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The Barking Code for the Public Realm and how it should be applied 2008-2012

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LBBD with Design for London Prepared by muf architecture/art


LBBD believe that the quality of the public realm is vitally important in a borough which is undergoing such dramatic change as Barking. It is the public realm which links the existing fabric and new developments. It is the public realm where existing and new communities meet.


The Barking Code for the Public Realm 2008-2012 Contents Introduction

page 2

Principles

page 4

Code Area

page 7

Design Guidelines

4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 4.7 4.8 4.9 4.9

Sustainability Surface materials Street furniture Seating Signage and Wayfinding Lighting Trees and soft landscaping Play Art Making Temporary “public realm” 5.0 Event Infrastructure activating the “public realm”

page 1

page 39 page 41

Typical Details Appendix A Appendix B Appendix C

page 9 page 12 page 16 page 18 page 22 page 24 page 27 page 31 page 33 page 37

Examples of the code in practice Examples of the code in practice Built examples

page 47 page 49 page 51

The Barking Code for the Public Realm 2008-2012


Introduction Why a code? The developments and master plans which are currently on the table have different timetables and sources of funding. Equally the streetscape associated with developments will not be implemented in a single go. By developing a simple palette of materials public realm improvements can be delivered in a phased way but in time join up -thus knitting together very different projects with disparate uses and tenures. To achieve this the London Borough of Barking and Dagenham (LBBD) has developed the Barking Code which sets out rules for the choice of materials and how they are constructed along with street furniture, lighting and planting. Why a revision? muf architecture/art were commissioned by LBBD with Design for London to revisit the Barking Code for the public realm in Spring 2007. The original Barking Code 2004 was a mixture of guidance and aspiration. Over the last three years LBBD have embarked on implementing a new streetscape. This new gudience draws on lessons learnt ,it will cover all new development from 2008-2012 . In 2012 a new revision will be considered .

Councillor McCarthy

page 2

Introduction


What is its status? The Barking Code is both menu and a primer. Menu because it details the elements that are authorised for use. Primer because it encompasses a set of principles to be followed when implementing new streetscape and public realm. This code supercedes the Barking Code July 2004. Where does it apply? We have chosen to concentrate on an Extended High Street Network that embraces both Abbey Green and the new proposed open spaces created by the Riverside masterplan it also applies to other sites for residential development such as the Lintons and the Gasgoigne Estate. (see map page 8). Simply the code in its entirity applies everywhere in the extended high street network see maps...

Outside this area in Barking and Dagenham the following applies. All Kerbs must be granite with designed radii. The principles of sustainability and play apply everywhere in the borough . Simply, the code is understood as a set of principles and street furniture that can be applied throughout the borough.

page 3

The Barking Code for the Public Realm 2008-2012


Principles

1. Use a simpliďŹ ed palette of quality materials and high quality of workmanship on site. 2. Create a simple and robust streetscape that acts as a foil for lyrical interventions. 3. Limit carbon footprint through the careful speciďŹ cation of materials . 4. Prioritise pedestrian movement over car use. 5. Enable equal and inclusive use and enjoyment of the public realm for all ages. 6. Including play as an essential dimension for the public realm 7. Make ease of future maintenance an essential foundation for any proposal. 8. Enable events to take place through the provision of appropriate infrastructure.

page 4

Principles


Floodlighting by Philips

Menu The elements proposed are an intentionally short menu. They combine a simple palette of granite, asphalt, concrete pavers and resin bound gravel with a number of proprietary fittings and the special “Barking Bench”.

1. Materials

2. Kerbs

3. Lighting

Flamed silver grey granite

Curved kerb

Geo lighting post

Flamed silver grey granite sets

Dropped kerb

Mini-deco. floods for feature lighting

Resin bonded gravel

page 5

The Barking Code for the Public Realm 2008-2012


5.Bollards, Racks& Railings

6. Street Furniture

A propriety seating module

Geo Bollard

Geo Bin

which can be modified

sheffield bike racks

Geo Ash tray

Red

Black

Dark Green

Light Grey Mid Grey

BROXAP cycle & motorcycle - stands

4.seating

Mid Blue Dark Blue

Brown

Alpha Rail flat top galvanized railing

page 6

Principles


Code Areas

The extended High Street Network runs from Barking Park to the River Roding and includes Abbey Green. ������������������� ����������� �����������������������������

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page 7

Code Area


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page 8

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Sustainability

The design of the public realm is a key tool in ensuring that Barking town centre is well adapted to climate change. Long-term sustainability in the built environment is a central concern of all future developments in Barking. Carbon saving and the efficient use of resources are become benchmarks for quality design in all aspects of future public works. Ways and means of adapting to climate change Careful slelection of building materials which minimise the heat island effect, provision of shading and attractive outdoor seating,managing storm water, maximising trees and vegetation (particulary those which are effective air conditioners and drought resistant), See “Adapting to climate change by design”. Design And Construction Both during construction and over the lifetime of all future developments suitable measures are taken to minimise the use of energy and materials, and reduce pollution and waste. ‘A Sustainability Checklist for Developments: a common framework for developers and local authorities’ (A Building Research Establishment publication) is an essential tool for use in measuring the suitability of all proposed developments. Building Materials Consideration should be given to the Life-Cycle impact of all materials used. To help mitigate the negative impact on the environment caused by building materials preference needs to be given to materials with a low embodied energy. Wherever possible materials will be recycled on site (for example Aggregates), or locally sourced. The

page 9

The Barking Code for the Public Realm 2008-2012


‘Green Guide to Specifications’ (available from the Building Research Establishment) will be referred to during the procurement process. Also refer to the BRE Green Guide to Specification. Sustainable Urban Drainage An integrated approach to water management should be adopted in accordance with “The Interim Code of Practice for Sustainable Drainage Systems’ (available on the CIRIA website http://www.ciria.org.uk/suds). The design of SUDS presents an opportunity for creating public amenities within the borough. Renewable Energy Barking is an Energy Action Area and as such all public institutions requiring energy should generate at least 10% of their energy from renewable sources. Waste Routes for recycling Recycling infrastructure should inform street design and layout. Public recycling facilities will be integrated into the design of other street furniture and form part of coherent streetscape. Managing high temperatures: 1) Cool pavement materials on roadways or large parking areas – to increase surface reflectivity (though it is important to avoid glare problems) or increase permeability to benefit from the cooling effects of evaporation; 2) Increased use of ponds, roadside swales, flood balancing lakes, swimming pools and fountains; 3) Evaporative cooling effects from a matrix of green corridors, smaller open spaces, street trees, and green or living roofs; may provide additional water in times of drought.

page 10

Design Guidelines


Managing flood risk 1) Impermeable surfaces can be replaced by SUDS, such as permeable pavement, gravel or grass so that water can soak away. Within parks and greenspaces storage areas, such as infiltration ponds, can be constructed 2) Smaller scale hard barriers or managed realignment schemes; 3) Widening drains to increase drainage capacity; 4) Managing flood pathways and removing ‘pinchpoints’ so that heavy rains can drain away. Managing water resources and quality 1) Xeriscaping, or low water use planting, can greatly reduce water demand; 2) Rainwater harvesting and storage from roofs or other surfaces for future use (normally toilet flushing and irrigation). This strategy can also increase soil moisture levels for vegetation, sustaining evaporative cooling and reduce risk of urban flooding; 3) More use of reclaimed and recycled water, produced after advanced treatment and filtering of wastewater and stormwater. This result in high quality water suitable for irrigation and non-drinking water uses such as toilet flushing; 4) In order to sustain the evaporative cooling function of vegetation rainwater harvesting, underground storage and accessing new supplies of lower grade ground water may provide additional water in times of drought.

page 11

The Barking Code for the Public Realm 2008-2012


Surface Materials

A very limited palette for paving gives continuity, coherence and a sense of active civic guardianship of the public realm. Materials for new streetscape projects within the High Street Network are limited to granite paving, asphalt and clear resin bound gravel. Mix areas of hard landscaping with areas of permeable ground . Doing paving well is all important for LBBDthis ranges from the design of granite kerbs, to the design of utility covers (see TFL link)

page 12

Design Guidelines


Granite Paving for the High Street Network Silver grey granite for pavement surfaces and kerbs. Larger sized pieces of silver grey granite can be specified for the new ‘quayside’ public spaces being proposed as extensions to the high street network. Care should be taken before specifying granite for trafficked areas. 1 Granite Kerbs A considered kerb brings grace to the footway. Within the high street network kerbs should be silver grey granite 300mm wide. Elsewhere they can be 150mm wide. Granite kerbs should be at a radius whenever change of direction occurs. Asphalt /Tarmac A wearing course of Hot Rolled Asphalt (HRA) should be used for all carriageways throughout Barking. Asphalt can be used for pavement areas outside the High Street Network, specifically in the streets identified as 20th Century housing. Clear resin bound Gravel A clear resin bound natural buff rounded gravel can be used for cycle routes, park footpaths and tree surrounds. Along the river edge: Tactile Paving Tactile paving should match the general paving surface within which it is located for uncontrolled crossings. Concrete Paving Beyond the High Street Network footways are paved in concrete paving or asphalt. Pavers should be 750x600. Concrete paving should be designed cut and laid with the same care as granite paving. Flags should be tightly cut and filled without small units.

1 The use of granite paving in areas with regular vehicular overrun will need to be discussed in detail with LBBD’s highway enginners and current tendency is to avoid it except in areas where traffic speeds of less than 20mph are naturally enforced.

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The Barking Code for the Public Realm 2008-2012


See location plan

Pavements

Kerbs and Channels

High Street Network

Silver grey granite 600mm x 300mm x 75mm, staggered for all paved areas, flamed surface.

Silver grey granite, 300mm width x 200mm depth x random lengths of 300mm - 1000mm to radius as appropriate. Channel: Silver grey granite, 300mm width x 100mm depth x 900mm, to radius as appropriate.

Abbey Green

Reclaimed Yorkstone within the cemetery.

not applicable

Riverside

Larger sized pieces of silver grey granite can be specified for the new ‘quayside’ public spaces. Resin-bonded surface with locally sourced buffcoloured aggreagate or 750mm x 600mm natural concrete slab paving.

Silver grey granite, 300mm width x 200mm depth x random lengths of 300mm - 1000mm to radius as appropriate. Channel: Silver grey granite, 300mm width x 100mm depth x 900mm, to radius as appropriate.

Other areas

Asphalt or 750x600mm natural concrete slab paving.

Silver grey granite, 150mm width x 200mm depth x random lengths of 300mm - 1000mm to radius as appropriate. Channel: Silver grey granite, 300mm width x 100mm depth x 900mm, to radius as appropriate.

page 14

Design Guidelines Section


Edging

Special paving areas

Carriageway

Silver grey granite, 300mm width x 150mm depth x random lengths of 300mm - 1000mm to radius as appropriate.

Special paving areas in the major public spaces can use different natural stones and terrazzo in combination with the standard materials.

A wearing course of Hot Rolled Asphalt (HRA) should be used throughout. For shared areas and raised tables cementuous resin bound asphalt in ‘natural’ light grey.

Between grassed areas and stone pavement: silver grey granite, 50mm width x 150mm depth x 1000mm.

see High Street Network

HRA

Between grassed areas and resin-bonded surface: silver grey granite, 50mm width x 150mm depth x 1000mm length.

not applicable

HRA

silver grey granite, 50mm width x 150mm depth x 1000mm Adjoining concrete paving: natural concrete edging 75mm width x 150mm depth x 1000mm length.

not applicable

HRA

page 15

The Barking Code for the Public Realm 2008-2012


Street furniture

The quality of street furniture and the precision of its placement is a simple and immediate means of enhancing the quality of the public realm. It is in street furniture that components at the scale of the hand are introduced into the public realm.1

1 The detail in the terracotta relief of the Magistrates court and the windows of the curfew tower are valued in part because of their intricacy. This level of detail is rare in contemporary architecture generally and even more rare in Design and Build projects which many of the new developments are.

page 16

Design Guidelines


Bollards The Woodhouse Geo stainless steel bollard is currently being installed in several locations. It should be used throughout the High Street Network. A Convincing argument should be made to use bollards of a unique colour code. Bins It is likely that in the near future bins separating rubbish between glass paper and plastic will become standard. Underground recycling bins are being considered in Barking. Cycle stands ‘Sheffield’ type cycle stands in brushed or beadblasted stainless steel finish. Enclosures Brick walls and railings are traditional features of London’s streets and open spaces. Barking can afford to have the simplest of enclosures and guardrails. Traffic schemes in the main are generally designing out the need for guardrails and where they are necessary they should be a simple profile in RAL 9007. Along the river edge the railings should be as simple as possible so as not to compete with views of the water. The Environmental Agency must meet standrds for parapet defences. Existing examples of highly decorative artist maker commissions on the riverside should be viewed as one offs not precedent.

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The Barking Code for the Public Realm 2008-2012


Seating

There is a commitment to the Town Centre being ‘lively with cafĂŠ seating’, but also a recognition of the need to provide seating for those disinclined or not rich enough to be consumers. At the same time there has been anxiety about the introduction of benches in case this encourages intimidating loitering. This contradiction has been expressed in the granite cuboids installed over the last 3 years. We do not believe that any more are necessary in the town centre. The greater activity and number of CCTV cameras in Barking means that there is greater informal and formal surveillance in the public realm. For this reason barking has a Barking Bench which can adapt to multiple situations according to the particularities of a site.

page 18

Design Guidelines


The Barking bench is traditional in its referencesbut endlessly flexible. It is based on proprietry product by a German manafacturer-this can be specified as a standard single unit or customised to different situations. It is (as all timber products must be) FSC certified timber. Generaly benches should all be the same colour using RAL 7035. Starting with a standard propriety bench the Barking Bench can be modified to suit different situations

Bench Manufacturer: Runge, Germany www.runge-bank.de

SECTION VIEW

N ARBORETUM, page 19

The Barking Code for the Public Realm 2008-2012


Examples of how the Barking bench can be varied according to situation:

a. A miniature bench for children. b. A double bench c. 10 metre bench to mark a boundary or provide spectator seating in a park d. Bench unit with foot rest modules (Barking has a relatively large elderly population who could feel excluded from the inux of new residents). e. Seating as a means to protect tree planting – the Barking bench can be adapted as a means to delineate and protect the edge of clump planting

Example of the 10 metre Barking bench in Barking Town Centre

page 20

Section Design Guidelines


Certain areas with a Barking Bench:

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The Barking Code for the Public Realm 2008-2012


Signage and Wayfinding

Signage and Wayfinding should be used strategically to reinforce the underlying priciples of the masterplanning currently being introduced into Barking. Signage generally should be the minimum necessary- it smacks of desperation to oversign.

Street Signs All names plates should be similar to existing names plates (see picture) and preferably wall mounted. Contemporary street signage can have very crude letter spacing, a typographer is being commissioned to create a template. Their positioning should be consistant preferably at 3m height to maximise visibility. Traffic Signs Traffic signs are often intrusive and should be reduced to the maximum number and the minimum size necessary to meet highways regulations. This should be agreed through a focused discussion with highways everytime any new

page 22

Design Guidelines


alignment is introduced. At the same time any signs that are rendered redundant should be removed. The number of poles can be reduced by combining signals, signs, lighting and or CCTV. Signs such as waiting/loading restrictions can be fixed to adjacent walls or bollards. Poles should be coloured to match other steet furniture (RAL 9007) including sign backs and traffic lights. Directional signage Now that the overall footprint has been established for the town centre primary signage including maps can be positioned. Secondary signage to reinforce routes and reassure the unconfident visitor that they are on the right track can back this up. As with the lighting strategy it is desirable for signage to be incorporated onto walls wherever possible. There are strong precedents for this

Temporary signage – The Green Grid as a means of way finding through Barking Barking is investing in its open spaces. Barking Park has received £7.5million of lottery money, a bid is being put together for Valence Park and it is probable that Abbey Green will be the subject of an ambitious design ������������ competition. The new Town Square arboretum will be complete by 2010. Current master���� plans are designed ������� around making ways down to the waters edge. Signage to these green spaces can be combined with tree planting see illustration.

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Advertising Advertising signs can have a considerable impact on an area’s visual appearance. Guidelines should be drawn up regulating both design and location of advertising signs. Hoardings should be limited to 50% signage as part of planning. Consideration should be given to the position of If at anytime a scheme is introduced for the sponsoring by a local firm of an area of greenspace ensure that signage celebrating the fact does not dwarf the area being sponsored.

page 23

The Barking Code 2008


Lighting

The perception of good light levels is the means to give a sense of security in the public realm. This is not just about lux levels. A good overall ambient light level on routes can be supplemented by the enhancement and highlighting of architectural details and other features rather than the wholesale overlighting of the streetscape generally. Lighting levels must be no more than regulation and all lighting must be energy efďŹ cient. Consider dimming down at appropriate times in accordance with guidance from Crime Prevention ofďŹ cers.

Example of proposal for lighting by Clare Brew

page 24

Design Guidelines


Lighting can be separated into Street lighting Wall mounted is preferable and should be incorporated where ever practical to avoid clutter (see image to the right). This has been successfully integrated in the design for the new town square and the proposed LIFT (primary health) building. It must be designed in from the outset (pre planning stage is preferable) and must be positioned carefully. Details should be submitted indicating the control location and specification. In an areas of a different scale or special treatment alternatives may be used such as wall mounted floods. Highlighting of important and historical buildings The emphasis of the Barking Code generally is to combine rules with their occasional exceptions; lighting of historical and important buildings and landmarks is a case in point. Just as the lighting artist Clare Brew has lit the town hall Magistrates Court and Curfew Tower other buildings might be deemed suitable for highlighting-for example the overhang of the soffit of Barking station or the fragments of the abbey. Fittings Aluminium and stainless steel are high quality materials which should be left unpainted for both aesthetic and maintenace reasons. Where this is not possible light fittings are to be painted ot powdercoated in RAL 9007. Fittings should be simple and unfussy and designed as part of the street furniture. Exceptions should only be made in spaces of particular significance, an example being the Tom Dixon designed fittings specified by muf for the Barking Town Square. Light levels Public lighting throughout Barking will progressively be upgraded to white light with a minimum CRI index of 65 (for example the Philips Cosmo lamp). Colour temperature within the High Street Network should be

page 25

The Barking Code for the Public Realm 2008-2012


High Street Network

Abbey Green

Highway Lighting

Area Lighting

wall mounted: Woodhouse Geo Disc 400 or 600

wall mounted: Woodhouse Geo Disc 400

column mounted: Woodhouse Geo Disc 400 or 600 mounted on conical pole from the Woodhouse Geo Range (brushed marine grade aluminium or bead-blasted stainless steel).

column mounted: Woodhouse Geo Disc 400 mounted on conical pole from the Woodhouse Geo Range (brushed marine grade aluminium or beadblasted stainless steel).

not applicable

Woodhouse Geo Disc 400 mounted on conical brushed marine grade aluminium pole from the Woodhouse Geo Range. Woodhouse Parklight mounted on conical brushed marine grade aluminium pole from the Woodhouse Geo Range. low level lighting as supplementary lighting only.

Riverside

not applicable

as ‘Abbey Green’

Other areas

Philips Iridium or Philips Koffer 2 alumiunium mounted on conical anodized aluminium column with shallow glass bowl.

Philips Iridium anodized alumiunium mounted on conical anodized aluminium column with shallow glass bowl.

N.B. For Feature Lighting in all areas use wall or column mounted fittings as required e.g. Philips Mini-deco lights page 26

Design Guidel Guidelines ines


Trees and soft landscaping

The green spaces are one ne part of the East London Green Grid, a network of linked areas of open spaces and parks. The Green Grid is a green infrastructure alongside public transport, utilities and other built infrastructure.

Within the Green grid the route between Barking station and the River Roding and east between the station and Barking Park is considered to be of strategic importance. There are a number of opportunities to introduce sustainable areas of planting along this route as it crosses the High Street network. In addition there are opportunities to move away the culture of ‘bare minimum’ necessary due to maintenance budgets of many open spaces in Barking and instead through careful specifying and imaginative new management strategies, find ways of introducing green refuges throughout Barking as a counterpoint to dramatic changes in Barking’s built fabric. This will have multiple benefits including the role that vegetation and trees have for adapting the city to climate change and the opportunity for play . In terms of biodiversity it is important that opportunities are taken to facilitate rainwater collection to allow birds to feed from and bathe. Xeriscaping, or low water planting can greatly reduce water demand. Sustainable drainage systems can be positioned alongside planting to reduce water demand.

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The Barking Code for the Public Realm 2008-2012


page 28

Design Guidelines


Abbey Green Abbey Green has been the subject of a study authored by Groundwork and is likely to be the subject of a design competition. It has been agreed that East West routes between the Town centre and the riverside are essential. it has also been stated that it would be desirable to introduce a new route from the Gasgoigne estate to the south directly into Abbey Green. It is important that these new routes become more than the link between a to b and enhance the amenity value of the Green.

Clumps of trees within the high street network. New trees should be introduced to consolidate existing trees both solitary or small groups. These new trees do not have to be the same species as the existing. Alongside this introduction of new trees and new species should be the replacement of the ground treatment and associated street furniture . Location for new clump planting in association with existing trees include : a. alongside the site of the existing bandstand on the elt route. b. alongside the new lift building, in this case there are no existing trees although trees stood on the site at this point before construction c. Within the new market square a clump of trees can form an organising element for the stalls

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The Barking Code for the Public Realm 2008-2012


Quaker Burial Ground This historic open space is currently under-used and bleak although still signiďŹ cant historically. Lower maintenance schemes that embrace principoles of biodervisty and add interest in the selection of owering plants are relevant here as tey are in other small scale green spaces. Left over areas of green There are small areas of land which are unlikely to be developed in the foreseeable future. One example of this is the area of land either side of the Northern Relief Road. It has been suggested that this could be planted as an area of decorative woodland an area of biodiversity that would not be easily or frequently accessed. As development continues there is the potential for the temporary planting of sites in advance of construction especially within larger areas of social housing where the development of one block can give a sense of blight to those areas awaiting development. Examples of temporary planting with a large impact are meadow planting or a corn ďŹ eld. Anxieties around management are lessened due to the temporary nature of these interventions. Generally it should be remembered that shared s occupation as a means of enlivening and protecting open spaces

page 30

Quaker Burial Ground

Design Guidelines


Play

The success of the town centre is dependent on making a public realm for all. Children learn through play and by including space for play both as formal designated areas but also by accomodating safe playable landscapes in the streetscape young children and their carers will be encouraged to use open spaces and not rely on the car or remain within the confines of home and so contribute to the success of the town centre. The Mayor of London’s office is currently preparing supplementary planning guidance on play, as one of the Mayors’ 100 Public Spaces there is an expectation that the Town square can be seen as an exemplary example of making a ‘playable’ landscape.

1

All London Boroughs are currently preparing their play strategies amongst other priorities all play strategies must: – Promote greater social inclusion; – Ensure that play spaces enhance the quality of the local environment for children and young people; – Improve the public realm as a child-friendly environment; Each borough can decide what (if any) play spaces the developers of housing should include in their plans. This applies to any housing developments, including publicly funded Housing Associations. 2 the supplementary planning guidance to the London Plan, Providing or Children and Young People’s Play and Recreation is currently at draft stage 3 ibid., B7 Design Principles

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The Barking Code for the Public Realm 2008-2012


For there to be successful streets for children there have to be linked routes that favour the pedestrian this is true for much of the town centre but this is something which must be considered within the design of residential developments Playable landscapes Places that are attractive for children should give them an opportunity to shape or create something according to their own ideas. This presupposes that play equipment is not fixed for specific purposes, but that it is possible and necessary for children to alter something themselves. Some developers might be wary about the idea of incorporated into a development : this is something to be embraced rather than feared. Unlike many conventional playgrounds playable landscapes can dramatically enhance developments because their use is not fixed nor appears exclusively for a single group. The arboretum is an example of a playable landscape which is not perceived of as a playground but where there inc are elements which are open to appropriation for imaginative play. Examples include an informal stage, an undulating ground plane and scaled down street furniture. 1 Include play as an essential dimension for public space. Be ambitious in preparation of your play strategy and present it at the earliest planning stage. Support flexible and overlapping uses between different user groups (for example school daytime, community use evenings). Challange assumptions as to what is low maintaenance. attractive to the wider community.

3

maintenance

Reflect the great diversity that exists in play settings .

page 32

Design Guidelines


Art

Art in the urban realm is a source of pleasurable but unpredictable encounters for the risk averse. The role of the artist is as both a critical and creative catalyst within the process of urban design and as the producer of places within the urban realm. The value of arts in the public realm is therefore both in the creative process and the product: what the artist does, what the artist makes and the ensuing debate that stimulates. Barking has Barking has championed public art from the early A13 scheme to numerous commissions from the permanent to performance.

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The Barking Code for the Public Realm 2008-2012


Within the terms of the code the definition of “public art” is predominantly but not exclusively the visual arts. However the code seeks to avoid prescribing the form that “public art” might take and each individual brief should commission a practitioner appropriate to the situation. The strategic commissioning of art in the public realm can: – Forge a strong identity that will differentiate. – Frame and celebrate valued qualities of the existing environment to engage and inspire diverse audiences. – Positively contribute to the process of regeneration. – Stimulate involvement and support participation in discussions concerning the existing and proposed developments. All commissions should meet the ambitions of the Local Cultural strategy for access and inclusion for all to creative and cultural activity and therefore take into account that audiences for art in this area will be diverse. Each commission should therefore identify an audience and ensure their engagement. Genuine creative activity that results in good art is contingent on genuine speculative research where the outcome may not be known at the outset, therefore the code cannot prescribe desired outcomes for art in terms of either form or content, however the code can usefully outline the requisites necessary for the commissioning and delivery of quality art in the public realm.

page 34

Design Guidelines


These are concerned with – A clear curatorial policy to establish aims and ambitions, – The necessity for that ambition to be shared across all members of the design and development team and for the process to enable effective brief development through research – For artist engagement through to implementation, design-build doesn’t do it in the arts. Role of the artist on the Design Team The inclusion of artists on the design team of the urban realm can have a twofold outcome. First to contribute to the overall conceptual process of brief and design development. Secondly the artist or product designer can bring to the design of specific elements of the utilitarian fabric of the urban realm an alternative rarefied resolution. Art: Guidelines for a Model of Excellence – Ensure briefs for the inclusion of public art are transparent and reflect the client’s ambition yet are sufficiently open to allow genuine speculative creative enquiry. – Include the client in all stages of the process. – Research all limits as possibilities. – Commission in a way appropriate to each project. – Encourage and support genuine speculative research by the artist. – Accept speculation involves risk. – Enable brief development by the artist; value the artist’s time. – Accept the outcome of an artist’s commission cannot be known from the outset. – Ensure the artist is not commissioned to ameliorate fundamental design errors. – Ensure the artist is not commissioned as a stand in

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The Barking Code for the Public Realm 2008-2012


Examples of Public Art Commisioned by LBBD

Alison Unsworth, Temporary printed street Intervention, clockhouse Avenue

Plush, Love & Light, video projection against Town Hall

page 36

Design Guidelines


Making Temporary “public realm” “the first shock of a great earthquake had rent the whole neighbourhood to its centre... Houses were knocked down; streets broken through and stopped; deep pits and trenches dug in the ground; enormous heaps of earth and clay thrown up; buildings that were undermined and shaking, propped by great beams of wood. In short the yet unfinished and unopened Railroad was in progress; Dombey and Son Dickens 1834 Scenes in Barking and Dagenham today resound with such moments of wholesale upheaval and change that Dickens described with the arrival of the railways. However we are today not just assailed by the cranes, demolitions, blocked up passages and rights of way, but also with the import of the glaring super-graphics of development hoardings that borrow heavily on generic images of bland lifestyle goals. These shy from reflecting the complex and diverse aspirations of London and its world savvy citizens. The hoarding could instead give developers a real opportunity to engage with present and future contexts with temporary enhancements of the existing and snapshots of the possible.

Above: Public Art commision no 1 by muf The production of the image for the hoarding was concieved & delivered as a means for muf to research local attitudes to the regeneration of public space.

page 37

The Barking Code for the Public Realm 2008-2012


Barking and Dagenham is changing rapidly with development activity growing in a seemingly exponential fashion. It is important that this period of change should not adversely effect the experience of living in and growing up in Barking. An example of this is the development of the Gasgoinge-temporary play settings could be developed and inform the final schemes. The hoarding you can sit on, play within find out about activities and showcase events. It is not only construction sites and their perimeters which can have a negative impact on an area. Sites that form part of master-plans or areas of the city that have been identified as possible contenders as development sites and opportunities are effectively blighted for the period of any deliberations. Although there is an understandable resistance to investment with a limited shelf life, temporary improvements can be approached in a way that limits ‘wastage’ and can be seen as an opportunity to test options and in fact limit risk by trying out possible scenarios of use or design treatment. The corn field or the temporary allotmernts created by The Shoreditch Trust with the consultants ‘what if”..

Above: “What if” a project that activates a vacant lot in Hoxton through urban agriculture.

Above: By muf, a temporary hoarding that depicts a forest that stands in for the Arboretum to come. The hoarding incorporates temporary timber steps a 1:1 depiction of the planned steps for the Barking Town Square.

page 38

Design Guidelines


Event Infrastructure-Activating the “Public Realm”

It is desirable that public space should be designed with occupation in mind. This important fact can be advanced by thinking about it as a first principle, for example, an active public group of floors or designing facades so that the interior activities can spill into the street. But it is also about detail, for example, installing “in ground units” to support temporary events without the need for generators.

page 39

The Barking Code for the Public Realm 2008-2012


Typical details T

The resolution of the detail in the following situations is particularly critical for the design of a successful streetscape. Useful guidence can be found in the TFL streetscape design guidence document.

page 40

Typical T ypical Details


Corner

1000m m

min.

1000mm min.

Paving to return by min. 1000mm to meet different pattern / direction / material Granite paving 600mm x 300mm Granite kerb 300mm x 900-1200mm lonP g aving to return by min. 1000mm to meet different pattern / direction / material

Layby

1000m m

min.

1000m m

min.

Corner

Paving to return by min. 1000mm to meet different pattern / direction / material

Paving to return by min. 1000mm to meet different pattern / direction / material Kerb to be radiused at every change of direction

in

page 41

The Barking Code for the Public Realm 2008-2012


Approved drainage details

600mm x 300mm half stagger granite paving Footway inlet only to be used if water cannot drain naturally over kerb.

Cover fi

Galvaniz Section

r 600mm x 300mm half stagger granite paving

dded

Stainless steel slot drain

Granite paving to be replaced with 40 x 40mm silver grey mosaic gra Snhieteffiseeldtts around strBeiectyfculernsittuarned

Lighting c

Plan

Recessed manhol

450

min 450mm

1200

Existing/new street furniture

to be kept free of street furniture

min. 2000mm

Manhole

ngthmeanterial CovIfelrefsilsletdhawnit1 vim h5p0am continue mosaic setts to bel recessed manhole cover. edkesrte Galgvraanniizte

Bicycle standsSection Lighting column

0

page 42

Bollard 140mm diameter placed mamnhcolree-cdorvile in 156M lerd

Bollard

Typical Details


450

Bollard 140mm diameter placed in 156mm core-drilled hole centered in longitudinal joint Street furniture: bollard

Bollard

C

Section

600mm x 300mm half stagger granite paving

Sheffield Stainless steel slot dBriaciyncle stand min 450mm

1200

to be kept free of street furniture

min. 2000mm

G

M

Street furniture: cycle stands

Bicycle stands

Existing/new street furniture

Plan

Recessed m

Granite paving to be replaced with 40 x 40mm silver grey mosaic granite setts around street furniture If less than 150mm then Gure anm ite contin ospaaicvisnegtts to grani3 te00kexrb600 x 200mm Granite kerb 300 x 1200 x 200mm Street furniture: lighting columns 00mm min.

Lighting column page 43

Tree Granite kerb The Barking Code for the Public Realm 2008-2012 300 x 1200 x 200mm


lin

e

600mm x 300mm

C

ut

ut

C lin e

45. 00째

1800

lin

e

Cut line

C

ut

ut

C lin e

45. 00째

1800

Red tactile paving 400mm x 400mm at crossing point Dropped granite kerb Granite paving 600mm x 300mm

Red tactile paving 400mm x 400mm at crossing point Dropped granite kerb

Controlled crossing

C

ut l

in

e

Cut line

C

l ut in e

00째 45.

Cut line

l ut

C

C

ut l

in

e

Uncontrolled crossing

in e

00째 45.

page 44

yellow tactile paving 400mm x 400mm at crossing Dropped granite kerb

1800

1800

Granite paving 600mm x 300mm

Granite paving 600mm x 300mm yellow tactile paving 400mm x 400mm at crossing Dropped granite kerb

Typical Details


900mm x 100mm 900mm 900mm x 10 granite sets

300mm granite kerb

R= 600

600

LAND

1000

STREET FURNITURE SET IN PAVING 1000

half stagger 600mm x 300mm granite paving

Granite mm granite kerb specials granite kerb

1250mm min.

2400mm min. 800mm min. 800mm min.

to be a multiple of 300m m

600

min. 2000mm

Raised entry treatment

1250mm min.

CONTROLLED

2400mm min.

Ashpha Ashphalt

Ashphalt

600

'Spacer' 'Spacie f rIs' land is wider r m if Islatnhdanis 2w0i0d0em than 2's0p0a0cm ' to be added erm 'spacer' to be added TrafďŹ c island

page 45

The Barking Code for the Public Realm 2008-2012


Appendix A: Example of the code in practice

The principles of the code were brought to the detailed design of the ELT route on Ripple Road. Analysis will follow.

LitfaĂ&#x; column with public toilet existing pedestrian crossing 1 1.36-D.01

tree clump with barking bench

the relationship of pedestrian crossing, vehicular access for market traders, public toilet, proposed planting and market stall locations needs to be carefully tested 3 1.36-D.01

Geo bollards at 2m intervals, RAL 3207015 with stainless steel cap

Shallow 60mm kerb

all existing trees to be retained

2. PEDESTRIAN AREA north of bandstand as existing

Granite retaining kerb to top and bottom of ramps

flush granite kerb

Shallow 60mm kerb 160mm kerb at ELT stop

Existing trees in permeable resin-bound pit New paving to shopping centre to protrude into pavement

400 x 400mm granite corduroy paving Dropped kerb 160mm kerb at proposed ELT stop Granite retaining kerb to top and bottom of ramps

the relationship between ELT stop, pedestrian crossing, chicane and delivery bay should be carefully examined 5 1.36-D.02

considered design of the meeting of two materials

6 1.36-D.02

Location of lay-bys to be confirmed

300 x 600mm silver-grey granite paving, pattern delineating direction 200 x 100mm silver-grey granite paving Drivable resin bonded aggregate or grouted macadam paving light grey See above.

1. PLAN OF ELT ROUTE

page 46

kerbs radius where they change direction

1:500

Appendix


In this example new trees are positioned to join existing and a new clump is created.Pedestrian movement is informally steered through the positioning of a new bench for 14 to 18 people.

Granite special to accommodate kerb Level of access road raised to form level crossing

Existing granite kerb

Resin-bound surface

300mm granite kerb

Shade loving bround cover in mulch over tree soil (tbc)

Bench see Barking bench; Barking Code

300mm x 600mm silver-grey granite paving Multiwoody lighting column

Tree soil with shade loving ground cover (tbc)

Bin

Permeable resin-bound surface Location of BT box Existing trees

PLAN OF TREE PIT 1:100 @ A3

Proposed tree types - Alnus glutinosa (common alder) - Betula jacquemontii (jacquemont's birch) - Special : black poplar/ olive willow/ nut tree

49-51 Central Street London EC1V 8AB tel: 020 7251 4004 fax: 020 7250 1967 email: studio@muf.co.uk

page 47

20.11.07

The Barking Code for the Public Realm 2008-2012


Appendix B: Example of the code in practice

This is an example of the code applied to the public realm around the new health building. Analysis will follow.

1

setting out from existing edge of paving

8

All dimensions and levels to be checked on site before commencing work. Any discrepancies shall be immediately notified to the architect in writing. Do not scale from this drawing, use figured dimensions only. If in doubt consult the architect.

1.29-D.29

5900

1600

1800

1.29-D.10

Falls to drain into building storm drainage

1

6750

1.29-D.20

location subject to statutory services location

7x Large granite pavers inset in ground to signify seating 900mm x 1200mm Large granite pavers inset in ground to signify entry point into building 3 x pavers 900mm x 1200mm 6 x pavers 600mm x 400mm

KEY Flamed top, sawn sides silver-grey granite paving 300mm x 600mm

Raised table 2 no.s Geo 'Coffin' bollards powdercoated colour tbc

Flamed top, cropped sides silver grey granite paving 200mm x 300mm Flamed top, sawn sides silver grey granite sets 200mm x 300mm

set out from inner edge of door opening

3600

Yellow granite corduroy paving 400mm x 400mm at crossing min. 800 Hot Rolled Asphalt wearing course Woodhouse Geo bollard powder coated colour tbc Large granite pavers inset in ground to signify entry point into building 3 x pavers 800mm x 1200mm 4 x pavers 600mm x 400mm

2200

1. Where cuts would result in paviours less than 200mm wide use extra long specials instead. See drawing no. 1.29 - D .20 setting out detail no. 7

Stands provide 10 bike spaces

3600

2. Setting out from existing granite paving which is situated between the town hall and BLC.

Axe Street

2350 100 2350

Large granite pavers inset in ground to signify entry point into building 3 x pavers 800mm x 1200mm 4 x pavers 600mm x 400mm

4. Bollards to be equidistant apart maximum width ranging from 1400mm - 1800mm from c/p to c/p

D

As Clouded

29.05.08

C

relocation of tree clump to join parking lot

22.05.08

B

Addition of parking space and general amendemts

18.03.08

A

general amendments to plan

05.03.08

* revision

date

description

FOR COSTING

2400

1.29-D.21

3. Dimension as shown are exclusive of joint widths.

All bollards are woodhouse geo bollards, 140mm diameter, embedded/ rooted RAL finish 9007

2400

2400

29756.6

1 x ambulance drop-off / 2 x disabled drop-off area as per planning application

3600

Drainage to Thames Water standards as Axe Street will be regarded as highway

PCT and members parking 8 standard spaces / inc. 3 disabled spaces

11

Woodhouse Geo bin colour tbc

NOTE:

5700

Falls to drain. New drainage installed by LBBD

project

N

5100

11400

page 48

Barking and Havering LIFT 1st Floor Stewards House,

Service road drained into new drainage installed by LBBD within road itself

11 1.29-D.20

Temporary carparking 100 spaces

St. Edwards Court, London Road, Romford, Essex, RM7 9QD drawing title

Drop-off area for pallets

LANDSCAPE GENERAL ARRANGEMENT

set outer edge of deterrent paving

recessed manhole covered with recessed granite slab

300

project number

drawing no

1.29

SK.05

revision no

D

scale

creation date

1:100 at Din A1

27.12.07

muf architecture/art LLP

with outer edge of building

6000

client min 800

min. 2100

600

2400

BARKING LIFT

49-52 Central Street London EC1V 8AB T 020 7251 4004 F 020 7251 1967 E studio@muf.co.uk

Appendix


5900

1800

setting out from existing edge of paving

1

6750

1.29-D.20 for tree clump please see drawing no. 1.29-D.20 detail 1-6

6

200mm x 300mm contrasting shade granite paving

location subject to 7 statutory services location where last slab is less than 200mm wide then use 300mm x 300mm pieces

100mm wide slim kerb demarcates parking space in parking lot

where last slab is less than 200mm wide then use 400mm x 300mm pieces

set out from inner edge of door opening

align pavers across kerb

3600

1

2

1.

TYPICAL DETAIL WHERE PARKING LINES MEET IN PARKING LOT PLAN, SCALE 1:20

2.

DETAIL PEDEST PLAN, S

5

300mm wide granite kerb

align pavers across kerb 200mm x 300mm contrasting shade granite sample to be approved where last slab is less than 300mm then use 300mm x 300mm pieces

2200

300mm x 600mm silver grey granite pavers 200mm x 300mm black granite pavers sample yp be approved

200mm x 300mm contrasting shade granite paving

3600

where last slab is less than 200mm wide then use

where last slab is less than 300mm long 300mm x 400mm piecespieces then use 300mm x 300mm

2.

29756.6

200mm x 300mm contrasting shade granite paving

300

300

950

re-location of tree c join parking lot

A

change in granite special and shade

project

950

1000

client

5100

950

where last slab is less than 300mm then use 300mm x 300mm pieces

RAISED TABLE

project number

drawing n

1.29

SK. 06

scale

client

Barking and H

1st Floor Stewards H St. Edwards Court,

various London Road, Romf

300mm x 600mm silver grey granite pavers

Essex, RM7 9QD drawing title

7.

8.

RAISED TABLE AT NE OF SITE PLAN, SCALE 1:100

EC1

1.29

3.

3

T0

F0

Es

various

R = 8000mm

1.29-D.20

granite slab

Lon

project number

granite kerb special

scale

11

11400

muf

49GRANITE SET

where last slab is less than 300mm then use 300mm x 300mm pieces

1300

for bollard setting out please see drawing no.

1.29-D.20 detail 9. DETAIL OF GRANITE SPECIAL AT NORTH EASTERN TIP OF PARKING LOT PLAN, SCALE 1:50

300

300

DETAIL OF GRANIT SPECIAL AT NORTH WESTERN TIP OF PARKING LOT PLAN, SCALE 1:50

300

drawing title

GRANITE SETTING

200mm x 300mm contrasting shade granite sample to be approved

130

6.

min. 2100

align pavers across kerb

align pavers across kerb

DETAIL OF GRANITE SPECIAL AT NORTH EASTERN TIP OF PARKING LOT PLAN, SCALE 1:50 0

FOR COSTIN

1st Floor Stewards House,

project St. Edwards Court,

BARKING LIF

1000

7.

30 300

desc

Essex, RM7 9QD

silver Grey granite special R= 2250

DETAIL OF GRANIT SPECIAL AT NORTH WESTERN TIP OF PARKING LOT PLAN, SCALE 1:50

*

London Road, Romford,

300

2400

6.

of

Barking and Haverin

300mm wide granite kerb

RAISED TABLE

then use 300mm x 300mm pieces

re-location join parking

revision LIFT BARKING

300

silver Grey granite special R= 2200

200mm x 300mm silver grey granite paver

description addition

B

silver Grey granite special R= 2250

300 30 0 300

C

change in g special and FOR COSTING

300

where last slab is less than 200mm wide then use 300mm x 300mm where last slab is less than 300mm pieces

recessed manhole

addition of detail 8

B

A

300

300mm wide kerb align pavers across kerb demarcates parking space in parking lot

5. DETAIL covered with OF MEETING POINT BETWEEN PEDESTRIAN AREA AND NW EDGE OF PARKING LOT recessed PLAN, SCALE 1:20

GRANITE SPECIAL AT WESTERN TYPICAL DETAIL WHERE PARKING LINES MEET EDGE OF PARKING LOT IN PARKING LOT PLAN, SCALE 1:20 PLAN, SCALE 1:20

600

2350 100 2350

4.

1.

silver Grey granite special R= 2200

200mm x 300mm silver grey granite paver

6000

C

*

2

5

2400

DETAIL OF MEETING POINT BETWEEN PEDESTRIAN AND SW EDGE TemporaryAREA carparking OF PARKING LOT 100 SCALE spaces PLAN, 1:20 8. RAISED TABLE AT NE OF SITE PLAN, SCALE 1:100

Drop-off area for pallets

4 300

PARKING LOT PLAN, SCALE 1:100

300

300mm x 600mm silver grey granite paver

silver Grey granite special R= 2200

300mm wide kerb demarcates parking space in parking lot

950

1000

11

1.29-D.21

300

1

DETAIL OF MEETING POINT BETWEEN PEDESTRIAN AREA AND SW EDGE OF PARKING LOT PLAN, SCALE 1:20

where last slab is less than 200mm wide then use 300mm x 300mm pieces

where last slab is less than 300mm then use 300mm x 300mm pieces

GRANITE SPECIAL AT WESTERN EDGE OF PARKING LOT PLAN, SCALE 1:20

align pavers across kerb

300

3

DETAIL OF MEETING POINT BETWEEN PEDESTRIAN AREA AND NW EDGE OF PARKING LOT PLAN, SCALE 1:20

100mm wide slim kerb demarcates parking space in parking lot

granite special

revision

3.

300mm wide kerb demarcates parking space in parking lot

5.

R= TBC LBBD

300

R= TBC LBBD

4.

granite kerb special

All bollards ar bollards, 140m embedded/ ro RAL finish 900

R = 8000mm

3

300mm x 600mm silver grey granite paver

300mm x 600mm silver grey granite paver

300

1000

where last slab is less than 200mm wide then use 400mm x 300mm pieces

where last slab is less than 300mm then use 300mm x 300mm pieces

1. ALLare JOINT All bollards wood bollards, 140mm diam

align special pavers across kerb granite 300

300mm x 600mm silver grey granite pavers

DETAIL OF MEETING POINT BETWEEN PEDESTRIAN AREA AND SW EDGE OF PARKING LOT PLAN, SCALE 1:20

300

where last slab is less than 200mm then use 300mm x 300mm pieces or specials as hatched

where last slab is less than 200mm wide then use 300mm x 300mm pieces

granite kerb special

300

2400

130

130

3.

300

where last slab is less than 300mm

where last slab less than 300mm thenisuse 300mm x 300mm pieces then use 300mm x 300mm pieces

1300

2. Bollards to be equ maximum width rang 1400mm - 1800mm f centreNOTE:

300mm x 600mm

7

300mm x 600mm silver grey DETAIL OF MEETING POINT BETWEEN 200mm x 300mm granitegranite pavers shade PEDESTRIAN AREA AND NW EDGEcontrasting OF PARKING LOT sample to be approved PLAN, SCALE 1:20 1300

1. ALL JOINTS TO B

embedded/ rootedto 2. Bollards granite pavers 7. silver grey DETAIL OF GRANITE SPECIAL RAL finish 9007 wid maximum AT NORTH EASTERN TIP OF PARKING LOT 1400mm - 180 use 200mm x 300mm contrasting PLAN, SCALE 1:50 shade granite pavers, sample to be approved. centre align pavers across kerb

DETAIL OF GRANIT SPECIAL AT NORTH WESTERN TIP OF PARKING LOT PLAN, SCALE 1:50

1000

2400

align pavers across kerb where last slab is less than 300mm then use 300mm x 300mm pieces

where last slab is less than 300mm then use 300mm x 300mm pieces

for bollard setting out please see drawing no. 1.29-D.20 detail 9.

wea

NOTE: 300 300mm x 600mm silver grey granite pavers

use 200mm x 300mm contrasting shade granite pavers, sample to be approved. where last slab is less than 200mm then use 300mm x 300mm pieces or specials as hatched

6.

R = 8000mm

PARKING LOT PLAN, SCALE 1:100

DETAIL OF MEETING POINT BETWEEN PEDESTRIAN AREA AND EDGE OF PARKING LOT PLAN, SCALE 1:20

300mm wide across kerb align pavers granite kerb

align pavers across kerb

4

1000

2.

where last slab is less than 200mm wide then use 300mm x 300mm pieces

300mm wide200mm x 300mm for tree clump please granite kerb contrasting shade seegranite drawing no. sample to be approved 1.29-D.20 detail 1-6

5.

Hot RolledsilA wearing cou 20

silver Grey gra special R= 2250 Hot

R= 2200

300mm wide kerb demarcates parking space in parking lot

6

Fl

300mm x 600mm silver grey 300 granite pavers

DETAIL OF MEETING POINT BETWEEN PEDESTRIAN AREA AND EDGE OF PARKING LOT silver Grey granite PLAN, SCALE 1:20 special

300mm x 600mm silver grey granite paver

300

PCT and members parking 8 standard spaces / inc. 3 disabled spaces

PARKING LOT PLAN, SCALE 1:100

Flamedsilv to 20 silver grey 200mm x 3

where last slab is less than 300mm long then use 300mm x 300mm pieces

200mm x 300mm silver grey granite paver

for bollard setting out please see drawing no. 1.29-D.20 detail 9.

Fla

align pavers across kerb

300mm x 600mm silver grey granite pavers

TYPICAL DETAIL WHERE PARKING LINES MEET IN PARKING LOT PLAN, SCALE 1:20

3600

1.

Fla silv 30

Flamed top silver grey 200mm x 3

in parking lot align pavers across kerb

300

PARKING LOT PLAN, SCALE 1:100 TYPICAL DETAIL WHERE PARKING LINES MEET IN PARKING LOT PLAN, SCALE 1:20

1.

Flamed top silver-grey 4. 300mm x 6

KEY

where last slab is less than 200mm wide then usekerb 100mm wide slim 300mm x 400mm piecesspace demarcates parking

4

2

2

KEYIf in doubt cons

100mm wide slim kerb 300mm x parking 600mmspace silver grey granite pavers demarcates in parking lot

align pavers across kerb

1

4

DETAIL OF MEETING POINT BETWEEN PEDESTRIAN AREA AND SW EDGE OF PARKING LOT PLAN, SCALE 1:20

100mm wide slim 3 kerb demarcates parking space in parking lot

where last slab is less than 200mm wide then align pavers across kerb use 400mm x 300mm pieces

1

3.

100mm wide slim kerb demarcates parking space in parking lot

where last slab is less where last slab is less than 200mm wide then use 300mm x 300mmthan 200mm wide then use 400mm x 300mm pieces pieces

5

Do not scale fro figured dimensi

300mm wide kerb demarcates parking space in parking lot

R =300mm 8000mmx 600mm silver grey granite pavers

where last slab is less than 200mm wide then use 300mm x 300mm pieces

Stands provide 10 bike spaces

5

where last slab is less than 200mm granite kerb special then use 300mm wide300mm kerb x 300mm pieces demarcates parking space in parking lot

300

7

All dimensions and lev on site before commen Any discrepancies sha notified the architec Alltodimensions Do not thisc onscale site from before figured dimensions on Any discrepanc If in doubt consult thea notified to the

where slab is less than 200mm where last last slabx is300mm less thanblack 300mm 200mm granite pavers use 300mm x 300mm pieces thenthen use 300mm 300mm pieces sample yp xbe approved

1300

for bollard setting out please see drawing no. 1.29-D.20 detail 9.

200mm x 300mm contrasting shade 7 granite paving

300

for tree clump please see drawing no. 1.29-D.20 detail 1-6

130

for tree clump please see drawing no. 1.29-D.20 detail 1-6

Falls to drain. New drainage installed by LBBD

5700

6

6

where last slab is less than 200mm wide then use 300mm x 300mm pieces

page 49

200mm x 300mm silver grey granite paver

30

The Barking Code for the Public Realm 2008-2012 300

0

300

align pavers across kerb

6.

DETAIL OF GRANIT SPECIAL AT

7.

DETAIL OF GRANITE SPECIAL


Appendix C: Built examples

staggered granite paving meets resin bond tree pit

page 50

Appendix


Bad

Good

Half cuts

We propose to use mini stones around larger pieces of street furniture

Paving specials should be robust and functional

Thresholds between different surface treatments need to be carefully designed page 51

The Barking Code for the Public Realm 2008-2012


page 52

Section


muf architecture/art 2008-2012


Barking Code