Issuu on Google+

King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals

ARC 400 Jeddah Media Park Graduation Thesis - Senior Project preparation

Created by:

Supervised by:

Date:

Musab M. Badahdah

Dr. Jamal Al-Qawasmi

September – January 2011 / 2012


2


ARC 400 Jeddah Media Park Graduation Thesis - Senior Project preparation

King Fahd University of petroleum & Minerals College of Environmental Design

Created by: Musab Badahdah

Supervised by: Dr. Jamal Al-Qawasmi

September - January 2011 / 2012 3


4


Dedication: This thesis is dedicated to my father, who taught me that the best kind of knowledge to have is that which is learned for its own sake. It is also dedicated to my mother, who taught me that even the largest task can be accomplished if it is done one step at a time.To my family who was supportive and encouraging all along and finally to my colleges who had the same rough times as I had.

5


6


Table of Contents

2.4 Space program sheet: ......................................................................... 43

Table of Contents ....................................................................................... 7

3. Site Analyses ............................................................................................. 55

1. Literature Review ....................................................................................... 9

3.1Site Location in General ....................................................................... 56

1.1 Media, digital Media & Multimedia? ................................................. 10

3.1.1 Why Jeddah .................................................................................. 56

1.2 History of Multimedia......................................................................... 11

3.1.2 History of Jeddah City .................................................................. 56

1.3 Importance of Multimedia ................................................................. 12

3.1.3 Characteristics of Jeddah City ...................................................... 57

1.4 Multimedia production ...................................................................... 14

3.2 Site Selection ....................................................................................... 58

1.5Evolving of The Medias: ...................................................................... 15

3.2.1 Proposed site ............................................................................... 58

1.6 Objective of the propose Media Park................................................. 15

3.2.2 Selection criteria .......................................................................... 63

1.7 Sections of the proposed Media Park ................................................ 15

3.2.4 The selected site .......................................................................... 65

1.7.1 Companies offices ....................................................................... 15

3.3. Site Analyses ...................................................................................... 66

1.7.2 Studios block................................................................................ 16

3.3.1. Location and Access to the site:.................................................. 66

1.7.3 Educational Institute ................................................................... 16

3.3.2. Zoning and neighborhood:.......................................................... 67

1.7.4 Community zone ......................................................................... 16

3.3.3. Natural Environment: ................................................................. 68

1.8 Structure of the proposed MediaPark................................................ 17

3.3.4. Annual Sun and Temperature Data for Jeddah:.......................... 69

2. Architectural Program .............................................................................. 19

3.3.5. Wind and Rain Data .................................................................... 72

2.1.1 Organizational structure.................................................................. 20

4. Case Studies .............................................................................................. 83

2.1.1 Proposed project Goals and Needs: ................................................ 22

4.1 MediaCity UK....................................................................................... 84

2.1.2 Components of the proposed project: ............................................ 24

4.2 Columbia Media center, Columbia Chicago College ........................... 89

2.1.3 Space identification and allocation ................................................. 26

4.3 Pinewood Studio Berlin ....................................................................... 95

2.2.1 The complex proposed users: ......................................................... 31

4.4 Vakko Headquarters and Power Media Center ................................. 99

2.2.2 Simplified users chart: ..................................................................... 32 2.3.1 Summary of spaces and their areas: ............................................... 33 7


8


1. Literature Review

1.1 Media, Digital Medi & Multimedia 1.2 History of Multimedia 1.3 Importance of Multimedia 1.4 Multimedia Production 1.4.1 Development 1.4.2 Pre-Production 1.4.3 Production 1.4.4 Post-Production 1.5 Evolving of the media 1.6 Objectives of proposed Media Park 1.7 Sections of proposed Media Park 1.8 Structure of proposed Media Park

9


1.1 Media, digital Media & Multimedia?

Multimedia is media and content that uses a combination of different

Media in general, refers to various means of

content forms. The term can be used as a noun (a medium with multiple content forms) or as an adjective describing a medium as having multiple content forms. The term is used in contrast to media which use only rudimentary computer display such as text-only or traditional forms of printed or hand-produced material. Multimedia includes a combination of text, audio, still images, video, animation, or

communication. For example, television, radio, newspapers and magazines considered as media. The term can also be used as a collective noun for the press or news reporting agencies. In the computer world, "media" is also used as a collective noun, but refers to different types of data storage options. With the improvement of technology computers become an essential part of communication and involved a lot in media production which led us to new terms known as Digital Media and Multimedia.

Digital media is a form of electronic media

where data is stored in digital form (as opposed to analog). It can refer also to the technical aspect of storage and transmission of information like hard disk drives or computer networking. Also digital media refers to audio, video, and photo content that have been encoded (digitally compressed). Encoding content involves converting audio and video input into a digital media file such as a Windows Media file. After digital media is encoded, it can be easily manipulated, distributed, and rendered (played) by computers, and is easily transmitted over computer networks.1

1

interactivity content forms. Multimedia is usually recorded and played, displayed or accessed by information content processing devices, such as computerized and electronic devices, but can also be part of a live performance. Multimedia (as an adjective) also describes electronic media devices used to store and experience multimedia content. Multimedia is distinguished from mixed media in fine; by including audio, for example, it has a broader scope. The term "rich media" is similar for interactive multimedia. Multimedia uses computers to present text, audio, video, animation, interactive features, and still images in various ways and combinations made possible through the advancement of technology. By combining media and content, those interested in multimedia can take on and work with a variety of media forms to get their content across. This is an exciting new field for those interested in computers, technology, and creative career options. Multimedia can be accessed through computers or electronic devices and integrates the

http://onlinehelp.microsoft.com 10


quickly: 1981 saw IBM's first PC, and in 1984 Apple released the Macintosh, the first computer system to use a graphical user interface (GUI). The Macintosh also bore the first mouse, which would forever change the way people interact with computers. In 1985, Microsoft released the first version of its Windows operating system. That same year, Commodore released the Amiga, a machine which many experts consider to be the first multimedia computer due to its advanced graphics processing power and innovative user interface. The Amiga did not fare well over the years, though, and Windows has become the standard for desktop computing.

various forms together. One example of multimedia would be combining a website with video, audio, or text images. 2 However, multimedia is now commonplace. Nearly all PCs are capable of displaying video, though the resolution available depends on the power of the computer's video adapter and CPU.3

1.2 History of Multimedia In the real world, though, when most people talk about multimedia, they are talking about computer multimedia. The word has come to represent the realm of computer graphics, video games, on-screen presentations, and a whole world of other possibilities. Where Did It All Begin? That is hard to say, but one of the earliest and best-known examples of multimedia was the video game Pong. Developed in 1972 by Nolan Bushnell (the founder of a then new company called Atari), the game consisted of two simple paddles that batted a square "ball" back and forth across the screen, like tennis. It started as an arcade game, and eventually ended up in many homes. A New Revolution In 1976, another revolution was about to start as friends Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak founded a startup company called Apple Computer. A year later they unveiled the Apple II, the first computer to use color graphics. The computer revolution moved 2 3

http://internships.about.com/od/internshipsquestions http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/M/multimedia.html

Innovations Both Windows and the Macintosh operating systems paved the way for the lightning-fast developments in multimedia that were to come. Since both Windows and Mac OS handle graphics and sound developers are able to create programs that use multimedia to more powerful effect.4 In the mid-1980s and into the 1990s, computer developers started looking at how computers could be used an s never before. At the same time, advances in technology brought about 1. Faster desktop computers, 2.Increased working memory capacity, 3. Higher data storage capacity, 4. Digital audio and video, 5. Graphic operating systems worked by pointing and clicking, 6. Local and wide area networks, 7. Thousands of applications ranging from word processing to a myriad of multimedia. Computer developers started looking to multimedia – the delivery of information using text, pictures, audio and video—as a way to utilize computers in a uniquely personal 4

Solomon, A.W. (2004), Introduction to Multimedia. Woodland Hills, CA

11


way. Multimedia computers could be used to increase efficiency and productivity on the job, provide information at out fingertips in the home, and help students learn more effectively both in and out of the classroom. These personal gains meant that people would see computers as practical and useful tools in their everyday lives.5 One company that has played an important role in multimedia from its very inception is Macromedia (formerly called Macro mind). In 1988, Macromedia released its landmark Director program, which allowed everyday computer users to create stunning, interactive multimedia presentations. Today, Adobe Corporation bought Macromedia Flash that was drives most of the animation and multimedia you see on the Internet, while Flash is still used to craft high-end interactive productions. Each new development of each passing year is absorbed into next year's technology, making the multimedia experience, better, faster, and more interesting. As you can see, the impact of multimedia technology on our daily lives is often more than we realize. The bottom line is that if there is a need to inform, teach, or entertain multimedia technology can play a key role. , or entertain, or entert. Gdsg. Gdsg

5

1.3 Importance of Multimedia Multimedia finds its application in various areas including, advertisements, art, education, entertainment, engineering, medicine, mathematics, business, scientific research and spatial temporal applications. Education: In Education, multimedia is used to produce training courses (popularly called CBTs) and reference books like encyclopedia and almanacs. A CBT lets the user go through a series of presentations, text about a particular topic, and associated illustrations in various information formats. Edutainment is an informal term used to describe combining education with entertainment, especially multimedia entertainment. Learning theory in the past decade has expanded dramatically because of the introduction of multimedia. Several lines of research have evolved (e.g. Cognitive load, Multimedia learning, and the list goes on). The possibilities for learning and instruction are nearly endless. The idea of media convergence is also becoming a major factor in education, particularly higher education. Defined as separate technologies such as voice (and telephony features), data (and productivity applications) and video that now share resources and interact with each other, synergistically creating new efficiencies, media convergence is rapidly changing the curriculum in universities all over the world. Likewise, it is changing the availability, or lack thereof, of jobs requiring this savvy technological skill.

http://churmura.com/technology/brief-history-of-multimedia

12


Engineering: Software engineers may use multimedia in Computer Simulations for anything from entertainment to training such as military or industrial training. Multimedia for software interfaces are often done as collaboration between creative professionals and software engineers. Industry: In the Industrial sector, multimedia is used as a way to help present information to shareholders, superiors and coworkers. Multimedia is also helpful for providing employee training, advertising and selling products all over the world via virtually unlimited web-based technology Mathematical and scientific research: In mathematical and research, multimedia is mainly used for modeling and simulation. For example, a scientist can look at a molecular model of a particular substance and manipulate it to arrive at a new substance. Representative research can be found in journals like the Journal of Multimedia. Commercial: Much of the electronic old and new media used by commercial artists is multimedia. Exciting presentations are used to grab and keep attention in advertising. Business to business and interoffice communications are often developed by creative services firms for advanced multimedia

presentations beyond simple slide shows to sell ideas or liven-up training. Commercial multimedia developers may be hired to design for governmental services and nonprofit services applications as well. Medicine: In Medicine, doctors can get trained by looking at a virtual surgery or they can simulate how the human body is affected by diseases spread by viruses and bacteria and then develop techniques to prevent it. Entertainment and fine arts: In addition, multimedia is heavily used in the entertainment industry, especially to develop special effects in movies and animations. Multimedia games are a popular pastime and are software programs available either as CD-ROMs or online. Some video games also use multimedia features. Multimedia applications that allow users to actively participate instead of just sitting by as passive recipients of information are called Interactive Multimedia. In the Arts there are multimedia artists, whose minds are able to blend techniques using different media that in some way incorporates interaction with the viewer. One of the most relevant could be Peter Greenaway who is melding Cinema with Opera and all sorts of digital media. Another approach entails the creation of multimedia that can be displayed in a traditional fine arts arena, such as an art gallery. Although multimedia display material may be volatile, the survivability of the content is as strong as any traditional media. 13


1.4 Multimedia production

    

The Process of Production Management The production of interactive multimedia applications is a complex one, involving multiple steps. This process can be divided into the following phases: 1. Development 3. Production

2.Pre-production 4. Post-production

1.4.1 Development: is defining project goals and objectives

1.4.3 Production: Once all the preproduction activities have been completed, the multimedia application enters the production phase. Activities in this phase include:       

Goals: In multimedia production goals are general statements of anticipated project outcomes, usually more global in scope. Objectives: Specific statements of anticipated project outcomes. Activities: These are actions, in order to implement an objective. Specific people are responsible for the execution, a cost is related to their implementation and there is a time frame binding. Defining the Targeted Audience: At this stage is the potential target audience of the proposed project. This will determine how the content needs to be presented. 1.4.2 Pre-production: It is the process of mapping out a cohesive strategy for the entire multimedia project, including content, technical execution and marketing. Based on the goals and objectives, the three pillars of multimedia Hardware, software and user participation are defined. At this stage the multimedia producer begins to assemble the resources and talent required for creating the multimedia application. The Production Manager undertakes the following activities.  

Development of the budget control system Hiring of specialists involved in the multimedia application process

Contracting video and audio production crews & recording studios Equipment rental, leasing and purchasing Software acquisition and installation Planning the research work of the content specialists Development of the multimedia application outline, logic flow, scripts and video and audio files production scripts and schedules Coordination of legal aspects of production

Content Research Interface Design Graphics Development Selection of musical background and sound recording Development of computer animation Production of digital video Authoring

1.4.4 Post-production: Here the video/film is assembled by the video/film editor. The modern use of video in the filmmaking process has resulted in two workflow variants: one using entirely film, and the other using a mixture of film and video. This is the final stage, where the film is released to cinemas or, occasionally, to consumer media (DVD, VCD, VHS, Blu-ray) or direct download from a provider. The film is duplicated as required for distribution to cinemas. Press kits, posters, and other advertising materials are published and the film is advertised and promoted. The film plays at selected cinemas and the DVD typically is released a few months later. The distribution rights for the film and DVD are also usually sold for worldwide distribution. The distributor and the production company share profits.6

6

Methodology of Multimedia Production, Atoll Pant, 1999

14


1.5Evolving of The Medias:

1.6 Objective of the propose Media Park

The media over the last ten years has rapidly changed and developments like high definition, fully digital processes, and changing production workflows – coupled with ever-increasing customer demand for interactivity – are all creating new challenges for the industry. By offering this facilitating high speed connectivity, a purpose-built infrastructure, changes in supply chain, and flexible training and development for staff, I hope to help you embrace – and exploit – every opportunity. The Media Park could be describes simply as an urban regeneration neighborhood. As the production process described earlier, there many people and companies involved into this work. As an idea of make production easier is to collect all companies of interest into one complex with unified infrastructure of networking and database. It usually develops a set up to accommodate companies of small media and communication industry, as well as educational institutions, a studio block and public open zone with outdoor activities. The idea of the park is a smaller version of a media city which contains more facilities than the park. It first appears was around 1980s’ in Germany. The park contain about 6 companies in different fields of Animation, Film-making, Visual effects, Sound design, Photography and Graphic design collaborating with each other or to be departments of one big company. The studio block will held five different types of studios for filming and motion capturing. These studios fully equipped and supported with dressing rooms, directing, sound recording, cameras and machines and all required accessories as well as workshop. The educational institute managed by the park or complex owner providing a two years professional diploma in all previous mentioned fields. For the public to participate, enjoy and experiment this new neighborhood, a public zone will be provided contains exhibitions, auditorium, cinema halls and outdoor activities in additional to some commercial and retail shops.

The MediaPark is acting as an initiative neighborhood attraction for the professionals in the multimedia production to show their works and participate in the Saudi media community. Creating a creative, business and social environmental spot in the city, would gave a recognition and importance for the media production in the country. Also to provide professional education facility for multimedia production since there is no current professional schools yet in the country rolling apart in this field. As part of community

1.7 Sections of the proposed Media Park As mentioned The Ark is divided into four clear sections: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Companies offices Studios block Educational Institute Community zone

Each of the previous components has it unique functions and purpose and its own targeted users and varied in privacy and security as how valuable is this part. A brief description about the sections is presented as follow: 1.7.1 Companies offices Commercial office space is available at the MediaPark with a range of solutions and flexible floor sizes to meet the specific needs of most businesses. In addition, there are flexible work space solutions for smaller creative companies, freelancers or those looking to establish a new foothold at the park.

15


1.7.2 Studios block The heart of MediaPark containing an amazing new studio complex – high definition facilities in the country, operated in partnership by local companies. Containing 3-5 HD studios and about two audio studios facility works individually or complementary with the HD studios. 1.7.3 Educational Institute The institute is the first educational facility of its kind in the kingdom, designed on a basis of an international collaboration. It will provide a two years diploma in seven different majors which they are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Animation & VFX 3D design Film-making Sound design Graphic design Photography

1.7.4 Community zone The community zone divided into 3 main parts: 1. Exhibition section: Which will have an exhibition and galleries supported with lecture halls as well as Cinema halls. 2. Retail: Coffee shops and restaurants will be there as well as technical shops providing tools and equipments for media production. 3. A Piazza overlooking the water front of Jeddah

16


1.8 Structure of the proposed MediaPark

MediaPark

Buisiness

Owner HQ

Rental Offices

Institue

Community

Studio Block

Library

Exhibtions

Park Control

Typical spaces

Visual

Admin

Retails

Office space

Special spaces

Audio

Departments

Public piazza

Services

Support

Facilities

Labs and studios

17


18


2. Architectural Program

2.1 Project Goals and Needs 2.2 Organizational structure 2.3 Components of the proposed project 2.4 Space Identification and Allocation 2.5 Proposed users for the projects 2.6 Summary of spaces and their areas 2.7 Space Program sheets

19


Business

2.1.1 Organizational structure Rental Offices

Owner HQ Office place

Park Control Admin.

Typical

Services Special

Reciption

Design studio

Admin

Printing

Custemers meeting

Reciption

Design studio

Meeting rooms

General Managment

Admin

Printing

Commomn Spaces

Maintinance

Custemers meeting

Model shop

Storeges

IT

Meeting room

small studio

Studio rentals

Office Space Toilets & cantin

Make-up & dressing

Audio recording

Special

Lobby

Financal Affairs

Personal Affairs

Typical

Studio blocks

Technical Power

Normal

Services

Reciption

Reciption

Commomn Spaces

Audio Control

Audience review

Storeges

Model shop

Vision Control

Meeting room

Loading area

Meeting room

small studio

Director

Catering

Server station

Office Space

Make-up & dressing

Producer

Make-up

Toilets & cantin

Audio recording

Workshop

Dressong

Prop store

Green room

source

Institute Public

Performin studio

20


Institute Community

Deanship

Departments

Common

Dean office

Animation & VFX

Studios/ each department

Registration

3D design

Classrooms

History of Media

Administration

Production design

Theater

History of Saudi Media

student affairs

office spaces

Film-making

Sound Design

Stage

Model Shop

Perminant Exhibitions

Tools History

Companies gallery

Outdoor Ex. meeting room

Graphic Design

Library

Conference Centre

Exhibitions

Temporary Exhibitions

Retail stores

Supporting

Cinema Halls

Caffees

Admin.

Indoor

Large Auditorium

Restaurants

Reciption

Outdoor

Lecture Halls

Pro Tools 1

security

Multipurpose Hall

Pro Tools 2

Storeges

Pro Tools 3

Commomn Spaces Resturants and Cafes

Services

toilets

Photography

Faculty

21


2.1.1 Proposed project Goals and Needs:

 Aspire service to the wider community and of advocacy for the value of the arts.

Human Issues:  Functional Issues :

o Goal:  The building should capable of serving all the needs of the students with high performance. o Needs:  Provide studios, labs, classrooms and library with all the facilities to every department.  Locate all the classrooms near the students’ studios.

o Goal:  Encourage collaboration among students. o Needs:  Provide at least 1 meeting hall in every department  Provide an open common space between the departments  Social issues:

o Goal:  Be a cultural resource for the citizens of area and all Saudi.

o Needs:  Galleries those are capable of holding big exhibits and hold 40 persons

Environmental Issues:  Site Location :

o Goal:  Site should be easily accessible from all parts of the city. o Needs:  The site should be located on big major roads.  The area shouldn’t be crowded.  Context :

o Goal:  To serve as a Landmark to the city and give a pleasing image. o Needs:  Use a colorful theme.  The building should be Bold and modern shape.

o Needs:  Provide facilities to hold local competitions and public competitions, a multipurpose hall. o Goal: 22


 Climatic :

o Goal:  Maximum utilization of the sun and wind energy and record a green building in the land of Jeddah. o Needs:  Use photovoltaic panels on all exposed roof surfaces to collect solar energy.  Use shading devices on all west and south facades. Cultural Issues:  Public awareness :

o Goal:  It should publish scientific production with all its forms like magazine and periodical newsletters. o Needs:  Special room for publications and media as a supporting facility to the library.

Aesthetic Issues:  Form & Meaning :

o Goal:  Form should be contemporary. o Needs:  Adapt new design theories and materials.

o Goal:  Form should reflect the youth and fresh nature of the students. o Needs:  Building should be colorful and exciting to look at.

Aesthetic Issues:  Form & Meaning :

o Goal:  The conduction of artistic sessions like forums, workshops, studying sessions, artistic lectures and others. o Needs:  Provide lecture theaters with digital displays.  Workshops to allow a hands-on experience for the attendants.

o Goal:  Handicapped accessibility. o Needs:  Provide ramps with 1:10m slope at every exit and entry point.  Provide elevators with every stair case in the facility.

23


2.1.2 Components of the proposed project: (Explanation of the previous chart) 1. 2. 3. 4.

Complex owner Headquarter Business sector Educational Sector Community sector

1. Owner Headquarter o Complex administration Here where all departments controlling the complex and managing the facilities allocated. Here we are talking about the following:        

Financial Affairs General Management Maintenance department IT department Personal Affairs department Studio rentals and client affairs Institute sub-administration Community facilities managements.

     

Animation & VFX Department Film-making department Production design department Sound design department Graphic design department Photography department

All supported with required facilities and studios such as:      

Design studios Printing rooms Model shops Small filming studio Make-up & dressing Audio recording studios

As long as normal open offices spaces with meeting rooms, copy center, archive, executive offices conferences halls and supporting services from storages, toilets and catering.

o The Owner office headquarter Here where all the company business and work allocated. It is a main headquarter of the production of the company where all required facilities and equipment are placed. The company divided into different departments as follow:

24


2. Business sector o Rental offices A normal office building for different medium range media production such as graphics, animation and 3d modeling which doesn’t required large studios or warehouse facilities. It will obtain a normal offices spaces as well as special spaces for workshops and model shops supported with especial ventilation systems and so on. o Studio blocks There will be different types of studios with different sizes to accommodate different needs. It is also supported with all required facilities as listed below:     

Reception. Audience and client viewing area. Meeting rooms. Make-up, hair dressing and green rooms. Catering and toilets.

         

Power source. Vision control. Audio control. Director and producers rooms. Workshop and storages. Actress stages Storage for technical and sensitive equipments. Loading area. Common spaces and tea seats. Server and data storage network.

3. Educational sector o Located under the complex owner providing 2years diploma certified by the complex owner in the following majors:  Animation & VFX department.  3D design and modeling department.  Film-making department.  Production design department.  Sound design department.  Graphic design department.  Photography department. o Common facilities will be implemented with the institute as studios for each department as the need and shared classrooms among the department with public library and workshop. Theater and performing stage will be essentials for the institute. o The deanship will be divided into:      

Dean offices Registration. Administration. Student Affairs. Meeting room and open spaces. Chairman offices in each department.

25


4. Community sector o Exhibitions Containing different galleries showing the history media and the revolution of the technology and equipments and having some of the companies characters and works displayed in an internal exhibits or exterior exhibits.

2.1.3 Space identification and allocation POWELL THEATRE (PW) Powell theatre is the largest re-recording room, offering an extremely comfortable environment.

o Conference and cinemas  Cinemas.  Auditorium.  Lecture halls. Playback / record: Pro Tools o Retail stores  Coffee shops.  Restaurants.  Professional shops.

Specifications: length 19.20 m, width (11.58 m), height 7.32 m 1. PRESSBURGER THEATRE (PW)

o Outdoor plaza on the water front and outdoor stage place where community activities take place

A versatile theatre in the heart of the sound department which caters for high quality television and feature film mixes. Specifications: length: 13.41 m, Width: 8.53 m, height: 5.79 m 26


2. THEATRE 7 (PW)

Screen width: 31ft x14ft Seats: 115 Greenroom: Yes Desk: 32 Fader ICON Power Point presentation from Theatre This room also has HD Video, Data & Fiber links to MTC & Cutting Rooms. The largest preview theatre in the UK capable of running all formats of film and video. The theatre has a seating capacity of one hundred and fifteen and the attached hospitality room for pre or post screening discussions makes it a perfect venue for previews. SPECIFICATIONS LENGTH:70 ft (21.34 m) WIDTH:43 ft (13.11 m) HEIGHT:17 ft (5.18 m)

3. KORDA THEATRE (SH)

Screen width: 34ft x 14ft Seats: 60 Producers room: Yes Set apart in its own building the Korda Theatre has the advantage of a light spacious foyer where clients can relax and entertain. Moving up the stairs into the mixing auditorium the first impression is one of size, with the very comfortable lounge area behind the mixing desk and forty five seats in front gives a very flexible working environment as well as the opportunity for screening the mix. specifications length:59 ft (17.98 m) width:35 ft (10.67 m) height:31 ft (9.45 m)

27


4. THEATRE 1 (SH)

Screen width: 12ft x 9ft Seats: 6 Producers room: No A large dedicated Foley/ADR theatre with probably the largest collection of surfaces and props anywhere in Europe, offering the flexibility for recording any type of film genre. specifications length:33 ft (10.06 m) width:26 ft (7.92 m) height:17 ft (5.18 m)

5. THEATRE 2 (SH)

Screen width: 27ft x 14ft Seats: 14 Producers room: Yes A large mixing theatre set in a self-contained facility with the added comfort of a producers room. Suitable for dedicated projects, it can also double up with the Korda for larger films as the two theatres match exactly in equipment and quality. specifications length:52 ft (15.85 m) width:29 ft (8.84 m) height:25 ft (7.62 m)

28


6. THEATRE 3 (SH)

CUTTING ROOMS Across Pinewood and Shepperton there are over 40 secure suites of air conditioned cutting rooms. These rooms are furnished to a high standard and offer a comfortable working environment. All rooms benefit from access to the newly refurbished post production hospitality suite.

The following support facilities are included:

Screen width: 9ft x 4ft A Dolby licensed 5.1 mixing theatre. The size of this room makes it perfect for lower budget projects or for premix and prep work to feed the larger theatres. specifications length:26 ft (7.92 m) width:15 ft (4.57 m) height:13 ft (3.96 m)

       

Green Room Kitchen * Make-up room Wardrobe* Production Office* Shower room Parking* Seating for up to 50 people

1. Kitchens / Catering Each kitchen has a kettle, fridge, microwave, sink/drainer and plenty of work-top space. Meals can be brought in on request, with a selection of menus held by the studio. Studio clients can visit any of the restaurants and cafés that abound in the immediate vicinity

29


Stages: It is containing about 10 warehouse studios varies from 550 m2 to 2500 m2 as I will take one example of the studios.

Different types of stages with different sizes supported with all it needs from catering, workshops, and dressing and make-up rooms in a way that keep it close and not interfere with each other.

The following color key to indicate general functions around the stage. Stage A, with the specification and accommodations.

Length Width Height (installation) Stage Size STAGE DOORS Width Height

STAGE A SPECIFICATION SHEET 34.71 m 27.95 m 8 970.15 m2

Supporting rooms. Technical filming rooms. Make-up and dressing. Building technical. Workshops and set rooms.

3.22 m 3.9 m 30


2.2.1 The complex proposed users: This project is designed to offer a headquarter of a major production company with its own facilities plus rentable production facilities like studios and offices as well as a community center with public plaza. The users will vary between owners, renters, client and visitors.

Project users: 

Owner They are the owners of the complex and the agencies renting in the office building and the studios. They have frequent visits to the building and use of some facilities around.

Public o Guests Are the people who appear on some shows either as guest actors or guest speakers. o Visitors Are the public that use the community center or the open public plaza and the retails, coffee shops and restaurants. o Clients Are the people who are client of the agencies located in the complex or even the clients who are temporarily renting the filming studios. Private o Students and Faculty Usually related to the educational institute with some accessibility to studio blocks or the plaza for filming activities.

Workers o Directors A person who direct the show or the ongoing production. o Cast They are mostly actors or hosts who appear on the shows. o Makeup artists The people taking care of makeup setting for the cast who appear in front of the cameras & make sure they look good. o Hairdressers Take care of the actors’ hair style & make sure it looks good o Wardrobe support People in charge of costumes and how ready to be used. o Producers People financing the film project or the show and make sure they have everything they need available. o Editors Dealing with footage and work on it in postproduction. o Audio engineer Take care of the sound control from placing microphones and recording until the final product. o Electrician Set up the scene by required power supply and connectors. o Cameramen People behind the camera who shoot and filming. o Librarians People who run and operate the library. o Secretaries & assistance o Genitors o security 31


2.2.2 Simplified users chart:

Users Of the complex

Public

Private

For public places

For secured places

Workers

Guests

Visitors

Clients Owner HQ

Institute

Community center

Studio blocks

Park Administration

Community Center

Exterior plaza

Agencies

Studio blocks

Agencies

Restaurants and cafes

Park Administration

Agencies located

Owner HQ

Community center

Students and faculty Institute Studio blocks

Security Retails staff

32


2.3.1 Summary of spaces and their areas: Data sources:

Standards:

The sources that available from books and standards references sources that been authorizes by international society of architecture.  

The following few pages will list the summary of the spaces with its areas and users. Users will be listed in each space according to the users’ structure in the chart on the previous page. The sheets will be listed as following: 

Neufert Architects’ Data. Time-Saver standards for Building Types.

o Studio Blocks.  stages

Outsourcing:

None-standardized or not available in previous standards and books, which lead to find the dimension and the areas from real built examples around the world.  Pinewood studios, Berlin.

Business Sector o Rental office building. o Park owner headquarter.  Typical Administration Department.  Headquarters departments.

Training Sector. o Departments of the training sector.

Community Center.

Total area of the proposed project.

http://www.pinewoodgroup.com

 New York State Authority - Qualified Production Facilities. http://www.nylovesfilm.com/tax/Qualified_Production_Facilities.pdf

 Studio Gang Architects, Columbia media center. http://www.studiogang.net

Media City UK.

After the summery sheets it will be followed by the space program sheets of some special parts of the proposed project.

http://www.mediacityuk.co.uk

 Vakko Headquarters and Media Center, Turkey. http://www.archdaily.com/56149/vakko-headquarters-and-powermedia-center-rex-2

33


Space

Area

Quantity

Net Area

Users

Workers – clients guests

Business Sector – Rental Offices / 8 Companies Suites Reception

10

1

10

Executive offices

50

1

50

Customers meeting

20

2

40

Closed offices

20

4

80

Open offices space

100

2

200

Open workstation

100

5

500

Cantina & Toilet

35

2

70

Copy place

15

1

15

Design studio

100

1

100

Computer lab

80

1

80

Model shop

80

1

60

Audio recording

80

1

80

Printing room

50

1

50

Filming studio

100

1

100

Make-up and dressing

20

2

40

Common spaces

40

1

40

Storages

50

1

50

Server station

50

1

50

Total

1635 m2 / suite

Rental Offices

Typical

Supporting

Special As required

Table 2.1

Workers - clients

Workers

13,080 m2

34


Space

Area

Quantity

Net Area

Users

General Management

526

1

526

Financial department

526

1

526

526

1

526

Customers service

526

1

526

Maintenance

526

1

526

Business

200

1

200

Training Center

200

1

200

Community

200 15 30 100 15 10 35

1 1 2 2 4 3 2

200 15 60 200 60 30 70

Personal Affairs

Sectors control

Departments

Office Places

Park Administration

Park Owner Headquarter

Film-making department Animation department VFX Department 3D Design Sound Design Graphic Design Photography

See table 2.3

Typical

Special

Reception Customers space Office Spaces Copy place Cantina Toilets Motion Capture studio Computer lab Animation Lab Graphic studio Printing room Model shop Photography studio Film studios

Restaurant Table 2.2

Workers – clients guests

Check the next schedule 2.4 please. 6730 m2

150 Total

See table 2.3

1

150 10,545 m2

35


Space

Area

Quantity

Net Area

Users

Typical Administration Department

Typical Administration Department Department manager

30

1

30

Manager secretary

15

1

15

Vice manager

25

1

25

Vice manager secretary

15

1

15

General supervisor

20

1

20

Accountant

20

1

20

Network assistance

20

1

20

Office space

30

3

90

Waiting lounge

15

2

30

Reception

10

1

10

Meeting room

60

3

180

Client meeting

30

2

60

Copy place

15

1

15

Cantina and toilets

35

1

35

Table 2.3

Total

526 m2 / department

Workers

Workers - clients

2630 m2

36


Space

Area

Quantity

Net Area

Users

HQ Departments Typical

Storages

100

7

700

Closed offices

20

14

280

Meeting room Small Studios Preparation stage Vision / Audio Control Review theater Editing room Color Correction lab Compositing lab Make-up / Dressing room Computer lab Preview room Motion capture studio Model shop Special effects studio Computer lab Model shop Recording studio Mixing studio Dubbing lab Design studio

60 500 200 40 160 100 100 100 30 100 160 280 100 120 100 100 100 100 100 150

7 2 2 2 1 2 2 2 2 3 2 1 1 1 3 1 3 2 2 3

420 1000 400 80 160 200 200 200 200 300 300 280 100 120 300 100 300 200 200 450

Printing room Photography studio Production studio Model room Wardrobe room

60 100 100 20 20

1 2 1 2 2

60 200 100 40 40 2 6730 m

Departments

Film-making

Animation VFX Design Special 3D Design Sound Design Graphic Design

Photography Table 2.4

Total

Workers

Workers - clients Workers Workers - clients

Workers

37


Space

Area

Quantity

Net Area

Users

Studio Blocks

Business Sector – Studio Blocks

General

Stages

Reception Catering Workshop Toilets Power Source Loading Dock Check the following schedule 2.6 please.

36 70 375 35 30 25 1765

Table 2.5

1 1 2 2 2 3 4 Total

Space

Area

36 70 750 70 60 75 7060

Workers - clients Workers Workers - clients Workers

8121 m2

Quantity

Net Area

Users

Stages

Stages

Technical

Supporting

Table 2.6

Performing Stage Vision Control Audio Control Lighting Control Dolly systems Review room LAN room Offices: Director/Producer Open Office Meeting room Audience/VIP Dressing Room Make-Up Craft shop Storage Toilets

875 30 30 15 20 150 20 20 60 60 80 15 15 150 100 35

1 1 1 1 2 1 1 4 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 Total

875 30 30 15 40 150 20 80 60 60 60 30 30 150 100 35 1765 m2

Workers – visitors

Workers – clients Workers Workers – clients guests

Workers - guests

38


Space

Area

Quantity

Net Area

Users

6 60 100 40 100 100 100 100

Workers – faculty student – visitors

Departments

Deanship

Training Center Sector Toilets Meeting room Typical Office spaces Archiving Dean office + support Admission Departments Registration Student affairs 1. Chairman offices 2. Film-making 3. Animation 4. VFX Design 5. 3D Design 6. Sound Design 7. Graphic Design 8. Photography Classrooms Theater Stage Model shop Common Library Faculty offices Cafeteria Toilets

Table 2.7

6 60 100 40 100 100 100 100

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Check the next schedule 2.8 please. Total of = 3820 m2

70 150 50 100 300 250 20 35

14 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 Total

980 150 50 100 300 250 20 105

Students – faculty Students – guests visitors Workers – students faculty

6411 m2

39


Space

Area

Quantity

Net Area

Users

Training Center Departments Chairman

Chairman Chairman secretary Office spaces

Departments

Film-making

Animation

Special

VFX Design 3D Design Sound Design Graphic Design

Photography Table 2.8

Main stage Lighting stage Preparation stage Vision / Audio Control Editing room Color Correction lab Compositing lab Make-up / Dressing room Computer lab Preview room Motion capture studio Model shop Special effects studio Computer lab Model shop Recording studio Mixing studio Dubbing lab Design studio Printing room Photography studio Production studio Model room Wardrobe room

30 10 70 800 280 120 40 80 80 80 30 80 150 280 80 120 80 80 80 80 80 60 60 60 60 20 20

7 2 7 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 Total

210 20 490 800 280 120 40 160 80 80 30 160 150 280 80 120 160 80 160 80 80 120 60 120 60 20 20 3820 m2

Workers – student faculty

Workers Students Faculty

40


Space

Area

Quantity

Net Area

Users

Community Center Lobby & Reception

200

1

200

35

2

70

Workers – visitors guests

Storage and Services

150

1

15

Workers

History of Media

200

1

200

History of Media in KSA

200

1

200

Production History

200

1

200

Companies Galleries

100

4

400

Outdoor Exhibition

200

1

200

Indoor

120

1

120

Outdoor

120

1

120

Occupancy of 500 people

400

1

700

Theaters

200

2

400

Ticketing

20

1

20

Snack bar

30

1

30

Toilets Lecture halls Multipurpose hall Coffee shops & Restaurants

35 150 150 15

1 2 1 6

35 300 150 90

Technical shops

40

3

120

Exhibitions

General

Permanent

Temporary

Retail

Conference Center

Auditorium

Cinema Halls

Table 2.9

Toilets

Total

Visitors - workers

Visitors – guests workers

Visitors - workers

3570 m2

41


Space

Net Area

Total Areas Calculation Owner Headquarter

10, 540 m2

Business Sector

21,201 m2

Educational institute

6,411

m2

Community Center

3,570

m2

Total

41,722

m2

+ 15% circulation

6,250

m2

Total Area

47,970

m2

Table 2.10

42


2.4 Space program sheet: In this section we will go through some major spaces in this project where it we go a little deep inside it.

Owner Offices

Before that here is a general bubble diagram showing the relations between the whole complexes together. Owner Headquarter

Studio Blocks

The spaces are placed in the following order:     

   

Offices spaces. o Where most offices in the complex will look like. Cinema. Indoor exhibits. Outdoor Exhibits. Film Theater. o A small theater for showing short documentary in the exhibition Library. Auditorium. Park administration. Filming studio. o The major heart of the project and how it is organized. Recording studio. o The recording studio as separated into two parts of singing and control recording.

Park Administration Community center Rental office building Plaza & Water front

Training Center

43


Offices Function

Rentable Offices

QTY

Unit Area m²

Total Area m²

Activities

Occupancy

56

100

5600

Rentable Offices

-

Critical Factors   

Flexible arrangement Clear observation path Security issue Samples

Equipment  

Varying depth Natural light Standard

44


Cinemas Function

QTY

Unit Area m²

Show movies

3

200

Total Area m² 600

Activities

Occupancy

Sitting watching

-

Critical Factors   

Clear path Artificial lighting Acoustical panels Samples

Equipment   

Lobby Projector room Emergency exits Standard

45


Exhibition – indoor display Function

QTY

Unit Area m²

Total Area m²

Activities

Occupancy

Display of Collections

5

200

1000

Public View

-

Critical Factors   

Flexible arrangement Clear observation path Security issue

Equipment  

Temporary Partitions Artificial Lighting

Standard

46


Exhibition – outdoor exhibition Function

QTY

Unit Area m²

Sculptures and outdoor collections

2

200

Total Area m² 400

Activities

Occupancy

Public View

-

Critical Factors   

Equipment   

Flexible arrangement Clear observation path Security issue Relationship

Shading Devices Landscape Artificial light at night Standard

Movie theatre.

coffee shop

Exhibitions Control & info.

Admin.

Event & conference facilities

47


Film Theater Function

QTY

Unit Area m²

Show educational movies

2

120

Total Area m² 240

Activities

Occupancy

Watch movies

-

Critical Factors  

Equipment   

Security issue Emergency exits Relationship

Lobby Show Place Services Standard

Film theatre.

coffee shop

Exhibitions Control & info. Library

Admin.

Event & conference facilities

48


Library of educational institute Function

QTY

Unit Area m²

Show educational movies

1

300

Total Area m² 300

Activities

Occupancy

Watch movies

-

Critical Factors  

Equipment   

Security issue Emergency exits Relationship

Lobby Show Place Services Standard

Stage

Departments

Faculty room

Library

Deanship

Classrooms

49


Auditorium Function

QTY

Unit Area m²

Shows And seminars

1

400

Total Area m² 400

Critical Factors    

Clear observation path Emergency exits Acoustics panels Artificial lighting Relationship

Activities

Occupancy

Lectures, seminars and shows

500 Equipment

  

Seating capacity levels, sightlines, acoustics, circulation and seating density Stage and backstage (house) Standard

stage

Back stage

Seating area Storage

Lobby Info. desk

Multipurpose hall

Admin.

50


Park administration Function

QTY

Unit Area m²

Offices for the Stuff.

5

526

Total Area m² 2630

Activities

Occupancy

Desktop working

-

Critical Factors  

Equipment   

Natural daylight Openness Relationship

Desktop stations Computers Clear circulation Standard

51


Film Studio Function

QTY

Unit Area m²

Total Area m²

Activities

Occupancy

Filming

4

1765

7060

Filming, dancing and acting

10 - 30

Critical Factors   

Isolated from the outdoor lighting and sounds Critical height of the studio as hanged system used A lot of wires and equipments moving Images

Equipment   

Dolly systems Cameras and tripods Lighting systems Standard

52


Recording studio Function

QTY

Unit Area m²

Singing, playing and Recording

5

120

Total Area m² 600

Critical Factors   

Sound isolation Doors and walls insolation system No connection to the outside Images

Activities

Occupancy

Play music singing

7 Equipment

  

Recording system Amplifier Microphones and music instruments Standard

53


54


3. Site Analyses

3.1Site Location in General 3.1.1 Why Jeddah 3.1.2 History of Jeddah City 3.1.3 Characteristics of Jeddah City 3.2 Site Selection 3.2.1 Proposed site 3.2.2 Selection criteria 3.2.3 Evaluation and comparison of proposed sites 3.3. Site Analyses 3.3.1. Location and Access to the site 3.3.2. Annual Sun and Temperature Data for Jeddah 3.3.3. Wind and Rain Data

55


3.1Site Location in General 3.1.1 Why Jeddah A Saudi city located in the middle of the Eastern coast of the Red Sea known as the 'Bride of the Red Sea' and is considered the economic and tourism capital of the country. Its population is estimated around 3.4 million and it is the second largest city after Riyadh. The foundation of the city of Jeddah is dated back to around 3000 years when groups of fishermen used to settle in it after their fishing trips. After that, the tribe of 'Quda'ah' came to Jeddah 2500 years ago and settled in it and was known by it. The historical transformation of Jeddah was in the era of the third Muslim Caliph Othman Bin Affan (May Allah be Pleased with Him) in 647 AD when he ordered the city to be transformed into a port to welcome pilgrims (Hajjis) coming by sea for the Holy Pilgrimage in Makkah. To this day, Jeddah is the main passage for both sea and air pilgrims as well as those traveling by road. Jeddah has grown during the last two decades of the 20th Century, which made the city a center for money and business in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and a major and important port for exporting non-oil related goods as well as importing domestic needs. 3.1.2 History of Jeddah City Before Islam: Some archaeologists' studies suggest the existence of inhabitants in the region now known as Jeddah since the Stone Age seeing as they found some artifacts and 'Thamoudian' writings in Wadi Breiman east of Jeddah and Wadi Boib northeast of Jeddah. Some historians trace its founding to the tribe of Bani Quda'ah, who inhabited it after the collapse of Sad Ma'rib in 115 BC. Some believe that Jeddah had been inhabited before the tribe of Bani Quda'ah by fishermen in the

Red Sea, who considered it a center from which they sailed out into the sea as well as a place for relaxation and well-being. According to some accounts, the history of Jeddah dates back to early times before Alexander the Great, who visited the city between 323 and 356 BC. Islamic Era: In 647 AD, Othman bin Affan chose the city as a major port for entering the city of Makkah and accessing it by sea. At that time, it was named Balad Al-Qanasil. In their travels, Ibn Jubayr and Ibn Battuta mention that the city had Persian architecture when they visited it. Al-Maqdisi Al-Bishari, the author of the book called Ahsan AlTaqaseem, says of the city: "secure, full of people-people of trade and wealth. It is the treasurer of Makkah and the residing place for Yemen and Egypt. It has a secret mosque, but people have trouble getting water although the city has a lot of ponds. Water is carried to them from afar and inhabitants have a majority of Persians, who have wonderful palaces. It has straight alleyways and its overall condition is good, but very very hot". Nasser Khosro, a Persian Muslim traveler, describes Jeddah when he visited it in 1050 AD as a thriving city of many good things to trade, and a city of great construction. He also gave a description of its markets as being good and clean; and he estimated its population at around 5000 people. In the 6th Hijri Century, the people of the city of Jeddah experienced economic hardship say Ibn Jubayr. Of the population and their religion he says, "Most residents of this town along with those from the neighboring desert and mountains are Ashraaf Alaweyoon in terms of religion-may Allah be pleased with their ancestors. They are enduring such hardships that inanimate objects would feel sympathy for them. They use themselves in all professions: renting camels, selling milk and water, picking up fallen dates, or cutting down timber. This would 56


extend to their gentlewomen as well". These economic trials were a natural result of the general situation in the Islamic world affected by the Christian Crusades and the disruption between Seljuqs and Ayyubids. After almost a century, another Arab historian, called Ibn AlMujawir, tells of the flourishing of the city of Jeddah in his times. During the Othoman Rule: Al-Shareef Barakat, Governor of Hijaz declared his loyalty to the Ottoman succession in 931 AH. Jeddah, at the beginning of the Ottoman Empire, was attacked several times by the Portuguese fleet in the 16th Century AD as well as being exposed to the Dutch pirate raids in the 17th Century AD. The Portuguese fleet of Lobo Soarez arrived in front of Jeddah in 1516 AD, but was obstructed by the Ottoman defense led by Suleiman Basha, who captured a ship and sent it to the 'Astana'. During the 16th and 17th centuries, world maritime trade routes were owned then by the Portuguese, Dutch and English, which made the economic value of Jeddah as a port decline; and were it not for the delegations of pilgrims and Umrah performers, Jeddah would not have lived or continued. 3.1.3 Characteristics of Jeddah City Geographical Location: The city of Jeddah is located on the west coast of the Kingdom (latitude 29.21 north & longitude 39.7 east), in the middle of the eastern shore of the Red Sea south of the Tropic of Cancer. To the east are the plains of Tihama, which are considered the low heights of the Hijaz region. To the west along the beach there are parallel chains of coral reefs.

Climate: Jeddah is directly affected by the climate of the geographic location which means high temperatures and humidity during the summer. These temperatures are around the early the 40s, when the city falls under the influence of a low seasonal zone with a solid and warm air mass. Humidity reaches its highest levels in summer because of the high temperature of sea water and it is lower in winter due to the impact of the moderate air mass associated with high pressure. The prevailing winds over Jeddah are North West winds due to the city's coastal location on the shore of the Red Sea. These winds are usually light-to-moderate winds for much of the year. However, sometimes Southern winds blow through winter, spring and fall accompanied by a rise in temperature. These winds get active sometimes and their speed may cause great sandstorms. They may also be accompanied by thunderstorms and heavy rain. The most common type of rainfall is that accompanied by thunderstorms, which usually fall during the winter season as well as in the spring and fall due to the passage of low pressure from the west to the east and their meeting with the zone of Sudan's low pressure heat in the region.

57


3.2 Site Selection 3.2.1 Proposed site

Makkah Provinces

Saudi Arabia:

Map

Descriptions Saudi Arabia is the largest state in the Middle East, constituting the bulk of the Arabian Peninsula, and the second-largest in the Arab World. It is bordered by Jordan, and Iraq on the north and northeast, Kuwait, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates on the east, Oman on the southeast, and Yemen on the south. It is also connected to Bahrain by the King Fahd Causeway. The Red Sea lies to its west, and the Persian gulf lies to the northeast. Saudi Arabia has an estimated population of 25.7 million of which 5.5 million are non-citizens. And its size is approximately 2,149,690 km2.

Saudi Arabia is divided into 13 states or provinces, singular – mintaqah idariyya) . Each province is divided into governorates (Arabic: muhafazat, ‫محافظات‬‎, singular muhafazah), 118 in total. This number contains the emirate capitals, which have a different status as municipalities (amanah) headed by mayors (ameen). The governorates are further subdivided into sub-governorates (Aumdah, or istrict centers).

58


Jeddah City

Map

Descriptions

The Makkah Province is the most populous province of Saudi Arabia. It is located in the western Saudi Arabia and has an extended coastline. It has an area of 164,000 km² and a population of 5,797,971 (2004 census). Its capital is the sacred city of Mecca and its largest city is Jeddah, which is also Saudi Arabia's main port city.

Jeddah is a city located on the coast of the Red Sea and is Arial view, Jeddah

the major urban center of western Saudi Arabia. It is the largest city in Makkah Province, the largest sea port on the Red Sea, and the second largest city in Saudi after the capital city, Riyadh. The population of the city currently stands at 3.2 million. It is an important commercial hub in Saudi Arabia. Jeddah is the principal gateway to Mecca, Islam's holiest city. It is also a gateway to Medina, the second holiest place in Islam. Jeddah is one of the most cosmopolitan, diverse, and tolerant of all Saudi Arabian cities.

59


General map shows all the proposed three sites in Jeddah city, as an evaluation will take place to select one of them.

60


Site 1: Dawar The Globe  Accessible from North, South and the Eastern site of the city.  Closes to shopping mall in new development area near the sea.  Good site shape and acceptable area for such project

Site 2: Dawar King Abdulaziz  Located on a very strong business development in the near future.  On the center if the city where it’s reachable from everywhere around the city.  Close to the university which can make it easy to communicate.  Close to two major commercial mall in the city.

61


Site 3: NCB Bank  Located in front of the Landmark of Jeddah, the NCB tower.  Taking place in the old city of Jeddah.  Having a water front near the sea.  Close to the university which can make it easy to communicate.

Site 4: Dawar Al-Sufon  Located next to the Media Ministry.  Accessible from all four directions of the city.  On an existing business neighborhood.  Two view sides, towards the city and the bay.

62


Site Size 3.2.2 Selection criteria The site selection depends on specific criteria. All the Proposed sites should be evaluated according to the Points mentioned in the schedule as presented by: Cherry, on his book Programing for design Scoring the Site: 

 

Recommended site 35,000 m2 – 40,000 m2 o Size < 35,000 – 40,000 15 Points o Size = Recommendation 25 Points o Size > 35,000 – 40,000 20 Points Most Important Criteria Desirable Criteria

Most Important Criteria

1 – 8 15 Points Max. 9 – 13 10 Points Max.

Maximum possible score is 195 points.

Desirable Criteria

Criteria

Weight

• Area m2

15 - 25

• Location relative to service area( 1 km radius)

0 - 15

• Users access

0 - 15

• Good site shape

0 - 15

• Economic site development

0 - 15

• Absence of environmental pollution

0 - 15

• Image

0 - 15

• Proximity to other community facilities

0 - 15

• Ease of orientation

0 - 10

• Existing facilities capable of use

0 - 10

• Topography

0 - 10

• Compatibility with present and f future surrounding land uses

0 - 10

• Views

0 - 10

63


3.2.3 Evaluation and comparison of proposed sites: Table 4, shows a summary for the evaluation process on the three proposed sites: Site 1 Globe Round 170,000 m2 15

Site 2 KA Round 160,000 m2 15

Sit 3 NCB Bank 90,000 m2 20

Site 4 Sufon Round 75,000 m2 25

2. Location relative to service area

8

8

11

10

3. Users access

13

8

11

13

4. Good site shape

13

9

12

10

5. Economic site development

9

14

5

7

6. Absence of environmental pollution

6

10

3

6

7. Image

9

13

13

12

8. Proximity to other community facilities

6

11

8

12

9. Ease of orientation

4

5

5

7

10. Existing facilities capable of use

2

4

6

5

11. Topography

8

9

6

6

12. Compatibility with present and future surrounding land uses

5

10

5

6

13. Views

6

8

6

8

104

124

111

127

Criteria Level Site Size

Important Criteria

Desirable Criteria

Total Points

Criteria

1. Area m2

64


As a result of the evaluation process, site number 4 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sufon Roundaboutâ&#x20AC;? is selected for the pro

3.2.4 The selected site

Location & Orientation:

Accesses:

Located next to the Ministry of media and the Television building.

Ease of access from anywhere in the city through fast roads from east, south and north.

It has a water view not the sea, thus it has a city view and water view similar to a river.

65


3.3. Site Analyses 3.3.1. Location and Access to the site:

Main Access Roads

Location and Access

Western Bughdadiah - Jeddah

66


3.3.2. Zoning and neighborhood: Existing Neighborhood

Key Map Commercial Governmental

Zoning and neighborhood

   

Chambers of Commerce. Ministry of media. Jeddah Municipality. Private palace.

Services    

International Medical Center. Electric company. Mosque. School.

Entertainment  

King Fahd coastal city. Water front.

Residential

Empty lands

67


3.3.3. Natural Environment:

Site Response

Natural Environment

Site Condition

68


3.3.4. Annual Sun and Temperature Data for Jeddah: Some unusual events often happen during the year, such as dust storms in summer and sometimes in winter, coming from the Arabian Peninsula's deserts or from North Africa.7 Climate data for Jeddah

7

Month

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Year

Record high 째C

33

35

38

40

42

47

42

42

42

41

41

34

47

Average high 째C

29

29

29

33

35

36

37

37

36

35

33

30

33

Average low 째C

19

18

19

21

23

24

26

27

25

23

22

19

22

Record low 째C

9

11

13

12

13

19

21

23

21

20

17

10

9

Rainfall mm

5

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

25

31

61

humidity %

56

52

52

54

53

56

53

55

63

61

57

55

55

"Jeddah, Saudi Arabia". BBC. Retrieved 2010-10-28.

69


Solar Radiation: The location, form, and orientation of a building and its spaces should take advantage of the thermal, hygienic, and psychological benefits of sunlight. In planning the design of a building, the objective should be to maintain balance between under heated periods when solar radiation is beneficial and overheated periods when radiation should be avoided. The path of the sun through the sky varies with the seasons and latitude of a building site. The range of solar angles for a specific site should be obtained from a weather almanac or service bureau before calculating the potential solar heat gain and shading requirements for a building design.

Hot-Arid Regions: Building forms should enclose courtyard spaces.   

Reducing solar and conductive heat gain. Promote cooling by evaporation using water features and plantations. Provide solar shading for windows and outdoor spaces.

Hot-Humid Regions: Building form elongated along the east-west axis minimizing east and west exposure.   

Reduce solar heat gain. Utilize wind to promote cooling by evaporation. Provides solar shading for windows and outdoor spaces. 70


Sun Path East & West Sun Path North & South

Site Condition Site response

71


3.3.5. Wind and Rain Data Statistics based on observations taken between 6/2009 - 10/2011 daily from 7am to 7pm local time.8 = North

= North northwest

= North northeast

= West

Month of year Dominant Wind direction Average Wind speed (Knots) Average air temp. 째C Diagrams of Wind direction and speed of the seasons changings, based on the previous schedule.

8

Wind & weather statistics, windfinder.com

72


Wind flow and speed: The direction and velocity of prevailing winds are important site considerations in all climatic regions. The seasonal and daily variations of winds should be carefully considered in evaluating its potential for ventilating interior spaces and outdoor courtyards I warm weather, causing heat loss in cold weather, and imposing lateral loads on building structure. The movement of air through a building is generated by differences in air pressure as well as temperature. The resulting patterns of air flow are affected more by building geometry and orientation than by air speed.

73


Site Condition

Site response

Seasonal wind

Winter seasonal cold wind.

Allowing natural ventilation between the buildings and complex to reduce heat and circulate the air.

Summer seasonal hot wind.

Land Breeze

Daily wind

Allowing daily winds and the breezes to refresh the site with a new air and to work as thermal barrier Sea Breeze

74


Contour / drainage Dimensions / setbacks

Site Condition Site Condition

75


Noise

Vehicular

Site Condition

Site Response

Introducing an inside streets from either west or east side connecting the shore with the main street for trucks and utilities. Provide services and secure line for emergencies and golf cars.

To have the noisy part of filming, shooting and recording away from the Noisy points. Locate the parking on the side of the existing parking of AL-Amanah.

76


77

Views TO the site

Views TO the site


78

Views TO the site

Views TO the site


79

Views FROM the site Views FROM the site


80

Views FROM the site

Views FROM the site


81


82


4. Case Studies

4.1 MediaCity UK 4.1.1 About the city 4.1.2 Components of the city 4.1.3 Distination Guide 4.2 Columbia Media center, Columbia Chicago College 4.2.1 Facilities 4.2.2 Technical and Qualities 4.3. Pinewood Studios Berlin 4.3.1. Master planning 4.3.2. Functions and relations 4.4 Vakko Headquarters and Power Media Center

83


4.1 MediaCity UK 4.1.1 About the city MediaCityUK, the new home for the BBC, ITV, Coronation Street, SIS and the University of Salford. Our vision is for MediaCityUK to become a global hub for innovation and content creation. Located at Salford Quays on the banks of Manchester's historic ship canal, MediaCityUK has been developed by The Peel Group. The city’s community features a wide range of commercial office space, one of the biggest HD studio developments in Europe; 378 apartments, a hotel and a brand new tram stop in the heart of a spectacular five-acre piazza.

new challenges for the industry. By offering or facilitating high speed connectivity, a purpose-built infrastructure, changes in supply chain, and flexible training and development for staff, we hope to help you embrace every opportunity. MediaCityUK is about 140,000 m2 site which consists of:     

The city is no a city as the name sound. But might be a compound or somethuing like that as you will see soon from the plans and images.

MediaCityUK is a brand new city on Manchester’s waterfront, Salford Quays. The Peel Group has invested £650million in developing a bespoke environment designed specifically around the needs of the creative and digital industries.

The Vision of MediaCity UK is for MediaCityUK to become a global hub for innovation and content creation. The media over the last ten years has rapidly changed and developments like high definition, fully digital processes, and changing production workflows – coupled with ever-increasing customer demand for interactivity – are all creating

 

Office space – 65,032 m2 (spread across five buildings). Cut down to ONLY Two office buildings  Studio block – 23,000 m2.  Cut down to 16,000 m2 Retail/leisure space –7,000 m2 (divided into units). As required  378 apartments (divided between two towers). To be canclled  218 bed Holiday Inn. To be canclled  20,000 m2 public realm area, including piazza. To be decided during design  New tram terminus, extending the current line. To be canclled  New foot bridge across the Manchester Ship Canal, linking Salford Quays with Trafford Wharf. A brige to be introduced  300 cycle bays To be canclled  Multi-storey car park with approximately 2,200 spaces To cut down for about 1000 spaces  84


85


86


87


 A great public piaza overlooking the water front covered with some greenary and light effects to nominated it and produce influential environment.  The biuldings sorrounding the plaza from two sides and one side on the water and the last side is open for the public accesability.  Towers and buildings decreses gradula as it reaches the water front to maximize the visibility of the whole city.

 Coffee shops and retails facing the piaza that connected to the water body as part of the zoning and separating between the buisiness lot and the recreational part.  Providing outdoor mixed with the indoor places makes great experiences.  Providin some commercial activities usually work for the benefits of the park owner interm of increasing the income to manage the park.  It also works as an attraction for tourist and people to come visit and spend some mony around and enjoy the experience.

Finally, having an overall nice views from the water or from the plaza or even from the offices to both othe plaza and the water. And establishing a new landmark for certin function that all people of interest can come and get inspired and learned.

88


4.2 Columbia Media center, Columbia Chicago College 4.2.1 About the MPC

disciplines," says Doreen Bartoni, dean of the School of Media Arts. "At the end of the day, the building is the container in which our philosophy of education, to have students 'author the culture of their times,' can really take root." Environmental sustainability is important to the college, which will apply for LEED certification for the MPC. Architect Jeanne Gang applied green solutions to the project, such as having over 50 percent of the roof planted with vegetation. This green roof and other measures reduce energy consumption, mitigate the urban heat island effect, and contribute to the responsible stewardship of resources. The MPC ushers in a new era of media arts education at Columbia College Chicago, described by President Warrick L. Carter, Ph. D., as

The Media Production Center, the college's first new-construction

"one of the most important moments in Columbia's history."

building in its 120-year history, is now open! The 3,300 m2 facility, designed by Studio Gang Architects, provides adaptable, state-of-the-

Teaching Media Production in a New Way, Columbia Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first

art facilities including two film production soundstages, a motion-

new-construction building, located at the intersection of South State

capture studio, digital labs, animating suites, a fabrication shop, and

Street and West 16th Street, compliments the collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s urban campus

classrooms.

and is a visual focal point for the surrounding South Loop

The MPC is the first educational facility of its kind anywhere, designed

neighborhood. The innovative, 35,500-square-foot facility comprises

from the ground up to foster cross-disciplinary collaboration, a

two soundstages, a motion-capture studio, an animation lab, four

manifestation of the innovative model of arts and media education that

classrooms, and spaces for production design, costumes, and equipment

the college has been developing for years. "I've always thought that

storage. The building is designed to inspire a new way of teaching

one of our guiding principles is the collaborative nature of our

media production.

89


What inside.. Teaching Media Production in a New Way: Courtyard functions as open-air theater and back lot film location allowing t=students to create outdoor sets.

Innovative 680 m2 & 200 m2 sound stage are ideally positioned along the western edge of the building for optimal control of lighting and sound.

Outdoor dock for HD Media Production Truck

Outdoor rooftop terrace functions as a quiet space for students or places for formal gatherings.

Classrooms, production office, prop and wardrobe studios, storages, and equipment rooms are housed along the behind a gradually sloping ramp.

Equipment checkout is located at the center of the building placing the tools for media production at the heart of thr structure.

200 m2 motion capture studio

Historic famous-players lasky arch was salvages from what became the Film Exchange lofts Building once located at 1327 south Wabash Avenue. It was the parent company of Paramount Pictures. Lobby and Mezzanine provide a public gathering space for viewing films.

90


Innovative 680 m2 & 200 m2 sound stage are ideally positioned along the western edge of the building for optimal control of lighting and sound.

Representation of previous qualities in the plan Courtyard functions as open-air theater and back lot film location allowing t=students to create outdoor sets.

200 m2 motion capture studio

Classrooms, production office, prop and wardrobe studios, storages, and equipment rooms are housed along the behind a gradually sloping ramp.

Lobby and Mezzanine provide a public gathering space for viewing films.

91


Environmentally Sensitive Media Production:

Partial green roof reduces energy consumption, creates an acoustic buffer, and provides additional social gathering space.

An innovation mechanical system directly and efficiently addresses the energy usage on the MPCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s two sound stages. Fabric diffusers deliver cool air low into the spaces allowing natural heat produced from lighting to drift upward.

Pre-cast concrete panels eliminate the need for wood framing and drywall, has low maintenance and reduce construction site noise and debris.

The glass façade along the state street allows classrooms spaces to benefit from natural light. Radiant flooring distributes cool temperatures evenly throughout the building space.

92


Diagramatic Explaination of Function relations

Diagramatic Explaination of the levels relations

93


Lobby from under the stairs, with the interactive panels.

The corridor, between the street and the classrooms.

Lobby entrance showing the main stairs and interactive steps.

The courtyard and the rooftop garden. 94


4.3 Pinewood Studio Berlin 4.3.1 About the Pinwood

also enable film and television productions to significantly reduce their carbon emissions. The Pinewood Studios Group is the leading European provider of studio and related services to the worldwide film and television industries. Synonymous with world class British and international productions, our studios have an impressive heritage and have been home to some of the most successful features films and TV shows ever made.

Pinewood Studio Berlin Film Services offers international filmmakers a full range of production services, state of the art film and TV studios ranging from 550 m2 to 2500 m2 and a team of English speaking crew experienced in dealing with international productions. Project Pinewood, is a long-term scheme of national and regional significance to create a living and working community for the creative industries adjacent to Pinewood Studios. A key part of the project will be the creation of permanent, living streetscapes including Venice, Amsterdam, Prague and New York that have been designed to give film and television makers, as well as those in the wider creative industries such as advertising and photography, the greatest flexibility possible. Having the ability to shoot on a number of different streetscapes in one place, without the need to move crews and equipment around the world, will be invaluable. Project Pinewood is aimed at building upon the creative hub developing at Pinewood Studios. The Company believes that the project will benefit individuals, the creative industries and more widely "UK plc, through job creation, its emphasis on skills and training and access to affordable housing. Project Pinewood’s green credentials will

Master plan of the complex show the enormous number of studios which I will not accommodate all of them, the number of adopted studio in the park will be between 4-6 studios. As going on I will take a close up look on the following:   

Stages. Accommodations. Production Services. 95


Stages: It is containing about 10 warehouse studios varies from 550 m2 to 2500 m2 as I will take one example of the studios.

Different types of stages with different sizes supported with all it needs from catering, workshops, and dressing and make-up rooms in a way that keep it close and not interfere with each other.

The following color key to indicate general functions around the stage. Stage A, with the specification and accommodations.

Length Width Height (installation) Stage Size STAGE DOORS Width Height

STAGE A SPECIFICATION SHEET 34.71 m 27.95 m 8 970.15 m2

Supporting rooms. Technical filming rooms. Make-up and dressing. Building technical. Workshops and set rooms.

3.22 m 3.9 m 96


Production Accommodations:

Dressing rooms

All Studios offer a comprehensive range of fully serviced, managed and furnished production facilities. Offices, dressing rooms, carpenters and plasterers shops are available from pre-production right through to post, whether you are based at the studios or on location. Production accommodation is conveniently located next to stages and studios, allowing you to benefit from being based on a secure studio complex with access to some of the best crews in the world.

The choice of five categories includes the outstanding which incorporates separate living and kitchenette areas along with in suite bedroom and bathroom facilities. Additionally, you can choose from our Deluxe Star, Star, Standard Plus or Standard Dressing Rooms which are all furnished to offer a relaxed environment and are conveniently located around the studios.

Art department Our Art Departments at Pinewood are furnished to make the design process as productive as possible. Design Suites boast drawing boards, layout tables, desks, pin boards and digital telephony. Large and standard alternatives are also available. Make-up and hair room These bright, clean and modern facilities are offered in three sizes ranging from single to six positions. All of these include Makeup and back wash chairs, ample lighting and fresh towels. Rooms have the flexibility to cater for all makeup needs including prosthetics and full body casts.

97


Wardrobes

Meeting and offices

Wardrobe facilities are available in a range of various sizes conveniently located around the Studios.

Our executive meeting rooms are ideal for all your production briefings, meetings or read-throughs. They vary from Board Rooms set in luxurious surroundings to formal classroom style. Each room is supplied with comfortable seating and telephone conferencing facilities and video conferencing in some. Your catering needs can also be accommodated in all of these areas.

Offices Our offices are equipped with a view to making your working day as stress free as possible. From standard to deluxe we have a range of high quality, flexible offices to suit all budgets. Individual or interconnecting offices are available and furnished to suit your production needs. Our facilities are also available to productions shooting on location, providing a studio base.

Workshops Ranging from 1,000 to 13,000 sq ft, our workshops cater for any size production. Whether you need plastering, carpentry, sfx, props, poly sculpturing, paint or steel work we will have a workshop to suit.

98


4.4 Vakko Headquarters and Power Media Center Location: Istanbul, Turkey Area: 9,100 sqm Program: Headquarters for a Turkish fashion house including offices, showrooms, conference rooms, auditorium, museum, and dining hall as well as the television studios, radio production facilities, and screening rooms of its media sister-company.

A concept for the Showcase was developed that established the general steel shapes and quantities while still allowing the design to evolve significantly.

99


100


101


102


References:  http://churmura.com/technology/brief-history-of-multimedia  http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/M/multimedia.html  Solomon, A.W. (2004), Introduction to Multimedia. Woodland Hills, CA  Methodology of Multimedia Production, Atoll Pant, 1999  Jeddah, Saudi Arabia". BBC. Retrieved 2010-10-28.  Wind & weather statistics, windfinder.com  Savannah college of art and design

scad.edu

 Full sail university

fullsail.edu

 Pinewood studios UK

pinewoodgroup.com

 Media city UK, Manchester.

mediacityuk.com

 Pixar Animation Studios

pixarplanet.com

 Dammam University - design library  Studio Gang Architects  Programming for Design, Edith Cherry, FAIA  Neufert Architects’ Data, Third edition

103


Bs.Arch graduation Thesis