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TH E

R I D G E WAY a masterplan by muf architecture/art January 2010


‘. . . a fundamental change is recognizable in attitudes to making public space, from Australia to Chicago, from London to Hong Kong, a paradigm shift is unfolding where the new mantra is work with what you have, recognize the existing assets and harness these to address issues of health, walkability and sense of place.’

Projects for Public Space, New York, July 2009


Commissioning Client The Ridgeway environmental improvements were identified as a project in the East London Green Grid Area 6 Framework 2008 by the Area Group in consultation with the ELGG Working Group (Greater London Authority, London Development Agency, Thames Gateway London Partnership, Environmental Agency). Subsequently the Ridgeway masterplan was commissioned by the multi agency client that is comprised of London Development Agency/Design for London, the London boroughs of Greenwich and Bexley and the landowner, Thames Water.

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C ONT EN TS

INTRODUCTION Baseline Setting Baseline conditions that inspire use Baseline conditions that deter use

p. 07 p. 08 p. 10

CONTEXT

Green Spaces, existing Routes, existing Amenities, existing and in development Relation to other urban design initiatives

p. p. p. p.

METHODOLOGY

Evidence based & Action Research

p. 19

MASTERPLAN

The Masterplan

p. 24

13 14 15 16

Stem Projects 01 Ecology Strategy 02 Sense of Place 03 Safety Strategy Branch Projects Overview 01 Plumstead Gateway 02 Industrial Arts 03 Community Garden 04 Radiomast Gateway 05 Ridgeway Classroom 06 Community Orchard & Growing Plots 07 Lookouts & Dens 08 The Social Cinema 09 Path Crossing 10.1 Marsh Lookout 10.2 Enlightened Underpass 10.3 Football Club Path 11 Grazing Enclosures 12 Crossness Gateway

p. 28 p. 30 p. 36

PROJECT MATRIX

p. 88 p. 94

Project Matrix Risk Benefit Matrix

APPENDIX Revisited Documents Contacts Client Group Design Team Stakeholders Wider Constituency Consultation Consultation Images Observations on the Ridgeway Questionnaire and Recipe Booklet Management Plan Built Heritage Baseline Study Access Report

p. 40 p. 44 p. 48 p. 50 p. 52 p. 54 p. 58 p. 62 p. 64 p. 68 p. 70 p. 74 p. 76 p. 80 p. 82

p. 99 p. 100 p. 100 p. 101 p. 102 p. 103 p. 104 p. 108 p. 110 p. 120 p. 162 p. 188

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INTRODUCTION

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The Ridgeway is the name given to the path that runs for three and a half miles from Plumstead Station in the west to Crossness Pumping Station in the east. The path is six meters above road level and runs along the top of the Victorian engineering masterpiece, the Southern Outfall Sewer.

The strategic and local proposals build on the existing assets, address the current impediments to use and propose sustainable and durable improvements that embed a sense of local ownership, reinforce local character and encourage increased use.

The Ridgeway masterplan sets out a series of strategies for overall improvements to the environment of the Ridgeway and identifies 12 discrete projects. The masterplan is based on a recognition of the intrinsic value of the Ridgeway as an area of natural beauty that is used as a route and a destination by local people.

Part I outlines the baseline conditions and context. Part II consists of the masterplan proposals which incorporate the overall design principles and 12 discrete projects. Part III is the project matrix as action plan for the way forward.

The masterplan document is divided into three parts.

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IN T R O D U C T I O N

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Gallions Housing Association Tilfen Land Thames Water London Borough boundaries

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BAS E LI N E S ETT I N G

Ownership The Ridgeway is within the boundaries of two boroughs, Greenwich to the west and Bexley to the east. The embankment structure and a strip of adjoining land are owned by Thames Water. The property boundary is marked by a palisade fence that runs along the entire length on both sides. The impulse to open the Ridgeway to public access was motivated by a desire by Thames Water to share their assets and in recognition that the observed anti social behaviour, particularly motorcycling and flytipping, is best countered by the increased presence of other people. In 1991 Thames Water granted permissive public access and teamed up with Thamesmead Town and Greenwich Council to facilitate use of the path. In 1993 central government funding was secured for works that included removal of fly-tipping, installation of ramps at access points, enhancements to the top surface, provision of signage and additional tree and shrub planting. A Section 106 agreement was made with Riverside Golf Club to allow the public route to continue across the golf course and to connect to the Thames Path. CCTV posts including alarm points were later installed. Existing maintenance agreements Maintenance of the Ridgeway is currently the responsibility of Thames Water and includes keeping the path and one meter each side clear, cutting back the vegetation to the boundary of the palisade fence on the pavement side, rubbish clearing and control of Japanese Knotweed and any other notifiable invasive species. Greenwich Council are responsible for the maintenance of the step crossovers and are contracted by Thames Water to carry out some additional maintenance works particularly removal of fly-tipping, no additional maintenance agreement exists between Thames Water and local authorities. History The Southern Outfall Sewer is the structural underfelt of the Ridgeway footpath and embodies the history of the surrounding area. A reading of the landscape can be made as one of stabilising the intertidal fluctuating marsh landscape by the civil engineering prowess of successive generations. When the Outfall pipeline was constructed in 1862, I N T R O D U CT I O N

it crossed an area of open, intertidal marsh. This remote and uninhabitable environment made the Plumstead and Erith Marshes an ideal location for Woolwich Royal Arsenal to establish ordnance-testing grounds and locate gunpowder magazines and other explosives storage facilities; the marshes were therefore rendered even more isolated, for reasons of safety and security. However the pipeline made an accessible path across the marsh which was gradually drained and crossed with road and rail infrastructure and developed from the early C20th onwards. Today none of the original ordnance structures remain and all the visible infrastructure of the Outfall sewer dates from the early C20th. The current landscape is shaped by the control and regulation of water. The marshes are now drained by a system of dykes and standing bodies of water. Perversely, the river cannot be seen from the Southern Outfall Sewer; the construction of low-rise buildings on the former marshes to the north has blocked the view. Yet the elevated situation of the Ridgeway, the long open views, the remains of the marsh landscape and the infrastructure of platforms and access hatches give a particular character to the area that is still reminiscent of an intertidal typology.

Plants with edible, medicinal and other uses. Yarrow: food and healing herb for roots Mugwort: used as a flavouring for fatty meats and as a blood cleanser Garlic Mustard: young leaves used in salads Black Horehound: treatment of nausea & vomitting Hemlock: sedative & poison Dogwood: twigs used for teeth cleaning Hawthorn: fruits used to make jelly, jam and tisanes Wild Carrot: edible root and seeds used as birth control Field Horsehair: buds eaten as a vegetable, as a poultice for chilblains and a polish for pewter Japanese Knotweed: shoots can be eaten, similar to rhubarb, medicinal source of emodian Fennel: roots, leaves and seeds used as a food and flavouring and as gripe water Goat’s rue: Medieval treatment for diabetes, crushed pants thrown in water are a fish sedative Cleavers: seeds make coffee like drink, roots a red dye, and to treat skin diseases 7 low blood pressure Common Nettle: spinach like leaves in salad & soups, fibres used to make twine & clothes Prickly lettuce: salad leaf and soporific hallucinogen Everlasting pea: tips can be eaten but in excess toxic Common Mallow: young leaves can be eaten, produces a yellow dye Ribbed Melliot: medicinally used to reduce fluid retention Green Alkanet: flowers used to garnish food and drinks Common Reed: used in thatching, paper making and basket weaving Bristly oxtongue: used as a wormer

Ecology

Ribwort Plantain: used as a tisane and to make tarts

The ecology of the Ridgeway is a mosaic habitat of significant biodiversity value. The typology is highly particular, it is a feral landscape that has overgrown a man–made structure but is perceived as “natural” rather than man–made. The habitat mosaic includes open grass, low shrubs and small copses of trees that are rich in species of birds, insects and small vertebrates. The Ridgeway survey records 119 plant species, five of which are notable species and 38 of which have medicinal, edible or other uses. The Ridgeway is one green space in an area well provided with open spaces. These open spaces range in degrees of formality that include the ornamental design of Plumstead Gardens, the sports pitches, play spaces and lake side lawns, the open marshes and residual farm land and overgrown development sites. The linear nature of the Ridgeway and its proximity to these other sites of nature conservation value, namely the marshes, make the Ridgeway an important link for species to move between habitats.

Creeping Cinquefoil: used as a treatment of diarrhoe and catarrhs Wild Cherry: edible fruit Wild Plum: edible fruit Blackthorn: Damson fruits suitable for jam and making sloe gin Dog Rose: Fruits used to make jelly, jam and marmalade, rich in vitamin C Bramble: Blackberries edible fruit Curied Dock: Blood cleanser that binds with heavy metals Elder: fruits used in cordials, wine & jelly, stem & roots proven treatment for bronchitis Alexanders: used instead of clery, has medicinal properties Common chickweed: Salad leaves & and used to treat skin diseases & muscular pains Dandelion: salad leaves & used to make coffee like drink Smooth Sow Thistle: bitter vegetable in Chinese cookery Dove Foot Crane’s Bill: used to treat wind colic Corn Salad: salad leaves Colts Foot: biol to cough sweets Vetch: used as a food since Neolithic times

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BAS E L I N E CO N D I T I O N S T H AT I N S P I R E U S E

A Walking and Cycling Route

Access to Nature

A Forage landscape

The path is well and regularly used by individuals and groups as a route to and from work, to the station and to the river. There is evidence of the path being used as a running and cycling route by individuals and by groups.

Consultation confirms the Ridgeway is perceived by many as a “natural” space, a place that is a refuge for wildlife and people alike.

Many of those who are positive about the existing qualities of the Ridgeway have extensive knowledge of the flora and fauna and regularly forage here for a range of edible seasonal species and for other useful species such as reeds.

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The “wild” unkempt appearance that some find threatening is equally perceived as an asset in an area where open space, including the original “natural” marsh landscape is increasingly seen as over managed and/or developed. People who appreciate this environment come here as a destination either to walk their dogs or simply for their own pleasure.

This productive connection with the landscape is evidenced in the wider area through the adjacent growing plots on Church Manor Road, fishing in the Thames, local lakes and ponds and in the grazing of horses on the marsh and adjacent areas.

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Informal Play Opportunities Both children and young people realise the potential of the Ridgeway as a place to hang out and as a site for free ranging, adventurous play. For children the absence of formal landscaping, the absence of adult presence, yet the sense of being looked out for from the housing along Sewell Road, the level differences, the informal back routes and the readily available junk from the fly-tipping from which to make dens all lend themselves to the kind of experiential, self-directed, risk-taking play that children in the city are rarely able to indulge in on their own terms outside of provisions made by adults. For older children and young people the inspection balconies provide spaces for social gatherings, overlooked by passers-by but sufficiently off the path for them to feel free to hang out.

I N T R O D U CT I O N

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BAS E L I N E CO N D I T I O N S T H AT D E T E R U S E

Fly-tipping

Joy riding

Perceived as unsafe

Fly-tipping, casual littering and dog fouling are an entrenched problem on the Ridgeway and in the surrounding streets, with both domestic and commercial waste frequently dumped.

Despite motorbike inhibitors and vehicle gates, joy riding of motorbikes has been observed on the Ridgeway and there is evidence of burnt out motorbikes and even a car on the section of the Ridgeway close to Harrow Manor Way flyover.

Anecdotal evidence is of a path that is not used because of perceived or actual experience of anti-social behaviour.

Kellner Way and Nathan Road are areas susceptible to commercial and industrial waste disposal and the enclosed spaces adjoining the garages along Sewell Road, Marmadon Road and Bracondale Road attract domestic waste and littering. Domestic waste is fly-tipped on the Ridgeway adjacent to access points and where the boundary fence is adjacent to the road and informal surveillance is poor. All access points attract a degree of casual littering and this is particularly extreme at the Plumstead station end. Dog fouling is common along the length of the Ridgeway path.

Anecdotal evidence suggest this behaviour is less common than it was in the past due to increased cycle patrols by the police. Belvedere Road, adjacent to the south east section of the path, is frequently used as an informal speedway.

The Safer Neighbourhood Team has no reports of incidents on the Ridgeway. During the research phase degrees of anti-social behaviour were observed that ranged from frequently observed but benign casual drinking, one incident of verbal abuse, the theft of a bag and the path used as a means to outrun and hide from pursuing police officers. Notwithstanding actual behaviours, the linear and narrow nature of the path creates encounters with fellow walkers (and their dogs) from which there is nowhere to retreat. The access points being at least 1/2 mile apart, once on the path you are committed and even potential benign encounters have a degree of apprehension. In addition the narrowness of the path creates awkward overtaking or passing between pedestrians and cyclists. Although the crossing points are lit, the length of the path is not and there is very little ambient light from the street in some sections. The narrowness of the path, the proximity of the shrubs and undergrowth and the lack of illumination all militate against use of the path at night.

“Kellner Road is a target for fly-tipping as it is a badly lit cul-de-sac. As it is a business park, no-one is there at night. The security cameras don’t work or are pointing in the wrong direction. The council is slow to respond, even though we always report tipping, little gets done.” Respond Furniture Recycling, Kellner Road.

“Fly-tipping is a problem because people come to the Re-use and Recycling Centre on Nathan Way and if it’s closed they just dump their litter.” One - one consultation.

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Poor access

Perceived and actual state of repair

Access to the Ridgeway is both actual and perceptual. The path is not widely known as a route, signage connecting to other paths or amenities are hard to find or absent and to compound this obscurity, locally the path is known as the “bank” (truncation of embankment) not the Ridgeway (despite the entry signage).

The Ridgeway is not a cultivated landscape but one that has grown up over the man-made structure beneath. The maintenance regime is minimal and is only designed to keep the path clear. Despite a tree planting program of 2000 trees, the appearance of the Ridgeway is perceived by some as unkempt and “wild”, particularly in the autumn and winter when the foliage dies back and the overall appearance is of bare trees, brown leafless stalks and dead leaves. However to others this is considered a natural asset

There is localised subsidence of ramps and of the earth around the embankment which in places results in unprotected 70 cm falls, often obscured by foliage.

The initial ecology survey has identified substantial stands of Japanese Knotweed not only on the Ridgeway but also on the adjacent land sites. As an invasive non-native species, landowners are bound by the following legal obligations: The Wildlife and Countryside Act (WCA) 1981 states that it is an offence to plant or otherwise cause Japanese Knotweed to grow in the wild. The Environmental Protection Act (EPA) 1990, Duty of Care Regulations 1991, states that cut Japanese Knotweed material and soil containing rhizomes must be disposed of as controlled waste if they are to be removed from their site of origin. Property owners can be made liable for costs and damages if Japanese Knotweed is allowed to spread onto adjacent property.

All signage is either graffitied or missing.

Actual access to the path entails a 6m level difference from street level. Entry points or crossings are via grass, gravel or tarmac ramps or steps and at all formal access points there are motorbike inhibitors and in places vehicle barriers. Access for wheelchair users, push chairs or those with reduced mobility is only possible via the ramp underneath Harrow Manor Way. The ramp on both the south and the north side has a hard surface and handrails, but is not DDA compliant. Whilst this ramp may give access up to the path, the path itself has an uneven surface, is not sufficiently wide to easily accommodate wheelchairs, has no passing or turning points and no other accessible exit points. The path is frequently used by cyclists and despite the motorbike/bike inhibitors, cyclists are frequently observed lifting their bikes over the fence. The east end of the path ramps down from the top of the embankment and runs along the north side of its final length. Way finding at this point is difficult. The path under the flyover is obscure and of very poor quality. The general environment is regarded as unpleasant. Where the path follows the boundary of the golf course fence, the route is unclear and the gates at both ends have been welded shut and access is through a hole in the fence.

I N T R O D U CT I O N

Many of the buildings relating to the sewer inspection and maintenance have a dilapidated appearance and this is compounded by their purpose being unclear. Along Sewell Road the path gives access onto the roofs of the adjacent garages, some of which are in a poor state of repair with unprotected holes. Many of the bike inhibitors are partially dismantled, vandalised and/or graffitied. The path surface is uneven and underneath the flyovers many of the paving slabs are loose or missing. In places the palisade fence has been vandalised. All of the lighting columns along the path have been vandalised. There is localised evidence of fires being lit in sections along the path.

In addition to the actual and perceived qualities of the natural environment, the sewer embankment and other sewer structures, as well as the paths, signage and furniture installed in 1994 are in a poor state of repair.

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CONTEXT The Ridgeway is both a local route and a destination. It is located in proximity to other footpath networks, green spaces, residential communities and amenities. As such improvements to encourage greater use, and which give access and links to the surrounding environment will have a synergetic effect; namely to increase the catchments area for amenities, turn backdoors into main entrances and extend experiences, by connecting different users, uses and qualities, for example, play and young people with a sense of history and experiential education.

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EX I ST I N G G R E E N S PA C E S

The Ridgeway is one type of green space in a wider landscape of open spaces that have different degrees of formality and which offer different kinds of outdoor opportunities and experiences.

Formal garden Sports pitches – grade grass Green space around housing Mown and unmown green space Residual marsh Open water Land banked feral landscape Existing growing plots

C O NT EXT

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EX I ST I N G ROUTES

The Ridgeway is an established North/ East to South/ West route from the river to Plumstead and also links with other existing pedestrian and cycling routes. Research and observation has determined the additional, informal, circular cycling and running loops of different distances.

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Green Chain Walk www.walklondon.org.uk www.greenchain.com

Thames Path www.walklondon.org.uk www.nationaltrail.co.uk/Thamespath

LCN – London Cycle Network www.londoncyclenetwork.org.uk

Sustrans www.sustrans.org.uk/assets/files/london/ south_central_feasibility_report(1).pdf

Possible running route – 1 mile www.walkjogrun.net

Possible running route – 8 miles www.walkjogrun.net

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AM E N ITI ES : EX I ST I N G AN D I N D EV E LO P M E NT

The Ridgeway is a potential route to a range of existing and proposed projects and initiatives in the immediate and wider area.

Current initiatives and developments Fishing opportunities Fishing and sailing opportunities 9 hole golf course and driving range Horse grazing Sports pitches Formal playspaces the cAve / Youthzone

C O NT EXT

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R E L AT I O N TO OT H E R U R B A N D E S I G N I N I T I AT I V E S

Managing the Marsh Landscape – Vision & Strategy March 2006 This strategy takes account of the vast potential of the marshes, the huge range of demands on them, the needs of local and wider communities and the need to restore a sustainable ecosytem. The Ridgeway is an adjacent and typographically separate landscape and ecology to the marshes but it is a relevant site historically. The principles set out in the character study have been applied to the assessment of the character of the Ridgeway and have informed proposal for enhanced access and biodiversity. East London Green Grid (ELGG) East London’s unique landscape is already recognised as an asset that reinforces character, identity and environmental resilience. Now a more ambitious network of green infrastructure, the East London Green Grid (ELGG), is being planned alongside other infrastructure, such as transport, utilities and schools. It will serve to strike a balance between development targets and environmental quality. It will support sustainable communities, tackle climate change and enhance our open spaces and natural landscapes. It is supporting site-specific projects, and assists with potential funding sources. ELGG Area Frameworks The ELGG Supplementary Planning Guidance provides the sub-regional framework for the development of the Green Grid and describes how to integrate the open space network into the planning and regeneration of East London. ELGG Area Frameworks provide a mechanism for Area Groups to develop and deliver the ELGG Vision at the local level. The Area Groups works in close partnership with the ELGG Working group (Greater London Authority, London Development Agency, Thames Gateway London Partnership, Environment Agency, Natural England) and an allocated LDA Design Advisor. The Area Steering Groups and LDA Design Advisors utilise the outputs and endings contained in the ELGG SPG to the London Plan.

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ELGG Area 5 The Ridgeway has the potential to be a link route to larger open spaces identified in the ELGG 5. Those projects that are of particular relevance are: Erith Marshes environmental improvements The Ridgeway links to the north end of the marsh and extends pedestrian routes across the marsh up to Plumstead Station. Improved north-south access across the Ridgeway will give better access between residential areas to the west and the marshes. Lesnes Abbey Visitor Centre LDA Parklands funding secured towards Erith marches will deliver lighting improvements to the raised pedestrian route that runs from Southmere Lakes to Lesnes Abbey. The Ridgeway extends this route towards Plumstead Station and improved access across the Ridgeway will extend this route to the residential area to the west. Belvedere Wetlands The Ridgeway as a pedestrian route to an employment zone. ELGG Area 6 The Ridgeway is included as a site in ELGG Area 6 and is identified as a link route to other green spaces and amenities, namely the White Hart Triangle employment area, Thamesmead Housing and the proposed Cross River Park. Plumstead Road and Pettman Crescent - Pedestrian and Cycle Accessibility Review Analysis of pedestrian and cycle traffic in relation to road layout with proposals for an improved environment. Potential to give road level access onto the Ridgeway from Plumstead Station.

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A206 Study + Plumstead Station Environs The A206 study identifies the A206 as a barrier to north-south movement and includes detailed proposals for entrance treatments to the western end of the Ridgeway. The study demonstrates how the A206 reinforces the historic division of high land and flood plain, separating town centres and residential areas to the south from private, often inaccessible developments to the north. It proposes that the A206 should become subordinate to and characterised by the three character areas it passes through, the eastern one of which is ‘Plumstead High Street’. Proposals are for environmental improvements such as de-cluttering of street furniture and for making specific north-south pedestrian and vehicular connections. Proposed projects relevant to the Ridgeway are: Project 14: Plumstead Station Environs (phase 1 currently on site) Project 15: Pedestrian circulation to be prioritised and to be re-arranged at street level by filling in and planting of existing subway areas (costed at £2.8m for both areas, see back of document) Project 16: increased planting Ridgeway/ connection to Green Grid. (costed at £995k for a first stretch) Central South East Greenways, Consultation draft document (Sustrans) The study aims to identify a network of Greenways for cycling and walking across southeast London. The Ridgeway is identified as a valuable walking and cycling link between Thamesmead and Plumstead. A detailed study is proposed to identify new access points and measures to improve the routes’ conditions and usage. The Ridgeway could form an important link between existing London Cycle Network Plus and the Thames Path cycle route. Sustrans generally promote shared pedestrian and cycle use of routes.

C O NT EXT

Erith Marshes & Belvedere Links programme (2009/10 - 2010/11) The Belvedere Employment Area Regeneration Project aims to direct investment to upgrade core infrastructure and the environment in the area. Projects relevant to the Ridgeway include the following – Improvements to the Lesnes Abbey to the River route. The route crosses the Ridgeway, creating a potential for a social gathering space with direct access to the improved Thamesmead Town Football Club. – Coach drop off point for visiting supporters to Thamesmead Football Club and pedestrian route across the Ridgeway to the club. – Public realm and access works to Thames Path along the Crossness Sewage plant frontage, most relevantly a new link road along the north side of Riverside Golf Club at the eastern Ridgeway entrance, creating potential for improved access to the Ridgeway and disabled parking for Ridgeway visitors. – Environmental and infrastructure improvements to the marshes particularly Crossness Nature Reserve. This includes upgrading the network of dykes, improving the area’s capacity for flood mitigation and biodiversity and a feasibility study into the potential for a visitor centre.

Metropolitan Open Land, Bexley Council Unitary Development Plan Any future improvements or development of the Ridgeway will sit within the policies of the Open Land UDP. Policy G26 is particularly relevant, as it advocates a need to conserve and enhance features of special character. Thamesmead and Abbey Wood Supplementary Planning Document (SPD) The Ridgeway is designated as a walking and cycling route and the garages on the north side of Sewell Road, adjacent to the south side of the Ridgeway are identified as a possible site for workshops and/or housing. Relevant SPD Projects from the document matrix are: 4. White Hart Triangle Implemented new employment floor space: The Ridgeway as a walking/ cycling route to work. 11. Discovery School Implemented new primary school: The Ridgeway as a learning resource “Forest School”. 13. The Ridgeway 21. The Arches Implemented development of road undercroft as Youth Zone: The Ridgeway as access route and outdoor social space for the Youth Zone in the arches. 23. Urban Farm Conceptual scoping to site an urban farm: Ridgeway as a complimentary food growing space and access route. 29. Sporting Club Awaiting implementation improvements and upgrade to Thamesmead Football Club, new café, showers and changing facilities. The Ridgeway as access route and as running circuit. 38. Crossness Heritage site and visitor attraction In development: The Ridgeway as a complimentary heritage infrastructure and walking/ cycling historic tour and route to Crossness from Plumstead Station. 47. Ridgeway and links to Eastern Way Road realignment to give better level access from road level to the Ridgeway to link with Green Chain and Sustrans cycling route.

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M ET H O DO LO G Y Any capital improvements to the Ridgeway are only sustainable if its value as a local asset is recognised and fully embedded in the local community. The research and development process to establish the masterplan is generated by a consultation methodology of two way exchange: A dialogue to identify existing value and problems and to also initiate events and activities to promote the Ridgeway. This promotion through positive on

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site experiences begins the process of embedding perception of the Ridgeway as a valuable local asset. The consultation process was therefore also a means to test the underlying principle of the masterplan, which is, to ensure sustainable capital investment every capital project is linked to a program of community engagement to increase use and a sense of ownership by specific user groups.

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EV I D E N C E BAS E D & A CT I O N R E S E A R C H

The baseline research established the range of uses, users and attitudes to the Ridgeway. The research method comprised of a desk based review of the existing relevant literature, on site observation, qualified through one to one conversations, informal presentations at the Thamesmead Festival and Plumstead Great Get Together and more formal interviews with stakeholders and landowners. The baseline findings of perceived and actual impediments and attractions to use of the Ridgeway were further tested through action research. The action research constructed two social events and a number of small-scale interventions, opportunity for feedback was made available through group discussions, a questionnaire and online.

M ETH O D O LO GY

Ridgeway observations (extract) 01.09.09 weather: sunny location: steps on Sewell Road 1.20pm: Man (mid 50’s) walks from north to south over Ridgeway carrying his shopping. He says he uses the Ridgeway every day to “pick up some bits”. 1.25pm: Man (30’s) runs up steps after getting out of black car, paces around on phone, looking around, walks over and down steps on other side, south to north. 1.30pm: (16 year old) Boy with bike comes up from the south side, goes to cycle off towards Harrow Manor Way along the Ridgeway. Ask him where he’s coming from/ going to. He lives in the flats on Sewell Road and cycles along the Ridgeway to see his girlfriend over the other side of Thamesmead “It’s wicked cos it’s like being in the countryside on my bike”. 1.40pm: Same man from 1.25pm comes back north to south. I ask does he know what the Ridgeway is “No babes”, ask how often he walks across “you ask a lot of questions don’t you, I was just picking something up” phone rings and he walks off.

1.40pm: Young teenage boy smoking, listening to music on his mobile phone. I say hello, he says **** off. 2.10pm: Male jogger (late 20’s) jogs the full length and back every day, lives in Plumstead loves to get all the way to the river to do his stretching out and then jogs back. 2.10pm: Young couple (early 20’s), both live near Harrow Manor Way, come up here to be alone as both of their houses are “hectic”. At least once a day, use it to walk to Plumstead station, “I recommend it.”

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A CT I O N R E S E A R C H

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Any material improvement to the Ridgeway must counter actual and perceived notions of it as unsafe, overgrown and untidy. Conversely any design interventions must not destroy the ‘natural’ or ‘wild’ qualities that make it such an attractive destination. The design approach is therefore to frame the site through a simple material palette to give an elegant geometry and formal ordering to paths, crossings and any other interventions. The local community’s response to the power of formal ordering, as a device to change perceptions, was tested as action research on site. The domestic fly-tipping on one of the paved fenced areas along Sewell Road was systematically set out to a perceptible geometric pattern. A week later many of the objects had been removed. The simple act of bringing a visible intention and order, changed the status of what was formerly considered rubbish and those objects were again recognised as useful and desirable and are circulating once again as ‘goods’.

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The Picnic, 10.05.2009

The film ‘Through your eyes’, 11.09.2009

The picnic was organised as a drop in event on site and was advertised through flyers and by online invitations and also drew in incidental passer by. The picnic itself comprised of salads, cordials and cakes made from those species that freely grow on the Ridgeway. People were able to share their views on the Ridgeway in an informal setting and to experience the potential of the site as a social space and as a productive site for foraging and food growing.

The film was made with 57 local people, as individuals and as organisations, the on site screening drew an audience of 100. The film demonstrated the potential of the Ridgeway as an event and social space, able to bring disparate individuals and groups together and counter both perceived and actual anti-social behaviour. The process of making the film included the YMCA Sailing Club, the Plumstead Runners, the Thamesmead Youth Club, Thamesmead Football Club and demonstrated the potential of the Ridgeway as a route that connects local amenities and as a destination in its own right with intrinsic value and charm. The film is a series of talking heads, that describe perceptions of natural beauty, the value of a forage landscape, the value of the past, interspersed with activities on the site.

The R idgeway: Thro ugh Yo ur Eyes To b e e n t e r e d i n t o t h e r af f l e p l e as e f i l l o u t t h i s f o r m an d h an d i n at t h e r e f r e s h m e n t s ar e a b y 8 p m .

3. D o yo u t h i n k t h at th e Ri d gewa y i s h i s t ori c a l l y i mp ort a n t for t h e ar e a? 4 . W o u l d yo u l i k e t o lea rn more a bou t i t s h i s t ory? 5 . D o yo u t h i n k t h e R i d gewa y i s a good p l a c e for c h i l d ren t o p l a y? yes no

1 . A r e yo u al r e ad y u s i n g t h e R i d g e way ?

ye s

no

A n d i f s o , d o yo u u s e i t : - to get somehere? Where? - to seek solitude - for running - t o wal k yo u r d o g - t o f o r ag e f r u i t - other

6. -

W h at w o u l d m ak e t h e Ri d gewa y feel s a fer? i n cr e as e d u s e b e t t e r l i g h t i n g at cros s i n gs i n cr e as e d p r e s e n ce of Sa fer Nei gh bou rh ood Tea ms other

7. Fl y t i p p i n g i s a p r o bl em i n t h i s a rea , wou l d you be i n t eres t ed i n - b e t t e r i n f o r m at i o n on ru bbi s h c ol l ec t i on - co m m u n i t y - l e d r u bbi s h c l ea ri n g

2 . M an y e d i b l e s p e ci e s ar e al r e ad y g r o w i n g o n t h e R i d g e way , t h i s co u l d b e e n h an ce d . W o u l d yo u l i k e t o b e i n v o l v e d i n co mm u n i t y - l e d p l an t i n g an d g ar d e n i n g ? ye s

no

8 . W h at o t h e r u s e s co u l d you i ma gi n e on t h e Ri d gwa y?

n am e : ag e :

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Delivery Methodology The event based research and consultation methodology is evidence of the value of community events as a means to deliver the key principles of the masterplan, that is, the ambition to increase use and change perceptions. The delivery of the capital improvements is only sustainable if the value of the Ridgeway as an asset is fully embedded in the local community. The masterplan sets out a plan for improvements where the sustainability of every capital investment is underlined by a programme of community engagement to address specific user groups. The delivery mechanism must establish a champion able to coordinate, administer and ensure delivery of the community programme.

M ETH O D O LO GY

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M A ST E R P L A N

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M A ST ER PL A N

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T H E M AST E R P L A N

The Ridgeway masterplan is based on a recognition of the intrinsic value of the site as an area of natural beauty, a place that is valued as a route and a destination by local people. The strategic and local proposals build on the existing assets and address the current impediments to use. To ensure sustainable and durable improvements that will reinforce local character and encourage increased use, every capital investment must be matched by a program of community engagement that will embed a sense of local ownership.

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The masterplan is made up of both a stem strategy and branch projects. The stem strategy applies along the entire length of the Ridgeway and addresses ecology, safety and sense of place. The branch projects are 12 localised physical improvements. Each project embodies the stem strategies and is coupled with a community engagement project.

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ST E M P R O J E CT 0 1

ECO LO G Y ST RAT E G Y

14 Crossness Gateway

Edible, Playable, Threshold 13

12

Playable landscape

11 10 09 Football Gateway

Cluster

08 The Lounge

Playable landscape

Edible landscape 07 Dens and Lookouts

Playable landscape Threshold

06 Community Orchard

Edible landscape

05 Forest School

Borrowed pleasure

04 Radio Mast Gateway

Threshold

ECOLOGY

03

Asian Community Centre Garden

02 Ridgeway icon

01 Plumstead Gateway

The ecology strategy is a means to create a virtuous circle of care and use that will preserve the ecological value of the site and change perceptions of it as overgrown and unsafe.

Potentially expert management of the Ridgeway could be undertaken by London Wildlife Trust, Northwest Kent Countryside Partnership, Thames 21 or existing borough park rangers.

The current maintenance of the site is not sympathetic to the existing ecology and will eventually result in a monoculture of the more invasive species of Bramble and Buddleja. The mosaic of habitats will be lost along with the habitat specific species. The perception of the site as overgrown and untidy will be reinforced and use will be deterred rather then encouraged.

The volunteer engagement must build on local interest and is more likely to be sustainable if there is a meeting room and base. The Cave, Youth Zone, or even “Archies Nightclub� are viable bases for volunteers.

Therefore in addition to the existing path clearing, the proposal is for a three year cycle of annually mowing 1/3 of the grass and coppicing 1/3 of the shrubs to preserve these habitats and the forage landscape. Due to the scale of the site only those invasive shrubs or those encroaching on the grassland will be cut back.

The most viable groups on which to build support for a volunteer group are potentially with the growers on the Church Manor Way growing plots, with the people who currently forage for edible plants and through community events linked to the autumn mowing and coppicing regime, for example a Ridgeway Harvest Festival or Halloween Lantern procession will be necessary to focus and generate initial commitment.

The labour for each annual cycle is 800 hours or 10 people working 10 days to mow and rake off 25000 sqm grass and 10 people working 168 days to coppice 11262sqm of shrubs. Even if only a proportion of this remedial work is undertaken it will have a significant effect on preserving the mosaic of habitats. A viable means to deliver the ecology strategy is through the model of volunteer maintenance operated on the Greenway and Eastham Nature reserve, where the overall management is by an expert organisation with regular input from volunteers.

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‘The best way to achieve increased biodiversity is by putting peoples needs at the forefront. This will establish a better understanding of the unique ecology of the Ridgeway, challenge negative perception and encourage local ownership. All will have net benefit for wildlife, preserving biodiversity and making an attractive and safe place for people.’ Chief Executive London Wildlife Trust

Visitor of the Ridgeway foraging for edible plants.

Autumn year 1 Halloween cookout of locally grown pumpkins on the Ridgeway.

“Green gym” workout for landscape maintenance volunteers.

Autumn year 3 Promenade Halloween theatre event organised by local agency, for example Emergency Exit Arts and delivered with local schools.

STE M P RO J ECTS

Autumn year 2 Halloween lantern procession along the Ridgeway using locally grown pumpkins. shrub and woodland coppicing grass, mow and rake off to the edge remove Japanese Knotweed and other invasives Buddleja & Ragwort

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ST E M P R O J E CT 0 2

S E N S E O F P L A C E S T R AT E G Y

14 Crossness Gateway

13

12

Edible, Playable, Threshold 11 10

09 Football Gateway

Cluster Playable landscape

08 The Lounge

Playable landscape

07 Dens and Lookouts

Edible landscape

Playable landscape 06 Community Orchard

Threshold

05 Forest School 04 Radio Mast Gateway

Edible landscape

Borrowed pleasure

Threshold

03

Asian Community Centre Garden

02 Ridgeway icon

SENSE OF PLACE 01 Plumstead Gateway

The value of the Ridgeway as a natural landscape is enhanced by its historic and ongoing importance as a seminal piece of city infrastructure. The importance of these sites, where the utilitarian functions of the city also make amenity space are increasingly valuable as more pressure is brought to bear on open and seemingly “wild” landscapes. The Ridgeway material palette and the strategy of implementation celebrates these utilitarian qualities and acknowledges the Ridgeway as a destination in its own right, as well as a well used route. The material palette is comprised of a limited number of durable, utilitarian materials that are used sparingly and which frame the natural landscape. The localised sources of funding and implementation related to other schemes make it unlikely the entire length of the path can be undertaken as a single project and improvements will be delivered piecemeal. Therefore to ensure a sense of legibility and coherence and to avoid the sense of being “stranded” when the path surface changes, all localised improvements must ensure any new path surface connects to the next exit point.

The Path The path surface is comprised of re-used concrete sleepers interspersed with a self-binding aggregate surface. The sleepers mark the beginning and the end of the path and where localised improvements provide amenity space or improved access to other amenities or routes. To provide safe passage for pedestrians and cyclists, the width of the path must be no less then 2m wide and to ensure safety, shrubs should be cut back from the path edge. However it is important that the “natural” and “wild” character of the Ridgeway is not lost and where space permits the path is to be designed as a series of shallow dog-legs to reduce the monotonous linearity and give sight lines directly onto planting.

‘Crossness and its adjoining infrastructure, the Ridgeway, is a significant piece of Victorian engineering and doesn’t get the recognition within London that it deserves.’ Andrew Housam Schal

Construction detail Southern Outfall Sewer, 1859, Thames Water. 3 0

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new path surface of self-binding aggregate new path surface of self-binding aggregate

new path surface of concrete sleepers

Strategic path surface improvements illustrated by the entry point to the Forest School site

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ST E M P R O J E CT 0 2

Proposed improvements Marsh Lookout, branch project 10.1 Strategic options for path edge construction The top of the embankment varies in width along its length and in parts the erosion of the sloping banks is more extreme. When implementing the required 2m wide path it will be necessary to undertake investigations of the surface conditions in each location and determine an appropriate edge detail. 100mm self-binding fine gravel, watered and rolled

100mm sub base Compacted ground

Whilst the self-retaining edge will erode against a slope it can be used where it is not possible to either create a retaining edge nor feasible to regrade the embankment.

Self retaining edge detail

Self-binding aggregate surface with timber board and stake edge. Detail to be used where there is sufficient existing ground on either side of the path.

Self-binding aggregate surface with pin kerb edge. Detail to be used where there is limited existing ground on either side of the path.

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Existing path

Opportunities for forage

Furniture

New path surface: concrete sleepers Lighting Furniture Bin

Soft edge

Signage

Existing path

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ST E M P R O J E CT 0 2

Furniture and Signage The path improvements will create an accessible and legible route and this will be enhanced by making places to sit, places to collect berries and places to sort foraged plants. The Ridgeway furniture for these places will comprise of seats, tables, kneelers, bins, ground inlaid signs and lampposts and the design will be recognisable part of the same language of the wrought iron work of Crossness Pumping Station, where the utilitarian meets the decorative. The open lattice aluminium steel alloy will ensure the furniture is robust, difficult to graffiti and low maintenance. The wayfinding strategy is to locate signs at each junction along the Ridgeway indicating the direction and proximity of adjacent amenities and other paths and to also indicate the distance from that point to the east and west destinations of the station and the river. The signage is constructed as cast steel alloy plates with open lattice for plants to grow through and is embedded within the path surface.

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Ridgeway Furniture The furniture is designed as series of bespoke pieces that together give a strong sense of identity that draws on the heritage of the site. It is proposed that the furniture is developed as prototypes as a community project with local people. (see Project 10.1)

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Bench

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Lamppost

Table

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Kneeler

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ST E M P R O J E CT 0 3

S A F E T Y S T R AT E G Y

14 Crossness Gateway

13

Edible, Playable, Threshold 12

11 10

Playable landscape

09 Football Gateway

Cluster

08 The Lounge

Playable landscape

07 Dens and Lookouts

Edible landscape

Playable landscape Threshold

The safety strategy addresses both perceptual and actual barriers to use of the Ridgeway and of the Ridgeway as a physical and psychological barrier between the neighbourhoods of Abbey Wood and Thamesmead. Although it is desirable to propose an all over treatment to the Ridgeway, that will deliver increased use as an north/east south/west route and increased permeability to connect the neighbourhoods on each side, the constraints of funding preclude this, so a measured approach must be taken, in relation to what is achievable as a ‘safety master plan’ and what safety and permeability benefits the localised projects incrementally bring.

06 Community Orchard

05 Forest School

Edible landscape

04 Radio Mast Gateway

Borrowed pleasure

03

Asian Community Centre Garden

Threshold

SAFETY

02 Ridgeway icon

01 Plumstead Gateway

Every localised improvement to the material fabric is strategically sited so to increase access both onto and across the Ridgeway. The improvements will be designed to eliminate the potential for misbehaviour and risk and will provide better access and amenities, in order to encourage benign use, shared between the two residential communities. To this end the detailed design of each project must seek to enhance the valued character of the Ridgeway in consultation with the Community Safety and Crime Prevention Officers. A site visit with the officers to assess and address safety issues is recommended.

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One of the strongest deterrents to use of the Ridgeway is that it is perceived as derelict and uncared for because of the localised fly-tipping and littering. Those areas most vulnerable to fly tipping are where the boundary fence is close to the road and the fence itself becomes the boundary line that delineates the neighbourhood; where littering is less acceptable; and the “other” territory “outside” the neighbourhood where those constraints do not apply. In these situations the location of the fence and the spatial and material condition of the territory it encloses must be carefully considered. Can the fence be moved back so what was previously vacant space becomes a useful part of the neighbourhood, can the design of the territory enclosed become more intentional through more formal planting. The improvement principles, embedded in each of the localised projects, are as follows: – Remove all fly-tipping and make information locally available on council collection of large domestic items. – On the most fly-tipped fenced vacant plots, particularly on Sewell Road instigate temporary planting to redefine these areas or install temporary signage, for example simply painting onto the ground “children play here”. – Risks assess and instigate the phased and monitored removal of all the existing ineffectual and damaged vehicle and motor-cycle barriers. – Remove all vandalised furniture and signs. – Repair localised subsidence. – Remove or repair the derelict garages along Sewell Road. – Create a number of passing places for cyclists and pedestrians on the narrowest sections. – Light the path and undercroft of the flyover between Harrow Manor Way and the Football Club. – Inaugurate a Sustrans local monitor to report on cycling conditions.

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Material improvements alone will not be enough to counter antisocial behaviour, it is also essential to change local perceptions, to create a positive sense of local ownership and care and establish a mutually agreed code of acceptable behaviour. Therefore every physical improvement is designed to be delivered in conjunction with a community engagement programme.

‘Local people do walk along the bank, but it has also attracted a lot of anti-social behaviour. No one locally feels that it is their space, it isn’t perceived in the same way as the other green space in the area, if people are to use the space they need to feel that it is part of the neighbourhood, and not a fenced off wasteland’. Joy Cunningham, Abbey Wood Forum.

To enable an ongoing programme of events, without having to apply for individual events licenses, it is recommended that an operations safety agreement be secured from the landowner Thames Water.

Engineering sketches for localised repair strategy for embankment.

Barriers to movement, fly-tipping and damaged infrastructure.

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ST E M P R O J E CT 0 3

The community engagement projects will be instrumental in changing perception of the Ridgeway. A critical mass of year round activity will establish a virtous circle of increased occupation leading to increase perceptions of value which in turn will encourage more people to use the site.

January

February

March

April

May

Orchard planting Orchard pruning Orchard harvest Orchard cookout Forage outings Thamesmead FC away supporters use of the Ridgeway Plumstead Runners Ridgeway circuit Heritage walk with Crossness Engines Trust Sustrans community cycle circuit Disabled Ramblers outing Annual Halloween walk with Forest Schools developed over 3 years as a promenade performance Enlightened underpass design development showcase Ridgeway Expo Shrine and den making Natural and cultural history collection exhibition Dog show Horse show Forest school

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June

STE M P RO J ECTS

July

August

September

October

November

December

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B RA N C H P R O J E CTS

The branch projects are twelve localised physical improvement projects. Each project embodies the principles of the stem strategies and each is coupled with a community engagement programme.

Threshold Projects Improved access and links to local amenities and other walking and cycling routes. Borrowed Pleasures Projects that maximise the existing assets of the topography and infra-structure and celebrate local culture and skills. Edible Landscapes Projects that support and enhance the forage landscape as the first step in community food growing. Playable Landscapes Projects that make space for the presence of the child and young people.

The projects are located and described in detail in the following pages.

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B RA N C H P R O J E CTS Lookouts & Dens

Proposal for a child friendly, accessible playable landscape on the route to the schools on the south side of the Ridgeway with hard landscaping, earthworks, look-out points, places to sit, embedded interpretation and augmenting existing planting.

The Ridgeway Classroom

Community Garden

Proposal for improved access through hard landscaping and a management regime to encourage the existing edible species as the first stage in initiative for more formal community planting.

Proposal to partner the ‘Forest School Initiative’ with local primary schools and create outdoor ‘study areas’ child friendly access points on walking routes from the local primary schools on both the north and south sides of the Ridgeway.

Th lan e ed 05 ds ibl ca e pe

Th e lan play 07 ds abl ca e pe

0 Th 6 lan e ed ds ca ible pe

Plumstead Gateway

Proposal for level and direct access onto the west end of the Ridgeway from Plumstead Station with hard landscape treatment to designate the entrance, deter fly-tipping and joyriding and ground level embedded directional signage.

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Th lan e ed 03 ds ibl ca e pe

Community Orchard & Growing plots

0 Th 4 res

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Proposal to remodel the boundary at pavement level along Sewell Road as a community orchard to reinforce the sense of the Ridgeway as part of the neighbourhood and not a separate territory in order to counter fly-tipping.

Radiomast Gateway

0 Bo 2 ple rrow as ure ed s

Proposal for a level access and disabled parking at the crossing point of White Hart Avenue. The route onto the Ridgeway will be upgraded with hard landscaping, embedded signage and seating.

Industrial Arts

A proposal for a series of artists commissions for artworks – situated on the roofs of buildings visible from the Ridgeway and made in collaboration with the occupants of the industrial buildings. 4 2

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Grazing Enclosures

The Enlightened Underpass

Path Crossing

Improvements to wayfinding to the Green Chain and other footpath networks with embedded signage.

Proposal for an artist lighting commission to be delivered with young people to illuminate the currently dark and gloomy underside of the flyover using renewable energy sources and turn a threatening environment into a gateway for the Ridgeway.

Proposal to license sites for horse grazing. The license will include a welfare clause and each site will have enclosure and shelter. Grazing is an effective means to maintain grassland and control invasive shrubs.

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Crossness Gateway

Proposal for level access onto the east end of the Ridgeway from Thames Path to co-ordinate with the proposed link road and entrance to Crossness Visitor Centre, prioritising pedestrian and cycle movement over vehicular traffic.

lds

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The Social Cinema

Proposal to create the infrastructure for performance and projections adjacent to the MySpace Youth Leisure Zone in the Arches at Harrow Manor Way flyover.

10 Th Bo e ed rro ib we le l d p and lea sca su pe res

lds

Football Club Path

Proposal to improve the ramped access on the north side of the Ridgeway and create an entrance to the football club with hard landscaping augmented with planting.

Marsh Lookout

Proposals for improvements to ramps, signage and furniture at the crossing point of Ridgeway and Green Chain Walk. Creation of a viewing platform including augmenting the existing forage species of plum trees and blackberries. 12

11 10.3 10.2 10.1 09

08

07

06 05 04

03 02

01

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BRA N C H P ROJ ECT 0 1 / TH R ES H O L D

P L U M ST E A D G AT E WAY

Street level access from Plumstead Station via Pettman Crescent as part of the A206 and Plumstead Station Environmental Improvements Planting on pavement side of the fence to back of bench. New precast concrete planks paving with embedded signage to widened walkway.

Tree at corner to be removed.

Fencing to be repaired with additional planting.

Existing barrier to be moved to the junction with the main road and kept shut.

Raised table introduced and road surface to be made good.

Proposed new access point

Project Partners: LB Greenwich, TfL Funding Sources: Belmarsh Extension Section 106, station environs improvements Cost estimate: ÂŁ87,272.00 44

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01

Improved physical access will be matched by enhanced cultural access. An annual programme of guided walks, runs and cycles to encourage the use of the Ridgeway and to demonstrate the potential to link to other routes and amenities. The History Walk A guided walk through Bazalgette’s engineering masterpiece and the later C20th city infrastructure. Delivered in conjunction with the Crossness Pumping Station programme of activities as a means to encourage visitors to travel by train to Plumstead and to walk along the Ridgeway. Four summer walks – Crossness Engines Trust.

The proposed programme is strategically relevant to Transport for London’s walking routes initiatives and Sustrans initiatives to encourage cycling. Project Partners: Crossness Engines Trust London Wildlife Trust Sustrans Plumstead Running Club Cost estimate for an annual programme of ten events (excluding the promenade theatre) £3000.00

The Ridgeway Run A series of group runs organised by the Plumstead Running Club. Community Cycle A family cycle day organised by Sustrans to encourage more local cycling. Forage Outing A guided nature walk delivered by London Wildlife Trust to introduce the variety of edible species that can be foraged from the Ridgeway followed by a cookout event. Halloween promenade theatre event with local schools Based on the successful Eastbrookend Country Park event : www.barking-dagenham.gov.uk/2-news-events/ annual/spooktacular/spooktacular-main.html

“Without getting rid of the barriers it is impossible for people like me to use the Ridgeway and this is my neighbourhood and there are already very few places I can go with my dog”. Sorinda Bridgewater, Local resident with mobility scooter & canine assistant

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153.4

Existing kerbline

Existing entrance gates and associated paths to be replaced

Tightened kerb radii

Bridge structure to be extended to accomodate path

Position of gate to be relocated

Width of carriageway to be minimised

Proposed raised table entrance treatment

New fencing

Low level pedestrian circulation to be filled as part of A206 works

Existing tree to be removed for improved sight lines

MOVE 1 RELOCATE ACCESS TO HIGHER LEVEL

MOVE 2 CREATE GENEROUS PEDESTRIAN ENTRY POINT

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MOVE 3 APPLY RIDGEWAY MATERIAL PALLETTE

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EXISTING Embankment [arrow points down] EXISTING PROPOSED Embankment [arrow points down] MOVES PROPOSED EXTENT OF WORKS MOVES HARD SURFACING reclaimed concrete railway sleepers EXTENT OF WORKS SURFACING crushed concrete HARD SURFACING reclaimed concrete railway sleepers SURFACING crushed concrete

Existing entrance to be retained Paths to be removed and planted

6.4 21

6.4 21

Existing entrance to be retained HARD SURFACING reclaimed concrete railway sleepers Paths to be removed and planted Existing gate to be replaced HARD SURFACING reclaimed concrete railway sleepers SURFACING crushed concrete surface to widened path treatment to be to top of ramp Existing gate to extended be replaced SURFACING crushed concrete surface to widened path treatment to be extended to top of ramp

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BRA N C H P ROJ ECT 0 2 / B O R R O W E D P L E AS U R E

I N D U S T R I A L A RT S

A series of artist commissions paired with local business to create iconic art works for the roof-scape of the industrial estate adjacent to the Ridgeway.

“You’ve got to change the way people think about the Ridgeway and then everything else will follow” Lee Dalby, local resident and basket weaver from Woodlands Trust

Temporary works will be made in collaboration with local people and will use local skills in an area where there is still a degree of manufacturing and engineering expertise. The artworks will create a destination for the intrepid art tourist and will inspire curiosity in the passer-by. Project Partners To ensure an inspirational process that will deliver a quality outcome for local people and draw critical acclaim, it is essential to establish an ambitious brief and coherent implementation process.

Artwork made in collaboration with local people.

There are two potential options to develop this project. Either an organisation such as Stream, www.streamarts.org.uk who are based in Greenwich and have a commissioning track record should be appointed to develop the brief and deliver the project. Alternatively, a relationship between LBG and LBB Arts Officers and an institution such as the RCA Curating Contemporary Art MA Course (www.rca.ac.uk) has the potential to take forward the concept and explore the means to deliver.

Funding Sources Arts Council England / Arts and Business Paul Hamlyn Foundation The Leverhulme Trust, Artists in Residence grants Cost Estimates £15,000.00 - £50,000.00 per site 4 8

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An example of how collaborations between artists, institutions and neighbourhoods can transform the city is the Dalston Mill. A temporary working mill and wheat field created by EXYZT and Agnes Denes for three months in the summer of 2009 on wasteground at Dalston Junction as part of the Barbican Art Gallery ‘Radical Nature’ exhibition.

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BRA N C H P ROJ ECT 0 3 / E DI B L E LAN DSCA P E

CO M M U N I TY GA R D E N

Access from the Asian Community Centre A shared garden between SUS Asian Community Centre and the Ridgeway would provide a positive and visible integration of the centre with the surroundings and counter the isolation of the centre which is experienced by the centre’s users and perceived in the wider neighbourhood.

way in from Asian Community Centre

forage landscape

Project Partners SUS Asian Community Centre Greenwich Co-operative Development Agency Funding Sources Groundworks “Community Spaces” Initiative, www.community-spaces.org.uk Greenwich Pride Fund 5 0

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“If enhancing access to the Ridgeway as a recreational space is a real possibility it would be keenly supported by the SUSCC as long as security and access are carefully considered and the new facility is properly resourced. The SUSCC don’t have the capacity to manage additional space beyond coordinating voluntary engagement from the community in gardening and promoting use”. K K Jalli Director SUS Asian Community Centre Ltd

55 species recorded in this sector of which 24 are edible. Seventeen of the most frequently occurring are listed in order of dominance:

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BRA N C H P ROJ ECT 0 4 / TH R ES H O L D

R A D I O M A S T G AT E WAY 04

Level access from Whitehart Avenue with disabled parking, improvement to the path surface, embedded signage and places to sit. This new entry point gives access to the proposed Forest School site.

Concrete barrier to be removed.

Loose gravel surface to be upgraded. Dropped kerb and tactile paving.

New precast concrete planks paving with embedded signage.

Planting to be cut back for improved sightlines.

Fencing line to be brought forward.

Two disabled car parking spaces with hard landscaping and fencing.

Proposed new access point with disabled car parking.

“It is as much a “people route“ as a street and the absence of cars is no excuse for lack of attention and improving access” Urban Rambler and local resident

Project Partners Tilfen Land Cost Estimate £51,532.00 5 2

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Photo opposite: Mary Knight, The Disabled Ramblers, 2008

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BRA N C H P ROJ ECT 0 5 / E D I B L E LAN DSCA P E

R I DG EWAY C LA S S R O O M

A “Forest Schools” outdoor classroom for use by local primary schools. Designed in line with a brief from the Forest Schools Initiative the site will create opportunities for self-directed learning and exploration stimulated by the natural environment. Improvements include new access from the Triangle Nursery site along the north embankment and improvements to the path surface to create space for 30 children and their carers.

Gate and path to link Triangle Nursery to the Ridgeway.

Seating areas for a class of children.

Project Partners Forest Schools Widehorizons Outdoor Education Trust LBG Cluster Area One Schools

Improved path surface with embedded interpretation signage.

Funding Sources Play England Playbuilder and Pathfinder Initiative “New Approaches to Learning” Esmee Fairbairn Foundation Cost Estimate £275,800.00 54

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Forest School/ Nature Nurseries have been an integral part of early years education in Scandinavia since the 1950’s. Their philosophy of the Forest School/ Nature Nurseries was based upon a desire to provide young children with an education which encouraged appreciation of the wider, natural world and which would encourage responsibility for nature conservation in later life. Bridgewater College adapted their philosophy and began their Forest School in 1995 following a visit to Denmark. Evesham College became involved in 2000 and since March 2006 the Environmental Curriculum Service has worked in partnership with the Early Years Advisory Team and Christina Dee & Wendi Vick from the Forest School Learning Initiative to develop Forest School in Greenwich. Greenwich is now the first borough in London and the South East to develop Forest School and provide accredited training.

The Ridgeway is identified by FS as an ideal site. It has a good ecological profile, is within walking distance of 5 primary and early years schools and is large enough to accommodate that demand. Each school or setting needs to have a trained Forest School Leader who will be able to lead the sessions. Training takes place over a year and involves at least 50 hours study time. The first five days are based at the Environmental Curriculum Service in Eltham, London and two further practical skills days are in Wrotham, Kent. During the course participants will learn about how the ethos links to the curriculum, how to manage risk and behaviour, how to identify different learning styles and schemes and how to teach tool use, shelter building and other woodland skills. On completion of the course all participants will receive an NOCN Forest School Leaders Award Level 3.

55 species are recorded in this sector of which 21 are edible, twelve of the most common are listed in order of dominance. Hawthorn: fruit used to make jelly, jam and tisanes Bramble: fruit eaten from the bush and used in pies

Wild Cherry: fruit eaten from the tree and used in pies

Ribwort Plantain: used to make tisanes and the flower heads in tarts Vetch: used a leaf vegetable since Neolithic times

Ribbed melliot: used medicinally to promote lymphatic discharge and fluid retention Cleavers: seeds used to make a coffee like drink and treat skin diseases and lower blood pressure, roots can be used to make a red dye Elder: fruits can be used to make jelly, cordials and wine, root and stem extracts have proven beneficial in the treatment of bronchitis Common nettle: used as a spinach like leaf and in soups, Fibres used to make cloth Wild carrot: root is similar to the domestic carrot in the young plant, seeds used as birth control Creeping cinquefoil: used in the treatment of catarrhs and diarrhea Black Horehound: Treatment for nausea and vomiting

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MOVE 1 CREATE HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBLE PEDESTRIAN CROSSING

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EXISTING Embankment [arrow points down] EXISTING PROPOSED Embankment [arrow points down] MOVES PROPOSED EXTENT OF WORKS MOVES HARD SURFACING reclaimed concrete railway sleepers EXTENT OF WORKS SURFACE crushed concrete HARD SURFACING reclaimed concrete railway sleepers SURFACE crushed concrete

HARD SURFACING Ramp, paved HARD SURFACING Reclaimed concrete railway sleepers HARD SURFACING Ramp, paved HARD SURFACING Reclaimed concrete railway sleepers Existing entrance and access ramps to Ridgeway to be retained SURFACING Crushedentrance concreteand surface to widened Existing access ramps path adjoin withtoexisting path and ramps totoRidgeway be retained SURFACING Existing path surface and barriers to Crushed concrete surface to widened path be replaced to adjoin with existing path and ramps Existing fencing, to be retained Existing path surface and barriers to be replaced Existing vegetation to be cut back to improvefencing, sight lines Existing to be retained SURFACING Crushed concrete surface to widened path to adjoinvegetation with existing path Existing to be cutand backramps to improve sight lines SURFACING New fencing, to adjoin with existing Crushed fencing concrete surface to widened path to adjoin with existing path and ramps HARD SURFACING Reclaimed concrete railway sleepers, New fencing, to adjoin with existing Handicapped accessible fencing pedestrian crossing HARD SURFACING Reclaimed concrete railway sleepers, Existing fencing, to be retained Handicapped accessible pedestrian crossing Existing fencing, to be retained Disabled parking

Disabled parking

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BRA N C H P ROJ ECT 0 6 / E D I B L E LAN DSCA P E

CO M M U N I TY O RC H A R D & G ROW I N G PLOTS Project to create a community orchard as the front garden for Sewell Road. A treatment to improve the Sewell Road boundary to the Ridgeway. The boundary on the south side of Sewell Road is currently lined with garages, some of which are derelict and with fenced enclosures which attract fly-tipping. Both conditions are a detriment, not an asset to the neighbourhood. The Thamesmead and Abbey Wood SPD advocates the development of a selected number of these sites for workshop units and housing. The plan is to abut the edge of the embankment on the existing garage footprint with an additional three stories above. The value this development brings to the Ridgeway is negligible. The development will overshadow the south side and the elevated vantage, the quality that makes the Ridgeway special, including long views onto the

neighbourhood will be lost. In addition, it is likely the close proximity between the Ridgeway and the rear elevations will create a security issue for those properties that will outweigh the benefits of informal surveillance. There is potential to develop the existing garages as single storey workshops with parking spaces and to transform the fenced enclosures as a community orchard. The process of making the orchard will be in conjunction with the local community to engender a sense of local ownership and value in the neighbourhood. The proposed fruit tree species will augment the existing forage landscape and will reference the local Plumstead orchards that once supplied London with fruit.

The proposed construction method for the planting beds is low cost, easy to install and to decommission. The soil, the retaining walls and even the trees can be re-used. The orchard can be implemented incrementally to test the use of the fenced off sites for this purpose and to replace the garages as and when they are demolished.

The project can start small, on a single site, with community events to generate local champions able to take ownership of the project and steer the future maintenance and implementation on other sites.

Project Partners Local TRAs Greenwich Housing Greenwich Co-operative Development Agency

Pavement extended and fence line relocated to the base of the embankment.

Funding Sources Greenwich Housing Groundworks “Community Spaces” Initiative Greenwich Pride Fund Cost Estimates £25,000.00 per 260 sqm site 5 8

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Containers for soil with resin bound surface.

Orchard planting of indigenous species.

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55 species are recorded in this sector of which 21 are edible and four are fruit trees: >Wmj^ehd0\hk_jki[ZjecWa[`[bbo"`WcWdZj_iWd[i

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BRA N C H P ROJ ECT 0 6 / E D I B L E LAN DSCA P E

precast concrete as retaining wall for planting beds

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MU GW OR T Use d as a flavouring for fatty me ats and as a blood c leanser.

R I B W O R T P LA NT A I N Used as a tisane and to make tar ts.

P R ICKL Y L E TTU CE Salad le af and soporific halluc inog en.

S M O O T H S O W T H I S T LE Bitter v egetab le in Chinese c ooker y.

R IB B E D ME L L IOT Medic inally used to re duc e water rete ntion.

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Existing paved areas proposed as orchards

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ELDERBERRY AND DAMSON CAKE 6 bunches elderberri es 500g damsons, pitted 100g caster sugar 100g plain flour 50g unsalted butter 50g brown sugar 50g oats 1. Remove the elderberries from their stal ks and place in a saucepan with the pi tted damsons and sugar. Cook over a l ow heat for 20 minutes or unti l the fruit i s soft. Check the surface of the stewed fruit for any mi ssed stones. 2. Preheat the oven to 180C/Gas 4. 3. Place the flour, butter, brown sugar and oats i n the food processor and whiz until the mi xture starts to come together. Do not over-process – i t should stay lumpy. 4. Place the fruit in an ovenproof dish and sprinkle over the topping. Do not press down. Bake the crumbl e for 15-20 mi nutes until the topping is golden brown.

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B R A N C H P R O J E C T 0 7 / P LA YA B L E L A N D S C A P E

LO O K O U T S & D E N S 07

Bringing added value and celebrating informal play through appropriation, a collaborative project with local children. The Ridgeway is a popular destination for free ranging and social play, both for children and young people. Children were observed in experimental, self directed, problem solving and risk managed play, they made ingenious and creative use of the available fly-tipped junk to create ‘as if’ scenarios and characters and constructed slides and dens, all of which far exceeded the usual provisions and projections made on them by adults.

The “wild” or “under defined” aspects of the Ridgeway; the absence of formal landscaping and of adult supervision, the perception that the site “belongs to no one” are important qualities for the children. They consider it a place of exploration and adventure, to be freely shared with other visitors, yet they themselves express a strong sense of ownership. These skills of sharing and adapting territory to create informal play opportunities are valuable life lessons that can be supported and legitimised by a collaborative project, with the children, to design access points as playable routes.

New ground surface with embedded signage

Shortcuts and plateaus

Look-out point

Extended landings with seating and planting

Augmented edible planting

Project Partners Widehorizons Outdoor Education Trust Thamesmead

Playable landscape and access point

Bespoke embankment slides to integrate with planting

Widened pavement

Embankment swings

Funding Sources Play England Playbuilder and Pathfinder Initiative “New Approaches to Learning” Esmee Fairbairn Foundation Cost Estimates £50,000.00–£150,000.00 capital £12,000.00 collaborative design process

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B R A N C H P R O J E C T 0 8 / P LA YA B L E L A N D S C A P E

TH E SOC I A L C I N E MA

Creation of a social space able to host performance and events and where young people can feel safe to socialise.

08

New precast concrete planks paving with embedded signage.

Power supply for projector and temporary lighting.

The Ridgeway and particularly the existing platforms are used as social spaces by young people to meet friends and to hang out. The film screening during the consultation phase of the master plan successfully tested the potential for these informal gatherings to expand and become community events. The proposal is for a social space that can also be a place for performance or for an audience where young people can feel free and safe to socialise. The site is on the route from the housing to the north of the Ridgeway and the My Space Youth Zone in the arches. It is not overlooked by residential development but has informal surveillance from both the road and the Cave climbing club. The environmental improvements of the Social Cinema project will be matched by a project to enhance cultural access to the Ridgeway and create a week long festival of creative events as a Ridgeway Expo

Tiered balcony can act as seating and stage.

Screen painted onto wall Traffic calming, either road narrowing or raised table.

Project Partners My Space Youth Zone Trust Thamesmead Funding Sources Cory Environmental

Engineering sketches

Cost Estimates ÂŁ81,525.00 capital costs ÂŁ15,000.00 community engagement as Ridgeway Expo 6 4

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EXISTING Embankment [arrow points down] PROPOSED MOVES EXTENT OF WORKS HARD SURFACING reclaimed concrete railway sleepers HARD SURFACING concrete pavers

Existing footbridge to be retained HARD SURFACING 89 Concrete pavers Existing footbridge to be retained Existing path surface and barriers to be replaced

HARD SURFACING Concrete pavers

HARD SURFACING Reclaimed concrete railway sleepers to adjoin with existing path Power supply for projector and temporary lighting

Existing path surface and barriers to be replaced HARD SURFACING Reclaimed concrete railway sleepers to adjoin with existing path Power supply for projector and temporary lighting

Existing platform to be extended

Existing platform to be extended Existing wall to be painted

Existing wall to be painted

OVE 2 REATION OF SOCIAL SPACE PPOSITE YOUTH ZONE ERED BALCONY TO ACT AS AGE/ SEATING ELEMENT

MOVE 3 SCREEN PAINTED ONTO WALL

MOVE 1 APPLY RIDGEWAY MATERIAL PALLETTE

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MOVE 2 CREATION OF SOCIAL SPACE OPPOSITE YOUTH ZONE TIERED BALCONY TO ACT AS STAGE/ SEATING ELEMENT

MOVE 3 SCREEN PAINTED ONTO WALL

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The Social Cinema inaugural event – The Ridgeway Expo: a Laboratory of Creative Enquiry. The Expo is an exhibition of the Ridgeway Cultural and Natural History Collection. It will take place along the length of the Ridgeway in early autumn and will comprise of found and made artefacts and specimens, outdoor projections and performance. The collection will be constructed through a series of workshop activities and events with local young people and will demonstrate the significance of the site and encourage use by local people and visitors. The workshops and on site activity will share knowledge of the ecology and history of the site and will be an opportunity to acquire new skills.

Workshops

On the Day events

Den Making A session with each local after-school club on the Ridgeway to make dens, delivered in conjunction with the Forest School Initiative. The dens will either be left in-situ or photographed and exhibited or remade for the Expo.

Forage cookout A series of workshops with young people to identify edible species from the Ridgeway and create recipes to be demonstrated on the day by an on site cookout and feast.

Shrine Making A session with each local after-school club on the Ridgeway to make shrines that explore the tradition of votives and a relationship to the landscape as a productive asset, delivered in conjunction with the Forest School Initiative. T he shrines will either be left in-situ or photographed and exhibited or remade for the Expo. Ecological survey A series of sessions with young people to map and make photographic or drawn inventories of the existing flora and fauna. This information will be used in an animation workshop to create short film portraits and these will be screened underneath the flyover. Delivered in conjunction with local secondary schools. Assemblage and Montage. A workshop with young people to explore the art tradition of assembling found objects to create new meanings. The workshop will make use of the fly-tipping and other objects found on site including the remains of burnt out cars, the decommissioned signage and vandalised barriers. Participants will be introduced to basic metal and other material skills such as welding. The resulting sculptures will be exhibited on site.

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Heritage Treasure Hunt A treasure hunt to investigate the significance of the embankment and surrounding marshes. In conjunction with Crossness Engines Trust. Dog Show/ Horse Show/ Angling Competition Three competitive events that address immediate and wider use of the landscape and which are an opportunity to share best practice.

Partners Forest Schools Initiative Local primary schools Youth Zone Trust Thamesmead Urban farm Museum of London Crossness Engines Trust London Wildlife Trust Gallions Housing Association

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BRA N C H P ROJ ECT 0 9 / TH R ES H O L D

PAT H C R O S S I N G

Improvements to wayfinding to the Green Chain and other footpath networks with embedded signage and augmentation of the existing forage planting. This project, combined with the following four, is a cluster of improvements to give better, safer access across the Ridgeway from north to south, to connect to footpath networks and amenities.

Signage for the Green Chain and for Footpath 2 embedded in the ground.

The Path Crossing will provide wayfinding as ground embedded signage at the junction of the Ridgeway, where it meets the Green Chain Route and Footpath 2 and will indicate the walking route to Thamesmead Football Club from the proposed coach drop off point on Belvedere Road. The existing wild plum trees growing along the path will be augmented with additional selected fruit trees of old English varieties of plum, medlar and quince. These once grew in Plumstead as part of the extensive fruit orchards that supplied London.

Additional fruit species planted on north edge of the ramp.

Project Partners LDA Parklands East London Green Grid Funding Sources Groundworks “Community Spaces� Initiative www.community-spaces.org.uk 6 8

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70 species recorded in this sector of which 18 are edible and four are fruit producing Wild plum: fruit eaten from the tree and in pies. Hawthorn: fruit used in jelly, jam and sloe gin Dog rose: fruits used to make jelly and jam Elder: fruits and flowers used to make cordials and in the treatment of bronchitis

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B R A N C H P R O J E C T 1 0 .1 / B O R R O W E D P L E A S U R E

M A R S H LO O K O U T 10.1

A place to pause, a platform surrounded by fruit bushes and trees to give long views south over the marshes. Improvements to the embankment path at the north south junction that leads to the Green Chain Path and to the Football Club. The scheme creates an observation point over the marshes and includes new path surfacing, seating, signage and a fruit bush promenade. There is an opportunity to establish a collaborative project with local people to both develop the design of the furniture and to create actual prototypes.

Ramp surface and railing to be upgraded, twin ramp to be removed. New pre-cast concrete planks paving with embedded signage.

Soft fruit promenade.

Project Partners East London Green Grid

Ramp surface and railing to be upgraded.

Path widened to form platform with seating.

Funding Sources Groundworks “Community Spaces� Initiative, www.community-spaces.org.uk Cost Estimate see 10.3 Football Club Path 70

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Marsh Lookout furniture prototyping The design and material resolution of the furniture is based on the Victorian wrought iron work that still exists in the beam engine shed at Crossness. The prototyping project will be organised in partnership with the Crossness Engines Trust to explore the industrial heritage of the area. The making process will take place in the Whitton Castings foundry in Charlton and will include a group of local people in the design refinement and techniques of mould making and casting of the furniture. The furniture from the prototyping will be installed on the Ridgeway and the other artefacts will form part of the Ridgeway Expo.

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Project Partners: Crossness Engines Trust Gallions Housing Association Funding Sources: Cory Environmental Paul Hamlyn Foundation ACE Cost estimates ÂŁ 8,000 design development and prototypes

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B R A N C H P R O J E CT 1 0. 2 / B O R R O W E D P L E AS U R E

E N L I G H T E N E D U N D E R PA S S

Lighting the underside of the flyover to transform the actual and perceived quality of this space and turn a threat to a pleasure. The lighting will be powered using innovative renewable energy technology and will be developed through action research in collaboration with local young people. “It is frightening crossing over the Ridgeway under the road. I would never want to walk it on my own, there have been all sorts of problems including joy-riding and fly-tipping�. Kelly Sullivan, Gallions Neighbourhood Projects Officer

Use of the concrete soffit to reflect coloured light and transform the atmosphere of the underpass.

Project Partners Trust Thamesmead Gallions Housing Association Funding Sources Arts Council England Paul Hamlyn Foundation Cory Environmental Cost Estimates see 10.3 Football Club Path 74

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Enlightened Underpass collaborative design process A participative project with young people of temporary transformations of the existing environment of the underpass to test proposals for permanent designs. The project will build on the work of the film “Through Your Eyes� and will establish a collaborative partnership with two local Trust Thamesmead youth clubs. (Bentham Road / Seacourt Road) Professional lighting designers will lead the workshop process with two groups using theatre lighting, projections and performance. The participant groups will establish and show case their transformations to each other and an invited audience on a Friday and Saturday evening. The activity will share skills and engender ownership of the space with local young people. The transformation will be advertised as an event to draw a local audience and so increase use and local knowledge of the Ridgeway and the programme of improvements. The temporary transformations will inform the brief for permanent lighting scheme for this space.

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B R A N C H P R O J E CT 1 0. 3 / TH R E S H O L D

F O O T B A L L C L U B P AT H

Create a back entrance to the Football Club to allow access for visiting supporters from the coach drop off on Belvedere Road and for access on non-match days to the cafe and changing rooms. Improvements to the path coupled with the lighting project for the underpass. Lighting and signage. New entrance, visible from Green Chain Walk and Ridgway.

Formal planting of native species.

Hard landscaping with integrated seating.

Proposed new access point. New precast ground surfacing with embedded signage to widened walkway.

Project Partners Trust Thamesmead Continuum Sport and Leisure London Borough of Bexley Funding Sources Trust Thamesmead London Borough of Bexley Cost Estimates ÂŁ532,012.50 76

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View looking from proposed gateway link to Ridgeway. Drawing by Saville Jones Consultants

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Sporting Club Thamesmead

Position of entrance to Football club to be co-ordinated with Saville Jones Architects and level adjoining chainlink fence to be confirmed New Ridgeway Surface: New 1:20 6m wide self-binding gravel ramp with timber edging.

New Ridgeway Surface: New 1:20 2m wide self-binding gravel ramp with timber edging.

Embankment to be cleared of all planting and re-profiled to accept new ramp/path.

Area bounded by red line to be cleared for grazing except for trees identified by further tree survey.

New Ridgeway Surface: 2m wide self-binding gravel path w/ concrete curb See DWG xxxx

Existing Tarmac Path

Existing Concrete retaining wall to flyover above

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Do not scale from drawing. All dimensions to be checked on site by contractor and such dimensions to be the contractors responsibility. Drawing errors and omissions are to be reported to architect.

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STEP FREE CROSSING OVER THE RIDGEWAY client

LB Bexley

muf architecture/art LLP 49-52 Central Street London EC1V 8AB T 020 7251 4004 F 020 7251 1967 E studio@muf.co.uk

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BRA N C H P ROJ ECT 1 1 / B O R R O W E D P L E AS U R E

G R A Z I N G E N C LO S U R E S

Licenced horse grazing on the Ridgeway Proposal to license sites for horse grazing, identified in consultation with local horse owners. The provision of sites ensures the continued culture of horse ownership in the area and grazing is an effective means to maintain grassland and control invasive shrub. The criteria for designating sites is avoid use of the embankment slope where the potential for erosion, through soil creep, or more seriously, land slide is high and exposure of the underlying structure would present a problem. The three sites are relatively small and will be licensed as a cluster for rotational grazing. The license will include a welfare clause and each site will have enclosure and shelter. To celebrate the tradition of horse-keeping on the marshes and to disseminate horse health and welfare information, the proposed Ridgeway Expo community event, linked to the Social cinema project, should also include a Horse Show.

Project Partners Gallions Housing Association Thames Water National Equine Welfare Council Local Graziers Cost Estimates ÂŁ20.00 per linear meter of fencing ÂŁ5,000.00 demountable enclosure 80

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Steve Pyke Gallions Open Space & Green Space Manager muf architecture/art


11

B RANC H P R O J ECTS

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BRA N C H P ROJ ECT 1 2 / TH R ES H O L D

C R O S S N E S S G AT E WAY

Improved access to Crossness Pumping Station Visitor Centre and Thames Path. Level access to connect with the Crossness Pumping Station Visitor Centre and the Thames Path linked to proposed improvements to the Crossness access road. To provide disabled parking, seating and signage to mark the beginning of the Ridgeway Path and the Thames Path.

Generous pedestrian access to Crossness. Raised table denoting pedestrian priority.

Proposed new access point.

Project Partners Tilfen Land London Borough of Bexley

Grasscrete turning point

New precast ground surfacing with embedded signage to widened walkway. Disabled car parking for Thames Path and Ridgeway visitors.

Rationalised and unified fencing.

Funding Sources London Borough of Bexley Cost Estimates ÂŁ38,282.00 82

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“The connection between the Ridgeway and the Pumping station hasn’t been explored by the Trust before now. The opening of the new Visitor Centre could be an opportunity to make this connection more explicit potentially including information about the Ridgeway in the new exhibition”.

12

Mike Jones Crossness Trust

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10

36 MOVE 3 APPLY RIDGEWAY MATERIAL PALLETTE

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MOVE 1 CONNECT ENTRANCE CROSSNESS AND PLANNED ACCESS ROAD CREATE GENEROUS PEDESTRIAN ENTRANCE

MOVE 2 CREATE DISABLED CAR PARKING SPACE

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EXISTING EXISTING Embankment Embankment [arrow points points down] down] [arrow PROPOSED PROPOSED MOVES MOVES EXTENT OF OF WORKS WORKS EXTENT HARD SURFACING SURFACING HARD reclaimed concrete concrete railway railway sleepers sleepers reclaimed SOFT SURFACING SURFACING SOFT grass grass

Assumed Assumed location location of of planned planned access access road road Existing Existing entrance entrance gates gates and and path path surface surface to to be be replaced replaced Proposed Proposed raised raised table table denoting denoting pedestrian pedestrian priority priority Bollards Bollards proposed proposed

Proposed Proposed entrance entrance gates gates to to Crossness Crossness to to adjoin adjoin with with existing existing fence fence Existing Existing fencing fencing to to be be retained retained and and to to adjoin adjoin proposed proposed entrance entrance gate gate SOFT SOFT SURFACING SURFACING Grass Grass HARD HARD SURFACING SURFACING Reclaimed Reclaimed concrete concrete railway railway sleepers sleepers HARD HARD SURFACING SURFACING Proposed Proposed pedestrian pedestrian lane lane to to adjoin adjoin with with existing existing site site infrastructure infrastructure HARD HARD SURFACING SURFACING Proposed Proposed access access road road to to adjoin adjoin with with existing existing site site infrastructure infrastructure

Disabled Disabled car car parking parking for for Thames Thames Path Path and and Ridgeway Ridgeway visitors visitors

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P R O J E C T M AT R I X

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P R O J E C T M AT R I X

No

Project name

Strategic project

Borough/ locality

Land owner

Project description

Community engagement

Strategic Relevance: national/regional and local

Project size

Capacity building program to create a local volunteer group able to undertake maintenance with support from London Wildlife Trust.

National: food growing Change 4 Life Local: Greenwich Strategic Biodiversity Action Plan and Climate Change Strategy, East London Green Grid, Natural England „Natural Health Service“

Annual treatment 25000sqm of grass 11262sqm shrub

CABE Green Spaces Strategy, Green Flag awards

3.5 miles x 50m

3.5 miles x 50m

STEM PROJECTS 01

Ecology Strategy for Sustainable Biodiversity

Yes

Greenwich/ Bexley

Thames Water

A strategy to manage the wild and feral ecology to make it attractive to people and wildlife. A three year cyclical maintenance regime of mowing and coppicing alternate designated sections to sustain the existing mosaic of habitats and promote a forage landscape of edible species.

02

Sense of Place Strategy, a design code for a materials palette and signage.

Yes

Greenwich/ Bexley

Thames Water

A design code to ensure ongoing sustainable and coherent improvements for all materials and generic details to paths, seating, bins and other furniture. A signage strategy for on site information and directional signs and for off site, paper and digital maps which in turn can be used to promote the Ridgeway as a route and a destination.

03

Safety Strategy to increase use and embed local ownership.

Yes

Greenwich/ Bexley

Thames Water

A community engagement strategy of events and activities to increase use and a sense of ownership of the Ridgeway and to capacity build with local residents food growing and local management initiatives. Create a dedicated Ridgeway Safer Neighbourhoods team. Remove existing redundant barriers, repair subsidence, create passing places for cyclists and pedestrians.

A year long program of events and activities to increase use of the Ridgeway and underwrite an acceptable code of behaviour.

Feeling Good about Where You Live, Access to green space, PCT etc Natural England‘s Natural Health Service, Sustrans

BRANCH PROJECTS 01

Plumstead Gateway

No

Greenwich

Network Rail, LB Greenwich, Highways, Thames Water

Level and direct street level access from Pettman Crescent along Coal Yard Lane as part of the WWM proposed improvements. To include repaving, hard landscaping, signage, re-site existing road barrier and cutting back foliage.

Guided walks, runs and cycles. Annual program of 10.

TfL, Sustrans

02

Industrial Arts

Yes

Greenwich

Hunter Plastics, Network Rail

Art project as a collaboration between local businesses to make works to be sited on the roofs of both used and derelict buildings visible from the Ridgeway to advertise the hidden skill and creativity of people who live and work in the area.

Creative collaboration between the commissioned artist and local businesses.

Art In Empty Spaces

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Project delivery partners

Project engagement partners

London Wildlife Trust, Greenwich and Bexley Park rangers, Thames Water

Project champions

Cost estimate

Funding notes

Phasing: short / medium / long term delivery

Delivery

Long term management

Consultation carried out

Medium term and ongoing.

Thames Water, London Wildlife Trust Park Rangers

Thames Water, London Wildlife Trust

London Wildlife Trust Greenwich and Bexley Parks Officer

Long term

LA through adherence to the design code.

LB Greenwich and Bexley, Thames Water

Gallions Housing Association, Crossness Trust

Greenwich MIT

Long term

muf deliver 12 months engagement plan

LB Greenwich and Bexley, Thames Water, Safer Neighbourhoods Team

Crossness Trust, Wider Horizons, Outdoor Education Trust, Sustrans, Plumstead Runners Club, East Greenwich Housing, Greenwich Cooperative Development, Feeling Good about Where You Live

Short term

Expert management annual cost £ 30,000.00

Crossness Engines Trust, LB Greenwich, LB Bexley, Sustrans, TfL

Crossness Engines Trust, Safer Neighbourhoods, TfL, Sustrans, London Wildlife Trust, Forest Schools, Plumstead Runners

LB Greenwich TfL

P R O J EC T M AT R I X

Crossness Engines Trust, Plumstead Runners, Sustrans, London Wildlife Trust

£ 87,272.00 Capital £ 3,000.00 Engagement

Potential funding sources: Belmarsh Extension Section 106, Station Environs Improvements

Local Businesses, ACE

£ 15,000.00 – £ 50,000.00

Potential funding sources: Arts Council England/ Arts and Business, Paul Hamlyn Foundation, The Leverhulme Trust, Artists in Residence grants

Thames Water, LB Greenwich, Highways

Artist to deliver

Building Owner, LB Greenwich

Hunter Plastics, Saskia Delman Bexley Arts officer

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No

Project name

Strategic project

Borough/ locality

Land owner

Project description

Community engagement

Strategic Relevance: national/regional and local

03

Community Garden

No

Greenwich

Shaded Udham Singh Asian Community Centre, Thames Water

Proposal to make a gated route from the Asian Community Centre outside space onto the Ridgeway to increase recreational use and give access for food growing and foraging.

Program of events on the Ridgeway with users of SUSSAC to increase presence on the Ridgeway and instill a sense of shared ownership.

Change 4 Life CNP, Mosaic Initiative

04

Radiomast Gateway

No

Greenwich

Tilfen Land, Thames Water, in future when the road is adopted LB Greenwich and Highways

Level access from White Hart Avenue with disabled parking, path resurfacing, embedded signage and seating.

05

Ridgeway Classroom

No

Greenwich

Thames Water, Tilfen Land as lease holder to Triangle Nursery

Proposal for the Ridgeway to be a Forest School site accessible to local primary and nursery schools. Path landscaping and surfacing, seating and signage. Direct access from the Triangle Nursery.

Ongoing program of activity with local Primary and Nursery schools

Forest Schools, Walk To School, Wider Horizons, Outdoor Education Trust

06

Community Orchard + Growing Plots

No

Greenwich

Thames Water, LB Greenwich Housing

Boundary treatment along Sewell Road to reinforce a positive relationship between the Ridgeway and neighbourhood. To deter fly tipping, remove the existing fence and extend pavement to the bottom of the embankment. To plant with an orchard of those fruit trees already on the Ridgeway. To either demolish derelict garages or refurbish as workshop spaces.

Community capacity building to embed local ownership and care of the orchard.

London: 2 Million Trees by 2025 Feeling Good about Where You Live Initiative

07

Lookouts & Dens

No

Greenwich

Thames Water, LB Greenwich Housing

Proposal to create a series of playable child friendly look outs, slides and pavilions. To be designed in consultation with local children and to frame and celebrate the current use of the Ridgeway as an ad hoc play space.

Collaborative design development with local children and ongoing outreach play activities.

Play Pathfinder PCT

08

The Social Cinema

No

Bexley

Thames Water

Proposal for improvements to the existing ramp to create an outside space for the MyPlace Youth Leisure Zone, to be designed and delivered in consultation and collaboration with local young people.

Collaborative design and process with local young people as Ridgeway Expo.

MyPlace PCT

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Project size

Disabled Ramblers Association

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Project delivery partners

Project engagement partners

Project champions

Cost estimate

SUSSAC, Greenwich Co-operative Development Agency

Funding notes

Phasing: short / medium / long term delivery

Delivery

Long term management

Consultation carried out

Designer to deliver

SUSSAC, Thames Water

SUSSAC

Long term

Designer to deliver

Highways, Thames Water, Tilfen Land

Tilfen Land

Short term

Designer to deliver

Thames Water, Triangle Nursery

Triangle Nursery, De Lucy, Thomas a Beckett and Boxgrove Primary Schools, Wide Horizons, Outdoor Education Trust

LB Greenwich Housing and Parks

LB Greenwich Housing

Greenwich Housing, Abbey Wood Forum, Growing Greenwich

Potential funding sources: Groundworks ‘Community Spaces’ Initiative, www.communityspaces.org.uk, Greenwich Pride Fund

Tilfen Land

£ 51,532.00

Forest Schools, Widehorizons Outdoor Education Trust, LBG Cluster Area One Schools

Triangle Nursery

£ 275,800.00

Potential funding sources: Play England Playbuilder and Pathfinder Initiative, ‘New Approaches to learn” Esmee Fairbairn Foundation

Local TRA, Greenwich Housing, Greenwich Co-operative Development Agency

‘Growing Greenwich’, Feeling Good About Where You Live

£ 25,000.00 per 260sqm site

Potential funding sources: Greenwich Housing, Groundworks ‘Community Spaces’ Initiative, Greenwich Pride Fund

Widehorizons Outdoor Education Trust, Trust Thamesmead

£ 50,000.00 – £ 150,000.00 Capital £12,000.00 Collaborative design process

Potential funding sources: Play England Playbuilder and Pathfinder Initiative, ‘New Approaches to learn” Esmee Fairbairn Foundation

Short term

Designer to deliver

LB Greenwich, Thames Water

Bridget Hanscsombe LBG Play Officer

Trust Thamesmead, myspace Youth Zone

£ 81,525.00 Capital £ 15.000.00 Community engagement as Ridgeway Expo

Potential funding sources: Cory Environmental

Short term

Designer to deliver

LB Bexley, Thames Water

Gallions Housing Association

P R O J EC T M AT R I X

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No

Project name

Strategic project

Borough/ locality

Land owner

Project description

09

Path Crossing

No

Bexley

Thames Water

Proposal for improvements, connect with Green Chain and Footpath 2 and to augment edible species.

Sport England Grass Roots sport access

10.1

Marsh Lookout

No

Bexley

Thames Water

Proposal for improvements to the existing ramp form Belvedere Road to the north of the embankment and Thamesmead Football club to include a look out and orientation point, hard landscaping and signage to encourage further exploration of the network of paths and destinations visible from this point across the marsh.

Natural England „Natural Health Service“, Green Chain Walk, East London Green Grid

10.2

Enlightened Underpass

No

Bexley

Thames Water, Gallions Housing Association

Proposal to light the underside of the flyover with renewable energy technology to be delivered by an artist in collaboration with local young people.

10.3

Football Club Path

No

Bexley

Thames Water

Proposal for improvements to the route on the north side of the embankment and to link to Thamesmead Football Club via a secondary entry point that gives access to the café and showers.

11

Grazing Enclosures

No

Bexley

Thames Water

Proposal for additional grazing licenses from Thames Water for grazing on the Ridgeway and appropriate fenced enclosures, shelters and access to water. The license to include an enforceable welfare clause to ensure proper care of horses.

Community program of events with local horse owners to establish viable numbers for the available grazing and to promote proper care particularly of teeth, feet and regular worming.

12

Crossness Gateway

No

Bexley

Thames Water, Tilfen Land

Access from the Thames Path and new road to Crossness Pumping Station. Hard landscaping to include disabled parking space, path surfacing, signage and seating.

Annual program of walks, see Plumstead Gardens

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Community engagement

Strategic Relevance: national/regional and local

Project size

Collaborative design development with local young people.

Crossness Trust, English Heritage

muf architecture/art


Project delivery partners

Project engagement partners

Project champions

Cost estimate

East London Green Grid, LDA Parklands,

Funding notes

Potential funding sources: Groundworks ‘Community Spaces’ Initiative, www.communityspaces.org.uk

East London Green Grid

see 10.3

Potential funding sources: Groundworks ‘Community Spaces’ Initiative, www.communityspaces.org.uk

Trust Thamesmead, Gallions Housing Association

see 10.3

Potential funding sources: Arts Council England, Paul Hamlyn Foundation, Cory Environmental

£ 532,012.50

Potential funding sources: Trust Thamesmead, LB Bexley

Trust Thamesmead, Continuum Sport and Leisure, LB Bexley

Thamesmead FC

Gallions Housing Association, Thames Water, National Equine Welfare Council, Local graziers

£ 20.00 per linear metre fencing £ 5,000.00 Demountable enclosure

Tilfen Land, LB Bexley

£ 38,282.50

P R O J EC T M AT R I X

Phasing: short / medium / long term delivery

Delivery

Long term management

Consultation carried out

Designer to deliver as exemplar of design code and signage strategy.

LB Bexley, Thames Water, Thamesmead Football Club, Highways

Artist to deliver

Bubbles Brazil Grazier Community, Steve Pyke Gallions Open Space Manager

LB Bexley

Designer to deliver

Thames Water, LB Bexley

Crossness Trust Mike Hayes, Jonathan Rooks, Schal Andrew Housan

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R I S K B E N E F I T M AT R I X

No

Project proposal

Worst case scenario

Likelihood

Risk controllable

STEM PROJECTS 01

Ecology Strategy for Sustainable Biodiversity

If the proposed maintenance is not implemented, the mosaic of habitats and the existing biodiversity will be lost. Forage opportunities will be limited and a monoculture of invasive species will dominate.

High

Yes

02

Sense of Place Strategy, a design code for a materials palette and signage.

Vandalism of upgraded paths, signage and furniture.

High

Yes

03

Safety Strategy to increase use and embed local ownership.

Continued anti social behaviour that involves threatening behaviour and abusive language, littering and fly tipping, uncontrolled dogs and dog mess, graffiti, lighting of fires, joyriding with motorbikes and inconsiderate use by cyclists.

High

Yes

2.0

BRANCH + SEED PROJECTS

01

Plumstead Gateway

Fly tipping

High Medium

Yes

Proposed removal of existing barriers will encourage or at least enable motorbike and car joyriding.

Medium

No

02

Industrial Arts

Vandalism, cynical or lack of interest and/ or commitment from local businesses/ building owners.

Medium

No

03

Community Garden

Continued isolation and perceived segregation of the Asian Community Centre from the neighbourhood by both the centre itself and the neighbours if the project is not undertaken.

High

No

If the project is implemented, increased vulnerability of centre and individuals to anti social behaviour.

Medium

Yes

04

Radiomast Gateway

In addition to fly tipping and access for joy riders (see above) Tilfen Land may refuse access.

Medium

No

05

Ridgeway Classroom

Children getting scratched or stung by nettles.

Medium

No

06

Community Orchard + Growing Plots

Fly tipping and lack of ongoing community interest and care.

Medium

Yes

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Practicalities to avoid or reduce risk

Value of allowing

Three year cyclical mowing and coppicing of designated areas.

The relatively small cost of this regime will deliver large benefits to people and wildlife and make the Ridgeway a more attractive place to be.

Use of only durable, robust materials that are seemingly part of what is there already. Embed all signage in the ground not on the horizontal. Deploy all materials changes through community involvement to ensure they have local ownership.

Even minimal improvements to access and provision of seating and signage are evidence of care and will help to change perceptions and encourage use.

Short term dedicated Safer Neighbourhood Team patrols and enforcement. Year long program of community activities linked to capital improvements to increase use, engender a sense of local ownership and institute an informally agreed code of acceptable behaviour. Establish program of volunteer wildlife and cycle ranger with Sustrans to monitor and report misuse and so tailor official patrols and enforcement.

Embed ownership locally so the continued care and‚ policing‘ of the Ridgeway is sustainable.

Design in increased informal surveillance. Extend perception of the existing pavement boundary into the Ridgeway.

Improvements to thresholds will encourage more use and change the perception of the Ridgeway to a valued and cared green space and establish a virtuous circle that will encourage more use.

Existing barriers are inadequate and also keep out wheelchairs and mobility scooters.

Increased use by wheelchair and mobility scooter users who have limited access to open green space in the area. Contribution to the virtuous circle of increased use changing perception.

Program of advocacy and capacity building with potential building owners and businesses.

Sense of local ownership and pride will contribute to changing the perception of the Ridgeway and driving out anti social behaviour.

Targeted community engagement program hosted by local individuals who already use the Ridgeway to host activities in collaboration with SUSACC and other minority groups.

Opportunities to encourage ethnic minorities‘ use of green space to establish local sense of ownership of a shared amenity that will contribute to the virtuous circle of increased use changing perception.

Establish a project champion in LBG and/ or Highways who will advocate the benefits to Tilfen Land, address the anxieties of Tilfen Land re fly tipping and land squatting and design in acceptable barriers that also allow for wheelchair and mobility scooter access.

Increased use by wheelchair and mobility scooter users who have limited access to open green space in the area that will contribute to the virtuous circle of increased use changing perception.

Create access paths that are wide enough and long enough for a class of children, so they are close to nature but can choose either to remain on the path or explore further.

The social, emotional and educational experience of being immersed in a natural environment outweighs getting scratched.

Only make material changes accompanied by a community engagement program to embed local ownership and generate potential for ongoing involvement. Consult other successful similar scheme, Rudd Street and Birchmere Community orchard. Make information available both about where and how to dispose rubbish and what to do if fly tipping occurs. Plant the same species of high fruiting low maintenance trees already on the Ridgeway.

Opportunity for local ownership through management of the neighbourhood environment outweighs the current ongoing neglect and degraded condition of this stretch of the Ridgeway.

R IS K B EN EF I T MAT R I X

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No

Project proposal

Worst case scenario

Likelihood

Risk controllable

07

Lookouts & Dens

Vandalism, adult antagonism and fear of increased anti social behaviour.

High

No

08

The Social Cinema

Vandalism, adult antagonism and fear of increased anti social behaviour.

High

No

09

Path Crossing

Vandalism, anti social behaviour, littering.

Medium

No

10.1

Marsh Lookout

Vandalism

Medium

10.2

Enlightened Underpass

Vandalism, graffiti

High

10.3

Football Club Path

Fly tipping, vandalism

Medium

11

Grazing Enclosures

Abuse of horses through neglect and active targeted cruelty. Exponential increase in the local horse population without adequate grazing provision.

Medium

Yes

12

Crossness Gateway

Vandalism

Medium

No

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No

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Practicalities to avoid or reduce risk

Value of allowing

Only make material changes accompanied by a community program of engagement with adults and children. Include the children and their carers in the brief development and implementation process. Make visible the existing use of the Ridgeway as an amenity and playable space by children and young people.

The inclusion of the presence of the children in public space and the provision of play space delivers emotions, psychological and health benefits to children and their carers that outweigh the perceived and actual potential for anti social behaviour.

Only make material changes accompanied by a community program of engagement with adults and children. Include the young people and the Youth Zone in brief development and implementation process. Make visible the existing use of the Ridgeway as an amenity and valued space by young people.

The positive inclusion of the presence of the young people in public space delivers psychological and health benefits that outweigh the perceived and actual potential for anti social behaviour.

Use of only durable, robust materials that are seemingly part of what is there already. Embed all signage in the ground not on the horizontal. Deploy all materials changes through community involvement to ensure they have local ownership.

Increased access to the local footpath network has the potential to increase use of the Ridgeway and to be part of a raft of opportunities to increase exercise, counter obesity and mental health problems.

see above

see above

Design, develop and implement the artist lighting commission in consultation and collaboration with local young people. Ensure the lighting is low energy, low maintenance and utilises cheap and easily replaced components. Establish agency responsible for ongoing maintenance program before committing to the project with particular regard to the removal of graffiti.

Improvements to the environment will encourage use and will contribute to the virtuous circle of increased use changing perception.

Use of only durable, robust materials that are seemingly part of what is there already. Ensure maintenance is committed from Football Club.

Access to the Football Club facilities, not only on match days, will increase use of the Ridgeway by creating another destination, that is of use to runners as well as walkers.

Ensure that grazing licenses have a welfare clause that is enforceable and establish an agency able and willing to enforce before issuing licenses. Consult with all interested parties to ensure a long term plan for the presence of the horses on the marsh and establish viable population numbers to inform granting of future licenses. Community engagement program organised around horse welfare to establish need for regular worming, teeth and foot care.

Horse ownership and care can be a positive influence for children and young people and diverts them from antisocial behaviour. The presence of the horse can be part of the traditional regime of sustainable biodiversity management of the Ridgeway.

Use of only durable, robust materials that are seemingly part of what is there already. Embed all signage in the ground not on the horizontal. Deploy all materials changes through community involvement to ensure they have local ownership.

Increased ease of access, increased use.

R IS K B EN EF I T MAT R I X

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APPENDIX

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R EV I S I T E D DOCUMENTS

Title: Managing the Marshes: Landscape Character Assessment Author: Groundwork South East London Date: Feb 2006 web: http://www.bexley.gov.uk/CHttpHandler.ashx?id=1156&p=0 Title: East London Green Grid: South East London Green Chain Plus Area Frameworks 5 and 6 Author: Design for London Date: Feb 2006 web: www.designforlondon.gov.uk/uploads/media/ELGGarea6.pdf Title: Author: Date:

Erith Marshes and Belvedere Green Links London Borough of Bexley Jan 2009

Title: Plumstead Road and Pettman Crescent: Pedestrian and Cycle Accessibility Review Author: Colin Buchanan and Partners for London Borough of Greenwich Date: May 2007 Title: Author: Date:

South Central Greenways Feasibility Report Transport for London, Sustrans October 2008

Title: Thamesmead and Abbey Wood Supplementary Planning Document (SPD) Author: LB of Greenwich, LB of Bexley web: http://www.bexley.gov.uk/index.aspx?articleid=4069 Title: A206 Study Author: Colin Buchanan and WWM for London Borough of Greenwich Date: July 2008 Title: Author: Date:

Plumstead Station Environs Witherford Watson Mann Draft, Feb 2007

Title: Rights of Way and Access Improvement Plan Author: London Borough of Bexley Date: 2009 web: http://www.bexley.gov.uk/index.aspx?articleid=5985 Title: Author: Date:

Belvedere and Erith Links/ Sign _1 Peter Beard, Landroom signage _preliminary notes/ baseline 01.05.2009

APP E N D I X – R EV I S I T ED DO CUMENTS

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CLI E N T G RO U P

DES I G N T EA M

London Borough of Greenwich

muf architecture/art llp

Rachel Morris Rachel.Morris@Greenwich.gov.uk T 020 8921 6476 M 07976 234 051 Greenwich Waterfront Regeneration Agency 31 Thomas Street London SE18 6HU

London Borough of Bexley

Katherine Clarke katherine@muf.co.uk Caitlin Elster Julia Sch端ler Verity Keefe Felix Xylander-Swannell

Laurence Pinturault Laurence.pinturault@bexley.gov.uk T 020 8308 7777 Regeneration and Major Projects Wyncham House 207 Longlands Road Sidcup Kent DA15 7JH

T 020 7251 4004 muf architecture/art LLP 49-51 Central Street London EC1V 8AB

Martin Stockley Associates ltd Thames Water

Alan Lenander alan.lenander@thameswater.co.uk M 07747 642540

Design for London

Matthew Murphy Matthew.Murphy@designforlondon.gov.uk T 020 7593 8819 M 0796 715 0818 Palestra 197 Blackfriars Road London SE1 8AA

Mark Lemanski mark@muf.co.uk

Mark Goodbrand mg@martinstockleyassociates.co.uk T 020 7278 1555 1st Floor, Gensurco House 46a Rosebery Avenue London EC1R 4RP

Appleyard & Trew llp

Mark Weatherby Mark.Weatherby@appleyardandtrew.co.uk T 020 7379 6223 M 07770 920 890 36 Long Acre London WC2E 9SZ

Complete Ecology ltd

Alan Scott T 020 8764 7292 M 07710 317 469 76 Tankerville Road Streatham London SW16 5LP

Museum of London

Emma Dwyer Senior Archaeologist edwyer@museumoflondon.org.uk T 020 7410 2241 Mortimer Wheeler House 46 Eagle Wharf Road London N1 7ED

Access Consultant

10 0

TH E RI DGEWAY

Mark Crouch crouchm@ealing.gov.uk T 020 8825 6279

muf architecture/art


STA K E H O L D E R S

London Borough of Greenwich

Environment Agency

Continuum Sport and Leisure

Parks and Open Spaces

Rob Goring robert.goring@greenwich.org.uk T 020 8856 0100

Jenny Schofield jenny.scholfield@environment-agency.gov.uk T 020 7944 4565 M 07917 554602

Richard Fishlock T 020 7749 9177

Highways

Kim Smith kim.smith@greenwich.org.uk T 020 8921 5492

Play

Gurdeep Sehmi gurdeep.sehmi@greenwich.org.uk

Street Cleaning

Craig Hanling craig.hanling@greenwich.org.uk

Business Development

Anne Cruickshank anne.cruickshank@greenwich.org.uk

Tourism

Sue Whiting sue.whiting@greenwich.org.uk

Tenancy Services

Thames Gateway Sustainable Development Team Environment Agency 10th Floor, Exchange Tower Harbour Exchange Square London E14 9GE Liz Walker liz.walker@environment-agency.gov.uk T 020 7944 6222 London Project Officer Thames Gateway and Olympics Sustainable Development Team Vicki Kidney vicki.kidney@environment-agency.gov.uk

Timmy Bajwa timmy.bajwa@greenwich.gov.uk

64 Great Eastern Street London EC2A 3QR

South East London Green Chain Mark Budd mark.budd@greenchain.com T 020 8921 5876 F 020 8921 5442 Peggy Middleton House 50 Woolwich New Road London SE18 6HQ http://www.greenchain.com/

Tilfen Thames Water

Health Development

Bridget Imeson bridget.imeson@greenwichPCT.nhs.uk

London Borough of Bexley Play

Kirsty Jones Kirsty.E.Jones@thameswater.co.uk Walthamstow Reseviors Martin Wagner Martin.Wagner@thameswater.co.uk Conservation, Access and Recreation Manager

Jacqueline Skinner Jacqueline.Skinner@bexley.gov.uk T 020 8836 8400

John Liddard John.Liddard@thameswater.co.uk>

Parks and Open Spaces

Rod Lean rod.lean@bexley.gov.uk

Shaun Walkling shaun.walkling@thameswater.co.uk

Rights of Way

Brian Burton brian.burton@bexley.gov.uk T 020 8294 6952

Monica Kumah monica.kumah@thameswater.co.uk

Leisure Services

Saskia Delman saskia.delman@bexley.org.uk

Regeneration Unit

Winifred Glover winifred.glover@bexley.gov.uk Nicola Elcock nicola.elcock@bexley.org.uk

Simon Newsholme T 020 8319 5040 snewsholme@tilfenland.co.uk

Gallions Housing Association Kelly Sullivan ksullivan@gallionsha.co.uk Sue Asquith sasquith@gallionsha.co.uk Steve Pyke spyke@gallionsha.co.uk

Karen Sutton karen.sutton@thameswater.co.uk

Trust Thamesmead Mick Hayes Chief Executive MHayes@trust-thamesmead.co.uk T 020 8320 4479 F 020 8310 8918 Janice Songhurst Jones jsonghurst-jones@trust-thamesmead.co.uk> T 020 8320 4488 http://www.trust-thamesmead.co.uk/

APP E N D I X – C O NTA CTS

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W I D E R C O N ST I T U E N C Y

Discovery Childrens Centre

Headteacher P Smith headteacher.discovery.greenwich@lgfl.net T 020 8855 2470 F 020 8855 2738

London Wildlife Trust

/

East

London Wildlife Trust Carlo Laurenzi claurenzi@wildlondon.org.uk Plumstead Safer Neighbourhoods

Brian Washbourne Thamesmead Police Station T 020 8284 9609 Battery Road Thamesmead SE28 0JN

Greenwich Cooperative Development Agency

Claire Pritchard claire@gcda.org.uk

Greenwich Community Food Co-op ltd

Sue Pollock, Development Worker 19 Telemann Square London SE3 9YR Tel no: 020 8856 1578 Fax no: 020 8856 1578 email: sue.gcfc@tiscali.co.uk

Crossness Trust

Davey Haydock-Wilson Davey@gcda.org.uk

SUS Asian Community Centre ltd

Saville Jones Architects

Haydn Jones T 01903 211363 74 Victoria Road Worthing West Sussex BN11 1UN

K K Jalli, Director susacc@btconnect.com T 020 8317 0244 White Hart Road Plumstead SE18 1DG

London Bubble Theatre Company

crossness@btconnect.com T 020 8311 3711 The Old Works Crossness S.T.W. Belvedere Road Abbey Wood London SE2 9AQ

4th floor 49-59 Old Street London EC1V 9HX

Girish Rambaran grambaran@wildlondon.org.uk

London Wildlife Trust Jan Skinner Local Voluntary jask@btconnect.com Group Greenwich T 020 8265 4099

Dann Jessen dannjessen@east.uk.com T 020 7490 3190 F 020 7490 3290

Jonathan Petherbridge, Creative Director 020 7237 4434 www.londonbubble.org.uk

Country Markets

Marilyn J Rodgers Publicity & Craft. T 012 5287 1108 M 07885117008 www.country-markets.co.uk/

Sustrans London

Tom Sharland Area Manager, South London tom.sharland@sustrans.org.uk T 020 7017 2353 F 020 7250 0328

Respond (Thamesmead) ltd.

59 Kellner Road Thamesmead London SE28 0AX

SUSTRANS 70 Cowcross Street London EC1M 6EJ

Seltrans

Dog Rose Trust

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Andy Blake Rail Station Access Officer T 07758 884668

julia@dogrose-trust.org.uk/ T 0158487 4567

TH E RI DGEWAY

T 020 8316 1099

www.respondbank.co.uk

Broadreach Training College

T 01322 287270 www.broad-reach.co.uk 145 Nathan Way London SE28 0AQ

Landroom

Peter Beard office@peterbeardlandroom.co.uk T 020 7288 2414

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C O N S U LTAT I O N

Consultation London Wildlife Trust 17.04.2009 Carlo Laurenzi - Chief Executive Girish Rambaran - London 2012 Olympic Officer Country Markets 20.04.09 Marilyn J Rodgers – Publicity & Craft Broadreach Training College 21.04.2009 145 Nathan Way SUS Asian Community Centre 21.04.2009 K K Jalli – Director Greenwich Community Food Co-op Ltd 23.04.2009 Sue Pollock - Development Worker Bob Hayward - Stall Manager Eynsham Greenwich Great Get Together 09.05.2009 Lee Dalby – Local resident and willow sculptor Alan Pett – Greenwich Parks Department - Security & Education Manager Greenwich Co-operative Development Growing Greenwich 21.05.2009 Davey Haydock – Wilson

Abbey Wood Forum 26.06.2009 Joy Cunningham Tilfen Land 14.07.2009 Terry Adams – Director of Real Estate Forest School Initiative – Wide Horizons 14.07.2009 Lucy Nettleton- Head of Centre Environmental Curriculum Service East London Green Grid Steering Group 10.11.2009 Marc Deeley – Environment Agency Mike Neill – Greenwich Council Tom Sharland – Sustrans Vanessa Rodgers – Greenwich Council Matt Murphy – DfL Matthew Carrington – DfL/ Groundwork Tony Wall – Bexley Council Mark Budd – SE London Green Chain Jeremy Shearmur – Greenwich Council

Events Picnic on the Ridgeway 10.05.2009 Rubbish clearing 22.05.2009 Audition film – Harrow Manor Flyover 16.06.2009 Audition film – Thamesmead Festival 11.07.2009 Stakeholder meeting – Archies 05.08.2009 Screening ‘Through your eyes’ 11.09.2009

Community Safety 19.11.2009 Val Hines - CPDA Bexley Robert Couchman – CPDA Greenwich Graziers 24.11.2009 Bill Anderson - Local Grazier

Primary Care Trust 21.05.2009 Bridget Imerson Triangle Nursery 21.05.2009 Beverley Hall Gallions Housing Association 04.06.2009 Kelly Sullivan - Neighbourhood Projects Officer Steve Pyke - Open Space & Green Space Management Greenwich Housing East-Neighbourghood Office 17.06.2009 Timmy Bajwa - Operations Manager Tenancy Services, East Greenwich Council Colin Childs - Maintenance & Repairs, East Greenwich Council Crossness Engines Trust 23.06.2009 Mike Jones - Treasurer Andrew Housam – Consultant

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C O N S U LTAT I O N I M A G E S

Picnic

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Audition ‘Through your eyes’

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Rubbish clearing

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Screening ‘Through your eyes’

APP E N D I X – CO NSU LTATI O N I MA GES

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O B S E R VAT I O N S O N T H E R I D G E WAY

01.09.2009, sunny weather Frequently asked questions to commuters: Where are you going? Do you usually use this route? Do you live local? What do you think about the Ridgeway? How do you think it looks? Do you think it smells?

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On the Ridgeway 9:00am Business man, part owner of near-by factory looking at the security on the site. Factory was broken into and police were too late to arrive at the scene. Has this factory on the market to sale but has had no luck selling it due to area being associated as a no-man’s area. Doesn’t usually use the Ridgeway. No opinions on the Ridgeway and didn’t really think much of it; only to repeat that the area is being associated as a no-man’s area. 9:30am Man walks his dog as usual along the Ridgeway strip. Lives local. Doesn’t like the look of the Ridgeway and thinks it’s unsafe. “It smells and is a mess.”. 10:00am Local man goes to work. Doesn’t think about the Ridgeway, thinks it smells though. 10:10am Woman from Thamesmead on her way to Plumstead. Doesn’t normally use this route. Thinks it smells further down towards Greenwich towards the recycling bins. Doesn’t think about the Ridgeway. 10:15am Man goes to work, uses this route regularly as he lives in this area. Doesn’t like the look of the Ridgeway and doesn’t think it’s safe. He never goes by himself and advises colleagues at work to never go by themselves. 10:30am Local woman is going to pick up her son from primary school. Usually uses this route. She thinks it’s unsafe - scary, she rather walks around it than through it. 11:00am Business man, off to a meeting. Doesn’t usually use this route. Thinks the Ridgeway looks ugly and unsafe. 11:22am Boy, lives in the area goes to the south part of the embankment. Usually uses his bike. Thinks the Ridgeway is quite good for a short-cut from one area to another. Thinks it looks ok. 11:45am Local man on his way to Thamesmead, often uses this route. Has never had any problems on the site and thinks it’s a good short cut. Thinks it looks quite natural. Occasionally it smells. 12:05pm Man walking along the Ridgeway strip; he walks his dog three times a day to and from home in Thamesmead. Thinks it’s safe, never had any problems, thinks it’s quite a nice location and nice to look at – scenery is fine. It smells further down the site.

12:30pm Group of young Asian men, are on their way home. Travel to work in the early hours in the morning and feel safe, can be busy at times though. Say it’s a good short-cut. Use the bridge every day. Don’t really care how it looks. Don’t think it smells.

Steps over Ridgeway on Sewell Road 1.20pm Man (mid 50’s) walks from north to south over Ridgeway carrying his shopping. He says he uses the Ridgeway every day to “pick up some bits”. 1.25pm Man (30’s) runs up steps after getting out of black car, paces around on phone, looking around, walks over and down steps on other side, south to north. 1.30pm (16 year) old boy with bike comes up from the south side, goes to cycle off towards Harrow Manor Way along the Ridgeway. He lives in the flats on Sewell Road and cycles along the Ridgeway to see his girlfriend over the other side of Thamesmead. “It’s wicked cos it’s like being in the countryside on my bike”. 1.40pm Same man from 1.25pm comes back north to south. I ask does he know what the Ridgeway is “No babes”, ask how often he walks across “You ask a lot of questions, don’t you? I was just picking something up.” phone rings and he walks off. 1.40pm Young teenage boy smoking, listening to music on his mobile phone. I say hello, he says **** off. 2.10pm Male jogger (late 20’s) jogs the full length and back every day. Lives in Plumstead and loves to get all the way to the river to do his stretching out and then jogs back. 2.10pm Young couple (early 20’s) both live near Harrow Manor Way, come up here to be alone as both of their houses are “hectic”. At least once a day, use it to walk to Plumstead station, they have never been out to Plumstead, I recommend it. 2.10pm Young mum and son walking over bridge south to north use it to get to the shops and the son’s dad’s house is over the other side.

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2.15pm Two teenage girls very loud on mobile phones asking “Where are you? We’re on our Jack Jones here, all we want is our weed” Followed by a young boy (8) on bike, a girl (14) on bike and another boy on bike. They all wait in a huddle at the bottom of the steps on the north side. Ask what I’m doing, I say I’m asking how and why people use the Ridgeway path, they all laugh and one shouts “Don’t ask”. 2.18pm Boy (early 20’s) runs up through the group. 2.20pm Two (30ish) African men walk over bridge “You alright darling, yes, are you? Yes darling we’ve been blackberry picking.” Stop to smell a flower at the bottom of the steps and walk off. 2.25pm A young polish couple walk from north to south weighed down with shopping. Stop at top and sit on steps, smoke a cigarette and then get up and carry on. I approach them to be told they don’t speak English.

Steps over Ridgeway near White Hart Road and the Asian Community Centre. 1.17pm Man (60) walking his dog. Does the same walk every day from Plumstead Bridge to Harrow Manor Way and back again. 1.20pm Couple (mid 40’s) jogging. Do it 2/3 times a week from their home in Plumstead up to the lake and back. 1.25pm Man (25) walking over bridge from north to south. No response. 1.27pm Woman (mid 30’s) uses the bridge from Monday to Friday to get to and from work. Doesn’t ever come here otherwise. 1.30pm Man (30) walks over bridge south to north, avoids eye contact. 1.35pm Man (60) walks every day “to get some air in his lungs” from Harrow Manor Way to Plumstead town. 1.48pm Man (47) walks once a week over the bridge from his house on White Hart Road to Plumstead town to visit his parents. 1.50pm Man (26) Monday to Friday from work to Plumstead to get his lunch, gets him out of the office. 2.07pm Man (68) walks the Ridgeway twice a day from Plumstead to Harrow Manor Way with his dog. 2.15pm Young man (about 17) runs from his home near Harrow Manor Way along the Ridgeway.

APP E N D I X – O BSERVATI O NS

Bridge over Harrow Manor Way flyover. 2.33pm Man (35) four times a week over the bridge. Has never been on the Ridgeway. Just crosses to get his shopping, then back again. 2.35pm Man (28) walks his dog every day over the bridge and then goes off along the Ridgeway towards Plumstead to let him off the lead. 2.40pm Man (27) walks about three times a week from his home in Plumstead, along the Ridgeway, then over the fly-over pedestrian bridge to visit his friends who live over the north side. 2.41pm Two girls (19-21) hang out on the bridge and this bit of the Ridgeway about three times a week. They live near Tavy Bridge and come across to go to town. 2.45pm Man (17) crosses over every Monday to Friday to get to work on the north. Never uses the Ridgeway. 2.48pm Woman (40) uses bridge three times a week to get from her home on the south side to pick up her child on the north. Doesn’t know what the Ridgeway is when I ask her. 2.54pm Woman (early 60’s) uses bridge twice a week to get to the shops. Used to play on the Ridgeway as a little girl and still picks blackberries and apples to cook with. 3.00pm Women with four young children uses the bridge every day to get to nursery and the shops. I ask if she ever uses the Ridgeway “Are you mental, with these four? They’d be off!” 3.06pm Two men and one woman (early 20’s). One man comes from the north side, the couple from the south. Meet in the middle and exchange money and then leave. 3.06pm Family with two young boys kick football along bridge path. They say they are going up by the horse, along the Ridgeway to play football. 3.07pm Group of 20 kids from YMCA centre walk up steps from the south side being ushered over to the north. Just visited the cAve. 3.09pm Man (50) uses the bridge from Monday to Friday to get to work. “It’s ok now in the summer, it’s in the winter when it’s darker that we have to be careful”. 3.11pm Man (40ish) walks over bridge from the north and walks off down the Ridgeway towards his home in Plumstead “It’s nicer than getting the bus ad walking along the road innit?”.

3.14pm Teenage boy (approx 15) cycles down the Ridgeway towards Crossness to meet a friend. “We’re building some jumps down under the bridge”. 15.16pm Woman (mid 30’s) twice a week to get to the shops. 3.24pm Man (45) three times a week to get to work. Likes to spend his lunch break on the Ridgeway when the weather is nice.

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Q U EST I O N N A I R E A N D R EC I P E BO O K L E T

The Ri dg eway :Throug h Yo ur Eyes To b e en tered into the raffle p le ase fill o u t t h i s f o r m an d h an d i n a t th e ref reshme nts are a by 8 p m.

3 . D o yo u t h i nk t h a t t h e R i d g e wa y i s h i s t o r i c a l l y i m p o r t a n t fo r t h e ar ea? 4 . W o u l d yo u l i k e t o l e a r n m o r e a b o u t i t s h i s t o r y ? 5 . D o yo u t h i n k t h e R i d g e wa y i s a g o o d p l a c e fo r c h i l d r e n t o p l a y ? ye s no

1. A re you a l re ad y using the Rid g e way ?

yes

no

A n d if so, do you use it: - to get som e he re ? W he re ? - to seek solitud e - f or ru n n ing - to wa l k yo ur d og - to f ora ge fruit - oth er

6. -

W h at wo u l d m a k e t h e R i d g e wa y fe e l s a fe r ? i n c r eas ed us e b et t er l i ght i n g a t c r o s s i n g s i n c r eas ed p r e s e n c e o f S a fe r N e i g h b o u r h o o d Te a m s o t h er

7. F l yt i ppi n g i s a p r o b l e m i n t h i s a r e a , w o u l d yo u b e i n t e r e s t e d i n - b et t er i n f o r m a t i o n o n r u b b i s h c o l l e c t i o n - community-led rubbish clearing

2. M a n y edible sp e c ie s are alre ad y g rowi n g o n t h e R i dgeway, th is c ou l d b e e nhanc e d . W ould you like t o b e i n v o l v ed i n c o mm u n i ty- l ed p lanting and g ard e ning ? ye s

no

8 . W h at o t h er u s e s c o u l d yo u i m a g i n e o n t h e R i d g wa y ?

n am e: age:

Pl ea se tu rn o ve r and c ontinue

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ar e yo u a l o c a l r e s i d e n t ?

ye s

no

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R e c i p e s f r o m th e R i d g e wa y

The R i d g e wa y : Th r o u g h Yo u r E ye s

Th e Rid g ewa y i s a t h r ee a n d a h a l f m i l e pa t h t h a t r u n s fr o m Plu ms t e a d R a i l wa y S t a t i o n t o Cr o s s n es s P u m pi n g S t a t i o n a lon g t h e t o p o f t h e Vi ct o r i a n en gi n eer i n g m a s t er pi ece, Th e Sou t h e rn O u t fa l l S ewer . It is a g r een co r r i do r m u ch va l u ed b y peo pl e, b o t h a du l t s , you n g peo pl e a n d ch i l dr en , wh o u s e i t a s a fo o t pa t h , a p la c e t o pl a y, a pl a ce t o fo r a ge a n d s i m pl y a s a pl a ce o f t ra n q u il n a t u r a l b ea u t y. H ow e v er t h e R i dgewa y i s t a r n i s h ed b y fl y t i ppi n g, j oy- r i di n g a n d ot her fo r m s o f a n t i - s o ci a l b eh a vi o u r . To f u lly r ea l i s e t h e po t en t i a l o f t h e R i dgewa y a s a va l u ed g re e n s pa ce a n d t o l i n k i t wi t h o t h er r o u t es i n t h e a r ea , D e s ig n f o r L o n do n a n d t h e L o n do n B o r o u gh s o f B ex l ey a n d G re e n w i ch co m m i s s i o n ed a s t u dy t o pr o po s e a m a s t er pl a n o f imp rov em en t s .

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Th e d ra f t p l a n h a s i den t i fi ed 1 4 pr o j ect s t h a t wi l l : Imp rov e a s en s e o f s a fet y Re v e a l t h e l o ca l h i s t o r y o f t h e a r ea Sa f e g u a rd t he R i dgewa y a s a n a t u r a l pl a ce a n d i n cl u ded loc a l p e o pl e i n t h e wi l dl i fe m a n a gem en t , M a k e op p or t u n i t i es fo r l o ca l fo o d gr o wi n g, M a k e op p or t u n i t i es fo r s ch o o l s t o u s e t h e R i dgewa y fo r le a rn in g Sa f e g u a rd t he R i dgewa y a s a pl a ce o f pl a y, Imp ov e a c c es s a n d m a k e b et t er co n n ect i o n s t o o t h er pa t h s a n d p la c es Th is ma s t e rpl a n i s i n i t s fi r s t s t a ge a n d h a s b een pr o du ced in c on s u lt a t i o n wi t h t h e l a n do wn er , Th a m es Wa t er a n d l o c a l p e op le . L o ca l vi ews a n d ex per t i s e a r e do cu m en t ed i n t h e f ilm, “ Th r o u gh yo u r E yes ” a n d i n t h i s b o o k l et o f r eci pes p rov id e d b y l o ca l r es i den t s . You r v ie w s a r e vi t a l t o co n t r i b u t e t o t h e fi n a l pl a n a n d t h e re is a q ues t i o n n a i r e a t t h e b a ck o f t h i s b o o k l et wh er e you c a n t e ll u s wh a t yo u t h i n k . Th e ma s t e rpl a n i n dr a ft a n d even t u a l l y i n i t s fi n a l fo r m i s a va ila b le a t www. r i dgewa yi m pr o vem en t s . b l o gs po t .co m /

ALEXANDERS Use d inste ad of c e ler y, h as m edi c i n al p rop e rtie s.

P L U M S F R OM P L U M S T E A D Th er e i s a l o n g h i s t o r y o f P l u m s t e a d p r o vi d i n g fo o d fo r L o n d o n , wh i l e s t i l l s u r r o u n d e d b y m a r s h e s P l u m s t e a d wa s a fi s h i n g vi ll age b o at s wo u l d m o o r t o t h e wa l l s o f S t . N i c h o l a s C h u r c h w h i c h was t h en at t h e h e a r t o f P l u m s t e a d vi l l a g e .

BLACK HOREHOUN D Tre atme nt of nause a an d v o m i t i n g.

O n e t h eo r y i s t h a t t h e n a m e ‘ P l u m s t e a d ’ m e a n s “ P l a c e w h e r e t h e pl u m t r ee s g r o w ” t h i s d a t e s b a c k t o t h e t i m e w h e n R o m a n L o n do n er s u s e d t h e l a n d t o p l a n t o u t o f t o w n o r c h a r d s , i n t r odu c i n g f r u i t t r e e s i m p o r t e d fr o m It a l y . I t i s s t i l l po s s i b l e t o fi n d p l u m t r e e s a r o u n d P l u m s t e a d C o m m o n an d o n Sh o ot e r s h i l l . If yo u wa l k a l o n g t h e R i d g e wa y t h e r e a r e al s o pl ac es w h e r e ye l l o w p l u m s g r o w i n a b u n d a n c e .

MULBERRIES FROM LESNES ABBEY

BLACKTHORN Damson fruits suitabl e f o r j am m ak i n g and sloe g in and wi n e.

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Th e f am o u s m u l b e r r y t r e e i s r e p u t e d t o b e o ve r 4 0 0 ye a r s o l d an d b ar es pu r p l e M u l b e r r i e s . Th e s t o r y g o e s t h a t i t wa s m i s t a ken l y b o u gh t b y t h e m o n k s fr o m t h e A b b e y w h o b e l i e ve d i t wa s a wh i t e M u l b e r r y i m p o r t e d fr o m c h i n a i n o r d e r t o c u l t i va t e s i l k wo r m s .

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BRAMLEY APPLES The c ooks favour i t e wo r k s wel l i n m an y p ie and c ake re ci pes .

PLUM C O M P O T E

3 0 0 m l / ½ p i n t b o i l i n g wa t e r 1 5 0 g/ 5 ½o z c a s t e r s u g a r 5 0 0 g/ 1 l b 2 o z p l u m s , s t o n e s r e m o ve d 2 c i n n am o n s t i c k s 3 -4 wh o l e s t a r a n i s e

BRAMBLES Blac kbe rrie s are an edi b l e f r u i t

1 . H eat a l a r g e s a u c e p a n a n d p o u r i n t h e b o i l i n g wa t e r . A d d t h e s u ga r a n d l e t t h e m i x t u r e b u b b l e fo r 3 0 s e c o n d s . 2. Add t h e p l u m s , c i n n a m o n s t i c k s a n d s t a r a n i s e a n d s i m m e r f o r 8 -1 0 m i n u t e s . 3 . R em o ve t h e p l u m s , a n d s i m m e r t h e s a u c e , s t i r r i n g g e n t l y u n t i l i t t h i c k e n s , t h e n p o u r o ve r t h e p l u m s a n d l e a ve t o c o o l s l i gh t l y be fo r e s e r vi n g .

BRIS TLY OXTONG UE Use d as a worme r

CLEAVERS Se e d s make c offee l i k e dr i n k , r o o t s a re d d ye and to t r eat s k i n di s eas es an d low blood p re ssu r e.

PLUM JA M 1 . 8 k g/ 4 l b s p l u m s 5 75 m l / 1 p i n t wa t e r 1 . 8 k g/ 4 l b s s u g a r

1 . Was h a n d w i p e t h e p l u m s . C u t i n h a l ve s .

COLTSFOOT Biol to make c ou gh s weet s an d s yr u p.

2. P u t i nt o a p a n w i t h t h e wa t e r a n d s i m m e r g e n t l y u n t i l t h e f r u i t i s s o ft . 3 . Tes t f o r p e c t i n . 4 . Add t h e s u g a r , s t i r r i n g u n t i l t h e s u g a r h a s d i s s o l ve d . 5 . B r i n g t o t h e b o i l a n d b o i l r a p i d l y u n t i l t h e ja m s e t s w h e n t es t ed, r e m o vi n g t h e s t o n e s a s t h e y r i s e t o t h e t o p . 6 . R em ove t h e s c u m .

COMMON MALLO W Young le ave s c an b e eat en , pr o du c es a ye llow d ye .

APP E N D I X – QU EST I O NNA I RE A ND RECI P E BO O KLET

7. Po t and s e a l w h i l e s t i l l h o t . M ak es ar o u n d 6 l b s ( 2 . 7 k g ) o f ja m .

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COMMON REED Use d in thatc hing , p aper m ak i n g an d baske t we aving .

COMMON CHI CKWEED Salad le ave s or c an b e u s ed t o t r eat skin d ise ase s and m u s c u l ar pai n s .

COMMON NETTLE Sp inac h like le ave s i n s al ad an d s o u ps , fibre s use d to make t wi n e an d c l o t h es

CORN SALAD Salad le ave s.

DOVE’S FOOT CRAN ES BILL Use d to tre at wind c o l i c .

BLA C K BERR Y AN D AP P L E CAKE 1 5 0 g s o f t en e d b u t t e r 1 5 0 g c as t er s u g a r 3 l ar ge eggs 75 g pl ai n f l o u r 1 1 / 2 t s p b ak i n g p o w d e r 1 1 0 g gr o u n d a l m o n d s 1 l ar ge b r am l e y a p p l e 1 5 0 g b l ac k b e r r i e s pr eh eat o v e n t o 1 8 0 /g a s 5 .

fo r c r u m b l e : 1 00g c o l d b u t t e r 1 00g p l a i n fl o u r 110g demerara sugar 2 tbsps whole rolled oats a k n i fe p o i n t ( ! ) o f g r o u n d cinnamon i c i n g s u g a r fo r d u s t i n g

1 . Cr eam b ut t e r a n d s u g a r i n a m i x e r u n t i l l i g h t a n d fl u ffy . B r eak t h e e g g s i n t o a b o w l a n d b e a t t h e m l i g h t l y w i t h a fo r k , add t h em bi t b y b i t t o t h e b u t t e r a n d s u g a r . M i x t h e fl o u r a n d b ak i n g po wd e r t o g e t h e r , t h e n fo l d i n t o t h e b u t t e r m i x t u r e wi t h a m et a l s p o o n , fo l l o w e d b y t h e g r o u n d a l m o n d s . S p o o n the mix into the cake tin and smooth the top. 2. Cu t t h e ap p l e i n t o t h i n s l i c e s a n d p u s h t h e m g e n t l y i n t o t h e t o p o f t h e ca k e . T i p t h e b l a c k b e r r i e s o ve r t h e t o p . 3 . F o r c r u m b l e , r u b t h e b u t t e r i n t o t h e fl o u r , t h e n s t i r i n t h e s u gar , o at s a n d c i n n a m o n . S c a t t e r o ve r t h e t o p o f t h e c a k e . B ak e f o r 1 ho u r .

NE TTL E SO U P ½ c ar r i er b a g fu l l o f n e t t l e s , t o p s o r yo u n g l e a ve s 5 0 g b u t t er 1 l ar ge o r 2 m e d i u m o n i o n s , fi n e l y s l i c e d 1 l ar ge c ar r o t , c h o p p e d 2 al ex an der s t i c k s , c h o p p e d 1 l ar ge gar l i c c l o ve , c r u s h e d 1 l i t r e go o d c h i c k e n , fi s h o r ve g e t a b l e s t o c k a pi n c h o f f r e s h l y g r a t e d n u t m e g 3 tbsp cooked rice or 3 rice cakes 2 t b s p t h i c k c r e a m o r c r è m e fr a î c h e 1 . P i c k o v er a n d wa s h t h e n e t t l e s . D i s c a r d o n l y t h e t o u g h e r s t al k s , as t h e s o u p w i l l b e l i q u i d i s e d . M e l t t h e b u t t e r i n a l a r g e pan an d s we a t t h e o n i o n , p l u s t h e c a r r o t , a l e x a n d e r s a n d g a r l i c u n t i l s o f t b ut n o t b r o w n .

CREEPI NG CINQUEF O IL Use d as a tre atme nt f o r di ar r h ea an d c atarrh.

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2. Add t h e s t o c k a n d p i l e i n t h e n e t t l e s . B r i n g t o t h e b o i l a n d s i m m er f o r 5 - 1 0 m i n u t e s , u n t i l t h e n e t t l e s a r e t e n d e r . S e a s o n . 3 . P u r ée t h e s o u p i n a l i q u i d i s e r w i t h t h e c o o k e d r i c e o r r i c e c ak es . R et u r n t o a c l e a n p a n , s t i r i n t h e c r e a m a n d r e h e a t b u t do n o t l et i t b o i l . C h e c k t h e s e a s o n i n g , t h e n g a r n i s h w i t h a s wi r l o f c r ea m a n d c h o p p e d h e r b s t o s e r ve .

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CURLED DOCK Blood c le anse r th at b i n ds wt h h eav y me tals.

D A ND ELIO N AN D B ACO N S AL AD 3 t b s p ext r a - vi r g i n o l i ve o i l 1 s m al l r o u n d s h a l l o t , fi n e l y c h o p p e d Sal t an d p e p p e r 6 h an df u l s o f yo u n g d a n d e l i o n l e a ve s 1 b r am l ey a p p l e , u n p e e l e d b u t c o r e r e m o ve d 8 s l i c es s t r e a k y b a c o n 1 ½ t b s p r e d - w i n e vi n e g a r

DANDELI ON Salad le ave s and t h e r o o t s b ei n g u s ed to make a c offe e l i k e dr i n k .

1 . M i x t h e o i l w i t h t h e c h o p p e d s h a l l o t a n d s o m e s a l t a n d p e pper . P u t t o o n e s i d e . 2. Was h a n d d r y t h e d a n d e l i o n s . S l i c e t h e a p p l e i n t o m a t c h s t i c k s . H e a t a fr y i n g p a n a n d c o o k t h e b a c o n u n t i l c r i s p . P u t t o o n e s i de.

DOG ROSE Fruits use d to ma k e j el l y, j am an d m ar malad e . the y ar e r i c h i n v i t am i n C.

DOGWOOD Twig s c an be use d f o r t eet h c l ean i n g.

3 . Ti p awa y a l l b u t 1 t b s p o f t h e fa t fr o m t h e b a c o n p a n , t u r n o f f t h e h e a t , t h e n t h r o w t h e vi n e g a r i n t o t h e h o t p a n . L e t i t bubble for a second, scraping up any bits and bobs, then tip it into the oil and shallot mixture. 4 . B r eak t h e b a c o n i n t o b i t s a n d t o s s w i t h t h e l e a ve s , a p p l e an d j u s t e n o u g h o f t h e d r e s s i n g t o c o a t t h e l e a ve s . D i vi d e a n d s pr i n k l e t h e r e m a i n i n g d r e s s i n g o ve r t h e t o p .

ELD ER FL O WE R CO R D I AL 2l b s c as t e r s u g a r 1 pi n t b oi l i n g wa t e r 1 l em o n , ze s t e d t h e n s l i c e d 1 1/4 oz of citric acid. 25 el der be r r y h e a d s .

ELDER Fruits use d in c o r di al s , wi n e an d j el l y, ste m and roots pr o v en t r eat m en t f o r bronc hitis.

1 . Was h an d d r a i n t h e e l d e r b e r r y h e a d s b e fo r e r e m o vi n g t h e b er r i es an d p u t t i n g i n a s a u c e p a n . 2. Add t h e s u g a r a n d b o i l i n g wa t e r a n d p u t o ve r a m e d i u m h eat . St i r c o n t i n u o u s l y u n t i l a l l t h e s u g a r h a s d i s s o l ve d i n t h e s i m m er i n g wa t e r t h e n a d d t h e c i t r i c a c i d a n d l e m o n ze s t a n d s l i c es . . 3 . Co m b i n e w e l l a n d s i m m e r fo r a fu r t h e r fi ve m i n u t e s b e fo r e c o v er i n g w i t h a t e a t o w e l . P u t t h e s a u c e p a n i n a c o o l p l a c e an d l eav e o ve r n i g h t t o l e t t h e fl a vo u r s i n fu s e .

EVERLASTI NG P EA T ip s c an be e ate n , b u t i f do n e s o i n ex c e ss, the y c an be t o x i c .

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4 . Af t er i t h a s r e s t e d s t r a i n t h r o u g h a p i e c e o f m u s l i m , o r c l e a n o l d t i gh t s . S t o r e i n a d a r k p l a c e . Th e c o r d i a l c a n b e u s e d i mm edi at el y a n d k e e p s fo r a t l e a s t t h r e e m o n t h s .

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FENNEL Roots, le ave s and se eds u s ed as a f o o d and flavouring and as gr i pe wat er .

W I L D SL OE G IN

4 5 0 g/ 1 l b s l o e s 225 g/ 8 o z c as t e r s u g a r 1 l i t r e/ 1 他 pi n t g i n

GARLI C MUSTARD Young le ave s use d in s al ads .

1 . P r i c k t h e t o u g h s k i n o f t h e s l o e s a l l o ve r w i t h a c l e a n n e e d l e an d pu t i n a l a r g e s t e r i l i s e d ja r . 2. Po u r i n t h e s u g a r a n d t h e g i n , s e a l t i g h t l y a n d s h a k e w e l l . 3 . St o r e i n a c o o l , d a r k c u p b o a r d a n d s h a k e e ve r y o t h e r d a y f o r a week . Th e n s h a k e o n c e a w e e k fo r t w o m o n t h s .

GOATS RUE Me d ie val tre atme nt f o r di ab et es , c rushe d p lants whe n t h r o wn i n wat er ar e a fish se d ative .

GREEN ALKANET Roots, le ave s and seeds u s ed as a f o o d and flavouring and as gr i pe wat er .

HAWTHORN Fruit use d to make j el l y, j am s an d tisane s.

4 . Th e s l o e g i n w i l l n o w b e a b e a u t i fu l d a r k r e d a n d r e a d y t o dr i n k , al t h o u g h i t w i l l s t i l l i m p r o ve w i t h k e e p i n g .

B L ACKB E R RY P A N C A K E S 1 c u p b l ac k b e r r i e s 2 eggs 2 c u ps m i l k 2 c u ps pl ai n fl o u r 1 t eas po o n b a k i n g s o d a 1 t eas po o n s a l t 1 t ab l es po o n g r a n u l a t e d s u g a r 2 t eas po o n s b a k i n g p o w d e r 1/4 cup butter melted

1 . B eat eggs u n t i l l i g h t a n d fl u ffy t h e n b e a t i n b u t t e r m i l k a n d s o da. 2. Si f t f l o u r , s a l t , s u g a r a n d b a k i n g p o w d e r . A d d fl o u r m i x t u r e t o egg m i x t u r e b e a t i n g w e l l t o m a k e a t h i n b a t t e r . 3 . Add b l ack b e r r i e s a n d b u t t e r .

JAPANES E KNOTWE ED Shoots c an be e ate n, s i m i l ar t o r h u babrb, me d ic inal so u r c e o f i m o di u m .

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4 . F r y o n a ho t b u t t e r e d g r i d d l e u n t i l p u ffy a n d g o l d e n b r o w n t u r n i n g o n l y o n c e . S e r ve h o t .

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MUGWORT Use d as a flavour i n g f o r f at t y m eat s an d as a blood c le ans er .

B L ACKB ER R Y A N D A P P L E C R U M B L E

PRICKLY LETTUCE Salad le af and so po r i f i c h al l u c i n o gen .

1 . Peel , c o r e a n d c u t a p p l e s i n t o s i x p i e c e s . C u t e a c h p i e c e i n t o 5 m m /¼ i n t h i c k s l i c e s .

3 l ar ge Br a m l e y a p p l e s 3 0 g/ 1 ¼o z b u t t e r 1 5 0 g/ 5 o z c a s t e r s u g a r pi n c h o f c i n n a m o n 8 0 g/ 3 o z f r e s h b l a c k b e r r i e s P r eh eat o ve n t o 2 0 0 C

To p p i n g : 5 0 g /2 o z u n s a l t e d b u t t e r 1 1 0g /4 o z p l a i n fl o u r 5 5 g /2 o z c a s t e r s u g a r m i n t l e a ve s icing sugar

2. H eat b u t t e r i n s a u c e p a n . A d d a p p l e s a n d g e n t l y s a u t é . A d d s u gar an d c i n n a m o n . C o n t i n u e s t i r r i n g u n t i l a p p l e s a r e ju s t c o o k ed. A d d b l a c k b e r r i e s t o a p p l e s a n d s t i r ve r y g e n t l y . 3 . To m ak e t h e t o p p i n g , l i g h t l y r u b b u t t e r i n t o fl o u r a n d s u g a r until crumbly.

RI BBED MELLIOT Me d ic inally use d t o r edu c e wat er r et en tion.

4 . Spo o n a p p l e s a n d b l a c k b e r r i e s i n t o s h a l l o w , o va l 2 3 c m /9 i n o v en pr o o f d i s h . S p r i n k l e c r u m b l e m i x t u r e o ve r t o p u n t i l fr u i t i s j u s t c o ve r e d . 5 . P l ac e i n o ve n fo r 1 0 - 3 0 m i n u t e s o r u n t i l l i g h t g o l d e n b r o w n .

RIBWORT PLANTA IN Use d as a tisane an d t o m ak e t ar t s .

ELDERBERRY AND DAMSON CAKE 6 bunches elderberries 5 0 0 g dam s o n s , p i t t e d 1 0 0 g c as t e r s u g a r 1 0 0 g pl ai n fl o u r 5 0 g u n s al t e d b u t t e r 50g brown sugar 5 0 g o at s

SMOOTH SOW TH IST LE Bitte r ve g e table i n Ch i n es e c o o k er y.

1 . R em o ve t h e e l d e r b e r r i e s fr o m t h e i r s t a l k s a n d p l a c e i n a s au c epan w i t h t h e p i t t e d d a m s o n s a n d s u g a r . C o o k o ve r a l o w h eat f o r 2 0 m i n u t e s o r u n t i l t h e fr u i t i s s o ft . C h e c k t h e s u r fa c e o f t h e s t e w e d fr u i t fo r a n y m i s s e d s t o n e s . 2. P r eh ea t t h e o ve n t o 1 8 0 C /G a s 4 . 3 . P l ac e t h e fl o u r , b u t t e r , b r o w n s u g a r a n d o a t s i n t h e fo o d pr o c es s o r a n d w h i z u n t i l t h e m i x t u r e s t a r t s t o c o m e t o g e t h e r . D o n o t o ve r - p r o c e s s – i t s h o u l d s t a y l u m py .

WILD PLUM E d ible fruit.

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4 . P l ac e t h e fr u i t i n a n o ve n p r o o f d i s h a n d s p r i n k l e o ve r t h e t o ppi n g. D o n o t p r e s s d o w n . B a k e t h e c r u m b l e fo r 1 5 - 2 0 m i nu t es u n t i l t h e t o p p i n g i s g o l d e n b r o w n .

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VETCH Use d as a food sinc e n eo l i t h i c t i m es .

WI LD CARROT E d ible root and se eds u s ed as b i r t h c ontrol.

TH ANKY 0 U t o t h e r es i de n t s fo r t h e i r r e c i p e s a n d p a r t i c i a p t i o n i n t h e m a ki n g o f “ Th r o u g h Yo u r E ye s ” w i t h Ve r i t y - J a n e K e e fe & m u f a r c h it ec t u r e/ ar t Ab del k r i m A s s a d Sh ar o n B adha n Nat as h a B ad h a n An t h o n y B ad h a n D o n al d B l ac k s To n y B u s b y D es h i r a B u z ha q h i D en n i s B u z h a q h i Gr ac e B u z h a q h i An t h o n y D ay Cr ai g D ay Gl en da D ay Yas m een D j e d je

M a r i u s D je d je L i z Fa u l k n e r Nadia Hamidi A n d y Id e h Tim Lawson Chris Minney Sam Nemri Sarah Nemri A n d r e w S a w ye r C h l o e S a w ye r Raj Sharma S a m s a r a W i l l i a m s - Tu l l M a r va W i l l i a m s

Al s o t o Th am e s m e a d YM C A S a i l i n g C l u b , Th e P l u m s t e a d R u n n i n g Cl u b an d Th e Th a m e s m e a d Yo u t h F o r u m .

YARROW Food and he aling her b f o r r o o t s .

Ar c h i val f o o t a g e o f Th a m e s m e a d p r o vi d e d b y C h o c o l a t e fi l m s as par t o f t h e i r 2 1 s t C e n t r u y To w n p r o je c t

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MA N AG E M E NT P LA N

COMPLETE ECOLOGY LIMITED Management Plan for

The Ridgeway A report for

MUF Architecture December 2009

Report Written by

Alan Scott BSc. MSc. MIEEM. CEnv. Tony Wileman BSc. AIEEM. for

Complete Ecology Limited 76 Tankerville Road, London SW16 5LP /07710 317 469 E-mail: asec@talktalk.net working on behalf of

London Conservation Services

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Complete Ecology Limited Complete Ecology Limited (CEL) is a freelance ecological consultancy and contracting company based in London owned and managed by Alan Scott. Alan is an experienced ecologist who has carried out contracts on behalf of LCS for over 10 years. He is a member of the Institute of Ecology and Environmental Management and has been registered by the Society for the Environment as a Chartered Environmentalist. He has worked in many nature conservation organisations, statutory bodies and local authorities including The Nature Conservancy Council (now Natural England), Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust, London Borough of Islington and Groundwork Hackney. He is on the Executive of the Urban Wildlife Network and the UNESCO Man and Biosphere Urban Forum.

CEL specialises in practical nature conservation, habitat management, management plans and ecological surveys and assessments.

London Conservation Services London Conservation Services (LCS) is the trading company of the London Wildlife Trust (LWT) which is the only charity working through the whole of Greater London to help London’s Wildlife. LWT is part of a nation-wide network of Wildlife Trusts and Urban Wildlife Groups, which work to promote wildlife, and is widely regarded as one of the foremost urban nature conservation organisations in the UK. As well as managing over 50 nature reserves in London, the Trust campaigns to save and improve greenspace, gives advice to local communities and schools and works with Local Authorities and other organisations to make London a better place, not only for wildlife, but for people too.

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1.

Introduction

This plan has been complied by London Conservation Services (LCS) under contract to MUF Architects. It was written by Tony Wileman and Alan Scott of Complete Ecology Limited following a site visit by both on 2nd May 2009 and further visits by A Scott on the 19th May and 20th June 2009. This plan covers the period of the next 5 years (2010/11 to 2014/15). The habitats and species present are described and the management required to preserve and enhance the wildlife value of the site is detailed.

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2.

Description

2.1

General Information

2.1.1 Name The Ridgeway 2.1.2 Location The site is located in the London Borough of Greenwich and runs in a north easterly direction from Plumstead at TQ 449 788 to the South bank of the River Thames at TQ 483 811. The site is 4.35 Km long and on average only 0.05 Km wide. 2.1.3 Access The site is open to the public at all times via numerous access points along the entire length. 2.1.4 Land Tenure The site is owned by Thames Water. 2.1.5 Status The Ridgeway has been designated as a Borough Grade 2 for Nature Conservation by the Greater London Authority. 2.1.6 Public Rights of Way There are no public rights of way through the site but it is open to the public at all times. 2.1.7 Planning Authority London Borough of Greenwich. 2.2 General Description The site consists of the embankment of the Southern Outfall Sewer. The habitats are therefore mostly on the steep sides of the embankment and the site has relatively few flat areas. The main habitats present are scrub, semi-improved neutral grassland and scattered trees. When these habitats are together in a mosaic (as they are on this site) it is called a rough land habitat or sometimes as open mosaic habitat. A path runs along the top of the embankment allowing open public access along the entire length. Numerous access points exist which mostly have metal barriers and arches to block motorbike/vehicle access. However most of the entrances are quite untidy and not very attractive due to litter, graffiti etc. Access ramps have been created from some of the gates to the top of the embankment but these are mostly in poor condition to due to pot holes and over grown vegetation or have a poor gravel surface. They are mostly too steep to allow disabled access.

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2.3

Biological Description

2.3.1

Habitats

2.3.1.1 Habitat survey methodology A Habitat Survey (phase I extended) was carried out on 2nd May 2009 by Anthony Wileman. The survey followed standard Phase I habitat survey methodology (JNCC 1993), as modified for Greater London by the former London Ecology Unit and adopted by the Greater London Authority (LEU 1994). The site was divided into 5 compartments with compartment dividing boundaries chosen as obvious and permanent features. Characteristic, rare and interesting species and plant assemblages were evaluated for conservation designations and assessed as to whether they were notable for the Greater London area (species list given in Appendix 1). Notable is defined as species which were recorded from 15% or fewer of the 400 two-kilometre recording squares (tetrads) in Greater London in the Flora of the London Area (Burton 1983). Casual recording of birds and other fauna was attempted throughout the duration of the Habitat Survey (Appendix 2) In addition an ecological data search of the area within a 500m radius of the Ridgeway was carried out through Greenspace Information for Greater London (GiGL). This identifies any records of protected or other important wildlife species and/or habitats which may already exist. 2.3.1.2

Aims of the survey

The aims were to: • • • • • •

Identify dominant, characteristic and otherwise unusual vascular plant species and the chief habitats present using the DAFOR scale for each community; Identifying and mapping habitat communities; Determine the importance of these features in a regional (London) and national context as noted in Biodiversity Action Plans; Determine whether or not the site supports notable, rare or protected species; Determine whether there is suitable habitat for breeding birds and make incidental recording of other fauna sightings; Formulate recommendations for management for improving the sites biodiversity.

Survey objectives did not include non-vascular plant (mosses, lichens, ferns etc) species surveys. 2.3.1.3

Limitations of the survey

Seasonal Plants The timing of the survey was considered excellent to characterise the habitats present on site. However because the survey was undertaken only on one day, it was not possible to note all species on site (particularly autumn and late summer flowering species).

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Access The majority of the site was accessible although the steep banks and dense scrub vegetation in places made access impossible. These areas were viewed with the aid of binoculars. 2.3.1.4 Plant nomenclature and rarity The New Flora of the British Isles (Stace, 1997) was consulted for plant nomenclature. English names have been used in preference to Latin (only quoted in the first instance) in order to facilitate readability of the report. Any uncommon vascular plant species were identified in the London context using the Flora of the London Area (Burton 1983). For national rarity The Atlas of British Flora (Preston, Pearman & Dines, 2002) was referred to (where a taxon appearing in 150 or less 10 x 10km squares was considered rare). 2.3.1.5 Habitat rarity The London Biodiversity Plan and the UK Biodiversity Action Plan were consulted on regional and national habitat rarity respectively. 2.3.2

Compartment descriptions

A full list of plant species recorded at the site during the Phase I survey; along with an assessment of their abundance using the DAFOR scale in each compartment appears in Appendix 1.

2.3.2.1

Compartment 1

Runs from TQ 449 788 – TQ 453 790 See Map 1a This compartment is comprised predominantly of roughland (defined as an intimate mix of semi-improved neutral grassland, tall herbs and scrub) and scrub with scattered trees of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus), ash (Fraxinus excelsior) at the western end. Under the trees, vegetation is dominated by ivy (Hedera helix), bramble (Rubus fruticosus agg.) and cow parsley (Anthriscus sylvestris) with frequent hogweed (Heracleum sphondylium) and white dead nettle (Lamium album). Away from the trees the shrub component of the roughland and scrub is predominantly bramble with lesser amounts of butterfly bush (Buddleja davidii), hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna) and elder (Sambucus nigra). Grassy areas are comprised of a mix of false oat-grass (Arrhenatherum elatius), cock’sfoot (Dactylis glomerata), Red fescue (Festuca rubra) and smooth meadow-grass (Poa pratensis) with the herbs yarrow (Achillea millefolium), dove’s-foot crane’s-bill (Geranium molle), hoary mustard (Hirschfeldia incana), white and red dead nettle (Lamium purpureum), ribwort plantain (Plantago lanceolata), common chickweed (Stellaria media) and common vetch (Vicia sativa) the most frequent. Taller herbs present include cow parsley, mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris), black horehound (Ballota nigra), hawkweed oxtongue (Picris hieracioides) and broad-leaved and the London notable Greek dock (Rumex obtusifolius and R. cristatus). The Ridgeway Management Plan Complete Ecology Limted

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A row of planted mature hybrid black poplars and aspen (Populus x canadensis and P. tremula) outside the site but along the northern boundary have suckered and set seed to produce a number of seedlings and young trees of these species along the edge. Notable and interesting species present include patches of common reed (Phragmites australis) and Greek dock. Japanese knotweed (Fallopia japonica) occurs in places. This is an invasive non-native species proscribed under Section 14 of the Wildlife & Countryside Act 1981.

2.3.2.2

Compartment 2

Runs from TQ 453 790 – TQ 459 793 See Map 2a Predominantly dominated by hawthorn scrub and stands of Japanese knotweed, with extensive areas of bramble, cleavers (Galium aparine), hoary cress (Lepidium draba) ribwort plantain and colt’s-foot (Tussilago farfara) with patches of cock’s-foot and meadow fescue (Festuca pratensis) dominated grasslands. Other frequent herbs include cow parsley, hoary mustard, prickly lettuce (Lactuca serriola), ox-eye daisy (Leucanthemum vulgare), hawkweed oxtongue, common vetch, Greek dock and ribbed melilot (Melilotus officinalis) plus the grasses false-oat grass (Arrhenatherum elatius) and red fescue. A scattering of trees in this compartment, include young sycamore, silver birch (Betula pendula), wild cherry (Prunus avium) and Turkey oak (Quercus cerris). Notable and interesting species present include patches of common reed near the top of the slopes, round-leaved crane’s-bill (Geranium rotundifolium), common cornsalad (Valerianella locusta) and Greek dock

2.3.2.3

Compartment 3

Runs from TQ 459 793 – TQ 466 797 See Map 32a The largest compartment and like compartment 2 dominated by hawthorn scrub but with less but still frequent stands of Japanese knotweed. Bramble is more extensive particularly along the north facing slope and is joined with areas of plum scrub (Prunus domestica) along the south facing slope. Tall herbs of cow parsley and ribbed melilot are frequent with smaller grassy areas of predominantly a mix of barren brome (Anisantha sterilis) cock’sfoot, meadow fescue, common vetch, and ribwort plantain making up the rest of the compartment. Other scattered plant species include wild carrot (Daucus carota), perennial wall-rocket (Diplotaxis tenuifolia), hoary cress, creeping cinquefoil (Potentilla reptans), common nettle (Urtica dioica) and charlock (Sinapis arvensis). The only notable species found were occasional Greek dock.

2.3.2.4

Compartment 4

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Runs from TQ 466 797 – TQ 473 801 See Map 4a A bramble wild plum scrub dominated compartment with frequent blackthorn (Prunus spinosa), Japanese knotweed, ribbed melilot, cow parsley and common reed and a number of young trees of Norway maple, field maple (Acer platanoides and A. campestre), sycamore, ash, aspen, Italian alder (Alnus cordata) and whitebeam (Sorbus sp.). Grassy areas are dominated by barren brome or false-oat grass with a mix of herbs that includes black horehound, creeping thistle (Cirsium arvense), perennial wall-rocket, teasel (Dipsacus fullonum), goat’s-rue (Galega officinalis), cut-leaved crane’s-bill (Geranium dissectum), white dead nettle, hoary cress, ribwort plantain, smooth sow-thistle (Sonchus oleraceus), lesser trefoil (Trifolium dubium), charlock and common vetch. Notable and interesting species include common reed, Greek dock, round-leaved crane’sbill and alexanders (Smyrnium olusatrum). The latter is particularly rare in London.

2.3.2.5

Compartment 5

Runs from TQ 47323 80121 – TQ 48396 81167 See Map 5a This compartment includes a very narrow section that runs between Thamesmead Golf Course and Crossness Sewage Treatment Works This compartment is comprised of abundant bramble scrub with frequent hawthorn, and tall herb stands of cow parsley, Japanese knotweed and hawkweed oxtongue. Scattered trees include young field maple, sycamore and ash. Grassland areas are comprised on barren brome, cock’-foot and/or false oat grass with lesser amounts of soft-brome (Bromus hordeaceus), meadow fescue, red fescue, and perennial rye-grass (Lolium perenne) with a number of herbs that includes yarrow, creeping thistle, wild carrot, goat’s-rue, hogweed, Spanish bluebell (Hyacinthoides hispanica), white dead-nettle, red dead-nettle, hoary cress, ox-eye daisy, common mallow (Malva sylvestris), ribwort plantain, creeping cinquefoil, broad-leaved dock, common ragwort (Senecio jacobaea), lesser trefoil, red clover (Trifolium pratense), common vetch, charlock and ribbed melilot. Notable and interesting species include common reed, Greek dock and round-leaved crane’s-bill. 2.3.3 Fauna As part of the survey incidental vertebrate and invertebrates were recorded and are listed in Appendix 4. The warblers, chiffchaff, common whitethroat and blackcap species were particularly prevalent along the site but this could be due to ongoing migration. Many of these birds may leave the site to breed but habitats present are ideal for at least 5-10 pairs to breed for the latter two species. Chiffchaffs prefer more wooded habitats to breed but are not uncommon breeding in scrub. A singing male lesser whitethroat, a much scarcer warbler species was also recorded on site and like the other warbler species may stay to breed or The Ridgeway Management Plan Complete Ecology Limted

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move on as part of its ongoing migration. Other birds recorded are all resident species and are likely to use the site for breeding and/or feeding throughout the year. Invertebrates recorded include a number of butterflies, which have their larval foodplants present on site. Yellow meadow ants are indicators of good quality grasslands. The GiGL data search showed a number of protected and Biodiversity Action Plan (BAP) species in the area. Although none are actually from on the site itself, a number of the birds which are London BAP priority species are likely to utilise the site at times: • •

Song thrush Turdus merula House sparrow Passer domesticus

• •

Common starling Sturnus vulgaris Common linnet Carduelis cannabina

Further surveys of invertebrates, birds, reptiles and mammals (especially bats) would be very desirable to inform the future management of the site. 2.3.4

Sites of Nature conservation importance

The following sites were identified in the GiGL search within 500m of the Ridgeway:

Sites of Metropolitan Importance for Nature Conservation • •

The River Thames and tidal estuaries Erith marshes

MO31 MO41

Sites of Borough grade 1 Importance for Nature Conservation in Greenwich • •

Tump 53 Nature Park Birchmere

GrB102 GrB115

Sites of Borough grade 2 Importance for Nature Conservation in Greenwich • •

Belmarsh Ditches Plumstead Railway Cutting

GrB1108 GrB1115

Sites of Borough grade 1 Importance for Nature Conservation in Bexley •

Crossways Nature reserve and Crossways Golf Course

BxB101

Sites of Borough grade 2 Importance for Nature Conservation in Bexley •

Southmere Park

BxB1102

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3.

Evaluation

3.1

Habitat evaluation

The entire site designated as Open Mosaic Habitats on Previously Developed Land is a UK Biodiversity Action Plan Habitat. Amenity grassland designated as Parks, Squares and Amenity Grassland and Roughland designated as Wasteland are London (regional) Biodiversity Action Plan local habitats. It should be emphasised that although habitats have some and occasionally great value as stand alone ‘parcels’ within the landscape, a mosaic of differing habitats within that landscape have significantly more value for biodiversity than any single habitat type. 3.2

Plant species evaluation

No plant species fully protected under Schedule 8 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 were identified during this survey. It is a criminal offence to pick, uproot or otherwise damage any of these species. It is considered unlikely that any schedule 8 protected plant species were present at the site. No UK or London (regional) Biodiversity Action Plan vascular plant species were recorded during the survey. Round-leaved crane’s-bill (3.5%), Greek dock (1.75%), common cornsalad (3.5%) and alexanders (1%) are London notable species occurring in less than 15% of the 400 tetrads as indicated in the Flora of the London Area (Burton 1983). It is assumed that both roundleaved crane’s-bill and Greek dock have become more abundant since 1983. It is not known whether the common cornsalad and alexanders has become more rare or more abundant since 1983. 3.3

Animal species evaluation

No animal species fully protected under the Schedule 5 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act were identified during the survey. No UK or London (regional) Biodiversity Action plan animal species were recorded during the survey. It is probable that small mammals including mice, shrews and voles and reptiles such as slowworm are present on site. A number of London BAP priority bird species have been recorded in the vicinity of the site and are likely to utilise the site at times. The position of the Ridgeway, its linear nature and its proximity to numerous other site of Importance for Nature conservation make it an important link between sites which may be used by species to move from one site to another.

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4.

References

Burton R. 1983. Flora of the London Area. London Natural History Society, London. Common Ground () The Community Orchards Handbook. 2008 http://www.commonground.org.uk/index.html JNCC. 2003. Handbook for Phase 1 Habitat Survey – A technique for Environmental Audit. Joint Nature Conservation Committee, Peterborough. LEU (London Ecology Unit). 1994. Habitat Survey for Greater London. London Ecology Unit, London. London Biodiversity Partnership. 2007. http://www.lbp.org.uk/index.html Preston, C.D., Pearman, D.A. & Dines, T.D. 2002. New Atlas of the British & Irish Flora. Oxford University Press. Oxford. Stace C.A. 1997 New flora of the British Isles (2nd ed.). Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. UK Government. 1994. Biodiversity: the UK Action Plan. CM2428, HMSO, London.

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5.

Policy

5.1

General Principles on Ecological Issues

5.1.1

Survey and monitoring

It is essential that all management work is recorded and monitored in order to be able to ensure that the work carried out is of benefit to the wildlife on the site and to visitors. Management tasks should be recorded and an annual report of work produced. It is therefore necessary to know what species and habitats are already on the site. The vegetation of the site has been surveyed for this plan but there is very little information on the other fauna of the site. Ideally vegetation/habitat surveys and broad-based invertebrate surveys should be carried out every 5 years and regular bird monitoring should be carried out on an ongoing basis if suitable volunteers can be found. Reptile and amphibian and mammal (especially bat) surveys are also required. There are some groups where little, if any, information prevails – e.g. molluscs, annelids, micro-moths, etc. – and surveying of these should be undertaken as and when resources permit. All surveying should conform to standardised techniques, from which accurate and relevant data can be drawn. Monitoring, likewise, should conform to standardised methodology. The London Ecology Unit/Greater London Authority bird monitoring transect and butterfly transects should also be considered. Ideally biological data recorded on site should be made available to Greenspace Information for Greater London (GIGL). Records of unusual sightings, especially birds and invertebrates, should also be relayed quickly to the appropriate London Natural History Society recorders. 5.1.2 Dead Wood There is now a considerable body of knowledge regarding the value of standing and fallen dead and dying timber. It is an essential habitat for many species, especially invertebrates, bats, birds, bryophytes and fungi. Standing dead wood is also important for woodpeckers and other birds for feeding and nesting. Removal of dead wood and 'tidyingup' leads to relatively sterile conditions and takes away an essential part of the woodland ecology. The aim is to provide as much dead wood as feasible - lying, standing, and hanging - without compromising other management aims. However, standing dead wood can be a safety hazard and this must always take precedence in areas of public use. Consequently any trees which are in a demonstrably unsafe condition must be made safe especially where they are near boundaries or footpaths. Regular arboricultural inspections should be carried out to ensure that trees do not present a hazard to members of the public. Any dead or dying trees that pose a safety hazard by being situated close to a path or any other well-used area should be felled, preferably at head height (or above) to retain some standing dead wood. The cut timber should be left on site, and allowed to accumulate randomly across the site and ideally maintained in contact with damp soil in a variety of shaded and open areas. Brashings (small cut material) can be used to form dead hedges or woodpiles in strategic locations, which may also help to deter access to certain areas.

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Hollow trees are of particularly high value and often more stable than other trees. Normal arboricultural practice is to remove dead or hollow trees for safety reasons. However in a nature reserve they should be retained wherever possible. If safety work is required they should be cut as far above the ground as possible to leave the hollow trunk standing. Dead wood should not be tidied away or cut from trees unless clearly dangerous. Hollow trees are also of importance for nesting birds and roosting bats. This is especially significant as all species of bat are fully protected under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (as amended) through their inclusion in Schedule 5. All bats are also included in Schedule 2 of the Conservation (Natural Habitats, & c.) Regulations 1994. The Act and Regulations make it illegal to: •

intentionally or deliberately kill, injure or capture (take) bats;

deliberately disturb bats (whether in a roost or not);

damage, destroy or obstruct access to bat roosts;

possess or transport a bat or any other part of a bat, unless acquired legally; or

sell, barter or exchange bats or parts of bats.

Consequently it is strongly recommended that if any trees with holes in are to be felled or cut a bat survey should be carried out by a suitably qualified person before any work is carried out. Ivy climbing up trees should not be cleared unless there is a real danger of the weight causing the tree to fall. Ivy provides a valuable habitat for invertebrates, a late winter food source for many birds and roosting opportunities for bats and owls. 5.1.3 Introductions, translocations and planting Any planting should normally be of native species, preferably of local provenance. There should be a presumption against the introduction of wild animals into the site. If any introductions are considered in order to meet management objectives, reference should be made to policies of relevant organisations, e.g. the London Wildlife Trust’s Translocation Policy. This does not cover domestic animals and the suggestion of introducing horse grazing to the site would be welcome (see below under grassland management). 5.1.4 Fires There should be a general presumption against burning any material on the site. 5.1.5. Herbicides There should be a presumption against the use herbicides. By their very nature all herbicides are damaging to the environment to a greater or lesser extent, and can be a danger to the public. Consequently their use should be restricted to only necessary tasks and only if other management methods are inappropriate or have failed. However herbicides are usually the only way to combat some invasive non-native species such as Japanese knotweed. If chemicals are used, the appropriate risk assessments must be followed and should only be used by appropriately qualified persons. The Ridgeway Management Plan Complete Ecology Limted

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It may also sometimes be necessary to treat the stumps of species scheduled for removal from the site where these have grown too large and where it would be a waste of resources to keep on cutting the plants back every year. 5.2.

General Principles on Amenity Issues

5.2.1 Paths A clearly defined and well maintained path is the best way of reducing trampling of sensitive vegetation and will ensure that people can enjoy their visit and not have an adverse effect. Ideally paths should be upgraded to provide wheelchair access where possible. 5.2.2 General Safety All boundaries, footpaths and other visitor facilities need to be inspected regularly and any necessary remedial action taken immediately (see sections on footpaths and boundaries). Regular inspections must also be carried out of all trees near boundaries and footpaths, to ensure they are in a safe condition, i.e. not about to fall over or shed dead branches onto an area frequently used by the public. Appropriate action should be taken but in recognition that standing dead wood is an essential feature of the woodland ecosystem (see section on Dead Wood). 5.2.3 Access The site has public access at times. The site owners therefore have a responsibility to ensure that all footpaths and other visitor facilities are in a safe condition at all times. 5.2.4 Litter Litter makes a site look untidy and uncared for and can spoil the enjoyment of visitors. Some litter can also be unsafe, or lethal to small mammals and some invertebrates. Litter should therefore be cleared on a regular basis. 5.2.5 Dogs Ideally dogs should not be allowed onto wildlife sites (except guide dogs) as they disturb wildlife and their faeces are a health hazard. However this site is a very popular area for exercising dogs and it would not be feasible to prevent people bringing dogs onto the site. Therefore the owners should be encouraged to keep their dogs on a leash to minimise disturbance to wildlife. Fouling by dogs presents a problem and visitors should be requested to clear up after their dogs. Some dog bins are present but more should be installed.

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6.

Management

6.1

Habitat/Species Management Proposals

6.1.1 Grassland The grasslands present are mostly those typical of semi-improved neutral grassland and associated tall herb succession related to scrub encroachment and/or disturbed soils. Species rich grassland is important for many insects, birds and amphibians. However it is not simply enough to leave these areas unmanaged as they would quite quickly deteriorate. If grassland is not managed it tends to be taken over by brambles and eventually scrub. Management can consist of a number of options, the commonest being burning, grazing or mowing. Burning is no longer generally acceptable for environmental and safety reasons and is detrimental to many species (e.g. reptiles). Grazing would be ideal but is not feasible for much of the site due to steep slopes etc. There is the possibility of having some horse grazing under licence on the site and this should be investigated. The suggestion is for three areas to be grazed on rotation which would help to maintain the grass areas and control the bramble scrub. However in the short term mowing is the most feasible option. It should be carried out in late summer or early autumn (after the flowering season when the seeds of had the chance to set) at a height of approx. 10cm. The cuttings should be raked off to the edges of the site allowing only a narrow strip around the perimeter to be enriched from the decaying grasses and herbs. This will help to maintain a high species diversity. In high fertility soils the sward tends to be taken over by fast growing species such as nettles and amenity grasses. In lower fertility soils everything grows slowly and therefore more species thrive leading to a more diverse sward. The resulting piles of cuttings provide good habitat for over-wintering reptiles, amphibians and invertebrates. Ideally the piles should be at the bottom of the embankment so that as they rot down the nutrients are not leached into the other habitats on the site. Some larger areas of grassland should be cut every year to help maintain the species diversity. However it would be desirable for some areas of grassland to be left uncut each year (to leave seed heads as food for birds and to provide cover for invertebrates etc.) especially on some of the south facing banks where the higher amount of sun leads to a high plant diversity and attracts more invertebrates. Different areas could be left each year to ensure that the areas do not become to over grown with brambles and scrub. It is therefore recommended that only 50% of the grassland areas on the south face are cut each year on a rotation so that each section is cut every 2 years. The grass areas on the north facing slope get less sun and have developed a more rank sward with more brambles and tall herbs. These areas could be managed by cutting on a 3 year rotation with 1/3 cut each year. This mixture of management regimes will maximise the diversity of species and habitats on the site. Details of the areas to be cut are given below under the various compartments. 6.1.2 Tall Herb Tall herb stands of native species should be allowed to thrive between areas of scrub and grasslands but should be maintained and prevented from encroachment into the grassland edges by the annual grassland cutting. Each year some areas should be left to die back The Ridgeway Management Plan Complete Ecology Limted

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naturally as they are valuable winter refugia for many invertebrates and small mammals. However to prevent them, developing into scrub and bramble beds it is recommended that some areas are cut each year and raked off in the autumn on rotation so that the tall herb areas are cut every 3 to 5 years. Again this will help to maximise the diversity of species and habitats. 6.1.3 Scrub Scrub is an important habitat which supports many birds and invertebrates. However it will tend to take over the grassland areas in the absence of mowing (see above). Where remnant grassland is present within the scrub, the scrub and young trees should be cut and removed annually (between November – February) while allowing areas of dominant scrub to remain creating a patch mosaic of scrub and grassland. This mosaic effect is attractive a huge variety of invertebrates and in turn provides feeding and breeding opportunities for birds such as the warblers found present on site during the survey. Some areas that have substantial young tree growth (like at the entrance at the western end in Plumstead) may be allowed to develop into small secondary woodland copses to add to the diversity of the site. However, they should be kept small as tree growth may cause substantial damage to the underlying sewage pipe through root damage. Therefore maintaining small copses of trees may be counter productive to the site management unless they grow in areas where they are unlikely to cause damage (along boundary edges for instance). Some coppicing (cutting down trees and shrubs and allowing them to re-grow from the stumps) is recommended, specifically along the boundaries of scrub and grassland areas edges. Maximum ecological diversity can be promoted by creating a graded edge, with a more gradual transition from scrub to open grassland. This maximises the habitats in a small area thereby increasing the number of species which can be supported. For example many birds like to forage in the open areas but require the dense shrubs as cover to hide from predators and for nesting sites. Some insects such as butterflies require different plants at different stages of their life; the adults could be reliant on nectar from plants which grow in the open sunny areas but the larvae may require food plants which occur in the scrub. Management should therefore consist of selectively coppicing back shrubs along the scrub/grassland margins in the autumn/winter. Bays approximately 2 to 3m deep should be cut back each year on rotation so that different sections are cut back each year. This will create open bays of low vegetation interspersed with taller brambles and scrub areas. These will of course grow back but then other areas will be opened up by cutting back a different section the following year. Overall the boundaries will then consist of sections of tall herbs, brambles, scrub and grassy bays, ideal for many species. In places the scrub is partially composed of butterfly bush which tends to be very invasive. At present this is not too much of a problem but could become so if left un-controlled. It is therefore recommended that the butterfly bush is felled when the coppicing takes place and the stumps treated to prevent re-growth.

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Diagrammatic representation of woodland desired edge structure

Long grass /tall herbs

Brambles/

Low shrubs

Woodland

6.1.4 Japanese knotweed This species occurs in places along the whole length of the site. It is an invasive species proscribed under Section 14 of the Wildlife & Countryside Act 1981 and should be eradicated through the implementation of a herbicide spraying programme. Several repeat treatments are likely to be necessary to achieve control. The normal herbicide used is glyphosate which is a broad spectrum herbicide and care should be taken to avoid damage to non-target vegetation. Any cut vegetation or soil contaminated with Japanese knotweed rhizomes is regarded as ‘controlled waste’ under Section 34 of the Environmental Protection Act. Consequently there is a ‘duty of care’ placed upon landowners, managers and contractors to ensure safe disposal in accordance with the provisions of the Act. Any Japanese knotweed waste that leaves the site of origin must be securely transported to a licensed landfill site, where it must be buried to a depth of at least five metres. Treatment of Japanese knotweed is a specialist job and it may be advisable to employ a company who specialise in its treatment to ensure a thorough job is done and that no other areas of the site are affected by either the Japanese knotweed or by the herbicide. In any case only trained operative must apply herbicides of any kind. The person who will be undertaking the spraying must hold a Certificate of Competence for herbicide use or should work under the direct supervision of a certificate holder. A Certificate of Technical Competence can be obtained by attending a short course at an agricultural college or similar institution. A COSHH assessment must be carried out for all activities involving herbicides. Further information on COSHH can be obtained from the HSE. Further information on giant hogweed and Japanese knotweed control can be obtained from www.netregs.gov.uk.

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6.1.5 Litter The site should be cleared of litter on a regular basis. 6.1.6 Paths and Access. In order to keep the paths open the vegetation along the sides should be cut back 3 times a year in May, July and the autumn to a distance of approximately 1m. 6.1.7 Surveys and Monitoring Very few faunal records exist for the site. It would be very desirable to carry out monitoring of birds, reptiles, bats and invertebrates if resources allow and suitable experienced volunteers can be found. All work on the reserve should be recorded and monitored. The vegetation should be re-surveyed in the summer of 2014 and the management plan reviewed in 2015. 6.1.8 Safety All boundaries, footpaths, and other visitor facilities need to be inspected annually and any necessary remedial action taken immediately. Inspections must also be carried out of all trees near boundaries and footpaths, to ensure they are in a safe condition, i.e. not about to fall over or shed dead branches onto an area frequently used by the public. Appropriate action should be taken but in recognition that standing dead wood is an essential feature of the woodland ecosystem (see section on Dead Wood 8.1.2).

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7

Management by compartment (see map)

Compartment 1 See Maps 1a and 1b Description This compartment is comprised predominantly of roughland and scrub with scattered trees of sycamore and ash at the western end of the site. Under the trees, vegetation is dominated by ivy, bramble, cow parsley and other tall herbs. Away from the trees the shrub component of the roughland is dominated by bramble with lesser amounts of butterfly bush, hawthorn and elder. The grassland component of the rough land is made up of a mix of false oat-grass, cock’s-foot, red fescue and smooth meadow-grass with a variety of herbaceous species (photo 1). The south facing slope is predominantly grassland and is one of the best areas of grassland on the entire site. A row of planted mature hybrid black poplars and aspen outside the site but along the northern boundary have suckered and set seed to produce a number of seedlings and young trees of these species along the edge. Notable and interesting species present include patches of common reed and Greek dock. A large stand if Japanese knotweed occurs at the eastern end of the compartment. The western entrance from Plumstead Station is very untidy and unwelcoming to visitors (Photos 2 and 3). It has a great deal of litter and graffiti and is very overgrown with scrub (mostly butterfly bush). Aims •

To maintain the mosaic of rough land habitats.

To eradicate Japanese Knotweed.

To make the site entrance more welcoming for visitors.

Management The whole of grassland on the southern slope should be cut annually the in late summer/autumn and the vegetation raked off and piled in the adjacent scrub areas and at the bottom of the slopes. To maintain the mosaic of rough land habitats is will be necessary to carry out a mowing regime on the other grassland and tall herb areas. It is suggested that 1/3 of the tall herb areas are cut each year at the same time as the grassland areas are cut and similarly raked off into piles. In order to regenerate the scrub areas and create a graded edge between the scrub and open areas, some scrub should be coppiced each year in the autumn and winter. When this is done the stumps of butterfly bush should be killed with herbicide to prevent regrowth and encourage other species. The Japanese knotweed should be eradicated through a regime of herbicide treatment. The Ridgeway Management Plan Complete Ecology Limted

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The entrance at the western end of the site needs to be tidied up as a matter of priority. The accumulated rubbish should be removed and then the area litter picked regularly in future. The graffiti should be removed and the vegetation along the path cleared back to make the site more welcoming. In order to keep the path open the vegetation along the sides should be cut back 3 times a year in May, July and the autumn to a distance of approximately 1m. To keep the area neat and tidy litter should be cleared on a regular basis. Compartment 2 See Maps 2a and 2b Predominantly roughland habitat with hawthorn scrub and stands of Japanese knotweed, extensive areas of bramble, patches of tall herb vegetation and cock’s-foot and meadow fescue dominated grasslands (Photo 4). A scattering of trees in this compartment, include young sycamore, silver birch, wild cherry and Turkey oak. Notable and interesting species present include patches of common reed near the top of the slopes, round-leaved crane’s-bill, common cornsalad and Greek dock. Aims •

To maintain the mosaic of rough land habitats.

To eradicate Japanese Knotweed.

Management As with Compartment 1 to maintain the mosaic of rough land habitats is will be necessary to carry out a mowing regime on the grassland and tall herb areas. 1/3 of the tall herb areas on the north facing slope should cut each year and the vegetation raked off and piled in the adjacent scrub areas and at the bottom of the slopes in late summer/autumn. As the grassland areas are less species rich than those in Compartment 1 is recommended that only 50% of the grassland areas on the south facing slope should be cut and raked off into piles each year in the late summer/autumn. In order to regenerate the scrub areas and create a graded edge between the scrub and open areas, some scrub should be coppiced each year in the autumn and winter. When this is done the stumps of butterfly bush should be killed with herbicide to prevent regrowth and encourage other species. The Japanese knotweed should be eradicated through a regime of herbicide treatment. In order to keep the path open the vegetation along the sides should be cut back 3 times a year in May, July and the autumn to a distance of approximately 1m. 19 The Ridgeway Management Plan December 2009 Complete Ecology Limted

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To keep the area neat and tidy litter should be cleared on a regular basis. Compartment 3 See Maps 3a and 3b This is the largest compartment and like compartment 2 dominated by hawthorn scrub but with fewer (but still frequent) stands of Japanese knotweed (Photo 6). Bramble is more extensive particularly along the north facing slope and is joined with areas of plum scrub on the south facing slope. The tall herbs cow parsley and ribbed melilot are frequent with smaller grassy areas The only notable species found are the occasional Greek dock. The topography of this section of the route is different in the western section. The embankment still slopes down to the north but to the south the land next to the embankment has been built up making it level with the top path (Photo 7). The land to the south consists of a derelict area with typical urban wasteland vegetation, including some quite extensive areas of Japanese knotweed. On the southern side there are several old garages facing onto the road (Photo 8) and one area where some garages have been demolished (Photo 9). These are in poor condition with quite a lot of fly tipping and rubbish and the drop behind is dangerous. Aims •

To maintain the mosaic of rough land habitats.

To eradicate Japanese Knotweed.

To make the old garages area safe and tidy.

Management As with Compartments 1 and 2 to maintain the mosaic of rough land habitats is will be necessary to carry out a mowing regime on the grassland and tall herb areas. 1/3 of the tall herb areas on the north and 50% of the grassland areas on the south facing slope should cut each year in the autumn and the vegetation raked off and piled in the adjacent scrub areas and at the bottom of the slopes. Some scrub areas should be coppiced each year in the autumn and winter to regenerate the scrub and create a graded edge between the scrub and open areas. When this is done the stumps of butterfly bush should be killed with herbicide to prevent re-growth and encourage other species. The Japanese knotweed should be eradicated through a regime of herbicide treatment. This will only be totally successful however if the areas of Japanese knotweed on the adjacent land are treated too. In order to keep the path open the vegetation along the sides should be cut back 3 times a year in May, July and the autumn to a distance of approximately 1m. 20 The Ridgeway Management Plan December 2009 Complete Ecology Limted

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To keep the area neat and tidy litter should be cleared on a regular basis. The old garages should be tidied by removing the litter and making the structures safe, or possibly demolishing them if that is considered appropriate. The drop down from the top of the embankment behind should be made safe by fencing and planting a native hedge along the fence. Suitable species would be hawthorn blackthorn and dog rose. These are good wildlife species, all already occur on site and have thorns making them an effective barrier. Compartment 4 See Maps 4a and 4b This compartment again consists of a mosaic of scrub, tall herbs and grassland. However here the scrub and bramble beds are more dominant than further west and there is much less open grassland (Photo 10). Bramble and wild plum scrub dominate the scrub with frequent blackthorn and a number of young trees of Norway maple, field maple sycamore, ash, aspen, Italian alder and whitebeam. Ribbed melilot, cow parsley and common reed are present in the tall herb areas and the gassy areas are dominated by barren brome or false-oat grass with a mix of herbs. A larger open grassland area can be found at the eastern end of the compartment (Photo 11). Japanese knotweed is less common in this compartment but is still present near the western end. Notable and interesting species include common reed, Greek dock, roundleaved crane’s-bill and alexanders. As in Compartment 3 there are several old garages facing onto the road to the south. These are again in poor condition with quite a lot of fly tipping and rubbish and the drop behind is dangerous. Aims •

To maintain the mosaic of rough land habitats.

To eradicate Japanese Knotweed.

To make the site entrance more welcoming for visitors.

To make the old garages area safe and tidy and create a community orchard.

Management Again to maintain the mosaic of rough land habitats is will be necessary to carry out a mowing regime on the grassland and tall herb areas. 1/3 of the tall herb on the north areas and 50% of the grassland areas on the south facing slope should cut each year in the autumn and the vegetation raked off and piled in the adjacent scrub areas and at the bottom of the slopes. Some scrub areas should be coppiced each year in the autumn and winter to regenerate the scrub and create a graded edge between the scrub and open areas. When this is 21 The Ridgeway Management Plan December 2009 Complete Ecology Limted

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done the stumps of butterfly bush should be killed with herbicide to prevent re-growth and encourage other species. The larger grassland areas should be maintained by cutting the entire areas annually in the late summer/autumn and raking the arisings into piles at the bottom of the slope or in the adjacent scrub. The Japanese knotweed should be eradicated through a regime of herbicide treatment. In order to keep the path open the vegetation along the sides should be cut back 3 times a year in May, July and the autumn to a distance of approximately 1m. To keep the area neat and tidy litter should be cleared on a regular basis. The old garages should be demolished and made safe. It is suggested that an orchard could then be created in the area. The fencing would be removed and raised beds installed with input from the local community. Orchards have a high wildlife value (nectar for bees and other insects, fruit for birds, etc) and a high cultural value. Common ground is an organisation which, amongst other things, promotes the protection of old orchards and the creation of new ones. They have produced a book call Community Orchards which is available from http://www.commonground.org.uk. This gives a lot of information about creating community orchards, fruit varieties, where to get fruit trees, fund raising ideas and sources, orchard events and activities and much more. Many of our older varieties of fruit trees are no longer commonly grown and are in danger of disappearing totally. By choosing some of these old varieties the orchard can become an educational and conservation resource too. Advice on what to plant is given in the book above or from Common Ground directly. There are also specialist nurseries which are listed in the book. However most nurseries and garden centres will be able to supply a range of fruit trees. Compartment 5 See Maps 5a and 5b This compartment runs east from the roundabout on Harrow Manor Way and includes a very narrow section that runs between Thamesmead Golf Course and Crossness Sewage Treatment Works to finish on the banks of the Thames. From Harrow Manor Way to Eastern way the path continues along the top of the embankment (Photo 12) but from there the path drops down and runs parallel at the bottom of the embankment (Photo 13). As with the other compartments the main habitat present is roughland with abundant bramble scrub, frequent hawthorn, and tall herb. Scattered trees include young field maple, sycamore and ash are found throughout. The small grassland areas are dominated by barren brome, cock’-foot and/or false oat grass with numerous other grasses and herbs. A larger area of grassland can be found to the west of the bridge on Eastern Way.

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Notable and interesting species include common reed, Greek dock and round-leaved crane’s-bill. Some stands of Japanese knotweed are present. The areas round the entrance from Harrow Manor Way and under the bridge on Eastern Way are very untidy with litter and graffiti. The strip of land alongside Thamesmead Golf Course is managed by the golf course by regular mowing a part of the course. A narrow strip of scrub can be found along the boundary with the sewage works (Photo 14). Aims •

To maintain the mosaic of rough land habitats.

To eradicate Japanese Knotweed.

To make the site entrance more welcoming for visitors.

Management To maintain the mosaic of rough land habitats on the embankment 1/3 of the tall herb on the north facing areas and 50% of the grassland areas on the south facing slope should cut each year in the autumn and the vegetation raked off and piled in the adjacent scrub areas and at the bottom of the slopes. Some scrub areas should be coppiced each year in the autumn and winter to regenerate the scrub and create a graded edge between the scrub and open areas. When this is done the stumps of butterfly bush should be killed with herbicide to prevent re-growth and encourage other species. The larger grassland area near eastern way should be maintained by cutting the entire area annually in the late summer/autumn and raking the arisings into piles at the bottom of the slope or in the adjacent scrub. The Japanese knotweed should be eradicated through a regime of herbicide treatment. The narrow strip next to the golf course could be improved for wildlife by some extra shrub planting to thicken up the screen along the side of the sewage works. However this area is managed by the golf course and they may not be amenable to this. The ramp from the top of the embankment down to the lower level near eastern way and the access ramp from the south should be improved to wheelchair accessible standard by resurfacing and if necessary re-grading to create more gentle gradients. The entrance area near Harrow Manor Way should be tidied up and the graffiti, litter etc removed to make the entrance more attractive and welcoming. In order to keep the path open the vegetation along the sides should be cut back 3 times a year in May, July and the autumn to a distance of approximately 1m. To keep the area neat and tidy litter should be cleared on a regular basis.

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8

Work Programme

8.1

Five year work programme

2010/ 11

2011/ 12

2012/ 13

20013/ 14

20014/ 15

Cut and rake grassland on south facing slope in late summer/autumn and stack arisings in adjacent scrub or at bottom of slope

Cut 1/3 of tall herb and grassland areas on north facing slope in late summer/autumn and stack arisings in adjacent scrub or at bottom of slope

Coppice scrub back on perimeter of grassland/tall herb areas

Control Japanese knotweed

Tidy entrance area

Compartment 1

Compartment 2 Cut and rake 50% grassland on south facing slope in late summer/autumn and stack arisings in adjacent scrub or at bottom of slope

Cut 1/3 of tall herb and grassland areas on north facing slope in late summer/autumn and stack arisings in adjacent scrub or at bottom of slope

Coppice scrub back on perimeter of grassland/tall herb areas

Control Japanese knotweed

Compartment 3 The Ridgeway Management Plan Complete Ecology Limted

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Cut and rake 50% grassland on south facing slope in late summer/autumn and stack arisings in adjacent scrub or at bottom of slope

Cut 1/3 of tall herb and grassland areas on north facing slope in late summer/autumn and stack arisings in adjacent scrub or at bottom of slope

Coppice scrub back on perimeter of grassland/tall herb areas

Control Japanese knotweed

Tidy around garages and make dangerous drop safe by fencing and hedge planting

Compartment 4 Cut and rake 50% grassland on south facing slope in late summer/autumn and stack arisings in adjacent scrub or at bottom of slope

Cut 1/3 of tall herb and grassland areas on north facing slope in late summer/autumn and stack arisings in adjacent scrub or at bottom of slope

Cut and rake entire grassland at eastern end in late summer/autumn and stack arisings in adjacent scrub or at bottom of slope

Coppice scrub back on perimeter of grassland/tall herb areas

Control Japanese knotweed

Demolish garages, make dangerous � drop safe and create community orchard Compartment 5 Cut and rake 50% grassland on � The Ridgeway Management Plan Complete Ecology Limted

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south facing slope in late summer/autumn and stack arisings in adjacent scrub or at bottom of slope Cut 1/3 of tall herb and grassland areas on north facing slope in late summer/autumn and stack arisings in adjacent scrub or at bottom of slope

Cut and rake entire grassland at eastern end in late summer/autumn and stack arisings in adjacent scrub or at bottom of slope

Coppice scrub back on perimeter of grassland/tall herb areas

Control Japanese knotweed

Tidy entrance area from Harrow Manor Way

General management Remove litter regularly

Cut back vegetation to 1m along footpath in May, July and the autumn

Carry out safety/arboricultural inspection of reserve annually and implement any necessary work

Re-survey the vegetation and review management plan

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Appendix 1: Phase 1 Habitat Survey Plant Species List (From survey carried out by T. Wileman on 2nd May 2009) Scale: D = Dominant; A = Abundant; F = Frequent; O = Occasional; R = Rare

Species Scientific name Acer campestre Acer platanoides Acer pseudoplatanus Achillea millefolium Agrostis capillaris Agrostis stolonifera Alliaria petiolata Allium sp. Alnus cordata Anisantha sterilis Anthriscus sylvestris Arrhenatherum elatius Artemisia vulgaris Ballota nigra Bellis perennis Betula pendula Bromus hordeaceus Buddleja davidii Calystegia sepium Calystegia silvatica Carex hirta Cerastium fontanum Cirsium arvense Cirsium vulgare Clematis vitalba Conium maculatum Convolvulus arvensis Cornus sanguinea Corylus avellana Cotoneaster sp. Crataegus monogyna Crepis vesicaria Dactylis glomerata Daucus carota Diplotaxis tenuifolia Dipsacus fullonum Equisetum arvense Eschscholzia californica Euphorbia peplus Fallopia japonica Festuca pratensis Festuca rubra Foeniculum vulgare Fraxinus excelsior Galega officinalis Galium aparine Geranium dissectum Geranium molle Geranium rotundifolium Hedera helix

Compartments Common Name Field maple Norway maple Sycamore Yarrow Common bent Creeping bent Garlic mustard Garlic species Italian alder Barren brome Cow parsley False oat-grass Mugwort Black horehound Daisy Silver birch Soft brome Butterfly-bush Hedge bindweed Large bindweed Hairy sedge Common mouse-ear Creeping thistle Spear thistle Traveller’s-joy Hemlock Field bindweed Dogwood Hazel Cotoneaster species Hawthorn Beaked hawk’s-beard Cock’s-foot Wild carrot Perennial wall-rocket Teasel Field horsetail Californian poppy Petty spurge Japanese knotweed Meadow fescue Red fescue Fennel Ash Goat’s-rue Cleavers Cut-leaved crane’s-bill Dove’s-foot crane’s-bill Round-leaved crane’s-bill Ivy

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1

2

3

F O O R

O O

O R

O R

O

4 R R O O

5 O O O

R O A F O O

O

F F O R R R O

A F O R R

O

R A F A O R O O O

F F F R R R O O O

R R

R R

O

R O

R R

R R R

R R

O R

R R F

D O A

O R R

O

D

F

F O O

F O O R

O O

R R R R F R O O

D A F O

A R

F F R R R O R

F O R O O O

O R

R

F O O O O O R R R

A

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Scale: D = Dominant; A = Abundant; F = Frequent; O = Occasional; R = Rare

Species Scientific name Heracleum sphondylium Hirschfeldia incana Holcus lanatus Hordeum murinum Hyacinthoides hispanica Hypericum calycinum Lactuca serriola Lamium album Lamium purpureum Lathyrus latifolius Lepidium draba Leucanthemum vulgare Linaria purpurea Lolium perenne Malva sylvestris Medicago arabica Medicago lupulina Melilotus officinalis Myosotis sylvatica Parthenocissus quinquefolia Pentaglottis sempervirens Phragmites australis Picris echioides Picris hieracioides Plantago lanceolata Poa annua Poa pratensis Populus tremula Populus x canadensis Potentilla reptans Prunus avium Prunus domestica Prunus sp. Prunus spinosa Quercus cerris Ranunculus repens Ribes sanguineum Rosa canina Rubus fruticosus agg. Rumex crispus Rumex cristatus Rumex obtusifolius Salix caprea Sambucus nigra Senecio jacobaea Senecio squalidus Senecio vulgaris Silene latifolia Sinapis arvensis Sisymbrium officinale

Compartments Common Name Hogweed Hoary mustard Yorkshire-fog Wall barley Spanish bluebell Rose-of-sharon Prickly lettuce White dead-nettle Red dead-nettle Broad-leaved everlasting pea Hoary cress Ox-eye daisy Purple toadflax Perennial rye-grass Common mallow Spotted medick Black medick Ribbed melilot Wood forget-me-not

1 F O O R R

2 O F

3 R O

R

R

R F O R

F O O

R R R O R

A F

R

O O R F R

4 O

5 O

R R

O O

O R R F O

O

O

O F

O R

O R O

F

F

O O R R O

R

Virginia-creeper Green alkanet Common reed Bristly oxtongue Hawkweed oxtongue Ribwort plantain Annual meadow-grass Smooth meadow-grass Aspen Hybrid black polar Creeping cinquefoil Wild cherry Wild plum Cherry species Blackthorn Turkey oak Creeping buttercup Flowering currant Dog rose Bramble aggregate Curled dock Greek dock Broad-leaved dock Goat willow Elder Common ragwort Oxford ragwort Groundsel White campion Charlock Hedge mustard

O

O

R R O F O F O R R

O O F A O

R

F R O

O R F F

O

R

R F

O R F

R R R

O A

O R

F R

R R A R O

A R F R

O R R

O R O

D O R R O R R

O D O O O O R

R O

O R

O

A R O R O O R R O R

Scale: D = Dominant; A = Abundant; F = Frequent; O = Occasional; R = Rare

Species The Ridgeway Management Plan Complete Ecology Limted

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Scientific name Smyrnium olusatrum Solidago canadensis Sonchus oleraceus Sorbus sp. Stellaria media Symphoricarpos albus Taraxacum sp. Tragopogon pratensis Trifolium dubium Trifolium pratense Trifolium repens Tussilago farfara Urtica dioica Valerianella locusta Veronica hederifolia Veronica persica Viburnum lantana Vicia sativa Vicia sepium

Common Name Alexanders Canadian goldenrod Smooth sow-thistle Whitebeam species Common chickweed Snowberry Dandelion aggregate Goat’s-beard Lesser trefoil Red clover White clover Colt’s-foot Common nettle Common cornsalad Ivy-leaved speedwell Common field speedwell Wayfaring-tree Common vetch Bush vetch

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1

2

3

4 R

R R

O

R

O R

O R R

R R R

R R O

O

O

R

R R O

R

O

O

O A O R

5

O

O O

O

R R O R

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A

F

F

R R F

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Appendix 2: Incidental Fauna List (From survey carried out by T. Wileman on 2nd May 2009) Species Common name

Compartments Scientific Name

1

2

3

*

* * *

4

5

*

*

INVERTEBRATES Large white Orange tip Peacock Small white Small tortoiseshell Speckled wood White-tailed bumblebee Red ant Yellow meadow ant

Pieris brassicae Anthocharis cardamines Inachis io Pieris rapae Aglais urticae Pararge aegeria Bombus lucorum Myrmica rubra Lasius flavus

* *

*

*

*

* *

*

* * *

* *

*

*

*

*

*

* *

*

*

*

* *

BIRDS Blackbird Blackcap Blue tit Carrion crow Chiffchaff Great tit Lesser whitethroat Magpie Robin Whitethroat Wren

Turdus merula Sylvia atricapilla Cyanistes caeruleus Corvus corone Phylloscopus collybita Parus major Sylvia curruca Pica pica Erithacus rubecula Sylvia communis Troglodytes troglodytes

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* * *

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* *

*

* *

* * *

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Map 1a: Compartment 1 Habitats

Roughland (mix of semiimproved neutral grassland, tall herbs and scrub) Semi-improved neutral grassland Dense scrub Japanese knotweed

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Map 1b: Compartment 1 Management

Cut 1/3 of tall herb and grassland areas on north facing slope in late summer/autumn and stack arisings in adjacent scrub or at bottom of slope

Coppice scrub back on perimeter of grassland/tall herb

Control Japanese knotweed

Tidy entrance area Cut back vegetation to 1m along footpath in May, July and the autumn

Cut and rake grassland on south facing slope in late summer/autumn and stack arisings in adjacent scrub or at bottom of slope

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Map 2a: Compartment 2 Habitats

Roughland (mix of semiimproved neutral grassland, tall herbs and scrub) Semi-improved neutral grassland Japanese knotweed

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Map 2b: Compartment 2 Management

Cut 1/3 of tall herb and grassland areas on north facing slope in late summer/autumn and stack arisings in adjacent scrub or at bottom of slope

Coppice scrub back on perimeter of grassland/tall herb areas Control Japanese knotweed

Cut back vegetation to 1m along footpath in May, July and the autumn

Cut and rake 50% of grassland on south facing slope in late summer/autumn and stack arisings in adjacent scrub or at bottom of slope

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Map 3a: Compartment 3 Habitats

Roughland (mix of semiimproved neutral grassland, tall herbs and scrub) Semi-improved neutral grassland Japanese knotweed

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Map 3b: Compartment 3 Management

Cut 1/3 of tall herb and grassland areas on north facing slope in late summer/autumn and stack arisings in adjacent scrub or at bottom of slope

Coppice scrub back on perimeter of grassland/tall herb areas Control Japanese knotweed Cut back vegetation to 1m along footpath in May, July and the autumn

Tidy around garages and make dangerous drop safe by fencing and hedge planting Make steep steps safe

Cut and rake 50% grassland on south facing slope in late summer/autumn and stack arisings in adjacent scrub or at bottom of slope

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Map 4a: Compartment 4 Habitats

Roughland (mix of semiimproved neutral grassland, tall herbs and scrub) Semi-improved neutral grassland Japanese knotweed Line of large trees

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Map 4b: Compartment 4 Management

Cut and rake entire grassland at eastern end in late summer/autumn and stack arisings in adjacent scrub or at bottom of slope

Cut 1/3 of tall herb and grassland areas on north facing slope in late summer/autumn and stack arisings in adjacent scrub or at bottom of slope

Coppice scrub back on perimeter of grassland/tall herb areas Cut back vegetation to 1m along footpath in May, July and the autumn

Control Japanese knotweed

Demolish garages, make dangerous drop safe and create community orchard

APP E N D I X – MA NAG EMENT PLA N

Cut and rake 50% grassland on south facing slope in late summer/autumn and stack arisings in adjacent scrub or at bottom of slope

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Map 5a: Compartment 5 Habitats To Thames path

Roughland (mix of semiimproved neutral grassland, tall herbs and scrub) Semi-improved neutral grassland Japanese knotweed

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Map 5b: Compartment 5 Management To Thames path

Control Japanese knotweed Cut 1/3 of tall herb and grassland in late summer/autumn and stack arisings in adjacent scrub or at bottom of slope

Cut 1/3 of tall herb and grassland areas on north facing slope in late summer/autumn and stack arisings in adjacent scrub or at bottom of slope

Cut and rake entire grassland in late summer/autumn and stack arisings in adjacent scrub or at bottom of slope

Coppice scrub back on perimeter of grassland/tall herb areas

Tidy entrance area from Harrow Manor Way Cut and rake 50% grassland on south facing slope in late summer/autumn and stack arisings in adjacent scrub or at bottom of slope

Cut back vegetation to 1m along footpath in May, July and the autumn

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The Ridgeway London Boroughs of Bexley & Greenwich

A built heritage baseline study

Project Manager

Sophie Jackson

Author

Emma Dwyer

Museum of London Archaeology © Museum of London

Mortimer Wheeler House, 46 Eagle Wharf Road, London N1 7ED tel 0207 410 2200 fax 0207 410 2201 email molas@molas.org.uk

12 May 2009

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Built Heritage baseline study Š MOL Archaeology

SUMMARY (non technical) Museum of London Archaeology was commissioned by muf architecture/art to undertake a Built Heritage baseline study of the Ridgeway, a public footpath which is located on the Southern Outfall Sewer, in the London Boroughs of Bexley and Greenwich. The Ridgeway footpath connects Plumstead, in the London Borough of Greenwich, with Crossness Pumping Station, in the London Borough of Bexley. This resulting document forms part of a baseline study, which will establish the existing resources and constraints associated with the Ridgeway, and identify opportunities for interpretation, use, and improvement to access.

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Built Heritage baseline study © MOL Archaeology

CONTENTS 1

Introduction

1

2

Topographical and historical background

2

2.1

Geology and natural topography

2

2.2

Early history of the site

2

2.3

Development and function of the Southern Outfall Sewer and surrounding landscape 3

3

Description of site and environs

5

4

Potential for the interpretation of archaeology and built heritage

7

5

Acknowledgements

8

6

Bibliography and references

8

7

Appendix

9

7.1

Listed Building Description for Crossness Pumping Station

9

7.2

Listed Building Description for Workshop Range to South West of Main Engine House Crossness Pumping Station

9

7.3

Listed Building Description for Workshop Range to South East of Main Engine House Crossness Pumping Station

9

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Built Heritage baseline study © MOL Archaeology

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS Fig 1 The Ordnance Survey plan of Woolwich of 1799 Fig 2 ‘The sappers and miners repairing the embankment of Plumstead Marshes after the explosion on Saturday last’; Illustrated London News, 8th October 1864 Fig 3 A map of the main, intercepting, storm relief and outfall sewers, pumping stations and outfall works in London, 1930 Fig 4 The western half of the Southern Outfall Sewer, shown on the Ordnance Survey map of 1899 Fig 5 The eastern half of the Southern Outfall Sewer, shown on the Ordnance Survey map of 1899 Fig 6 Rocket practice in the Marshes. Published by J Grant, Woolwich, to Illustrate the Army & Navy Register & Woolwich Gazette for 1845 Fig 7 The flooding of the Plumstead and Erith Marshes in 1953 Fig 8 The flooding of the Erith Marshes, close to Crossness Pumping Station Fig 9 The concrete retaining walls of the Southern Outfall Sewer Fig 10 An inspection hatch in the Southern Outfall Sewer Fig 11 One of the steel ventilation pipes of the Southern Outfall Sewer Fig 12 Concrete structure on the northern side of the Southern Outfall Sewer Fig 13 Inspection hatch serving the low and high level sewers Fig 14 The footbridge over Eastern Way, which connects Abbey Wood and the Southern Outfall with Thamesmead North Fig 15 The underside of the Harrow Manor way fly-over Fig 16 The Woolwich Industrial Estate Fig 17 Southmere Lake and Thamesmead Fig 18 The former Power House and White Hart Road Electricity Generating Station Fig 19 Crossness Pumping Station Fig 20 The East London Sewage Incinerator LIST OF TABLES Table 1 Abbreviations used in this report

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Built Heritage baseline study Š MOL Archaeology

1 Introduction This built heritage baseline study is intended to map the historic infrastructure of the Southern Outfall Sewer and the surrounding environment. Historic maps and other material dating to the periods before, during, and after the construction of the Southern Outfall Sewer have been examined, in order to provide a summary history of the structure and the surrounding built environment. The Southern Outfall Sewer is not located within a Conservation Area, nor is it Listed as a building or structure of architectural or historic importance. The Southern Outfall Sewer feeds into Crossness Pumping Station, at the eastern end of the study area. Crossness has been designated as a Conservation Area by the London Borough of Bexley, and contains three Listed Buildings; the main Pumping Station, which is Grade I Listed, and two workshop ranges, which are both Grade II Listed. The Thames foreshore, including Crossness Pumping Station, is designated as an Archaeological Priority Zone. The waterfront built heritage and archaeology have previously been briefly discussed in the Thames Strategy East: Cultural heritage assessment and strategy (London Development Agency 2004); however, while the study area for this previous assessment project included Crossness Pumping Station, and the northern part of Thamesmead, it did not extend as far inland as the Southern Outfall Sewer. Under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 MOL Archaeology retains the copyright to this document.

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Built Heritage baseline study © MOL Archaeology

2 Topographical and historical background 2.1

Geology and natural topography

The Southern Outfall Sewer crosses the low-lying ground of the alluvial floodplain associated with the River Thames; the stratigraphy of the floodplain consists of solid geology overlain by fluvial gravels of Late Pleistocene age, deposited between 100,000 and 10,000 years ago. Approximately 1.5 kilometres to the south of the Southern Outfall is the higher ground of Bostall Heath and Lesnes Abbey Wood. 2.2

Early history of the site

Andrews and Dury’s map of Kent of 1769 (not reproduced) and the Ordnance Surveyors’ plan of Woolwich of 1799 (Fig 1) were among the earliest accurate maps of the Plumstead and Erith Marshes, and indicated that the area now crossed by the Southern Outfall Sewer and the Ridgeway footpath was a wide, flat, intertidal salt marsh, which had been enclosed and drained from the medieval period onwards, to provide grazing pasture. The marshes were largely unsettled, as regular flooding of the marshes from the River Thames rendered the area largely uninhabitable; settlements and farms, namely Boston Farm and Abbey Farm, were concentrated along the higher ground of Bostall Heath and Abbey Wood to the south. One building, marked as Marsh, or Halfway House on the Ordnance Surveyors’ plan of 1799, was located adjacent to the river, and other small cottages or stores may have been constructed on the marsh. Halfway House was located close to two gunpowder stores, the Plumstead Magazine, and Erith Magazine. It was reported in the Illustrated London News of the 8th of October 1864 that one of the magazines had exploded, destroying part of the embankment separating the marshes from the River Thames (Fig 2), and leaving the area prone to flooding. Richard Ruegg’s Summer Evening Rambles Round Woolwich, published in 1847, gives a vivid description of the Plumstead and Erith Marshes: ‘Throughout this vast district… scarcely a tree rears its head, with the exception of some dozen or two of willows beside the running brooks, and a few hedgerows of venerable white-thorn, the growth of some century and a half: hedgerows they can hardly be called, though grouped along the sides of manor-ways and fields, inasmuch as most of the plants are venerable trees, with gnarled trunks and dense impervious branches. In favourable seasons they are laden with a plentiful crop of crimson berries, the support of numerous hard-billed birds in winter. ‘Threading our way over the marsh, for one has need of a compass here, where a broad dyke meets us at every few yards, we come suddenly upon a large swamp and, ‘whitt’, before us springs, uttering at the same moment his loud ‘scarp’, the snipe. Snipes are everywhere an uncertain bird as to numbers. In the early part of November 1844, I strolled casually down one of our manor-ways, unprovided with any weapon of destruction: and never shall I forget the scene I then witnessed – a scene, I think, unsurpassed even in the most favourable district of Ireland. At the side of the manor-way lay a field, which for the first time, perhaps in some hundred years, had been reclaimed from pasture, and to the dominion of the plough. It had produced a luxuriant crop of weeds as well as potatoes, and the autumnal rains, which had fallen copiously, had made its surface a succession of pools and bogs. The field swarmed with countless multitudes of birds, – a few lapwings were busily engaged in one corner in pursuit of their slimy prey; starlings, fieldfares, redwings, blackbirds, thrushes, larks, sparrows, and other birds made the ground absolutely dark with their numbers; and at every successive cause of alarm, the winged multitude rose and fell in dark undulating masses’ (Ruegg 1847).

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2.3

Development and function of the Southern Outfall Sewer and surrounding landscape

By the 1850s, London had expanded to become the largest city in the world, with a population of c 2,360,000. There was no unified network of drains to carry away the effluent produced by the city and its industries, only a small number of private drains serving the wealthier parts of the city; streams and rivers which fed into the Thames were used as open sewers. Fishing fleets could no longer use the river, as it had become so filthy and was unable to support marine life. Diseases spread rapidly through the city, at a time when there was little understanding of their causes. A cholera epidemic in 1831–2 killed 32,000 people within the space of three months; it was thought that the disease was ‘miasma’ – pollution, or the worst kind of ‘bad air’. A major outbreak of cholera struck Soho in 1854, killing several hundred people; a local doctor, John Snow, plotted the numbers of deaths on a map, and found that the centre of the spread of the disease was a water pump in Broad Street, Soho. When the handle of the pump was removed, forcing residents to go elsewhere for their water, the incidences of cholera were greatly reduced. It was later found that the well which fed the pump was contaminated by an adjacent cess pit. In 1858, the ‘Great Stink’ occurred. The smell of untreated sewage in the capital’s streets and the Thames, combined with the heat of the summer resulted in an unbearable smell. A House of Commons select committee was appointed to report on the Great Stink and recommend a solution to the problem. The newly established Metropolitan Board of Works considered a number of different schemes, but in 1859 the engineer Joseph Bazalgette was appointed to construct a new sewage network for the city, comprising six main interceptor sewers and hundreds of miles of main sewers and smaller local sewers (Fig 3). The Southern Outfall Sewer was constructed as part of this network between 1860 and 1862. The total length of the Southern Outfall Sewer was 7 miles, 2,240 feet, with 37 ventilating shafts. W Webster was appointed as the construction contractor in March 1860. The pumping station was to be constructed on Erith Marshes, opposite Dagenham Reach, and the sewer would extend to North Pole Lane in Greenwich, crossing the Erith and Plumstead Marshes to Plumsyead Road, at the junction of Griffin Manor Way and the crossing of the North Kent Railway, along Plumstead Road to Beresford Square, thence through and under Woolwich, along Albion Road, the Greenwich & Woolwich Lower Road, Trafalgar Road, Romney Road, Nelson Street, London Street and Greenwich Road to Normans Road. The Southern Outfall Sewer was constructed with an inclination towards Crossness of 2 feet per mile, and would have an internal diameter of 11 feet 6 inches, and walls 18 inches thick. A bridge would have to be constructed on Plumstead Marshes to carry a branch line from the North Kent Railway to the Royal Arsenal over the sewer. Crossness Pumping Station was designed by Bazalgette and the architect Charles Henry Driver as part of Bazalgette’s development of London’s sewerage system. The pumping station was constructed between 1862 and 1865, and was officially opened by the Prince of Wales in April of that year. The pumping station would discharge the untreated effluent of south London into the Thames, during each ebb tide, so it would be drawn away from London, into the Thames Estuary, and ultimately the North Sea. From 1889, a fleet of sludge ships took sewage sludge that hadn’t broken down out into the Thames Estuary, where it would be dumped at sea. The 1st edition Ordnance Survey map of the area around Plumstead, surveyed in 1869 (not reproduced), showed that the Southern Outfall Sewer was a much narrower structure than at present, and would have comprised only the low-level sewer. The map depicted a tramway which ran along the top of the length of the sewer, with an engine shed and water cistern at the western end of the sewer, at the rear of houses in Griffin Way, to the east of Plumstead Railway Station. The tramway terminated at a small building at the northern corner of the site occupied by Crossness Pumping Station, adjacent to the River Thames. Further research could be undertaken into the tramway, and its purpose, but it is suggested that it was constructed to convey the staff of Crossness Pumping Station to their place of work, from Plumstead. Without a tramway, Crossness would only have been 3

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accessible from the River Thames, and from Cross Manor Way, one of a small number of roads which crossed the Plumstead and Erith Marshes. The tramway appears to have been removed by the 1890s. The large, white, unmapped area shown on the large-scale Ordnance Survey map of Plumstead Marshes of 1899 (Fig 4 & Fig 5), to the north of Plumstead and the Southern Outfall Sewer, was occupied by the Woolwich Royal Arsenal. Early Ordnance Survey maps showed many military establishments in great detail, but concerns over security led to this information being suppressed on later maps; the Ordnance Survey still produced maps of the Woolwich Royal Arsenal (not reproduced in this document, but held at the Greenwich Heritage Centre). Rifle ranges were depicted to the north of the Southern Outfall Sewer on the 1899 map. The marshes were regularly used for military training, and the rocket firing practice which regularly took place on the marshes (Fig 6) was thought by the local residents to have made the area more healthy; the still, damp air of the marshes, thought to have caused agues and fevers, were disturbed by the vibrations caused by repeatedly firing rounds of heavy ordinance. On the night of the 31st January – 1st February 1953, the combination of a high spring tide and a storm in the North Sea caused a storm tide, resulting in extensive flooding in England and the Netherlands; France, Belgium and Denmark were also affected. In the Netherlands, 1,835 people were killed, and in England, 307 were killed, in the counties of Lincolnshire, Norfolk, Suffolk and Essex. On Canvey Island, in the Thames Estuary, 58 people died. Sea and river flood defences were demolished by the force of the storm, inundating low-lying areas, including the Plumstead and Erith Marshes (Fig 7 and Fig 8). As London expanded during the late 19th and 20th centuries, the Southern Outfall Sewer required additional capacity; two additional sewers were constructed in 1906, increasing the height of the linear earthwork. Crossness Pumping Station was greatly expanded in 1964, demolishing cottages which had been built for some of the pumping station workers, and constructing sedimentation tanks, digestion tanks, aeration tanks, and a sludge pumping station, which pumped the ‘sludge’ that could be broken down along a jetty to waiting ships. Sludge continued to be taken out along the Thames Estuary and dumped at sea, until the construction of the East London Sewage Incinerator. The old pumping station works were subsequently used for pumping storm water into the Thames.

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3 Description of site and environs The Ridgeway footpath is located on the linear earthwork containing the high- and lowlevel sewers of the Southern Outfall. As was mentioned in 2.3, the low-level sewer of the Southern Outfall begins in Greenwich, taking an easterly course below the streets to Greenwich. The low-level sewer east of Plumstead is carried, along with the high-level sewer, within an earthen embankment which starts at a point to the east of Plumstead Railway Station, and takes a broadly east-north-east course across the former Plumstead and Erith Marshes, to Crossness Pumping Station. Entrances to the Ridgeway footpath are located at intervals along the northern and southern sides of the Southern Outfall Sewer. The Southern Outfall Sewer was expanded and upgraded, as it served the growing population of south London. Little original fabric is visible above ground level, although the brick sewer designed by Sir Joseph Bazalgette is still used and maintained. The present sewer embankment is constructed of two parallel lines of concrete revetment walls, cast in situ, with soil mounded up between the two walls to form a raised causeway; the low- and high-level sewers being buried below the soil (Fig 9). Inspection hatches are located at intervals along the Southern Outfall Sewer; these take the form of concrete platforms projecting out from the sides of the Southern Outfall (Fig 10) with steel covers. Steel pipes also project up from the embankment at regular intervals, in order to prevent the build-up of explosive methane gas (Fig 11). At the western end of the Southern Outfall, close to Plumstead Railway Station, is a large concrete structure, built into the northern side of the Southern Outfall embankment. The structure has a flat roof at the same level as the top of the Southern Outfall, and a chamber below it, at ground level, with louvered openings on the northern side; the structure may have been used for the storage of equipment, or as a mess area for visiting maintenance staff. A smaller observation and maintenance hatch abuts the eastern side of the structure (Fig 12), and the concrete fabric of the two structures was cast in situ. To the west of the large concrete structure was a larger inspection hatch, differing from those at intermediate points along the Southern Outfall in that it had hatches at two levels and a steel frame, perhaps for lowering machinery or other equipment into the high- and lowlevel sewers (Fig 13). When the Southern Outfall Sewer was originally constructed, a bridge was built in order to carry a railway line over the sewer to the Woolwich Royal Arsenal’s works on the northern side of the Southern Outfall. The railway bridge was subsequently demolished when the line was decommissioned, but the physical barrier formed by the Southern Outfall was later breached by the construction of a footbridge and fly-overs (Fig 14) carrying Harrow Manor Way (the A2041) and Eastern Way (the A2016). The fly-overs form sheltered spaces, where there has been some vandalism and removal of paving slabs (Fig 15), but they are vital for connecting the formerly isolated northern part of the Plumstead and Erith Marshes with Thamesmead and Abbey Wood to the south. Harrow Manor Way is an older route, visible on early mapping of the area, but the construction of the Southern Outfall across the road was a barrier to development to the north. The flyovers were built when the new town of Thamesmead was constructed to the north and south of the Southern Outfall, on land that had formerly been used by the Woolwich Royal Arsenal. The Royal Arsenal had steadily expanded from Woolwich, in the west, so that by the 1920s the armaments factories, stores, and testing grounds took up much of the area to the north of the Southern Outfall. Censorship rules meant that the Royal Arsenal’s layout, and the function of the buildings on the site, could not be made available to the public, so much of the area north of the Southern Outfall was left as a blank, white space on Ordnance Survey mapping. The Ordnance Survey did produce maps of the Woolwich Royal Arsenal, however, and can be consulted now that the Royal Arsenal has closed and most of the associated land has been redeveloped. The land to the north of the Southern Outfall is now occupied largely by trading estates (Fig 16), some of which may contain buildings which were used by the Royal Arsenal as 5

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factories or storage facilities. The ‘Twin Tumps’, two moated ammunition stores which were built around 1890, are located on the northern side of Thamesmead. Much of the new town of Thamesmead, the construction of which began in 1967, is also located on the northern side of the Southern Outfall. Thamesmead incorporates a system of canals and lakes linked to a central pumping station which discharges water into the Thames; tidal flooding has always been a critical issue on this former marsh, and three miles of flood defences were raised when Thamesmead was built. The first two stages of the Thamesmead development, around Southmere Lake, on the southern side of the Southern Outfall (Fig 17), were built in pre-cast concrete and comprise high and low rise blocks with interconnected walkways. Some of these blocks have no habitable uses at ground floor due to the risk of flooding. Due to the improvements in flood defences, later housing could be built in cul-de-sacs of two-storey brick built houses. Woolwich Crown Court and Belmarsh Prison are relatively recent, if notorious, additions to the townscape. To the south of the Southern Outfall Sewer, the higher ground attracted settlement from a much earlier date. The section of the North Kent Line of the South-Eastern Railway, connecting the villages of Plumstead, Abbey Wood and Erith with London, opened in 1849. By 1922 a railway goods depot was established by the South-Eastern Railway near Plumstead, to the south of the Southern Outfall Sewer; the goods depot subsequently went out of use, but one structure, a possible engine house or power house, for the generation of power for lighting, still stands (Fig 18). In White Hart Road an Electricity Generating Station had already been built; when it was constructed it was the main generating station for Woolwich, and was powered by a waste incinerator, which was in use until the 1970s. The power station is now used as a storage depot and offices. At the eastern end of the Southern Outfall Sewer is Crossness Sewage Treatment Works, the history of which has been explored above. Crossness Pumping Station (Fig 19) is Listed as a building special architectural or historic interest, Grade I, and workshop ranges on the south-eastern and south-western sides of the Pumping Station are Grade II Listed. Crossness Pumping Station has been designated as a Conservation Area. These designations have not prevented the construction of the East London Sewage Incinerator at Crossness, a prominent landmark with a curved roof and metallic façade reminiscent of the Thames Flood Barrier further up-stream (Fig 20).

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4 Potential for the interpretation of archaeology and built heritage The complex of buildings at Crossness Pumping Station has been designated as a Conservation Area, and three have been Listed for their architectural and historic interest (see Appendix). The sewage treatment works contain some of the most prominent architectural highlights of East London; Sir Joseph Bazalgette’s Pumping Station and workshops, and the East London Sewage Incinerator. Crossness Pumping Station is currently being developed as a tourist destination for this part of London by the Crossness Engines Trust. Crossness is difficult to reach by public transport at present, so the Ridgeway footpath along the top of the Southern Outfall Sewer provides an ideal route for pedestrians from Plumstead or Thamesmead. As well as providing the basis for the Ridgeway footpath, the Southern Outfall Sewer embodies the history of the surrounding area. When it was constructed, it crossed an area of open marsh, which was largely uninhabitable owing to regular tidal flooding. The isolated nature of the environment made the Plumstead and Erith Marshes an ideal location for Woolwich Royal Arsenal to establish ordnance testing grounds, gunpowder magazines and other explosives storage facilities; the marshes were therefore rendered even less inhabitable, for reasons of safety and security. The tidal ranges that had rendered the marshes unsuitable for settlement made this stretch of the Thames the ideal location for the construction of Crossness Pumping Station, and required the construction of distinctive building types at Thamesmead, with ground floors that would not be inhabited, minimising the risk of damage to property and life by flooding. The present landscape has been shaped by the use and management of water, yet perversely, the river cannot be seen from the Southern Outfall; the construction of low-rise buildings on the former marshes to the north has blocked the view. There is the potential for future interpretation of the Southern Outfall and the Ridgeway to reflect on the area’s marshy past, when it was an other-worldly destination for writers like Richard Ruegg.

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5 Acknowledgements This built heritage baseline study were commissioned by muf architecture/art, whom the project manger and author wish to thank. They are grateful especially to Katherine Clarke and Mark Lemanski for their support and supplying additional photographs and information. They also thank the staff of the London Metropolitan Archives, Greenwich Heritage Centre and Bexley Archives for their assistance.

6 Bibliography and references British Geological Survey (BGS), 1993 1:50,000, England & Wales, solid and drift geology, sheet 256, North London Cherry, B, & Pevsner, N, 2002 The Buildings of England. London 2: South Yale University Press Department of the Environment (DoE), 1990 Planning Policy Guidance 16: archaeology and planning (PPG16) Department of the Environment (DoE), 1994 Planning Policy Guidance 15: planning and the historic environment English Heritage, 1991 Management of Archaeological Projects (2nd edition) English Heritage (Greater London Archaeological Advisory Service), 1998 Archaeological guidance papers English Heritage, 2006 Understanding Historic Buildings: A guide to good recording practice Institute for Archaeologists (IFA), 2001 Standard and guidance for archaeological investigation of standing buildings or structures London Development Agency, 2004 Thames Strategy East: Cultural heritage assessment and strategy Museum of London, 1994 Archaeological site manual (3rd edition) Museum of London, 2002 A research framework for London archaeology 2002 Penrose, S, 2007 Images of Change: an archaeology of England’s contemporary landscape English Heritage, Swindon Ruegg, R, 1847, Summer Evening Rambles Round Woolwich

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7 Appendix 7.1

Listed Building Description for Crossness Pumping Station

BELVEDERE ROAD 1. 5005 Belvedere Crossness Pumping Station TQ 48 SE 1/1 24.6.70. Grade I Opened 4 April 1865. Engineer: Joseph Bazalgette. Two storeys, yellow brick. Three-onethree bays divided by pilasters; the windows simple Romanesque style with 3 round headed lights. Machicolated cornice between the pilasters, cornice across all above this. Punctuated capped parapet. Three jointed one storey parallel gabled ranges at right angles to main block. The gable ends have black round arches containing a three light window (each with round head). Circular window in tympanum side elevation with series of joined round headed windows. Interior: Important cast iron architectural treatment and 4 colossal beam engines by James Watt and Co. Reference: Architectural Review December 1969. Article by John Smith with photographs and engraving. Listing NGR: TQ4849781080 7.2

Listed Building Description for Workshop Range to South West of Main Engine House Crossness Pumping Station

BELVEDERE ROAD TQ 48 SE BELVEDERE 1/3 Workshop range to SW of main engine house (qv), Crossness Pumping Station Grade II Workshop. Built 1862-5 by Contractor William Webster to designs of Sir Joseph Bazalgette and Charles Henry Driver. Flemish bond yellow brick with gauged red brick dressings and Portland Stone to kneelers and buttresses; gabled slate roof with glazed rooflights. Rectangular plan. Each 3-bay gable end has stone-coped gable with moulded kneelers: plank double doors set in semi-circular arched architrave with raised imposts and dogtooth hood mould set within similar blind recessed arch flanked by recessed panels; doorway flanked by similar blind arches set in square-headed recessed bay with carved stone corbels to arcaded frieze and dentilled dog-tooth cornice. North wall of 12 bays has similar blind arches set in similar square-headed recessed bays, and 2 inserted C20 entries. South wall of 24 bays has offset buttresses dividing recessed bays each of which has similar frieze and cornices. Interior: 12-bay wrought-iron roof. One of a pair of workshops facing south elevation of the boiler house of Bazagette's engine house of 18625 (Contract drawings in GLRO: MBW 2511) Listing NGR: TQ4842381072 7.3

Listed Building Description for Workshop Range to South East of Main Engine House Crossness Pumping Station

BELVEDERE ROAD 9

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TQ 48 SE BELVEDERE 1/2 Workshop range to SE of main engine house (qv) Crossness Pumping Station Grade II Workshop. Built 1862-5 by Contractor William Webster to designs of Sir Joseph Bazalgette and Charles Henry Driver, Flemish bond yellow brick with gauged red brick dressings and Portland stone to kneelers and buttresses; gabled slate roof with glazed rooflights. Rectangular plan. Each 3-bay gable end has stone-coped gable with moulded kneelers: plank double doors set in semi-circular arched architrave with raised imposts and dogtooth hood mould set within similar third recessed arch flanked by recessed panels; doorway flanked by similar blind arches set in square-headed recessed bay with carved stone corbels to arcaded frieze and dentilled dog-tooth cornice. North wall of 12 bays has similar blind arches set in similar square-headed recessed bays, and 4-bay lean-to with moulded stone cornice and semi-circular arched east doorway with fanlight. South wall of 24 bays has offset buttresses dividing recessed bays each of which has similar frieze and cornice. Interior: 12-bay wrought-iron roof. One of a pair of workshops facing south elevation of the boiler house of Bazalgette's main engine house of 1862-5. (Contract drawings in GLRO: MBW 2511) Listing NGR: TQ4852881013

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Fig 1 The Ordnance Survey plan of Woolwich of 1799

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Fig 2 ‘The sappers and miners repairing the embankment of Plumstead Marshes after the explosion on Saturday last’; Illustrated London News, 8th October 1864

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Fig 3 A map of the main, intercepting, storm relief and outfall sewers, pumping stations and outfall works in London, 1930

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Fig 4 The western half of the Southern Outfall Sewer, shown on the Ordnance Survey map of 1899

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Fig 5 The eastern half of the Southern Outfall Sewer, shown on the Ordnance Survey map of 1899

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Fig 6 Rocket practice in the Marshes. Published by J Grant, Woolwich, to Illustrate the Army & Navy Register & Woolwich Gazette for 1845

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Fig 7 The flooding of the Plumstead and Erith Marshes in 1953

Fig 8 The flooding of the Erith Marshes, close to Crossness Pumping Station

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Fig 13 Inspection hatch serving the low and high level sewers

Fig 14 The footbridge over Eastern Way, which connects Abbey Wood and the Southern Outfall with Thamesmead North 10

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Fig 15 The underside of the Harrow Manor way fly-over

Fig 16 The Woolwich Industrial Estate 11

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Fig 17 Southmere Lake and Thamesmead

Fig 18 The former Power House and White Hart Road Electricity Generating Station

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Fig 19 Crossness Pumping Station

Fig 20 The East London Sewage Incinerator 13

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Access Report for the Ridgeway

1.

Introduction This report was prepared by Mark Crouch, on behalf of MUF. It follows a series of visits to the site during summer 2009. The Ridgeway is a raised footpath linking Plumstead with Thamesmead. This document should not be seen as a comprehensive audit report. It identifies a number of access barriers for disabled and older people, and suggests ways in which these barriers might be overcome. Further work needs to be carried regarding the feasibility of the suggestions below. There also needs to be stakeholder consultation, and details costings need to be prepared and considered. At the moment, the site presents various difficulties for disabled visitors and others. The Ridgeway may be thought of as run down and, therefore, not well used. The footpath would not be seen by many as the logical route between Thamesmead and Plumstead. However, with some well thought out improvements in access, the Ridgeway could become both a useful and enjoyable local amenity. Such changes could help other users, too. For example, parents with young children.

2.

Legal Context It should be noted that the DDA is not compliance-based legislation. Under the Act, the service provider, Thames Water,

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has duties to make “reasonable adjustments” where disabled people find it “impossible or unreasonably difficult” to use the services provided. A disabled person has the right to take legal action if they believe that a service provider has not met its duties under the DDA. For built environments, statutory guidance is available in the Approved Document to Part M Building Regulations (AD M) [a]. If legal action is taken, the court must take any relevant guidance contained in AD M into consideration. There is no equivalent statutory guidance available for naturally occurring environments, such as The Ridgeway. There are, however, a number of non-statutory publications. These include “By All Reasonable Means” [b] and “Countryside for All” [c]. A disabled person taking legal action may submit documents such as these as evidence. 3.

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Access to the Ridgeway It is understood that there are plans to upgrade the car parking facilities at the pumping station at the eastern end of the Ridgeway. There should be at least 1 bay designated for Blue Badge holders. The bays should be sited on level ground. The bays should measure 4800 mm x 2400 mm. Additionally, each bay should have chevroned access zones, at least 1200 mm wide, to the side and rear. See diagram below, taken from AD M.

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There may be alternative car parking space available on Lytham Close, next to the vehicular entrance to Thamesview Golf Course. There is a short slope from linking to the Thames Footpath, which could easily be upgraded. It is thought that a public right of way exists across the golf course. This route is like to present problems for some disabled visitors, particularly in inclement weather. It is not thought that the golf club would be amenable to installing a path across the course. There is a built ramp onto the Ridgeway from Sewell Road, close to the junction with Harrow Manor Way. This ramp does not

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conform to current Building Regulations, and so is unlikely to be deemed a reasonable adjustment under the DDA. Approved Document M states that no built ramp should have a gradient steeper than 1 in 12. Approved Document M states that the maximum vertical rise for any ramped access should not exceed 2 m. The vertical rise at the ramp on Sewell Road is far in excess of this. Additionally there should be intermediate level platforms for resting for every vertical rise of 500 mm. There are no such platforms on this ramp. There should also be a continuous handrail positioned at a height of approximately 1000 mm above the pitch line of the ramp. 4.

Access on the Ridgeway A balance needs to be struck between making the site accessible to all and preserving the area’s fundamental character. It has been noted that the site is currently underused. Improvements to access may encourage more people to visit, regardless of whether they are disabled. Currently, access varies along different stretches of the Ridgeway. Thames Water may wish to consider identifying certain stretches of the route, for which improvements in access could be carried out. The Countryside Agency suggests that 1 in 8 may be acceptable for naturally occurring gradients. There are a number of motorcycle barriers along the route. Although there needs to be a method of preventing motorcyclists

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from getting onto the Ridgeway, the barriers effectively block access for those using wheelchairs. They are also like prove difficult for people with visual impairments to negotiate. There may be an alternative method of deterring motorcyclists from using the Ridgeway, such as installing CCTV equipment. The path surface will be an issue for people using wheelchairs, and those with walking difficulties or visual impairments. The path should be hard and smooth with loose stones no bigger than 10 mm. Improvements to the drainage may also need to be carried out. The width of the route should be no less than 1000 mm (ideally, 1200 mm). Overhanging branches, etc present a hazard for people with visual impairments. Vegetation protruding onto the route at a height of less than 2100 mm should be cut back regularly. This would also help maximise levels of natural light falling onto the path, and may also make visitors feel safer when visiting alone. There are some stretches of the route where the ground falls away on either side of the route. This could be hazardous and visitors should be alerted. There should be passing places 2000 mm wide every 150 m (ideally, every 50 m). The gradient of the route should not be steeper than 1 in 10 (ideally, no steeper than 1 in 12). Distances are a major issue for those with walking difficulties. One possible adjustment might be to purchase some mobility equipment, which can then be lent to disabled and older people visiting the area. If an information centre was built by the pumping station, this could be a convenient place to store the

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vehicles. If the information centre is built, and WC facilities are provided, they should be accessible to those using wheelchairs. There is a wide range of equipment available and care would need to be taken in choosing suitable models. Most powered wheelchairs and battery scooters are designed for use in urban environments and would not cope well with the Ridgeway’s rough terrain. The larger golf carts are better at negotiating rough surfaces and steep slopes, but may me too wide for the narrow footpaths It would also be helpful if some seating were provided along the route. Signposting to, and along, the route needs to be carefully considered. Pictorial signs will be of particular help those with learning difficulties, as well as those whose first language is not English. 5.

Publicity Materials Visitors will need information about the accessibility of the site before they visit. Scaled maps should be provided, showing levels of accessibility along the various stretches of the route. Each disabled visitor would then be able to decide which of the stretches are accessible to them. All guides, not just those aimed at disabled visitors, should be accessible. They should be written in Plain English. Any maps should be clear and have good colour contrast. A clear sans serif font, such as 12-14 point Arial, should be used. Thames Water should consider making the publications available in a range of

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alternative formats, such as large print, audio CD, MP3, EasyRead and Braille. If a website is developed, it should conform to the Web Accessibility Standard. 6.

Bibliography (a) Approved Document M 2004 – Access to and Use of Buildings, Department of Communities and Local Government (b) By All Reasonable Means: Inclusive Access to the Outdoors for Disabled People, Countryside Agency (c) BT Countryside for All – Standards and Guidelines: A good practice guide for disabled people’s access in the countryside, Fieldfare Trust

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muf architecture/art 49–51 Central Street London EC1V 8AB www.muf.co.uk

The Ridgeway  

Masterplan document for the Ridgeway, Greenwich and Bexley

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