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CELEBRATING 100 YEARS OF DELIVERING THE NEWS

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A SPECIAL EDITION PRE SENTED BY MUSTANG MEDIA GROUP & UNIVERSIT Y HOUSING

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ADVICE FOR NEW STUDENTS AND PARENTS Q&A with Keith B. Humphrey, Vice President for Student Affairs

PARENT- TO - PARENT Tips for freshmen parents from the Parent Advisory Council

UNIVERSITY HOUSING’S PEER MEDIATORS Ways for new students to get along with their roommates

A SPECIAL EDITION PRESENTED BY MUSTANG MEDIA GROUP AND UNIVERSIT Y HOUSING

Mustang News California Polytechnic State university 1 Grand Ave. San Luis Obispo, CA 93407

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President Armstrong welcomes the new academic year For many of our incoming students, this September marks the start of a new life; for our faculty, this September marks the renewal of our commitment to our students. Cal Poly is blessed to be able to surround our dedicated students with faculty and staff that allow them to define their own success. Mustangs are known for their relentless work ethic, in and out of the classroom. This is something that we are committed to not just celebrate, but proliferate. Student resources throughout campus exclusively deal in aiding the lives of students. Resources like the Mustang Success Center are open year round to help students with graduation pl anning , underst anding u n i ve r s it y p o l i c i e s an d proactive academic services. I urge all of our students to maximize their use of these resources. They offer a strong network that allows students to achieve all that they can. Our team is focused on the direct success of our students. Our success, as educators, is determined by how successful our students are, in and out

of the classroom. Our faculty is committed to fostering a strong learning environment and helping our students reveal their full potential. Resources such as collegespecific advising work with students to help them develop a plan for graduation. These advisors are well versed in the nuances that are involved with decisions such as changing majors, and can use their knowledge to guide students toward a detailed plan. Our faculty’s commitment is embodied in the pride we have for our school. Cal Poly’s reputation belongs to our students. Their winning attitude has made our Learn by Doing attitude world famous. Our faculty is grateful to be able to serve our Mustangs with pride. We are delighted to graduate driven and dedicated students that make their marks on the world every single day. We look forward to starting this September off by helping a new class of students do the same. - Jeffrey Armstrong Cal Poly President

MUSTANG NE WS FILE PHOTO EST. 2011

| Armstrong, a Kentucky native and first-generation college graduate, has been the Cal Poly president since February of 2011, making him the ninth president of the unversity since its birth in 1901.

A message to students from ASI President Jana Colombini Welcome to Cal Poly! My name is Jana Colombini and I am serving as your 2016-17 Associated Students, Inc. (ASI) President. While slightly similar to Associated Student Body in high school, ASI is so much more than that. As a student at Cal Poly, you are automatically a member of ASI, with access to all of our programs and services. I encourage you to take advantage of the opportunities ASI has to

offer; whether through Student Government, the state-of-theart Recreation Center, intramural sports, on-campus child care, outdoor adventures, concerts or the Craft Center — there is something for everyone! By choosing Cal Poly, you are part of the “Mustang Family.” I hope that you feel the same sense of pride to be a part of this community. It is important that we care for one another and are positive representatives of our university. It is our responsibility to hold each other to a high standard so

we can succeed together. I encourage you to find your connection to Cal Poly and experience life outside of the classroom. There are so many ways to get involved and a lot of opportunities will arise your first year here; don’t be afraid to take a risk and step outside of your comfort zone. There are over 300 student organizations on campus that you can join. Jump at the chance to get involved and always be yourself. It is my duty as your ASI President to represent you on the university level, so I am always avail-

able to hear your concerns or issues. Never hesitate to reach out; my email is asipresident@calpoly. edu. The ASI Student It is my duty as your Government Office ASI President to is located on the second floor of the represent you on the University Union. Please stop by! university level. Be safe and have the time of your life! JANA COLOMIBINI Go Mustangs! - Jana Colombini ASI President

ASHLEY NOWLIN | COURTESY PHOTO

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things to do in SLO with your family

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The“World Famous” Farmers’ Market Held every Thursday evening from 6-9 p.m., the local Farmers’ Market is a must -see for anyone visiting San Luis Obispo. Five blocks of historic downtown are dedicated to booths filled with fresh produce, crafts and delicious local cuisine.

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San Luis Obispo is full of outdoor adventures, shopping, dining and sightseeing — it’s truly a city that will appeal to every member of your family. As your student spends their time in the “Happiest City in America,” we encourage you and your family to make San Luis Obispo your home as well, and to enjoy the many wonderful things our community has to offer.

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San Luis Obispo Hikes

Bob Jones Trail A paved path leads you from the freeway to the Avila Beach Pier.

Poly Canyon

Bishop Peak

Located on the Cal Poly campus near Poly Canyon Village, this hike takes you past old architecture and engineering senior projects built by former Cal Poly students.

A longtime favorite of Cal Poly students and the community, this hike features panoramic views of the entire city — one of the best views of SLO you can find.

(Architecture Graveyard)

5 Parent and Family Weekend Return to Cal Poly Oct. 20-23 to see what your student has been learning and how they have made Cal Poly their new home. This is an event you don’t want to miss! With athletics, performing arts and student showcase events, there is something for everyone to enjoy during this jam-packed weekend.

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Sunset Drive-In With two films screened every night under the stars, the Sunset Drive-In is the perfect way to relax after a day of family adventures in SLO.

Edna Valley Home to more than 30 familyfriendly wineries and tasting rooms all located within 10 minutes of each other, Edna Valley in San Luis Obispo beckons you to pack a picnic and experience the beautiful rolling hills and vineyards for yourself.

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Let’s Go Poly!

Local Beaches

Show your Mustang pride by attending Cal Poly Athletics events throughout the year. Schedules are available at www. gopoly.com. During the summer, check out the SLO Blues, the city’s own local summer collegiate wooden baseball club!

A trip to SLO wouldn’t be complete without a visit to Pismo, Avila or Shell Beach, all just 15-20 minutes south of Cal Poly. Kayaking, surfing, ocean fishing and much more are available for those looking for fun ocean activities.

Provost Kathleen Enz Finken offers new students words of advice

OFFICE OF THE PROVOST | COURTESY PHOTO

Kathleen Enz Finken is the Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs. As a firm believer in the power of hands-on learning and the value of interdisciplinar y academic endeavors, Enz Finken joined the Cal Poly community in 2012. She earned her B.A. from Douglass College for Women, and M.A. and Ph.D. from Rutgers University. Her expertise is the art and architecture of the Roman Empire and Early Christian Rome.

executive leadership team, and I lead the Division of Academic Affairs, which includes all six colleges and numerous units that support the student experience — such as the Office of the Registrar, Kennedy Library, University Advising and Financial Aid, to name a few. Though students may not interact with me on a regular basis, my work and leadership directly impact the academic programs that students recognize as their majors, minors and concentrations. I am also responsible for working with the faculty to support their teaching, research and scholarly activity.

What is a provost? You may be wondering ‘What is a provost?” When I started college, I did not know what a provost was so I could never have expected my career path would eventually lead me to that role. The term “provost” is used to describe the senior academic officer who has oversight of the teaching and research activities at a university. As provost, I serve as the senior member of Cal Poly President Jeffrey Armstrong’s

What is the Division of Academic Affairs doing to help new students succeed? Under my guidance, Academic Affairs provides leadership to ensure that students have access to classes, faculty, advising, tutoring and other resources they need to be successful. The division has implemented a number of initiatives specifically to support first year students, including freshmen block scheduling, supplemental instruction, writing center sup-

port and coordinated advising through the Mustang Success Center and the six college advising offices. These initiatives help first year students successfully transition from high school and community college to Cal Poly. Academic Affairs also works closely with Student Affairs and the Administration and Finance Division to prioritize and coordinate programs and services. As the academic leader of Cal Poly, what advice would you give to new students? My two pieces of advice for first year students are to establish priorities and goals for success in the first year and to identify people who can help you achieve those priorities and goals. The college experience unfolds over time and presents different challenges as each year progresses. The Cal Poly experience is, above all, an academic experience, so all students should put academic success at the top of the priority list. It’s also

important to identify people on campus — faculty, advisors, resident advisors and peer mentors — who can provide valuable support, information and guidance. Your success is not a solitary pursuit! Take advantage of the services available to you. Never be afraid to ask questions, seek advice or reach out for help. Cal Poly students are so academically talented and well-prepared for college, they are not used to asking for

Your success is not a solitary pursuit! Take advantage of the services available to you. KATHLEEN ENZ FINKEN

help. It’s really important to know that asking for help is a responsible and mature way to respond to the unexpected

challenges that arise during your years in college. We are here to support you! What is one thing you remember most from your first year in college? I was a very serious student and worked very hard. My freshman and sophomore years I was an architecture student and stayed up late in the design studio all the time working on projects. I also rowed on the crew team my freshman year, so I was pretty exhausted. I’m a bit introverted and found it hard to build a strong social life while in college. Even though I had a lot of friends, I did not participate in a lot of extracurricular activities — I was more inclined to run, study and do my design work all by myself. If I could go back and do it again, I would take more time to enjoy more of the wonderful opportunities available to students — field trips, incredible speakers, athletic events, performing arts and similar things. — Provost Kathleen Enz Finken


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Q&A with VP of Student Affairs Keith Humphrey Vice President for Student Affairs Keith Humphrey (preferred pronouns: he, his, him) is a very accessible leader on campus, both via social media and around school. To help new students and their supporters get to know him a little better, Mustang News sat down with Humphrey and asked him a few questions. What’s your favorite thing about Cal Poly? It has to be our students. I love our students, how excited they are about being part of the community, all the different things our students add and the ideas that they share. I love how they do things like organize WOW (Week of Welcome) from the ground up — that is completely done by our students — I also love how our students fully embrace campus. They’re excited to be here, they want to be here and they want to make an impact. And that makes my job fun and this campus so special.

Does Student Affairs offer programs to help freshmen transition into college classes? Every Student Affairs department offers services for first-year students. One of the main areas is New Student and Transition Programs, which hosts Open House, SLO Days and WOW. We offer dynamic on-campus housing communities for new students to live and learn together with other students. I encourage new students to take advantage of our free study skills

Career Services has a Freshman Focus Team that helps freshmen identify their interests and strengths to develop a four-year career development plan. That involves connecting students with exciting internships, Learn by Doing experiences, and many learning opportunities. We really try to create a rich experience for all Cal Poly students to get the most of their college experience and set them up for success. I also encourage students to check out the new Center for Leadership & Service. Employers tell us that they want to meet students who are not only academically successful, but can also be leaders in their companies and work well with others. The center can help expose students to these critical skills. I also encourage students to get involved in at least one club or organization. Studies show that students who get involved are more engaged and do better academically. Plus, it’s a great opportunity to try new things and get to know different people.

We are really excited for the new students to get here and look forward to see how they change Cal Poly.

What do you do as Vice President for Student Affairs? Oh, lots of stuff. Student Affairs is about making sure that the quality of students’ out-of-class experiences matches the quality of their in-class experiences. We have close to 30 programs and services that help students get engaged with campus, build life-long relationships, be well and be successful here and after college.

KEITH HUMPHREY

sessions through Student Academic Services. You see, classes are taught differently at college compared to high school, and when you add in Learn by Doing, there’s a lot of expectation for students to understand and consume information. Student Academic Services can really help students build skills to do well in class. What are some of the other Student Affairs departments freshmen can take advantage of?

How do you connect with freshmen and their parents? I try to be very visible and accessible, especially during SLO Days. I talk with folks, host a parent session during SLO Days and answer a ton of questions through my Facebook page. During the academic year, I host an office hour every week for students, every Monday, 4-5 p.m. No appointment is necessary. I try to be as available as

possible and get out to the different student events to see what they are up to, which is a lot. What should freshmen be thinking about as they get ready to move to Cal Poly? I think they should be ready to be themselves. A lot people say, “When I get to college I’m going to change this or change that.” You don’t have to change who you are to be at Cal Poly. We want freshmen to think about what they can contribute to the community and how they can grow from this place — that means being open to new people and ideas. We have a campaign called “Inclusion Starts with Me,” which gives students the opportunity to express their identities in their own words. These are very powerful messages. My hope is for all students to feel included and safe at Cal Poly, so that they can be their very best. As a parent yourself, what advice do you have for parents sending their child to college for the first time? I have two young sons, so I can take a lot of lessons from our current parents. Now that your student is going to school, trust that all of the teaching, wisdom and love that you have given to them for the past 18 years will be with them when they go to college. You’ve done a good job, and they’re ready to be here and be out on their own. What advice do you have for students who have a little trouble adjusting to their first year?

OFFICE OF THE VICE PRESIDENT | COURTESY PHOTO OPEN ARMS | Humphrey has walk-in office hours if students need to talk.

My first piece of advice is they’re not alone. Most students have a hard time adjusting to their first year, and a lot of folks try to not admit it. So it’s pretty common to have adjustment troubles living in a residence hall room with two or three other people, taking classes differently, having to do your own laundry, having to cook your own food and all of that type of stuff. It’s all really normal, and chances are that the person living next door to you and across the hall and across campus are having the

same types of feelings. So do not put pressure on yourself to have it be perfect on the first day. Any final thoughts for the incoming class? We are really excited for the new students to get here and look forward to see how they change Cal Poly. In this class lies future club and organization presidents, future ASI (Associated Students, Inc.) presidents and future editors of Mustang News. I can’t wait to meet them.


Mustang Success Center aims to help students transition to colege

DAKOTA GREENWICH | MUSTANG NE WS ASK US | The center is designed to serve students who have questions, but don’t know who to ask.

Adjusting to life at Cal Poly can be difficult. For some students, it is their first time being away from home and grappling with the fast-pace quarter system. Some may feel like they’re not in the right major or aren’t sure what they want to do after graduation, and with all that Cal Poly has to offer in regards to clubs and organizations, getting involved may seem daunting. With all this on their plates, it’s not uncommon for some students to feel overwhelmed, lost or unsure if they’re in the right place. The Mustang Success Center provides students with quality and productive advice to ease their transition to Cal Poly. The Mustang Success Center

offers advising for freshmen, sophomores, transfer students and student-athletes. Advisors at the Mustang Success Center

We want students to know that if they don’t know where to start, they can start here. CASSIE PITKIN

advise students on university policies and procedures, offer ac-

ademic services, refer students to other campus resources and help coordinate and support student success. Coordinator of First Year Success Program Cassie Pitkin describes the Mustang Success Center as a place for students to go when they don’t know where to go. “We want students to know that if they don’t know where to start, they can start here,” Pitkin said. “We not only point students in the right direction, but we help them get there by connecting them with other campus resources either in person or via email.” The Mustang Success Center Continued on page 7


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offers several workshops for students with information regarding changing majors, planning schedules and registering for summer courses. Dates, times and locations of these workshops can be found on the Mustang Success Center’s website www.success.calpoly.edu. Civil engineering junior Matthew Berninghaus has worked with the advisors at the Mustang Success Center to tackle registration, enroll in summer classes and collaborate on programs he put on as a resident advisor. The Mustang Success Center also assisted in helping Berninghaus change his major. “It was my first quarter of college and I knew my major wasn’t right for me, but I had five different majors that I was considering switching to,” Berninghaus said in an email. “I went to the Suc-

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cess Center because I had no idea what to do. I met with Cassie and left with the forms I needed and appointments with the people I needed to talk to in order to find the right major for me.” The Mustang Success Center sees a lot of students come in fall quarter who are having trouble adjusting to the speed of the quarter system. Advisors can help students not only manage the quarter system, but succeed in it as well. “Come spring quarter we have students come back and thank us for helping them fall quarter,” Pitkin said. The Mustang Success Center offers advising on a fully walkin basis. Students can visit the office in building 52, room D37 Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Friday 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Students can also email the center at www.success@calpoly.edu.

MUSTANG SUCCESS CENTER | COURTESY PHOTO

SLO HotHouse continues to thrive in new location SLO HotHouse is a place in San Luis Obispo for students and entrepreneurs to develop their companies, Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship (CIE) Communications Manager Candice Conti said. “It provides them with the opportunity to have a startup of their own and have the ability to work with mentors, community leaders and academic leaders in the field,” Conti said. And now the HotHouse has a new home— 872 Higuera Street in downtown San Luis Obispo. The Hothouse began in 2013 on Morro Street, but has moved to a larger location to make space for a hotel as part of the downtown Chinatown project. The old HotHouse was approximately 6,000 square feet, but the new location offers more than twice as much room at 15,000 square feet. What is SLO HotHouse? CIE Small Business Development Center (SBDC) and Incubator Managing Director Judy Mahan said that the HotHouse has three pillars of activity — coworking, the accelerator program and the incubator program. “The HotHouse is a collaborative effort between the city of SLO, Cal Poly and our local business community,” Mahan said. “It has become a center for creating and launching viable startups.” As a site location by the CIE, the HotHouse obtained funding from the city of San Luis Obispo. “The purpose is to help build sustainable companies that will in return help economic development in SLO and keep Cal Poly students local to build their companies here,” Conti said. Pillar 1: Coworking The HotHouse encourages entrepreneurs to work in a collaborative environment through its coworking program. There are approximately 20 to 25 coworkers on a monthly

CELINA OSEGUER A | MUSTANG NE WS THE HOTSPOT

| The CIE helps get HotHouse businesses up and running, making it a hotspot of entrepreneurial activity. The HotHouse itself has moved to a bigger location downtown.

basis. However, the HotHouse hopes to expand in the next 12 months and increase to 75 coworkers per month. Coworkers pay a monthly fee to become a member at the HotHouse. Membership rates vary depending on the amenities coworkers want. If they choose, coworkers can get undesignated space for $175, which provides them with a month access to Wi-Fi and all other amenities. A monthly fee for students is half price at $87.50. Other membership rates can be found on the HotHouse’s website. “The magic of the space is that coworkers interact with SBDC clients,” Mahan said. “It becomes

a central networking space, which creates some really interesting results.” According to Mahan, some coworkers have gone on to become cofounders of the company. “The open work space creates opportunity,” Mahan said. Pillar 2: The accelerator program The accelerator program is a three-month summer program for students or recent graduates at Cal Poly. Each accelerator team receives $10,000 in seed money to cover initial business expenses. Lori Jordan runs the Hatchery at Cal Poly and works the accelerator program during the summer.

Teams that start out in the Hatchery move over to the accelerator program in the HotHouse. “HotHouse provides a place for companies to connect,” Jordan said. “It’s a very open environment that provides amazing spaces for collaboration.” There are currently eight companies in the accelerator program. The next step in the process: the incubator program Third and final pillar: The incubator program Once a company graduates from the accelerator program, it moves on to the incubator program, as long as it showcases a viable business model that is

committed to growing. Recently, the HotHouse has started opening the program up to startups in the community. “We have a pretty stringent application process but we encourage other startups to apply,” Mahan said. “We only accept companies that will provide scalable high growth and economic development in the region.” There are currently seven companies incubating in the program. There was a soft launch in December 2015 to allow startups in the community to apply for the program. Now, in the completely installed new space, the HotHouse is ready to relaunch the program for more startups

to apply. Through the CIE program, the company gets a grant that allows the HotHouse to hire consultants who will do one-on-one consulting with client tech startups. “What’s important is that it’s a major collaborative effort with stakeholders throughout the county,” Mahan said. “With such an interesting mix of entrepreneurs in the space, it creates an incredible energy.” Cal Poly’s CIE is a large center on campus that is open to all students. “While CIE helps startups, a big part of our mission is to help anyone who wants to be an entrepreneur,” Conti said.


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CAED leads nationally for resiliency and sustainability efforts The Cal Poly College of Architecture and Environmental Design (CAED) is now one of six National Resilience Initiative (NRI) programs, a network of community and university-based design studios that work to help communities become better prepared for natural disasters and climate change. The NRI currently consists of one design studio per U.S. region, making Cal Poly’s CAED the NRI’s Western U.S. network partner. According to one of the founding organizations of the NRI, the American Institute of Architects (AIA) foundation, architects involved in the initiative will develop solutions to combat the effects of climate change and natural disasters while also educating communities and shaping policy, in a national effort to make global regions physically safer and stronger. “The NRI studios represent the six regional areas of need for resilience planning within the 10 federal regions designated as at-risk for the effects of disaster by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA),” AIA Executive Director Sherry-Lea Bloodworth Botop said. “These six members will form a strong resilient studio network backbone that can serve as a point of entry to decision-makers and stakeholders who need to access

design solutions to pressing issues in resilience.” Partnering with the NRI will significantly expand the work currently being done by the college’s dedicated research center, the Resilient Communities Research Institute (RCRI) as well as foster partnerships with industry leaders with a mission to advance city resiliency. “As the NRI’s Western U.S. network partner, our resilience efforts will serve as national models recognized for their educational quality and community impact,” CAED Dean Christine Theodoropoulos said. However, a focus on resilient design is nothing new to the CAED, as the college has promoted and engaged in these concepts for decades, through its curriculum, studios, projects, internships and research. This includes Cal Poly’s nationally recognized environmental design studies sequence, sustainable environments minor, and the Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) studios, which all introduce students to the linkage between ecosystems and the built environment. Another interdisciplinary team of Cal Poly students has recently proven these skills by competing in the 2016 Bank of America Merrill Lynch Low-Income Housing Challenge, where 12 Cal Poly students produced a concept that tied for first place in the competition. The competition challenged students to envision an innova-

tive housing concept that would provide homes for low-to-moderate income residents while focusing on project finance, project design, community impact and support and an “X-factor” tying in innovation, creativity and feasibility. The students found an “X-factor” by localizing their concept and designing a housing development that could be built for veterans in the City of San Luis Obispo, a concept they called Sanctuary 6. The name Sanctuary 6 comes from the military saying “got your six,” which refers to standing back-to-back with a comrade to provide defense and support. The project was designed around six key pillars specific to the veteran community: a veteran population, independence, support, camaraderie, connectivity and sustainability. The project combined innovative architectural and planning practices, including Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Platinum certification, pet-friendly amenities and fully accessible floor plans for residents with disabilities. “Sanctuary 6 is positioned to be the first grassroots veteran housing project of its kind,” architecture lecturer Bryan Shields said. “The level to which this project has engaged the community alone puts it on the cutting edge of community planning initiatives.” What made Sanctuary 6 stand above the rest in the compe-

The team worked diligently and passionately on a project that can make a difference. PRATISH PATEL

COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN | COURTESY PHOTO PURPOSEFUL DESIGN | The CAED is known for design that is both aesthetically pleasing and sustainable.

tition is the team partnered with more than 17 community groups, including Peoples’ SelfHelp Housing, the Community Action Partnership of San Luis Obispo County and Supportive Services for Veteran Families. The group also worked directly with dozens of veterans and

veterans’ service professionals to receive feedback on what was needed for a development to be a successful community for veterans. The team brought together students from both the CAED and Cal Poly’s Orfalea College of Business, earning honors for

both academic colleges. “The team worked diligently and passionately on a project that can make a difference,” assistant professor of finance Pratish Patel said, “and team members will continue to work their hardest in the hopes that this project gets started.”


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10 things you need to know about BUS 100

ORFALEA COLLEGE OF BUSINESS | COURTESY PHOTO COLLEGE COMPA SS

| BUS 100 teaches Orfalea students about Cal Poly’s student resources, how to register for classes, what Orfalea Student Services are available and allows them to create a graduation gameplan.

If you’re an incoming freshman or transfer student in the Orfalea College of Business, you’ll be taking Student Orientation and College Success (BUS 100) this fall. You might see this on your schedule and think it’s not important compared to your other courses, but the 1-unit class is more than meets the eye. The class is a unique resource the college provides to help freshmen navigate their academic journey successfully by understanding the supportive resources available on campus. It has proven to help new students feel connected and supported right from the start, so they can go on to have more success at Cal Poly. Here’s what you can expect to learn in BUS 100:

1. Learn how to register In this course, you can master the ins and outs of PASS and Cal Poly registration. The class also gives insights into what quarters certain classes are offered so you plan classes in the right sequence. 2. Get to know Orfalea Student Services You’ll explore everything, including peer advising, peer mentoring, tutoring, career-readiness tools and international study opportunities, all created to help students thrive personally and academically. The college’s in-house resources help 87 percent of Orfalea students graduate within five years — the best graduation rate at Cal Poly.

3. Bond with your classmates This is your shot to network with fellow freshmen in the Orfalea College of Business that you may not have interacted with during Week of Welcome. Bonds you form here often turn into lab partners, roommates, travel buddies or study groups in the future. 4. Master college-level time management Anxious about the fast pace of Cal Poly’s 10-week quarter system? This course will help you learn more advanced time-management skills and master proven study habits suited for business curriculum, including group projects.

5. Explore your concentration and career options The course will open your eyes to career paths that lead from each of Orfalea’s nine concentrations within the business administration and economics majors. Through self-exploration and insights from upperclassmen, you’ll have a better idea of where you can focus your studies. 6. Meet professional advisors BUS 100 is taught by Orfalea’s professional advisors on staff to support students at every turn. Succeeding in this class means you’ll have an ally in the college who can answer questions and help you grow.

7. Adjust to life at Cal Poly Many incoming freshmen and transfer students feel stress moving away from home and balancing rigorous courses during fall quarter. This class helps you manage the pressure in a positive way as you get used to living in San Luis Obispo. 8. Map a plan toward graduation One of BUS 100’s central projects helps you map out all the courses you’ll need to take to graduate, including understanding how AP or other credits transfer to Cal Poly. The exercise often helps students see where they have time to study abroad, add a minor or even graduate early.

9. Embrace career readiness The college’s mission is to prepare career-ready graduates who can tackle the hiring process with confidence. You’ll learn about Orfalea’s career-readiness tools at your disposal, like Business Professionalism and Career Readiness (BUS 206), roundtables with alumni executives and salary negotiation workshops. 10. It’s a class you won’t forget Investing one hour every Friday in this course will help you succeed in every other class you take at Cal Poly and truly make the most of your time in college. If you have questions about BUS 100 or any of Orfalea Student Services resources, contact 805-756-2601 or cobadvis@calpoly.edu.


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The basics of saving money on textbooks Classes are challenging enough without having to worry about paying for the books you need to succeed. Luckily, the Cal Poly University Store offers a variety of ways to save money on buying and renting your textbooks. When you buy or rent a textbook at the University Store, you are giving back to Cal Poly. All of the money earned by the store stays at the University, helping fund many worthwhile Cal Poly programs and services. The money from textbooks also goes toward university donations, scholarships and giveaways, and developing tools such as the textbook price comparison tool. This tool allows you to make sure you

are saving the most money you can. Buy new, used or rent When it comes to saving money on textbooks, renting is the best option. With book editions constantly being updated and quickly going out of date, renting a book can save you a lot of money in the long run, compared to buying. The Cal Poly University Store lets you rent books right in the store. By renting, you can save up to 60 percent on more than 800 titles. In Fall 2015, approximately 7,500 books were rented from the University Store. This resulted in almost $300,000 of savings for students in just

one quarter.“We work hard to make sure that the books are both affordable and available,” University Store Academic Courseware Manager Reza Kazempour said. “We work aggressively every quarter to make books available for rental.” Kazempour also said growing the rental program is a main priority for the University Store. Another affordable textbook option is buying used. You can find a large selection of used books at the University Store and save up to 30 percent compared to new. These books are often in excellent condition and come with the added bonus of free highlighting and page notes. Along with used, you can also ex-

plore purchasing e-books. Going with the online version can save you up to 40 percent of the physical book price, and it can save your back as they are as light as the cloud they’re stored in. Get cash for your books When you are done with a book after buying or renting it from the University Store, you can sell the book back to the store for a portion of the amount you paid for it. The portion you get back is determined by the condition of the book, and whether or not the faculty will use it the next quarter. If they will, you will get more money back because the book will stay in campus

circulation. If not, a national used book company that works with Cal Poly will determine the price, and you will likely receive a lower portion back. Either way, you will still be getting cash back for a book that may otherwise just take up space on your bookshelf. You can use the money you get back however you choose, though many students use it to help buy or rent their textbooks at the University Store the following quarter. M a k i n g b o o k s m o re affordable The Affordable Learning Committee makes this “buyback” process possible. Kazempour is co-chair of this committee,

whose goals are tied to a larger California State University affordable learning initiative. The committee works with professors to find out which books are going to be used in classes each quarter, so that they can be available for price comparison on the University Store website and for repurchase. But not all books are created equal, which is why the committee evaluates each book to determine which ones really sell. Kazempour said the committee makes every effort to help make books affordable. “This year we negotiated with publishers to lower the costs and pass the savings on to students,” said Kazempour.

The Cal Poly Corporation is here for you Campus Dining feeds students. The University Store helps educate them. But the Cal Poly Corporation, which owns and operates Campus Dining and the University Store, serves the Cal Poly community more than just tri-tips and textbooks. As an auxiliary organization, the Corporation invests millions of dollars back into the university every year. There are approximately 90 auxiliaries in the California State University system, all of which provide revenue-producing services to their primary entities. The Corporation’s main commercial services include Campus Dining, the University Store, Cal Poly Downtown, Cal Poly Print & Copy and Conference and Event Planning. Auxiliaries are self-supporting, meaning they receive no state funding. Net revenue earned by

auxiliaries stays on campus. Incorporated in 1941, the Corporation has been giving back throughout its history. During World War II, the Corporation collaborated with the Navy to run a flight school on Cal Poly’s land. The project provided revenue to support buildings, train flight school faculty and fund many housing and food service jobs at Cal Poly. That tradition of paying it forward continues today. The Corporation funds student investment management projects in the College of Business, purchases and resells student-made Cal Poly food products and provides financial support to various university programs, as well as on-campus facilities such as the Sports Complex, Alex G. Spanos Stadium and the Engineering Plaza. And paying it forward does not

stop at just cash. The Corporation employs more than 2,000 students who work across their commercial and corporate services. Between preparing food at Campus Dining, assisting in University Store operations and contributing to the Corporation’s marketing and information technology efforts, students gain hands on, Learn By Doing experience. In 1993 the Corporation received Swanton Pacific Ranch from Orchard Supply Hardware owner Al Smith, an acquisition that has created many opportunities for students in forestry, natural resources and farming. From meals to textbooks, students at Cal Poly trade cash for goods with the Corporation every day. Those daily exchanges provide the funds for a larger transaction, one where students are paid back in more ways than one.

CAL POLY CORPOR ATION | COURTESY PHOTO ALL-IN-ONE

| Cal Poly Corporation includes entities like Campus Dining and the University Store.

Campus Dining’s guide to PLU$ Dollars

CAMPUS DINING | COURTESY PHOTO COLLEGE CURRENCY

| PLU$ Dollars are put on a student’s PolyCard and are deducted when swiped for a purchase at any one of the 17 Campus Dining facilities, which includes two markets and three food trucks.

Eating meals on campus is always a popular topic among incoming freshmen— and for good reason: students love food and want to make the most of their Plu$ Dollars. Whether you are vegan, vegetarian, gluten-free, fruitarian, kosher, paleo, pescatarian, omnivore, foodie or food agnostic, there are many different ways to maximize your Plu$ Dollars on the Cal Poly campus. A campus dining plan is required the entire first year for incoming freshmen living on campus or in on-campus apartments. But the plans come with a lot of choice. Freshmen can choose what and where they eat, as well as how much to spend at one time.

The math of eating on campus A one-year dining plan has three parts: $150 covers the cost of meals during WOW and $600 covers the base operating expense for the on-campus all-you-careto-eat-facility — these amounts are subtracted from the total cost paid for the dining plan. The rest of the money is divided equally among the three academic quarters for students to spend at their own discretion. The total cost of the dining plan for a student living in a residence hall is $5,147. The total cost for a student living in an on-campus apartment residence is $4,103. After the initial WOW and overhead expenses are factored in, the quarterly amount is $1,466 for residence hall students and $1,118 for apartment students.

In translation, students have about $130 per week to buy food. There are 17 different dining venues on campus including two markets, three food trucks and more than 1,000 options to choose from. Budgeting is often the most difficult part of the dining plan to manage, especially for students who are not accustomed to buying food for themselves. For many students, this is a new experience. “The price projected for a meal is around $9 but the program is intended to give students flexibility,” said Campus Dining account specialist Carla Brewer. “It is not necessarily a seven-day-a-week/ three-meals-a-day dining plan because it is taking into account that many students eat off campus.”

Are you a splurger or hoarder? When students are given $1,400 all at once, it can be easy to splurge too much too quickly, and they may find their Plu$ Dollar accounts dwindling by the end of the quarter. Others may have hundreds left by the end of the third quarter and not know how they will spend all of the remaining money by the end of the year. Though the money does roll over from quarter to quarter, Plu$ Dollars expire on June 18 and cannot roll over to the next academic year. Students can keep up to date on the balance of their Plu$ Dollars online through the Cal Poly portal. They can also swipe their PolyCard at any register of any campus dining operation to see their remaining balance. Students who do run out of their

Plu$ Dollars can add money to their Campus Express account, which they can use at any dining venue. They can also purchase Fast Pass Lunch Passes or Commuter Blocks, which they can use during all meal periods at 19 Metro station, saving them up to 40 percent of the regular cost of a meal there. Students can access both supplemental dining programs through the Money Matters tab on the Cal Poly Portal. Customer satisfaction is key “The dining administration’s goal is to serve the students,” Campus Dining Accounting Manager Roberta Rosenthal said. “If you have individual needs or concerns, we want to hear them directly. Input is encouraged; that’s what we want students to know.”

Campus Dining wants students to be satisfied with their meal plans, and those with dietary restrictions can work with Campus Dining’s Registered Dietitian Megan Coats to become more informed about their food options on campus. As a first year Cal Poly student, adjusting to college life and academics is tough enough. Students should not also have to worry about food. Eating on campus is a convenient way to make sure that hunger will not be a problem and that they are properly fueled for academic success for his or her first year. By budgeting and monitoring their Plu$ Dollars and utilizing campus nutritional options and support resources, students can get the most out of their campus dining experience.


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Executives in Residence program brings boardroom leaders to campus Networking. Everyone says it’s one of the most important components of professional success. And it’s true — having a diverse group of contacts helps young professionals explore job opportunities, learn from industry veterans and connect to potential employers. Yet, networking can be one of the hardest skills to master for a student just starting to build career-oriented relationships. Where do you start? What’s the right way to connect with busy professionals? The Orfalea College of Business introduced the Executives in Residence program in 2014 to give its students a head start before graduation. The college brings more than a dozen successful alumni and co-suite leaders to campus each quarter to speak in classes and host round tables where Orfalea students can get to know more about their background. As each executive tours the col-

lege, students have the opportunity to speak with them one-on-one, ask questions about their company and share contact information. “The intimate setting of an Executives in Residence visit turns some of the top business leaders in the world from intimidating to approachable,” said business administration junior Sara Chen, who also serves as president of Cal Poly’s Women in Business club. “You get to ask them personal questions and hear tailored, in-depth answers in an open conversation that wouldn’t be feasible to do in some huge presentation Q&A.” Last year, the college hosted 48 Executives in Residence — including more than 40 Cal Poly alumni. Students were able to connect personally with leaders like Goldman Sachs Partner Tammy Kiely (accounting, ’93), Google Finance Director Jim Marocco (economics, ’94), Clif Bar CFO Rich Boragno

(business administration, ’94) and Stryker Corporation Vice President of Human Resources Jessica Winter (marketing, ’98). Chen attended her first Executives in Residence round table in her first year at Cal Poly, saying it helped her learn about different fields within the business world as she began selecting her concentration. She also says the practice of interacting with high-level professionals like alumna Dolores Bernardo of Airbnb helped her sharpen professional communications skills. After each visit, she felt each executive’s tangible passion for their work and support for Cal Poly students. “I have been able to listen and learn as real executives have given us students invaluable advice based off personal experiences that simply can’t be learned from a textbook or company website — advice that has helped me shape my future af-

ter Cal Poly,” she said. According to students who have attended past roundtables, the discussions can benefit students of all ages and cover a wide range of topics. “You can be a freshman having a conversation about what that executive did in college that helped set them up for success later on,” Chen said. “Or you can be a graduating senior making a new connection that could lead to a possible job opportunity in that field.” Orfalea sees the Executives in Residence program as a key to its career-readiness initiatives, which aim to help each student select a ca-

reer path and confidently navigate the hiring process as they transition toward their careers. “I personally feel that having the chance to interact with our executives is one of the best Learn by Doing experiences available at our college,” Orfalea Career Readiness Advisor Chelsea Kidwell said. “The program prepares students for interviewing, networking and building their professional brand.” Beyond Executives in Residence, Kidwell helps provide a variety of professional resources for business administration, economics and industrial technology and packaging students, including resume

workshops, industry tours, student internship panels and one-on-one career advising. In Fall 2016, the Orfalea College of Business plans to welcome alumni like Saira Malik of TIAA-CREF, Dan Delaney of Public Consulting Group and Scott Cooper CFO of Allegro Ophthalmics, LLC. All Orfalea College of Business students can sign up for Executives in Residence round tables on the college’s website beginning in September. For more information on the program and past visitors, go to http://bit.ly/ executivesinresidence.

ORFALEA COLLEGE OF BUSINESS | COURTESY PHOTO INSIDER INFORMATION

| Roundtables give students a chance to hear successful alumni tell their stories.

Engineering clubs bridge students’ personal and professional lives At first glance, building a canoe out of concrete may seem like a fruitless endeavor, but this sink or swim challenge was no match for the Society of Civil Engineers (SCE). Last year, SCE took home podium honors in both the Concrete Canoe and Steel Bridge competitions. SCE is just one of many engineering clubs that have tirelessly pushed the envelope of what was thought to be possible. There are more than 50 clubs

associated with the College of Engineering. The clubs range from professional,offering networking and career building assistance, to service, which allow students to donate their time and skills to benefit all corners of the globe. One of the most prominent clubs on campus is the Society of Women Engineers (SWE). SWE offers all students an opportunity to promote and celebrate women in engineering, as well as offer support and

guidance to a new generation of women who strive to blaze their own path. SWE’s mentorship opportunities include Girl Scout Days, where members host Brownie and Junior troops on campus and guide them through hands-on engineering activities. At the end of the day, the young girls even get a patch for their efforts and enthusiasm. The reverberating effects of Cal Poly’s engineering clubs can be felt beyond just the core of its

community, or even California. Engineers Without Borders-Cal Poly (EWB), for instance, seeks to solve some of the toughest problems across the globe with simple, elegant solutions. In the small nation of Malawi, food security is one of the most challenging issues facing the country. EWB members worked in conjunction with residents to develop a bicycle-powered maize mill to enhance the food supply and put the power in the hands

of residents. This year, EWB was awarded the National 2016 Premier Project Award for the mill designed for residents of Kumponda, Malawi. Though this is a high honor, environmental engineering senior and student club liaison for the College of Engineering Chris Apple knows that clubs are special for more reasons than accolades and prestige. “Clubs give students opportunities that we never could have

had otherwise,” Apple said. He cites club involvement as being his guiding light while in school. “Clubs helped me balance out school,” he said. “In addition to helping me get involved in a project, clubs help students get their footing in finding friends, too.” Apple was involved in engineering clubs from his first days at Cal Poly, and encourages students to do the same. Continued on page 26


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Explore the Learning Communities and staff in your Cal Poly home

GEORGIE DE MATTOS | MUSTANG NE WS CHOICES | Students can choose their living situation based on major or personal interest. Living Learning Programs are focused on major while Connections Learning Community and iCommunity revolve around personal interest.

What can you get from living on campus? At Cal Poly, University Housing connects students to resources, both on and off campus, that will help enhance students’ learning community experience. All students who are going to be living on campus will be part of a living learning community. There is a variety of learning community options students have for themselves, and staff work hard to create an environment beyond just giving students a place to sleep, store their things and take a shower. The staff aims to help students create memories, make connections with others, explore new experiences outside the classroom and have a great time. So what are the learning communities? At Cal Poly, learning communities are a group of residents who live together in a building and have a common major, career and/ or personal interest. Through part-

nerships with a variety of academic departments, faculty and staff, students have exclusive access to activities that tie directly into their academic and personal success. Living Learning Programs (LLP), also known as red brick residence halls There are six different red brick residence halls. Each one is connected to an academic college on campus. If students are looking to connect with people in their major, the LLPs are a great place to live or visit.: · Tenaya Hall: Orfalea College of Business · Muir Hall: College of Science and Mathematics · Fre m o n t Ha l l : C o l lege of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences

· Santa Lucia Hall: College of Engineering ·

S equoia Ha l l: C ollege of Architecture and Environmental Design

· Trinity Hall: College of Liberal Arts “Traditionally, these dorms have a more academic setting,” Learning Community Coordinator Hunter Simmons said. “When you enter Sequoia you can see drafting tables and you know that you are clearly in the architecture dorm.” Connections Learning Community The other residence halls, Sierra Madre Hall and Yosemite Hall, connect people based on their interests. Do you love music? A

whole tower is dedicated to people who are also music lovers. With many themes available, there is one for everyone. Connections bring students, faculty, staff and community partners together around a common interest. In those communities, students live with other students who share an interest. iCommunity Housed in Cerro Vista this year, iCommunity is a place where those who dream of starting their own business, or desire to brainstorm innovative ideas, come together. The housing is in partnership with Cal Poly’s Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship (CIE), and allows students to explore new possibilities. “All of the residence halls and apartments are learning communities. However, the biggest difference is the intentionality of

the experience,” Simmons said. “You are going to be living with people that you have a great deal in common with, it just depends on what.” Some of the people students will be living with include staff, who want to help with the adjustment to life at Cal Poly. “I think it’s important for students to know that the staff, at all levels, really care and are invested in the success of all students,” Simmons said. “Help is available for you on campus in a variety of different forms and housing staff know a lot of the resources.” Resident advisors (RAs) are student leaders who live in residence halls, share similar interests and want to help students make the most of their Cal Poly experience. “Resident advisors are here to engage in conversations, partner with residents to build inclusive

communities, help plan events, assist in safety concerns and provide academic and personal resources,” Sequoia Coordinator of Student Development (CSD) Cindy Loza said. Whether you are locked out of your room, are feeling down or need help figuring out how to find your class, an RA is there to help. CSDs are professional staff that supervise the RAs and handle overall operations of the building. All of the Cal Poly CSDs have their master’s degrees and come from all over the country. There are 13 in total. “Students should be expecting to live in inclusive communities and learn about themselves, as well as learning about others,” Learning Community Coordinator Jessica Fred said. “We strive in our department to help residents as they create their home away from home.”

Move-in is changing this year

University Housing is looking forward to welcoming you to your campus home and preparing for your big move with convenience in mind. If you or your family have prior experience with a Cal Poly move-in, it’s important to know that things will work a little differently this year. We’re working around some very exciting campus improvements that we can’t wait to share with you! Here’s how things will work the day of move-in: You will be directed to enter campus through a specific campus entry point based on your housing assignment. Sierra Madre and Yosemite Hall residents, your entry point is Grand Avenue. Residents of the South Mountain and North Mountain Halls, Cerro Vista Apartments and Poly Canyon Village, your entry point is Highland Drive. It’s important to arrive at your designated campus entry point

so you won’t be turned around — physically and mentally. There won’t be a campus through route to get you where you need to be.

community while your driver proceeds to long-term parking. Shuttles will be provided between drop-off zones and long-term

Be sure to arrive at your designated move-in arrival time to ensure speedy service and as a courtesy to your fellow Mustangs.

Once you’re on campus, signs will direct you to a dropoff zone where our Mustang Welcome Team will greet you with rolling carts to help unload your belongings. Team members will escort you to your living

parking. If you arrive by yourself, your belongings will be kept at a holding area until you return from long-term parking. What else do you need to know? A Mustang Move-in Pass, secured by reserving a move-in

arrival time, is required for freshmen moving in Sept. 16, 17 or 18 and continuing students moving in on Sept. 20. You can reserve your time through a link emailed to you in University Housing’s July Move-in Update. Forgot or can’t decide? We’ll reserve a time for you. Be sure to arrive at your designated move-in arrival time to ensure speedy service and as a courtesy to your fellow Mustangs. Transfer students living in Poly Canyon Village don’t need a Mustang Move-in Pass due to the location of your living community. Early Start Program students don’t need to a Mustang Move-in Pass either. Parking will be in designated lots near campus housing, and carts will be available for you to check out upon arrival. Lastly, check your email for University Housing Movein Updates to help you prepare, and pack light. See you in September!


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Couple makes strides in Cal Poly community through agricultural education As the deep toll of the bronze bell ringing from the belfry echoes through the valley, a group of schoolchildren make their way up a dirt road, headed toward a pristine, white one-room schoolhouse. The girls dressed in long, bonneted dresses and the boys in denim pants and plaid shirts, bring to life the Living History Day that the third-grade class from the nearby Santa Ynez Valley Charter School is about to experience. The Pleasant Valley Schoolhouse, established in 1869, is a labor of love for Tina and Paul McEnroe, who rescued it from demolition and moved it to their home at Rancho La Purisima in the hills of the Santa Ynez Valley to be restored for community use. Tina McEnroe’s roots run deep in both agriculture and education and she has spent much of her life sharing those passions. In her most recent collaboration with Cal Poly, she partnered with wine and viticulture senior Courtney Gillespie

to develop a viticulture curriculum, which is now being taught in the vineyard adjacent to the historic Pleasant Valley Schoolhouse. “In the Cal Poly mantra of Learn By Doing we are discovering what a wonderful vineyard is all about,” said McEnroe, adding that she is in process of getting the curriculum published in the teacher resource guide of the California Foundation for Agriculture in the Classroom program. Gillespie recently visited the schoolhouse to help teach the inaugural viticulture lesson. As 19 third-graders rambled throughout the lush green vines, she helped the students identify the intricacies of what they were looking at. As the students crouched down to inspect the leaves, ladybugs landed on their clothing. Upon closer inspection, they found larvae on the vines — leading to Gillespie explaining the beneficial nature of the red winged insects. Gillespie and McEnroe created

four 20 minute lesson plans about sures she has collected to make the the science of viticulture, includ- schoolhouse strikingly authentic to ing the identifying characteristics of how it once was. Sitting in antique grapevines and even a song about desks, students use handheld slate photosynthesis that will be boards to do math lessons and read out of Mcused in the program. Guffey Readers. “It is important to expose youth They divide into to botany at a two teams to It is important young age,” participate to expose youth in an old said Gillespie. “Introducing fashioned to botany at a spelling bee them to vitiyoung age. culture leads and later, they them to ask imshare a laugh COURTNEY GILLESPIE portant questions as a dunce hat is such as where their introduced. food comes from.” The Pleasant Valley McEnroe doesn’t miss a beat, Schoolhouse, dating back to 1869, sharing the schoolchildren’s won- was built using shiplap redwood der in the vineyard, giggling and siding and a shingled roof by two exploring alongside them. Once neighbors in just three days. It the lesson is over, the students are closed in 1936 and went through ushered indoors to experience a several iterations before ultimately school day reminiscent of what it falling into disrepair. The McEnroe’s was like in the late 1890s. moved it to their sprawling 1,008McEnroe commands their at- acre cattle ranch in the Santa Ynez tention, sharing the historic trea- Valley in 2006 with the sole intent

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FOOD AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES | COURTESY PHOTO ROOTS

| Tina McEnroe has been around agriculture all her life

of restoring as a gift to the community. Today, it is recognized as a Santa Barbara County Building of Historic Merit. The couple has strong ties to the community — including Cal Poly. In June, Cal Poly awarded honorary doctorate degrees to them in recognition of their accomplishments and community dedication. Paul McEnroe, who directed the IBM team that developed the barcode, has served as a member of the Cal Poly President’s Advisory Council for 30 years. Tina McEnroe is a state and national award-winning education specialist, holding a reading specialist teaching credential from UC Santa Barbara and a special education teaching credentials from Cal Poly. In 2008 she was awarded the Cal Poly School of Education Alumna. The McEnroe’s dedication to preservation also pertains to their Rancho La Purisima, which is protected by a conservation easement in a partnership with the Santa Barbara Land Trust for Santa Bar-

bara County — protecting the agricultural nature of the lands and its wildlife habitat. Tina has also placed conservation easements on her ranches in Monterey County, assuring the preservation of the agricultural lands into perpetuity. Tina McEnroe plans to continue her relationship with Cal Poly and is working with officials to partner with the Cal Poly Strawberry Center on her farmland in Salinas. She is also seeking to develop a reading lab at Cal Poly similar to one she launched at UC Santa Barbara called the McEnroe Reading & Language Arts Clinic to serve the community���s challenged learners. “I’ve known Tina for many years, and her energy and enthusiasm are contagious” said College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences Dean Andrew J. Thulin. “She has a true passion for both agriculture and education, and we are so fortunate to partner with both Paul and her on these wonderful projects.”


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Life on the other side: Cal Poly graduate lands unexpected dream job Meet Claire Lindsey, a recent Cal Poly graduate from the College of Liberal Arts and a true example of Mustang success. She landed a job with the software giant Adobe Systems — in a sales role. While her path may be uncommon for an English major, the outcome has been rewarding. We asked her to share advice with incoming students on how to maximize their Cal Poly experiences to make their dreams a reality, just as she has.

What can students do beginning their first year to be successful during and after Cal Poly? Make a plan. It doesn’t have to be set in stone. Ask yourself, “What do I want to do, and what are two or three beginning steps that will help me get there?” If you want to get a career, then have your resume ready to go your freshman year, and start adding things that will get you experience in whatever career you want. Begin building toward some kind of goal, rather than

just waiting until spring quarter of senior year and realizing, “I have done nothing in the last four years except go to school or be in sports.” Think ahead and be proactive. What does the Freshman Focus Team (FFT) offer Cal Poly freshmen? They do a really good job of helping freshmen navigate the next three to five years at Cal Poly. They help you identify potential career paths within a major, or re-examine whether your

stands freshmen, (even though all the career counselors can help everyone).

How did you find your dream job? I met with Laura Hunkler and Tammy Martin in Career Services, and at first I was panicking about not knowing what to major is right for you. They also do with my life. I’m an English help with finding part-time major, and I felt it jobs, resume writing, was sort of up in interviewing, etc. the air. They helped me You can figure out figure out what you’re interthat pubested in, with no I met with Laura Hunkler and lic relapressure. Tammy Martin in Career SerKnowing what tions was vices, and at first I was panicking you don’t want to someabout not knowing what to do with my life. do is just as imthing I was portant as knowing i nt e re s t e d CLAIRE LINDSEY in, and even what you do want to do! It’s a little less scary though I wasn’t a also, knowing that you’re meetbusiness major and had ing with someone who under- no public relations background,

they helped me create a plan to work toward. I saw that Adobe had an open position, so I applied for it, and had my resume reviewed right before the career fair. Tammy actually put in a good word for me with Adobe, and I was able to meet with them in person. It turned out though that they were only recruiting for sales, even though they had advertised for a PR position! After my first interview they said, “We think you’d be good in sales, just try it.” I ended up having two more interviews, and realized that if I hate sales, I will never have to do it again, and if I love it, then I might have found my career. I went up to San Jose and fell in love with their headquarters and they offered me a position. I’m excited to say I found my dream job!

Cal Poly’s Polyfit club teaches students valuable measures of health Polyfit is a student-run club that provides members with the opportunity to learn how to measure personal health and strength, according to former Polyfit co-president Tessa Nelson. At the beginning of every quarter, Polyfit holds a meeting for anyone interested in becoming a member. The club is open to all students. In the following weeks, the student staff is organized into groups of four or five. Group leaders, who are chosen

before the quarter begins, train the students to understand the clinical skills in measuring body composition and carrying out basic fitness assessments. “It’s an awesome club where you really get to learn first-hand how to act in a professional setting, while learning valuable measures of health,” Nelson said. In weeks four through 10 of the quarter, Polyfit accepts clients and holds body composition and fitness assessment tests. The tests explain body

composition, body fat percentage and overall status of health, according to PolyFit co-president and kinesiology senior Meghan Rondon. “It gives students interested in the medical field with the opportunity to get hands-on experience with other students and community members,” Rondon said. The body composition test takes approximately 30 minutes and is made up of six different elements: resting heart rate,

blood pressure, height/weight, Body Mass Index (BMI), skinfold, waist to hip ratio and hydrostatic weighing. The full assessment fitness test is a more in-depth body test, which takes approximately one hour, includes all body composition elements in addition to muscular fitness tests: sit ups; push ups; grip strength; sit and reach flexibility; blood, glucose and cholesterol (triglyceride) levels; and a bike test. After they have taken the client

through all the assessments, a Polyfit member will debrief the client. The tests are open to Cal Poly faculty, staff and students and community members. “It is a professional commitment,” Nelson said. “Students must show up for an hour a week just like a class.” For students, the body composition is free. For a full test, it is $5. For faculty, staff and alumni, the body composition is $10 and a full test is $15. For commu-

nity members, it is $15 for the body composition and $20 for a full test. While most Polyfit members are kinesiology, nutrition or biological sciences majors, anyone interested in the medical field can join. Polyfit can be found in the kinesiology tower on the second floor. For more information or to schedule an appointment, visit the Polyfit website or email polyfit.scheduling@ gmail.com.

Kennedy Library saves time, money and stress For many students, the library is a place of solitude. It’s a place where you can go to get work done, collaborate on projects with other students or take a break from the hustle and bustle of college life. The warm and welcoming atmosphere and abundance of resources are just some of the reasons why many students pick this place to pour over their textbooks and assignments. 1. The library is always here for you Did you know that Kennedy Library has one of the only 24hour study spaces on campus? In fact, it’s so popular with the all-nighter crowd that the library is working to expand this space. Whether you’re studying

STRESS RELIEF

for finals late at night or working on a project at the crack of dawn, the Kennedy Library always has plenty of room for those who need a quiet, focused space. There are even vending machines and charging ports. 2. You’ll save money on textbooks Broke college students rejoice! Kennedy Library knows textbooks can get pricey. In an effort to increase access to course materials, the library provides course reserves where you can temporarily check out a textbook for a class. If you need a textbook for an entire quarter, consider checking out the library’s e-book collection of textbooks for Cal Poly courses. These textbooks are completely

WHETHER IT WAS THE WARM AND WELCOMING ATMOSPHERE OR THE ABUNDANCE OF RESOURCES, I KNEW I HAD FOUND MY “HOME AWAY FROM HOME.” free and easily accessible online. 3. You’ve got help whether you’re at the library or somewhere else Even though the library is truly the hub of learning at Cal Poly, you can also get friendly research advice outside the library. The Kennedy Library chat service is available 24/7 no matter where you are. If

you prefer old-fashioned faceto-face interactions, you can meet with librarians in the library. There are also students, or Library Research Assistance Technicians (LibRATS), who can answer all of your “howto” questions. Look for them at the Research Help Desk on the second floor. 4. You’ll have access to more

than just computers As a Cal Poly student with full access to Kennedy Library, you’ll have a chance to utilize all of the tech equipment available for checkout at the Poly Connect service desk on the first floor. From iPads and laptops to DSLRs and GoPros, you’ll be ready for any multimedia project. Besides these items, the library is fully equipped with more than 300 Mac and PC computers that come with useful software like the Adobe Creative Suite. All you need is your PolyCard and you’re ready to go. 5. You have an on-campus stress-free zone Between group projects and research assignments, it can be

difficult to remember to take a break every once in awhile. Luckily our student outreach team, Take5, is ready to help you relax and have fun throughout your college career. It’s not surprising to see students cuddling their stress away with cats, dogs and even goats outside Kennedy Library. The Take5 team also offers drop-in water-coloring sessions, board game nights, silent discos and other fun and stressfree events. Of course grabbing a book from the library’s vast collection is another proven stress buster for any bibliophile. Remember no matter what you’re doing, Kennedy Library is here for students to succeed. Don’t be shy and make sure you fully utilize all of the library’s resources.

KENNEDY LIBR ARY | COURTESY PHOTO

KENNEDY LIBR ARY | COURTESY PHOTO

| Kennedy Library sometimes brings in dogs for students to pet, usually during exam time.

FURRY FRIENDS | Dogs aren’t the only pets to cuddle during exams; the library sometimes brings cats too.


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SLOPD | COURTESY PHOTO SAFETY | SLOPD works with university police to keep students safe.

SLOPD here to support student success The next couple of months will be a whirlwind — moving into housing, finding classrooms, making new friends and exploring new surroundings. We hope you love the community of San Luis Obispo as much as the people who have lived here for 50 years. Selecting Cal Poly and San Luis Obispo as your academic home for the next several years is a commitment that we know isn’t taken lightly. Supporting your academic success is incredibly important to the City of San Luis Obispo and we endorse the principles of the Mustang Way: pride, responsibility and character. Those principles will help guide each student through their career at Cal Poly and as a resident of San Luis Obispo. What does it mean then for the city to support student success? First and foremost is safety. The San Luis Obispo Police Department (SLOPD) responds to all off-campus emergency needs, from traffic accidents to vandalism to laptop theft and beyond. Sometimes keeping people safe means issuing citations or even taking them to jail. If you are a minor and make the choice to obtain alco-

hol, you are putting yourself at risk of not tolerated and citations are issued receiving a minor in possession, result- frequently. Off-campus alcohol vioing in fines and a one year suspension of lations are also addressed on-campus your driver’s license. If you overindulge via the Dean of Students Office. For in alcohol and SLOPD scoops you off the parents of incoming students, we enstreet, you will be going to county jail courage you to have conversations with for being drunk in public and your son or daughter about the charge will remain choices they will have to on your permanent make when faced with record. DUIs in new experiences. San Luis Obispo We at SLOPD want you as a result in a trip to jail, loss of student to have driver’s license a positive, fun and fines startexperience while in San ing at $5,000. Luis Obispo Fines for aland knowing cohol and noise violations are the general rules steep. Open conyou should try SLOPD tainer and urinating to follow are a good in public tickets start at start to a desirable expe$350 and noise violations start rience. Remember why you are at $350 and max out at $1,000. Unruly attending college; hopefully to make a gathering citations, which can be issued difference in the world, or to set up your to party hosts and attendees, start at $700 future for success. This is your time to fill and max out at $1,000. Disruptive par- your pages and write your story. Don’t ty behaviors in the neighborhoods are write about things you may regret now

We at SLOPD want you as a student to have a positive, fun experience while in San Luis Obispo.

and later in life. SLOPD and Cal Poly University Police have a strong and collaborative relationship and University Police are able assist with off campus enforcement. While San Luis Obispo is a “college town,” maintaining the quality of life for all residents is a major goal of the city and keeping the neighborhoods safe and peaceable is taken seriously. The City of San Luis Obispo also supports student success by being a multi-faceted resource. Cal Poly contracts with the San Luis Obispo Fire Department, who provides both on- and off-campus fire and emergency medical response. In addition to public safety, we are able to help with issues concerning housing, connect residents to mediation in case of a dispute and provide safe and fun open space trails and parks. The city’s website, www.slocity.org, will connect you to a variety of resources and the Neighborhood Services website, www. respectslo.com, offers information on everything you need to know about living in San Luis Obispo.


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10 things you need to know about BUS 100

ORFALEA COLLEGE OF BUSINESS | COURTESY PHOTO COLLEGE COMPA SS

| BUS 100 teaches Orfalea students about Cal Poly’s student resources, how to register for classes, what Orfalea Student Services are available and allows them to create a graduation gameplan.

If you’re an incoming freshman or transfer student in the Orfalea College of Business, you’ll be taking Student Orientation and College Success (BUS 100) this fall. You might see this on your schedule and think it’s not important compared to your other courses, but the 1-unit class is more than meets the eye. The class is a unique resource the college provides to help freshmen navigate their academic journey successfully by understanding the supportive resources available on campus. It has proven to help new students feel connected and supported right from the start, so they can go on to have more success at Cal Poly. Here’s what you can expect to learn in BUS 100:

1. Learn how to register In this course, you can master the ins and outs of PASS and Cal Poly registration. The class also gives insights into what quarters certain classes are offered so you plan classes in the right sequence. 2. Get to know Orfalea Student Services You’ll explore everything, including peer advising, peer mentoring, tutoring, career-readiness tools and international study opportunities, all created to help students thrive personally and academically. The college’s in-house resources help 87 percent of Orfalea students graduate within five years — the best graduation rate at Cal Poly.

3. Bond with your classmates This is your shot to network with fellow freshmen in the Orfalea College of Business that you may not have interacted with during Week of Welcome. Bonds you form here often turn into lab partners, roommates, travel buddies or study groups in the future. 4. Master college-level time management Anxious about the fast pace of Cal Poly’s 10-week quarter system? This course will help you learn more advanced time-management skills and master proven study habits suited for business curriculum, including group projects.

5. Explore your concentration and career options The course will open your eyes to career paths that lead from each of Orfalea’s nine concentrations within the business administration and economics majors. Through self-exploration and insights from upperclassmen, you’ll have a better idea of where you can focus your studies. 6. Meet professional advisors BUS 100 is taught by Orfalea’s professional advisors on staff to support students at every turn. Succeeding in this class means you’ll have an ally in the college who can answer questions and help you grow.

7. Adjust to life at Cal Poly Many incoming freshmen and transfer students feel stress moving away from home and balancing rigorous courses during fall quarter. This class helps you manage the pressure in a positive way as you get used to living in San Luis Obispo. 8. Map a plan toward graduation One of BUS 100’s central projects helps you map out all the courses you’ll need to take to graduate, including understanding how AP or other credits transfer to Cal Poly. The exercise often helps students see where they have time to study abroad, add a minor or even graduate early.

9. Embrace career readiness The college’s mission is to prepare career-ready graduates who can tackle the hiring process with confidence. You’ll learn about Orfalea’s career-readiness tools at your disposal, like Business Professionalism and Career Readiness (BUS 206), roundtables with alumni executives and salary negotiation workshops. 10. It’s a class you won’t forget Investing one hour every Friday in this course will help you succeed in every other class you take at Cal Poly and truly make the most of your time in college. If you have questions about BUS 100 or any of Orfalea Student Services resources, contact 805-756-2601 or cobadvis@calpoly.edu.


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The basics of saving money on textbooks Classes are challenging enough without having to worry about paying for the books you need to succeed. Luckily, the Cal Poly University Store offers a variety of ways to save money on buying and renting your textbooks. When you buy or rent a textbook at the University Store, you are giving back to Cal Poly. All of the money earned by the store stays at the University, helping fund many worthwhile Cal Poly programs and services. The money from textbooks also goes toward university donations, scholarships and giveaways, and developing tools such as the textbook price comparison tool. This tool allows you to make sure you

are saving the most money you can. Buy new, used or rent When it comes to saving money on textbooks, renting is the best option. With book editions constantly being updated and quickly going out of date, renting a book can save you a lot of money in the long run, compared to buying. The Cal Poly University Store lets you rent books right in the store. By renting, you can save up to 60 percent on more than 800 titles. In Fall 2015, approximately 7,500 books were rented from the University Store. This resulted in almost $300,000 of savings for students in just

one quarter.“We work hard to make sure that the books are both affordable and available,” University Store Academic Courseware Manager Reza Kazempour said. “We work aggressively every quarter to make books available for rental.” Kazempour also said growing the rental program is a main priority for the University Store. Another affordable textbook option is buying used. You can find a large selection of used books at the University Store and save up to 30 percent compared to new. These books are often in excellent condition and come with the added bonus of free highlighting and page notes. Along with used, you can also ex-

plore purchasing e-books. Going with the online version can save you up to 40 percent of the physical book price, and it can save your back as they are as light as the cloud they’re stored in. Get cash for your books When you are done with a book after buying or renting it from the University Store, you can sell the book back to the store for a portion of the amount you paid for it. The portion you get back is determined by the condition of the book, and whether or not the faculty will use it the next quarter. If they will, you will get more money back because the book will stay in campus

circulation. If not, a national used book company that works with Cal Poly will determine the price, and you will likely receive a lower portion back. Either way, you will still be getting cash back for a book that may otherwise just take up space on your bookshelf. You can use the money you get back however you choose, though many students use it to help buy or rent their textbooks at the University Store the following quarter. M a k i n g b o o k s m o re affordable The Affordable Learning Committee makes this “buyback” process possible. Kazempour is co-chair of this committee,

whose goals are tied to a larger California State University affordable learning initiative. The committee works with professors to find out which books are going to be used in classes each quarter, so that they can be available for price comparison on the University Store website and for repurchase. But not all books are created equal, which is why the committee evaluates each book to determine which ones really sell. Kazempour said the committee makes every effort to help make books affordable. “This year we negotiated with publishers to lower the costs and pass the savings on to students,” said Kazempour.

The Cal Poly Corporation is here for you Campus Dining feeds students. The University Store helps educate them. But the Cal Poly Corporation, which owns and operates Campus Dining and the University Store, serves the Cal Poly community more than just tri-tips and textbooks. As an auxiliary organization, the Corporation invests millions of dollars back into the university every year. There are approximately 90 auxiliaries in the California State University system, all of which provide revenue-producing services to their primary entities. The Corporation’s main commercial services include Campus Dining, the University Store, Cal Poly Downtown, Cal Poly Print & Copy and Conference and Event Planning. Auxiliaries are self-supporting, meaning they receive no state funding. Net revenue earned by

auxiliaries stays on campus. Incorporated in 1941, the Corporation has been giving back throughout its history. During World War II, the Corporation collaborated with the Navy to run a flight school on Cal Poly’s land. The project provided revenue to support buildings, train flight school faculty and fund many housing and food service jobs at Cal Poly. That tradition of paying it forward continues today. The Corporation funds student investment management projects in the College of Business, purchases and resells student-made Cal Poly food products and provides financial support to various university programs, as well as on-campus facilities such as the Sports Complex, Alex G. Spanos Stadium and the Engineering Plaza. And paying it forward does not

stop at just cash. The Corporation employs more than 2,000 students who work across their commercial and corporate services. Between preparing food at Campus Dining, assisting in University Store operations and contributing to the Corporation’s marketing and information technology efforts, students gain hands on, Learn By Doing experience. In 1993 the Corporation received Swanton Pacific Ranch from Orchard Supply Hardware owner Al Smith, an acquisition that has created many opportunities for students in forestry, natural resources and farming. From meals to textbooks, students at Cal Poly trade cash for goods with the Corporation every day. Those daily exchanges provide the funds for a larger transaction, one where students are paid back in more ways than one.

CAL POLY CORPOR ATION | COURTESY PHOTO ALL-IN-ONE

| Cal Poly Corporation includes entities like Campus Dining and the University Store.

Campus Dining’s guide to PLU$ Dollars

CAMPUS DINING | COURTESY PHOTO COLLEGE CURRENCY

| PLU$ Dollars are put on a student’s PolyCard and are deducted when swiped for a purchase at any one of the 17 Campus Dining facilities, which includes two markets and three food trucks.

Eating meals on campus is always a popular topic among incoming freshmen— and for good reason: students love food and want to make the most of their Plu$ Dollars. Whether you are vegan, vegetarian, gluten-free, fruitarian, kosher, paleo, pescatarian, omnivore, foodie or food agnostic, there are many different ways to maximize your Plu$ Dollars on the Cal Poly campus. A campus dining plan is required the entire first year for incoming freshmen living on campus or in on-campus apartments. But the plans come with a lot of choice. Freshmen can choose what and where they eat, as well as how much to spend at one time.

The math of eating on campus A one-year dining plan has three parts: $150 covers the cost of meals during WOW and $600 covers the base operating expense for the on-campus all-you-careto-eat-facility — these amounts are subtracted from the total cost paid for the dining plan. The rest of the money is divided equally among the three academic quarters for students to spend at their own discretion. The total cost of the dining plan for a student living in a residence hall is $5,147. The total cost for a student living in an on-campus apartment residence is $4,103. After the initial WOW and overhead expenses are factored in, the quarterly amount is $1,466 for residence hall students and $1,118 for apartment students.

In translation, students have about $130 per week to buy food. There are 17 different dining venues on campus including two markets, three food trucks and more than 1,000 options to choose from. Budgeting is often the most difficult part of the dining plan to manage, especially for students who are not accustomed to buying food for themselves. For many students, this is a new experience. “The price projected for a meal is around $9 but the program is intended to give students flexibility,” said Campus Dining account specialist Carla Brewer. “It is not necessarily a seven-day-a-week/ three-meals-a-day dining plan because it is taking into account that many students eat off campus.”

Are you a splurger or hoarder? When students are given $1,400 all at once, it can be easy to splurge too much too quickly, and they may find their Plu$ Dollar accounts dwindling by the end of the quarter. Others may have hundreds left by the end of the third quarter and not know how they will spend all of the remaining money by the end of the year. Though the money does roll over from quarter to quarter, Plu$ Dollars expire on June 18 and cannot roll over to the next academic year. Students can keep up to date on the balance of their Plu$ Dollars online through the Cal Poly portal. They can also swipe their PolyCard at any register of any campus dining operation to see their remaining balance. Students who do run out of their

Plu$ Dollars can add money to their Campus Express account, which they can use at any dining venue. They can also purchase Fast Pass Lunch Passes or Commuter Blocks, which they can use during all meal periods at 19 Metro station, saving them up to 40 percent of the regular cost of a meal there. Students can access both supplemental dining programs through the Money Matters tab on the Cal Poly Portal. Customer satisfaction is key “The dining administration’s goal is to serve the students,” Campus Dining Accounting Manager Roberta Rosenthal said. “If you have individual needs or concerns, we want to hear them directly. Input is encouraged; that’s what we want students to know.”

Campus Dining wants students to be satisfied with their meal plans, and those with dietary restrictions can work with Campus Dining’s Registered Dietitian Megan Coats to become more informed about their food options on campus. As a first year Cal Poly student, adjusting to college life and academics is tough enough. Students should not also have to worry about food. Eating on campus is a convenient way to make sure that hunger will not be a problem and that they are properly fueled for academic success for his or her first year. By budgeting and monitoring their Plu$ Dollars and utilizing campus nutritional options and support resources, students can get the most out of their campus dining experience.


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Executives in Residence program brings boardroom leaders to campus Networking. Everyone says it’s one of the most important components of professional success. And it’s true — having a diverse group of contacts helps young professionals explore job opportunities, learn from industry veterans and connect to potential employers. Yet, networking can be one of the hardest skills to master for a student just starting to build career-oriented relationships. Where do you start? What’s the right way to connect with busy professionals? The Orfalea College of Business introduced the Executives in Residence program in 2014 to give its students a head start before graduation. The college brings more than a dozen successful alumni and co-suite leaders to campus each quarter to speak in classes and host round tables where Orfalea students can get to know more about their background. As each executive tours the col-

lege, students have the opportunity to speak with them one-on-one, ask questions about their company and share contact information. “The intimate setting of an Executives in Residence visit turns some of the top business leaders in the world from intimidating to approachable,” said business administration junior Sara Chen, who also serves as president of Cal Poly’s Women in Business club. “You get to ask them personal questions and hear tailored, in-depth answers in an open conversation that wouldn’t be feasible to do in some huge presentation Q&A.” Last year, the college hosted 48 Executives in Residence — including more than 40 Cal Poly alumni. Students were able to connect personally with leaders like Goldman Sachs Partner Tammy Kiely (accounting, ’93), Google Finance Director Jim Marocco (economics, ’94), Clif Bar CFO Rich Boragno

(business administration, ’94) and Stryker Corporation Vice President of Human Resources Jessica Winter (marketing, ’98). Chen attended her first Executives in Residence round table in her first year at Cal Poly, saying it helped her learn about different fields within the business world as she began selecting her concentration. She also says the practice of interacting with high-level professionals like alumna Dolores Bernardo of Airbnb helped her sharpen professional communications skills. After each visit, she felt each executive’s tangible passion for their work and support for Cal Poly students. “I have been able to listen and learn as real executives have given us students invaluable advice based off personal experiences that simply can’t be learned from a textbook or company website — advice that has helped me shape my future af-

ter Cal Poly,” she said. According to students who have attended past roundtables, the discussions can benefit students of all ages and cover a wide range of topics. “You can be a freshman having a conversation about what that executive did in college that helped set them up for success later on,” Chen said. “Or you can be a graduating senior making a new connection that could lead to a possible job opportunity in that field.” Orfalea sees the Executives in Residence program as a key to its career-readiness initiatives, which aim to help each student select a ca-

reer path and confidently navigate the hiring process as they transition toward their careers. “I personally feel that having the chance to interact with our executives is one of the best Learn by Doing experiences available at our college,” Orfalea Career Readiness Advisor Chelsea Kidwell said. “The program prepares students for interviewing, networking and building their professional brand.” Beyond Executives in Residence, Kidwell helps provide a variety of professional resources for business administration, economics and industrial technology and packaging students, including resume

workshops, industry tours, student internship panels and one-on-one career advising. In Fall 2016, the Orfalea College of Business plans to welcome alumni like Saira Malik of TIAA-CREF, Dan Delaney of Public Consulting Group and Scott Cooper CFO of Allegro Ophthalmics, LLC. All Orfalea College of Business students can sign up for Executives in Residence round tables on the college’s website beginning in September. For more information on the program and past visitors, go to http://bit.ly/ executivesinresidence.

ORFALEA COLLEGE OF BUSINESS | COURTESY PHOTO INSIDER INFORMATION

| Roundtables give students a chance to hear successful alumni tell their stories.

Engineering clubs bridge students’ personal and professional lives At first glance, building a canoe out of concrete may seem like a fruitless endeavor, but this sink or swim challenge was no match for the Society of Civil Engineers (SCE). Last year, SCE took home podium honors in both the Concrete Canoe and Steel Bridge competitions. SCE is just one of many engineering clubs that have tirelessly pushed the envelope of what was thought to be possible. There are more than 50 clubs

associated with the College of Engineering. The clubs range from professional,offering networking and career building assistance, to service, which allow students to donate their time and skills to benefit all corners of the globe. One of the most prominent clubs on campus is the Society of Women Engineers (SWE). SWE offers all students an opportunity to promote and celebrate women in engineering, as well as offer support and

guidance to a new generation of women who strive to blaze their own path. SWE’s mentorship opportunities include Girl Scout Days, where members host Brownie and Junior troops on campus and guide them through hands-on engineering activities. At the end of the day, the young girls even get a patch for their efforts and enthusiasm. The reverberating effects of Cal Poly’s engineering clubs can be felt beyond just the core of its

community, or even California. Engineers Without Borders-Cal Poly (EWB), for instance, seeks to solve some of the toughest problems across the globe with simple, elegant solutions. In the small nation of Malawi, food security is one of the most challenging issues facing the country. EWB members worked in conjunction with residents to develop a bicycle-powered maize mill to enhance the food supply and put the power in the hands

of residents. This year, EWB was awarded the National 2016 Premier Project Award for the mill designed for residents of Kumponda, Malawi. Though this is a high honor, environmental engineering senior and student club liaison for the College of Engineering Chris Apple knows that clubs are special for more reasons than accolades and prestige. “Clubs give students opportunities that we never could have

had otherwise,” Apple said. He cites club involvement as being his guiding light while in school. “Clubs helped me balance out school,” he said. “In addition to helping me get involved in a project, clubs help students get their footing in finding friends, too.” Apple was involved in engineering clubs from his first days at Cal Poly, and encourages students to do the same. Continued on page 26


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Explore the Learning Communities and staff in your Cal Poly home

GEORGIE DE MATTOS | MUSTANG NE WS CHOICES | Students can choose their living situation based on major or personal interest. Living Learning Programs are focused on major while Connections Learning Community and iCommunity revolve around personal interest.

What can you get from living on campus? At Cal Poly, University Housing connects students to resources, both on and off campus, that will help enhance students’ learning community experience. All students who are going to be living on campus will be part of a living learning community. There is a variety of learning community options students have for themselves, and staff work hard to create an environment beyond just giving students a place to sleep, store their things and take a shower. The staff aims to help students create memories, make connections with others, explore new experiences outside the classroom and have a great time. So what are the learning communities? At Cal Poly, learning communities are a group of residents who live together in a building and have a common major, career and/ or personal interest. Through part-

nerships with a variety of academic departments, faculty and staff, students have exclusive access to activities that tie directly into their academic and personal success. Living Learning Programs (LLP), also known as red brick residence halls There are six different red brick residence halls. Each one is connected to an academic college on campus. If students are looking to connect with people in their major, the LLPs are a great place to live or visit.: · Tenaya Hall: Orfalea College of Business · Muir Hall: College of Science and Mathematics · Fre m o n t Ha l l : C o l lege of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences

· Santa Lucia Hall: College of Engineering ·

S equoia Ha l l: C ollege of Architecture and Environmental Design

· Trinity Hall: College of Liberal Arts “Traditionally, these dorms have a more academic setting,” Learning Community Coordinator Hunter Simmons said. “When you enter Sequoia you can see drafting tables and you know that you are clearly in the architecture dorm.” Connections Learning Community The other residence halls, Sierra Madre Hall and Yosemite Hall, connect people based on their interests. Do you love music? A

whole tower is dedicated to people who are also music lovers. With many themes available, there is one for everyone. Connections bring students, faculty, staff and community partners together around a common interest. In those communities, students live with other students who share an interest. iCommunity Housed in Cerro Vista this year, iCommunity is a place where those who dream of starting their own business, or desire to brainstorm innovative ideas, come together. The housing is in partnership with Cal Poly’s Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship (CIE), and allows students to explore new possibilities. “All of the residence halls and apartments are learning communities. However, the biggest difference is the intentionality of

the experience,” Simmons said. “You are going to be living with people that you have a great deal in common with, it just depends on what.” Some of the people students will be living with include staff, who want to help with the adjustment to life at Cal Poly. “I think it’s important for students to know that the staff, at all levels, really care and are invested in the success of all students,” Simmons said. “Help is available for you on campus in a variety of different forms and housing staff know a lot of the resources.” Resident advisors (RAs) are student leaders who live in residence halls, share similar interests and want to help students make the most of their Cal Poly experience. “Resident advisors are here to engage in conversations, partner with residents to build inclusive

communities, help plan events, assist in safety concerns and provide academic and personal resources,” Sequoia Coordinator of Student Development (CSD) Cindy Loza said. Whether you are locked out of your room, are feeling down or need help figuring out how to find your class, an RA is there to help. CSDs are professional staff that supervise the RAs and handle overall operations of the building. All of the Cal Poly CSDs have their master’s degrees and come from all over the country. There are 13 in total. “Students should be expecting to live in inclusive communities and learn about themselves, as well as learning about others,” Learning Community Coordinator Jessica Fred said. “We strive in our department to help residents as they create their home away from home.”

Move-in is changing this year

University Housing is looking forward to welcoming you to your campus home and preparing for your big move with convenience in mind. If you or your family have prior experience with a Cal Poly move-in, it’s important to know that things will work a little differently this year. We’re working around some very exciting campus improvements that we can’t wait to share with you! Here’s how things will work the day of move-in: You will be directed to enter campus through a specific campus entry point based on your housing assignment. Sierra Madre and Yosemite Hall residents, your entry point is Grand Avenue. Residents of the South Mountain and North Mountain Halls, Cerro Vista Apartments and Poly Canyon Village, your entry point is Highland Drive. It’s important to arrive at your designated campus entry point

so you won’t be turned around — physically and mentally. There won’t be a campus through route to get you where you need to be.

community while your driver proceeds to long-term parking. Shuttles will be provided between drop-off zones and long-term

Be sure to arrive at your designated move-in arrival time to ensure speedy service and as a courtesy to your fellow Mustangs.

Once you’re on campus, signs will direct you to a dropoff zone where our Mustang Welcome Team will greet you with rolling carts to help unload your belongings. Team members will escort you to your living

parking. If you arrive by yourself, your belongings will be kept at a holding area until you return from long-term parking. What else do you need to know? A Mustang Move-in Pass, secured by reserving a move-in

arrival time, is required for freshmen moving in Sept. 16, 17 or 18 and continuing students moving in on Sept. 20. You can reserve your time through a link emailed to you in University Housing’s July Move-in Update. Forgot or can’t decide? We’ll reserve a time for you. Be sure to arrive at your designated move-in arrival time to ensure speedy service and as a courtesy to your fellow Mustangs. Transfer students living in Poly Canyon Village don’t need a Mustang Move-in Pass due to the location of your living community. Early Start Program students don’t need to a Mustang Move-in Pass either. Parking will be in designated lots near campus housing, and carts will be available for you to check out upon arrival. Lastly, check your email for University Housing Movein Updates to help you prepare, and pack light. See you in September!


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Couple makes strides in Cal Poly community through agricultural education As the deep toll of the bronze bell ringing from the belfry echoes through the valley, a group of schoolchildren make their way up a dirt road, headed toward a pristine, white one-room schoolhouse. The girls dressed in long, bonneted dresses and the boys in denim pants and plaid shirts, bring to life the Living History Day that the third-grade class from the nearby Santa Ynez Valley Charter School is about to experience. The Pleasant Valley Schoolhouse, established in 1869, is a labor of love for Tina and Paul McEnroe, who rescued it from demolition and moved it to their home at Rancho La Purisima in the hills of the Santa Ynez Valley to be restored for community use. Tina McEnroe’s roots run deep in both agriculture and education and she has spent much of her life sharing those passions. In her most recent collaboration with Cal Poly, she partnered with wine and viticulture senior Courtney Gillespie

to develop a viticulture curriculum, which is now being taught in the vineyard adjacent to the historic Pleasant Valley Schoolhouse. “In the Cal Poly mantra of Learn By Doing we are discovering what a wonderful vineyard is all about,” said McEnroe, adding that she is in process of getting the curriculum published in the teacher resource guide of the California Foundation for Agriculture in the Classroom program. Gillespie recently visited the schoolhouse to help teach the inaugural viticulture lesson. As 19 third-graders rambled throughout the lush green vines, she helped the students identify the intricacies of what they were looking at. As the students crouched down to inspect the leaves, ladybugs landed on their clothing. Upon closer inspection, they found larvae on the vines — leading to Gillespie explaining the beneficial nature of the red winged insects. Gillespie and McEnroe created

four 20 minute lesson plans about sures she has collected to make the the science of viticulture, includ- schoolhouse strikingly authentic to ing the identifying characteristics of how it once was. Sitting in antique grapevines and even a song about desks, students use handheld slate photosynthesis that will be boards to do math lessons and read out of Mcused in the program. Guffey Readers. “It is important to expose youth They divide into to botany at a two teams to It is important young age,” participate to expose youth in an old said Gillespie. “Introducing fashioned to botany at a spelling bee them to vitiyoung age. culture leads and later, they them to ask imshare a laugh COURTNEY GILLESPIE portant questions as a dunce hat is such as where their introduced. food comes from.” The Pleasant Valley McEnroe doesn’t miss a beat, Schoolhouse, dating back to 1869, sharing the schoolchildren’s won- was built using shiplap redwood der in the vineyard, giggling and siding and a shingled roof by two exploring alongside them. Once neighbors in just three days. It the lesson is over, the students are closed in 1936 and went through ushered indoors to experience a several iterations before ultimately school day reminiscent of what it falling into disrepair. The McEnroe’s was like in the late 1890s. moved it to their sprawling 1,008McEnroe commands their at- acre cattle ranch in the Santa Ynez tention, sharing the historic trea- Valley in 2006 with the sole intent

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FOOD AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES | COURTESY PHOTO ROOTS

| Tina McEnroe has been around agriculture all her life

of restoring as a gift to the community. Today, it is recognized as a Santa Barbara County Building of Historic Merit. The couple has strong ties to the community — including Cal Poly. In June, Cal Poly awarded honorary doctorate degrees to them in recognition of their accomplishments and community dedication. Paul McEnroe, who directed the IBM team that developed the barcode, has served as a member of the Cal Poly President’s Advisory Council for 30 years. Tina McEnroe is a state and national award-winning education specialist, holding a reading specialist teaching credential from UC Santa Barbara and a special education teaching credentials from Cal Poly. In 2008 she was awarded the Cal Poly School of Education Alumna. The McEnroe’s dedication to preservation also pertains to their Rancho La Purisima, which is protected by a conservation easement in a partnership with the Santa Barbara Land Trust for Santa Bar-

bara County — protecting the agricultural nature of the lands and its wildlife habitat. Tina has also placed conservation easements on her ranches in Monterey County, assuring the preservation of the agricultural lands into perpetuity. Tina McEnroe plans to continue her relationship with Cal Poly and is working with officials to partner with the Cal Poly Strawberry Center on her farmland in Salinas. She is also seeking to develop a reading lab at Cal Poly similar to one she launched at UC Santa Barbara called the McEnroe Reading & Language Arts Clinic to serve the community’s challenged learners. “I’ve known Tina for many years, and her energy and enthusiasm are contagious” said College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences Dean Andrew J. Thulin. “She has a true passion for both agriculture and education, and we are so fortunate to partner with both Paul and her on these wonderful projects.”


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Life on the other side: Cal Poly graduate lands unexpected dream job Meet Claire Lindsey, a recent Cal Poly graduate from the College of Liberal Arts and a true example of Mustang success. She landed a job with the software giant Adobe Systems — in a sales role. While her path may be uncommon for an English major, the outcome has been rewarding. We asked her to share advice with incoming students on how to maximize their Cal Poly experiences to make their dreams a reality, just as she has.

What can students do beginning their first year to be successful during and after Cal Poly? Make a plan. It doesn’t have to be set in stone. Ask yourself, “What do I want to do, and what are two or three beginning steps that will help me get there?” If you want to get a career, then have your resume ready to go your freshman year, and start adding things that will get you experience in whatever career you want. Begin building toward some kind of goal, rather than

just waiting until spring quarter of senior year and realizing, “I have done nothing in the last four years except go to school or be in sports.” Think ahead and be proactive. What does the Freshman Focus Team (FFT) offer Cal Poly freshmen? They do a really good job of helping freshmen navigate the next three to five years at Cal Poly. They help you identify potential career paths within a major, or re-examine whether your

stands freshmen, (even though all the career counselors can help everyone).

How did you find your dream job? I met with Laura Hunkler and Tammy Martin in Career Services, and at first I was panicking about not knowing what to major is right for you. They also do with my life. I’m an English help with finding part-time major, and I felt it jobs, resume writing, was sort of up in interviewing, etc. the air. They helped me You can figure out figure out what you’re interthat pubested in, with no I met with Laura Hunkler and lic relapressure. Tammy Martin in Career SerKnowing what tions was vices, and at first I was panicking you don’t want to someabout not knowing what to do with my life. do is just as imthing I was portant as knowing i nt e re s t e d CLAIRE LINDSEY in, and even what you do want to do! It’s a little less scary though I wasn’t a also, knowing that you’re meetbusiness major and had ing with someone who under- no public relations background,

they helped me create a plan to work toward. I saw that Adobe had an open position, so I applied for it, and had my resume reviewed right before the career fair. Tammy actually put in a good word for me with Adobe, and I was able to meet with them in person. It turned out though that they were only recruiting for sales, even though they had advertised for a PR position! After my first interview they said, “We think you’d be good in sales, just try it.” I ended up having two more interviews, and realized that if I hate sales, I will never have to do it again, and if I love it, then I might have found my career. I went up to San Jose and fell in love with their headquarters and they offered me a position. I’m excited to say I found my dream job!

Cal Poly’s Polyfit club teaches students valuable measures of health Polyfit is a student-run club that provides members with the opportunity to learn how to measure personal health and strength, according to former Polyfit co-president Tessa Nelson. At the beginning of every quarter, Polyfit holds a meeting for anyone interested in becoming a member. The club is open to all students. In the following weeks, the student staff is organized into groups of four or five. Group leaders, who are chosen

before the quarter begins, train the students to understand the clinical skills in measuring body composition and carrying out basic fitness assessments. “It’s an awesome club where you really get to learn first-hand how to act in a professional setting, while learning valuable measures of health,” Nelson said. In weeks four through 10 of the quarter, Polyfit accepts clients and holds body composition and fitness assessment tests. The tests explain body

composition, body fat percentage and overall status of health, according to PolyFit co-president and kinesiology senior Meghan Rondon. “It gives students interested in the medical field with the opportunity to get hands-on experience with other students and community members,” Rondon said. The body composition test takes approximately 30 minutes and is made up of six different elements: resting heart rate,

blood pressure, height/weight, Body Mass Index (BMI), skinfold, waist to hip ratio and hydrostatic weighing. The full assessment fitness test is a more in-depth body test, which takes approximately one hour, includes all body composition elements in addition to muscular fitness tests: sit ups; push ups; grip strength; sit and reach flexibility; blood, glucose and cholesterol (triglyceride) levels; and a bike test. After they have taken the client

through all the assessments, a Polyfit member will debrief the client. The tests are open to Cal Poly faculty, staff and students and community members. “It is a professional commitment,” Nelson said. “Students must show up for an hour a week just like a class.” For students, the body composition is free. For a full test, it is $5. For faculty, staff and alumni, the body composition is $10 and a full test is $15. For commu-

nity members, it is $15 for the body composition and $20 for a full test. While most Polyfit members are kinesiology, nutrition or biological sciences majors, anyone interested in the medical field can join. Polyfit can be found in the kinesiology tower on the second floor. For more information or to schedule an appointment, visit the Polyfit website or email polyfit.scheduling@ gmail.com.

Kennedy Library saves time, money and stress For many students, the library is a place of solitude. It’s a place where you can go to get work done, collaborate on projects with other students or take a break from the hustle and bustle of college life. The warm and welcoming atmosphere and abundance of resources are just some of the reasons why many students pick this place to pour over their textbooks and assignments. 1. The library is always here for you Did you know that Kennedy Library has one of the only 24hour study spaces on campus? In fact, it’s so popular with the all-nighter crowd that the library is working to expand this space. Whether you’re studying

STRESS RELIEF

for finals late at night or working on a project at the crack of dawn, the Kennedy Library always has plenty of room for those who need a quiet, focused space. There are even vending machines and charging ports. 2. You’ll save money on textbooks Broke college students rejoice! Kennedy Library knows textbooks can get pricey. In an effort to increase access to course materials, the library provides course reserves where you can temporarily check out a textbook for a class. If you need a textbook for an entire quarter, consider checking out the library’s e-book collection of textbooks for Cal Poly courses. These textbooks are completely

WHETHER IT WAS THE WARM AND WELCOMING ATMOSPHERE OR THE ABUNDANCE OF RESOURCES, I KNEW I HAD FOUND MY “HOME AWAY FROM HOME.” free and easily accessible online. 3. You’ve got help whether you’re at the library or somewhere else Even though the library is truly the hub of learning at Cal Poly, you can also get friendly research advice outside the library. The Kennedy Library chat service is available 24/7 no matter where you are. If

you prefer old-fashioned faceto-face interactions, you can meet with librarians in the library. There are also students, or Library Research Assistance Technicians (LibRATS), who can answer all of your “howto” questions. Look for them at the Research Help Desk on the second floor. 4. You’ll have access to more

than just computers As a Cal Poly student with full access to Kennedy Library, you’ll have a chance to utilize all of the tech equipment available for checkout at the Poly Connect service desk on the first floor. From iPads and laptops to DSLRs and GoPros, you’ll be ready for any multimedia project. Besides these items, the library is fully equipped with more than 300 Mac and PC computers that come with useful software like the Adobe Creative Suite. All you need is your PolyCard and you’re ready to go. 5. You have an on-campus stress-free zone Between group projects and research assignments, it can be

difficult to remember to take a break every once in awhile. Luckily our student outreach team, Take5, is ready to help you relax and have fun throughout your college career. It’s not surprising to see students cuddling their stress away with cats, dogs and even goats outside Kennedy Library. The Take5 team also offers drop-in water-coloring sessions, board game nights, silent discos and other fun and stressfree events. Of course grabbing a book from the library’s vast collection is another proven stress buster for any bibliophile. Remember no matter what you’re doing, Kennedy Library is here for students to succeed. Don’t be shy and make sure you fully utilize all of the library’s resources.

KENNEDY LIBR ARY | COURTESY PHOTO

KENNEDY LIBR ARY | COURTESY PHOTO

| Kennedy Library sometimes brings in dogs for students to pet, usually during exam time.

FURRY FRIENDS | Dogs aren’t the only pets to cuddle during exams; the library sometimes brings cats too.


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SLOPD | COURTESY PHOTO SAFETY | SLOPD works with university police to keep students safe.

SLOPD here to support student success The next couple of months will be a whirlwind — moving into housing, finding classrooms, making new friends and exploring new surroundings. We hope you love the community of San Luis Obispo as much as the people who have lived here for 50 years. Selecting Cal Poly and San Luis Obispo as your academic home for the next several years is a commitment that we know isn’t taken lightly. Supporting your academic success is incredibly important to the City of San Luis Obispo and we endorse the principles of the Mustang Way: pride, responsibility and character. Those principles will help guide each student through their career at Cal Poly and as a resident of San Luis Obispo. What does it mean then for the city to support student success? First and foremost is safety. The San Luis Obispo Police Department (SLOPD) responds to all off-campus emergency needs, from traffic accidents to vandalism to laptop theft and beyond. Sometimes keeping people safe means issuing citations or even taking them to jail. If you are a minor and make the choice to obtain alco-

hol, you are putting yourself at risk of not tolerated and citations are issued receiving a minor in possession, result- frequently. Off-campus alcohol vioing in fines and a one year suspension of lations are also addressed on-campus your driver’s license. If you overindulge via the Dean of Students Office. For in alcohol and SLOPD scoops you off the parents of incoming students, we enstreet, you will be going to county jail courage you to have conversations with for being drunk in public and your son or daughter about the charge will remain choices they will have to on your permanent make when faced with record. DUIs in new experiences. San Luis Obispo We at SLOPD want you as a result in a trip to jail, loss of student to have driver’s license a positive, fun and fines startexperience while in San ing at $5,000. Luis Obispo Fines for aland knowing cohol and noise violations are the general rules steep. Open conyou should try SLOPD tainer and urinating to follow are a good in public tickets start at start to a desirable expe$350 and noise violations start rience. Remember why you are at $350 and max out at $1,000. Unruly attending college; hopefully to make a gathering citations, which can be issued difference in the world, or to set up your to party hosts and attendees, start at $700 future for success. This is your time to fill and max out at $1,000. Disruptive par- your pages and write your story. Don’t ty behaviors in the neighborhoods are write about things you may regret now

We at SLOPD want you as a student to have a positive, fun experience while in San Luis Obispo.

and later in life. SLOPD and Cal Poly University Police have a strong and collaborative relationship and University Police are able assist with off campus enforcement. While San Luis Obispo is a “college town,” maintaining the quality of life for all residents is a major goal of the city and keeping the neighborhoods safe and peaceable is taken seriously. The City of San Luis Obispo also supports student success by being a multi-faceted resource. Cal Poly contracts with the San Luis Obispo Fire Department, who provides both on- and off-campus fire and emergency medical response. In addition to public safety, we are able to help with issues concerning housing, connect residents to mediation in case of a dispute and provide safe and fun open space trails and parks. The city’s website, www.slocity.org, will connect you to a variety of resources and the Neighborhood Services website, www. respectslo.com, offers information on everything you need to know about living in San Luis Obispo.


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Experience the world with Cal Poly Arts

MUSTANG NE WS FILE PHOTO AROUND THE WORLD | Some international acts that students can watch at the Performing Arts Center include Cuban dancers and the Golden Dragon Acrobats. Students can see these shows with their 20 percent student discount.

As the world comes to Cal Poly, Cal Poly Arts is making it possible for people to experience it. Cal Poly Arts is the presenter of world-class touring arts and entertainment events on campus, bringing a wide range of professional artists and performances to the Performing Arts Center. The new 2016-17 season offers more than 30 shows in all genres: live music and comedy concerts, Broadway shows, world and classical music, speakers, dance and family entertainment. Upcoming season highlights include: comedy with Anjelah Johnson, David Sedaris and The Capitol Steps, just in time for the

election; Broadway tours of “Rent,” “Once” and “Pippin”; concerts with Pink Martini, The Time Jumpers, Paddy Moloney & The Chieftains and Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Darlene Love; live wild animals on stage with “Wild Kingdom” host Peter Gros; the Golden Dragon Acrobats’ high-flying feats; Twyla Tharp Dance Co., an innovative take on ballet’s “Cinderella” and the stirring sounds of the Mozart Orchestra of New York, along with monks from Tibet and dancers from Cuba, speakers, world culture, hot bands, cool singers, family fun and much, much more. “Students have the chance to experience performances right here

on campus that they would otherwise have to travel to Los Angeles or San Francisco to see,” Cal Poly Arts Director Steve Lerian said. “We present shows that appeal to audiences of all ages, but there are several that should be of particular interest to students.” Cal Poly Arts student-priced tickets reflect a 20 percent discount on all seats. In addition, when seats are available for select shows, students are offered a special $10 student rush price, available at the door one hour before curtain with their PolyCard. These shows are usually announced within 1-3 days before the performance date on the

Cal Poly Arts website. “When they are available, student rush tickets are a great way for young people to check out new and interesting artists and shows — to allow them to take a chance at a great price and experience new aspects of live performing arts,” Lerian said. “Part of our mission is a commitment to bring innovative and exceptional events to the campus community for our students. With a $10 student rush ticket available for the majority of our performances, why not check these shows out?” For more information on all season shows and rush opportunities, please visit www.calpolyarts.org.

Continued from page 11

“Oftentimes, the first qualities employers look for are soft skills: written and verbal communication, plus interviewing.” Apple said. “I’m smiling because clubs taught me all the soft skills I have, the qualities I learned from my club involvement brought me to where I am today.” Every club associated with the College of Engineering is open to freshmen, and the college encourages all students to get involved. Engineering clubs are not based on a hierarchy or age. Regardless of previous experience, new members can find themselves welding on the Rose Float, or operating the 3D printers in the Quality of Life Plus club before they know it. Club involvement has become the premier hub for corporate recruiting, with innovators such as Tesla exclusively courting students with relevant club experience. In today’s workforce, experience with team-centered projects and team skills are valued on par with knowledge and intelligence. Cal Poly’s elite engineering clubs offer students a chance to build their own door, not just get their foot through one.

SOCIET Y OF WOMEN ENGINEERS | COURTESY PHOTO GIRL POWER | The College of Engineering has many clubs, including one focused on women — the Society of Women Engineers.


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Students further education through Cal Poly graduate programs With the job market as competitive as ever, college students have to stand out to employers when searching for a career. For some employers, this means having a master’s or doctorate degree. Though Cal Poly doesn’t offer a doctorate program, the university offers 52 master’s programs with three to four new programs added each year. Graduate programs are offered in each of Cal Poly’s six colleges. Director of Graduate Education Richard Savage said that many students pursue a master’s degree to study a more specialized area of their major, broaden their studies beyond their major or blend two different fields into one degree.

“For example, my field is biomedical engineering,” Savage said. “It’s engineering and it’s biology, how do you get all of that as an undergraduate student? A master’s degree is really that opportunity to blend those areas into one.” Cal Poly accepts applicants to its graduate programs every fall quarter, however the department also offers a “blended program,” where undergraduates in their junior year of college can decide to pursue a master’s degree alongside their bachelor’s degree. This way, students combine their undergraduate courses with their graduate courses, sometimes double-counting certain courses for both degrees. For example, certain upper di-

vision technology electives chology from Cal Poly can also included in a student’s under- be licensed therapists. Master’s graduate curriculum could also programs in the Orfalea College count for some of their gradof Business offer training to beuate courses. Students come a Certified Pubsometimes have lic Accountant. the opportuniThough Cal Po l y d o e s ty to combine Cal Poly offers a n ot of fe r “blended program,” where their senior d o c t o r at e undergraduates in their junior projects programs, year of college can decide to with their the univerpursue a master’s m a s t e r ’s sit y do es degree alongside their thesis. offer some bachelor’s degree. C al Poly research opalso offers a portunities for variety of specialized graduate graduate students. programs designed to Cal Poly offers a stem give licenses to students in cell research program that is fields that work with the public. funded by the State of CalFor example, students who ifornia and allows graduate obtain a master’s degree in psy- students to do cutting edge re-

generative medicine research. The program pays for the students’ tuition and allows them to conduct research at medical centers across the state, at campuses such as University of California, Davis and University of California, Los Angeles. Savage said it’s programs like these that are attractive to employers, because sometimes a bachelor’s degree isn’t the most desirable degree in the workforce. “A master’s degree gives (students) that edge, and maybe gets them the better job, enables them to be promoted or advance into different opportunities in their professional career,” Savage said. This year, Cal Poly has added

four new master’s programs to its catalog: business analytics, nutrition, architectural engineering and flexible electronics. On Sept. 21, Cal Poly will host an orientation for new graduate students to get acquainted with their program and Cal Poly’s campus. However, the university encourages anybody who is curious about the programs to come out and ask questions. Workshops are also available during fall quarter, where prospective students can learn more about master’s degree options. To learn more about Cal Poly’s graduate education and stay upto-date on announcements and upcoming events, visit www. grad.calpoly.edu.


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Q&A with the Health Center MUSTANG NE WS FILE PHOTO NEIGHBORHOOD DOCTOR

Executive Director of Campus Health & Wellbeing David L. Harris oversees a staff of 74 medical professionals who provide primary medical and mental health care to Cal Poly students at the Health Center. Harris answered frequently asked questions that will help Cal Poly students become more familiar with the on-campus Health Center. What is the Health Center (aka Campus Health & Wellbeing)? The Cal Poly Health Center is your family doctor away from home, plus a walk-in clinic. We handle the same range of problems that your family doctor or urgent care clinic would (injuries, sore throats, ear aches, etc.). We provide care for around 250 students every day. As a result of paying your student fees, all Cal Poly students are entitled to basic

| Cal Poly’s Health Center conducts basic hospital services such as X-rays and providing prescriptions drugs. All these basic services are covered by fees students already pay at Cal Poly. outpatient medical services for free. Services beyond the basics are available at a charge. What services does the Health Center provide? All care is provided by licensed professionals. We have four board certified physicians, four nurse practitioners and five physician assistants. We have a laboratory, which does a wide range of testing. Other tests are sent to a reference lab. We also offer regular X-rays. We use a computer radiographic system and send images to a board-certified radiologist off-campus who provides an official reading very quickly. We have a full-time pharmacy, which dispenses about 200250 prescriptions every day and has 174 different medications on its formulary. If students need a special medication, we can order it. We have a very

limited supply of controlled medicines, like sleeping medicines or pain medicines. We do not carry any heavy narcotic medications or medicines for ADD/ADHD, but can write prescriptions for these medications that can be filled at an off-campus pharmacy. We also provide orthopedic supplies like crutches or arm slings. We have a travel clinic and can provide students with just about all immunizations, medicines and information needed for safe travel. Our health education department (PULSE) has certified peer health educators who offer confidential consultations on topics like nutrition, alcohol and drug awareness, sexuality, lifestyle choices and mental health. How can students schedule an appointment?

Appointments can be made three ways: Online, by phone or in person. If a student has health questions or needs after-business hours, what should they do? We have a free after-hours nurse advice line that is available whenever we are closed. Students can talk to a licensed nurse who will give them advice. We get a report the next day and follow up with the student to make sure everything is OK. In regards to health records, what should students bring from home? We ask students to fill out online forms, which are accessible via their Cal Poly portal. There is a health questionnaire that is very detailed about their past medical history. We don’t mind if parents help with it to

make sure all of the details are correct. The student will have to fill this out only once and it can be finished before coming to campus. Every subsequent year, students are given an abbreviated form that has some general questions, including sexual health. How does personal health insurance work? We don’t accept he a lt h insurance, mainly because you’re already paying for our services through your student health fee. Everything we offer is either free or at minimal cost at the time of your visit. Any charges are automatically forwarded to your student account. Your p e r s o n a l h e a l t h i n s u rance comes to play when health issues go beyond our capacity/capability. Emergency room visits, hospitalizations

or referrals to specialists are where your private health insurance will be important. An y h elpfu l t i ps for students? Bring your own simple first aid kit: bandaids, double antibiotic ointment, Advil and Tylenol and any medications that you normally take. Bring a thermometer. If you wear contact lenses, bring a pair of glasses, because if you get an eye infection, you will not be able to wear your contacts. Also list your food and drug allergies and the reactions they cause. It is also helpful to always carry your health insurance card and make sure you understand your insurance plan. Last but not least, please c h e c k out ou r w e b s it e at w w w. c hw. c a l p o l y. e d u so you are familiar with our resources.

Make this year’s move with ‘Zero Waste’ During move-in weekend this September, incoming Cal Poly residents will participate in a growing effort to reduce waste on campus. The Cal Poly Zero Waste Collaborative has been working together to develop solutions to some of Cal Poly’s biggest waste problems. The group includes representatives from university housing, facilities, campus dining and the Zero Waste Club. Last September, students who moved in on campus discarded more than 12 tons of material, of which a large portion was recyclable cardboard. Proactive efforts by facilities and housing staff helped students and parents save these recyclable materials from going to the landfill. Cal Poly is making huge strides toward becoming a Zero Waste campus— but there is still a long way to go. The goal is to ensure 100 percent of campus waste is recycled or composted rather than sent to the landfill. Currently, only 20 percent of the university’s post-consumer waste — the waste we create every day — is being diverted from landfill to composting and recycling facilities. In other words, 80 percent of everyday items — from that salad container you got from Campus Market and that A+ paper you got back from your professor to this newspaper

you are reading — are all sent straight to landfill, instead of getting a second life. This year, the Zero Waste Collaborative is hoping to do more before move-in to limit the waste at its source. Before and during move-in, University Housing will be sending helpful tips and tricks to parents and incoming students to reduce waste while packing. Ideas include encouraging roommate communication prior to movein to avoid bringing duplicate items, urging residents to shop second-hand for household goods and asking people to pack reusable items like water bottles, coffee mugs, shopping bags and cutlery. Most importantly, students and parents should pack items into reusable containers that can double as storage throughout the school year. Instead of using disposable paper and plastic products as packing materials, clothing and linens that students already plan to bring should be used. Please join us in our efforts to make this year’s move-in zero waste. Before the car is packed, seize every opportunity to reduce, reuse and recycle. To learn more about sustainability efforts at Cal Poly including information on the Zero Waste Collaborative, visit www.sustainability.calpoly.edu.

Cal Poly is making huge strides toward becoming a Zero Waste campus

CELINA OSEGUER A | MUSTANG NE WS PACKING LIGHT

| It is important to recycle, but you can also be ‘zero waste’ by packing for your first year of college using reusable containers.



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