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D E S I G N S I N C . est.

/ nataliemanchia.ca info@nataliemanchia.ca @by.nataliemanchia

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I SS U E X V I

CONTENTS 07

10

A Truthful Account of a Third-Culture Child

Let’s Talk About Sex 18

Ms. Markle’s Canadian Wardrobe 32

The Pull of Political Satire

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The Cost of Culture: Museums, Money, and How Much You Need To Get Into Them

The Power of a Playlist 61 Kekhwíhsrons Akatatyentérha’ne’ ne Onkwehonwè:thsera Akwá:wenk    5 


MU SE M AGA Z I NE

A few days ago, I sat down and revisited my first copy of MUSE Magazine. At 18, I remember holding the issue in my hands, overwhelmed with excitement and disbelief. Four years later, I still get that surreal feeling every time a new issue falls into my hands. As I reflect, I can’t believe how much MUSE has changed and grown over these past few years. Every issue becomes grander, every photoshoot more intricate, and every article more thought-provoking. Issue XVI is exactly that. In these next few pages, you will explore the inner thoughts of our writers and the creative vision of our artists. I’m excited for you, the reader, to experience the collaborative work of over 110 creatives. I wanted to take this opportunity to appreciate and thank every individual that has contributed to MUSE. In these four years, I have been fortunate enough to have worked with some of the most talented and remarkable individuals that Queen’s has to offer. Every contributor, executive member, and reader has left an important mark on the MUSE community and for that, I thank you. As I wrap up my time at Queen’s, the hardest thing to do is to say goodbye to MUSE Magazine and to this wonderful family. MUSE was my outlet. It’s where I met my best friend, where I was inspired to embrace my creative side, and where I spent some of my most memorable nights. MUSE has changed me in a way that nothing else has. I have nothing but excitement for the future of this magazine. This is me, passing it off to the next creative generation. More than anything, I hope that MUSE inspires you in the way it has so greatly inspired me.

Yours creatively,

Amy Yu, Editor-in-Chief

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A Truthful Account of a Third-Culutre Child By Maddi Andrews We’ve all experienced the painful small talk that ensues upon meeting new people, ranging from the inevitable “What program are you in?” to the painfully terrifying “What do you want to do after you graduate?” For me, however, there is always that one question that ties my stomach into knots: “Where are you from?”

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ruthfully, being a third-culture kid, I don’t even know how to begin to explain where I’m from. The term ‘third-culture’ refers to children who have been raised in a culture that is not their own. This concept is all but foreign to me. When I was six years old, my family moved all the way from snowy Alberta to South Korea, a move that completely changed my everyday routine. We packed up and wished the grandparents well, promising to return after a two-year contract. However, my parents proceeded to whisk us away to countries like the Philippines, Qatar, and Saudi Arabia. Subsequently, I attended boarding school on Vancouver Island prior to my arrival at Queen’s. In total, I’ve lived in six countries, visited forty-five, and flown on more airplanes than I can count. For me, travelling comes as naturally as breathing. But each time I’m asked where I’m from, I find searching for the answer just as difficult. I still don’t fully know how to answer this question, and I find myself typically resorting to the rather wordy Canadian-born-but-currently-residing-in-Saudi-Arabiawhile-attending-Queen’s answer. Complicated, right? I’ve come to realize that who I am as a person has without a doubt been shaped by my experiences abroad; my general outlook on life and wanderlust mentality have formed as a byproduct of my upbringing. During my second year at Queen’s, I spent approximately four months in Kingston without travelling anywhere, marking the longest period of time I could remember being in a single location. By the time winter break rolled around, I felt like I was going stir-crazy, and I was beyond excited for the thirty-plus hour journey home to Saudi Arabia. It was during these four months in Kingston that I spent a good amount of time pondering about my feelings on being a third-culture kid. The phrase “the grass is always greener on the other side” particularly resonates with me. There were times when I was a child, that I would have given anything to move back to Canada

and become a ‘normal’ kid. I think my six-year-old self was always slightly envious of my friends and cousins who had the familiarity of the same home since birth or who had experienced their entire education with the same group of friends. I had become accustomed to unpacking and packing every two years, saying goodbye to friends, and making new ones. It’s almost funny that now that I’m back in Canada, I find myself daydreaming about getting on a plane and going somewhere else. I’ve learned an immense amount about the world and myself during my time spent abroad, but there is one lesson in particular that I’ve taken to heart: there are positive aspects to each situation, it is just a matter of taking the time to notice. If I were to spend my days imagining how other people live their lives, I would be missing out on the opportunity to fully appreciate my own. When I’m in Canada, I remind myself to take a moment to acknowledge what I am thankful for: the education I’m receiving, our liberal government and the freedoms it allows, my new friends at Queen’s, and the beautiful Canadian landscape. But when At the end of the day, I am beyond thankful that my parents I am moving to new made the brave decision to places, I shouldn’t leave everything behind and linger on what I am try something new. Had it not missing at home; been for their choice to fearI need to pause lessly embrace the unknown, I wouldn’t have become the and take the time person I am today, met the into fully appreciate credible people that are a part new adventures, of my life, or learned so much new people, differ- from my travels. It took this long ent cuisines, and to realize, but I know now that home is not a single location or ever y th ing else building. I’m lucky enough to that accompanies say that my home is the entire travelling. world. L I F E ST Y L E  7 


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P H O TO G R A P H Y BY M I K A E L A K R U S E

THE END OF SELECTIVE FEMINISM 8   L I F E ST Y L E


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By Alexa Bowie Group conformity is an extremely powerful thing. No one wants to deviate from the norm, especially at the risk of potential isolation from peers, family, or friends. This fear is deterring to the point that people often become capable of things they would never normally imagine themselves doing.

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ut, of course, would change ever be possible if everyone refused to deviate in the face of injustice? In the past decade, the world has seen increased attention and support surrounding social movements. Movements advocating for and empowering victims of sexual assault—which would’ve seemed unheard of even a few years ago—showcase the extent to which people have become open about discussing serious issues and bringing light to inequality in both small and large-scale platforms. Unfortunately, despite the obvious positive changes, the influence of the group remains an extraordinarily powerful force, and it severely hinders the progression towards a safe and equal society. Selective feminism is the act of supporting feminism only when it is favourable for an individual. My first personal experience encountering this peculiar phenomenon happened when someone in a mutual friend group of mine had committed multiple sexual assaults against some of the girls in the group. Much to my disbelief, rather than being subject to public condemnation, these assaults became a series of unspoken events, an elephant in the room that no one wanted to acknowledge. Some even ended up turning against each other, using classic statements of victim belittling: “Maybe you shouldn’t have gotten

so drunk” and, “Well, you sounded into it.” These poisonous phrases they once themselves criticized now seemed to flow through their lips like honey. This act of betrayal against their words and the innocent girls who fell victims to an assailant is what caused me to drastically reevaluate what it even meant to be a feminist. How can those who are outspoken about macro-level social issues and women’s rights also be the first ones to attack the victims and stand by the perpetuator? It made me question how quick we are to ignore the wrongdoings of those we associate with and the degree of power that a group has over one’s ability to remain true to their morals. Sure, it’s great that we can have progressive conversations and hold powerful beliefs, but what happens when someone we know behaves in a way that fundamentally contradicts them? When we read about a convicted rapist, we openly express our disgust in the person who committed such a heinous act; we show our remorse and empathize with the powerlessness of victims, taking a clear stance as to which side we support. So, why is it that people find themselves remaining silent in response to hearing about their friend taking advantage of a drunk girl from the bar? How do some openly identify as feminists, but

are surprisingly okay with remaining friends with a rapist? How can people support women’s rights and simultaneously choose not to express support for women of colour? Clearly, it is that persistent fear of isolation that drives people to conform to the popular opinion and to remain silent. The continuous advocacy of largescale social inequalities and choice to actively ignore the ones encountered at a personal level is selective feminism at its prime state. How do we begin to battle the hypocrisy that is selective feminism? If one thing is certain, it is that we must hold people accountable, irrespective of their relationship to us. Putting the responsibility into the hands of the individual puts pressure on them to make stronger moral decisions while motivating them to change their behaviours. But hypocrisy prevention doesn’t stop at policing each other; we must also be aware of how we may or may not be contributing to its existence. Preventing and acknowledging selective feminism in ourselves starts with critically evaluating our everyday thoughts and behaviours, and putting forth an effort to ensure that they align impeccably with our held moral beliefs.

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Let’s Talk about sex By Serene Nekoui

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ex, whether directly or indirectly, is explored in nearly every realm of our media. As a female, I frequently see the same narrative presented over and over: women portrayed through a very specific lens, created to fit the desires and fantasies of the opposite sex. Gender-normative sexuality prevails in various forms of media, including movies, magazines, music videos, video games, and so on. A predominant media outlet that is notorious for producing heteronormative content? Pornography, of course. With the rise of technology, porn has become more accessible, aiding its gradual integration into mainstream culture. As a result, criticisms regarding objectification and sexual violence in adult cinematography often arise. In her book, Pornland: How Porn Has Hijacked Our Sexuality, Gail Dines outlines the technological shifts that have made porn more accessible, causing its viewers to become desensitised and search for more violent and aggressive porn. Indeed, acts of aggression against women in porn have become a particularly recurring trend. In a recent study published in the journal Violence Against Women, researchers found that physical aggression was present in 88% of pornographic scenes. Women were found to almost always act as the targets of such aggression and were consistently shown to react with pleasure or impartiality, further feeding the notion that all women enjoy being dominated and demeaned during sex. With the increased mainstream prevalence of adult content, it is easy to blur the line that differentiates sex in real life from its pornographic portrayal. While porn itself does not inherently equal violence, it’s important to remember that it is hardly an accurate depiction of reality, and must be regarded as such. On the other hand, contesters of this viewpoint argue that violence against women as depicted in pornography is merely a portrayal of sexual fantasies. Sex therapist Dr. Marty Klein suggests that My critique of aspects of our media and popular culture pornography is a portrayal of our fantasies is not with the intent of ridding it altogether. The inabout power, pleasure, anger, and gender, creased normalization of porn creates a much-needed strung together in many forms of human opportunity for the de-stigmatization of sexual expressexual imagination. He argues that, while sion in everyday life. An ethical approach would involve some people may find areas of porn too sexu- diversifying the range of available porn and producing ally violent or demeaning towards women, content that isn’t created solely for the enjoyment of one they showcase scenarios in which acts and particular group. Doing so would allow pornography behaviour were created based on human to be enjoyed by anyone, regardless of their gender or imagination. In these scenarios, the power sexual preferences. Fortunately, as more women are dynamic exists solely in people’s sexual becoming involved in the production of pornography, female-directed projects leave less room for exploitative fantasies. Rather than viewing pornographic measures amongst workers and portrayal of gendered depictions of teasing, spanking, and physistereotypes in the bedroom. As popular culture continues cal aggression as violence, they should be to shift and grow, pornography is slowly embracing its regarded as women taking pride in their intended form—one that celebrates sexuality and pleasexuality and sexual pleasures in the same sure for everyone. way that male sexual pleasure is celebrated.

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P H O TO G R A P H Y BY L U C Y W E LS H C R E AT I V E D I R E C T I O N BY V I C TO R I A C H A N M A K E U P BY A P R I L C H R I ST I A N S E N C R E AT I V E ASS I STA N T K A R I N A R E B E L L ATO


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FASHION IS POLITICAL By Cassandra Littlewood

For a long time, fashion has been associated with personal expression, serving as a means to present one’s personality and interests to the world. However, fashion has not always received full credit for the ways in which it can express one’s political beliefs and intelligence. Protest and fashion have worked together for over a hundred years (at least!). Suffragettes wore hyper-feminine clothing to make the point that one did and should not have to wear typically masculine clothing to be perceived as a strong person. The Black Panther Party for Self Defence in the 60’s created a uniform for themselves—they made the black beret synonymous with their activism. For as long as Pride Month has continued, the LGBTQ+ community has expressed their cause by wearing different variations of the rainbow. More recently, female voters in the 2016 American Presidential Election wore pantsuits when they casted their vote for Hillary Clinton. The above examples illustrate how fashion has been employed to convey identity and political matters. However, using fashion as a form of protest is not always effective. So, when does it miss the mark? 16

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n any form of activism, it is important that all sides of the issue are considered before wearing a politically-charged garment. The Safety Pin movement following Donald Trump’s election was one that fell flat. Individuals wanted to mark themselves as an ally or “safe” to those in marginalized groups. While the original intent was sincere, being an ally calls for much more than putting on a pin. Fashion and politics work well together when the political protest is backed with action, thus producing a real impact in the lives of those being protested for. This is where the Safety Pin movement faltered—there was no real action, and many felt that it was a way displace guilty feelings. Fashion that is paired w it h r e a l-w orld action is what creates results. In the Black Lives Matter (BLM) protests, protestors of tent i mes wore black shirts adorned with the names of those who had been killed by acts of police brutality. These shirts have and continue to produce a greater support for the movement because they raise the names of those who were unjustly silenced. Personal style has also been deemed important to the movement, showcasing that no matter how people of colour choose to represent themselves, it is beautiful and worthy. As of late, casual style has also seen a great increase in t-shirts with political slogans. Brands ranging from high fashion—such as Dior’s “We Should All Be Feminists” shirt—to everyday wear—such as the slogan “Girls Support Girls”—can be found throughout the fashion world. However, this increase is dangerous as

the line between political movement and aesthetics becomes increasingly permeable. While many stores that sell shirts with feminist slogans send the proceeds to where it matters, many brands are only catching onto a “trend,” rendering the meaning of these slogans hollow. An example of this hollowing occurs when a consumer buys a “Girls Support Girls” shirt made in a sweatshop via child labour. By buying a shirt made in this way, the consumer is subscribing to selective feminism because they are not t r u ly supp or t i n g women from all walks of life. However, this does not mean that all shirts with feminist or political slogans should be shied away from; many companies succeed in selling political garments to empower individuals. Bulletin, located both online and in New York City, donates 10% of profits to Planned Parenthood N YC. They also host events where women can hear panelists discuss sexuality, relationships, and self-love. This creates an opportunity to build a community where female entrepreneurs can sell their wares. Fashion has never been just about the fabric. Fashion is and has always been about expression, whether of personality or politics. In terms of politics, fashion has the potential to start important conversations around timely political issues, serving as a visual representation of one’s beliefs. Though fashion may be an easy way to support a political standpoint, the actions beyond the garment are the ones that ring louder and farther than any piece of clothing can.

P H O TO G R A P H Y BY M O R GA N C H I N -Y E E

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MS. MARKLE’S CANADIAN WARDROBE By Jessica Cluett Some of you may recognize her as a supporting character from Suits, or as a model from Deal or No Deal. More recently, you would’ve heard her name in relation to the Royal Family, seeing as she’s engaged to Prince Harry. Whatever knowledge you have of her, Meghan Markle’s name has quickly become renowned in the world of entertainment. In addition to her involvement in the entertainment industry, Ms. Markle has also drawn attention to herself in the realm of fashion, particularly because of her fondness for Canadian labels. Since her engagement, Ms. Markle has attended various events as a member of the Royal Family. It is during these events that the media has noticed Ms. Markle’s tendency to wear Canadian labels.

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his past holiday season, Ms. Markle was spotted at the Royal Christmas Debut in a long, off-white coat by the label, Sentaler. Originating in Toronto, Sentaler has one retail boutique near Queen Street West—Toronto’s fashion district. The company has since titled the piece the “Meghan Coat” because of its association with Ms. Markle. Ms. Markle is not only increasing brand recognition, she is also being recognized for certain fashion styles. One of the most well-known examples of ‘look association’ is the fictional character Rachel Green (portrayed by Jennifer Aniston); Rachel Green’s hairstyle made her extremely recognizable and her distinct haircut is now coined the “Rachel Haircut.” Smythe is another Toronto fashion line worn by Ms. Markle; she was spotted in

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a casual black knit sweater by Smythe, which was worn layered under a leather jacket and a scarf. Ms. Markle’s choice to wear Canadian labels demonstrates her own passion to increase the global awareness of Canadian brands. She has also been spotted wearing the archetypal Canadian child’s winter boot: Kamik Siennas. The brand was founded in Contrecœur, Québec. If you grew up in Canada, your parents probably dragged you to a store to try these on. Her choice to wear these boots demonstrates that while she is busy jet-setting with the Royals, Ms. Markle has no reservations when it comes to embracing a modest, down-to-earth style. It comes as little surprise that Ms. Markle has decided to frequent these Canadian fashion labels, seeing as one of her good friends and personal

stylist, Jessica Mulroney (wife to Ben Mulroney) lives in Toronto—the city where Suits is often filmed. In terms of the influence Ms. Markle’s Canadianstyled wardrobe will have, it is hopeful that she will bring more recognition and popularity to the Canadian fashion industry. Each year, the Canadian Arts & Fashion Awards seeks to “celebrate outstanding achievement and emerging talent in the Canadian fashion industry” and to “foster the next generation of Canadian talent through an annual awards show and year-round economic development initiatives.” Therefore, one can suspect that successful fashion labels such as the ones mentioned in this article will not only be acknowledged by the CAFA council in the coming year, but internationally, too, thanks to none other than Meghan Markle.


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SLEEPWEAR OR STREETWEAR? By Tiasha Bhuiyan

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isten, I’m a pyjamas-after-5 p.m. kind of girl. If you show up at my door unannounced, I’ll be in pyjamas. If you catch me at Metro after 10 p.m., I’ll be in pyjamas. I also think some of my pyjamas are just too cute to be confined to my apartment. So, it goes without saying that when I started seeing more people incorporating sleepwear into their daily outfits, I was intrigued. Dressing up pyjamas to make them acceptable day-to-day wear is a trend that is taking over the fashion scene. Selena Gomez is just one of the many celebrities who has mastered the trend on multiple occasions. Gomez was spotted shopping in silk Olivia von Hale pyjamas dressed up in a black overcoat, heels, and red lipstick. Elle Fanning, Gigi Hadid, and even Rihanna have also braved the trend as well. Though we might not all have a celebrity budget to spend on sleepwear, much more affordable pyjama-style clothing is available in many generic retail stores. I came across a “pyjama-inspired romper” on Forever21’s site, and after some more searching, I found similar pieces at Missguided, ASOS, and Boohoo. Now, this isn’t athleisure in disguise, but rather full on, retro-style pyjamas that are not categorized into brands’ sleepwear sections. So, if you’re curious about trying this look, you could try some of these brands or just get a pair of PJ’s from any clothing store (even Walmart).

I know it’s a little out there, but I’ve come up with a few tips that work. The main point you’re trying to get across is “I woke up like this: flawless,” not “I just woke up.” For instance, heels dress up any outfit, so they can easily make your PJ outfit look more put together. Sleek-styled hair and statement makeup can also add flare and confidence. If you want to start off slow, wear a pyjama top as a blouse with tailored bottoms and leave the pyjama bottoms at home until you’re ready to go full out! A more obvious part of this trend includes slip dresses and camisoles. I remember one episode of Friends where Rachel met her date’s parents wearing her nightie—it was the most humiliating moment ever. She tried to brush it off as a fashion statement and jotted down, “USA, not ready” —well, they’re ready now! Recent changes in social attitudes promote women embracing their sexuality, allowing nightwear deemed scandalous in the 50’s-90’s to become acceptable wear in public … not to mention, it’s easy, cute, and comfortable. You can make this look as versatile as you want. For casual daywear, try layering a cami or short slip dress over a plain t-shirt or under a denim jacket. For a night out, the go-to has been black jeans and a cami, but try finding slips with lace or unique cut-outs to make a statement. You can even wear an elegant maxi slip in neutral tones for a more dressed up occasion. The next time someone judges you for wearing pyjamas at 3 p.m. on a Wednesday and assumes you’re having an earlylife crisis, just tell them to get with the times. It’s a comfort revolution, people. Embrace the jammies. FAS H I O N

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CA M R Y N + M E LO DY


P H O TO G R A P H Y BY ZO E Z I M M E R M A N C R E AT I V E D I R E C T I O N BY K A R I N A R E B E L L ATO

M A K E U P BY JASM I N E M O D U P E C R E AT I V E ASS I STA N T D O N AVA N W I L L I A M S


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RUNWAYS FAS H I O N

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By Sydney Williams

The relationship between fashion and film is one of history’s greatest love stories—a loyal bond that’s had its rocky patches, multiple fights, and tragic break-ups. But, through it all, this relationship has lasted over a century. What is it that makes the two so compatible?

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hhh, the Oscars, a night all movie buffs have circled on their calendars, awaiting to see what blockbusters have made it to the noteworthy platform. The build-up before the Academy Awards is thrilling and also quite nerve-wracking: suddenly, all of Hollywood is buzzing with whispers of who’s going to win best picture. Yet, another popular question also making its rounds is, “What will the celebrities be wearing?” The Red Carpet, capitalized for its important role in the overall ceremony, is where fashion and film first meet for the night. Gucci, Meryl Streep, and Quentin Tarantino all under one roof? It seems too good to be true, but this relationship is an age-old happening. Although often pitted against one another as two very distinct disciplines, fashion and film have created some of the most memorable moments, on both the runways and the screen. Do you remember the movie, The Seven Year Itch? Not ringing a bell? How about Marilyn Monroe’s halter neck dress blowing up around her legs as she stands over a subway grating? Ahhh, the image comes to mind almost right away. Tight-blonde curls, an alluring smile—and of course—one of the most iconic white gowns in history. Although we don’t remember the movie, we remember this particular image. This is just one of the many notable points in cinematic history where film and fashion clicked. It slowly became apparent that costumes are far more than just clothing—they are a robust cinematic

tool. Think of some of your favourite movie moments…Uma Thurman’s murderous rampage in Kill Bill (2003), the opening w indow-shopping sequence of Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961), and the closing amusement park scene of Grease (1978). All of these movies were amazing in their own right, but what made them iconic were the costumes their characters wore. Uma Thurman’s badass yellow motorcycle suit, Audrey Hepburn’s stunning Givenchy gown, and Sandy’s black spandex pants and red kitten heels are all outfits that have almost become larger than the films themselves—they are cultural icons in their own right. As movies are often influenced by our cultural atmosphere, costume design often influences fashion and vice versa. Diane Keaton’s appearance in the film Annie Hall (1997) is just one of those moments where costume design ignited a new fashion trend. The masculine look for women became a 70’s staple after Keaton sported the classic menswear combo throughout the film. This trend is apparent now with movies like The Man from U.N.C.L.E (2015) which launched around the same time that runways were stocked full of 60’s-inspired numbers. Stranger Things (2016), despite being a television show, launched its own clothing line under the UK brand Topshop. Fashion and film inspire each other more often than they’d like to admit. Although there is a profitable marketing aspect to this dynamic, the influence film has on fashion—and vice versa—does more to

bring the two disciplines together than it does to distinguish them as independent practices. Costumes have become more than clothing—they play a much bigger role in the plot of a movie than one might think. Just as Raf Simons curates an overall theme and feel for his collections, Sandy Powell takes on a similar approach when drafting the costumes for The Young Victoria (2009). Rather than simply being a hat or a blouse that’s chosen for someone to wear, costumes and clothing are now an integral part of how we understand the character as a whole. The ‘cutsie’ mini skirt and top combination that Buffy rocks informs us of her innocent high school identity, but is highly contrasted by the tight vinyl pants and leather jacket that transform her into the confident and ruthless Vampire Slayer. These costumes convey a story of their own, without any need for words. We put on clothes every day that— whether consciously or not—emit something specific about who we are. Clothes are almost like adopting an identity. Maybe we’re shy so we hide under turtlenecks, or perhaps we’re more on the bolder side and opt to wear bright colours and stripes. Something is already being said about us before we even have a chance to introduce ourselves, and that’s what both film and fashion do. They are a look into what cannot always be said and act as a mirror portraying identity in a beautifully-crafted way.   FAS H I O N  25 


SOPHIE Interview By Nick Scott

What inspired you to move to New York and pursue photography? 
 When I was at Queen’s, I found myself creatively frustrated. When you’re in your late teens and early twenties, you’re at a point where you are trying to figure out the kind of life you want to live. I spent a lot of time looking at magazines and online content, inspired by shoots and the opportunities photography could create. I had studied photography in high school and always loved it, but I never really considered it as a full-time career … that is until I found myself shooting a different headshot, band, or fashion shoot every weekend in Kingston. Once I decided on fashion photography, New York seemed the natural choice. The United States is definitely the land of opportunity, but it’s also the land of competition, especially in New York City. What makes New York stand out to me is that the opportunities are bigger and better than anywhere else. I’ve shot people and brands I’ve never thought possible, simply because New York is the place to be.


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What’s your favourite part about Fashion Week? 
 My favourite part about Fashion Week is the pace. Everything moves at lightning speed; you may only have 30 seconds to “get the shot.” You are forced to be extremely confidant and technically comfortable. There’s no room for error. One of my favourite Fashion Week experiences occurred Fall SS18. I was in a group of photographers who had access to the secret Oscar de la Renta show. We were all busy snapping streetstyle shots when all of a sudden a Cadillac Escalade pulls up and out steps Nicki Minaj, strutting her way into the show. How does the fashion scene in New York compare to that of Toronto? 
 I think the streetstyle scenes are very similar—there are cool people pushing the boundaries of dress everywhere. But when it comes to New York Fashion Week, nothing else compares. All of your favorite bloggers, stylists, photographers, and celebrities flock to New York. The stakes are so high because you never know who you’re going to see! Just yesterday I shot Whoopi Goldberg strolling out to the Chromat Show! How did your time with MUSE help you grow as an artist and photographer? 
 My time with MUSE was honestly the start of it all. Working as Head Photographer with the support of the most incredible creative team was essential for my growth as a photographer. It was through MUSE that I learned about the process of editorial shoots and how this process leads to great shots. My portfolio that I applied to Parsons with was largely made up of shoots that I did for MUSE. I actually brought in the magazines to my interview! What’s the most valuable advice you’ve received as a photographer? The most valuable advice I’ve received as a photographer (and as a person) is not to measure your worth on how busy you are or how busy others seem to be. Your worth is not determined by your productivity.

http://www.sophiebarkham.com/   FAS H I O N  27 


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THE PULL OF POLITICAL SATIRE By Lauren Morash

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t’s inevitable that most of us would rather lie back and watch our favourite sitcom than listen to politically-infused commentaries on recent news. Luckily, as political tensions have risen in recent years, we must find pleasure in noticing that satirical comedies’ standards have escalated alongside. Many television shows, stand-up comedians, and late-night talk show hosts use comedy to discuss political situations. Political satire has always been popular, but using comedy as a means of navigating turbulent political climates has taken off as of late. You’ve probably heard the saying “Don’t discuss politics in polite company.” Political issues tend to spark intense debate. However, the intersection between comedy and politics allows for a buffer, creating room for light-hearted discussion around otherwise sensitive topics. In this way, comedy is used to draw our attention to important dialogues. Good comics write jokes that force their listeners to reflect on what implications made the jokes so funny. Similarly, political humour turns pressing issues into more digestible pieces of information, provoking critical thought. Having a voice is one of the most important parts of addressing social injustice. For many, comedy is what provides this voice and allows common frustrations to be brought to public attention. Since the 2016 American election, comedy has increasingly dealt with the aftermath of the current presidency. Saturday Night Live and its various political impressions have played a huge role in using comedy to navigate this political time marked

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by controversy. SNL has produced some of the greatest impressions of politicians, the most well-known of which include Will Fer-rell’s George W. Bush and Tina Fey’s Sarah Palin. However, the last election had a significant in-fluence on the show’s political impressions and sketches, amusing audiences with Alec Baldwin’s Donald Trump and Kate McKinnon’s Hillary Clinton. What seemed to play a role in the success of these impressions was not only the physical and vocal rresemblances, but also the actors’ abilities to mockingly exaggerate some of the candidates’ most prominent quirks and characteristics. The tense climate of the election also played a major role in how influential SNL has been in the past year. Both the electoral campaigning and results seemed to further divide a nation that was already suffering from a conflict of identity. SNL allowed the aver- Satirical comedy brings age American to digest political issues to light the drastic changes that while creating a space for were taking place in people to laugh, and later reflect upon the reality of the country in a more the situation with a lighter relaxed and humorheart and more grounded ous manner. For a few perspective. As such, our hours each week, SNL current popular culture and was able to (and contin- news networks are teaching ues to) relieve the stress us that you don’t have to that has so promi- compromise your sense of nently characterized humour in order to remain the Trump presidency. politically aware.


P H O TO G R A P H Y BY M O R GA N C H I N -Y E E

I SS U E X V I

SPOTIFY KILLED THE RADIO STAR

I

By Sam Turnbull

am a child of radio. My parents have been in the communications business since before I was born. It’s how they met, in fact. I spent a good chunk of my childhood at the radio station. From voicing commercials to having my own little show, I was there as much as any kid could’ve been. I acted like my parents’ coworkers were my own, and I cared as much about ratings as everyone else did. I mean, I still do. Growing up, I’ve seen what technology has done to the music industry, and I’ve experienced first-hand the introduction of many new ways of listening to music. Because of my age, I’ve been around for almost every new thing. Only 90’s kids would understand, am I right? When satellite radio was introduced, the good old-fashioned local radio stations (like those where my parents work) took a hard hit. It was slow at first, but did some serious damage. My friends used to joke about what they heard my dad say on their way to school, but by the time I was in the ninth grade, all I heard about was what was on Sirius in the morning. The good thing for us (I say “us”

because I like to group myself with the radio station employees) is that the repetition of the same songs on every satellite station annoyed people, driving them back to regular radio, at least for a while. But because of the still rising popularity of satellite, the stations in small towns were constantly looking to remodel their shows to keep up. The pressure was on to be like the bigger cities. Announcers were being replaced constantly, all to keep up with whatever new demographic rolled around. Radio no longer offered a stable job, making it a surprise my dad lasted as long as he did. Unfortunately, satellite radio isn’t half the problem. The real issue lies in streaming and downloading music. Apps like Apple Music and Spotify are poisoning radio. They’ve completely changed the way everyone used to listen to music. When you get in the car, it’s “Pass me the aux.” When you’re at school, you’re listening on your phone. It’s everywhere, and it won’t be stopped. The appeal lies in the convenience. No commercials, no talking, and you listen to exactly what you want, whenever you want. Technology encourages fast, and radio can’t keep up. Even I only listen to the radio when I go home, half because I feel bad and half because my car there doesn’t have Bluetooth. This story isn’t going to have a happy ending. It isn’t supposed to. I can’t turn around and say, “Just kidding— I’m going to save everything!” Radio is not going to disappear overnight, but it’s going to happen soon. I could hope otherwise but let’s be realistic … society is moving forward and leaving radio behind. I guess I’m just going to have to learn to say goodbye to an old friend.   E N T E R TA I N M E N T   3 3 


P H O TO G R A P H Y BY J U L I E N R O G E R

ROCK AND ROLL IS THRIVING But The Elders Don’t Know It

By Jacqueline Resnik 34  E N T E R TA I N M E N T 


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usic in 2017 felt different, especially rock and roll. Hip-hop and rap were the most streamed genres of the year, which is why you didn’t hear rock and roll on the radio as much. It was as though the corporate music world wasn’t promoting anything when it came to the primitive, unchained, exciting sensation we know when we hear a really good rock and roll song. So, what happened to rock and roll? Firstly, the people who create rock and roll are no longer solely cis-gendered white men. The social awakening of 2017 has shown us that society is more inclined to listen to women, the non-binary, and people of colour. Granted, if you watched the Gram-my’s, it is clear that the elders of the music industry are not interested in recognizing gender and race equality. Every Grammy snub to Lorde, SZA, and Kesha communicates not only how the industry is out of touch, but also sexist. Historically, the music industry has overlooked women’s accomplishments and objectified them for profit. In December, Bono told Rolling Stone, “If the rock and roll revolution isn’t happening, we are going to start it.” I guess Bono didn’t know that meanwhile in New York, London, Los Angeles, and Toronto, rock and roll scenes were already thriving. Bands like Snail Mail, Dream Wife, Perfume Genius, HMTLD, Vagabon, Girli, The Big Moon, Downtown Boys,

Dilly Dally, Diet Cig, The Beaches, and so many more are reclaiming the raw sound we know and love as rock and roll. These musicians are challenging the status quo of the “rock and roll boys club” atmosphere. Although they are gaining coverage from media outlets such as Pitchfork, The New York Times, and Consequence of Sound, these musicians are not getting enough attention from the big budget music industry. Of course, we don’t need the music industry’s stamp of approval to recognize what is good and innovative music. However, it is frustrating that those within the industry get to decide what is canonized and remembered as classic. Canonical music embodies “the greats” and includes artists who are recognized for years after outliving their primes for their abilities to carry culturally significant insights and truths. This is why you feel obligated to think the Grateful Dead were legendary and buy their band tee at Urban Outfitters. Rock and roll’s canon is a white cis-gendered boys club. Women and people of colour are very clearly underrepresented. On Spotify’s Rock Classics playlist, the first bands listed are The Rolling Stones, The Animals, Guns N’ Roses, Creedence Clearwater Revival, and AC/DC. You have to scroll down quite a few times before reaching Fleetwood Mac’s “The Chain,” the only

classic rock band featured that includes female members. Rolling Stone’s 100 Best Albums of All Time list includes only seven albums by women. How could it be that 94% of the best albums of all time were created by male artists? The majority of bands listed have been canonized as great because they have made rock and roll seem like a carefree lifestyle unattainable to everyone, including women, non-binary people, and people of colour. Rock and roll’s narrative teaches us that women can’t make good rock and roll music. In December, a pub in Middleborough, England banned female fronted bands from playing because “regular customers won’t turn up if a woman is on stage.” Pitchfork recently posted a graphic on Instagram, reading, “The measure of any society is how it treats its women and girls.” I’d like to extend this quote to include non-binary people and people of colour. There is a sense of empowerment in supporting those who have been silenced in pop culture by the music canon. By streaming or buying their music and attending their shows, we can make steps to shift the canon. These are the steps required to show a new generation that anyone, regardless of gender, appearance, or background, can pick up a guitar and play great rock and roll music.

Bands Reclaiming Rock’s Narrative: Music From the Female Gaze Dream Wife•Punk Soccer Mommy•Soft Rock Daddy Issues• Grunge Pop Peach Kelly Pop•Rock Goat Girl•Rock The Orielles•Rock-Disco Pop

Out of Your Indie Rock Comfort Zone Perfume Genius•Rock n’ Pop HMLTD•Rock, Pop, Electronic DILLY DALLY•Punk, Grunge Japanese Breakfast•Rock

Political Commentary on Contemporary Society Downtown Boys•Rock n Punk Black Punk•Rap, Heavy Metal

A Party in Your Headphones Charly Bliss•Rock, Grunge Cherry Glazerr•Rock, Grunge The Big Moon•Indie Rock Girli•Rock n’ Pop Art School Jocks•Slacker Rock

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JACO B + A M PA I + I S A B E L L E


P H O TO G R A P H Y BY D U ST I N Z H A N G C R E AT I V E D I R E C T I O N BY O L I V I A JA N U S M A K E U P BY JASM I N E M O D U P E C R E AT I V E ASS I STA N C E BY K A R I N A R E B E L L ATO, V I C TO R I A C H A N , JA N E B R A D S H AW, A N D D O N AVA N W I L L I A M S


I SS U E X V I P H O TO G R A P H Y BY J E R E MY M A R AS I GA N

thank god for mod by Haley Sarfeld

A

21-year-old walks into a bar and watches her friends and classmates drink too much beer and dance all night. The punchline? Every song that the DJ plays sounds like it should be coming out of her mother’s kitchen radio. This delightful joke is played on me every Tuesday at The Brooklyn, and it’s called Mod Club.

Mod is a place of possibility. It’s a place where you can arrive alone knowing that, within the span of half a song, you’ll collide on the dance floor with a dozen familiar faces from around campus. It’s where you find out that the guy who sat next to you in first-year History knows the girl who printed your course notes at the P&CC yesterday, and that they both know all the words to “Twist and Shout” and want you to shake it up baby, now. The songs that play at Mod can be just as relevant to the twenty-somethings of 2018 as they were in their own time.

There’s nothing quite like dancing aggressively to “Build Me Up Buttercup” when your crush hasn’t texted you back or getting those last-minute FitBit steps in before midnight by stomping around The Brooklyn stage to “These Boots Are Made for Walkin.” I’m not out to hate on contemporary pop or partake in any sort of politically oblivious “born in the wrong era” milkshake-sipping, but the music at Mod is a refreshing change of pace from a lot of the party music that plays in the student district. DJ Emmett’s line-up of retro pop, 60’s soul, R&B, and rock and roll has a wholeheartedness that’s hard to find elsewhere. There’s an intense sincerity to even the unhappiest lyrics, and angst–oh, tainted love!–has its brightest, most energetic moments at Mod. The idea of expressing love and joy in a free, unironic way can be daunting to a bitterly sardonic millennial such as myself, but it’s hard to hold onto cynicism when I’m out dancing to such sincere music. At Mod, it’s easier to give

over to emotions, especially when it’s literally The Emotions who are singing “Best of My Love.” While drinking can certainly get people dancing, Mod is a lighthearted enough environment that you don’t have to be plastered to enjoy yourself, which can’t always be said for other clubbing experiences. The idea of a fight breaking out during Mod is laughable, and while other clubs are witnessing brawls in line, the bouncers at Mod are singing along to the music while patrons dance to warm their freezing feet. I went to Mod for sixteen consecutive weeks this summer, and although the start of the school year interrupted my regular groove, it’s still a highlight of my week when I find time to go dance my heart out. Even if I can only make it to the odd Mod these days, it makes me happy to know that something so joyful and lively happens in Kingston every Tuesday night.

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MU SE M AGA Z I NE

THE NOTORIOUS LGBTQ By Camryn McKay

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utcasts coming together to create a united community, free from the constraints and judgments of society—this is the foundation of the two cultural powerhouses that we know as the LGBTQ+ and Hip-Hop communities. Both were, and in some cases still are, collectives of those whose culture and identity were deemed invalid by the world. Similarly initiated through underground movements, hip-hop was hidden from plain sight in abandoned buildings to avoid backlash, while LBGTQ+ communities gathered in closed settings where they could be safe from hate-driven violence. Ironically, despite historical parallels, the relationship between the two communities has been nothing short of divided. Fortunately, the dynamic is beginning to change and it’s important to not only recognize the barriers that have been broken, but also those that still exist. 4 0  E N T E R TA I N M E N T 

Hip-Hop evolved from a collection of different mixes by pioneer MCs like Kool Herc and Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five into a platform for a new generation of hypermasculine content. Notable artists who popularized this style within the genre include Biggie and NWA. Although hip-hop’s primary catalysts were social consciousness and creativity, with the tidal wave of hypermasculinity that swept the hip-hop scene came an intolerance for anything that differed from a “real man.” This attitude clashed with the LGBTQ+ community whose own culture represented a divergence from the norm, contradicting hip-hop’s extreme dedication to binary gender roles. In response to this clash of the misfits came a mass increase of homophobic musical works and verbal rhetoric, along with normalization of hate crimes against the LBGTQ+ community. This response is once again ironic, as many artists use hip-hop as a medium to speak on the very issues that intersect with the struggles of the LGBTQ+ community including police brutality, racism, health epidemics, and socioeconomic marginalization. Although today we see a huge step forward from the days of the Beastie Boyz’s “Don’t Be a F*gg*t,” and A Tribe Called Quest’s homophobic “Georgie Porgie,” there still exists the controversial utilization of a culture created by the marginalized, to alienate another community still fighting for acceptance.

Despite a turbulent past, an increasing number of artists today with considerable social traction are coming out to be a part of the LGBTQ+ community. Artists like Tyler the Creator, Frank Ocean, members of BROCKHAMPTON, Kehlani, and Young Thug are breaking down barriers that previously excluded a mass demographic from active participation. W here do we go from here? Unfortunately, there is no definitive answer. To reach a point where people can express themselves as they please despite how they identify, we must show support for artists who continue to push the boundaries of the genre. By voicing acceptance of those deemed different, and by condemning those counteracting progress, one can only hope that hip-hop and the LGBTQ+ can intersect freely in the environment they both initially strived to create: a place for the marginalized to fit in.


I SS U E X V I Name: Vishmayaa Jeyamoorthy Year of Study: 4 Program: Stage and Screen Hometown: Toronto, ON

By Jaedie Sansom

Name: Naseem Loloie Year of Study: 4 Program: Stage and Screen Hometown: Mississauga, ON Name: Sam Woods Year of Study: 3 Program: Drama Hometown: Ottawa, ON

I PROMISE,

THEATRE’S NOT DEAD YET

Name: Madison Lymer Year of Study: 4 Program: Global Development (Drama Medial) Hometown: Kingston, ON Name: Jeff McGilton Year of Study: 4 Program: Drama Hometown: Pickering, ON

Name: Jacob Leonard Year of Study: 3 Program: Life Sciences Hometown: Oshawa, ON

Name: Blair MacMillan Year of Study: 4 Program: Drama Hometown: Toronto, ON ARTS

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MU SE M AGA Z I NE

When I tell people that I study drama, there’s usually a very particular look that I receive. Let’s call it a mixture of amusement and surprise. Amusement, because they’re most likely shuffling through my limited job prospects, and surprise, because they can’t believe people are actually still bothering to make theatre in this day and age. If you didn’t know, we are still making theatre in this day and age–even if it feels like a lot of people don’t really seem to care. Trust me–we’ve heard all the grievances: it’s expensive, it’s inconvenient, and “I’m just not that artsy.” Then why are we still at it? Maybe it’s time we explained ourselves. So, I decided to ask. I reached out to my friends, over a beer and over the phone, and I asked them about the state of theatre and what about it makes them tick. We’ve all got our own reasons, but here’s how it all went down, more or less.

What was the game changer for you when it came to theatre? Naseem: I saw We Will Rock You in Toronto. I was blown away because they’re right there! Madison: It was Devon (Jackson) and Mariah (Horner). They were the first people I saw that committed themselves to theatre as a way of life. They were artists that were so unashamed and certain. Blair: When I did The Snapping Back Ups (DSS A, 2014), I saw that you could put anything you wanted on stage, and what happens when you engage with an audience. They’re there, and they’re important. What is your favourite type of theatre to watch and create? Jacob: This might sound snobby, but 4 2  A R T S

I like anything if it’s good – well-told stories with good characters. I could watch Death of a Salesman over and over. Blair: I look for fearlessness in storytelling, whether that’s breaking expectations or barriers. It’s important to fail. Movies have no risk of failure. Jeff: Theatre that doesn’t take itself seriously. If something messes up, it’s okay. It’s acknowledging that these people on stage are flawed. They’re human. What about theatre inspires you to create? Jeff: I think that the theatre you make says a lot about you. It doesn’t just happen. So much goes into it from so many different people.


P H O TO G R A P H Y BY M I K A E L A K R U S E

I SS U E X V I

Blair: It’s the idea of connection. It’s why we have friends, lovers, and books. You become a part of something. It doesn’t always happen in theatre, but it’s what you’re aiming for. And it’s electric–that gap in between what you’re doing and what they see. Sam: I think part of being an angsty young person is that I have so much to say! I may not fully understand it yet, but theatre allows me to make those conclusions. It’s taught me how to be a more fluid person in the world. It’s the art that works with me as I grow as a person. Jacob: It’s the idea of creating something for someone else to watch. It doesn’t so much matter what type of impact it has, it’s just about what the audience takes away in a way that’s for them.

interested in theatre than before? Naseem: People’s idea of theatre is a bunch of fancy language they don’t understand. All the weird kids are the ones going into drama. Jeff: Audiences are changing and it’s honestly scary. We have this inability to connect with each other, and there’s less face-to-face interaction. Its breaking apart communities, and theatre–at its heart–is a community. Blair: It’s expensive and it’s not guaranteed to be good. We need to prove to audiences that the reason to attend theatre must match the financial cost of it. We need to prove to them that the connection within theatre is the reason. How do you see theatre changing and where do you think it needs to go?

Vishmayaa: We’re innovating more than before with more diverse people, and I don’t just mean racially. But we need to make more room at the table. Revolutions have always been grassroots. They come from really desperate people going far to see changes. We need to see a whole lot of people recognizing their power and demanding equality. I think they need to suck it up and do it. Sam: It needs to get more shocking and a lot shorter. We need to get more aggressive, messy, angry theatre. And when we do hit something real, I think we need to go with it. Blair: The world is a big, beautiful, crazy, annoying place and theatre is meant to look inward. It’s meant to reflect the world, not just in a hyper-realistic way but in an honest way. That’s why I’m doing it.

Why do you think people are less   A R T S  4 3 


ANTHONY + AUTUMN

P H O TO G R A P H Y BY J U L I E N R O G E R C R E AT I V E D I R E C T I O N BY D O N AVA N W I L L I A M S C R E AT I V E ASS I STA N C E BY K A R I N A R E B E L L ATO A N D O L I V I A JA N U S


MU SE M AGA Z I NE

Museums, Money, and How Much You Need To Get Into Them By Austin Henderson

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hink of the last time you visited a museum. Perhaps you saw the blockbuster Christian Dior exhibition at the Royal Ontario Museum over the winter break, witnessed Guillermo del Toro’s whimsical collections at the Art Gallery of Ontario, or just wanted to take a study break and admire the Agnes’s spring exhibitions. Do you remember having to shell out some cash or tap your debit card to get into these museums? In many cultural institutions, admission–especially to temporary exhibitions–is mandatory, but for others, you get a free pass. This issue hasn’t really been discussed until recently, when the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City announced that it would

charge a $25 admission fee for out-ofstate visitors, effective March 2018. The reasons behind the Met’s mandatory admission rate are just as abundant as the masterpieces in its collection. Last February, it was announced that the landmark museum was experiencing a $40 million deficit due to overspending throughout many of its departments. As a result, the Met laid off approximately 90 staff members and made cutbacks to a $600 million proposed expansion plan. As the home of the illustrious Met Gala, and with the title of the world’s secondmost-visited museum–surpassed only by a little-known Parisian gallery, the Louvre–such a deficit is almost impossible to comprehend.


I SS U E X V I

Historically, the Met has been lauded for its recommended donation offers ($25 for adults and $12 for students), as they recognized access for visitors of all financial capabilities. With the new implementation of a mandatory admission fee, I wanted to explore the question: How many museums are free, and how much am I willing to pay to get into them? It’s an important question you, too, should be asking yourself before you set foot in a museum. Before we dive into this complex topic, let’s break down the types of art museums that exist. First, you have public museums. These include the Mets, the AGOs, and the Louvres of the world. They can house collections of historical and contemporary art, and are chiefly supported by the government. Then, there are private galleries. A bit more exclusive, these museums thrive on selling the art that they display, and are usually owned by one person, family, or business. Examples include the Judd Foundation (owned by the family of artist Donald Judd), San Francisco’s Pier 24, and Mathaf: Arab Museum of Modern Art in Qatar. Although most of your museum visits will take place at public institutions, it’s nice to know what you’re stepping into, and what you may be paying for. So, which museums ask for admission and which don’t? It depends on the type of museum, and how much funding it receives. Provincial or state governments fund some museums, whereas others are funded federally or by other funding bodies, such as

arts councils. However, a government-funded museum can still ask for admission. This is up to how much funding it receives, and how it is distributed. The AGO, for example, charges $11 for full-time students and $21.50 for temporary exhibitions. Like many museums, these figures decrease significantly if you’re a member. Government-funded institutions that are known for not requiring admission fees include the Smithsonian museums in Washington DC, London’s National Gallery, the Art Gallery of New South Wales in Sydney, the Museo del Prado in Madrid, and many, many more. These world-class institutions hold some of the greatest artworks and artifacts in history, so it’s pretty astounding that you don’t need to pay a dime to see them in the flesh. There are reasons for this, though. A lot of cities– especially throughout Europe–place a higher emphasis on the visual arts than we do in Canada, and for fair reason. Simply put, it’s more engrained in their cultural h e r it a g e a n d economy, so many European nations r e c e i v e m or e funding to allow citizens and visitors to witness the definitive masterpieces of their past for free.

Although millions of dollars may fund these institutions to actively work to preserve, challenge, and reflect upon our heritage, we should always remember to give back what we receive, if we’re willing and able. Museums, no matter their size, invite donations in many forms. Donation boxes allow you to drop however much you wish upon entry or exit. You can also donate online, or better yet, through the purchase of a treat at the good ol’ gift shop–art museums have some of the best shopping around! We’re very lucky to live in a world where many museums allow us to lay our eyes upon history’s masterpieces without having to pay a dime. However, even though many museums are generous in this way, we should consider giving a little bit back to them, because they give so much back to us in education, inspiration, and pure enjoyment.

P H O TO G R A P H Y BY M O R GA N C H I N -Y E E

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MU SE M AGA Z I NE

THE ART OF SURVIVING CREATIVITY By June Barrage

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ou’re in art school? That’s so cool! Good for you! At least you’re studying what you love.” I can’t speak for everyone in art school or a similar creative program, but to be completely frank, art school almost obliterated my initial passion for creating art. Don’t get me wrong– it’s not all doom and gloom. Art school provides priceless insight into the processes of creating work that is, believe it or not, useful and applicable to everyday life. However, the pressures that come along with a Fine Arts degree–or any creative degree–can negatively affect your mental health. Let’s talk about the obvious factor–financial security. Maclean’s reported on a figure disclosed by the Council of Ontario Universities that Creative Arts graduates had the lowest average salary, earning $34,653 on average, compared to $49,469 overall. The title ‘artist’ has many labels attached to it, most of which are unfortunately negative. We are often perceived as ‘tortured souls’ or ‘social outcasts.’ This almost serves as a prophetic mission, because if successful artists like Van Gogh and Rothko were sad to their core, I therefore cannot be happy and successful. This mentality, paired with the pressure of creating art to achieve good grades, leads you to stop making art for yourself and start making it for others. The work you spent hours creating and getting lost in now seems like a chore. A creative outlet that makes you forget the world suddenly reconstructs into anxiety in the form of lines and brushstrokes. Throughout your journey, you reach a point of stagnation in which you become scared to create work because you are displeased with the outcome. Yet, you are so entrenched in it

that you have to see it through to completion. This is when your work can become disingenuous, causing you to question your own integrity. Insecurity seeps into your everyday life; you become unsure of yourself, and it shows in almost every aspect possible–personal relationships, work styles, your overall confidence–they’re all affected. This lack of authenticity is common for any creative program. Whether you’re a writer, a photographer, a filmmaker, or a fashion designer, you are exposing your innermost thoughts and feelings to criticism from anyone and everyone who views your work. You become a little biased and choose to compromise your individuality to cater to the general public. “I wonder what shade of red people will like more.” “What topic is current, trendy, and will get people talking?” “Am I a sell-out if I do this?” Have you ever written an essay on a topic that you were disinterested in? A topic you didn’t necessarily agree with, but proceeded to write on because it was due for class? Picture that, for the majority of your four-year undergraduate degree. Imagine having to convince your peers it is what you truly believe. In any creative work, you are taught to develop a personal style. Take, for example, my earlier reference to Van Gogh and Rothko. Whether you know anything about art or not, you can distinguish their paintings anywhere. Although style is an integral part of achieving


P H O TO G R A P H Y BY J E R E MY M A R AS I GA N

success in this field, it can also be detrimental to your work. In other words, you must make your work stand out. With this goal in mind, you put so much pressure on yourself to be different, instead of painting however you truly want to. This, too, leads to work that is inauthentic, and the people critiquing your work can tell almost instantly. The harshness of critiques can either motivate you to create better work or paralyze you into stagnation. The great part about all of this is that after a while, you grow thick skin. You destroy and create, destroy and create. This brand of confidence starts to become more present as time passes. You develop a process of renewal, meaning new ideas strike you so fast you have to write them down on napkins or receipts.

You are also never alone. You develop an incredible support system of colleagues and classmates that spend all this time together bouncing ideas off each other. You spend countless nights contemplating why the heck you’ve chosen to do what you’re doing. Again, I cannot speak for everyone, but my experience in a creative program was both taxing and fruitful. Creating something personal can be scary at first, but in due time, you learn to develop a process that you enjoy. The most valuable lesson you take away is to not care. When you near the end of your journey in a creative program, you start to disregard any humility, and you let your freak flag fly. It is in these moments that you truly discover your unique voice.

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GA B R I E L L A + PA U L A


I SS U E X V I P H O TO G R A P H Y BY J E R E MY M A R AS I GA N C R E AT I V E D R I E C T I O N BY JA N E B R A D S H AW M A K E U P BY A P R I L C H R I ST I A N S E N A N D C H A R LO T T E M C N A I R C R E AT I V E ASS I STA N C E BY K A R I N A R E B E L L ATO, V I C TO R I A C H A N , A N D D O N AVA N W I L L I A M S


MU SE M AGA Z I NE

THE POWER OF A PLAYLIST By Camryn McKay

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or nearly two years, any song that made me dance, my musical documentation. If someone were to ask me to laugh, or sing at the top of my lungs has been collected describe myself without words, I would send them the link through a series of monthly playlists and saved tracks. to my Spotify, as it has been one of the only constants in my What began as a nonchalant effort to organize my extensive life growing up. It’s been there through all the phases and and ridiculously varied music library, has ended up causing experiences that have shaped who I am today. unanticipated results. My music archive is somewhat of a vague and unintentional Nostalgia is something I have always experienced—randomly autobiography. If you scroll from the very bottom, you will of course—and is trignotice a lot of Punk music. This was a staple for my 14gered by the most obscure I Feel For You - Prince 4 Leaf Clover (feat. Steve Lacy) Ravyn Lenae, Steve Lacy year-old self who refused to things. Remembering Outstanding - Original 12” Mix - The Gap Band good times, especially listen to anything outside the SMUCKERS - Tyler, The Creator, Lil Wayne, Kanye West when a dose of apprelines of All Time Low or Panic Dedication To My Ex (Miss That) - Lloyd, André 3000 Caramelo Duro - Miguel, Kali Uchis ciation or happiness at the Disco. She wasn’t quite I’d Rather Be with You - Bootsy Collins is needed, is one of sure who she was, but decided Harem - Miguel the rare occurrences that black clothes and eyeliner Emily Oberg - Bourgeois Z Penelope - Col3trane in which I don’t mind seemed cool enough. Scroll up Swim - Towkio being bombarded with a bit further and you’ll probComputer Luv (feat. Steve Lacy) Ravyn Lenae, Steve Lacy emotions. By compilably stumble upon quite a bit Provider - Frank Ocean C U Girl - Steve Lacy ing these playlists over of 90’s R&B and rock. An odd Wanna Know - Idealism the months, I have combo, but paired with my 16Juice - CHISEKO, JCAL realized that nostalgia year-old angst and abundance Close Call - Marcellus Juvann Boofiness - 1010 Benja SL doesn’t always have to of band shirts, it felt right. Swim My Way - Remix - K.P. & Envyi be random, it can be I was once again in another How Was It? - High Sunn created. It’s a DIY sucker phase, a period of experimenFriend Zone - Thundercat Saw You In A Dream - The Japanese House punch of joy. tation, trying things in hopes Who’s Got You Singing Again - PREP This is the reason why that they’d click. Finally, if you Heir to the Sugar Honey Queen - Ehiorobo when I hear “Moonage scroll to the top, you’ll see who Paradise - Rex Orange Country Let Me Love You - Mario Daydream” by David I am right now, a combination Bloo - Zack Villere Bowie, that I’m taken of it all. Like my library, I’m a You Make Me Wanna… - Usher back to April 2017, the bit of a mess, but I’m somehow Creep - TLC Too Close - Next month I chose Queen’s still thriving. Back & Forth - Aaliyah over a gap-year. Or Although it’s easy to dismiss Just a Friend 2002 - Radio Edit - Mario why every time I hear music as a pastime or as someThere Goes My Baby - Usher Sweet Dreams - BORNS “Pyramids” by Frank thing to fill up the silence, I’m U Know What’s Up - Donell Jones, Ocean, I’m suddenly a believer that it can have a Girl Crush - Recorded - Harry Styles reliving his live perforgreater impact on our lives. mance in July of that same year. I knew that these songs made Not only can it bring back those feelings we wish we could me feel something as I initially listened to them, however, I experience all the time, but it can show us who we were, who didn’t know that they would make me feel once revisited. By we are, and maybe even who we could be. As I create my 21st manually linking music to a time period, it’s amazing how compilation for the month of January 2018, I realize that what a good song can become somewhat of a bookmark for your began as a mindless habit has taught me a valuable lesson: never underestimate the power of a playlist. favourite life chapters. Although incredible, nostalgia is not the only result of 56

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I SS U E X V I P H O TO G R A P H Y BY J U L I E N R O G E R

SOCIAL MEDIA KILLED THE SOCIAL LIFE By Lauchland Schuler-Lee

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peaking to the ever-expanding online community, essentially anyone you meet is bound to have one—if not an abundance of— social media accounts. There is an opportunity offered by these online platforms to build an identity for yourself, regardless of whether it rings true to your genuine character. In doing so, the act of socializing grows increasingly difficult and what once began as a way to stay connected, share, and interact within your social circle, has evolved into what is arguably doing the exact opposite. As the users of these platforms, we hold ties to a surplus of individuals, providing us with a window into their daily lives. Now, one’s tendency to overshare is made available to anyone who chooses to tune in while the intimate details of their lives become common knowledge. With the inclination people feel to recount their daily lives, there is little information left to learn in real life

interactions. This abundance of information makes for an excessive amount of knowledge on people we may have only had a single face-to-face interaction with. It’s become important to be mindful that much of the information being consumed is, more often than not, a depiction of an individual’s ideal self. Instagram and Snapchat act as highlight reels that make it hard to distinguish what is being documented for the sake of sharing from that which is merely adding layers to an online image. This expanding culture of oversharing has made real-life interactions plain uncomfortable. I’ve found that there is an observable shift in social cues. What once were innate mannerisms on what is appropriate to say or do are now replaced with phone checks to avoid lulls in conversation. Additionally, there’s a need to disentangle what we’ve seen online from what we’ve been told in person.

By fault, this creates an environment where we have adapted to act ignorant to the details we have full access to online. Information concerning what someone did for a birthday, what anniversary a couple just reached, or who went to a bar last night may not feel like information you technically should know when making small talk. Someone whose timeline you may know entirely may seem too socially distant to even say hello to in passing. We act according to the assumption that we’re in the dark about the details of others’ lives to avoid seeming like we’re keeping tabs on information available to us at any given moment. This new need to go along with polite re-introductions in order to ignore mutual and existent online interactions is stunting one’s understanding of who they’re surrounded by, and in turn, is making socializing increasingly superficial.

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P H O TO G R A P H Y BY L U C Y W E LS H

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THE PRICE OF A PU$$Y By Amy Tanaka It was one of your average Netflix and Chill evenings. We had Netflix, some excellent chilling, and I was teaching my now boyfriend the anatomy of a tampon.

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midst the lecture, he asked how much one of these “c on t r a p t i on s” cost. I answered, “Well you know depend i n g on the flow…” and that conversation quickly ended. But it got me thinking, how much did one cost? Without a good sale, I’d say the average box of 18 tampons costs five to six bucks. The average woman’s period lasts about five days. If you changed your tampon three times a day for five days, that’s 15 tampons (almost an entire box). So,

15 per month, 12 months a year, 180 tampons in packs of 18, 10 boxes a year for six bucks is an extra $60 out of my pocket to pay for the gift of a having a vagina. This sparked the inspiration for the article before you. Let’s get straight to the point because it’s expensive. For the last few weeks, I’ve been using my small talk opportunities to ask my peers about how much money they spend on themselves. I didn’t want to assume how much the average male student spends because honestly, how would I know? I also didn’t want to assume that every girl spends as much as I do on shoes or underwear or pads, so I tried to keep biases and stereotypes to a minimum. That, along with in-store observations,

guided most of my research to come up with fair price points and comparisons. Before I continue, I would like to make a disclaimer about the binary gender culture I seem to be exploiting in this article. I am very aware that not all women spend $60 or more on a haircut and that there are men that wear makeup. This piece is based on statistics and what I have gathered to be typical amongst Western society. Allocating funds and determining necessities may vary depending on one’s individual characteristics and priorities. Therefore, regardless of the segregated commercial market that surrounds us, these observations seem to be standard among my social circles and beyond.   M U S E ’ I N G S   59 


MU SE M AGA Z I NE

Category

Male Average Pricing

Female Average Pricing

Bras

N/A

• Bra: $40. 1 bra per day in a week = $280 • Sports Bra: $40. ~3 - 4 = $160

Swimwear

• $30 - $40

• $40 per piece (top and bottom often sold separately)

Haircuts

• $20 +

• $50 - $60+

Makeup

• $0 - $20

• ~$100

Birth Control

• Condoms = $12/12 Pack

*Without insurance (OHIP+) • Pill/3months = $75 • IUD/up to 5 years = $250 • Patch = $30/month • NuvaRing/month = up to $80 • PlanB = $40

Sanitary Products

N/A

• $60 - $100/year, depending on flow and sales

There are obviously some drastic differences in pricing, marketing, and necessity between men’s and women’s products. To start, girls have to buy an entirely separate piece of underwear for their upper half. Although “free the nipple” has increased the popularity of going braless, it remains a staple in many womens’ lives to strap into those pricey bosom prisons. Swimwear is often marketed so we can “mix and match,” when really, we’re just paying twice as much for a two-piece set that is pretty useless without the other half. The haircut price difference is often the most drastic and it’s argued that women’s haircuts are more expensive because they have more hair. But what about the women with short hair that still have to pay “long hair prices?” Makeup is pretty subjective. Some

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women like a lot, some not so much … but nearly all advertisements are marketed for women so, naturally, we’re expected to buy it. And finally, our everyday means to prevent pregnant-ness. Shout out to OHIP+ for covering these prescriptions for us, but for women older than 25, or for those not living in Ontario, these costs add up. We’re just out here trying to keep our hair trimmed, boobs in place, and uteruses empty, is that too much to ask? The point is, women are constantly told how to act, dress, present themselves, protect themselves—and evidently— spend their money. Society has told us to have long hair, be hairless, have clear skin, perky breasts, and so much more that it’s no surprise we’re willing to keep dropping money on vanity. Aside

from the physical costs of womanhood, there is the figurative cost of misogyny, sexual harassment, and the wage gap that keeps us mentally “in our place.” I walk home at night with my keys in my fist and one headphone out because that’s how girls are taught to think. I have been mansplained to more times than I can count and I’m well aware that only 8% of companies worldwide (with revenues over $500 million each) have CEOs that are women. It’s no contest. Men have a clear advantage, right? But despite these prices, degradation, and statistics, women are still less likely to commit suicide, sexual assault, or murder. Even with the odds stacked against us, women are still the happier sex. So, I guess that’s the power of the pu$$y.


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KEKHWÍHSRONS AKATATYENTÉRHA’NE’ NE ONKWEHONWÈ:THSERA AKWÁ:WENK By Lauren Archer and Hannah Tosello Claiming ancestry as one of the first people on this land perpetuates a sort of authenticity or symbolic status that many people seem to wish they had for themselves. In many cases, these people have tried to erase the history of the first to claim establishment for themselves. But what does it mean for Indigenous people to actually claim their own Indigenous identity? Unfortunately, it is often complicated and involves a fair bit of paperwork and cooperation with the government if one wants their status officially recognized. However, there is also a more self-reflective side to claiming one’s own identity that requires a deeply rooted understanding of what it means to be Indigenous. This self-evaluation becomes increasingly difficult when the individual is only partially Indigenous, with a mixed “white” heritage. This has been the case for our family for over three generations.

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t 13 y e a r s old, ou r great-great-grandfather was labeled a fugitive for running away from an abusive and oppressive school. As a teenager, our great-grandmother contracted tuberculosis due to the placement of both healthy and sick children together in the residential school system. As a child as young as six, our Dotah* was told he was a savage by the nuns in school because of his mother’s ancestry. These are just a few examples of the racism and oppression Indigenous people in Canada have faced for centuries. While we claim to no longer uphold these systems, they have undoubtedly had an intergenerational effect on Indigenous peoples, cultures, and languages across Canada. Our own family lost four languages, land rights, and countless traditions to the “Kill the Indian, save the man” mentality behind these systems. Our great-grandmother, Sadie, forbade her father from speaking to the children in his native tongue out of a fear evoked by her time in school. Unsurprisingly, this is a fact that her children resent. We often question how and if our lives would be different if our culture and family history hadn’t been systematically erased under the supervision of the Canadian government. Would any of the languages that our great-great-grandfather, Albert, spoke have made their way down to

us? Would we celebrate our holidays differently? Would we be more in touch with our Indigenous history more generally? Perhaps not with three generations of European marriages, but then again, if this were not the case, we would not be here. Sadie married Harry Dignan, a Scottish Catholic, after being told—and believing—that to be an “Indian” was to be a savage, and that the cultural practices of her ancestors were inherently wrong. She became enfranchised under the Indian Act upon her marriage to Harry because as an “Indian” woman marrying a “white” man, she lost her status and rights to live on reserve land. This was not amended until 1985 under Bill C-31. This enfranchisement also extended to any and all children born within the confines of that marriage, meaning our grandparents would not be able to legally claim their Indigenous ancestry for another 40 years. It is also relevant now to mention that despite the struggle to claim their ancestry, our grandparents and parents have now been recognized. However, the both of us have been denied. It is important to note that neither of us see government-recognized status or living on reserve territory as the key to identifying with one’s own Indigenous heritage. That being said, we do recognize that both past and present provisions surrounding status and

the Indian Act as a whole have played a large role in the degradation and loss of culture in our family and many others across Canada. As young women who appear to have a very “white” European background, which isn’t untrue, we have never come face-to-face with the discrimination that so many Indigenous people encounter all too often. We are separated by three generations of European marriages that have afforded us this privilege. However, generational separation and the lack of any tangible link to this part of our history have never hindered our interest and desire to connect with it. We are passionate about our Indigenous ancestry and have a strong desire to be involved with Indigenous communities, activism, and education. Nonetheless, we also struggle to identify with the overarching discrimination that surrounds so many Indigenous communities despite modern attempts to right the wrongs of the past. We feel it is our responsibility to address and raise awareness about the systemic racism and oppression of Indigenous peoples in Canada and to work towards complete reconciliation. We are not forgetting the past, but striving for a better future. *Dotah is a term that roughly translates to “wise elder” and has, in our family, been used to refer to a grandparent.   M U S E ’ I N G S  61 


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P H O TO G R A P H Y BY J E R E MY M A R AS I GA N

By Aiishwariya Haran

UNDER

MY

SKIN

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The concept of being beautiful has always been difficult for me. Growing up, all I could see was the colour of my skin. Dark. Not beautiful … just dark. Surrounded by fairskinned children, I was an anomaly.

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utside of school, I was bombarded with images of women in the media—beautiful women who looked nothing like me. I made collages of my favourite celebrities, idolizing their beauty and wishing I could look like them. Golden hair, bright coloured eyes, rose lips—I wanted nothing more than to be somebody other than myself. As I grew older, I told myself that I didn’t care. But the hatred of my skin, and ultimately myself, manifested through the rejection of my culture. I was ashamed to wear South Asian clothes in public, frustrated with the Sri Lankan food in my household, and embarrassed by the classical Indian dance classes my parents had enrolled me in. Why couldn’t I just be normal like everyone else? Why did I have to be the different one? I once asked my older brother if he had ever felt the same way as I did growing up, if he had ever felt like he was different or not good enough. He hadn’t. He had never felt the pressure to conform to a certain ideal. Nobody had ever made Indian jokes about him in middle school or made him cry in class. Prepubescent boys hadn’t told him how brown people smelled like curry, or how his family worshipped goats. Nobody had ever compared his thick, black, curly hair to pubes, or stated that he was a terrorist. Of course, these statements were all “jokes” and, to be fair, I probably laughed the first few times I heard them. When you laugh along you can almost pretend it’s not offensive; people aren’t laughing at you, but with you. But, after a while, it gets harder to pretend and it’s no longer funny. People often say things without fully understanding the implications of their words. They don’t realize that little careless comments or gestures can change the way someone views themselves, their beauty, or their self-worth. “You’re really pretty for a brown girl.” I’ve heard it many times. The compliment that’s not really a compliment. Every time, it’s said with the best intentions, and every time, it gets a little bit more painful. I’m attractive. For a brown girl. For a Sri Lankan girl. For a Tamil girl. But not for a regular girl? The colour

of my skin separates me from everyone else. I’m in my own category and I don’t qualify for the overall round. The first time I heard that sentence, I was flattered. But as I grew older, the connotations sunk in and I fully understood what it meant. When they say that I’m “really pretty for a brown girl,” it means that my heritage, my culture, my race is not typically beautiful. I’m an exception, and I should feel flattered because someone has decided that I am lucky enough to be attractive for a brown girl. Don’t get me wrong, I know that I am attractive. Beautiful even, as vain as that may sound. I won’t pretend that I haven’t looked in a mirror and I won’t pretend that I have not been validated. But knowing something is not the same as believing something. Society has taught me that dark is not beautiful, just like it has taught others that dark is not beautiful. As a woman, the media has taught me that my happiness and self-worth is contingent on my physical beauty. And I know that I am not alone. My experiences are shared by so many others struggling to love themselves—relegated to the colour of their skin, regardless of the colour of their skin. The desire to write this piece came to me at a point in my life where I was struggling to equate who I knew myself to be with who I thought I was. Standing at a crossroad—at the end of my undergraduate studies but the beginning stages of my future, I reflected on the past twenty years of my life through my law school applications. I spoke about my experiences as an ethnic minority growing up in a predominantly Caucasian upper-middle class neighbourhood. I attributed my successes and relationships with others to my ability to understand and appreciate different perspectives and outlooks on life. But the contradictions within myself were glaringly obvious. How could I perceive myself as a confident and sociable individual when I knew that I possessed so much self-doubt and dislike for most aspects of myself?

“You’re pretty for a Brown girl.” “You’re pretty for a Middle Eastern girl.” “You’re pretty for an Asian girl.” “You’re pretty for a Black girl.” That’s just it. You’re pretty, but never pretty enough.   M U S E ’ I N G S  6 3 


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MUSE MAGAZINE AT QUEEN’S

DIRECTORS

Editor-In-Chief Amy Yu

Creative Director Karina Rebellato Business Director Greg Radisic Online Director Anna Julia Stainsby Head of Photography Zoe Zimmerman Head of Editorial Lauren Backa Head of Marketing Lucie Quinlan Head of Layout Allie Kustec

EDITORIAL

Lifestyle Editor Varya Genkin Fashion Editor Nick Scott Entertainment Editor Samantha Fink Arts Editor Austin Henderson MUSE’ings Editor Amy Tanaka

C R E AT I V E Assistants Victoria Chan Olivia Janus Interns Jane Bradshaw Donavan Williams

PHOTOGRAPHY Lucy Welsh Mikaela Kruse Morgan Chin-Yee Julien Roger Dustin Zhang Jeremy Marasigan

MARKETING Kate Waslen Abby Stewart Ryleigh Ebron Camryn Mckay

FINANCE

Head of Finance Gabi Tremblay

SPONSORSHIP

Head of Sponsorship Tessa Latowsky Regional Ad Sales Coordinator Alex Blair Sponsorship Coordinator Leora Owsiany Sabrina Park

EVENTS

Head of Events Anna McAlpine Events Coordinators Katie Douglas Alex Chapleau Brodie Latimer Georgie Philpotts

L AYO U T Bonnie Wang Joe Palubiski Ryan Johnston Ally Kerkhoff Graphic Designer Victoria Horne

ONLINE

Music Editors Sam Gillon Sydney Williams Contributors Sam Turnbull Cassandra Littlewood Sam King Catherine MacKinnon Alexandra Cook Alex Strachan Maja Tomic Julie Ngu Nate Hobbs Kate Farrell Maggie Whitmore Thalia Tavares Lauren Chambers Serene Nekoui Tiasha Bhuiyan

VIDEOGRAPHERS Jing Wong Masha Nazina Natasha Uhrig

FROSH REPS Nicole Rodger Erin Macintosh Jenna Latowsky

MAKEUP Charlotte McNair April Christiansen Jasmine Modupe    6 5 


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IMAGE CREDITS [Photo of Frank Ocean]. (18, February 15). Retrieved March 11, 18, from https://nylon.com/ articles/frank-ocean-moon-river-song [Golf Wang autumn/winter 2015 lookbook]. (15, December 9). Retrieved March 11, 18, from https://i-d.vice.com/en_uk/article/ evxpbw/tyler-the-creator-made-this-bizarre-lookbook [Kevin Abstract]. (17, March 24). Retrieved March 11, 2018, from https://www.wonderlandmagazine.com/2017/03/24/kevin-abstract/ [Celebrities Are Rocking Pajamas as Streetwear]. (17, October 19). Retrieved March 11, 18, from https://www.usmagazine.com/ stylish/pictures/celebrities-are-wearing-pajamas-as-streetwear-photos-w497608/ kirsten-dunst/ Racco, Marilisa. “Meghan Markle Lends More Support to Canadian Fashion in a Mackage Coat.” Global News, 1 Dec. 2017, www.globalnews.ca/news/3891298/meghan-markle-canadian-fashion-mackage/. “Meghan Markle Style: Every Outfit From 2017.” Us Weekly, 7 Feb. 2018, www.usmagazine.com/stylish/pictures/meghan-marklestyle-every-outfit-from-2017/tk-8-55/. Griffiths, Josie. “Meet Meghan Markle’s Best Friend, Bridal Stylist Jessica Mulroney.” The Sun, 29 Jan. 2018, www.thesun.co.uk/ fabulous/5450951/jessica-mulroney-who-canadian-stylist-meghan-markle-dream-wedding-dress/.


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Muse Magazine Issue XVI  
Muse Magazine Issue XVI  
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