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Exception is the Norm: Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance September 2010


Exception is the Norm: Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance

Contents page 3

Introduction Strategies

1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8

Appendix

2.1 Map of Maps

page 1

Tree planting strategy Materials strategy Street furniture strategy Lighting strategy Wayfinding strategy Strategy for play Public art strategy Engagement strategy

page 6 page 29 page 50 page 63 page 77 page 89 page 97 page 107 page 121

Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


Public realm improvements are a visible and tangible means for the boroughs to demonstrate a commitment to existing communities and employment uses whilst at the same time, showing an air of welcome to those previously unfamiliar with the locality. The title ‘the exception is the norm’ refers to exceptions found in borough and TFL streetscape guidance for situations where the norm does not apply whether because of a conservation area or vehicle cross over -the richness and complexity of this mixed use area has led to us developing guidance which can provide a simple and responsive public realm.

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Introduction


Introduction The design guidance was produced by muf architecture/art LLP and J&L Gibbons LLP and commissioned by a client group which includes the London Boroughs of Hackney and Tower Hamlets ,The London Development Agency and Thames Gateway Development Agency. Hackney Wick and Fish Island is located immediately west of the site of the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games, and has been identified as a key component of the ‘Olympic Fringe’. These areas adjacent to the Olympic site are integral to the vision that the Legacy of the 2012 Olympics will fundamentally improve conditions - physical, social and economic - across East London. This guidance is specifically aimed to address a period on change from 2010 to 2014. It is an area of extraordinary contrasts, of social housing and Registered Social Landlords, light and heavy industry , artist communities both established and new, 2 annual festivals, industrial uses, canals and ruderal landscapes and both historic fabric and sites in flux . There is a great deal of interest and investment in the public realm with projects being delivered by the boroughs, the ODA ,Thames Gateway Art commissions alongside the prospect of a great deal of activity on the part of the private sector. This guidance seeks to assist the designer and client by demonstrating by example the ways investment in the public realm can simultaneously enhance routes through the area and enhance the area for those that live and work there. There is an emphasis on amplifying and drawing on existing assets, from built fabric to landscape, creativity to community projects . The guidance does not replace existing borough street scape guidance rather it draws upon it and develops a robust shared palette, site specific to the existing situation but that can accommodate change in the future. All elements have been agreed with the boroughs thus making it easier for designers to understand what is possible and encourage design thinking within parameters that are sensitive to the assets that already exist. The guidance will be revised in April 2011, the pace of projects and their delivery means that we will be able to illustrate the document with on the ground examples.

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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


page 4

Sttrategies


PART 1: STRATEGIES

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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


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Strategies


1.1 TREE PLANTING STRATEGY

Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


The tree planting strategy for Hackney Wick and Fish Island is part of wider strategy to create a multifunctional landscape of green infrastructure. Promoting the transformation of the landscape character from; a degraded and unmanaged landscape structure to a richer and more diverse landscape. Delivered through structural planting, woodlands, street tree planting, ruderal ecologies, waterways habitats, greening structures and buildings, community gardening networks and productive landscapes. The delivery of individual projects is a critcial step to achieveing a strategic network of green infrastructure.

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Strategies


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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


Green Infrastructure The Green Infrastructure approach for the A12 corridor adjacent to Hackney Wick and Fish Island promotes a soft engineering approach to this large urban landscape. Focussed capital works are underpinned by a more fundamental shift in attitudes towards the management, accessibility and design of these left-over spaces. Considering each space of a net work of green infrastructure enables economies of scale to be applied to the whole project. Within each project the design proposals consider all available surfaces as potential locations for green infrastructure; from patches of green space, fragmented woodlands, streets, transport structures, walls and buildings. When reviewing the existing conditions for each of the green infrastructure sites within Hackney Wick and Fish Island there are a number of factors that have informed extent to which access can be encouraged and tree planting or environmental improvements can take place. These factors include; different patterns of use, land ownership, the scale and layout of the transport infrastructure and access. The strategy proposes a linked approach that considers all sites as one system but recognises and celebrates the differences at a local scale.

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Strategies


Green – infrastructure

Canopy

Shrub

(Columns)

(Walls)

Field

(Kerbs and Barriers)

Ground

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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


Exotic and native The tree planting strategy for Hackney Wick and Fish Island has been informed by the two adjacent parks, Victoria Park and the Olympic Park. The approach to tree planting in each park is quite different. The tree planting strategy for Victoria Park will develop the Victorian planting palette and diversify it with many more exotic species. In contrast the Olympic Park planting palette is much more focussed on native species. Nestled between the two parks Hackney Wick and Fish Island can borrow from both, proposing a strategy that includes both exotic species and natives. This also helps define the route hierarchy throughout Hackney Wick and Fish Island as explained on the following pages.

NATIVE EXOTIC NATIVE

EXOTIC

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Strategies


Legend Green Infrastructure tree planting Primary structural street planting Secondary structural street planting Ornamental residential street planting Residential street planting Focal point planting evergreen clusters Focal point planting deciduous clusters Focal point planting specimen Orchard Nuttery

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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


A12 Corridor Planting along the A12 corridor - option 1 Woodland blocks, native groupings, high wildlife value, medium sized trees, planted at 2.5m centres and managed to 5m, coppicing potential, visual structure from density of planting, scale of planting to engage pedestrians and people travelling at speed along the A12.

Option 1 - Section of semi-mature planting

Plan semi-mature scale

Plan size at maturity

WOODLAND MIX

SPECIMEN SWAMP CYPRESS Option 1 - Axonometric of semi-mature planting Size at maturity

0

10

20m

Option 1 - Growth study, semi mature and mature

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Strategies


Recommended Species: Betula pendula (Silver birch) Betula pubescens (Downy birch) Alnus glutinosa (Common Alder) Carpinus betulus ‘fastigiata’ (Fastigiate hornbeam)

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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


A12 Corridor Planting along the A12 corridor - option 2 Exotic specimens, large scale tree planting, single species for visual impact, planted on 10m centres and managed to 20m, planting corridor prepared to accommodate continuous planting strip.

Option 2 - Axonometric at semi-mature planting

Plan semi-mature scale

Plan size at maturity

SPECIMEN SWAMP CYPRESS

LONDON PLANE

Option 2 - Growth study, semi mature and mature

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Strategies


Recommended Species: Metasequoia glyptostroboides (Swamp cypress)

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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


Street tree planting - primary/ secondary routes Planting on primary and secondary streets Exotic and native, large scale tree planting, avenue planting, single species on routes to aid with route definition and hierarchy, street survey to determine space tree nibs/ trenches as required, optimum 10m spacing, pollarding potential, supplementing existing planting of the same species Primary routes - London Plane Main north south route through Hackney Wick and Fish Island, including; The Eastway, Chapman Road, Rothbury Road, Wansbeck Road and Wick Lane. Main east west routes between Victoria Park and the Olympic Park, including: Wallis Road, Monier Road and Dace Road Secondary routes- Sweetgum Secondary north south routes including - Berkshire Road and Osbourne Road Secondary routes east west including; White post lane, Wyke Road SPECIMEN SWAMP CYPRESS

10

Plan semi-mature scale

LONDON PLANE

20m

Plan size at maturity

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Strategies


Recommended Species: primary routes Platanus hispanica (London Plane)

Specific route notes Wallis Road - London Plane trees provide continuity between the majestic London Plane avenues of Victoria Park and the future London Plane avenues of the Olympic Park.

Recommended Species: Secondary routes Liquidambar styraciflua (Sweetgum)

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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


Street tree planting - residential Street tree planting within the Trowbridge estate Exotic and native, medium scale tree planting, avenue planting, single species on routes to aid with route definition and hierarchy, dramatic seasonal variety, street survey to determine space, tree nibs/ trenches as required, optimum 5 and 10m spacing, Small streets- Gean Routes within the Trowbridge Estate where space permits in the context of existing tree planting.

Recommended Species: small streets Prunus avium ‘plena’ (Gean)

Recommended Species: medium streets Quercus palustris (Pin Oak)

Medium streets- Pin oak Such as Felstead Street and Trowbridge Road.

Plan semi-mature scale

TULIP TREE

ORNAMENTAL GEAN

Plan size at maturity

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Strategies


Orchard and nutteries Fruiting and nutting trees within community spaces and schools Exotic and native, medium scale tree planting, high biodiversity value, educational value, community gardening group involvement for planting and maintenance

Recommended Species: orchards Malus sp (Apple)

Recommended Species: nuttery

Orchards - Apple Location such as Mabley Green community meadow, Beanacre Close and Gainsborough Primary School

Juglans regia (Walnut)

Nuttery - Walnut Locations such as Mabley Green community meadow and Gainsborough Primary School

Plan semi-mature scale

ORCHARD APPLE

P TREE

NUTTERY HAZEL

ORNAMENTAL GEAN

ORCHARD APPLE

Plan size at maturity

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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


Focal point planting Focal points within the Trowbridge Estate main junctions Exotic and native, large scale tree planting, large specimen trees at locations within public spaces, single species clusters to define with public space character, seasonal colour survey to determine planting space, optimum 10m spacing, Specimen - Tulip tree/ Copper Beech Merriam Avenue, Beanacre Close, Monier Road roundabout Deciduous clusters - Maidenhair tree Trowbridge estate open spaces Evergreen clusters - Scots pine Trowbridge estate open spaces

Plan semi-mature scale

SCOTS PINE CLUSTERS

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Plan size at maturity

TULIP TREE

Strategies


Recommended Species: Deciduous Specimen 1 Liriodendron tulipifera (Tulip tree)

2

Acer pseudoplatanus ‘atropurpeum’ (Purple sycamore)

Clusters Gingko biloba (Maidenhair)

1

Recommended Species: Evergreen clusters Pinus sylvetris (Scots pine)

2

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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


Green Infrastructure as Network of Community Initiatives There are a multitude of community initiatives in Hackney Wick, allowing for greater diversity in planting, creating ownership and acting as a part of an engagement strategy.

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Strategies


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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


page 28


1.2 Material sTRATEGY

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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


The materials pallette for Hackney Wick and Fish Island aims to : •

Create a calm and coherent foreground that does not betray it’s funding sources. Retain and reuse existing materials wherever possible. Demonstrate a commitment to existing communities and employment uses through a robust materials pallette. Utilise Made In (see appendix)

Recommendations Hackney Wick residential Conservation area General treatment

Estate palette, poured surfaces in driveway fronted streets. Poured surface/ existing materials/ concrete paving Concrete paving as standard/ existing materials

Primary Routes

Concrete paving as standard/ existing materials

Principle Streets

Concrete paving as standard, 300mm granite kerbs, grey tactiles.

page 30

Material Strategy


Strategic Area Hackney Wick residential Fish Island Conservation Area Proposed extension to Fish Island Conservation Area Buildings of historic interest in AHP Characterisation study Listed buildings Borough Boundary Principle Street as Avenue Principle Street, mixed character

page 31

Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


The material strategy recognises recent investment by the boroughs in both Hackney Wick and Fish island, and their preference for the use of concrete pavers as standard. In order to create a coherent and calm foreground, the continued use of concrete paving is recommended as a general treatment and along primary routes - that is key vehicular thoroughfares such as the Eastway. The widths of the streets should be carefully considered and ample space for tree planting provided.

Consider repeating stagger @ four paver intervals.

page 32

Material Strategy


General Treatment and Primary Routes Concrete pavers. 600 x 600mm. 150mm staggered bond is standard. Consider repeating stagger @ four paver intervals.

Tree pits with resin bound 1800mm min, 2400mm preferred.

150mm granite kerb

Road width : @general treatment : min 4800mm @primary routes : min 6100mm

Standard coloured concrete tactiles

Consider the use of smaller paving units at cuts of less than 150mm. Concrete sets are recommended. Specification to be confirmed with LBH.

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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


page 34

Material Strategy


Principle Street as Avenue

Grey concrete tactiles

300mm granite kerb

Along principle streets, such as Berkshire and Osbourne Road, a normative approach to materials is also recommended. That which distinguishes the principle streets is the width of the kerb and a variation in the colour of the tactiles. With the approval of the borough access officer, grey concrete tactiles should be used.

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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


Exception is the Norm The material strategy acknowledges however, that in Hackney Wick Fish Island, the exception is the norm. As the plan on page 32 indicates, a large extent of the streets lie within estates or conservation areas and elsewhere, vehicular crossovers are a critical characteristic of the streetscape due to the numerous yards and the continued and positive presence of industry. ;%\%DE

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There are also routes that have been identified as being strategically important connections, the connection between the Greenway and Victoria Park for example. In this situation. The use of the Greenway materials pallette on only one side of the street is effective in making a decisive green link through a normative streetscape. Recognising the mixed character of a street by varying the materials on opposite sides of the street is recommended. Careful consideration should be given to pedestrian flow, to frontage, to vehicular use, to the potential desire for unobstructed views, to which side of the street will be in sunlight/ shade.

page 36

Material Strategy

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Concrete pavers. 600 x 600mm. 150mm staggered bond is standard. Consider repeating stagger @ four paver intervals. See p.34.

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300mm granite kerb

Paving set into tree grill Drivable surface as footway and gradient incorporated within width of footway creates shared access. Road width : min 5500mm Grey concrete tactiles as required

page 37

Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


Exception: Conservation Area

Existing materials Poured concrete Recommended specification and construction details to be developed with term contractors as part of made in. Mastic Asphalt Recommended specification and construction details to be developed with term contractors as part of made in. 300mm granite kerb

Resin bound tree pits as bands across width of footway Concrete pavers. Normative specification as foreground to mainly industrial conservation areas

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Material Strategy


Exception: Vehicle Crossover Vehicular crossovers are common to the streetscape of Hackney Wick and Fish Island due to the numerous yards and the continued presence of industry. The overriding ambition is to create an environment which is shared between pedestrians and vehicles associated with the current industrial and employment uses. The examples of vehicle crossovers aim to create a sense of continuity along the footway by: • matching the material of crossover and footway - if not exactly, then as closely as possible. • carefully considering the width of the road and footway and realigning where required to allow adequate space for the pedestrian and to incorporate the gradient of the entry into the overall width of the footway. • using short sections of low wall to break up significant extents of uninterrupted crossover. Tracking studies required.

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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


Exception: Vehicular Entry

Poured concrete

Mastic Asphalt

Recommended specification and

Recommended specification and

construction details to be

construction details to be

developed with term contractors

developed with term contractors

as part of made in.

as part of made in.

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Material Strategy


Exception: Vehicular Entry

Concrete paving

Poured concrete

Confirm concrete set

Where width allows, the footway

specification for crossover with

material could be continued

LBH. Align with setting out of

across the crossover,

larger concrete pavers at footway.

uninterrupted by the kerb.

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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


page 42

Material Strategy


Exception: Parking

Concrete Paving

Concrete Sets. Specification to be confirmed by LBH.

Tree grill with paved in lay

Granite Kerb

Controlled parking zones are currently being introduced in both Hackney Wick and Fish Island.

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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


Paving Units Concrete Paving Slabs The use of large concrete paving slabs (600 x 900 or 600 x 600) is common to both borough codes, to the UDLF and to TFL guidance. Schemes using concrete paving have been implemented recently in both Hackney Wick and Fish Island. The use of concrete paving slabs is consistent with the notion of a pared back and coherent palette. There are certain streets within the study area that cross through borough boundaries, for example Wallis Road, which has been identified as a Park to Park link. Proposals should be coordinated to ensure that where concrete paving slabs are used across such boundaries, the slabs are the same size and specification and that they are set out consistently. Yorkstone Paving Slabs The use of Yorkstone paving slabs (600 x 900) is appropriate within the Fish Island conservation area and in relation to specific buildings and locations identified in the character report. Yorkstone paving should be used where the width of the footway allows and where there is limited vehicular overrun. Setting out Refer to TFL guidance.

Yorkstone paving

600mm x 600mm ASP @ 150mm Staggered bond

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Material Strategy


Kerbs Paving units and poured surfaces should be used in conjunction with high quality kerbs. Granite kerbs are proposed to provide definition to the paving material and where conditions support, radiused kerbs should replace chamfered kerbs. This approach accords with the TfL streetscape guidance which states â&#x20AC;&#x153;shaped kerbs should be designed and ordered where a more robust kerb appearance will add significantly to the quality of the projectâ&#x20AC;?. On principle streets and where there is extensive use of poured surfaces, 300mm wide kerbs should be considered rather than 150mm. Bespoke kerbs may be required to transition between these two widths.

Use 300mm granite kerb on principle streets

Re-use existing granite kerbs where possible

Bespoke kerb

page 45

Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


Poured Surfaces There are a number of situations in which materials other than standard paving units may be used without compromising the coherence of the public realm. In many parts of Hackney Wick Fish Island, the streetscape must accommodate industrial uses and an anticipated increase in pedestrian footfall. Here, poured surfaces are recommended in order to allow for both vehicular and pedestrian use. (See scenario 2.1). Vehicle overrun is also typical of some of the housing estates in Hackney Wick, where a number of streets are fronted by driveways and poured surfaces should be retained. Asphalt Black poured asphalt is suitable for surfaces with many corners and can be used on smaller areas as it is not essential that it be compacted after laying. As it can support a range of loading, can be used on smaller areas, is readily available and is a standard construction method, it is possible to achieve a coherent streetscape through the use of black poured asphalt. It is critical that asphalt be used in conjunction with high quality granite kerbs and tactiles. See section on kerbs. Asphalt concrete and stone matrix asphalt are more limited in their application due to the need for roller compaction, although a wide range of finishes are available through processes such as bead blasting and through the choice of aggregate. Asphalt specifications will be reviewed with term contractors as part of Made In and included in the 2011 revision of the document.

page 46

Material Strategy


Front driveway: poured surfaces appropriate to accommodate successive vehicle overrun. (Beanacre Close)

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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


Poured Surfaces Resin bonded aggregate Resin bonded aggregate is suitable for lightly trafficked footways. Where resin bonded aggregate is used, aggregate should be sourced from the UK. Rounded aggregate, 1-3mm Brittany bronze is recommended. Resin bonded aggregate may be appropriate adjacent to the waterway and for the Fish Island conservation area, where it may be used in conjunction with existing materials. Resin bound aggregate Where permeable resin bound aggregate is used at tree pits, aggregate should be sourced from the UK. Rounded aggregate is recommended. Brittany Bronze, aggregate size up to 10mm is recommended.

Resin bonded. Brittany Bronze

Poured concrete Poured concrete specifications will be reviewed with term contractors as part of Made In and included in the 2011 revision of the document. Resin bonded. Brittany Bronze

page 48

Material Strategy


Retain and Reuse Existing Materials The existing granite kerbs and sets of Hackney Wick and Fish Island bring local distinctiveness and character to the material palette. Wherever possible these should be retained. Where the alignments or requirements of a street change, it may be possible to reuse materials within the same streetscape. The existing poured surfaces of Fish Island also relate to the industrial heritage of the area and should be retained where not degraded.

Existing 300mm granite kerbs

The material palettes of some of the residential estates of Hackney Wick are distinctive and again should be retained. In particular, within the Trowbridge Estate smaller paving units have been laid with great attention to detail and the use of brick paving within Wick Village relates to the materiality of the housing and street furniture.

Existing cobbles (Wallis Road)

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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


page 50


1.3 Street Furniture STRATEGY

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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


page 52

Street furniture strategy


The street furniture strategy advocates: that the streetscape be kept clear of obstruction to allow for spill and flow. that street furniture perform more than one function. This should be exploited in order to reduce clutter. that street furniture be concentrated at â&#x20AC;&#x153;release spacesâ&#x20AC;? at the conclusion of vistas, where the footway widens, or where the footway opens up into different types of spaces such as estates or yards. that boundaries provide opportunities for informal seating, that they should be considered as part of the streetscape and designed with comfort and expanded functionality in mind.

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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


Seating Free standing benches The borough design codes overlap in that they both advocate the use of timber slat benches with black painted metal frames. TFL guidance also recommends the use of timber. In Hackney Wick/ Fish Island therefore, where freestanding benches are used, those with timber slats and black painted metal frame are recommended and the heritage or park bench is preferred. (specification details tbc) The streetscape should be design for anticipated use and careful consideration should be given to the location of free standing benches. ≥

Seating - parks

≥≥ Seating - Streets and Squares

C

C

O

Park Bench

LI

Historic

B

telephone box

≥≥

PU

Correct positioning of posting and

R

telephone box

FO

Location: At green edges and

N

page 54

O

T

release spaces

Posting box at Street furniture strategy front of footway


The footways in Hackney Wick/ Fish Island serve more as routes than places where users stop and sit. It is appropriate therefore to maintain footways clear of obstruction and to limit the provision of seating to â&#x20AC;&#x153;release spacesâ&#x20AC;? at the conclusion of vistas, where the footway widens, or where the footway opens up into different types of spaces such as estates or yards. It is also appropriate to use freestanding benchs at green edges. A standard specification of free standing bench can be adapted to suit a given situation. This provides consistency across the public realm whilst allowing the seating to expand function and respond to the spatial/ environmental properties of a situation. The feasibility of adapting a standard product is subject to discussion with the supplier.

Standard product adapted to specific situations

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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


Seating Generous boundary as seating There is an opportunity to create social spaces and to incorporate seating without the use of loose benches. Monoliths should be avoided. Rather low walls that demarcate boundaries, changes in level, perimeters and edges to planters should be designed to provide informal seating. In these cases, ensure sufficient width (min 450 mm) and consider surface materials that are conducive to touch.

Oslo House Change in level as opportunity for informal seating

Seating should be provided with inclusive design in mind, making space for children and with sufficient dda compliant provision.

055

LLAW DNIHEB DECALP EB GNITHGIL DNA SEER

Wallis Rd: Low wall as informal seating

page 56

Street furniture strategy


Exploit the opportunity for street furniture to perform more than one function.

page 57

Design Guidelines


Anticipate spill and flow. There are a number of situations in Hackney Wick Fish Island, such as Felstead Street, where wide footways, clear of obstruction, should be preserved to allow for cafĂŠ seating.

page 58

Street furniture strategy


Where to locate seating (& where not to)

2. In the sun

flo w)

1. At release spaces

in ot tn (Bu

t he

d pe

ri a est

n

3. Where there is a need

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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


page 60

Street furniture strategy


Street Furniture Bins Suggested specification: Broxap, Derby Round. (BX45 2554) in black finish with no lettering, bands or logos. Provision for recycling.

Cycle Stands Sheffield hoop preferred

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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


page 62

Lighting strategy


1.4 Lighting STRATEGY

page 63

Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


page 64


The lighting strategy Anticipates demands for increased levels of security and illumination where pedestrian footfall will rise and currently provision is inadequate. Proposes a move towards energy reduction systems, but recognises that where investment has been made, it would be profligate to replace lighting systems. Proposes that street lighting be normative and discrete and that accent lighting be concentrated at the conclusion of vistas. Identifies certain situations where there is potential to use standard fittings in unexpected ways, drawing on cinematography lighting/ cameraman techniques to heighten atmosphere and demonstrate the seductive qualities of the landscape to visitor and resident alike.

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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


The illuminated scene, be it interior or exterior, will typically be composed of a series of lighting components. The manner in which light is applied, its colour appearance and colour rendering characteristics, luminaire form and mounting height all combine to define the visual hierarchy within any given location. The various lighting components are broadly categorised into three groups; Base lighting, Enhanced Base Lighting and Accent Lighting. The characteristics of each group may be summarised as follows: Base Lighting provides the platform for the introduction of the other lighting treatments. Such treatments should comply with the appropriate technical requirements as provided by the British Standard 5489-1 or the equivalent EN 13201-2 Enhanced Base illumination signifies greater importance for an area, particularly in relation to pedestrian use. Accent Lighting specifically addresses key buildings and landmark elements throughout the various project sites. By applying light in a series of layers it is possible to create a textured and nuanced night time environment, one in which views are promoted at the same time as satisfying all statutory requirements.

page 66

Lighting strategy


Character Area Estate Lighting Green infrastructures Buildings of historic interest in AHP Characterisation study Listed buildings Accent Lighting Bridges Strategic connections

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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


Street lighting Base lighting : the status quo The standard lighting system that is used by LBH is:

LBH specification Phillips Iridium preferred

Fitting: Phillips Iridium/ Urbis Sapphire. These are aluminium, factory painted jet black and are 100 watt SON-T plus lamps. Whilst whiter light, 100 watt CDO lamps, are preferred within Hackney in pedestrian areas such as Hoxton Street and Ridley Road market they are less energy efficient than SON-T. Mechanical fixings such as screens and baffles are used to prevent spillage to residences as required. Column: All columns are British Steel Maple columns or equivalent with 300 mm projection at 5 degree uplift and come factory painted Jet Black (BS00E53). They are 6 metre in residential areas and 8 metres in trafficked areas. This compares to LBTH standard system for public highways : Fitting: Urbis ZXU1. 60 watt cosmopolis lamp. Column: British Steel/Corus Poplar standard /HD 6-8metre mounted at rear of footway or maximum of 450mm from kerb edge. Jet black finish. Lux levels and uniformity are determined by the classification of the street. London Borough of Hackney have recently invested in street lighting along the majority of the streets within Hackney Wick. As discussed above it would be profligate to make proposals for lighting these streets in the short term.

LBTH specification Urbis ZXU1

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Lighting strategy


Street lighting Short term guidance In Fish Island and along routes that have been identified as strategic connections there is greater potential for imminent investment and guidance can be implemented in the short term. Given the anticipated increase in visitor numbers, Increased levels of illumination may be required along strategic connections. Accent Lighting : The proposal for Hackney Wick/ Fish Island is that accent lighting be concentrated at the conclusion of vistas (see accent lighting section). Base Lighting : Along streets, lighting should be normative and discrete. Fittings and columns should be consistent and non gestural. The columns and fittings that are currently used are considered appropriate. The Phillips Iridium fitting is preferred. Use of the Cosmowhite lamp should be encouraged for use in Base light applications. This will provide a white light (2850K) with improved colour rendering characteristics (Ra65) over standard high pressure sodium sources. The Cosmowhite lamp has a higher efficacy than that of high pressure sodium light and so will provide opportunities for the reduction of energy consumption.

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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


Short term guidance In proposed conservation areas, accent lighting may used to pick out features identified in the character report â&#x20AC;&#x201C; see accent lighting. Generally, normative fittings and columns should be used in conservation areas rather than heritage varieties. A light source of warmer colour appearance than that of the aforementioned Cosmoswhite is proposed so as to retain a visual connection with the older lamp technologies. However, in such instances the SON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; T comfort lamp from Philips should be utilised as it offers significant improvements in colour rendering (Ra 65) over standard high pressure sodium sources, whilst at the same time having a colour temperature of 2150K The warmer colour will also provide greater contrast with accent lighting. Enhanced Base Lighting : For routes identified as strategic connections, Wallis Road, for example, where there will be increased pedestrian traffic, it may be appropriate to move to a warm white ceramic metal halide 3000K lighting solution. This will provide a more significant shift in how the local environment is perceived by night than any increase in the levels of illumination. Metal halide sources exhibit improved colour rendering characteristics than either high pressure sodium or the cosmopolis lamp types.

Conservation area

Strategic connection : Enhanced Base lighting

Long term guidance In the long term, lighting systems should be designed to take advantage of energy reduction systems. (see sustainability section).

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Lighting strategy


Energy Efficient lighting Lighting systems should be designed as much as possible to take advantage of energy reduction systems. LED: Continued advances in LED technology will, in time, deliver an effective LED street lighting solution. Indeed manufacturers such as Ewo, iGuzzini and We-Ef Philips currently all produce luminaires which will are being looked at being adopted by various authorities in the UK and in mainland Europe. The use of LED sources will reduce both energy consumption and extend maintenance cycles (lamp replacement may be reduced significantly but the cleaning of the lantern glass will still be required). Variable output control of LED sources is much easier than more conventional sources (metal halide etc.). Once again despite the energy saving opportunities provided with variable outputs, one must question to do so in an urban environment is beneficial from a safety perspective. Remote dimming: Step dimming may be deemed appropriate along certain routes although such a strategy is not without functional or political implications. 100 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 70 % step dimming is being trialed in Tower Hamlets. Movement sensor: Movement sensor scheme are being trialled in London.

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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


Accent lighting With consistent and coherent treatments in terms of colour appearance established for the base and enhanced base lighting solutions a legible framework is thus provided for feature lighting solutions to operate in. There is potential to use standard fittings in unexpected ways, drawing on cinematography lighting/ cameraman techniques to heighten atmosphere and demonstrate the seductive qualities of the landscape to visitor and resident alike. Scenography. The illumination of vertical surfaces is key in informing ones perception of the lit environment. The illumination specific surfaces of building elements, or features, will create a series of visual markers which will assist in allowing one to orientate themselves within the night time environment. Moreover, such treatments will provide a lit focus which will define pull views across the night vista. Areas of no light are as important as areas of light in defining the night time scene. Contrast is key is ensuring visual interest. The targeted illumination of specific surfaces or elements will contribute to producing a more textured and nuanced night time environment built up as a series of lighting layers. Layers of light applied in variances of colour appearance (cool white, warm white, coloured light etc.) and light intensity will contribute to the nigh time scene. Scenes include: - the conclusion of vistas, e.g. the hackney wick sign, the boathouse, the listed pub faรงade. - specified spaces of the green infrastructure corridor

page 72

Lighting strategy


page 73

Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


Accent lighting Lighting under bridges Bridge structures may be revealed by simple feature lighting solutions employing typically metal halide or LED sources.

page 74

Lighting strategy


Accent lighting The use of normative fittings It is possible to achieve dramatic lighting effects using normative light fittings that are easy to maintain.

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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


page 76

Wayfinding strategy


1.5 wayfinding STRATEGY page 77

Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


Hackney Wick and Fish Island have a mixed urban grain, ranging from housing estates with diverse character and management regimes to industrial yards. The A12 and the canal network separate the area from Victoria Park, the Olympic Park and from wider connections. In its current state, it is challenging for the first time visitor to find their way through to key destinations such as the station or to navigate between the parks as desire lines turn through doglegs and they are faced with intersections of large scale infrastructure.

page 78

Wayfinding strategy


The wayfinding strategy is informed by previous reports that have identified key destinations and strategic connections in Hackney Wick and Fish Island. It is considered in three strands:

Scenography as wayfinding

A coordinated signage strategy for the first time visitor that connects Hackney Wick and Fish Island to a wider network of amenities.

Local signage

page 79

Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


Scenography as Wayfinding To enhance and frame existing conditions and views in order to establish a sequence of visual relationships along ways in that draws visitors and residents through the territory intuitively. In its current state, it is challenging for the first time visitor to find their way through to key destinations such as the station or to navigate between the parks as desire lines turn through doglegs and they are faced with intersections of large scale infrastructure. Given this landscape, it is not necessarily helpful.to add more information in the form of signs. There is an opportunity to think spatially through the enhancement and framing of landmarks and vistas that allow residents and visitors to orientate themselves.

This is achieved by A. Character lighting (see lighting strategy) B. Planting that frames views C. Creating a calm and coherent foreground (see materials palette and street furniture) D. Concentrating interest at conclusions of vistas

A

page 80

B

C

D

Wayfinding strategy


3

2

1

page 81

Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


A Coordinated Signage Strategy To review routes through Hackney Wick and Fish Island and to introduce signage for the first time visitor that connects the area to a wider network of amenities. Legible London There is an ambition to link Hackney Wick Fish Island with a wider network of amenities and to allow first time visitors to find their way through the area. In order to achieve this, a study has been undertaken by City ID to review routes through the area and to develop a coordinated, map based, signage strategy as part of the Legible London programme. • The study assesses the natural legibility of the network and proposes that signage be used only to supplement where vistas are restricted, routes are not obvious or people feel disorientated. • It locates information at a decision point along the network, in a situation where it is visible, in the line of sight, and accessible. • It aims to provide consistent sign information point-to-point to reinforce the wider network. • It prioritises mapping information at a point of change in the journey, entering, arriving or leaving – where an overview is required to help mental mapping and journey planning. • It operates by progressive disclosure – the right information at the right stage in the journey, appropriate and relevant to the user.

page 82

Wayfinding strategy


key routes as mapped by city id.

36

page 83

Olympic Fringe Wayfinding Strategy Draft version 1 City ID

Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


Legible London City ID have identified a hierarchy of cycling and pedestrian networks

39

Olympic Fringe Wayfinding Strategy Final. Version 2. City ID

39

Olympic Fringe Wayfinding Strategy Final. Version 2. City ID

Olympic Fringe Wayfinding Strategy Final. Version 2. City ID

page 40 84

Olympic Fringe Wayfinding Strategy Final. Version 2. City ID

Wayfinding strategy


MABLEY GREEN

Legible London City ID have produced a map of suggested locations for the Legible London signs. The exact location of the signs will be determined by the boroughs and is potentially subject to further study.

O LY YMP N O RT H P

S23

Hackneyy Wick

H AC K N E Y WICK TORIA PARK

OLD FORD

2012 MABLEY GREEN

Product types

Decision points

Monolith Minilith Connector/Finder Monolith Connector/Finder Minilith Connector/Connector Minilith Wall-mounted Monolith Wall-mounted Minilith Fingerpost

Other decision points where system development is required to establish if a sign product is necessary and to define its type

page 85

Hackney ey Wick W

H AC K N E Y WICK

Decision points

Other decision points where system development is required to establish if a sign product is necessary and to define its type

S23

Off-road decision points where system development is required to establish if a sign product is necessary and to define its type

Marker (artwork)

Off-road decision points where system development is required to establish if a sign product is necessary and to define its type

O LY YMP N O RT H P

TORIA PARK

OLD FORD

2014

Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


Local signage To recognise the contribution of local signage to intuitive wayfinding and local distinctiveness.

The value of local signs may be recognised through listing and/or lighting them.

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Wayfinding strategy


YARD SIGN NAME

NAME NAME NAME NAME NAME NAME

NAME

Yard sign Some yard signs exist in Hackney Wick FishIsland. Working with a sign maker identified through Made In, it is proposed to extend the system of yard signage.

page 87

Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


page 88

Strategy for Section play


1.6 Strategy FOR play

page 89

Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


Existing examples of play provision in the green opposite St Mary of Eton .

page 90

Strategy for play


Children learn through play and by including space for play both as formal designated areas and by accommodating safe playable landscapes in the streetscape, young children and their carers will be encouraged to use open spaces. Play provision is currently liited and crudely demarcated in the project areas with the effect that it is either perceived to â&#x20AC;&#x153;take over â&#x20AC;&#x153; sites in the case of the green opposite St Mary of Eton or it is meanly allocated within a fenced area. The play strategy advocates a different approach where play is recognised as integral to achieving public space that are social spaces.

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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


Play should:

a. Allow for exploration rather than provision, setting play opportunities within the particular qualities of a landscape.

page 92

Strategy for play


b. Make edges a playable amenity. Boundaries are necessary to keep in the roaming toddler or keep out the roaming dog. However, the crude boundaries of uses that currently exist can be challenged and edges and threaseholds can themseles become an amenity page 93

Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


d. Making room for the adult as well as the child ensures both stay longer and makes play space into social space.

e. Create play spaces that are attractive to the wider community

page 94

Strategy for play


f. Exploit existing terrain and see how different age groups can play together

g. Challenge what is considered to be anti social behaviour by recognising that street furntiture itself can be appropriated for play. when other factors such as a lack of cars make this possible page 95

Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


page 96

Public Art strategy


1.7 Public Art Strategy

page 97

Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


Art works are by definition exceptions to the norm, and if commissioned well, will deliver added value to this environment.

The best art practice is unpredictable, speculative, critical and risky and responds to the contingencies of a situation.

The best commissioning strategy is to enable this kind of practice.

Art practice in the public realm is always harnessed to regeneration objectives and the commissioner must define in precise terms, in advance of writing the brief, what an artist will deliver that cannot be achieved by good urban design.

The commissioner of art in the public realm must recognize the value of temporary projects and their capacity to deliver genuine research and to test predictions for the future.

When commissioning permanent projects the commissioner must quantify the risk of the unknown and embrace that challenge.

The best art practice is motivated by enquiry and research and therefore briefs should determine with accuracy the scope and focus of that enquiry and should avoid imprecise terms like way finding, place making, gateways and route markers.

The scope and focus should be sufficiently defined but should not predict object outcomes.

Accurate and precise briefs should elicit insightful and critical proposals that may be tangential or expand upon or overthrow the original question, briefs that deliver predictable object outcomes are not good briefs and will not deliver art that will endure.

Briefs must be precise to the site and must recognizes the complex and dynamic environment of Hackney Wick and Fish Island.

page 98

Public Art strategy


The guiding principle for the public art strategy is the notion of “Home Grown” and this has three strands, these are:

“Home Growing” the role of the public art strategy to inform and steer planning policy to ensure the creative community has sustainable and positive growth. “Grow your Own Art” The opportunities for the existing creative practitioner community to undertake commissions. “Robust Infrastructure for host space” Scoping the opportunities within the public realm improvements to determine appropriate sites for permanent and temporary commissions.

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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


Art Practise/Development and Change Since the 1970â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s HWFI has sustained an artist population who colonised the warehouses vacated by the demise of the industry in the area. What was originally essentially a studio based artist community with little presence in the neighbourhood has evolved to establish a smallscale mixed community of individual artist studios, arts organisations, art galleries, artisan cafes and live/work units. Today HW/FI host two annual arts festivals, which are delivered by local resident organisations and local arts organisations and are evidence of the overlap between the residential population and the arts organisations and the commitment of both to the local area. The arts community is housed across 16 studio buildings and the ad hoc use of other light industrial units. The tenancy agreements, management and occupation of these spaces vary from developer led commercial enterprise to SPACE an arts and educational charity that supports art and creativity at source to small-scale individual enterprises. The impact of the Olympics and developer interest in the area has had a mixed effect; the negative aspect of development has led to leases not being renewed and businesses moving out of the area. However the area has attracted some enlightened developers who recognise the value of the presence of small-scale artisan uses and how hard it is to attract these uses back once they are displaced.

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Public Art strategy


The success of the Hackney Wicked Festival, the Wick Flea market and to certain extent the vitality of the creative constituency is that it is self determined and creativity appropriates and repurposes the available resources to create actual and intellectual “host’ spaces. This is feasible in an under determined environment of HW/FI as it currently stands in 2010 where the public realm is utilitarian and under designed, residential density is still relatively low, where studio rents are sufficiently low and some protected and where the presence of industry means the streets are empty of a large proportion of the week day traffic. This under determination has some of the constructed cultural neutrality of the white cube gallery space as a place able to accommodate critical, diverse and eclectic art practices, however the capacity for HW/FI as a place to be creatively appropriated must be addressed through strategies that identify locations that can remain under-determined and which take on the paradox of formalizing space for the impromptu. Over the course of the last 18 months there has been an expansion of the cultural offer in HW/FI; Forman’s Smokehouse Gallery, linked to Hackney Wicked Festival has launched a program of exhibitions showcasing local artists, while the development of Queens Yard is generating a new mix of public space and back office studio provision. The cluster of activity around the ‘Hackney Pearl’ and the predicted arrival of a gallery in the corner unit of Oslo House (facing into Felstead street) is evidence that the area is at a ‘tipping point’ with the cultural sector driving the expansion of amenity.

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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


It is acknowledged that the presence of creative industry adds to property values and inflates development opportunities and that the malign consequence is that those industries are then vulnerable to being ousted, the area loses its cache, there is a flattening of cultural activity and interest and the wider value that culture brings to a place is lost. Therefore, to ensure the sustainable growth of HW/FI as a cultural and creative, the art strategy is an opportunity to map alternative growth scenarios based on an analysis of the existing tenancy and organisation models and from this research to lobby both the planning department and incoming investors and organisations in order to create the optimum mix of development scale, provision of affordable units and the necessary infrastructure provided by locally committed organisations

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Public Art strategy


“Grow your Own Art” Delivering public art in an area that is home to a large community of studio based practitioners, who exhibit mostly in galleries, is an opportunity that requires the involvement of that resident artist community in shaping the curatorial approach. Over the last 18 months muf architecture / art have engaged in discussion with key players and their ambitions ‘to make public’ the creative potential which is largely hidden behind studio doors. It is important that the evolving public face of the cultural sector isn’t eclipsed by art commissions that favour the established and permanent over the evolving and temporary. The basis of selection for art projects must always be on the quality of the proposal and not the geographic location of the artist, however in order to ensure that local artists are well placed to take up local opportunities a strategy for mentoring and enabling is proposed. Many artists working in HW/FI have a practice that is gallery focused. To make the transition from the gallery to the public realm requires the artist identifies and critically interrogates the very different social, cultural and spatial issues of the public realm, rather than those of the gallery. The technical and logistical constraints of working in the public realm are also significantly different from those of a gallery environment. If there is a commitment from both the commissioner and the artist community to “Home Grow”, then briefs must be written that directly enable artists (not just from HW/FI) to make that transition from gallery to public realm. This work will enviably be speculative and is best suited to temporary commissions. Both the brief and the commissioner must make clear that the development of the work is likely to be an iterative process with the commissioner acting as critic, mentor and facilitator. The commissioner must be prepared and able to take on this role.

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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


Enabling and Mentoring Home Grown

Home Grown and Made In as a Sustainable Strategy. Every commissioning brief should continue to ask the question “it is viable for an international artist community to “Home Grow” their own public art and draw on the industrial legacy of the area and deliver a material resolution through a “Made In Hackney Wick” strategy” and every brief should have as an appendix the Made In inventory. Artist may not necessarily make art exclusively from the materials locally available, but the inventory is an invaluable and fascinating portrait of the hidden activity of the area and as such is an invaluable resource to inform the development of an artist project. Home Grown Brief Development and Selection. To ensure that all art projects are embedded in the ongoing dynamic of the creative constituency, an artist and/or curator from HW/FI must be included as part of the brief development process and as part of the selection panel. It is acknowledged that the creative constituency is neither homogenous nor formally constituted and the process of selecting that panel member is not that they represent that constituency but that they are party to the dialogue and process and can therefore shape it from a position of knowledge. It is generally recognised that retaining creativity within Hackney Wick/Fish Island is more about exploring with planners and developers ways to retain creative uses than commissions.

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Public Art strategy


Types of Commissions This strategy sets out a series of guiding principles for the Art Strategy to enable both permanent and temporary commissions. There are broadly three types of commissions: 1.Permanent commissions that are integrated and embedded within the public realm improvements program. To ensure these works deliver added value and build on the principle of making a coherent and characterful public realm, the opportunities and limits of each site will be scoped to create an outline brief and to Identify the necessary permissions in relation to planning, Highways, Network Rail and British Waterways. The artist briefs will clearly define the expected outcome to ensure the commission attracts the most appropriate practitioners, who have the necessary skills. 2. Permanent commissions where the final artwork is generated by the research of the commissioned artist. The briefs for these commissions will emerge through the research of the HW/FI Factory Town Improvements and will be open ended in terms of the defined outcome and will address emerging themes or the opportunities of specific sites not already identified in the brief. 3.Temporary commissions that enable ongoing, dialogue, through artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; projects between the artist communities, residents, the visitor and the ongoing development of the area. These projects may be temporary objects or events. To ensure the area can act as a robust host for these commissions the HW/FI Factory Town Improvements will identify the most appropriate locations as host sites and ensure these have an infrastructure of power, access to water and are able to be licensed.

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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


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Engagement strategy


1.8 ENGAGEMENT STRATEGY - Two way traffic between proposed and existing

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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


The engagement strategy acknowledges that sustainable and accurate improvements to the physical environment must be made in dialogue with existing local networks and individuals. The engagement process will establish collaborative processes with organizations, individuals and businesses that are already active within their own communities; Initial research has identified the large number of community groups, cultural organizations and representatives from the residential and business community which are established expressly to take advantage of new â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Olympicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; opportunity and which also actively oppose moves that are seen as negative or not in the interest of the resident population.

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Engagement strategy


Initial conversations with individuals and representatives of theses groups has informed the engagement plan which will be delivered through the following initiatives.

1. Partnering and supporting existing ‘socially engaged’ art projects and practice as a means of accessing communities. 2. Partnering with and supporting the long-term delivery of the Hackney Wick and Hackney Wicked Festivals. 3. Collaborating with ‘grass route’ horticultural groups who are investing in the upkeep of green space 4. Supporting the ‘social’ ambitions of private developers and the business community 5. Partnering with RSL in the delivery and maintenance of public space linked to housing provision, and where possible linking investment in public space to existing resident outreach projects in particular those with a focus on young people. 6. Made in Hackney Wick and Fish Island; working with local business to ensure investment in the public realm supports the ongoing viability of the business community, and where possible materials and services are procured locally and local supply chains are established and supported.

These initiatives are described in more detail on the following pages.

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1.Supporting ‘socially engaged’ arts practice as a means of accessing communities. The promotion of ‘socially engaged’ arts practice is as an opportunity to bridge the often-perceived gap between the studio based artists and their neighbouring residential communities and as a means of widening participation in the arts.

Trowbridge Senior Citizens Centre collaborate with the Wick Curiosity Shop

Organisations such as SPACE and Public Works have a successful track record of supporting collaboration between artists and residents, as a means of expanding opportuniy and supporting communities to explore issues within their immediate urban environment. SPACE and Newlon Fusions commissed artist Lucy Harrison to work with residents of Buxhall Cresent, the resulting publication the ‘Buxhall Bee’ documented life at Buxhall Cresent. During the 10 month project Lucy identified a lack of provision for young people and observed how the play space designed in …had been outgrown by the majority of families living on the estate. Participative practice should be understood as a viable means of engaging communities in a dialogue about the use of public and semi-public space, and the undetermined and unexpected outcomes from creative practice used to inform planning decisions.

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Engagement strategy


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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


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Engagement strategy


es: Home Grown

4. Supporting the ‘social’ ambitions of private developers and the business community Principles: Home Grown Hackney Wick & Fish Island has unique development potential due to the significant quantity of undeveloped and brownfield land in private ownership. It is evident that a large number of active businesses, many of who have The business will have to move, the scale of our freight isn’t compatible with the changing area, but significant land holdings are intending toaclose or relocate I’m determined to leave positive legacy, which is beginning with the commissioning of a non-resimooring at the back of our site and the purchase of a canal barge for community / creative in favour of selling land fordential redevelopment. projects delivered in partnership with Emergency Exit Arts. Michael Spinks Essex Flour & Grain The scale and grain of ‘permitted’ development will significantly alter land use in Hackney Wick and Fish Island, particularly in areas characterized by low-density buildings and industrial yards. “The business will have to

The business will have to move, the scale of our fr

It is recognized that new developments (some of which I’m determined move, thetoscale of our freight leave a positive legacy, which is mooring at the back of our could be at the scale of a city block) will have a significantdential isn’t compatible with thesite and the pu projects delivered in partnership with Emergency E impact on the public realm in the long-term. changing area, but I’m determined to leave a positive

The principles set out in the design code should be used to inform planning decisions where private development interfaces with public space to ensure a coherent approach to design.

legacy which is beginning with the commissioning of a non-residential mooring at the back of our site and the purchase of a canal barge for community / creative projects in partnership with Emergency Exit Arts.” Michael Spinks Essex Floor and Grain.

I’m keen to develop the site so that ground floor use can support the development of creative business. There is room for a more commercial strand to the cultural activity in this area, a modern development would be an opportunity to bring something like this top the area. Lance Forman Formans Fish Island.

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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


Working with private developers (and businesses with long term investment in the area) should be recognized as central to the sustainable development of high quality architecture that supports an active mix of use. So that: • Increase’s in residential density are supported by adequate social provision and employment opportunity • Where possible existing workspace and employment opportunities are retained in mixed - use developments. • Further increase in inadequate B1 provision on the ground floor of developments is avoided. • The expansion of a sustainable business sector in line with the ambitions of for ‘Green Enterprise District’ A concept for East London, is supported rather than deterred by housing development • The work of the cultural sector is integrated into wider development objectives. • S106 funding is used to develop ‘cultural infrastructure’ rather than spent on one off arts commissions (see public art strategy) A number of other opportunities to work closely with private developers and businesses with a long-term commitment to remaining in the area have been scoped as part of the ‘Hackney wick and Fish Island Public Realm Improvement Strategy’. Testing the deliverability of these projects during the development of detail design will inform an approach to engaging with private developers in Hackney Wick & Fish Island in the Long term. • Essex Floor & Grain / Lee Conservancy Road underpass • Forman’s Fish Island / Host Space • Oslo House / Public realm • Lord Napier Pub / Hub development. A precedent of the integration of private development with public realm objectives is the St Mary of Eton’s church development.

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Engagement strategy


5. Partnering with RSL and Resident Organisations There is a complex mix of housing ownership across HWFI, particularly in Hackney Wick North, the area with the largest concentration of social housing tenants, leasehold and freehold properties. The green and open spaces within housing provision, walking routes through estates, and spaces owned by housing that front onto the street make a significant contribution to the public realm. Working with RSL, local authority agencies, and private housing providers has been identified as significant to the delivery of high quality public and semi-public space. (See Map) In a number of situations in Hackney Wick North, RSL have responsibility for the upkeep of areas of the public highway, in these instances a high level of ‘buy in’ for public realm improvements needs to be assured particularly if there are long term maintenance implications. The social remit of housing providers extends beyond the maintenance of housing stock to outreach programs that aim to facilitate vulnerable members of the community to live more independent lives; offering training for vulnerable adults and young people, youth provision / work experience, and support for the work of TRA’s and residents forums.

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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


Partnering with housing providers and the networks of tenants and residents they represent should be understood as an opportunity to: • Develop a comprehensive understanding of housing needs in the area. • Facilitate community involvement in the use of green space, via SLA and alternative maintenance arrangements • Increase opportunities and the provision of amenity for young people.

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6. Made In Hackney Wick and Fish Island There are over two hundred businesses working in Hackney Wick and Fish Island and 650+ studio based practitioners. Commercial business, social enterprise, and the cultural sector are significant contributors to the character and use of public and semi-public space. (Map 1: depicts the spatial distribution of business in HW/FI.) The area South of Hackney Wick Station (in LBTH) has a unique spatial typology made up of active and ex-industrial warehousing and yards. The majority of the older building stock (within the two conservation areas) has been appropriated by the cultural industries and house studio space. The remaining mix of lower grade industrial buildings and brownfield land is occupied by light industry and recycling, manufacturing and distribution companies, the proximity of the A12 and access to a wider road network is also a factor for the location of business in this area. It is recognized that the release of ‘Strategic Industrial Land’ in Fish Island will result in an increase in housing and the development of a ‘mixed used’ urban area in the long term. Ahead of these changes, this document sets out to recognize the significance of business sector to both the spatial character and economic viability of Hackney Wick and Fish Island and its neighboring communities. And to considers how the treatment of the public realm can, both enable the diversification of the area, and retain opportunities for the expansion of a sustainable business sector, in line with strategic ambitions for East London.

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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


Engaging with Business: • The business community should be recognized as significant stakeholders in discussions about the delivery of mix-used development in Hackney Wick and Fish Island. • The Cultural Interest Group should be recognized as a viable route to access the business community. The CIG is representative of how the business community is evolving with the expansion of the creative sector. The chair of the now disbanded ‘Fish Island Business Club’ sits on this group to represent the interest of the longer standing businesses in the area.

Made In • Where possible materials should be locally sourced and designers and fabricators based in Hackney Wick and Fish Island should be supported to contract for work linked to the delivery of public realm projects. • Working with local businesses should be understood as an opportunity to make visible the resource of local materials and skills and celebrate the role light industry plays in forming the character and identity of the area.

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Engagement strategy


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page 120

Appendix


PART 3: APPENDIX

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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance


page 122

Appendix


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LTGDC Strategic Connections

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Hackney Wick & Fish Island Design Guidance

Exception is the Norm  
Exception is the Norm