.com

Michael Aram Sleepy Hollow Cheese Knife Set $69 michaelaram.com

Tom Dixon Large Form Bowl Set $130 abchome.com Kiini Daydreamer Peshtemal Towel $50 kiini.com Kouboo Banana Leaf Pewter Napkin Ring $29.50 houzz.com

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“I believe that hair changes everything. Discover your individual beauty.� - Ted Gibson

tedgibsonbeauty.com ted gibson new york - 184 fifth ave 2nd floor / tel 212 633 6333

|

ted gibson ft. lauderdale - 401 north fort lauderdale beach blvd / tel 954 414 8343


INSPIRE

The GOODS “Color is my daily inspiration and defines my lifestyle and wardrobe. The combination of a vibrant statement piece and prints can lead to an original, bold look. A bright handbag, coat or the cover of a book can slant my world in a visual way. Even a perfume scent adds color to my day.” Guest Editor Jules Reid

Pierre Hardy Lava Pouch $1,495 barneys.com

THE INSPIRATION Chantecaille Pétales $175 chantecaille.com

Kotur Guzel $650 koturltd.com

Alexandra Von Furstenberg Acrylic Candy Bowl $178 ahalife.com

Hermès Acreau Timepiece $4,150 hermes.com

Prada Spring 2014 prada.com The Interestings Meg Wolitzer $16 amazon.com

Madeline Weinrib Pink Sugar Chenille Carpet price depends on size madelineweinrib.com

Seaman Schepps Rio Bracelet price upon request seamanschepps.com

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Eyes & EARS

, 2014

We Have to Dream in Blue by ARNALDO ROCHE RABELL Shown at Pérez Art Museum Miami, April 18 to August 17, 2014


INSPIRE The LATEST on the ARTS and CULTURE SCENE

With “downsizing” on the rise, Dreaming Small: Intimate Interiors is a revelation on how to live large in a small space. Authored by Douglas Woods and photography by Melba Levick, Dreaming Small showcases the livability of diminutive homes, from Spanish bungalows to mid-century modern masterpieces and many in between. (Rizzoli, March 4, 2014)

What is it about TED presentations that garner millions of Web views and years of sharing? Communications coach Carmine Gallo provides the answers in Talk Like TED: The 9 Public-Speaking Secrets of the World’s Top Minds. Gallo studied more than 500 TED talks to discover how some of the world’s most intriguing thinkers deliver persuasive, game-changing speeches. (St. Martin’s Press, March 4, 2014)

The Opposite of Loneliness: Essays and Stories is a poignant posthumous collection of writings by Marina Keegan, a magna cum Yale graduate whose life tragically ended in a car accident five days after graduation. With a literary career on the horizon, Keegan had penned works in several genres and had accepted a position with The New Yorker. The Opposite of Loneliness was the last essay she wrote for the Yale Daily News. It became an international sensation upon her death. Now published in a compilation with her other stories and essays, Keegan leaves behind a voice for the millennial generation that is full of possibility. (Scribner, April 8, 2014)

Untitled Species I by EBONY PATTERSON Shown at Pérez Art Museum Miami, April 18 to August 17, 2014

C

Spirit of the Carnival, Tam Joseph

aribbean: Crossroads of the World was originally organized by El Museo del Barrio in conjunction with the Queens Museum of Art and The Studio Museum in Harlem. It is part of the inaugural lineup at the Pérez Art Museum Miami’s new building in Museum Park. The show will highlight two centuries of rarely seen works—from paintings and sculptures to books, photographs, films, and historical artifacts—intended to convey an understanding of the Caribbean and its artistic legacy. The exhibition features historic works by artists such as Paul Gauguin and Winslow Homer alongside those of contemporary artists like José Bedia and Edouard Duval-Carrié and will be on view from April 18 to August 17.

The request of a pencil from an impoverished boy in India changed Adam Braun’s life, moving him away from a Wall Street career to the creation of an organization that taps leading corporations and start-ups to improve education around the globe. The Promise of a Pencil: How an Ordinary Person Can Create Extraordinary Change is Braun’s account of his world travels and entre into a purpose-driven life. (Scribner, March 18, 2014)

Cultural historian and biographer Tilar Mazzeo’s latest work, The Hotel on Place Vendôme: Life, Death, and Betrayal at the Hotel Ritz in Paris, spotlights one of Paris’ most iconic hotels during the German occupation of France during World War II. The posh hotel was allowed to remain operational, catering to wealthy and famous clients like Coco Chanel, while housing high-ranking German officials, including Hermann Göring. The book includes tales of secrecy, treachery, courage and resistance and follows the characters that stayed at the landmark during this historic period. (HarperCollins, March 11, 2014)

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Eyes & EARS

T

he San Diego Museum of Art found a unique and creative way to call attention to its permanent collection of art. Art Alive, now in its 33rd year, interprets famous works of art into inspired floral displays. This year 120 floral designers will participate in the museum’s signature fundraising event. Art Alive 2014 will take place over three days, April 11–13, and includes activities that pair San Diego’s top talent in restaurants and entertainment with a viewing of the one-of-a-kind floral creations. Floral designer Carlos Franco of Green Fresh Florals will transfrom the museum’s famed rotunda.

The Blue-eyed Boy, Amedeo Modigliani; floral by Hannah Murdoch

Nude Young Woman 1, Francisco Zúñiga; floral by Tish Toy

Coming Home Hurts, Beverly McIver; floral by Judy Chance

Rotunda designer Carlos Franco

B

olstering its current collection of iconic photographs from the South, the Ogden Museum of Southern Art in New Orleans liberated buried photographic gems from its vaults, some which have never been seen before. The exhibition, Into the Light, Part II, is a visual nod to the South as both a geographic location and a state of mind and includes some of the most iconic photographs in the history of Southern photography. The changing cultural landscape represented in the images provides a backdrop for the evolution of photography itself from silver halide crystal to pixel.

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Shopping on Gay Street, East Baltimore, Roland Freeman

The Enigma, Clarence John Laughlin

Riverside Lounge, Birney Imes

The collection will be on display March 20 to July 20, 2014.


INSPIRE

D

irector Wes Anderson’s whimsical world is back. The Grand Budapest Hotel recounts the adventures of Gustave H., a legendary concierge at a famous European hotel between the two world wars, and his most trusted friend Zero Moustafa, the lobby boy. Anderson’s typical live action plot follows a theft and recovery of a priceless Renaissance painting and the battle for an enormous family fortune. The movie hits theaters March 7. grandbudapesthotel.com

Wes Anderson’s The Grand Budapest Hotel features actors Ralph Fiennes (sitting) and Tony Revolori (right).

J

ohn Maloof discovered the work of Vivian Maier after he purchased more than 100,000 of her undeveloped still photographs from a Chicago auction store in 2007. Maier was a career nanny, and on the side, led a secret life for more than five decades as a street photographer. The documentary film Finding Vivian Maier traces Maloof ’s discovery of Maier and his curiosity to uncover more information about the woman. Maloof is credited for championing her work and bringing it to the public eye: Today Maier is reputed as one of America’s most accomplished and insightful 20th century photographers. The film releases March 28. findingvivianmaier.com

LOOK BEYOND COACHELLA FOR MUSIC FESTIVALS THIS SPRING. THE LEGENDARY YET ALREADY SOLD OUT MUSIC FESTIVAL LEAVES US WANTING MORE. • The 9th annual Jazz in the Gardens brings Grammy-award winning artists Kelly Rowland, Anthony Hamilton, LL Cool J and Jamie Foxx to Sun Life Stadium in Miami March 15-16. jazzinthegardens.com • Move over Austin City Limits. The Texas music destination is welcoming a new festival geared toward country. iHeartRadio Country Festival will be held March 29. news.iheart.com/go/countryfestival • French Quarter Festival in New Orleans often is overshadowed by Jazz Fest, but this free festival, which celebrates its 30th anniversary April 10-13, is a favorite among locals. fqfi.org ■ M A R C H / A P R I L 2 0 1 4 M&V

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INSPIRE

Indulge OR NOT

“I

f music be the food of love, play on,” wrote William Shakespeare. Little did The Bard know that centuries later music would fill our homes wirelessly, streaming tunes from all points of the globe. From home music systems to personal headphones, music is tailored to each of us based on how we listen, when we listen and even whether or not we choose to hear advertisements. Open your ears and listen with these gadgets.

HIGH 

PARROT ZIK $399 PARROT.COM

SHURE SOUND ISOLATING™ $1,250 SHURE.COM

BOSE SOUNDTOUCH™ 30 WI-FI® $699 BOSE.COM

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MID 

LOW 

SENNHEISER MOMENTUM ON-EAR $229 SENNHEISER.COM

JVC HA-S160 FLATS $19.95 JVC.COM

BOWERS & WILKINS C5 $179 BOWERS-WILKINS.COM

FREEDOM SPRINT BLUETOOTH $99.95 JAYBIRDSPORT.COM

SONOS PLAY: 1 $199 SONOS.COM

JBL BY HARMAN FLIP 2 $129.95 JBL.COM


Making WAVES

JORDANN WEINGARTNER

Cynthia Conley Photography

Petals & Metals

By Tess Ghilaga

J

ordann Weingartner developed her entrepreneurial talents during her time at Babson College in Massachusetts. While her peers were considering career options, the Palm Beach native was creating stunning handmade jewelry out of Swarovski crystals, an experience that helped her land a plum job at Cartier in New York City after graduation.

our sales and put us right in front of our customer without waiting for them to come to us.” With more than 220,000 subscribers, this venture has changed her whole life. “I was not a big social media person prior to launching I Love Jewelry Auctions,” she said. “Now I am on Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest for most of my day.”

While growing up in South Florida, Weingartner enjoyed flower arranging and felt drawn to magnolias for their beauty and symbolism of perseverance and dignity. Weingartner debuted her esteemed Magnolia Collection jewelry line in 2008. This early inspiration would fuel her for years to come.

In addition to finding gaps in the marketplace and creating original ways to overcome barriers, Weingartner’s success is due to her understanding of what women of all ages want. Case in point, the debut of her recent Bangled + Charmed collection, which caters to a multi-generational audience, was conceived when Weingartner couldn’t find the perfect charm bracelets for her daughters. “My modern-day charm bangles are a great addition to any arm party,” she said. “It’s fun to mix and match them to create a unique style.”

A self-described “doer,” Weingartner likes to have a full plate in front of her. Around the time her second daughter Scarlett was born in 2011, she began to notice companies on Facebook selling children’s clothes and decided to launch her own concept in jewelry. A stay-at-home mom at the time, Weingartner toiled on her side business after the girls were asleep to make some extra money. After speaking at a Babson College alumni event in Miami in 2012, she realized her innovative idea had legs and launched I Love Jewelry Auctions the following week. The site sells her collections as well as fashion and on-trend jewelry found at major department stores and boutiques at a fraction of the price. The concept alone of selling jewelry on Facebook makes it unique. “We call it F-Commerce,” she said. “We depend on social media to promote

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Last November, Weingartner opened her flagship I Love Jewelry store in Palm Beach Gardens, FL, for customers who prefer an in-person shopping experience. The 1,700-square-foot retail space features her three collections—I Love Jewelry, Jordann Jewelry and Bangled + Charmed— and showcases everything in elegant, sleek décors of gray and white striped wallpaper, mirrored tables and white lacquer. Weingartner’s astounding success is a feel-good Palm Beach story and a bona fide case study for business school. Expect her evergreen designs to continue to sparkle and surprise. ■


INSPIRE

Lila Photo

Moveable Feasts Kelly Murphy with Bobby DeFriest

Lila Photo

Lila Photo

KELLY MURPHY By Tess Ghilaga

G

rowing up in the food service industry, Kelly Murphy’s father often told her “people eat with their eyes first.” As co-founder of Panache, a Classic Party Rental Company, Murphy seduces the senses at countless illustrious events, including Art Basel Miami Beach, South Beach Wine & Food Festival, NFL Super Bowls, Sony Open Tennis and SunFest. With her father’s philosophy in mind, Murphy brings menus to life at these hot happenings via creative presentation vessels and displays. “The guest’s experience is about getting away from their everyday routine and enjoying a unique celebration,” Murphy said. “Our job is to create the perfect environment.” Murphy and her husband, Bob DeFriest, started Panache from their dining room in 1992. They built a loyal client base over the years. The major turning point came when they were hired in 1999 to create the NHL All-Star event for more than 5,000 people in

Tampa. The signature event required more than 50,000 pieces of stemware, plateware and flatware, along with truckloads of tables, chairs and catering equipment—it was the perfect dress rehearsal for the many Super Bowl events in their future.

company is known for its unique approach to the ‘architecture of the table,’ relying on a keen eye for trendsetting, classic seating and plating options that are complimented with a myriad of fabrics and other tabletop accessories.

Business boomed over the years, and in 2007 the Classic Party Rental Company made the talented duo an acquisition offer they couldn’t refuse. Though her husband decided to exit the business at that time, Murphy chose to stay on board and currently serves as the director of business and product development in Florida. Classic Party Rental also retained her Panache brand, broadening its unique caché and recognition throughout the Southeast.

Panache’s vintage farm-to-table aesthetic is all the rage. To go along with the rustic presentation, chefs and caterers often seek local food from nearby purveyors and farmers. Local seafood, produce and farm-raised meats are also on the minds of consumers versus a previous emphasis on imports.

Murphy visits headquarters in Pompano Beach and satellite offices as needed. She also maintains a regular presence at industry events and shows nationwide. Today, the

The New Jersey transplant waxes poetic about the advantages of South Florida events from the geographical diversity to the most marvelous sunrises and sunsets. “The South Florida sky is a brilliant background to stage special events, and it’s home to some of the most talented people,” Murphy said. “The synergy is amazing.” ■

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INSPIRE

Making WAVES

ESTELLA MIMS PYFROM

Have Knowledge, Will Travel

M

ost educators with 50 years of service to their community look forward to retirement, but not Estella Mims Pyfrom. The 77-year-old woman continues to take her skills on the road with Estella’s Brilliant Bus, a customized mobile learning classroom she founded in 2010 with a large portion of her pension and life savings. Staffed with about 45 volunteers, the nonprofit organization motors into underserved communities throughout Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties to support hard-to-reach individuals. Pyfrom parks the bus, which is equipped with Wi-Fi and computer learning stations, at local schools, parks and community centers to provide free, computer-based tutoring. “My kids say I like gadgets,” Pyfrom said. “My idea is that you have to find out as much information as you can. Stay connected so you don’t get left behind.” To increase her reach, Pyfrom now is setting up laptops outside of the bus. She partners with local agencies to deliver vital services to families such as flu shot vouchers and food distribution, and has extended her time to include service to college students so they can work on assignments and to adults who need to search for jobs and housing. Pyfrom’s childhood is a testament to grit and a reverence for education. As one of seven children born to migrant workers, she

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By Tess Ghilaga joined her siblings and parents each summer as they traveled north to harvest produce. This hardscrabble upbringing, albeit with much parental love, inspired her to serve as a teacher and guidance counselor. The Belle Glade community was her proving grounds, andmany students and their families have reaped the rewards. High profile media attention and prestigious awards have brought well-deserved recognition. Last year, Pyfrom was named a Daily Point of Light Award winner, which was hosted by the White House. She was a L’Oreal Paris 2013 Women of Worth honoree and one of the top 10 CNN Heroes. Being in the limelight doesn’t come naturally for Pyfrom; instead, she lets her impact on society and fundraising do the talking. Grants and donations come from corporate sponsors such as Microsoft, Office Depot and Comcast. Private donors and supporters who donate as little as $5 a month help. “Partners are stepping up to the plate and are seeing the movement across the country and the world,” she said. Pyfrom hopes to launch a fleet of Brilliant Buses to hit the open road and reach more needy communities and children. In the meantime, she'll continue practicing what she believes in. “I do truly give the world the best that I have. I serve from the heart; it’s not about what I’m going to get in return.” ■


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Madrid Visitors & Convention Bureau

MADRID

CAIXAFORUM

T

By Lola ThĂŠlin

he most wonderful aspect of Madrid is the blend of old and new. The vibrant modern lifestyle of its residents is merged beautifully with its strong historic culture, which dates back to Moorish days. MadrileĂąos, as its citizens are called, are dedicated to patron saint La Virgen de la Almudena and its treasured artists and have a love for living the good life. Madrid breathes vitality, art and culture.

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ECOALF FLAGSHIP STORE


INSPIRE STAY

PANORAMIC VIEW AT VILLA MAGNA

TERRACE AT VILLA MAGNA

Villa Magna should be your home while in Madrid. The big-city hotel gets everything right from its very knowledgeable concierges to its chic cocktail bar. Located on Paseo de la Castellana, Villa Magna is in walking distance to shopping and cultural sites. Its spa is serene; its spacious guestrooms with a beige palette are soothing, and its beds are the most comfortable this side of Europe. Innside Madrid GĂŠnova and Hotel de las Letras are also great options. Tip: Villa Magna serves a scrumptious breakfast buffet that will expand your waistline. Their terrace is the perfect spot for a romantic meal.

EXECUTIVE SUITE AT VILLA MAGNA

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INNSIDE MADRID GÉNOVA

INNSIDE MADRID GÉNOVA

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INNSIDE MADRID GÉNOVA


INSPIRE CULTURE Take a stroll in the Hapsburg neighborhood, home of the Royal Palace, built in 1764. The regal palace and its almost 3,000 rooms are open to visitors. The Teatro Real opera house and La Almudena Cathedral are nearby. The Plaza Mayor is one of the most popular squares, for both tourists and locals.

José Barea

Tip: Wander off the main streets and get lost in this neighborhood’s narrow streets, stone buildings and churches.

THE TEATRO REAL

Madrid S.A. Promotion

Madrid Visitors & Convention Bureau

PLAZA MAYOR

ROYAL PALACE

A gold mine for art, Madrid boasts three key museums: The Prado, Thyssen-Bornemisza Museum and Reina Sofía. Don’t look so bored already; these museums with their distinct personalities, architecture and collection of masterpieces are worthy of your time. The Prado houses Las Meninas by Diego Velázquez and The Third of May 1808 by Francisco Goya. The Thyssen’s collection goes back 700 years and has the largest collection of American artwork outside of the States. Reina Sofía, a former 18th-century hospital, embraces the minority movements. Check out the schedule for CaixaForum, a live space used for art, poetry, films, festivals, debates and more.

LA ALMUDENA CATHEDRAL

THE PRADO

Tip: Schools in Spain are required to take field trips. During the end of the school year, museums are packed with kids. REINA SOFÍA

THYSSEN-BORNEMISZA MUSEUM

Mujer Sentado, Juan Gris

Augustín Martínez

ART

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Tips: Casa Botín, near Plaza Mayor and built in 1725, is the oldest restaurant in the world. Hungry for churros with hot chocolate? Chocoletería San Ginés is opened 24/7.

TRADITIONAL SPANISH FOOD INCLUDING SERRANO HAM

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CHURROS

Escarabajo Amarillo

Come ready to eat, because there are approximately 3,100 restaurants in the city. The two popular markets, San Miguel Mercado and San Antón Mercado, are multi-purpose serving up top-quality tapas, beer and wine in lively atmospheres. Make a reservation at La Cocina de San Antón for its delicious serrano ham. Vi-Cool by Michelin chef Sergi Arola serves Spain’s traditional dishes in a casual setting. Restaurante Villa Magna serves a true gastronomy experience with Executive Chef Rodrigo de la Calle at the helm. The young chef is revolutionizing the cuisine experience with the creation of gastrobotanical, which investigates new species and rescues forgotten and unknown vegetable varieties. Need a break from tapas? Tse-Yang is the spot for Chinese food.

Madrid Visitors & Convention Bureau

GASTRONOMY


INSPIRE

CASA BOTÍN

RESTAURANTE VILLA MAGNA

Getting to Madrid is easy! All major carriers fly into Madrid, with American Airlines offering direct flights from Miami, Dallas and JFK.

LA COCINA DE SAN ANTÓN

GRAN VIA

LATE NIGHT

SALAMANCA DISTRICT

GRAN VIA

José Barea

Tip: No matter where you go, don’t be intimidated by the crowds. Get out there and enjoy the night. José Barea

Madrid Visitors & Convention Bureau

The city is electric even at 2 a.m. Ático de las Letras’ rooftop bar is great for sunset drinks. La Latina neighborhood, situated around Cava Baja and Cava Alta, has a lively nightlife and is a great spot for bar hopping. Círculo de Bella Artes is historic (where many famous writers spent their time) and a great area for a late evening stroll, tapas and cocktails.

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Madrid Visitors & Convention Bureau

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CIBELES PALACE

CRISTAL PALACE, EL RETIRO PARK

LAKE AT EL RETIRO PARK

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Escarabajo Amarillo

MONUMENT OF ALFONSO XII, EL RETIRO PARK

SANTIAGO BERNABÉU STADIUM

Escarabajo Amarillo

Tips: Cibeles’ top floor has one of the best views of Madrid. Show your kids the true meaning of recycling. Ecoalf is a Madrid-based clothing company that turns waste products like fishing nets into fashion.

Madrid Visitors & Convention Bureau

When in Rome, or in this case Madrid, attend a fútbol game at the Santiago Bernabéu stadium to watch Real Madrid or at the Vicente Calderón stadium to support Atlético de Madrid. On a warm day, rent a canoe on the lake in El Retiro Park, a historical and botanical area. Cibeles Palace is an icon that encompasses modernity and history and has a great patio if the family needs a break. Originally, it was the post office headquarters and today is city hall. Zoo Aquarium de Madrid is famous for twin pandas Po and De De.

Madrid Visitors & Convention Bureau

FAMILY


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At HOME

ROOM for ALL

A

clutter-free workspace is essential to your success. Minimal items on your desktop are tickets to increasing efficiency and peace of mind. Invest in a filing system and drawer organizers.

E

very item needs a home. Use labeled bins and baskets to organize your products. Visit your local Container Store or kidecals.com for label ideas.

A

t a young age, children develop literacy skills and learn responsibility, a great reason to keep children’s toys categorized, contained and labeled. When decorating your child’s room, implement products such as Restoration Hardware’s bookracks and industrial baskets, and The Land of Nod’s art caddies and floor bins.

O

rganizing a closet is simple: Use drawer organizers, canvas bins and clear shoe boxes to group like items together, employ the ROY-G-BIV color coding system and black slim-line hangers. “Your closet should be as shop-able as a store so that your mornings are efficient,” said Marissa Hagmeyer, NEAT Method’s South Florida organizing professional.

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INSPIRE

NEAT METHOD Clutter-free and organized spaces are no longer an anomaly. Lifestyle companies like Neat Method are the answer to a hectic life. Pros enter a client’s home to transform a space from chaotic to composed. Marissa Hagmeyer (below) is Neat Method’s director of marketing and South Florida correspondent. She shares the key steps to making a home efficient and stylish. neatmethod.com

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2014

Amerian Red Cro

Designers’ Show House 3 8T H

AN N IV E RSA RY

February 20th - March 22nd

Monday - Saturday 10:00 am - 4:00 pm • Sundays Noon - 4:00 pm 124 Churchill Road, West Palm Beach

Participating Design Firms Fernando Wong Outdoor Living Design • Island Living & Patio • Jennifer Garrigues, Inc. Joseph Pubillones Interiors Inc. • Katherine Shenaman Interiors • Krista Watterworth Design Studio Melody Smith Interiors • NXG Studio • Piper Gonzalez Designs • Quigley Maguire Collections Scott Robertson Interiors Inc. • Stephen Mooney Interiors • Veronica Volani-Inza Interior Design, Inc.

Classical South Florida, Designer Homes Construction, Kirchhoff Architects, Mary K. Oxley Foundation

For more information and tickets www.redcross.org/pbtc


INFORM

"We thought we had the answers. It was the questions we had wrong." Bono


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MAD

About MARY

FROM LIFE AS A MILLINER TO CELEBRITY INTERIOR DESIGNER, TASTEMAKER MARY MCDONALD IS BUILDING A BRAND OF STYLE, ONE PROJECT AT A TIME. By Amy Lagae Profile Photography by Ninelle Efremova

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INFORM room should invite, seduce and welcome. No one knows that better than Mary McDonald. The Los Angeles-based interior designer, who took reality TV by storm via Bravo’s “Million Dollar Decorators” and “Property Envy,” flawlessly merges geometric prints, painted floors, traditional accents and chinoiserie. Like most successful entrepreneurs, McDonald’s burgeoning career was not an overnight success, rather a result of charting her own creative path.

furniture with well-known interior brands. Starting in 2010, McDonald designed a lighting collection with Robert Abbey, which segued into a range of fabric, trim and wallpaper with F. Schumacher & Co., rugs with Patterson Flynn & Martin and a furniture line with Chaddock Home debuting this April. While she is known for the use of chevron and bold patterned floors paired with hand-painted chinoiserie wallpapers, she insists she doesn’t play favorites. “I honestly love everything, just not everything all at once. If I had to choose, then Louis XVL period objects: chintz, urns, intaglios, graphic floors and Georgian millwork.”

McDonald’s latest design project is the Beverly Hills home of friend Jennifer Salke, president of NBC Entertainment. For McDonald, this is just another typical day at the office.

McDonald set out to Boston University to study art history but changed course, transferring to Parsons School of Design where she focused on fashion design. After graduation, she started a hat collection aptly named Mary Rea McDonald, and became a millinery darling for top editors and stylists. The transition from milliner to decorator was a natural progression. “The ability to layer a particular, angled millinery silhouette block with a bouquet of flowers, birds and runway-type elements is the same core as collecting varied  intaglios, prints and  curiosities for a room to look interestingly populated with character,” said McDonald. “The use of color and pattern was a strong force for me that continues to translate into interiors to this day.” She began decorating full time in the mid-90s. Her success steadily grew, culminating in 2001 when her own home was photographed by House & Garden, earning her national attention. Three more major magazine covers followed that year and McDonald quickly realized the power of media was changing. From there, McDonald decided that putting herself out there was going to be key to her brand’s growth. “I was in my mid30s, and I wasn’t trying to get published. Years ago, people weren’t branding themselves. Media changes every decade and becomes more available. It’s so exponential.” Iconic design firms came calling, and soon McDonald was collaborating on collections of fabrics, lamps, rugs, wallpapers and

Photo by Jean Randazzo

Born into a family of intensely creative women, McDonald seemed destined for the artistic field. “My Aunt Phyllis was a Beach Club-going Brentwood decorator so my fondest memories were seeing all of those Schumacher chintz and black and white checked Brunschwig & Fils bags in her trunk,” said McDonald. There’s also great wisdom in the family tree. Her grandmother was an intellectual and graduated Stanford class of 1917, which was an anomaly for women back then.

McDonald admits she learned how to run her company through trial and error. “At the end of the day, it’s your business. Certain press opportunities and clients fall in your lap. Other projects, you work for months [to secure] them, and sometimes, they just don’t happen. You have [to accept that] it’s not the time or fit, and you move on until it is the right time. A strong sense of humor also helped her persevere through trying business moments, including handling difficult clients. McDonald became an international star in 2011 when she joined the cast of Bravo’s “Million Dollar Decorators,” a docu-series that followed the most sought-after interior decorators as they navigated the high-pressured design industry for their wealthy, famous, and extremely demanding clients for two seasons. She is also a cast member on “Property Envy.” Observed for her quick wit and brutally honest comments, McDonald was an audience favorite. “It’s a business, and in my opinion that’s what they are paying for,” said McDonald. “You have to be prepared for people to love you or hate you.  M A R C H / A P R I L 2 0 1 4 M&V

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Feature Mary MCDOnald “The use of color and pattern in millinery was a strong force for me that continues to translate into interiors to this day.� -Mary McDonald

Honeycomb 66172 Bittersweet Labyrinth Tape 66152 Tangerine

Vanderbilt Velvet 66192 Noir

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Photo by Miguel Flores Vianna

Photo by Miguel Flores Vianna

McDonald with chief project manager Kenna Ryman


Photo by Melanie Acevedo


Photo by Robert Trachtenburg

Interior shots of homes are from McDonald's portfolio, and were featured in her book Mary McDonald: Interiors: The Allure of Style.

When you put yourself on TV, you’re asking for it. There’s really more benefit from it than not. You have to be prepared for criticism. I don’t go looking for it, but you have to be ready either way.” In her day-to-day job, she is focused on homes for discerning clients like Salke. McDonald’s creative process centers on communication and visual clues such as the client’s favorite items. “I use visual tools to see the language that they want to speak in so that I know what they’re talking about, because sometimes a person’s style is nothing like their personality,” explained McDonald. “You can have a client who’s extremely extroverted, but they want their home to be low-key and subdued.” Some clients like Salke love to collaborate. “Mary is a true artist, and I respond to her boundless enthusiasm and how she always surprises and evolves as a designer. She never wants to be boring or pedestrian and is always pushing for originality,” said Salke. “Truthfully, she brings us ideas, and we always love them right off the bat. We are very trusting of her level of taste so we are always willing to sign off on her big, exciting visions. We have three teenagers and three dogs, so it was important that the house have great style but not be too precious.” Salke falls in the category of dream clients, according to McDonald. “There are fantastic clients, and there are difficult clients. A fantastic client isn’t necessarily someone who’s extremely wealthy. They have to share your vision and be willing to see their surroundings with you.” Along with the new furniture line, McDonald is launching a new wallpaper line for Schumacher in April. Also on the drawing board is a second book for which she currently is collecting images. Her first book, Mary McDonald: Interiors: The Allure of Style (Rizzoli 2010), was praised for its quality and breadth of the featured projects. Naturally, McDonald needs a break here and there, and her home provides her with the needed comfort and gratitude. “For me, home is a place where I close the door and find peace and relaxation in my surroundings. I have lots of quiet, private time to balance out the other hours.” ■

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Photo by Miguel Flores Vianna

Photo by Miguel Flores Vianna

“Mary is a true artist, and I respond to her boundless enthusiasm and how she always surprises and evolves as a designer. She never wants to be boring or pedestrian and is always pushing for originality.� -Jennifer Salke President NBC Entertainment

Photo by Melanie Acevedo

Photo by Robert Trachtenburg

Photo by Miguel Flores Vianna

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Big picture NEWS AND REPORTS FROM AROUND THE WORLD

MEDICAL NEWS

Look Who’s Inspiring M&V

M

ADAM BOUSKA

eet Raegan Payne, a young woman who completed 100 volunteer projects in honor of her grandfather’s memory. “He was kindness personified, a WWII veteran, and a true man of character who would help anyone that asked for it,” said Payne, a playright who lives in LA and began the undertaking in 2009. She completed the 100th project this past December and is planning project 101. “I found a tremendous sense of peace knowing that I was helping someone. I also learned so much: practical skills, environmental concerns. I often tell people it was like a second university education, a really rigorous program. My world expanded,” said Payne, who documents the experiences at thegoodmuse.com.

ENTREPRENEURS = Happy People

E

ntrepreneurs are among the happiest people in the world when it comes to individual well-being and satisfaction with their work conditions. That is the finding of the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) 15th annual study of entrepreneurship that surveyed more than 197,000 individuals selected among 75 percent of the world’s population and 90 percent of world GDP. The survey revealed that entrepreneurs worldwide—at both the established and early stages of business ownership—exhibit higher rates of subjective well-being in comparison to individuals who are not involved in the process of starting a business or owning/managing a business. In relation to female entrepreneurs, report co-author José Ernesto Amorós stated, “In innovation-driven economies [female entrepreneurs] exhibit on average a higher degree of subjective well-being than males. This initial assessment opens up possibilities for exploring the role of women and men entrepreneurs beyond the traditional notion of development generally associated with economic indicators.” The report suggests that for some economies, it may be valuable to convince talented females who are considering entrepreneurial endeavors to take the final jump. The report delves into differing entrepreneurial attitudes and activities as related to the type of economies respondents are from (factor-, efficiency- and innovation-driven) and geographic area. It also acknowledges that many types of entrepreneurship exist and that entrepreneurial aspirations are also crucial for assessing potential impact.

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 Google revealed a revolutionary “smart” contact lens to help diabetics monitor glucose levels. The prototype, developed by Google X lab members, uses tiny chips, sensors and a microscopic antenna to measure the level of glucose in tears. Project members suggest the lens may use miniature LED lights to alert users when levels are getting too high. It is expected to reach consumers in five years.  Researchers from Syracuse and Brown universities studied the association between young women “hooking up”—sexual liaisons outside of committed romantic relationships—and depression, sexual victimization and sexually transmitted infections. The study of 483 first-year female undergraduate students, published in The Journal of Sex Research, found that early hook-up behavior was associated with all three outcomes, pointing to a need for proactive educational efforts.  Research by Kings College London and University of East Anglia, published in The Journal of Nutrition, shows that a high intake of flavonoids, compounds found in chocolate, tea, wine and berries, may help protect against Type 2 diabetes by reducing insulin resistance and improving glucose regulation.  A study by Western University in Canada indicates that women who use nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) to kick smoking may be putting their offspring at risk for obesity. The FDA has approved five types of NRT–nicotine gums, patches, nasal sprays, inhalers and lozenges. Researchers found a link between NRT use and an increase in triglyceride production, an indicator of obesity, in animal subjects.  Sunlight may help the one in three Americans that have high blood pressure, in turn reducing the risk of heart attack and stroke. Researchers at the Universities of Southampton and Edinburgh reported in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology that the blood pressure was significantly lowered as a result of exposure to a UVA lamp for two 20-minute sessions.


INFORM

✈ American Eagle celebrates real women without the airbrush

T

he “real” movement in the fashion industry keeps getting stronger. One can credit Dove Campaign for Real Beauty for launching the movement 10 years ago. Other notable campaigns are Make Up For Ever in 2011, Marie Claire’s no photoshop on cover girl Jessica Simpson, and most recently aerie, American Eagle Outfitter’s lingerie spinoff. The company launched its “aerie Real” Spring 2014 campaign featuring models of all sizes in un-retouched photos. The campaign is a response to customer demand for realistic images rather than models who don’t capture the company’s general female population. The set of advertisements is particularly impactful as aerie’s line is aimed at young girls, ages 15 to 21, and has the potential to help girls embrace their own beauty. Seeing a model in true form, which means beauty marks, lines, creases and tattoos, is a breath of fresh air. After all, authenticity is beauty.

BOOKMARK THESE SOCIALLY-RESPONSIBLE ONLINE SITES

A

bleMadeShop.com an e-commerce site founded by Suzanne McKenzie How It Works The Able Made team collaborates with a designer or brand to create a unique product made exclusively for Able Made that is available online until it sells out. If it’s particularly popular, then Able Made will produce a second edition. Who It Benefits Able Made works with organizations such as The Harlem Stories Project and Somaly Mam Foundation that have been established for several years and proven to fulfill their social impact promise.

S

ameSky.com a microfinance site founded by Francine LeFrak How It Works Same Sky provides women in Africa living with HIV/AIDS training to become artisans, moving them toward self-sufficiency. The company brought the model to the states and hired formerly incarcerated women in New Jersey. Who It Benefits The jewelry products are sold on the website and 100 percent of net proceeds are reinvested to train and employ artisans in need.

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Saks Fifth Avenue, Fine Jewelry Gardens Mall, 3109 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410

www.katybriscoe.com


The Perfect Match Polo and Brunch

Experience the energy of world-class polo and brunch at the International Polo Club. Delicious food, champagne, celebrity sightings, music, fashion and, of course, polo. Every Sunday at 3 p.m. through April 20 The Pavilion opens at 2 p.m.

Join us at The Pavilion for the after-party from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.

For ticket options, please visit InternationalPoloClub.com or call 561.204.5687.

3667 120th Avenue South Wellington, Florida 33414

Photography by LILA PHOTO


ROBIN WILSON

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Larry Baglio

Master CLASS


INFORM

ROBIN WILSON

R

obin Wilson made her mark by specializing in creating eco-healthy environments. Owner of an eponymous interior design firm in NYC, Wilson is one of the country’s leading sources on sustainable, non-toxic and recyclable materials. She also knows how to translate those items into classic/modern designs for residential and commercial spaces. “Eco-friendly design provides an opportunity for consumers to understand how to live in a sustainable and non-toxic environment,” said Wilson. “When we started in 2000, most of the products were quite expensive and bland. Today, there are many options as companies recognize that non-formaldehyde adhesives, low-to-no-VOC paints and stains, non-toxic textiles and cleaners are the way to go to keep a healthy home.” To help educate consumers on how to create eco-healthy environments, Wilson stars in a TV Web series titled “Home with Robin,” available at robinwilsonhome.com. Her environmentally-conscious furniture line also is sold on the website. Her eco-friendly kitchen cabinetry is available at Holiday Kitchens, while the Robin Wilson Home bedding, bath products and hypoallergenic pillows are sold at Bed Bath & Beyond.

Eco-friendly TIPS for the home ✴

Adopt a shoe-free environment to help keep the outside world from coming into your home.

✴ Use hypoallergenic bed linens, mattress pads and pillows to prevent dust mites from infesting your sleep environment.

Install a nylon shower curtain liner (not vinyl) to limit mold and off-gassing.

Use low-to-no VOC paints as they self-seal, and there is no paint smell one hour after painting your space.

✴ Use WaterSense rated plumbing fixtures and

Energy Star rated appliances to limit the environmental impact.

the ultimate green House Wilson’s most recent green project is Eco Bungalow, LA Inspired by the tragic story of a family who lost their home to fire during the holidays in 2011, Wilson, her team and the Sustainable Furnishings Council built a fireproof, energy efficient and toxin-free “Eco Bungalow” from the ground up for the family. Some of the home's highlights include a solar power system that generates nearly eight megawatts of power and a hard-wired fire monitoring system. ecobungalow-la.com

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Business UNUSUAL

ALL IN THE FAMILY Working side-by-side with family can be overwhelming. With the right professional management and commitment, family-owned businesses are proven to be more stable and inspire more trust and dedication in their employees compared to non-family businesses. In fact, more than one-third of Fortune 500 companies are defined as family businesses. By Styliana Resvanis

G

rant Gravitt began working with his parents’ business before most children learn to read. He looked on as his parents started their production company in the back of their South Florida home. “I was quality control while I was still in my crib,” he said. He broke into the industry as a child actor, starring in a milk campaign, but his father fired him at age four, because he didn’t grow fast enough to match the company’s slogan, “We all grew up on McArthur.” Now Gravitt, 51, is president of Tel-Air Interests, a film and video production company in Hollywood, Fla., which his parents founded in 1960 at a time when local television producers were hard to come by in the Southeast. As a child he listened to his parents discuss work at the dinner table and hung out at the office after school to help with odds and ends, but he admits he never thought he would buy the company from his parents in 1998. “I was going to be a pro-soccer player, but I got hurt in

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college and came home. I turned down some really good offers, but I never regretted it because I always enjoyed working with the family,” said Gravitt. Gravitt’s company counts as one of 5.5 million family-owned businesses in the United States, according to Family Enterprise USA. The advocacy organization, which focuses on the contributions family businesses make to the community and economy, notes that 60 percent of publicly held U.S. companies are controlled by family-run entities. But what’s the key to sustaining these businesses? “It always comes down to people, so whether it’s your son and daughter or non-family key employees, if you don’t have super people, your business will not succeed going forward,” said Wayne Rivers, a public speaker, author, co-founder and president of Family Business Institute, a consulting firm for family-owned companies based in Raleigh, N.C.


INFORM

“When does the pilot think about landing the plane? As soon as he takes off. Family businesses are really good at getting off the ground and achieving altitude, but they’re horrible at achieving that landing. For most family businesses, they should have started planning yesterday.” -Wayne Rivers

Rivers, 52, started his consulting firm with his father-in-law. He won’t pass down the business because he does not want to wait 12 to 15 years until his 19-year-old son, the oldest of his two children, reveals the interest or qualifications to take over. Instead, Rivers plans to sell the business when he reaches age 60, and advises family businesses to have an exit plan in place. “When does the pilot think about landing the plane? As soon as he takes off,” he said. “Family businesses are really good at getting off the ground and achieving altitude, but they’re horrible at achieving that landing. For most family businesses, they should have started planning yesterday.” As for children looking to take over for their parents, Rivers recommends they assert themselves instead of waiting for their parents to assign them tasks. “They need to come up with their plan for acquiring responsibility and learning the [skills] they need to become not just managers but leaders one day,” he said. Christie Yiannis Les’ children know all about assuming responsibilities in the family business. Her two boys—14-year-old Angelo and nine-year-old JohnMichael—often argue over who will take over the Cozy Cottage Restaurant, a carving board deli restaurant in the Bronx, N.Y. Les and her husband George grew up in their parents’ restaurants. Although they never felt pressured to stay in the restaurant industry, the two pooled their funds together to buy out George’s father’s partner in the mid-1990s. Fast-forward almost 20 years, and Angelo, JohnMichael and 12-year-old Sophie understand how to take and bring out food orders, help in the kitchen, answer phones and operate the register. Because of this experience, Les believes her children will be well-prepared for future jobs even if they don’t choose to follow in their parents’ footsteps, because helping in the family busi-

ness teaches valuable skills they can use if they are ever in-between jobs. “I want them to finish college, and then if they still feel that they want to run the family business, that’s not a problem,” Les said. “But I don’t want them to fall into the mentality of ‘If your father owns something you have to follow that.’” She advises other parents to think the same way. “[Children] have to aspire to what their potential is. Allow them to explore all different possibilities and let it be their final decision.” Rivers said family businesses allow parents to model family values, teach children the importance of hard work and provide children with opportunities for employment and financial security. Gravitt, who has no spouse or children to take over for him, also notes many who inherit their parents’ companies tend to put work ahead of their personal priorities. “There’s such a fine line between being dedicated to your business and being obsessive compulsive,” he said. “You become really married to your job.” He said that working in the family business became a great bonding experience, and he counts the best days of his life as those when his father looked at him as an equal because they fought the same battles and shared the same successes. As for how he operates the company that became his parents’ legacy, Gravitt understands Tel-Air Interests is a 54-year-old company. He realizes the importance of keeping a company fresh and differentiating his leadership from his family’s leadership while respecting his parents’ efforts. "You’ve got to understand that every day everything is changing around you,” Gravitt said. “I do know that in family businesses the second generation can really ruin a company if they weren’t born with the same drive as the proprietor. You have to have that fire in the belly to keep something successful for a long, long time.” ■

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On the EDGE

A GROWING Problem Not all psychologists are the on-the-couch types. Consider the good doctors who enter a hoarder’s home and help the patient move past the mounds of stuff. By Trémene Triplett

By Treméne Triplet

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INFORM

O

ne of the few positives of reality television is its ability to bring hidden issues to the forefront. Shows like A&E’s “Hoarders” and TLC’s “Hoarding: Buried Alive” are credited for raising awareness about the serious and oft-misunderstood problem. The real phenomenon is the trained specialist who helps those who compulsively acquire objects and have difficulty discarding them. “There was not much interest in hoarding,” said Fugen Neziroglu, Ph.D., a certified behavior and cognitive psychologist and pioneer researcher on the topic. “We’ve been studying it for 10 years. [The term] did not take off until the TLC program took off,” said Neziroglu, who worked on the pilot episode for “Hoarding: Buried Alive.” Since founding the Bio Behavioral Institute in Long Island, N.Y., with her husband in 1979, she has seen an increase in societal acceptance of mental health treatment. “I think the stigma has really lessened,” she said. “When we first started out, one of our major goals was to give diagnoses so that you could know what it was—to de-stigmatize.” Practicing psychologists are trained to help their patients handle life challenges and mental health issues more effectively. The American Psychological Association (APA) estimates that there are 85,000 psychologists in the U.S., but a psychologist qualified to treat hoarding is a rarity, according to Palm Beach psychologist Holly LaSalle-Ricci, Ph.D., who practices at Advanced Mental Health Care in South Florida. She is a

licensed practicing cognitive-behavioral psychologist—providing psychotherapy (psychological treatment), mainly in patients’ homes, to help them change the way they think and behave. “Seeing a patient throw away a five-year-old newspaper, when weeks before they could not fathom throwing away a single page, makes my day,” said LaSalle-Ricci. “I used to be more of a saver [myself ], but I now realize the tremendous value of giving or throwing away things that are not of use,” she said of the personal effects of treating hoarders. On average LaSalle-Ricci works with hoarding patients for approximately six months by making assessments, setting treatment goals and decluttering. She then phases in an organizer, who continues the decluttering process. One room can take up to 100 hour to declutter. “During an initial treatment process, you spend weeks helping to visualize the progress,” she said. It is unclear how many people suffer from hoarding. Some psychologists argued the number is close to four million. Until recently, the APA listed hoarding as a symptom of obsessive-compulsive disorder, but in its latest edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders the two illnesses are separated. Hoarding is defined as “persistent difficulty discarding or parting with possessions, regardless of their actual value.” Paper items like books, newspapers and mail are hoarded most; however, LaSalle-Ricci has worked with people

who hoard food, jewelry, clothing and unique items such as bottle caps. “We don’t know why paper is the most commonly hoarded item. Clinically, we’ve learned that there could be something on the paper that the patient considers important,” explained LaSalle-Ricci. “I have had more success with younger generations when dealing with paper products because of the Internet. We’re able to scan things and store them electronically.” Technology furthers the treatment in other ways. LaSalle-Ricci uses Skype to work with patients who live in remote areas where there are no treatment providers. “I see technology playing a larger role in the treatment of many disorders. Skype and FaceTime allow more access for the psychologist to be in the patients’ homes without physically being there.” Neziroglu, who has written two books on hoarding, said one of the most commonly misconstrued views about hoarding is the emphasis on the hoarders, and adds that the disease impacts society, including governmental agencies, communities and children. She also points out that the United States’ need for consumerism favors hoarding. “In other cultures, people buy what they need. We shop excessively. Do you really need 20 million sweaters?” said Neziroglu. ■ ARE YOU A HOARDER? Take the quiz to learn more about hoarding at the Bio Behavioral Institute website, biobehavioralinstitute.com. M A R C H / A P R I L 2 0 1 4 M&V

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Sip.

Savor.

Sea.

Escape to Culinary paradise Lunch shouldn’t be a culinary scavenger hunt. At 50 Ocean, it’s an afternoon escape to foodie heaven. Select from a veritable feast of tasty small plates, sandwiches, soups and salads, and mouthwatering desserts. Go ahead and enjoy a refreshing glass of bubbly too. We won’t tell.

Brunch • Lunch • Happy Hour • Dinner 50 S. Ocean Boulevard (A1A), Delray Beach, Florida 33483 • 561.278.3364 • 50ocean.com


INFORM

Room for DEBATE

YAY?

OR

NAY?

HOMESCHOOLING

By Styliana Resvanis

&

If you think educating children in the home is a thing of the past, think again. Homeschooling, or home-based education, was common in the days of Abraham Lincoln, and it experienced a rebirth in the late 1970s and remains viable option today. The U.S. Department of Education reports about 1.77 million students learned at home in 2011—an increase from the estimated 1.5 million students educated this way in 2007.

Homeschooling may seem like a viable alternative to traditional schooling, but there are negative aspects to consider. Two major concerns about home education include the availability of social outlets for students and the quality of teaching from parents without an educational background, said Megan McCahill, a New York elementary school teacher.

“All of us who have ever been classroom teachers know that in your education courses, you dream about individualization and customization; that’s the golden standard,” said Brian Ray, Ph.D., who founded the National Home Education Research Institute (NHERI) in 1990 and has studied homeschooling for 30 years. Yet teachers arrive in classrooms with roughly 25 students of varying skills and learning styles and realize it’s impossible to individualize education in an institutional setting with limited resource.

Although homeschool communities allow children to interact through experiences such as field trips and extracurricular activities, the opportunities depend on the state, situation and parents’ decisions. McCahill has taught in the school system for 10 years while watching her nieces and nephews learn at home. She believes traditional schooling allows students to interact in a real-world setting on a daily basis with people of varying differences and similarities. Homeschooling may not be able to provide such an opportunity.

The customized curriculum and teaching approach tailored to a child’s strengths, weaknesses and interests is one of the reasons why homeschooling counts as a worthwhile alternative. Parents note other positive aspects of homeschooling include a safe environment without distractions or negative influences (drugs or violence), the opportunity to strengthen family relationships and the chance to teach specific values or beliefs (religious or moral).

Home-educated children who lack this social interaction could experience culture shock or develop anxiety disorders or inadequate interpersonal skills. This lack of social interaction might even affect how home-educated students transition into college or adulthood, which are difficult situations even for traditionally schooled children.

According to Ray, research shows the amount of one-on-one time parents give children outweighs a parent’s lack of teaching expertise or certification. Homeschooled students typically score 15 to 30 percentile points above public school students on standardized tests. Average public school scores land in the 50th percentile, according to NHERI and other studies. Home education can offer an efficiency that’s lacking in traditional schools. “In two hours of homeschooling, you can do what public school takes six hours to do,” Ray said.

Parents can find resources for homeschooling such as advocacy groups, local homeschool support systems and home education conferences, which offer lessons on teaching techniques. Ray also notes the inaccuracy of social stereotypes. The majority of homeschooled students are engaged in their neighborhoods and local homeschool community in extracurricular activities such as sports teams, church and youth groups. “They aren’t just with their peers for seven hours a day in a place called school,” he said. “They’re mixing with a variety of people.”

Continue the debate. SHARE your opinion at magazinemv.com/roomfordebate

As for the quality of education, some states have stricter academic guidelines than others. Pennsylvania and New York require high levels of regulation (test scores, curriculum approval and teacher qualification). Florida clocks in at the moderate level of regulation and states such as Georgia and California have low regulation, according to the Home School Legal Defense Association. “Teachers study specific fields so that they’re experts,” McCahill said. “I’m not sure parents are taking that into account when they’re homeschooling.” The educational experience of the parent may limit the academic rigor in each subject they’re teaching. While homeschooling can allow students to spend more time on subjects of interest, parents play a much larger role in pre-determining or limiting the direction of study because of the structured learning environment. “Are parents guiding [their homeschooled children] through a tunnel with boundaries set by the parents, or are [they] guiding them on a path with free-thought process, which [students] would get in a public school?” McCahill said. “Families that do not agree with public education have a right to homeschool their children, but they should honestly consider what they’re doing. Are they really setting their kids up for leading their own lives or leading the lives the parents want them to lead?” M A R C H / A P R I L 2 0 1 4 M&V

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Your Next Great Meal Is In Our Hands

Chef Steve’s take on global comfort food is reason enough to love Table 26. But our commitment to teamwork takes your dining experience to the next level.

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NURTURE

"Home wasn’t a set house, or a single town on a map. It was wherever the people who loved you were, whenever you were together."  Sarah Dessen


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Project ME CARVE OUT TIME FOR YOURSELF. M&V’s ROUNDUP OF IDEAS & PRODUCTS FOR SELF-CARE.

W

ith every new season comes trends inspired by the runway. This spring and summer is about freshness and femininity. M&V sought out M∙A∙C Cosmetics for its take on achieving the look— a makeup-free ‘raw’ beauty and just-washed hair style. Day-Glow CC-Thru Color

Photos courtesy of M∙A∙C Cosmetics

RAW, RUGGED AND HEALTHY. MORE THAN JUST BRONZED, THIS LOOK IS A NOD TO ALL ELEMENTS OF SUN, SEA, SAND, WIND, AIR AND WATER. SUMMERY, GLOWING.

A SENSITIVE YET STRONG STATEMENT. COOL AND WARM SHADES WORK WITH THE SKIN’S NATURAL TONES TO BRIGHTEN THE SKIN. TAKING “NATURAL” MAKEUP TO THE NEXT LEVEL.

Light FX The New Deal THE RETURN OF FEMININITY THROUGH LINER, LASHES AND KOHL. TIMELESS DETAILS IN EXECUTION ENHANCE AND REINVENT EYE ACCENTS.

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BEAUTIFUL AND PURE. OPALESCENT CLARITY. PREVAILING RADIANCE THROUGH WHITE, GOLD, SILVER, GLITTER, SHIMMER AND FROSTING. FRESHNESS AND ENERGY ABOUND.


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ant clear, healthy glowing skin? ESPA’s new Optimal Skin ProSerum may be the answer (along with drinking water and sleeping eight hours a night). The formula harnesses the power of key natural ingredients to activate skin’s own revitalizers like collagen, ceramides and hyaluronic acid. ProSerum is exclusively available at spa resorts such as Acqualina Resort & Spa in Sunny Isles Beach, FL. espaskincare.com

F

rédéric Fekkai reawakens his brand with the launch of new hair indulgences, and as expected, Fekkai is pushing the envelope in luxurious hair care. “We reinvented the product line to deliver this sumptuous experience with products that will awaken a woman’s senses and make her feel beautiful,” said Fekkai. Some must-haves include the Argan-oil infused PrX Reparatives Mending Elixir to smooth hair’s cuticles and soften texture and the Full Blown Volume Foam Condition to deliver incredible volume without leaving a heavy residue behind. fekkai.com

I

f there’s a company that understands gratitude, it’s Alex & Ani. Its new collection Light & Ignite fuels its purpose further. The use of white wax in the candles ($28 for large, $12 for votive) is intended to help bring forth your best intentions, peace and spiritual strength and repel negativity. Choose from crisp herbal greens, gardenia notes, aroma of patchouli or three other glorious scents. alexandani.com

R

einforcing positivity goes a long way, and it doesn’t take a lot. Soaps to Live By is a new sustainable company making a difference with positive words— LAUGH, BLISS, HOPE, SHINE—engraved in each bar ($8). In addition to the inspiring words and quotes on each bar’s label, the company produces the bars in the States from organic and natural ingredients and beneficial essential oils. For every bar of soap sold, Soaps to Live By plants a tree through Trees for the Future. (M&V staff raved about the product’s lather and long-lasting aroma.) soapstoliveby.com

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Gatherings

A SPRING Fête There’s more to pulling off a successful dinner party than sending out invitations and planning a menu. It requires strategizing and proper organization. To make it easy, follow our step-by-step plan for a spring-themed soirée designed for 10 people. Begin the gathering with cocktails and canapés alfresco. Then lead your guests through a candlelit path to evoke their anticipation for their dining experience to come. Serve an elegant, locally sourced three-course dinner with wine pairings. End the evening with heartfelt personal toasts. By Melanie Blonshine and Emily Marrah Photography by Patricia Dash

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The Timeline FOUR WEEKS • Determine budget, choose a date and arrange food and beverage vendors • Purchase invitations, place cards and beverage napkins

THREE WEEKS • • • •

Establish the concept and décor Begin menu planning, including cocktail, water and wine options Decide on gathering area for cocktails and hors d’oeuvres and assess setup options Mail out invitations

TWO WEEKS • • • •

RSVPs are in; keep list of guests attending and any dietary restrictions Finalize food and beverage, table layout and décor specifications Choose guest gifts Schedule house cleaning for day prior to event

ONE WEEK • Confirm number of guests • Buy beverages

TWO DAYS BEFORE • Place candles and hand towels in guest bathroom (be sure there is sufficient toilet paper and hand soap) • Polish silverware

MORNING OF, 4 HOURS BEFORE • Vendors arrive, prepare food, set linens, bar and décor

30 MINUTES BEFORE • Ensure cold canapés and bar are ready • Light candles throughout the house

15 MINUTES BEFORE • Pour Champagne

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Gatherings Food and Wine An evening shines when the food is sublime. Executive Chef Michael Haycook of The Grove in Delray Beach, Fla., prepared our menu. The wine pairings are by Matt Franco of MCF Rare Wines of NYC. Start with appetizers: a quail egg and caviar canapé, and an English pea, chevre, Iberico ham and mint canapé. The main course is an heirloom beet salad paired with the Lobarzán Monterrei Blanco 2010. The entrée course is a Colorado lamb with fava, maitake, and Montasio served with Bois de Boursan Châteauneuf-du-Pape Tradition 2010. Dessert is a chocolate tart with raspberry, Lady Grey and crispy pearls, with the Bamberger Riesling Auslese Meddersheimer Rheingrafenberg 2009. For the entire lineup of recipes, visit magazinemv.com/epicurean.

HEIRLOOM BEET SALAD Serves 4 1 lb. assorted baby heirloom beets ½ cup olive oil 4 sprigs thyme 2 cloves garlic avocado puree (recipe below) 2 tablespoons each of chopped dill, parsley and chives ½ cup fromage blanc (a French-style cow’s milk cheese, low in fat with a consistency similar to cream cheese) ½ cup hazelnuts, roasted, peeled and finely chopped INSTRUCTIONS Make avocado puree. Peel and remove pit of one avocado, then place in a food processor with juice of ½ lime, ⅛ teaspoon coriander and ½ teaspoon salt. Puree until smooth. Place the fromage blanc in a mixing bowl with the chopped herbs and whip until thoroughly combined. Place mixture in a pastry bag. Add the beets, olive oil, thyme, and garlic to a roasting pan. Toss the ingredients together so that the beets have the oil over their entire surface. This will help them to peel easily after roasting. Sprinkle with salt and roast at 400 degrees for 45 minutes. Peel the beets. Reserve the oil. Assemble salad. Cut the beets depending on their size, or leave whole if they are small enough. Season lightly with salt and pepper and a squeeze of lemon juice. Drizzle some of the reserved oil over the beets. Divide the beets between four plates. Spoon a few dollops of avocado puree around the beets. Pipe a few dots of the fromage blanc mixture around the beets. Sprinkle with chopped hazelnuts and garnish with some more herbs.

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Chocolate tart with raspberry, Lady Grey and crispy pearls

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Gatherings

COLORADO LAMB WITH FAVA, MAITAKE AND MONTASIO Serves 4

2 Colorado lamb racks, meat cut from the bones (bones reserved for the sauce) 1 large red tomato, roughly chopped 1 bottle of Cabernet Sauvignon 2 sprigs of rosemary 1 bay leaf ½ yellow onion, sliced ½ carrot sliced 1 cup shelled fava beans, blanched 2 minutes, then shocked in ice water 12 pearl onions, skins removed, blanched 3 minutes, then shocked in ice water 8 oz. maitake mushrooms, seasoned with salt, pepper, and drizzled with olive oil, then roasted at 400 degrees for 10 minutes 4 oz. Montasio cheese, cut into small dice (pecorino is a good substitute) 4 oz. piquillo peppers, pureed with 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil and 1 teaspoon salt * mint leaves, julienned (for garnish) INSTRUCTIONS Prepare the lamb jus. Roast the bones, tomato, onion, carrot in a large sauté pan at 375 degrees for 30 minutes. Remove from oven and place on stovetop on medium-high heat. Add the Cabernet Sauvignon to the pan, followed by the bay leaf and rosemary. Add two cups of water. Reduce over medium-low heat until half of liquid remains. Strain the jus and reserve. Season the lamb loins liberally with salt and pepper. Sear in a very hot pan until browned on all sides, then cook for 7-10 minutes at 350 degrees, depending on the size loin and the temperature desired. Keep in mind lamb is most tender when served rare to medium rare. Remove from oven and let rest in a warm place for half as long as the cooking time. In a medium sauté pan, add 2 tablespoons of the lamb sauce with 1 tablespoon water and 1 tablespoon butter. Add the fava beans, pearl onions, and maitake mushrooms. Toss to heat up and combine. Check and adjust seasoning. Slice each loin into four medallions. Arrange two per plate, cut side up. Spoon some of the vegetables next to the lamb, and add some of the diced Montasio on top. Give a squeeze of piquillo puree around the plate. Then drizzle the lamb jus on top and around. Garnish with a few mint leaves.

When you receive an invitation, make a reminder in your calendar to RSVP by requested date, regardless of whether you'll be attending or not.

ETIQUETTE & TIPS

Upon arrival, greet guests with Champagne and sparkling water. Be conscious of the evening's timeline. Lagging between courses makes for too many drinks during dinner. Plus guests' patience will diminish. Host gifts are a lovely gesture to thank the individual for having the party. Consider candles, beverage napkins and monogrammed gifts. Guest gifts are as important as host gifts. Thank your guests for celebrating your occasion with something sweet such as macarons.

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Sources: Christofle china and flatware, Christofle, Palm Beach, Fla.; Champagne flutes, Baccarat, Bloomingdale's, Palm Beach Gardens, Fla.; blue and green patterned table linens and pillow covers, Party Tables, Inc., Hollywood, Fla.; floral bouquets by Richard Grille Events, Lake Worth, Fla.; blue glassware and white chairs, Panache a Classic Party Rentals Company, Pompano Beach, Fla.; invitation, Stationer on Sunrise, Palm Beach, Fla.

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LO CA TE

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PA L

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PL

AC

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E X P E R I E N C E T H E U N E X P ECT E D

Featuring Award Winning Chef, Ron Weisheit

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NURTURE

Little ONES

TOYS that TEACH The first three years of life are the golden years of the developing brain. It's the time to build internal connections, which strengthen and grow those little minds. These unique toys and devices offer a triple punch of education, stimulation and fun.

EARLY LINGO’s DVD Series has animated and live-action videos to teach children six months to six years the basic foundation of a foreign language. The programs use a playful approach to learning with stimulating visual content of everyday activities. ($19.99 single DVD, $99.99 for six-DVD set, earlylingo.com)

Children learn languages with remarkable speed. LITTLE PIM offers a comprehensive language program through videos, books, flashcards and CDs that is ideal for children from birth to six years. (price varies per set, littlepim.com)

App BAREFOOT WORLD ATLAS lets children jetset to hundreds of regions across the world and features puzzles to test their knowledge. (free)

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Stephen Hawking is the brain behind SNAPSHOTS OF THE UNIVERSE, an app that teaches the fundamentals of space through interactive mini-games. ($4.99)

DUOLINGO uses photos, videos and the phone’s microphone to help kids learn to recite, write words and translate real-world texts in new languages. (free)


NURTURE

SHAPEOMETRY builds mathematical understanding with hands-on puzzles that challenge kids to create identical shapes. ($19.99, thinkfun.com)

It’s time for some strategic thinking. THE GREAT GAME IN THE TEENY WEENY TIN BY IOTA reinforces spatial relations and visual skills by combining a shared playing area and turn taking with finding common attributes on the cards. ($7.99, gamewright.com)

SUSPEND is a balancing game that develops hand-eye coordination as players take turns adding to the ever-growing and wobbly vertical structure. ($16.99, thinkfun.com)

Children will never lose track of time with ZINGO! TIME-TELLING, which teaches children how to read an analog clock and make the translation to digital time. ($19.99, thinkfun.com)

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On the CoucH

I

&A

Photo by Steven Martine

Q

with

Dr. Sandra Watson

have a seven-year-old son. When is it appropriate to start giving him chores around the house? What are healthy rewards for doing these chores?

Producing children who start out loving their chores and smoothly develop a strong work ethic is every parent’s dream. A prerequisite for this is a parent who enjoys, or at least highly values, keeping a home and possessions orderly, clean and in good repair. I’m talking about people who smile while working, remain pleasant with the repetition and show enthusiasm about both the work and the results. Those who dislike household chores have a much harder time selling their children on them. If you’re in the latter camp, it may pay to be aware of your behavior since it expresses your unhappy attitude about chores. There is no bottom age for encouraging children to imitate parents working. If he has the coordination and interest, hand him a towel and make the activity mutually enjoyable. Playing music, talking while working, admiring your handiwork afterward and treating yourselves if you’ve done a major job can all reinforce the value of work for a child. For busy parents, this time spent together provides extra opportunity for good conversations about all manner of topics. A good running commentary from a parent is one in which every family member’s contribution is recognized and valued. Mom’s job, Dad’s travel planning and Junior’s recycling should be frequently credited for their contributions to the well-being of the family. Self-esteem in children is effectively developed by teaching them skills that contribute to their own and others’ well-being. Each new responsibility for a child conveys competence and builds confidence. The confidence comes from the competence, not the other way around. A child who learns to walk the dog properly or cook a simple dish feels proud of himself for the skill learned, as well as for the help it gives to the parent. Rather than specific rewards or punishments for chores, use natural consequences, i.e., arrange it so that household work is done before you eat dinner, use the computer, or go to a game. Praise shouldn’t be overblown—just a quick, kind squeeze or word communicates your respect. The time and effort you put into these lessons are well worth it.

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Submit your questions to editorial@magazinemv.com. M&V M A R C H / A P R I L 2 0 1 4


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y husband is constantly on his smartphone, computer and iPad. After work and in the evenings, he basically sits in one spot with his electronics. Sometimes it’s for work, but it feels like an addiction. Can there be such a thing as too much technology?

Yes, your husband may be addicted to technology. PDAs are the new cocoon, the escape hatch, the self-soother. They’re the latest drug requiring self-control to use productively. Some couples spend their time together side by side but on their devices, living in parallel bubbles. If that’s not your idea of a meaningful relationship, your job is to communicate what is. In a marriage, your spouse is your peer and equal. Someone else parented him—taught him what to give and what to expect in a relationship. While it is your job to communicate your own expectations and preferences for his behavior, it’s not your job to badger, insult or guilt trip. Calm statements that begin with, “I’m feeling lonely when you’re on the iPad. How about getting together in an hour for a cup of tea?” are helpful. If you’re respectful and your persistent requests don’t gradually get you the companionship you seek, it may be time to seek professional help.

O

ur daughter has been dating a man for 10 years. There is no talk of marriage, which bothers my husband and me. We think they should marry. Should I initiate a conversation about her future plans?

You are done with parenting this grown-up daughter, so back off gracefully. You presumably have given her your best shot at attaining an independent, productive life. Since you are not mentioning problems, I assume she is living one. At this stage in her life, your job is to stand on the sidelines and support her. Imagine her as a close friend’s child. Wouldn’t you keep your own personal fantasies quiet and look for things about her to enjoy and praise? Many of us find it hard to accept that our adult children will just keep doing what they decide to do, regardless of our own needs from them. It can actually be a relief to accept that boundary, to stop personalizing their choices and start seeing them as separate, lovely beings.

I

am going through a difficult period in my life and in my marriage. Many friends have heard details and inquire. I feel that they are being nosy. How do I politely decline these inquiries from both friends and intrusive acquaintances?

Friends and intrusive acquaintances can be responded to in different ways. Friends, the people who keep up with your comings and goings with compassion, want to make themselves available to you for feedback, cheerleading and/or meltdowns. You know who those valuable people are, so if the moment isn’t right for discussion, you can thank them for asking and make a date to speak in confidence. Those you’re not close to, and those who may be merely gathering information for the village, can be responded to with a pleasant, confident look, an “I do appreciate your concern, but I’m hanging in there…” and a brisk change of subject. Nonverbal communication is key, so look directly in the eyes of your inquirer with a smile. Practicing this response in the mirror will polish your confidence for these uncomfortable moments. As a general rule, it’s best to assume that others have good intentions toward you, so perhaps the inquiry comes from a good place. If you handle the questioner in a kind way, you may inspire the same.

M

y nine-year-old daughter announced she no longer wants to eat ice cream because it has too many calories. While this might be schoolyard banter encouraged by friends, I worry she could be on her way to an eating disorder. How do I instill healthy eating habits?

Your daughter is your responsibility. Model good behavior, teach your values and give her the first, most essential building block relationship. You are the ringmaster, the wise owl and the captain of her ship. If you are successful in establishing a close and positive relationship with her, the teaching part is easier because she will want to be like you. Unfortunately through overexposure, many young girls are adopting the values of today’s pop culture, which emphasizes physical appearance and glamorizes thin females. Effective parents will model healthy eating, show acceptance of their own physiques (fashionable or not) and present eating as a pleasure of life enjoyed in moderation. Cook with her, exercise with her, eat with her, and talk to her about your own view of healthy eating. Dr. Sandra Watson is a clinical psychologist specializing in the assessment and treatment of adults. She has practiced in Stuart, Fla., since 1984. M A R C H / A P R I L 2 0 1 4 M&V

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Growing pains

An Inside Look Every person feels anxiety from time to time, but don’t fret. That anxious feeling is a coping mechanism, causing humans to focus and handle a tense or uncomfortable situation. Anxiety in children is another story. When a child struggles with a mood or anxiety disorder, it can literally cause distress in every facet of their young life.

By Ellen Schmidt

Sarah Taylor* did not immediately think anything was wrong when she started bringing Alice*, her quiet 10 month old, to a children’s music class, and Alice refused to interact with the other babies or pick up class instruments. Soon after, Alice was diagnosed with hypotonia (low muscle tone in infants), but that diagnosis did not seem to entirely explain her behavior. As Alice grew older, the irregular behavior became more apparent. On vacation, Taylor had to point her daughter’s high chair toward a wall because she did not want anyone to look at her while she ate, a behavior that continued until she was four. Teachers informed Taylor that Alice, at that time two years old, had no social interaction with other children in the classroom. Outside of school, she was very engaged and vocal, yet inside of school she refused to engage with others.

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Alice was diagnosed at age four with social anxiety disorder and selective mutism, a condition in which a child who can speak stops speaking, usually in school or social settings. With the diagnosis came new challenges: Taylor needed to consider physical therapy, child psychologist visits and special education versus private center-based schools. Taylor also wondered how long this affliction would dominate their lives. Alice’s inability to speak openly and warmly to others prevented her from making friends, which was disheartening for her parents to witness. According to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), “When anxiety becomes an excessive, irrational dread of everyday situations, it has become a disabling condition.” The NIMH asserts that anxiety disorders are

often linked to mood disorders. “Mood disorders represent a category of mental disorders in which the underlying problem primarily affects a person’s persistent emotional state.” Children who are full of potential may find this debilitating disorder interfering with their aspirations, making them potentially unattainable. Mood disorders can be difficult to diagnose because the brain is still developing, and children may not be able to articulate how they feel. “We won’t always know the exact diagnosis until the adolescent reaches adulthood, but it’s essential to be alert for early signs,” said Dr. Vilma Gabbay, an associate professor of psychiatry and neuroscience and chief of the Mount Sinai's Pediatric Mood and Anxiety Disorders Program in an interview with the New York Daily News. Gabbay is a leading expert on pediatric


NURTURE

mood disorders. “Some things to look for are social withdrawal, diminished ability to enjoy, decline in academic performance, concentration difficulties and irritability—someone who was easygoing is suddenly irritable, and not only with his or her parents.” Common symptoms include tearfulness, sadness, decreased energy, low self-esteem, hypersensitivity to failure and rejection, a change in appetite and sleeping patterns and last but not least, any change of well-being, often without trigger. Mood disorders are diagnosed based on the clusters of symptoms laid out in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). A patient must demonstrate five of the nine symptoms outlined in the manual to be diagnosed. Irritable mood, sadness and the inability to enjoy pleasurable activities are the main symptoms. As with most afflictions, early detection and intervention are paramount. If undiagnosed, adolescents are at a greater risk for developing other conditions (anxiety disorders, disruptive behaviors and substance abuse disorders) as they grow older.

Treatment is often a three-pronged approach that includes therapy with the child’s family, meetings with the school and doctor appointments, if necessary. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is another type of therapy that helps train patients to think more positively and challenge negative thoughts about themselves, their future and how others view them. In addition to the alarming number of increased diagnoses of mood and anxiety disorders in children, the question of treatment with medication is an ongoing debate. Gabbay notes there are other options. First, be informed about the latest research. Second, ensure the child gets enough sleep—at least eight hours a night. Lastly, children should exercise about 2030 minutes, four to five times a week. There’s no question that navigating this vast world of disorders mixed with doctors, psychiatrists, research and medications is complicated at best. The key is to stay abreast of current studies and communicating your concerns with medical professionals will lead you to make the best treatment decisions for your child. ■ *Names were changed to protect identity. M A R C H / A P R I L 2 0 1 4 M&V

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IMPACT

"I attribute my success to this: I never gave or took any excuse." Florence Nightingale


House of

JULES Designer Jules Reid’s Virginia Beach home is where vintage cool meets fashion whimsy. Enter a world where mod rules, and vibrant is the new black. Reid takes M&V on a tour of her technicolor dream house. Photography by Tony Giammarino My favorite space is the living room. The shades of lavender mixed with white create a feeling of calmness for me and for my sons. I found the round vintage lucite shelves at Deluxe, one of my favorite stores located on Madison Avenue in NYC. Madeline Weinrib's pillow and carpet are inspirational due to their opposing graphics. The vintage Louis Vuitton suitcases recall days of travel and remind me that the world is always there to explore. The draperies are made from leftover fabric from my first season as a fashion designer, Spring 2010. My outfit is one of my favorite vintage finds, an Emilio Pucci nightgown and robe.

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Feature JULES REID

The bookshelf is filled with cherished photos of my three boys. I love the Italian designer Fornasetti whose plates are whimsical yet visually stimulating. The coral is from Florida.


IMPACT

The dining room is one of the most used rooms in our home. The high-gloss, painted turquoise chests hold the china. A 20th century French side chair is covered in ikat fabric by Madeline Weinrib. A moth painting by Joseph Scheer, from Ruby Beets in Sag Harbor, centers the room. I fell in love with his work when Bergdorf Goodman had a showcase of his paintings in 2009.


Feature JULES REID

I love a playful vignette. This is an Italian-made curio chest I found in an antique store in Norfolk, Virginia. It's a classic designer piece that you will see in many 1950s Frank Sinatra movies, typically used as a part of a bar. The tall ceramic greyhound guards the British flag trashcan from HomeGoods. A framed Hermès scarf with an elephant motif evokes travel and my Indian influences. The hanging lucite boxes from The Container Store organize our monthly activities. The large Italian plate is by the artist Giovanni De Simone.

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IMPACT I love the mixture of the green, the pops of orange and blues in the ceramics on the wall and the knickknacks on the counters.

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IMPACT This nook featuring an antique pine table is where my ideas are generated. My work station is surrounded by a wild range of colors, which mirror the way that I like to live and to think. A constant source of inspiration is the painting of the models wearing my JR line. The 1970s oval yellow mirror is by Dorothy Draper; it once hung in The Greenbrier resort. I love how the graphic wallpaper by China Seas creates almost a neutral palette. The seashell carpet by Stark is perfect for when I want to spread out on the floor.

Never let a loud print scare you. Florence Broadhurst's metallic red and gold wallpaper featured in my kitchen is the happiest wall covering I have ever found.

I love the combination of two colors that you wouldn't expect; in the case of my guest room, it's green and lavender. I pulled in lavender in both the rug and wallpaper. The original green Dorothy Draper chest is a find from Georgetown. The bedding is John Robshaw's vintage Suzani textile.


Feature JULES REID

This closet only holds pieces from my eight fashion collections. I keep the doors open to see the array of colors and prints. It's a great source of inspiration to me when I am designing a new collection. I love to look back at the prints all mixed together. I can see the different moods that they recall and times in my life. I am wearing the Dean long dress in the jeweled pink print from one of my first collections, which I'm bringing back for the Summer 2014 line available April 15. These are my signature green JR lacquer boxes (above).

The top drawer of my dresser holds precious finds of vintage and couture jewelry. Happiness to me is finding pieces that make a statement: vintage Lanvin necklaces, a man's oversized Rolex watch with a custom pink face, a vintage Pierre Cardin necklace, a Saint Laurent gold and black cross necklace, a lucite pink Chanel cuff and my favorite Herend seashell choker. Every day I pick an item from this drawer to add to an outfit.

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TOUCHÉ CROCHET


RALPH LAUREN BLUE LABEL 50S STYLE LACE DRESS ROECKL GLOVES


TA-BOU CROCHET BIKINI


ESCADA LACE TOP TA-BOU CROCHET BIKINI PATRIK MUFF NECKLACE


TA-BOU CROCHET BATHING SUIT DODO BRACELET


TA-BOU CROCHET BIKINI TWIN-SET ITALY LACE DRESS


FORNARINA TWO-PIECE LACE DRESS


TA-BOU CROCHET BIKINI SEAFOLLY CUTOUT TOP


ESCADA LACE TOP TA-BOU CROCHET BIKINI PATRIK MUFF SILVER NECKLACE


LA PERLA BATHING SUIT SEAFOLLY HOT PANTS PHOTOGRAPHER: ANDREAS ORTNER STYLING: PETRA WEIBE HAIR/MAKEUP: NORBERT CHEMINEL , KATHRIN HOHBERG MODEL: LAURA RASIVKEVICIUTE /MODELWERK


Marci Zaroff is an acclaimed eco-pioneer.


Exciting home textile and apparel companies utilizing FAIR TRADE FABRICS are creating luxurious soft organic linens, innovative fashion and upcycled wearable art for today’s high-demand market. The call to action for consumers to support ETHICAL global manufacturing through our voices and collective purchasing power is more urgent than ever. By Robin Bradley Hansel

Colin Finlay, Eco Amazons: 20 Women Who Are Transforming the World

Turning Over the Tapestry


Features ECO - FRIENDLY TEXTILES

T

he blankets we wrap ourselves in to watch television, the bathrobes we reach for after our showers and the T-shirts that comfort our bodies are more than just functional fabrics. These items serve a unique purpose by connecting us as individuals to a people and planet at large. There’s a global story behind every thread of textile goods in your home. Seeds grow from the ground and are watered, worked and woven into the fibers that surround us; natural and human resources are either both protected or exploited in the process. By becoming more conscientious consumers, we will help offset the negative impact of today’s low-cost, ‘fast fashion’ collections. In the past decade, more sustainable practices have evolved in response to an environment that needs our protection if it is to support advances in social and economic systems. Some of the most common practices of sustainability include buying locally-grown and organically-farmed produce and shopping for natural, cruelty-free body products that conserve Earth’s resources. These choices enhance our own health and ensure that the people within the supply chain are earning fair wages while working in a safe environment. But do you give as much attention to the ‘natural’ materials in your bed sheets, blankets and clothing as you do the ingredients in your food and cosmetics? Are you aware of the toxic chemical residue left behind from the manufacturing of your clothing? “The fabrics we place next to our bodies are just as important to our health as the food we eat,” said Marci Zaroff, an acclaimed eco-pioneer and chief marketing and sustainability officer of Portico Brand Group, a luxury organic lifestyle

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company that owns Under the Canopy and FASE. “The skin is the body’s largest organ, comprising more than 90 percent of our body’s surface.” Genetically modified seeds, pesticides, and a toxic cocktail of chemical dyes go into the manufacturing of conventional cotton and remain an inherent part of the finished textile product. Many of these substances have hormone-altering properties while others contain known neurotoxins and carcinogens. These poisons never completely wash out of our textiles, and their direct and daily contact with our skin can cause allergic reactions and worse. These health and environmental threats can be scary, but don’t overreact. “Resist the urge to go into your closet and throw out all that you see. The next time you make a purchase try to do so with thought. Ask yourself how you can best make decisions that are lasting and sustainable, not extreme,” said Zaroff. A consumer’s best tools for change are education and empowerment. Familiar faces like actress Amber Valletta are doing their part in supporting the need for more sustainable textiles. Valletta is working with Zaroff to present the upcoming Driving Fashion Forward series of short films on sustainability and design. The project launches online via Lexus’s LStudio in mid-April. Other well-known designers are lending their voices to The Greenpeace Detox Campaign, which began calling on major brands in 2011 to eliminate hazardous chemicals from their supply chains by the year 2020. Earlier this year Greenpeace Toxic Campaigner John Deans featured the #LittleMonsters, a two-week intensive social media push to stimulate public awareness about the

chemicals lurking in children’s clothing that wash into our waterways, pollute the environment and threaten public health. Burberry joined the Greenpeace Detox Catwalk’s list of 18 major clothing companies committed to detoxing their textile manufacturing practices as a result of more than 10,000 tweets and Instagram postings in early 2014 from concerned customers. Other companies leading this effort include Benetton, Esprit and H&M. Zaroff also notes that it is important to support the progress of major brands such as Patagonia, Nike, Adidas and Puma without expecting perfection. “They have brought a lot of credibility to sustainable practices and are working hard to reduce their negative footprint,” said Zaroff. The goal for many sustainable textile companies is the use of logos and key words displayed on clothing labels, similar to the food industry’s use of the words organic and all-natural. “In my dreams, I’d love to see a system of garment tagging requirements not dissimilar to food labeling that lists the carbon footprint of the product along with any environmental and human costs that were incurred through production,” said Sass Brown, the acting assistant dean for the School of Art and Design at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York and journalist for Eco Fashion Talk. “I don’t honestly think that many people would continue buying throwaway fashion if they knew that their $15 pair of jeans was produced at the cost of another human being’s life,” said Brown. Textile Exchange, a nonprofit organization, is creating a more transparent labeling system. Consumers can visit their website for the most up-to-date information on textile certifications used 


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Features ECO - FRIENDLY TEXTILES by retailers such as Target and Nordstrom. Universal certifications like Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS), OEKO-TEX 100 and the newly revised Global Recycle Standard (GRS) will help consumers better understand the fiber content of textiles prior to purchase. Reworking and recycling existing garments is another effective way to reduce the environmental stresses of new manufacturing. One million tons of textiles are thrown out every year. Textile waste alone occupies nearly 5 percent of all landfill space. FIT professor Brown’s latest book, ReFashioned, highlights the practice of ‘upcycling,’ whereby textile remnants and recycled fabrics are repurposed into exciting, unique works of functional, wearable art. Brown is encouraged by the amount of shared spaces, creative support and cooperative incubators among green designers in New York City. However, additional collaboration, particularly in the arena of global human rights, is needed to bring more attention to dangerous textile working conditions.

Courtesy of Laurence King Publishing

The Maquila Solidarity Network (MSN) is a labor and women’s rights organization, which supports the efforts of workers in global supply chains to win improved wages and working conditions. According to MSN cofounder Lynda Yanz, major brands and retailers seek products from countries and suppliers willing to produce for the lowest price. “The trend toward fast fashion increases pressure on suppliers to meet tight order deadlines, which results in long hours of forced overtime and/or subcontracting to smaller factories where conditions are usually worse,” said Yanz.

Pillows by Under the Canopy

Spark the discussion. Fashion Revolution Day USA encourages consumers to wear clothes inside out on April 24. This year’s observance commemorates the first anniversary of The Rana Plaza collapse in Bangladesh where 1,129 factory workers lost their lives in the deadliest disaster in the garment industry. Be part of the movement with hashtags ‘fashion revolution’ and ‘insideout’ on social media.

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Some leading apparel brands are taking a stronger stand on issues like forced pregnancy testing and child labor, but dangers still exist that require MSN’s direct support. MSN helped obtain the signatures of 30 major brands and three global unions for a letter to Cambodia’s prime minister in response to violence against workers. More than 130 brands and suppliers, including Abercrombie & Fitch, Fruit of the Loom and American Eagle Outfitters, have now signed the Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh. In the end, the future for more eco-friendly fabrics shows great promise. Consumers hold the power by building awareness about working conditions and influencing companies to take more responsibility. “The very best lasting efforts are authentic, transparent, mindful, and conscious. This year will be a game-changer for the eco-fashion movement thanks to the collaboration and co-creation we are seeing now,” concluded Zaroff. ■


IMPACT QUICK TIPS TO LESSEN YOUR TEXTILE FOOTPRINT ➊

“If you have things you don’t want anymore, but they’re still cool and in good condition, use one of the swap websites like ‘Bib + Tuck’ so someone else can love it. You can find something new to you – without it actually being new – to get excited about.” Sass Brown, acting assistant dean for the School of Art and Design, Fashion Institute of Technology

“Use your voice online to be active in educating friends and family on the toxic textile industry and the solutions that are available.” John Deans, Greenpeace Toxic Campaigner

“Read the ‘made by’ labels in your products and [visit their websites] to learn what companies are doing to help improve workers’ wages and safety in those countries.” Lynda Yanz, Maquila Solidarity Network cofounder

“Try to be mindful of not running the dishwasher half-filled.” Marci Zaroff, chief marketing and sustainability officer of Portico Brand Group

“Being accustomed to cut prices and deep discounts can be unlearned, just as it was learned. Instead of buying fast fashion, take ideas from ‘The Tailor Project’ on how to refit, restyle and repair your existing wardrobe.” Sass Brown

“If your favorite brand is one that has made a Detox commitment, call or email them and thank them for taking a positive step, then tell them you are watching them and want to see real change.” John Deans

“Always shop first for organic Fair Trade certified food, beauty, and personal care items.” Marci Zaroff

GREEN THREADS FOR THE HOME Designtex environmental design, recycling designtex.com Oliveira Textiles organic fibers, textiles oliveiratextiles.com Kravet 100% recycled polyester kravet.com Maharam ISO 14001 certification for all its facilities maharam.com Amenity Home certified organic fabrics amenityhome.com All textiles shown are by Maharam.


LUSH LIFE

Feature LANDSCAPE

FW ernando

ong

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urb appeal is a popular term in real estate, and for good reason. Landscaping affects property value. Even if there are no sales in your future, a beautiful yard is an enjoyable investment. M&V enlisted the help of South Florida landscape designer Fernando Wong to learn how to spruce up an outdoor space.

1. Invest in quality outdoor furniture. It will last for many years, and in the end will be less expensive than buying inferior furniture every couple of years. Teak is a high quality material because of its longevity and ease in maintaining. Let it turn that beautiful gray color on its own. Check out David Sutherland furniture or Restoration Hardware for great options. 2. Skip the big home improvement warehouse stores and head to the green nurseries. “We always encourage people to use independently-owned local businesses because we believe that it is important to support the community,” said Wong. “Not only will nurseries have a better selection and quality, but also they will likely have a more knowledgeable staff that can answer questions about what plants need full sun or what is drought tolerant.” In addition, many nurseries have areas where they display plants grouped around water features and trees, which can give you ideas and inspiration. 3. Arboretums and botanical gardens can be good sources of beautiful quality plants. Be sure to frequently check their websites for their annual plant sales. 4. This might surprise you, but plants come with a warranty. Always ask about the warranties on trees and shrubs. 5. When designing your garden, repeat some plant material in groupings. All gardens need a dominant element. Pick one plant and/or color and make that your element. “Think about what colors you like, and remember you have to match plant colors in the same way you match your clothes,” said Wong. 6. Objects can create impact. Consider garden ornaments such as old sundials. Visit local garden centers but don’t forget antique stores, flea markets and garage sales.

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Raise Your Glass

Social Matters

Photo by Gio Alma

By Lola Thélin

W

orking against the grain takes wits, desire and a strong backbone, especially when dealing with large sums of money. For Jocelyn Cortez-Young, it’s another day at the office as CEO and founder of Minerva Capital Group, one of the first social-impact private equity firms in Miami. “We focus on emerging markets in Latin America and invest in small- to medium-size companies that have a social impact reach,” said Cortez-Young, who founded Minerva in 2009 and is a Harvard and Kellogg alum. Cortez-Young is one of the leaders of a growing kind of investment called impact investing. The key to success is finding the right company, one that is making a positive impact, and to deliver financial returns to end investors and their portfolio companies. Minerva’s success is proving that investing in socially responsible companies doesn’t require an extra

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degree of risk or lower return. That’s where Cortez-Young’s experiences are key.

the company's management team or board must be women.

The Miami resident, born in the states to Chilean parents, began her career on Wall Street and helped launch Goldman Sachs’ Brazil and Mexico offices in her early twenties. She then worked for Credit Suisse’s Latin America emerging markets division, and later with Citibank to develop its investment portfolio, again, in Latin America.

It’s been almost five years since Cortez-Young launched Minerva, whose name derives from the Roman goddess of wisdom and sponsor of arts, trade and defense. During the financial crisis, Cortez-Young jumped the corporate ship to launch her own initiative in a time full of possibility. “You have to be able to venture out into places where most people are not willing to go because the risk and the return end up going in your favor, if you know what you are doing.”

“A necessary component for any entrepreneur when they are starting [out] is to understand what it is they’ve been trained to do, their forte and where their advantage lies,” said Cortez-Young, who realized she had significant expertise in the emerging markets of Latin America and could offer investors a unique level of knowledge. She also is fluent in Portuguese, Spanish and French, which enhanced her value in the Latin America markets. Minerva’s portfolio includes companies in Colombia, Brazil and Mexico; the names of the companies cannot be revealed. Every company that Minerva invests in must be developing innovative and sustainable solutions that promote progressive label practices and environmental standards. On top of that, there are three components that Cortez-Young looks for in its investments. First, the company must employ a certain percentage of people from the “bottom of the pyramid.” Second, employees must constantly be learning and furthering their skills via training programs provided by the company. Lastly, and this component is more of an incentive, 20 percent of

Last year the Global Impact Investing Network (GIIN) released a study, which predicted that funds allocated to impact investing would grow from $8 billion in 2012 to $9 billion in 2013. Despite the anticipated growth, only $100 million of an available $7.9 billion of private equity space in Latin America was allocated to impact investing. This confirms that Minerva and Cortez-Young are still innovators in the field. When she isn’t dealing with investment returns and financial impact in Latin America, Cortez-Young has two major ongoing gigs: She is mom to a baby son and the chairman for the Miami chapter of 85 Broads, an exclusive global women’s network. “There is no difference between my hours of work for industry and my hours at home. It’s more about figuring out how to balance the things that come at you whether that’s at home or work. It’s wrapped up in the same attitude. It’s finding life and purpose in what you do.” ■


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R.S.V.P. SAN FRANCISCO BALLET’S BLACK TIE AFFAIR San Francisco Ballet’s 2014 Opening Night Gala featured a one-time only performance of the ballet classic Giselle on January 22, 2014.

1. TANYA POWELL 2. KRISTI YAMAGUCHI 3. ORLANDO DIAZ-AZCUY, CLARA SHAYEVICH 4. PATRICK AND MELISSA BARBER 5. KOMAL SHAH, PATRICIA FERRIN LOUCKS 6. JOHN GIDDING, DAMIAN SMITH 7. NAVID ARMSTRONG, GISELLE FARRIS, CAROLYN CHANDLER

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IMPACT NORTON MUSEUM HONORS JANE HOLZER The Norton Museum of Art Gala in West Palm Beach celebrated the opening of To Jane, Love Andy: Warhol’s First Superstar, on February 1, 2014.

1.  DON BURNS, HEATHER HENRY 2. AXI MINES AND LOY ANDERSON 3. SCOTT AND ASHLEY HARCOURT 4. JAY AND EMILY CLIFFORD, SCOTT MOSES 5. KATHERINE LANDE, BETTINA ANDERSON, JANE HOLZER, TOMMY MORRISON, BRANDIE HERBST 6. BRIANNA MAHLER, ZAC POTTER

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R.S.V.P. ANIMAL LOVERS GATHER FOR HUMANE SOCIETY GALA The Humane Society of the United States held its premiere Palm Beach to the Rescue! Gala at Club Colette on Thursday, January 23, 2014.

1. ROSS MELTZER AND VICTOR FIGUEREDO 2. JILL RAPPAPORT, LOIS FRANKEL AND SCOTT VELOZO 3. ANGELA VECELLIO, WAYNE PACELLE AND LAURA MALONEY 4. PENNY AND KEITH WILLIAMS 5. EDDIE SCHMIDT, SANDY KRAKOFF, AND OZZIE MEDEIROS 6. KEVIN CLARK, JOANNA BERWIND, JAMES BERWIND AND JESSICA BERWIND 7. MR. AND MRS. JUAN PRATEL 1.

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IMPACT ART WYNWOOD VIP PREVIEW Art Wynwood and official sponsoR Christie's inviteD M&V Magazine to experience First View of the highly anticipated Art Wynwood Fair on FEBRUARY 13, 2014.

1.  DENISE KRIMERSHMOYS 2.

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JESSICA GOLDMAN SREBNICK NICK KORNILOFF, MOLLY GREENE AND PAMELA COHEN LINA AND AGOSTINO CORDEIRO CAROLINE UNDERWOOD, DANIELLE ALVAREZ, AND LUCIA GONZALEZ MODEL FOR LUIS VALENZUELA RON SHUFFIELD AND RICK MOESER RUDOLF BUDJA

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IMPACT

Visions Becky Straw

West Bengal, India

M

y ‘it’ moment happened in Haiti. I was standing in one of the largest tent-camps outside Port au Prince with my co-founder, Jody Landers and Esther Havens, a humanitarian photographer, when three burly men called out and approached us. My heart began racing. How would I explain why we were there? We were not handing out food or water. We had no aid to offer. Surely, I assumed, these guys were going to beg for something. Instead, one wrung his hands and sheepishly said, “Excuse me, ma’am, but we’re wondering if you are hiring? Because we really want to work.” Through sad TV commercials of orphans covered in flies, we have been fed a view that we can end poverty only with handouts and charity. These commercials broke my heart and because of them, I set my sights on becoming an aid worker. I thought it would be so romantic to travel the world “saving” others. Then I stopped and listened.

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I realized people all over the world want the same things: the opportunity to care for their families, send their kids to school and lead healthy lives. Aid is always appreciated, but a job has the power and ability to move an entire family out of poverty forever. With that vision in mind, Landers and I launched The Adventure Project, a nonprofit focused on building individual skills and growing entrepreneurship in developing countries. We work strategically to invest in jobs that solve local problems and help communities thrive. For example, in Africa and much of India, more than one-third of all drinking water wells are broken. Without a trained mechanic, tools or spare parts nearby, most communities watch helplessly as their wells break only a few years after they’ve been drilled, which means hundreds of people who had clean water one day suddenly have to go back to collecting water from dirty rivers and streams.

Instead of drilling new wells, we support a training program for well mechanics in India, started by Water for People, which focuses on long-lasting, safe drinking water resources. Locals learn how to become well mechanics and earn commission for every well they fix. The program has become so successful in India that we’re now helping to replicate it in Uganda, East Africa. Through TheAdventureProject.org, people can give $30 per month to support one person’s job training, education and uniform. In the last three years, more than 5,000 donors have joined us in helping 546 people in Haiti, India, Kenya and Uganda become profitable entrepreneurs, serving, in turn, more than 930,000 people in their communities with better food, water, health and a cleaner environment. Now when someone stops me in a village and asks if we’re hiring, I get to smile and respond, “Yes, we are.” ■

Esther Havens

Becky Straw (left) with co-founder Jody Landers near Kampala, Uganda

Esther Havens

IF THERE’S A WELL, THERE’S A WAY


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Muses & Visionaries magazine No3  

The Home Issue, 2014, featuring Mary McDonald

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