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magazine

Est. /  2011 Issue  /  No.1 Autumn  /  2011

Editorial Office Editor  in  Chief  /  Andrea  Blanch Editorial  Director  /  Ellen  Schweber Creative  Director  /  Marsin  Mogielski   Design  Director  / Alessandro  Sisto   Production  Manager  /  Lauren  Wylie Consultant  /  Beatrice  Dupierre

Contributors Anthony Goicolea  /  Sara  Greenberger  Rafferty

Writers Dmitry Kiper  /  Diane  Echer


EDITOR’S PAGE

y entry  in  to  the  world  of  fashion  photography  was rarified  and  magical.  And  much  of  it  started  out  of  mere coincidence  through  house  sitting  for  a  friend  at  the  right  place  and the  right  time.  Although  I  was  a  painter,  I  had  never  picked  up  a camera  before,  and  never  had  any  aspirations  to  do  so.  But  it  just  so happened  this  house  I  was  in  was  being  used  by  Richard  Avedon for  a  photo  shoot.  As  I  watched  him  work  I  knew  instantly  that  this is  what  I  wanted  to  do  for  the  rest  of  my  life.  From  there  I  began  as Avedon’s  unpaid  “trainee”,  he  then  became  my  mentor  after which;;  American  Vogue  became  my  first  client. Musée  will  evolve  with  each  continuing  issue  and  will  include  interviews  and  profiles  with  guest photographers,  artists,  writers,  collectors,  and  gallerists.  Guest  curators  will  lend  their  expertise  to selecting  the  photographers  and  their  photographs.  There  will  be  works  of  fiction  inspired  by  the photograph  in  the  issue,  also  created  by  emerging  writers.  Unlike  our  inaugural  issue,  in  which  the artists  could  submit  work  on  any  subject  matter,  our  subsequent  issues  will  theme  inspired. It  is  incredibly  important  for  Musée  to  have  broad  appeal  and  community  support  the  more  exposure we  give  emergent  photographers  who  wouldn’t  necessarily  have  a  platform  to  display  their  work. In  our  premiere  issue  guest  artists  Anthony  Goicolea  and  Sarah  Greenberger  Rafferty  are  featured along  with  their  work.  Diane  Echer,  an  emerging  writer  inspired  by  Tucker  Friend’s  photograph  wrote a  work  of  fiction.  And  finally  there  is  Dmytri  Kipper’s  interview  of  Ann  Schaffer,  art  consultant, collector,  curator,  and  board  member  which  provides  Ann’s  advice  and  experiences  as  a  collector. I  am  pleased  to  welcome  Ellen  Schweber  as  Musée’s  Editorial  Director.  Her  contribution  and collaboration  has  been  invaluable  in  making  this  issue  as  diverse  and  interesting  as  it  is.  Being  an  art consultant  and  collector  Ellen’s  knowledge  and  scope  of  emerging  art  is  comprehensive.  Her  unerring eye  and  intuition  in  spotting  new  talent  is  uncanny.  We  are  lucky  to  have  her!  I  am  pleased  to  introduce  to  you  the  first  issue  of  Musée  Magazine,  and  hope  you  enjoy  the  incredible work  our  artists  have  created.  The  magazine  is  released  quarterly,  and  the    ART  OUT  section  is  updated on  a  need  to  know  basis,  so  keep  checking  in!

ANDREA BLANCH,  Editor  in  Chief ab@museemagazine.com

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Thanks to Joseph  Baldassare  /  Tim  Girvin    /  Francis  Grill  /  Ann  Schaffer John  Buck  /  André  Acimin Victor  Chen    /  Cassandra  Walsh   Rachel  Uffner  Gallery  /  Postmasters  Gallery                        Mazdack  Rassi  /  VicenteWolf

Special thanks  to  Cory  Scott  Alter Website    www.museemagazine.com Email    musee@museemagazine.com   Facebook    facebook.com/MuseeMagazine Twitter    twitter.com/MuseeMagazine Tumblr    museemagazine.tumblr.com

Cover by  Anthony  Goicolea ©  2011  Musée  Magazine Reproduction  without  permission  is  prohibited


magazine

Andrea Blanch

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Special Thanks

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Editors Letter

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ANTHONY GOICOLEA,  Artist.   Exploring  youth  homoeroticism  identiy

Dmitry Kiper

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Emerging Photographers  Part  I Joseph  Campbell,  Genevieve  Blais  and  Natalie  Poette

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SARAH GREENBERGER  RAFFERTY,  Artist.   Fascinating  and  unsettling  photographs  that  hit  and  startle   the  viewer  

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Emerging Photographers  Part  II   Matt  Monath,  Rachel  Monosov  and  Mackenzie  Gomez

Diane Echer

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Fiction. “Sniper”   Emerging  Photographers  Part  III Guenter  Knopp,  Tucker  Friend  and  Chris  Harris

Andrea Blanch

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ANN SCHAFFER,  Art  Collector.  

25 years  of  collecting  cutting  edge  art  

ART OUT.   Gallery  and  exhibition  openings  around  New  York

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Index

www.museemagazine.com                                                                                             3


Anthony Goicolea Photographed by   Andrea  Blanch

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magazine

MUSEE /  Interviews  /  Anthony  Goicolea Although  Anthony  Goicolea  is  perhaps  best  known  for  photographs  that  explore  the  concepts  of  youth,   homo-­eroticism,  and  identity,  in  which  he  serves  as  his  own  model,  he  has  also  deeply  investigated  such  themes  as   displacement,  environmental  destruction,  and  the  human  obsession  with  shaping  nature  to  fit  our  needs.   Whenever  Goicolea  does  serve  as  his  own  model,  he  plays  multiple  characters  -­-­  wearing  different  wigs,  outfits,   facial  expressions  -­-­  who  sometimes  all  appear  in  the  same  photograph.  The  mood  those  photos  give  off  can   be  eerie  and  playful,  a  strange  mix  of  A  Clockwork  Orange  and  Kids  in  the  Hall.  Whereas  Goicolea's  carefully   staged  black-­and-­white  and  color  photos  of  nature  explore  various  scenarios  -­-­  all  digitally  composed  -­-­  in  which   the  city,  in  one  way  or  another,  creeps  into  the  forest. For  the  past  15  years,  Goicolea  has  skillfully  been  using  digital  manipulation  in  a  way  that  does  not  call  attention   to  itself;;  rather,  it  reflects  his  aesthetic  and  conceptual  vision  -­-­  whether  it  is  psychological  or  ecological.   A  retrospective  of  his  work,  titled  “Alter  Ego,”  is  now  at  the  North  Carolina  Museum  of  Art,  in  Raleigh.  Beside   photographs,  it  also  features  his  paintings,  video,  and  mixed-­media  installations.  His  art  has  also  been  featured  in   many  prominent  museums  and  galleries,  including  the  Whitney  Museum  of  American  Art  and  The  Guggenheim   Museum  of  Art.   Goicolea  lives  and  works  in  New  York  City. By  Dmitry  Kiper

Q: Is  procrastination  a  friend  or  an  enemy? A:  I  guess  it’s  a  “frenemy.”  I  feel  like  I  shoot  myself  in  the  foot  sometimes  because  I  don’t  leave  myself  enough  time.   A  lot  of  times  that  pressure  keeps  me  from  being  too  precious—so  then  I  am  forced  to  take  risks  that   maybe  I  wouldn’t  normally  take. Q:  Do  you  listen  to  others  opinions  or  criticizm? A:  I  think  I  would  ask  them  what  it  is  they  don’t  like  about  it,  if  I  actually  cared  about  their  opinion  .  .  .  I  think  when   you  are  working  and  you  have  something  in  mind  and  that’s  not  coming  across,  somebody  says,   “Oh  I  didn’t  get  that  at  all  from  this,”  you  need  to  figure  out  what  it  is  that  you  are  doing  that  is  not  communicating   what  it  is  that  you  want  to  communicate. Q:  Are  you  saying  that  you  care  more  about  the  communication  of  your  work  than  you  do  about  the  asthetic? A:  They  are  both  integral  to  me.  I  wouldn’t  weigh  one  more  than  the  other.    But  let’s  say  somebody  said  that  they   didn’t  like  it  because  they  didn’t  like  the  way  that  it  looked,  but  my  intention  was  to  make  it  look  like  that;;  well  then,   fine,  that’s  just  their  own  opinion  .  .  .  If  they  are  pointing  out  something  that  I  was  trying  to  do  and  did  it   unsuccessfully,  and  they  are  recommending  a  better  way  to  do  it  ,  then  yeah  I  will  listen  to  them  and  sort  of  take   that  in  to  account  the  next  time  around.

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MUSEE /  Interviews  /  Anthony  Goicolea

Q: Would  you  recommend  grad  school  for  people?   A:  The  advantages  are  that  you  get  a  concentrated  amount  of  time  to  work  on  things  in  a  very  focused  way.   The  disadvantage  is  the  cost  (laughs).  It  just  is  exorbitant,  and  sometimes  I  wonder  if  it  is  not  more  beneficial   to  take  the  40  or  50  thousand  dollars  that  grad  school  costs  and  give  yourself  some  time  off    or  do  an  artist  residency   or  something.    I  think  residencies  are  an  excellent  way  to  get  around  it,  and  so  I  don’t  think  it  is  necessarily   crucial  but  it  does  offer  you  this  really  condensed  concentrated  period  in  which  you  get  to  work.  There  are  some   programs,  like  the  Bart  Graduate  program,  that  seem  like  a  nice  halfway  step  where  it’s  just  in  the  summer  it’s  really   concentrated  for  about  two  months  and  the  tuition  is  not  as  expensive  and  then  you  have  the  rest  of  the  year  to  work   on  your  work. Q:  What  do  you  think  is  the  smartest  thing  you  have  ever  done  for  your  career? A:  I  guess  take  it  seriously,  because  initially  when  I  first  started  working  I  didn’t  really  treat  it  like  a  job,  and  I  think   once  I  stated  treating  it  like  a  job,  that’s  when  other  people  started  taking  me  seriously  and  things  started  to  happen. The  not  taking  it  seriously  part  didn’t  last  too  long.  I  got  out  of  school  and  there  was  a  year  where  I  was  just  sort   of  flopping  around  doing  whatever.  It  wasn’t  a  mistake—just  sort  of  a  learning  curve. Q:  Who  has  been  the  most  helpful  to  you  in  your  career? A:  My  friends.  I  have  a  group  of  friends,  and  we  have  like  a  crit  group  and  they  all  work  in  very  diverse  ways:   there’s  a  sculptor,  there’s  another  photographer,  there’s  a  painter.  We  all  approach  it  with  the  idea  of  what   it  is  that  you  want  to  communicate  and  kind  of  bringing  sort  of  an  outside  eye  into  things.  I  really  trust  their  opinion. Q:  What  would  you  say  your  worst  mistake  has  been  in  your  career,  if  there  is  one? A:  In  a  way  there  are  no  mistakes,  because  you  learn  from  everything;;  so  I  guess  I  don’t  have  anything  that   I  would  actually  pin  point. Q:  Are  there  any  collections,  museums,  or  galleries  you  aspire  to  be  in? A:  The  minute  you  complete  one  goal,  there’s  another  goal  that  is  on  the  horizon.  I’m  sure  that  people  who  get  the   McArthur  Foundation  Genius  grant  or  who  have  a  solo  show  at  the  Whitney  or  MoMA,  it’s  not  like  that’s  it  and   there  is  nothing  left  to  aspire  to. Q:  What’s  one  of  the  things  you  aspire  to? A:  I  would  love  to  have  a  solo  museum  show  in  the  northeast.  I  have  one  going  on  right  now  in  the  south.   It  would  be  nice  to  have  one  where  I  live. Q:  So  besides  time,  what  do  you  think  gets  you  started:  inspiration  or  fear? A:  It’s  usually  inspiration.  I  enjoy  the  idea  of  a  challenge  and  learning  how  to  do  something  and  trying  to  figure  it  out;;   that  I  think  is  a  motivational  factor.  But  I  don’t  feel  like  I  have  the  luxury  of  having  fear  because  I’m  usually  a  little   bit  over  scheduled.  I  can’t  think  about  being  scared. Q:  You  don’t  think  any  of  your  work  in  particular  comes  from  any  of  your  fears? A:  Sure  I  think  there  are  things  in  my  work  asthetically  that  I  find  uncomfortable  in  real  life.  The  idea  of  chaos  and   disorder  and  things  being  really  cluttered  and  falling  apart  and  this  idea  of    loss  or  transition  and  things  being   dislocated;;  those  are  all  things  that  make  me  really  uncomfortable  in  real  life.  I  don’t  want  to  experience  them,   but  somehow  I  gravitated  towards  representing  that  in  my  work.

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MUSEE /  Interviews  /  Anthony  Goicolea

Q: Your  early  work  was  about  more  of  a  performance.  How  has  it  evolved? A:  I  think  I  just  naturally  change  my  work.  When  I  was  doing  those  self  portraits,  that’s  when  people  began  to   recognized  me  and  my  work;;  but  previous  to  that  I  had  been  doing  other  stuff.  To  me  it  seems  like  it  fits  very  snuggly   on  this  whole  continuum.  I  could  see  how  from  the  outside,  if  that’s  your  starting  point,  it  seems  as  if  it    radically   shifted  or  changed  or  stopped  doing  one  particular  thing,  but  that’s  not  necessarily  the  case. Q:  Since  then,  do  you  feel  that  your  influences  on  your  work  have  changed? A:  I  am  constantly  exposed  to  different  things,  so  with  that  exposure  come  new  influences.  When  I  was  doing  self   portraiture  (Cindy  Sherman)  was  a  natural  influence,  and  a  lot  of  painters  were  also  influencial.  I  think  in  doing   landscapes  there  were  a  lot  of  early  American  (like  the  Hudson  valley  school  of  landscape  painters).  But  then  also   the  fact  that  I  moved  to  the  country  full-­time  for  like  a  year  and  half;;  that  was  really  insirping.  I  remember  the  first   time  I  had  seen  Disney  films  was  as  a  young  adult—I  never  really  saw  them  growing  up,  we  didn’t  go  and  see   cartoon  movies—the  way  landscape  was  portrayed,  or  nature  in  general,  was  really  inspiring  to  me.  And  the  show   that  I  have  up  now  is  called  “Pathetic  Fallacy.”  I  went  through  a  big  phase  where  I  was  reading    a  lot  of  Victorian   novels  and  a  lot  of  gothic  novels;;    and  this  idea  or  the  environment  and  nature  kind  of  immulating  the  mood  of  the   characters  and  almost  foreshadowing  events  is  called  pathetic  fallacy.  So  depending  on  what  I  am  reading,   I  become  inspired  by  that,  or  new  friends  that  I  make—their  interests  naturally  become  part  of  my  interests. Q:  What  do  you  want  your  art  to  achieve?   A:  I  guess  I  want  it  to  have  an  impact.  I  want  people  to  have  an  emotional  response.  But  I  think  I  have  said  it  before:   I  don’t  want  it  to  be  really  didactic,  so  I  like  the  fact  that  there  is  an  open-­ended,  ambiguous  aspect  to  my  work. Q:  Do  you  think  you  are  a  good  curator  for  your  own  work  or  do  you  think  someone  else  has  a  better  eye  for  it? A:  Usually  I  start  out  curating  it  and  then  I  will  get  advice  from  the  director,  and  so  it’s  sort  of  a  two  person  job.   If  I  feel  really  really  strongly  about  something  then  I’ll  just  stick  to  my  guns.  If  somebody  can  present  a  clearer  case   as  to  why  they  feel  something  else  works  better  than  what  I  have  done  then  I  will  listen  to  it  and  take  that  advice.   I  tend  to  be  over-­controlling  and  micromanage  everything,  so  there  are  instances  where  my  hand  is  not  involved  where   it  is  kind  of  nice  to  see  what  other  people  do.  I  just  had  a  survey  exhibition  at  the  North  Carolina  Museum  of  Art  and   they  did  a  catalogue  which  is  really  nice:  all  of  the  essays  and  that  kind  of  thing,  it  was  really  surprising  to  go  through   it  and  see  how  somebody  else  curated  my  work.  It  was  kind  of  nice  and  felt  very  stress-­free  and  felt  interesting  to  see   my  work  through  somebody  else’s  eyes  in  that  way. Q:  How  do  you  think  your  work  has  improved  over  the  years  and  in  what  way? A:  I  think  it  depends  on  the  medium.  In  phtography,  I  feel  like  I  am  a  little  bit  more  confident  in  what  it  is  I  am  able   to  render  or  do.  I  also  feel  that  I  am  a  little  bit  more  loose  in  a  way  that  I  am  not  terribly  concerned  with  things   lining  up  in  terms  of  perspective  or  scale;;  and  that  kind  of  thing  when  I  am  digitally  compositing  something,  it   doesn’t  necessarily  have  to  be  true  to  life;;  it  just  has  to  work  .  I  think  I  have  given  myself  more  leeway  than  I  had  in   the  past.  I  think  probably  the  main  thing  is  a  greater  level  of  confidence.  I  feel  like  when  I  do  things,    it’s  a  self-­taught   way  of  doing  things.  It’s  not  the  way  that  probably  is  the  most  technically  appropriate  way,  but  it  works  for  me.   I  used  to  be  embarrassed  by  that,  but  I’m  not  anymore.   Q:  How  important  is  travel  to  you  and  to  your  work  and  to  an  artist,  and  do  you  think  you  will  keep  traveling? A:  I  love  it,  minus  the  plane  flight.  I  like  being  exposed  to  new  things  and  new  places.  I  mean  that’s  how   I  get  new  ideas,  just  through  exposure  of  newness.

9


Anthony Goicolea

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MUSEE /  Interviews  /  Anthony  Goicolea

Q: What  is  the  best  advice  you  could  give  someone  who  is  starting  their  career  in  art? A:  One:  to  take  it  seriously.  The  other:  be  aware  of  what’s  going  on,  like  go  to  shows  and  galleries  and  that  sort  of   thing;;  and  do  not  just  approach  a  gallery  cold—do  your  research.    You  don’t  want  to  go  to  a  painting  gallery  and   submit  work  that  is  all  photography.  It  doesn’t  make  sense  and  people  don’t  appreciate  that. Q:  Should  emerging  photographers  approach  galleries? A:  You  usually  don’t.    You  should  have  a  body  or  work,  something  to  actually  show  .  The  best  way  to  approach   a  gallery  is  through  word  of  mouth.    I  think  it  kind  of  behooves  you  to  try  to  be  part  of  group  shows,  if  possible,   just  things  curated    even  by  friends  or  whatever,  and  kind  of  work  your  way  up.  Have  your  own  website.   I  mean  even  when  I  was  starting  out  there  wasn’t  this  social  networking  ,  there  weren’t  even  really  websites.   I  think  that  kind  of  thing  helps.  My  approach  was    to  have  as  many  people  come  to  my    studio  as  possible  to  see  work   and  to  see  what  I  was  working  on    to  create  this  sort  of  word-­of-­mouth  type  of  thing.    Online  magazines  like  this  are   a  great  way  to  gain  exposure.  And  then  maintain  some  sort  of  contact  list  of  people  who  have  expressed  interest.     As  you  are  doing  projects  in  the  future  keep  them  posted  of  what  you  are  doing. Q:  Do  you  have  advice  on  what  NOT  to  do? A:  Don’t  be  abnoxcious.  And  that  goes  back  to  cold  calling  or  just  assuming  your  work  is  amazing  because  you  just   got  out  of  grad  school.  When  I  went  to  school,  I  guess  I  was  part  of  a  generation  that  thought  “I’m  going  to  be   an  artist,  which  means  I  am  going  to  be  poor,  starving,  and  work  at  a  restaurant  my  entire  life.”  I  think  there  is   a  sense  of  entitlement  that  is  pervasive  now:  “Well,  I  am  going  to  art  school  and  such  is  going  to  buy  my  whole  thesis   exhibition  and  I  am  going  to  be  an  art  star.”  My  friends  and  I  never  had  this  idea.  There  was  no  concept  of  art  star.   I  think  you  can  be  motivated  and  driven  and  ambitious—but  you  can  also  have  some  humbleness. Q:  As  far  as  the  pricing  of  your  work:  Is  that  solely  up  to  the  gallery  or  do  you  have  a  say? A:  It’s  something  that  we  do  together,  but  they  kind  of  have  the  last  say.  They  know  the  business.  When  you  look   at  something  and  you  look  at  the  amount  of  time  that  you  have  put  into  it  and  it’s  selling  for  such  a  small  amount,   you’re  like  “Ughhh,”  it  almost  hurts.  But  you  know  that’s  kind  of  part  of  the  whole  process  and  you  can  incrementally   increase  you  prices  in  a  zone  that  feels  comfortable  and  makes  sense;;  you  don’t  want  to  increase  them  too  much  all   at  once,  because  even  if  there  is  a  demand,  when  that  demand  starts  to  wean    or  dry  up,  then  you  are  stuck  with  these   exorbitantly  high  prices  or  when  the  economy  fails,  then  you’ve  got  these  prices  that  if  you  try  to  lower  them  then   your  previous  collectors  will  get  mad  because  they  bought  a  piece  for  15  thousand  dollars  that  is  now  ten  thousand;;   that  doesn’t  make  sense.    It  is  important  to  do  things  incrementally  and  to  have  patience. Q:  How  important  is  your  image? A:  I  don’t  think  it’s  that  important.  I  think  a  lot  people  put  a  lot  of  energy  into  this  idea  of  the  artist  as  a  persona,   but  I  think  when  it  comes  down  to  it,  what’s  important  is  the  art.  It’s  important  to  know  how  to  talk  about  your  work.   I  think  a  lot  of  artists  fall  under  this  misconception  that  they  are  a  visual  artist  and  as  such  they  don’t  need  to  know   how  to  talk  about  their  work  and  that  their  work  speaks  for  itself.    Even  if  your  work  does  speak  for  itself,  you  don’t   always  have  it  with  you.  You  might  meet  somebody  who  is  expressing  interest  in  you  work  and  wants  to  know  what   it’s  about  and  it’s  important  to  be  able  to  succinctly  say  my  work  is  concerned  with  this  and  that,  and  this  is  my   process—just  in  two  or  three  sentences. Q:  Briefly  talk  about  your  photo  series  “Pathetic  Fallacy.” A:  The  photographs,  conceptually  they  don’t  exist.    They  are  cobbled  together  from  a  variety  of  different  places.   They  are  digitally  composited  and  they  are  these  kinds  of  large  scale  mural  images  that  portray  this  idea  of  transition   or  migration  or  loss.  A  lot  of  them  have  these  kinds  of  boarded  up  homes  or  shelters  and  that  sort  of  thing.   They  communicate  this  idea  of  transition,  in  a  way. Interviewed  by  Andrea  Blanch/  Edited  by  Dmytri  Kiper


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MUSEE /  Interviews  /  Anthony  Goicolea

SOLO EXHIBITIONS 2011  “Alter  Ego:  A  Decade  of  Work  by  Anthony  Goicolea,”  NC  Museum  of  Art,  Raleigh,  NC  travelling   to  Telfair  Museum,  Savannah,  GA  (09/2011-­01/2012)  and  21c  Museum,  Louisville,  KY   (01/2012  –  07/2012)  (catalog) 2010  “Related,”  Houston  Center  for  Photography,  Houston,  TX 2009  “Once  Removed,”  Postmasters  Gallery,  New  York MCA  Denver,  Photography  Gallery,  Denver,  CO 2008  “Related  III,”  Sandroni.Rey,  Los  Angeles “Almost  Safe,”  Monte  Clark  Gallery,  Toronto “Related  II,”  Haunch  of  Venison,  London “Related  I,”  Aurel  Scheibler  Gallery,  Berlin 2007  “The  Septemberists,”  Sandroni  Rey  Gallery,  Los  Angeles “Almost  Safe”  Postmasters  Gallery,  New  York 2006  “The  Septemberists,”  Aurel  Scheibler  Gallery,  Berlin Monte  Clark  Gallery,  Toronto,  Canada Monte  Clark  Gallery,  Vancouver,  Canada “Drawings,”  Sandroni  Rey  Gallery,  Los  Angeles 2005    Louis  Adelatando  Gallery,  Miami Estaciones,  Galeria    Luis    Adelantado,  Valencia,  Spain. “Outsiders  -­  Videos  and  Photographs  by  Anthony  Goicolea,”  Cheekwood  Museum  of  Art  Museum,   Nashville,  TN “Sheltered  Life”,  Postmasters  Gallery,  New  York “Anthony  Goicolea,  Photographs,  Drawings  and  Video,”  The  Arizona  State  University  Museum  of   Art,  Tempe,  AZ   2004    “Sheltered  Life”,  Galerie  Aurel  Scheibler  Cologne,  Germany “Kidnap”,  Sandroni-­Rey  Gallery,  Los  Angeles,  CA “Kidnap”,  Torch  Gallery,  Amsterdam,  The  Netherlands “Tea  Party,”  Madison  Avenue  Calvin  Klein  Space,  New  York,  NY


MUSEE /  Interviews  /  Anthony  Goicolea Anthony  Goicolea,  New  Videos,  Spazio-­(H),  Milan,  Italy Recent  Works,  New  Photographs,  Angstrom  Gallery,  Dallas,  TX “Boys  Will  Be  Boys,”  The  John  Michael  Kohler  Arts  Center,  Sheboygan,  WI,  (June)  Galerie  Aurel  Scheibler,   Cologne,  Germany  (October) Sandroni-­Rey  Gallery,  Los  Angeles,  CA  (July) 2003    Galerie  Aurel  Scheibler,  Cologne,  Germany Photos  &  Films,  Curated  by  Edsel  Williams,  The  GREEN  BARN,  Sagaponack,  NY Gow  Langsford,  Sydney,  Australia Gow  Langsford,  Auckland,  New  Zealand Cotthem  Gallery,  Barcelona,  Spain Videos,  Gallery  845/LAAA,  Los  Angeles,  CA Cotthem  Gallery,  Brussels,  Belgium Casa  De  America,  Madrid,  Spain Contemporary  Center  of  Photography,  Melbourne,  Australia The  Sargeant  Gallery,  Wanganui,  New  Zealand 2002    “Land,”  RARE  Gallery,  New  York,  NY “Water,”  Sandroni-­Rey,  Los  Angeles,  CA Arizona  State  University  Art  Museum,Tempe,  AZ Art  Space,  Auckland,  New  Zealand   Galerie  Aurel  Scheibler,  Cologne,  Germany The  Museum  of  Contemporary  Photography,  Chicago,  IL Torch  Gallery,  Amsterdam,  Holland 2001      “Detention,”  RARE  Gallery,  New  York,  NY Angstrom  Gallery,  Dallas,  TX The  Corcoran  College  of  Art  and  Design  at   The  Corcoran  Gallery  of  Art,  Washington,  D.C. MCMAGMA,  Milan,  Italy 2000    “Solo,”  Vedanta,  Chicago,  IL Fabien  Fryns,  Marbella,  Spain Luis  Adelantado,  Valencia,  Spain 1999    “You  and  What  Army,”  RARE  Gallery,  New  York,  N

18


Ivan Forde

Title:  Rapture Contact:  ivan.1.forde@gmail.com


Paul Typaldos

Title: Iceland  Air Contact:  paultypaldos@gmail.com

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Julia Forrest

Title: Illusion Contact:  www.JuliaForrest.com


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Dila Atay

Contact: www.ataydesign.com


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Nazareth Taccari

Contact: Â www.nazarethtaccari.com


Reinaldo Cabanillas

Contact: Â rec@quiquecabanillas.com

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Leif Huron

Contact:leifhuron@gmail.com


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Adam Handler

Contact: Â www.adhandlerstudio.com


Zoe Hiigli

Contact: zoe@zoehiigli.com

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Marsin

Title: Lost  In  Wonderland Contact:  www.marsindigital.com


Rachel Monosov

Contact: Â rmonosov@hotmail.com

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Jacobia Dahm

Contact: Â jacobiadahmphotography@gmail.com


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Chris Parente

Title: Cigarettes Title:  Gas  From  Waste Contact:  www.christopherparente.com Contact:  www.christopherparente.com

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Chris Parente

Title: Cigarettes Title:  Gas  From  Waste Contact:  www.christopherparente.com

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Elliot Townsend

Contact: elliot.e.townsend@gmail.com/  www.elliottownsendphotography.com  

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Edwin Flores

Contact: edwinfloresphoto@gmail.com/  www.edwinfloresphotography.weebly.com

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Joseph Campbell

Title:  Mirror Contact:  joacampb@gmail.com

in this page:


in this page:

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Syed Kazmi

Contact: www.syedkazminyc.com  /  studio@syedkazminyc.com


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Egon Schiele

Contact: Â egonsphoto@yahoo.com

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Genevieve Blais

Title: Hollow:  A  Self  Portrait  of  Madness     Contact:  gen@genevieveblais.com/  www.genevieveblais.com    


Genevieve Blais

Title: Hollow:  A  Self  Portrait  of  Madness     Contact:  gen@genevieveblais.com/  www.genevieveblais.com    

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Sarah Flores Pninit Boev

Contact: ??? Contact:  pninitboev@gmail.com  

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Â

Leire Unzueta

Contact: Â leire_unzueta@hotmail.com


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Francesco GenevieveBarion Blais

Contact: info@francescobarion.com   Contact:  ???

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Lindsay Kreighbaum

Contact: Â lkphotography7@gmail.com

:

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Natalie Poette

Contact: natalia_poetteodgornaya@yahoo.com/  www.nataliepoette.weebley.com        

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Chris Montgomery

Contact: www.chrismontgomeryphoto.com


Arielle Kramer

Contact: Â a.kramerphoto@yahoo.com

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Debora Mittelstaedt

Contact:  www.debora-­mittelstaedt.de

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Jaci Berkopec

Title: The  Execution  of  Sin Contact:  jaci.berkopec@gmail.com


Silvia Forni

Contact: Â silviaforni75@gmail.com

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Edmond Handwerker

Title: Illusion Bio:  July  28th,  1987/  Brooklyn,  New  York   Contact:  ehandwerker@gmail.com

Edmond Handwerker

Title: The  (Un)Real  New  York   Contact:  ehandwerker@gmail.com

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Lindsay Knowles

Contact: Â mepluralll@hotmail.com

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Gary Brechkheimer

Title: Blackout Contact:  www.lindsaykeys.com


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Elizabeth Ramanand

Contact: Â lizr89@gmail.com

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Ki Joon Kim Contact: giyom85@gmail.com/  www.kijoonkim.com

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Florence Early

Contact: Â floearly@yahoo.co.uk


Paul Kamau

Contact: Â www.pmkphotography.com

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Katie Bell Moore

Contact: Â www.katiebellmoore.com

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Jeanie Choi

Contact:  www.jeaniechoi.com

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magazine

MUSEE /  Interviews  /  Sara  Greenberger  Rafferty Sara  Greenberger  Rafferty’s  photographs  hit—or  startle—the  viewer  with  an  emotional  force  that  never  seems  to   settle  down.  Her  photos—primarily  of  food,  women,  actors,  and  comedians—exhibit  a  painterly  quality.  They  are   appropriated  and  manipulated,  with  such  techniques  as  blurring  and  water  splashing.  The  effect,  in  painting  terms,   is  a  combination  of  Expressionism  and  Abstract  Expressionism.  And  the  results  are  usually  fascinating  and  unsettling.   In  the  last  10  years,  Rafferty’s  work  has  been  exhibited  all  over  the  United  States,  at  dozens  of  galleries  and  museums.   In  New  York,  her  work  has  graced  the  walls  of  the  Museum  of  Modern  Art  P.S.  1.,  Gagosian  Gallery,  the   Rachel  Uffner  Gallery,  and  many  others.  Rafferty  spoke  to  Musée  Magazine  about  her  art,  technique,  inspiration,   training  in  sculpture,  and  her  views  on  grad  school  for  young  artists. By  Dmitry  Kiper

Q: At  what  age  did  you  get  into  photography?  And  who  were  some  of  the  photographers  you  admired? A:  I  first  learned  manual  photography  when  I  was  about  6  or  7,  at  a  local  elementary  school  day  summer  camp  called   “Adventures  in  Learning.”  We  made  pinhole  cameras  and  learned  how  to  operate  35  mm  cameras  and  develop  our  own  film   and  print  black  and  white  prints.  It  was  kind  of  funny  to  spend  those  lovely  summer  days  at  that  age  in  a  basement  darkroom.   After  that,  when  I  was  about  8,  I  got  a  beautiful  Nikkormat  camera  and  a  few  lenses  from  my  parents.  I  sort  of  knew  how  to  use  it.   I  don’t  remember  knowing  about  photographers  at  that  time,  but  when  I  was  in  high  school,  my  favorites  were  Richard  Avedon,   Roy  DeCarava,  and,  later,  Nan  Goldin.    DeCarava’s  picture  of  a  black  man  in  a  dark  window  –  from  across  the  room  it  looks   like  a  monochrome  black  picture  –  killed  me. Q:  After  getting  a  BFA  in  photography  from  the  Rhode  Island  school  of  design,  you  then  went  on  to  earn  an  MFA   in  sculpture  from  Columbia.  Would  you  recommend  grad  school  to  young  artists  and  photographers?   What  are  some  of  the  advantages  and  disadvantages? A:  I  think  grad  school  is  an  individual  choice.  Certainly  I  don’t  think  you  need  an  advanced  degree  to  be  a  good   artist.  Some  of  the  advantages  include  the  connections  you  make  among  peers  and  faculty,  the  investment  in  two   or  three  years  of  intense  focus  on  your  work,  and  official  credentials  to  teach  college.  The  main  disadvantage   is  the  cost,  but  that’s  not  the  only  negative.  I  think  the  whole  model  could  be  rethought  and  retooled  while  still  being   in  dialogue  with  MFA  programs  of  the  past  40  years.  There’s  also  a  tendency  to  focus  unfortunately  on  career  over   work  among  MFAs.  And,  especially,  I  think  the  division  between  media  or  discipline  is  increasingly  becoming   outmoded.

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Sara Greenberger Rafferty Photographed by And rea  Blanch


MUSEE /  Interviews  /  Sara  Greenberger  Rafferty

Q: Any  other  advice  you  can  give  to  young  artists  and  photographers? A:  If  you  have  any  integrity,  don’t  lose  it.  You  don’t  have  to  do  anything  but  make  your  work.     Q:  Why  did  you  get  a  degree  in  sculpture? A:  Even  though  I  was  in  the  photography  department  at  RISD,  I  always  made  objects  and  installations.  I  never   really  showed  a  straight  photograph  until  my  exhibition  in  late  2009.  I  continued  doing  sculpture,  performance,   installation,  and  ephemeral  works  when  I  first  moved  to  New  York.  For  grad  school,  I  had  only  one  requirement  –   that  I  not  have  to  leave  New  York.  I  didn’t  want  a  summer  camp  experience.  I  wanted  to  keep  my  job  and  apartment   and  life  outside  of  grad  school.  Columbia  was  a  good  fit  for  me,  and  I  applied  under  the  rubric  of  “Sculpture  and   New  Genres,”  which  made  more  sense  for  my  work.  I  would  have  never  gotten  into  a  straight  photo  program  with   my  work. Q:  The  other  photographer  we’re  featuring  in  this  issue,  Anthony  Goicolea,  also  studied  sculpture  in  addition   to  photography.  Your  work  is  of  course  very  different,  but  how  has  sculpture  benefited  your  approach  to  photography?   A:  Actually,  when  I  first  saw  Anthony’s  work,  I  was  at  a  random  Miami  art  fair  (pre-­Basel)  in  1999.  It  was  at  the   RARE  gallery  booth.  I  became  quite  obsessed  with  his  work  and  got  all  of  my  classmates  interested  in  him  too.   It  was  the  early  days  of  websites,  and  Anthony  had  a  website.  So  even  though  he  didn’t  have  a  catalogue  or  slides   in  the  slide  library,  we  could  see  his  work.  As  a  side-­note:  for  most  of  my  youth  and  education,  we  only  had  access   to  artists  work  via  catalogues  in  the  library,  major  art  magazines,  and  slides  our  teachers  showed  us.  It’s  very   different  now.  Anyhow,  I  emailed  Anthony  and  we  met  somewhere  close  to  the  music  venue  Irving  Plaza,  near   14th  Street.  I  think  I  was  trying  to  convince  him  to  hire  me  as  an  assistant  after  I  graduated. Back  to  your  original  question:  I  guess  the  best  way  to  describe  my  relationship  to  both  sculpture  and  photography   is  to  say  that  when  I  see  an  image  on  a  screen,  I  see  the  computer  hardware,  and  the  space  where  it’s  installed,   and  how  people  interact  with  it  as  well.     Q:  When  you  are  at  the  early  stages  of  a  project,  do  you  already  know  100  percent  how  your  photos  will  look  like?   Or  does  the  creative  process  serve  as  kind  of  guide,  letting  you  tweak  your  ideas  along  the  way? A:  I  rarely  know  what  form  my  work  will  take.  I  often  try  things  in  different  ways,  as  photos,  sculptures,  videos,   prints,  etc.  I  usually  start  with  a  few  notions,  like  some  source  images,  or  a  relationship,  or  a  feeling,  or  in  the   case  of  my  current  show  [at  the  Rachel  Uffner  Gallery]  some  literature.  Then  the  work  comes  out  of  a  lot   of  trial  and  error  and  a  lot  of  staring  at  the  wall. Q:  Please  discuss  your  creative  process  for  making  photos  like  “Rodney,”  “United  Artist,”  and  “Stage  (Gilda).” A:  I’ll  start  with  “United  Artist,”  because  that  was  the  first  of  the  three,  and  the  process  was  fairly  different.   I  was  working  on  some  small  color  studies  for  a  show  at  the  now  defunct  Guild  and  Greyshkul  Gallery,  in  SoHo.   I  had  this  black  and  white  picture  of  Mary  Pickford  in  a  striped  apron  on  a  stool.  I  chose  the  picture  for  three  reasons.   One,  because  of  who  Pickford  was,  a  female  comic  and  co-­founder  (with  Charlie  Chaplin  and  Douglas  Fairbanks)   of  the  United  Artists  motion  picture  studios.  Two,  because  she  was  wearing  stripes,  and  I  was  working  with  stripes,   because  of  their  multifaceted  associations  with  pajamas,  prisoners’  clothing,  and  fairs.  And,  three,  because  she  was   sitting  on  a  stool,  and  I  had  been  working  for  a  while  with  stools  as  a  form.  I  used  Photoshop  to  tone  the  photograph   red,  and  then  I  gave  her  yellow  ‘rouge’  because  I  was  working  with  yellow  for  eggs.  This  all  sounds  neither  here   nor  there,  but  this  is  the  process. For  “Rodney”  and  “Stage  (Gilda)”  the  process  started  with  the  source  image  as  well,  in  the  case  of  Rodney,   it’s  from  the  record  cover  for  “Rappin’  Rodney.”  I  tried  to  make  him  look  like  a  Vietnam  Vet.  In  the  Gilda  picture,   it  was  the  first  one  I  made  that  wasn’t  a  face-­only  portrait.  It’s  a  full  figure,  with  a  stage  and  audience.  It  was  from   a  YouTube  clip,  so  I  was  trying  something  new,  more  of  which  you  see  in  my  current  show.  The  rest  of  the  process   was  the  same:  I  printed  out  the  pictures  small  on  an  inkjet  printer,  added  water  on  the  floor  or  on  another  structure,   waited  for  it  to  dry,  and  then  I  photographed  the  “prop”  using  a  scanner.  Then  I  edited  the  files  in  Photoshop.   They  were  all  printed  using  light  exposed  to  sensitive  paper  like  traditional  photographs.

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MUSEE /  Interviews  /  Sara  Greenberger  Rafferty

Q: Are  there  any  rules  you  follow  or  advice  you  can  give  with  regard  to  incorporating  humor  into  your  work? A:  I  actually  don’t  think  my  work  is  funny.  I  think  it’s  pretty  sad.  I  don’t  think  work  that  is  trying  to  be  funny,   or  that  is  only  trying  to  get  a  laugh  is  the  best  approach.  Much  good  humor  hits  you  in  the  gut  and  points  to   kinds  of  failures  or  inadequacies.   Q:  Is  procrastination  an  enemy  or  a  friend? A:  For  me,  a  frenemy:  it’s  a  friend  because  I'm  fairly  intimate  with  procrastination  as  a  mechanism,  and  it’s  an   enemy  because  in  general  I  think  procrastination  as  an  avoidance  of  heavy  lifting  is  not  so  good. Q:  Are  you  involved  in  writing  your  own  press  releases  and  other  related  material?   A:  I  try  my  best  not  to  be.  I  don’t  think  it’s  my  job  and  I  hate  to  be  the  one  that  might  tell  someone  how  to   ‘read’  my  work.  I  hate  most  press  releases,  because  I  think  they  are  overwrought  and  used  as  a  crutch;;   but  I  also  see  their  point.  That  being  said,  I  usually  get  to  preview  and  make  suggestions  about  these  kinds   of  things  when  it  comes  to  my  own  shows.   Q:  Do  you  collaborate  with  curators  for  your  exhibits?   A:  Yes,  I  do.  It’s  different  in  each  case.  Some  curators  have  a  specific  piece  in  mind  for  their  show,  and  some  may   commission  new  work.  Especially  in  group  shows,  curators  contextualize  your  works  among  other  works,   and  that  is  invaluable. Q:  What’s  the  best  or  smartest  thing  you  did  for  your  career? A:  I  try  not  to  do  things  for  my  career.  On  my  cynical  days,  I  would  say  the  smartest  thing  I  did  for  my  career   was  pay  –  and  continue  to  pay  –  for  fancy  higher  education.  And  I  gained  access  to  certain  connections  that  way. Q:  What  current  artists  –  in  any  field  –  do  you  find  the  most  fascinating  or  groundbreaking?   A:  This  could  be  a  list  of  hundreds,  but  artists  who  I  don't  know  personally  but  have  been  interested  in  recently   include  Oliver  Laric,  Frances  Stark,  and  Mai-­Thu  Perret. Q:  What  are  you  working  on  right  now?   A:  I’m  continuing  to  work  in  the  veins  represented  in  my  current  exhibition  –  including  smaller  c-­prints  to  expand   the  constellation  of  image  inundation  on  a  wall,  more  acetate  works,  and  more  Plexiglas  works. Q:  Is  there  an  artistic  field  that  you  have  not  yet  tried  but  would  like  to? A:  I  could  see  myself  working  on  a  stage  production  at  some  point. Q:  Who  are  your  biggest  influences? A:  My  friends.  I  have  a  constant  dialogue  about  work,  life,  literature,  and  the  world  with  my  friends.   Many  friends  have  been  with  me  throughout  my  entire  career,  so  it's  easy  to  talk  shorthand  with  them.   Of  my  friends,  my  husband  is  the  most  honest  as  well  as  removed  –since  he  doesn't  make  art  –  and  his  perspective   is  invaluable. Interviewed  and  Edited  by  Dmitry  Kiper

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MUSEE /  Interviews  /  Sara  Greenberger  Rafferty SOLO  EXHIBITIONS 2011  “Sara  Greenberger  Rafferty”,  The  Suburban,  Oak  Park,  IL 2010  “In  Residence”,  Eli  Marsh  Gallery,  Fayerweather  Hall,  Amherst  College,  Amherst,  MA 2009  “Tears”,  Rachel  Uffner  Gallery,  New  York,  NY   2009    “BANANAS”,  The  Kitchen,  New  York,  NY,  curated  by  Matthew  Lyons 2009    “SGR”:  Recent  Photos  and  Videos,  Eli  Marsh  Gallery,  Fayerweather  Hall,  Amherst  College,  Amherst,  MA 2006  “De/Feat  and  Drawings”,  Sandroni  Rey  Gallery,  Los  Angeles,  CA 2006    “Sara  Greenberger  Rafferty”,  P.S.  1  Contemporary  Art  Center,  New  York,  NY

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Contact:  kahhtee@yahoo.com


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Cana Atay

Contact: Â www.ataydesign.com


Guihem de Castelbajac

Title: Nothing  New Contact:  guilhemdecastelbajac@gmail.com

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Matt Monath

Contact: Â www.mattmonath.com


Cana Atay

Contact: Â www.ataydesign.com

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Hannah Ross

Contact: Â hannahross@gmail.com


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Lukasz Piech

Contact: Â lukasz@lukaszpiech.pl

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Vera Miljkovic

Bio: Born  in  1975  /  Belgrade,  Serbia   Contact:  www.veramiljkovic.com

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www.Facebook.com/MattMonathPhoto

Matt Monath

Contact: www.MattMonath.com/  www.Facebook.com/MattMonathPhoto

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Miguel Rodriguez

Contact: Â miguelrodrigueztx@yahoo.com

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Hervè Kwimo

Contact: hervekwimo@gmail.com


Julio Gaggia

Title: Lick  Me Contact:  www.juliogaggia.com


Beryl Fine

Title: Dirty  Glamour   Contact:  contact@berylfine.com

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Rachel Monosov

Contact: Â www.rachelmonosov.com


Rachel Monosov

Contact: Â www.rachelmonosov.com

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Elliot Townsend

Title: None  existent Contact:  www.elliottownsendphotography.com

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Julio Gaggia

Contact: Â www.juliogaggia.com

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Beryl Fine

Title: Dirty  Glamour Contact:  contact@berylfine.com


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Syed Kasmi

Contact: Â www.syedkazminyc.com

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Chris Parente

Title: Gas  From  Waste Contact:  www.christopherparente.com

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Paul Kamau

Contact: pkamau1@gmail.com/  pmkphotography.com

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Reinaldo Cabanillas

Contact: Â rec@quiquecabanillas.com

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Mattia Crosson

Contact: Â Isaia.M.Crosson@gmail.com

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Jacobia Dahm

Title: Red           Contact:  jacobiadahmphotography@gmail.com

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Michelle Aristocrat

Contact: Â info@michellearistocrat.com


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Michael Ortiz

Contact: Â michael.ortiz27@gmail.com


Vera

Bio: Born  in  1975  /  Belgrade,  Serbia   Contact:  www.veramiljkovic.com

Michael Ortiz update info

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Ashley Cunningham

Contact: ashley.lc@gmail.com  /  www.acunningham.net  

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Ashley Campbell

Contact: www.ashleyisstupid.com

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Agnes Fohn

Contact: Â www.agnesfohn.com

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Lindsay Keys

Title: Blackout Contact:  www.lindsaykeys.com

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Alek Belakov

Contact: Â belakov@belakov.com


Beryl Fine

Title: Dirty  Glamour Contact:  contact@berylfine.com

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Mackenzie Gomez

Contact: Â www.mackenziegomez.com


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Patrick Gliem

Contact: patrick.gliem@gmail.com  

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SP Tomer

Title: 59  Columbus  Circle Contact:  tomer@studioperle.com

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York City   r

Corey Scott Arter

Contact: arterphotography@gmail.com/www.coreyscottarter.com                                                    

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SP Tomer

Bio: Born  in  1975  /  Belgrade,  Serbia   Contact:  www.veramiljkovic.com

Title: 59  Columbus  Circle Contact:  tomer@studioperle.com

SP Tomer update info

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MUSEE /  Short  Story  /  Sniper He  got  to  my  street  in  the  dead  of  night.  Like  any  outsider,  he  had  a  five-­minute  stay  expectancy.   After  an  hour  he  was  still  there  and  the  street  was  his. He  was  shooting. That  night  I  was  outside  the  dive  where  I  had  a  gig.  By  the  time  he  got  here,  it  was  over  and  I  was  just  sitting  on  the  sidewalk,   smoking.  His  battered  car  wheezed  up  the  hill.  He  scanned  the  place,  his  arm  hanging  out  the  window.  He  cruised  up  and  down,   looking  for  the  perfect  spot.   He  was  up  to  something. He  finally  killed  the  engine  right  across  from  the  bar.  The  car’s  windows  had  a  crank  handle.  Unbelievable.   Man,  if  you’re  going  to  get  a  car,  get  it  right.  He  rolled  up  the  window  and  turned  around  to  unlock  the  back  door.   When  he  got  out,  he  looked  up  and  down  the  street  and  through  me,  as  if  I  wasn’t  even  there.  Suited  me  alright.   He  pulled  two  things  from  his  back  seat.  A  long,  hard  case.  And  a  small,  heavy  bag.  He  locked  the  front  doors.   He  locked  the  back  doors.  Then  he  jammed  his  keys  inside  his  cheap  leather  jacket  and  picked  up  his  junk.   He  walked  straight  up  to  the  first  broken  window  in  the  building,  climbed  inside  and  set  up  shop  like  he  owned  the  place.   Got  busy  adjusting  the  shutter.  Unbelievable. When  he  was  settled,  I  sent  some  kids  out  for  bait. He  shot. I  didn’t  move. The  street  went  dead  silent.  Then  some  guy  with  a  girl  hooked  around  his  neck  tumbled  out  of  the  bar  and  he  shot  again.   Bam  bam.  Blinded  me.


MUSEE /  Story  /  Sniper

I pulled  out  my  sunglasses.  Slow.  Real  slow.  I  didn’t  want  him  to  shoot  my  way.  Not  yet.  I  wanted  to  stick  around  a  little.   He’d  notice  me  at  some  point.  Just  not  yet. But  still,  I  put  on  my  shades  so  he  wouldn’t  rob  my  soul. Then  I  felt  him  focus  on  me.  While  I  waited  for  it  to  happen,  I  thought  about  my  old  man.  I  wished  I  could  remember  his  face.   His  smell,  I  could.  Old  sweat  and  once  in  a  while  booze  to  top  it  off.  I  almost  smiled.  Then  I  thought  about  me.   The  feel  of  the  drum  under  my  palms.  My  girl’s  soft  legs  wrapped  around  my  waist  at  night.  The  first  drag  of  the  day.   The  rhythms  of  my  life.   I  was  getting  way  too  philosophical  so  I  cut  the  crap.  It  was  the  waiting  I  couldn’t  stand.   I  stood  up.  I  knew  exactly  where  he  was.  And  I  knew  that  because  of  the  shades,  he  couldn’t  tell  if  I  was  looking  his  way  or  not.   If  I  was  getting  ready  to  pull  a  fast  one  on  him.   I  was  in  the  middle  of  the  street  now,  facing  his  shutter.  I  knew  he  had  me  in  his  sights.   “If  you’re  gonna  do  it,  do  it  now,  and  do  it  right,”  I  told  him.  “Do  this  man  justice.”   Nothing  happened. I’m  a  mellow  sort  of  guy  and  I  get  even  softer  with  the  smoking,  but  I  managed  to  lose  my  patience.   I  crossed  the  street  and  got  to  the  broken  window.  I  framed  my  face  with  my  hands.  I  was  level  with  his  Cannon  just  three   feet  from  me,  the  whole  street  rounded  in  its  glass  eye  and  me  smack  in  the  middle.  “Shoot.” Diane  Echer www.DianeEcher.com Diane  Echer  is  a  fellow  of  the  Writers’  Institute  at  the  Graduate  Center

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Victor Chen

Contact: victorchen0980@gmail.com


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Bryan Meador

Contact: Â Bryan@BryanMeador.com


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Adam Sherbell

Contact: Â www.adamsherbellphotography.com


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Marc Engle

Contact: Â marcengle09@gmail.com

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Marc Engle

Contact:  marcengle09@gmail.com Contact:  marcengle09@gmail.com

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Joie Candido

Contact: Â joiemcandido@yahoo.com

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Peter Zervas contact: Â ptrzrvs@gmail.com

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Camille Herbert

Contact: Â lavenderspoon.blogspot.com


Sarah Flores

Contact: saraahflores@gmail.com  

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Johnny Maroney

Title: Virgins  and  Non-­Virgins Contact:  johnnymmaroney@yahoo.com


Florence Early

Contact: Â floearly@yahoo.co.uk

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Guenter Knopp

Contact: Â guenter12.30@gmail.com


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Gregory Prescott

Contact: Â www.gregoryprescott.com


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Andrea Furedy

Contact: Â www.furedy.com


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Leon Rodriguez

Contact: Â www.flickr.com/photos/innoart

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Belle Mcintyre

Titles: Hookah  Hall Contact:  Bmcintyre3@mac.com

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Belle Mcintyre

Title: Moon  Pool Contact:  Bmcintyre3@mac.com


Tucker Friend

Contact: www.tuckerfriendphotography.com/        

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Matthew Marocco

Contact: cyrmorr@gmail.com/  www.cyrmorr.com

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Matthew Marocco

Contact: Â www.cyrmorr@gmail.com

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Adam Regan

Contact:: Â adam.regan@me.com


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Kogo Araki

Title: Spirit  of  Simple Contact:  kogoaraki@gmail.com


Vera Miljkovic

Contact: Â www.veramiljkovic.com

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Camille Herbert Contact:  czgh34@gmail.com/  lavenderspoon.blogspot.com


Tucker Friend

Title: Illusion Contact:  www.tuckerfriendphotography.com/enter

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PaigeNiluna Luna Niluna

Contact: Â lunaniluna@gmail.com

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Zoe Hiigli

Contact: Â zoe@zoehiigli.com


Marc Engle

Contact: Â marcengle09@gmail.com


Shikeith Cathey

Contact: Â shikeithcathey@gmail.com

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Ki Joo Kim

Contact: giyom85@gmail.com  /  www.kijoonkim.com

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Contact: chrisharrisnyc@gmail.com   Chris Harris in  this  page: Photographed  by  Andrea  Blanch

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Chris Harris

Contact: chrisharrisnyc@gmail.com

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Title: Dirty  Glamour  

Beryl Fine Contact: contact@berylfine.com Amanda Ramon Contact:  amanda.ramon23@gmail.com/  www.amandaramon.sites.livebooks.com

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Cassandra Walsh

Contact: Â www.cassandrawalsh.com

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Nick Dabas

Title: Addiction Contact:  www.nickdabas.com

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magazine

MUSEE /  Interviews  /  Ann  Schaffer Q:  What  is  your  philosophy  on  collecting? A:  My  philosophy  on  collecting  is  multi-­layered.  One:  I  have  an  encyclopedic  collection  from  the  early  1980s  to  the   present.  Two:  I  buy  the  works  of  certain  artists  that  I  think  are  very  special  to  me  as  far  as  embodying  my  philosophical,   visual,  and  conceptual  needs.  Three:  I  buy  something  that  has  a  unique  vocabulary—that  if  I  saw  it  in  someone  else’s   house,  I  would  recognize  who  did  it  based  on  something  that  is  unusual  in  the  photographic  process  or  some  use  of   colors  on  a  pallet  or  a  way  of  readjusting  the  truth.  Another  way  of  saying  this  would  be  a  fresh  vision. What  amazes  me  is  that  after  collecting  this  type  of  cutting-­edge  contemporary  art  for  more  than  25  years,  I  can  still   find  new  photography,  new  painting,  new  sculpture,  new  works  on  paper.  Works  on  paper  are  another  aspect  of  our   collecting:  my  husband  has  much  more  of  a  minimal  sensibility,  and  he  also  likes  to  know  the  origin  of  things.   So  he  likes  to  see  the  way  a  drawing  becomes  an  oil  painting  or  a  work  on  paper  on  a  grand  scale. Q:  You  have  your  own  way  of  hanging  your  art.  Why  did  you  decide  to  do  it  that  way? A:  Because  we  have  acquired  so  much  art,  I  had  to  find  a  way  to  hang  it  where  it  doesn’t  just  look  randomly  hung.       Each  of  our  rooms  and  areas  have  a  theme  or  a  similar  medium  or  a  sensibility  that  makes  sense  when  hung  together.   Each  work  of  art  "speaks"  to  or  enhances  the  other.  I  think  the  technical  term  for  this  type  of  hanging  is  called  salon   style,  as  compared  to  just  unique  pieces  carrying  a  whole  wall,  breathing  and  shining.  I  have  a  wall  of  heads  or  a   wall  of  drawings  that  relate  to  one  another.  When  you  first  walk  in,  as  you  go  through  my  home,  everything  emerges   little  by  little.  For  me  it’s  conceptual—not  about  hanging  the  big  piece  in  the  hall.  It’s  a  way  to  accommodate  a  lot  of  art. Q:  How  important  is  graduate  school? A:  When  I  went  to  college,  my  father  told  me  that  the  importance  of  college  is  to  learn  to  grow  more  gracefully  over   four  years    and  learn  how  to  find  answers.    I  think  that  anyone  who  goes  for  an  MFA—who  can  afford  to  go  for  an   MFA—the  benefit  is  that  there  they  can  work  with  different  mediums,  some  good  teachers,  and  they  can  learn  more   about  who  they  are.  Also,  a  residency  is  fabulous:  many  great  artists  are  lucky  enough  to  have  a  three-­year  residency,   and  then,  because  of  where  they  are,  they  can  get  picked  up  more  readily  by  a  good  gallery.  So  I  think  both  are  important. Q:  How  do  collectors  treat  other  collectors?   A:  That’s  a  huge  question.  Some  can’t  wait  to  call  you  or  tell  you  “Oh,  I  found  this  fabulous  artist  you  should  go   look  at  it.”  But  most  of  them  try  to  keep  their  finds  and  their  secrets  to  themselves.  Sometimes  if  somebody  says  to  me,   “I  want  to  tell  you  about  this  artist  that  you  should  buy,”  I  am  leery  about  it  because  I  think  they  are  doing  it  because   they  want  more  people  to  buy  the  artist  because  they  want  that  artist  to  become  better  known,  so  I  judge  by  who  the   messenger  is  and  then  decide  after  seeing  the  work  and  liking  it  independent  of  what  I  have  been  told.  I  go  to  a  lot   of  dinners  for  artists  when  they  have  their  shows,  and  sit  among  the  collectors  and  artists  and  exchange  ideas.   I  respect  a  lot  of  collectors  who  collect  with  the  right  spirit  and  the  right  quest  for  new  things  and  who  get  passionate   the  way  that  I  do  when  I  see  something  that  I  can’t  stop  thinking  about.   Q:  Is  there  any  advice  you  would  give  to  a  young  collector? A:  A:  Look  at  art,  go  to  the  galleries,  and  maybe  not  buy  anything  even  for  a  year  until  you  have  developed  in  your   own  mind—what  it  is  that  rocks  your  world,  what  touches  your  soul.  You  like  something,  take  a  picture  of  it,  pin  it   on  the  wall,  walk  by  it  for  a  couple  of  days  and  see  if  it  still  stimulates  you,  and  then  you  will  see  threads  developing.   The  pieces  you  collect  have  to  talk  to  each  other  in  a  way  that  is  not  boring,  so  mix  your  mediums.  Change  it  up  a  bit   so  that  it  stays  alive,  stays  challenging,  and  stays  interesting.  

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Ann Schaffer Photographed by Andrea  Blanch

Portrait by  Cindy  Sherman  (Untitled,  2002)


MUSEE /  Interviews  /  Ann  Schaffer

Q: How  often  do  you  rotate  or  sell  pieces  from  your  collection?   A:  Most  of  what  I  own  I  would  never  sell.  Early  on  I  sold  a  Felix  Gonzales-­Torres  “two  light  bulbs”  and  a  few  other   things,  and  I  have  regretted  it  ever  since.  People  should  sell  art  because  they  need  the  money,  because  they  tire  of  it,   or  because  they  want  to  trade  up.    I  don’t  think  I  have  tired  of  anything  I  have  bought.  Also,  I  don’t  buy  for  investment.   I  do  want  to  think  that  what  I  own  will  appreciate,  but  if  it  doesn’t,  I  am  still  going  to  love  it.   Q:  Why  did  you  choose  to  collect  the  works  of  emerging  artists? A:  If  you  don’t  buy  works  by  emerging  artists,  they  will  never  become  mid-­career  or  fully-­grown  artists.  They  all  have   to  be  given  a  chance.  But  I  don’t  buy  emerging  artists  because  I  feel  sorry  for  them.  I  only  buy  their  work  if  I  feel   that  they  should  be  given  the  opportunity  to  go  on  because  they  are  doing  something  with  a  fresh  vocabulary  or  a   different  way  of  painting  or  drawing.  In  my  opining,  there  are  plenty  of  artists  who  should  be  given  that  opportunity.   I  also  buy  mid-­career  artists  as  well  as  ones  who  are  already  established. Q:  Is  it  true  that  you  give  museum  tours  of  your  house? A:  Yes.  I  give  tours  on  a  regular  basis  to  patron  groups  of  museums  or  non-­profit  organizations,  as  well  as  various   charities,  churches  and  synagogues  that  are  looking  for  a  way  to  raise  money  for  their  institutions.  So  they  charge   to  have  people  go  on  tours  of  homes  that  have  an  interesting  art  collection.  I  find  it  very  gratifying  because,  when   touring  my  home,  most  people  ask  intelligent  questions  as  they  get  to  see  art  in  a  different  way.  They  couldn’t  imagine   hanging  something  that  is  so  bizarre  or  cutting  edge  or  strange;  and  some  people  may  think,  “Oh  my  gosh,  I  have   something  like  that  that  I  could  hang  in  my  home,  and  it  would  look  interesting.”   Q:  Has  your  taste  at  all  changed  in  your  25  years  of  collecting? A:  I  think  that  from  the  very  beginning  I  was  willing  and  able  to  take  a  risk.  Also,  my  husband  never  held  me  back,   and  my  kids  were  no  more  destructive  than  anyone  else’s.  So  I  took  a  chance:  I  put  things  on  the  floor,  hung  them   from  the  ceiling,  stood  them  up  in  corners.  I  embraced  works  that  challenged  me  intellectually  or  emotionally.  As  I  walk  by   many  of  these  art  works  everyday,  they  take  on  new  meanings,  and  sometimes  I  just  go  to  a  room  in  my  house  that  I  haven’t   been  in  a  long  time  and  just  enjoy  looking  and  thinking. Q:  Did  you  ever  buy  a  piece  of  art  that  was  atypical  of  an  artist’s  style  because  you  loved  it?  Or  do  you  always  stay   true  to  what  they  are  known  for? A:  If  I  go  to  a  show  of  an  emerging  artist  or  a  mid-­career  artist  and  I  can  stand  there  literally  trying  to  decide  among   many,  I  know  this  is  an  artist  for  me.    If  there  is  only  one  piece  that  I  like,  I  say  to  myself,  “Am  I  liking  this  for  the   wrong  reason.”  I  love  hearts,  so  maybe  there  would  be  a  heart  in  it  and  I  think  that  I  have  to  have  that  even  if   there  is  no  other  artwork  in  the  show  that  I  think  is  also  good.  I  don’t  buy  the  artist  even  if  I  like  the  one  piece,   because  I  feel  as  though  there  is  not  enough  of  what  that  artist  does  that  holds  my  attention  or  has  a  unique  vision   or  vocabulary. That’s  what  often  happens  when  you  get  drawn  into  something  that  is  visually  appealing,  and  then  you  have  to  stop   and  say  to  yourself,  “Picture  this  on  an  auction  block.  Is  anyone  else  going  to  want  this  or  is  it  going  to  look  like   everything  else  that  you  see?”  So  I  usually  know  right  away  that  I  like  something,  but  I  usually  spend  a  few  minutes   asking  myself  if  I’ll  like  it  next  year.  For  me,  at  this  stage  of  my  collecting,  it  has  to  be  something  that’s  going   to  stand  out.  


MUSEE /  Interviews  /  Ann  Schaffer

Q: How  do  you  think  the  art-­collecting  business  has  changed  since  you  started  collecting?   A:  When  I  started  collecting  contemporary  cutting  edge  art  28  years  ago,  only  10  percent  of  all  art  collectors  collected   this  type  of  art.  You  could  spend  an  afternoon  in  SoHo,  see  all  of  the  shows,  and  just  really  enjoy  yourself  and  take  chances   on  buying,  whether  it  was  a  Jean-­Michel  Basquiat  on  the  floor  in  a  gallery  or  a  Keith  Haring  drawing  in  a  drawer.   You  knew  you  were  looking  at  things  that  were  different  from  what  you  had  seen  at  various  art  shows  years  before.   But  now,  in  addition  to  having  over  350  galleries  in  Chelsea—still  more  in  SoHo,  still  more  in  the  UES  the  LES,  DUMBO,   Long  Island  City,  and  so  on—  you  have  a  huge  amount  of  art  out  there  and  a    huge  amount  of  collectors,  many  of   whom  are  buying  because  they  have  money  and  their  consultants  tell  them  to  do  so,  an  article  or  a  review  tells  them   to  buy  it,  or  a  neighbor  just  bought  one.  They  often  don’t  even  have  the  challenge  and  the  wonderful  experience  of   the  quest.  They  often  just  put  it  directly  in  storage.   There  are  also  art  fairs  all  over  the  world.  We  now  have  an  art  fair  probably  every  month,  whether  it’s  in  Spain,  England,   New  York  or  Miami.  I  do  understand  that  for  people  who  can’t  go  to  Chelsea,  as  I  do  every  week  or  every   other  week,  the  art  fairs  provide  a  chance  for  them  to—I  hate  to  use  the  expression—“one  stop  shop,”  but  they  can   see  a  lot  of  art.  For  me  the  only  value  of  the  art  fairs  is  to  be  able  see  face-­to-­face  a  dealer  from  France  or  Spain  or   Italy  whom  I  really  like  and  with  whom  I  have  done  business  and  whose  works  I  collect.  But  I  must  admit  that  I  do   like  to  be  loyal  to  American  galleries  if  they  carry  the  same  artist  as  a  foreign  dealer. Now  when  I  do  buy,  I  really  have  to  spend  much  more  time  thinking  about  why  I  want  to  purchase  something  or  why   I  want  to  have  something  be  part  of  my  collection.  And  it  just  could  be  some  art  work  of  some  unknown  artist  that   maybe  is  in  Newark  or  part  of  a  show  that  I  curate  in  Summit,  NJ  every  year  at  the  art  center  where  we  show  a  hundred   or  more  artists,  many  of  whom  don’t  show  with  galleries  and  whose  works  are  often  superior  to  those  of  many   well-­known  artists  who  show  in  Chelsea. Q:  Is  there  any  piece  of  art  that  you  feel  got  away  from  you  that  you  would  like  to  own? A:  Oh  I  am  sure  there  are  plenty,  but  I  don’t  like  to  think  that  way.  Sometimes  when  I  am  looking  at  works  of  art,   I  put  a  reserve  on  a  piece  immediately  if  I  really  think  I  might  want  it.  That  doesn’t  mean  I  am  always  going  to  buy  it,   but  it  means  that  at  least  I  am  preserving  the  chance  to  think  about  it  over  a  few  days.  That’s  what  I  try  to  tell  people   who  are  looking:  it  doesn’t  cost  anything  to  put  a  reserve,  but  you  have  to  be  fair  to  the  gallery  and  honor  that  privilege   in  a  day  or  two  and  not  just  keep  leading  them  on. Q:  What  advice  would  you  give  to  emerging  artists? A:  There  is  a  lot  of  luck  involved.  It  has  a  lot  to  do  with  whom  you  know  and  who  can  help  you  meet  gallerists.  But   what  I  would  say  is  that  when  you  finally  have  that  MFA,  you’ve  done  all  of  your  work  and  all  of  your  experimentation   under  a  safety  net  with  the  school  and  your  professors  there,  you  might  not  need  to  be  taken  in  immediately  by  a  gallery   until  you  are  sure  of  what  your  style  or  what  your  method  of  painting  or  photography  or  whatever  is,  because  if  you  look   at  most  of  the  well  known  modernist  painters  they  all  painted  the  same  way  initially  because  of  what  they  learned  in  school   and  then  they  developed  their  own  special  technique  or  their  own  special  vocabulary. Sometimes  an  artist  can  be  stopped  in  his  or  her  tracks  because  his  or  her  only  goal  is  to  be  represented  by  a  gallery   the  second  they  get  out  of  school.  I  can  understand  from  a  financial  point  of  view  they  want  to  be  represented,  but   they  might  be  better  off  working  in  a  gallery  or  working  in  a  museum  or  working  someplace  while  they  are  still  painting   or  drawing  or  photographing  and  finding  their  voice. Interview  by  Andrea  Blanch/  Edited  by  Dmitry  Kiper

182


MUSEE /  Interviews  /  Ann  Schaffer

CURRENT BOARDS,  COMMITTEES  and  OTHER  AFFILIATIONS: Trustee  of  the  NJ  State  of  Israel  Bonds  /  Women’s  Division   Trustee  of  the  United  Jewish  Federation  of  Metrowest,  American  Jewish  Committee,  and  Congregation  Beth  El. Trustee  and  Chair  of  the  Art  Committee  /  Montclair  Art  Museum Trustee  on  the  Board  of  the  Visual  Arts  Center  of  New  Jersey Alumni  Correspondent,  Class  Agent,  Prospective  Student  Interviewer  at  Skidmore  College National  Advisory  Council  and  Chair  of  Acquisitions  and  Collections  Committee  of   Tang  Teaching  Museum  and  Art  Gallery Photography  and  Art  Selection  Committee  of  the  Guggenheim  Museum Advisory  Committee  of  the  Opportunity  Project,  an  Organization  that  helps  to  empower   persons  with  acquired  brain  injuries Trustee,  Associate,  Exhibitions  Partner  and  Executive  Committee  Member  of  ICI,   Independent  Curators  International. 2011  Honoree:    Aljira,  a  Contemporary  Art  Space  in  Newark,  NJ Art  Table:    Women  in  the  Arts  Organization Founder  of  the  Rachel  Coalition,  an  organization  to  combat  domestic  violence Curator  of  the  Annual  Art  Show,  Visual  Arts  Center  of  New  Jersey,  Summit,  NJ Teacher,  Consultant  and  Advisor  of  Contemporary  Art  Appreciation  and  Acquisition “Drawings,”  Sandroni  Rey  Gallery,  Los  Angeles

183


PHOTOGRAPHERS INDEX  

Adam Handler:  29

Edmond Handwerker:  61

Adam Regan:  157

Edwin Flores:  38

Adam Sherbell:  133

Egon Schiele:  43

Agnes Fohn:  117

Elizabeth Ramanand:  65

Alek Belakov:  119

Elliot Townsend:  37,  101

Amanda Ramon:  175

Florence Early:  67,  144

Andrea Furedy:  149

Francesco Barion:  51

Arielle Kramer:  56

Gary Breckheimer:  63

Ashley Campbell:  116

Genevieve Blais:  45

Ashley Cunningham:  115  

Gregory Prescott:  147

Belle Mcintyre:  152

Guenter Knopp:  145

Beryl Fine:  98,  103,  120  

Guilhem de  Castelbajac:  86

Bryan Meador:  131

Hannah Ross:  89

Camille Herbert:  141,  161

Hervé Kwimo:  96

Cana Atay:  85,  88

Marc Engle:  167      

Cassandra Walsh:  177

Ivan Forde:  19

Chris Harris:  171

Jaci Berkopec:  59

Chris Montgomery:  55

Jacobia Dahm:  34,  110

Chris Parente:  35,  36,  106

Jeanie Choi:  70

Corey Scott  Arter:  125

Johnny Maroney:  143

Debora Mittelstaedt:  57

Joie Candido:  137

Dila Atay:  23

Joseph Campbell:  39      

 

185


MUSEE MUSEE    /PHOTOGRAPHERS  INDEX

Julia Forrest:  21

Miguel Rodriguez:  95      

Julio Gaggia:  97,  102

Natalie Poette:  53

Katie Bell  Moore:  69

Nazareth Taccari:  25

Katlyn Kleist:  83  

Nick Dabas:  178

Ki Joon  Kim:  66,  170

Patrick Gliem:  123

Kogo Araki:  159

Paul Kamau:  68,  107

Leif Huron:  27

Paul Typaldos:  20

Leire Unzueta:  49

Peter Zervas:  139

Leon Rodriguez:  151

Pninit Boev:  47

Lindsay Keys:  118

Rachel Monosov:  32,  99

Lindsay Knowles:  62

Reinaldo Cabanillas:  26,  108

Lindsay Kreighbaum:  52

Sarah Flores:  142

Lukasz Piech:  91

Shikeith Cathey:  169

Luna Niluna:  163

Silvia Forni:  60

Marsin: 31

SP Tomer:  124,  126

Mackenzie Gomez:  121

Syed Kazmi:  41,  105

Matt Monath:  87,  93

Tom Lennon:  187

Mattia Crosson:  109

Tucker Friend:  154,  162

Matthew Marocco:  155

Vera Miljkovic:  160

Marc Engle:  135,  136,  167

Victor Chen:  129

Michael Ortiz:  113

Zoe Hiigli:  30,  166

Michelle Aristocrat:  111 186


Tom Lennon

Contact: tlennont@gmail.com/  www.tomlennondesign.com                                                          


SUBMISSIONS We  would  like  new  submissions  for  our  winter  issue.  The  theme  for  Musee/  Winter  2011  is  to   photograph  ones  fears.  The  deadline  for  photo  submissions  is  November  15th  2011 If  you  would  like  to  contribute  to  the  magazine  please  submit: 1.  Please  photography  our  fears  submitting  7-­15  images  of  your  best  work.  Please  submit  only   high  resolution  images  of  at  least  240  dpi  with  out  watermarks  otherwise  your  images  will  not  be   considered. 2.  A  brief  description  of  yourself  and  any  contact  information  that  you  would  want  published. Please  send  all  submissions  to  ab.photosubmissions@gmail.com  by  December  15th,  2011. Also,  due  to  the  volume  of  submissions  we  plan  on  receiving,  we  may  not  get  back  to  everyone  in  a   timely  fashion.  But  don't  worry  -­-­  we're  looking  at  everyone's  work,  and  will  get  in  contact  with   potential  candidates  with  further  instructions. We  look  forward  to  seeing  your  work!

Musée Magazine No. 1  

Autumn 2011