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The President’s Annual Report, 2016–17

The President’s Annual Report, 2016–17


University University President President Dr. Sidney A. Dr. Sidney A. McPhee McPhee

Executive Assistant to the President Executive Assistant to the President and Chief of Staff Kimberly S. Edgar Ms. Kimberly S. Edgar Dr. Mark Byrnes University Provost Mr. William J. Bales Vice President for University Advancement Mr. Andrew Oppmann Vice President for Marketing and Communications Mr. Bruce Petryshak Vice President for Information Technology and Chief Information Officer Dr. Debra Sells Vice President for Student Affairs and Vice Provost for Enrollment and Academic Services Mr. Alan Thomas Vice President for Business and Finance

TABLE OF CONTENTS MTSU At A Glance 2 Introduction 4 Student Success 6 Veterans and Military 10 University College 12 Admissions 13 Faculty 16 Athletics 18 Programs 20 Experiential Learning 22 Graduate Studies and Research 24

Facilities 28 International Relations 30 University Advancement 32 University Partnerships 34 Accolades 36 University Impact 38 MTSU Board of Trustees 40 Conclusion 45 By the Numbers 46 Financial Information 60


Board of Trustees Mr. W. Andrew Adams Chair, National Health Investors

OF CONTENTS Mr.TABLE J.B. Baker Owner and CEO, Sprint Logistics MTSU At A Glance 2 Mr.Introduction 4 Pete DeLay Executive, Forterra Building Products 6 Student Success Veterans and Military 10 Mr.University Darrell Freeman College Sr., Vice Chair 12 Founder, Zycron Inc. Admissions 13 Faculty 16 Mr.Athletics 18 Joey A. Jacobs Chair and CEO, Acadia Healthcare Programs 20

Experiential Learning 22 Ms. Christine Karbowiak Graduate Studies and Research 24 Executive Vice President, Chief Facilities 28 Administrative and Chief Risk 30 Officer, International Officer, Relations Bridgestone University Americas Advancement 32 University Partnerships 34 Mr.Accolades 36 Stephen B. Smith, Chair Chair, Haury and Smith Contractors 38 University Impact

MTSU's Board of Trustees 40 Ms. Pamela J. Wright Conclusion 44 Founder, Wright Travel Financial Information 46 Dr. Tony Johnston, Faculty Representative ​Professor, School of Agribusiness and Agriscience Ms. Lindsey Pierce Weaver, Student Representative Master’s Candidate, Administration and Supervision


MTSU AT A GLANCE

Founded September 11, 1911, at the geographic center of Tennessee, Middle Tennessee State University is proud of its more than 100-year commitment to academic excellence and student success. Starting out as a teacher training institution, MTSU today is a major comprehensive university accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges. The University is composed of eight undergraduate colleges offering 41 departments/schools and more than 140 majors/degree programs. MTSU houses a wide variety of nationally recognized academic degree programs at the baccalaureate, master’s, and doctoral levels. The College of Graduate Studies offers 90 master's and specialist's programs and nine doctoral degrees. The second largest university in Tennessee, MTSU is a comprehensive, Carnegie Doctoral-Research Intensive institution, with the largest student enrollment among the six locally governed institutions (LGIs). We currently enroll approximately 22,000 students, with 90 percent being from the state. We serve students from every county in the state, as well as students from 44 states and 77 foreign countries. Our international students are an important contributor to the educational, social, and cultural diversity of our campus, AND they typically pay full out-of-state tuition and fees. In all, our student body represents some of the state’s best and brightest, as evidenced by the recorded average GPA and ACT scores of our freshman class this fall and by the fact that more than

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70 percent of our incoming first-year students qualified for the Hope Scholarship. This is the direct result of our focus on quality and student success. We recognize, though, that our mission isn’t just about serving the highest achievers. It is about providing an education to all Tennesseans. We are extremely proud that we continue to serve many of the state’s first-generation students, as roughly 40 percent of our undergraduates are the first in their families to attend college. We also continue to serve the state’s most at-risk students, with more than 40 percent of our students qualifying for Pell grants or other need-based loans. MTSU is also the No. 1 choice of transfer students, military veterans, adult learners (ages 25 and up), and college students attending summer school. MTSU boasts almost 1,000 full-time faculty members and nearly 3,000 full- and part-time employees. Located on a 550-acre campus, MTSU is really the equivalent of a mid-size city. The University is among the largest employers in the Nashville metropolitan statistical area and has an estimated regional economic impact in excess of $1.1 billion annually. MTSU is the largest supplier of college-degreed workers in the mid-state, providing the vibrant Music City economy and workforce with more graduates than all other local universities combined (approximately 4,000 each year). According to the Business and Economic Research Center at MTSU, one in every five college-educated individuals in the Nashville area is an MTSU graduate. This annual president’s report is intended to celebrate the exciting advances and achievements that the University’s collective efforts have produced over the past academic year.


MTSU AT A GLANCE

2016–17 Bachelor's Degrees Awarded 4,137

MTSU

3,101

2,326

ETSU

U of M

2,116

TTU

1,564

APSU

Introduction A C

A

140

1,065

D E M

I

C

+ DEGREE

S

PROGRAMS

in our 8 undergraduate colleges

TSU

Source: State of Tennessee

$

200M

IN FINANCIAL AID AND SCHOLARSHIPS

Pell-Eligible Enrollment (Fall 2016) 11,241

MTSU

10,253

U of M 5,926

ETSU APSU TTU TSU

5,558 4,619 4,267

Source: 2016–17 Tennessee Higher Eduction (THEC) Fact Book

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STUDENT TO FACULTY RATIO

Adult Undergraduate Enrollment (Fall 2016) 4,172

MTSU 732

U of M

2,869

APSU

2,164

ETSU TSU TTU

4,024

1,831 1,060

Source: 2016–17 Tennessee Higher Eduction (THEC) Fact Book

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INTRODUCTION

True Blue Outlook The statistics presented on the previous pages clearly bear out that from its humble beginnings as a normal school established to train teachers, MTSU has experienced significant growth and has become a key component of middle Tennessee’s education and economic engine. Importantly, as the University has grown in size and prominence through the years, it has never lost its small college feel, and MTSU has accomplished that distinction through its unwavering commitment to students. By ever seeking to provide a supportive learning environment, the finest faculty, and a learning experience as personal and unique as its graduate and undergraduate student populations, MTSU has emerged as the institution of choice for the region’s top scholars and athletes. Said another way, MTSU has not just grown in quantity but, more importantly, in quality. Grounded in outstanding tradition, MTSU now faces a future that has never been brighter. This annual presidential report covering the 2016–17 academic and fiscal year is intended to celebrate the exciting advances and achievements that the University’s collective efforts have produced over the past year. As a valued MTSU stakeholder, thank you for taking stock of the accomplishments of the past and the promise of the future at MTSU. Now in my 17th year as MTSU’s president, I have never been prouder of the work being accomplished by the University and the achievements of our student body. Sincerely,

Dr. Sidney A. McPhee President, MTSU

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INTRODUCTION

I have never been prouder of the work being accomplished by the University and the achievements of our student body.

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STUDENT SUCCESS

Continuing the Quest MTSU’s greatest success lies in the important work being performed on a day-by-day basis by our faculty and staff to ensure that all MTSU students get the attention they each deserve on their path to earning a degree. Our unwavering focus on individual student success (meaning retention and graduation) is what will make us a successful institution today, tomorrow, and in the future. My focus every day is to shepherd University-wide efforts that provide continuous support to help students overcome obstacles, stay enrolled in classes, and earn college degrees. These students are our responsibility, and we work hard every day to discover and develop new and innovative ways to help them be successful. A few years ago, I announced a major initiative—the MTSU Quest for Student Success—designed to ensure that all students who come to MTSU with the drive to achieve would be met with the best instruction from excellent professors who care about their success. As part of the Quest, University faculty and staff members also have become more flexible to provide extra support and assistance when our students encounter unexpected difficulties or when roadblocks arise that negatively affect their persistence toward graduation. By doing so, we have created a culture of high expectations coupled with personal attention when students struggle inside or outside the classroom. As a result of this transformation, we have been recognized nationally as a leader in creating a new model for higher education. Since launching the Quest, we have made tremendous strides in helping our students stay enrolled and on a clear path to earning a degree. 6

Here are some major highlights of our student success initiatives from 2016–17. • Our full-time freshman retention rate increased to 76.1 percent for the Fall 2016 semester, up from 68.7 percent for Fall 2013. This increase represented the fastest rate of increase in the history of the institution. This also represented the highest freshman retention rate in the history of MTSU, based on available data. • The new transfer student retention rate rose to 73.8 percent, an increase of 4.7 percent in the same three-year period. • Our sophomore retention rate increased to 80.6 percent, up 3.1 percent between the Fall 2013 and Fall 2016 semesters. • MTSU has built a sterling reputation within the higher education community nationwide as among the best and most innovative in this space. Representatives from the Lumina Foundation, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and Community College Resource Center at Columbia University, among others, have made visits to study our efforts and results.

We have created a culture of high expectations coupled with personal attention.

• In fact, MTSU was invited to join 44 other leading universities from across the country to participate in the Re-Imagining the First Year initiative Fall 2016. This initiative, sponsored by the American Association of State Colleges and Universities


STUDENT SUCCESS

Scholars Academy group photo on the stairs of Kirksey Old Main

with support from the Gates Foundation, seeks to increase student success rates by focusing on improving students’ first-year experience. • In Summer 2016, a record 312 new students participated in our Scholars Academy, a two-week summer bridge, early-arrival program designed to enhance the success of at-risk students. The average retention rate for MTSU students who went through the Scholars Academy is 83 percent, well above that for other students. In addition, 54 percent of students in our Scholars Academy completed at least 30 hours in their first year of study, a rate that surpasses that of other students. • Free tutoring was available during Fall 2016 for more than 200 courses, a record level of support here at MTSU. More importantly, more of our students are going for tutoring and spending more hours in tutoring sessions, with tutoring usage in the first semester (almost 9,000 hours) surpassing that of all the previous year. In Spring 2017, the total number of tutoring sessions increased by an astounding 64 percent compared to Spring 2016. The number of hours spent by students in those tutoring

The average retention rate for MTSU students who went through the Scholars Academy is 83 percent.

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STUDENT SUCCESS

sessions rose by 67 percent from Spring 2016 to Spring 2017 to nearly 10,000 total hours—an increase of almost 4,000 hours over the previous spring. • We also implemented a Supplemental Instruction pilot program starting in Fall 2016, providing students enrolled in some of MTSU’s most challenging courses with additional instructional support. This involved 21 course sections, across three colleges, and served more than 1,500 students. The program is already showing very promising results. Students who attend SI study sessions have significantly higher exam and course grades than students who do not. By Fall 2017, SI was offered in more than 70 course sections across 13 courses in eight departments and five colleges. • In March 2016, we launched a campus student information and analytics system, an important tool used by multiple campus partners in their work with current MTSU students. This powerful technology platform, developed and supported by EAB, allows for outreach campaigns—like getting students enrolled for the upcoming semester—that produced significant gains in our persistence rates, as well as generated additional tuition and fees.

Supplemental Instruction session

• MTSU’s REBOUND program has been nationally recognized as a “model of excellence” for work to “re-position” freshmen who conclude the first semester with less than a 2.0 GPA. Our students who participate in the program retain at significantly higher levels than students who do not. • Academic advisors from across the University continue to do amazing work and are crucial to student success efforts. On their own initiative, and led by advising managers Brelinda Johnson Brelinda Johnson

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Eric Miller


STUDENT SUCCESS

and Eric Miller, MTSU academic advisors hosted the third annual NACADA State Drive In on May 8. With a theme of “Culture of Engagement: Strategies for Aiding Advisors, Faculty, Staff, and Students to Be True to Themselves,” the conference attracted over 150 attendees representing 20 community colleges and universities across the state, as well as Alabama. Mike Krause, the Tennessee Higher Education Commission executive director, gave the keynote on the future of higher education in the state. Our Advisor Professional Development Committee also has evolved and completed important work. Under the leadership of chair Amber Bollinger and assistant chair Janae Daniels, the committee has thoughtfully and carefully planned a coordinated series of training and professional development activities for 2017–18. • MTSU is one of five institutions featured by the Association of Public and Land Grant Universities (APLU) in the SMART training program. APLU recently launched an online educational resource, “A SMART Approach to Student Success,” to provide educational leaders across the country an opportunity to learn from peer colleges and universities that have flourished in their student success initiatives. More than a dozen interviews with MTSU administrators, faculty, and staff are included in the training program. MTSU also was one of 12 institutions recognized by APLU for its use of data to improve student success outcomes. Additionally, University College Dean Rick Sluder was recently identified by Ellucian as one of 20 experts in higher education in using technology to change institutional operations. The work of MTSU is featured in Ellucian’s e-book The Future of Higher Education: Experts Share Insights about Technologies That Will Transform Your Institution.

Rick Sluder, University College Dean

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VETERANS AND MILITARY

Transitioning Home One stellar example of MTSU’s focus on student success targets a very special group of adult learners, a student population we all admire and respect—student veterans. MTSU has a long and proud tradition of aiding veterans in their transition from military service to civilian life. I am extremely proud that MTSU has been recognized year after year by national publications such as Military Times and G.I. Jobs magazine as being one of the top universities in the U.S. for veteran education.

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee, First Lady Elizabeth McPhee, Hazel and Charlie Daniels, and Lt. Gen. Keith Huber, senior advisor for veterans and leadership initiatives

In 2011, MTSU became the first institution of higher education in the state (and one of the first in the country) to partner with the Veterans Affairs' new VetSuccess on Campus program. More recently, the creation of the Charlie and Hazel Daniels Veterans and Military Family Center on campus has made MTSU a national model for military friendliness on college campuses.

MTSU’s support of student veterans has touched the hearts of many who wish to do their part to support this student population as well. The Journey Home Project, co-founded by Daniels, has donated generously on multiple occasions to the center, which is now named in honor of the country music legend and his wife.

The most comprehensive veterans and military family center at a university in Tennessee, the Daniels Center provides one-stop service and support for the more than 1,000 student veterans and their family members at MTSU. Everything our student veterans need to succeed is available in this single location, from scheduling courses and completing government paperwork to getting questions answered about benefits and finding employment opportunities.

In 2016–17, the next step in making MTSU America’s most military-friendly college was expansion of the Daniels Center to allow the center to match veterans with prospective employers. Mike Krause, executive director of the Tennessee Higher Education Commission and a veteran himself, called the development “another tangible step by MTSU to support our veterans and military-connected students. . . . MTSU’s efforts are an example to the rest of the nation.” Now that’s true red, white, and blue!

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VETERANS AND MILITARY

Soldier Scholars Jessica Green and Joel Whitehead

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UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

Lifelong Learners Military veterans aren’t the only adult or nontraditional students benefiting from student success efforts at MTSU. Other key MTSU initiatives related to adult degree-seekers include: • The Adult Degree Completion Program. This flexible, customizable program was created for working adults who need to finish a bachelor's degree to get ahead in their career. It offers college credit for prior knowledge and experience. • Graduate MT program. MTSU actively seeks out former students who possess 90 or more credit hours, contacts them personally, and then works with them on a plan to finish college. As a result, for the Fall 2016 semester there were 193 students who came back to MTSU and were working to finish their undergraduate degrees. • Workforce education initiatives. MTSU has carved out dozens of partnerships with industry aimed at improving the education level of our state’s workforce (more on that in a discussion of University partnerships later in the report). The result of these specific efforts is that MTSU is the state’s clear leader in the education of adult students. According to the governor’s office, there are approximately 940,000 adult Tennesseans who have some college credit but haven’t earned an associate’s or four-year degree. This clearly positions MTSU as a pivotal player in the governor’s plan to have 55 percent of all Tennesseans possess a postsecondary degree or credential. This simply will not happen unless we engage the adult population.

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This clearly positions MTSU as a pivotal player in the governor’s plan to have 55 percent of all Tennesseans possess a postsecondary degree or credential.


ADMISSIONS

Recruiting the Best and the Brightest Several bold admissions initiatives geared toward more traditional students have been keys to our ongoing efforts to both sustain our operations and fuel our plans for growth. Here are some admissions-related highlights from 2016–17.

True Blue Tour Attendance for the Fall 2016 True Blue Tour increased more than 45 percent for students and nearly 100 percent for school counselors and community college staff! Those are remarkable percentage increases nearly unheard of in college admissions circles. Admissions staff traveled more than 64,000 miles to share opportunities at MTSU with prospective students and their families throughout Tennessee and in Alabama, Georgia, and Kentucky. University department representatives, advisors, deans, administrators, and student leaders are on hand at these tour stops to present information about admissions, scholarships, financial aid, and academic programs. Prospective students often say they are impressed that so many top University administrators took the time to travel in order to bring information closer to their home. This is a wonderful opportunity for prospective students and their parents to hear firsthand from MTSU representatives in their own backyards. This is also a prime opportunity to explain the unique educational experience MTSU offers.

Take a Closer Look The most influential recruitment activity impacting a student’s decision to enroll at an institution is the campus visit. We have had more than 17,000 students and guests join us for the new Campus 13


ADMISSIONS

Tour Experience. Admissions added live music by our very own singer-songwriting students and a full campus multimedia presentation to our walking tour of campus that includes housing visits. Prospective students are greeted to a warm “True Blue Welcome” as they walk through campus now that they are identifiable as visitors by the blue information bags they use to carry MTSU materials. Encourage any high school or transferring student you may know to “Take a Closer Look” with our new Campus Tour Experience!

Better Students, Better Outcomes We are committed to recruiting higher-ability students. For instance, in Fall 2016, MTSU’s incoming freshmen had averages of a 3.44 GPA (compared to 3.28 in 2011) and a 22.4 ACT test score (up from 21.9 in 2011). In addition, the University turned our hard work in 2016–17 into enrollment gains this fall. Overall, Fall 2017 applications increased 15.6 percent for freshmen over the previous year, 7.2 percent for transfers, and 12.5 percent overall. Admissions based upon those applications also were up over last year, with freshman admits showing a 3.8 increase, transfer admits up 3.5 percent, and overall admits rising 2 percent. Gains in applications and admissions included a 21 percent increase in out-of-state applicants and a 12 percent increase from Williamson County. MTSU’s dual enrollment initiative also continues to expand, serving hundreds of Tennessee students. In the Fall 2014 semester, only about 30 high school students were registered in MTSU dual enrollment courses. By Fall 2015, a total of 564 students took part in MTSU dual enrollment courses, and for the Fall 2016 semester a record 674 high school students were dual-enrolled at MTSU. We have formed collaborations with 14 high schools, and we continue work to increase the number of schools and students served.

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We had more than 17,000 students and guests join us for the new Campus Tour Experience.


ADMISSIONS

Freshman admits up 3.8%

Transfer admits up 3.5%

Overall admits up 2%

Fall 2017 freshman applications increased 15.6%

Fall 2017 transfer applications were up 7.2%

Fall 2017 overall applications rose 12.5%

Fall 2017 out-of-state applications were up 21%

Fall 2017 Williamson County applications rose 12% 15


FACULTY

Those Who Can, Teach Exceptional students, whether they are student veterans, adult learners, or traditional students, deserve exceptional faculty. As part of our commitment to quality—and our commitment to student success —MTSU provides students the opportunity to interact with and be guided by some of the nation’s leading educators and practitioners. Here are some examples of faculty A Proper Homecoming members at MTSU who achieved MTSU experts spearheaded the effort to deserved recognition during 2016–17.

Exceptional students deserve exceptional faculty.

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return Mexican-American War remains with Volunteer State ties to the U.S. With dignified precision befitting the honors due to fallen American soldiers, as many as 13 skeletal remains unearthed from what was a Mexican war battlefield 170 years ago were welcomed home to the U.S. Dover Air Force Base in Delaware on Sept. 28, 2016. The solemn movement of the two flag-draped transfer cases, believed to contain members of the Tennessee militia who died in the Battle for Monterrey in 1848, was the culmination of more than five years of diplomatic negotiation, sparked by the urging of an MTSU Anthropology professor. That professor,

Hugh Berryman, director of MTSU's Forensic Institute for Research and Education, stood on the flight line at the home to the Air Force Mortuary Affairs Operations and the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System to witness the transfer of the remains from the Army C-12 aircraft and to pay his respects. Berryman is now leading a team of MTSU professors, including Shannon Hodge, a bio-archaeologist with a specialty in paleopathology, and Derek Frisby, a military historian in Global Studies, along with experts from other academic institutions who have volunteered to assist the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System in the historical, bio-archaeological, and forensic analysis of the remains.


FACULTY

Far left: Members of the U.S. military conduct the “solemn movement” of a flag-draped transfer case containing skeletal remains unearthed from what was a Mexican battlefield. Center left is retired Lt. Gen. Keith M. Huber, MTSU’s senior advisor for veterans and leadership initiatives. Near left: Hugh Berryman speaks to media at Dover Air Force Base, Delaware. Behind him are U.S. Rep. Diane Black and MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee.

Defending Rights Two MTSU educators were appointed to the Tennessee Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. Amy Sayward, professor of History, and Sekou Franklin, associate professor of Political Science and International Relations, were announced as members in the summer of 2016. The commission is an independent, bipartisan agency with the mission of informing the development of national civil rights policy and enhancing enforcement of federal civil rights laws. State advisory committees to the commission are responsible for reports and recommendations on state and local civil rights issues in their areas, including—but not limited to—justice, voting, discrimination, housing, and education.

Amy Sayward

Sekou Franklin

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ATHLETICS

Building Champions MTSU’s ongoing athletics ascension is meteoric, to say the least. Our men’s basketball team cracked the Top 25 national ranking in the 2016–17 season and enjoyed another fantastic run in the NCAA Tournament, winning a firstround game for the second straight year and elevating MTSU to the level of a national brand. In addition, our football teams have been bowleligible eight out of the last 11 years including the 2016 Hawai‘i Bowl. But there’s more. As just one example, women’s golf recently followed up its three straight Conference USA titles with an individual championship by Jenna Burris and a runner-up team finish. Importantly, MT Athletics continues to experience unprecedented success academically as well. The department reached an all-time high for the 2015–16 school year with a score of 988 out of 1,000 on the NCAA’s Academic Progress Rate (APR). When the NCAA’s Academic Progress Report (APR) first came out about a decade ago, MTSU was almost dead last on the list in terms of studentathletes staying eligible and moving toward graduation. However, by employing many of the methods now being used campuswide at MTSU to improve student success (such as more proactive advising), MTSU athletics climbed from worst in the nation to the model program it is today. These days, when the APR ratings come out, the top 10 programs in the nation include names like Stanford, Notre Dame, Vanderbilt, and, yes, MTSU. Now those are statistics worth crowing about!

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ATHLETICS

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PROGRAMS

Getting with the Programs Several academic programs give MTSU national name recognition, either due to the quality of the faculty and/or the nature of the program. Such programs are at the heart of student success, providing a world-class education that in many cases cannot be achieved anywhere else in the nation or world. MTSU’s newest degree programs and majors match student curricula with real-world preparedness. MTSU now offers the only Bachelor of Science degree in Dance at a public university in Tennessee. The new Religious Studies major is the first for a public university in middle Tennessee. MTSU is one of just two universities in the state offering a major in Japanese. And MTSU’s Media Arts Department recently elevated studies in Interactive Media, Video and Film Production, and Animation from concentration to degree status. MTSU also now boasts the first Africana Studies major in the middle Tennessee region. Roughly 20 percent of MTSU’s student population identify as African-American, yet prior to the program’s introduction there was no degree program that studied people of the African diaspora. Also, MTSU’s Concrete Industry Management degree, the nation’s first, merged in December 2016 with the Construction Management program to form the new School of Concrete and Construction Management. MTSU is the only university in the state offering programs in this area under a stand-alone department.

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PROGRAMS

Not-So-Strange Brew One new academic program at MTSU grabbed national attention in 2016–17. The new Fermentation Science major is the first degree program of its type in Tennessee and is rare in the 15-state Southern Regional Education Board’s Academic Common Market. The nearest universities offering similar coursework are Appalachian State in North Carolina, Eastern Kentucky in Kentucky, and Auburn in Alabama. Amidst a growing national trend toward bolder, flavored food and drink, MTSU launched the Fermentation Science degree. For the most part, academia had yet to respond to game-changing trends redefining the multi-billion-dollar fermentation industry across the country—specifically the brewing industry highlighted by craft beers and small-batch brewing. Importantly, this new degree goes beyond just fermenting hops and barley—key ingredients in brewing beer—to any and all fermented foods and beverages. There are many ways the new Fermentation Science program will closely align with Tennessee’s workforce development agenda. Graduates of the program will have the opportunity go to work in a variety of positions for major manufacturers operating in middle Tennessee, including General Mills (home of Yoplait, the largest manufacturer of yogurt in the nation), Kroger (Dairy Division), Brown-Forman (Jack Daniel’s), and Diageo (George Dickel), as well as an ever-increasing number of locally owned and operated fermented food producers. Statewide, the latter includes at least 28 other distilleries, 52 breweries, 60 wineries, and 10 cheesemaking operations. The local and regional area will no doubt benefit economically from MTSU’s new role in producing graduates with specialized chemistry, biology, business, marketing, and entrepreneurial training ready to sustain and advance the industry.

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EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING

Hands-on Learning Experiential learning (EXL) gives students practical experience in real-world environments related to their fields of study. MTSU excels in this area and is nationally recognized for it. The idea is to engage students directly in public service and offer them experience beyond textbooks and lectures. That equates to student success. At MTSU, more than 200 courses are now approved as EXL courses. Examples abound. For instance, 2017 marked the fourth consecutive year that MTSU deployed a team of multimedia students to cover the Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival during the June international event in nearby Manchester, Tennessee. Each year of the unique partnership between Bonnaroo and MTSU’s College of Media and Entertainment is a fresh opportunity for students to gain valuable on-the-job experience in one of the world’s top live music venues. A contingent of about 50 students, faculty, and staff worked on the 700-acre farm that serves as grounds for the four-day festival. MTSU Journalism students covered major music acts; a broadcast-style student production team captured audio and video of performances using MTSU’s state-of-the-art, $1.7 million Mobile Production Lab; and a student multimedia reporting team generated story, photographic, and video coverage of Bonnaroo for area media outlets such as The Tennessean and USA Today Network sites throughout Tennessee, including the Daily News Journal. Most of the participating students were enrolled in credit-bearing courses based upon their Bonnaroo experiences.

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EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING Students from AMP and other organizations who helped put on the MT Engagefest event, with faculty advisor Dr. Amy Macy (far right)

Fully Engaged During this reporting period, the University unveiled MT Engage, its next Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP) to improve student learning through enhancing the curriculum. The five-year initiative, a requirement by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC), the regional accreditation body for higher education institutions in the South, affects the entire campus. MT Engage follows the popular Experiential Learning (EXL) program, which emphasizes learning that takes place beyond the traditional classroom. With a motto of “engage academically, learn exponentially, showcase yourself,� MT Engage encourages students to not only think in a more integrative way about their academics but to reflect on their experiences inside and outside of the classroom from the time they set foot on campus. This provides them with the tools they need to not only be successful graduates, but also be successful citizens of their communities.

Student Joaquin Jesus Salcedo San Martin networks with professional Christine Summers at the Jones College of Business MT Engage first impressions sales workshop in the Student Union Ballroom.

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GRADUATE STUDIES AND RESEARCH

Building a Better Model Increasing graduate student enrollment helps strengthen MTSU’s position as a publicly funded research university; enhances MTSU’s reputation as a research institution from both faculty and students’ points of view; meets market need for a more educated workforce in Tennessee, within the region, and across the nation; and increases revenue from both tuition and fees and the state funding formula. In the name of greater student success, we are working hard to recruit students to existing graduate programs with capacity, as well as develop new graduate programs. MTSU made an important transition recently. As of July 2016, we are no longer considered a PUI (Predominantly Undergraduate Institution) by the National Science Foundation (NSF). The qualification is based on the number of Ph.D. degrees conferred during the previous two years—an important indicator of the growth in our graduate education and sponsored programs. MTSU is also ramping up research efforts at a rapid pace. During fiscal year 2016–17, MTSU faculty and administrators received 59 new grants and contracts for externally funded research, service, and instructional activity, with a cumulative lifetime award value of $9,646,774. Our total portfolio value for all 187 awards that were active during the year was $31,835,888. The following are just three examples of important research taking place at MTSU during 2016–17.

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GRADUATE STUDIES AND RESEARCH

Game Changer

Crystal Clear

MTSU and Tennessee Tech student and faculty researchers, including MTSU Professor Mary Farone, discovered two new species of bacteria found in a cooling tower and hot tub in Putnam County. The discovery may provide clues to new pathways of disease and treatment, according to the lead scientists, whose nearly 20-year research endeavor has been published in Genome Announcements (January 2016) and the International Journal of Systematic Microbiology (February 2016). With nearly $1 million in U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant funding, more than a dozen MTSU grad and undergraduate students assisted with the research in on-campus laboratories and locations where bacteria samples were collected.

A novel partnership between MTSU and the Centre of Molecular and Macromolecular Studies at the Polish Academy of Sciences is allowing MTSU undergraduate students to interact daily with European scientists as the students conduct National Science Foundation-funded research on liquid crystals. Liquid crystals are fluids that are the basis of modern display technology, commonly known as LCD technology, which is found in many flat screen TVs. This research addresses the chemistry of boron clusters while contributing to the understanding of the physics of liquid crystal phases. It also produces materials of interest for LCD applications. Research performed by MTSU undergraduates benefits from constant technical help from established scientists. Several scientists visited in 2016–17 from the Polish Academy of Sciences, which is similar to an American national laboratory such as Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In the program’s first year, five MTSU undergraduate Chemistry and Biochemistry students worked on group research projects. The international component works both ways. Each summer, an MTSU undergraduate researcher now has the opportunity to travel to Lodz, Poland, to work with Polish Academy of Science scholars. Professional Chemistry major Jake Lasseter, an Honors College student, was the visiting student in summer 2017. There are now four active NSF Research in Undergraduate Institutions projects in the MTSU Department of Chemistry, a record level of research project support for the University.

Professors Sharon Berk (center) and Mary Farone (front) with graduate student Brock Arivett

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GRADUATE STUDIES AND RESEARCH

Chasing a Cure MTSU is at the forefront of breakthrough research aimed at helping treat metastatic breast cancer. Lead researcher Iris Gao, with the Tennessee Center for Botanical Medicine Research located at MTSU, spent 2016 isolating and identifying a new, patented compound, DMDD, from the root of the tropical star fruit tree that is helping treat this form of cancer. This new hope for a low-toxicity treatment for metastatic breast cancer has been reported in the prestigious research journals Scientific Reports and Oncotarget. Metastatic tumors—those that have spread to other organs—resulting from late-stage breast cancers are usually inaccessible by surgery or radiotherapy. That means there are no effective treatments, and 90 percent of cases at stage IV are fatal. The center at MTSU and the Guangxi Botanical Garden of Medicinal Plants in Nanning, China, which have an exclusive collaborative agreement, developed a novel approach to accelerate development of Western medicines from botanical extracts based on their respective strengths and

26

expertise. The Guangxi garden holds the largest depository of plants used in traditional medicine, including the tropical star fruit tree. The root of the star fruit tree has been used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat debilitating headaches for thousands of years. The discovery of this plant-derived anticancer agent resulted from the collaboration between Gao and Guangxi Medical University researcher Renbin Huang. Huang’s lab has previously studied DMDD as a robust anti-diabetic agent. Inspired by recent studies linking diabetes and breast cancer and fascinated by the fact one of the world’s top anti-diabetic drugs—metformin—can effectively treat breast cancer, Gao decided to investigate whether DMDD also could be used to fight breast cancer. Researchers from both universities demonstrated that DMDD significantly extended the life span of mice with breast tumors, shrinking not only the primary tumor but, most importantly, inhibiting the spread of the breast tumor to the lung and liver, according to the Scientific Reports article. The researchers also reported

the lack of toxicity of DMDD in mice and normal human cells. Before this publication, the Gao-led team—which includes MTSU grad students Nadin Almosnid and Hyo Sim Park—showed that DMDD suppressed a variety of human cancer cells, including breast, lung, and bone cancer cells. This earlier work was published in the Oncotarget article. Working with Guangxi, the joint studies indicate that DMDD “has significant potential as a safe and efficient therapeutic agent to treat metastatic breast cancer,” Gao said. “In contrast to toxic synthetic chemicals, medicinal plants have provided us an interesting alternative to develop efficacious and affordable anticancer drugs.” MTSU graduate student Gheda Alsaif and visiting Chinese scholar Li Chen recently joined the team. Deborah Knott, another MTSU master’s candidate, and Amy Ridings, a University Honors College undergraduate student, also have been involved in the cancer research. A grant provided by Tennessee-based Greenway Herbal Products has assisted the center’s overall research efforts since 2016.


GRADUATE STUDIES AND RESEARCH

Biology faculty member Iris Gao and her doctoral students are researching the medicinal properties of plants and their potential use in the treatment of cancer.

27


FACILITIES

Bricks and Mortar All facility planning at MTSU is done with an emphasis on students and with student success top of mind. At the top of that list for 2016–17 was the creation of the 400,000-square-foot Science Corridor of Innovation, which capped a $147 million project that included renovations unveiled in 2017 of the Davis Science Building and Wiser-Patten Science Hall, along with earlier construction of the new Science Building.

28


FACILITIES

29


INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

Building Bridges MTSU has strengthened its international initiatives both on campus and around the world. Those efforts boost student success through creating opportunities for travel, exposure to culture, and research opportunities. In recent years, MTSU has specifically increased our international undergraduate and graduate student enrollment, expanded our study abroad opportunities, and developed more faculty and student exchanges. We also have sought out and signed numerous student exchange and research collaborations with international partners. Here are just a few examples of our high levels of activity on a global scale. • D  uring 2016–17, we had 23 MTSU Signature faculty-led programs that served a total of 233 students. Approximately 70 percent of our students studying abroad participated in one of these Signature programs. Locations included Argentina, Belize, Brazil, Canada, China, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, England, Finland, France, Ireland, Israel, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, Russia, Taiwan, and Vietnam. • W  e began seeing in 2016 the culmination of our first 3+1+1 programs with Guangxi University in Nanning, China. After four years of planning and preparation by many people on campus, our new incoming Chinese student enrollment was expected to increase by 108 percent with the enrollment of this cohort. • M  TSU continued an educational exchange partnership with China’s Dongcheng Educational Group, which involves visiting

30


INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

schoolchildren, teachers, and administrators. The summer 2016 visit to China by an MTSU and Rutherford County delegation was the fifth in a series of reciprocal visits between the institutions, which continued with a return trip to Murfreesboro for the 2017–18 fiscal year. Dongcheng is an affiliate of Hangzhou Normal University, our partner in the creation and operation of the Confucius Institute on MTSU’s campus. Our partnership with Dongcheng is truly historic, perhaps the only such venture of its kind in the world that combines educational and cultural opportunities for student and teacher participants from both countries. This exchange has been recognized nationally and internationally for excellence. • R  ecording Industry Professor Mike Alleyne, who has written extensively on popular music and acted as consultant to the estate of Marvin Gaye in the “Blurred Lines” copyright infringement case, co-created the first academic conference devoted to music legend Prince. Held in May 2017 at the University of Salford in Manchester, England, Purple Reign: An Interdisciplinary Conference on the Life and Legacy of Prince paid tribute to the star, who died in April 2016. Thought to be the only conference ever dedicated solely to the Minneapolis-born funk legend, the event was hosted by Salford and its U.S. partner, MTSU. Academics from New York University, Harvard University, Stanford University, and the prestigious Smithsonian museum complex in the U.S., as well as from the University of Amsterdam and Australia, Canada, and New Zealand, came to Salford to discuss the lasting impact Prince had on popular culture.

31


UNIVERSITY ADVANCEMENT

True Blue Giving Philanthropy is the lifeblood of the University. Private gifts to the University have a transformative effect on programs and students across campus. Here are a few examples of gift-giving that made a major impact in 2016–17.

Following in Footsteps A new institute opening this fall at MTSU—the result of a gift to the University in 2016–17—will help students follow in the academic footsteps of the late MTSU graduate and Nobel laureate James Buchanan by exploring the impact of public policy on the economy. The Political Economy Research Institute, a joint venture between the Jennings A. Jones College of Business and the University Honors College, is funded by a startup grant from the Charles Koch Foundation. Buchanan (1919–2013), a Rutherford County native, 1940 graduate from then-named Middle Tennessee State Teachers College, and World War II veteran, was the 1986 recipient of the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences.

32


UNIVERSITY ADVANCEMENT

Flying High Again Students in MTSU’s Aerospace Maintenance Management program also will be taking their training to new heights thanks to Southwest Airlines’ generous donation of a turbofan airplane engine. The 4,300-pound CFM56 engine, which was used on flying aircraft, rules the skies today with regard to commercial transportation. The donation has an estimated market value of $100,000, though such engines can cost millions of dollars brand new. As a result of another Southwest-related gift in the fall of 2016, MTSU’s Aerospace students also now have access to an industryleading aviation operations management solution, WSI Fusion, in their simulation lab. Weather plays a critical role in aviation, and this state-of-the-art software (also used by Southwest Airlines) will better prepare and equip MTSU students for their future careers in aviation. The gift makes MTSU the first educational institution with the capability to use this product. The College of Basic and Applied Sciences’ Aerospace Department secured the donation of WSI Fusion from The Weather Co., an IBM Business, through an ongoing partnership with Southwest Airlines.

MTSU is the first educational institution with the capability to use this product.

33


PARTNERSHIPS

Hand in Hand Developing creative, new partnerships with government and private sector entities demonstrates MTSU’s ability to be responsive to the economic and educational needs of our state, further enhancing our value as a major contributor to Tennessee’s growing economy. University partnerships and public service initiatives also support our educational efforts and provide students with the breadth and relevance of experience needed to be successful both in college and eventually in the professional workplace. At MTSU, the concept of student success extends beyond commencement and into our graduates' professional lives. Here are just a few examples.

At MTSU, the concept of student success extends beyond commencement and into our graduates' professional lives.

34

Rubber Meets Road In 2016–17, the first group of enrollees began coursework in MTSU’s new degree program in leadership developed in concert with leading tire and rubber company Bridgestone Americas. Coordinated through MTSU’s University College, the new Applied Leadership certificate program offers adult learners already on the job a chance to earn additional job certifications—and even a bachelor’s degree—through online courses and short, intensive instruction that can be offered on-site. The program perfectly illustrates the kind of close collaborations this University embraces to fill the educational needs of a dynamic workforce environment in the 21st century. A student enrolling in the program can earn individual certificates in these four areas: leadership theory, communication and problem-solving, leading teams, and leading people and managing change. Students who obtain all four certificates—10 credit hours each for a total of 40 credit hours—and complete other general education and elective requirements can earn a Bachelor of Science in Liberal Studies with an Applied Leadership concentration.


PARTNERSHIPS

Partners in Health Leaders from Meharry Medical College and MTSU signed an agreement in June 2017 to develop an accelerated pathway for talented students to graduate as physicians to serve in rural areas of the state. State Sen. Bill Ketron, of Murfreesboro, a graduate of MTSU, and Mike Krause, executive director of the Tennessee Higher Education Commission, helped bring myself and Meharry President James Hildreth to the table after Hildreth, who is a medical doctor himself, first proposed the accelerated bachelor’s-to-doctoral degree program. The program will increase the number of primary care physicians in the state and incentivize them to practice in underserved areas of Tennessee to improve the overall health of the state’s residents. The health status of Tennessee is among the worst in the country, with the state ranked in the bottom five for many important health metrics. One reason is the fact that there aren’t enough doctors to care for those who are sick. The agreement will help accelerate the production of physicians by creating a six-year pathway for selected high-ability students to attain a bachelor’s degree at MTSU and a medical degree at Meharry. The arrangement may be the first partnership of its kind between a private college and a public university.

As several state lawmakers look on, Meharry Medical College President James Hildreth (seated left) and MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee sign a partnership, June 22, 2016, at a Tennessee State Capitol ceremony. Standing (l–r) are state lawmakers Rep. Johnnie Turner, Rep. Dawn White, House Speaker Beth Harwell, Sen. Bill Ketron, Rep. Tim Rudd, Rep. Brenda Gilmore, Rep. Harold Love, and Sen. Thelma Harper.

35


ACCOLADES

Proof in the Pudding MTSU has been recognized by many national and international organizations for its successes as an institution and its standing as a great place for students to study. Here are only a few highlights from 2016–17.

36


ACCOLADES

SACSCOC

Startup U.

In December 2016, MTSU was reaccredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges. The SACSCOC review to consider reaffirmation of our accreditation represents a critical benchmark in the life of this University, since it independently validates every 10 years that our institution is providing a high-quality academic experience for our students that meets the most rigorous standards. The review examined MTSU’s academic programs, policies, and operating procedures against standards based on best practices in higher education. The University was found in compliance through a lengthy review process. This accomplishment reaffirms the University’s quality endeavors by its peers and recognizes its commitment to excellence.

MTSU was recognized in 2016 among the nation’s top 50 schools for our support of aspiring entrepreneurs, according to a report released by LendEDU, an online marketplace for student loans and student loan refinance. MTSU ranked No. 17 in the “Top Colleges for Aspiring Entrepreneurs Report” by LendEDU.com, which crafted its rankings by looking at more than 100 colleges offering entrepreneurship courses and programs to undergraduates. MTSU was the top Tennessee university on the list (Belmont was No. 30) and outranked schools such as Penn State, Duke, USC, Ohio State, and Johns Hopkins.

In Tune The College of Media and Entertainment annually hauls in top rankings for its programs. In 2016–17, it was ranked No. 1 in a list of the Best 25 Audio Engineering Schools in the U.S. by Audio Assemble for the Audio Production program; rated No.1 in Tennessee by Animation Career Review for its Animation program (the program also ranked No. 33 nationally in the Top 50 Public Animation Schools and Colleges in the U.S. for 2017); and made The Hollywood Reporter’s annual “Top 25 Music Schools” for the third year in a row (the Department of Recording Industry ranked No. 18 in the nation).

Best in Tennessee OnlineU ranked MTSU among the Top 25 universities nationally in 2017 for offering great value with its online master’s degrees in human resources. MTSU was listed as No. 20 for its Master of Professional Studies—Human Resources Leadership degree. The program is administered through MTSU’s University College, which offers online and flexible courses for working adults and is home to the largest adult degree completion program in the state. MTSU continues to develop online opportunities to ensure students have a variety of options to meet their educational needs. MTSU and Austin Peay, at No. 25, were the only Tennessee public universities on the list.

37


UNIVERSITY IMPACT

Ripple Effect The cumulative impact of all of these people, programs, and initiatives results in a university that is growing in prominence and impact. Witness the recent study by MTSU’s Business and Economic Research Center (BERC), a center housed in MTSU’s Jones College of Business, on MTSU’s economic impact on the region.

• 90 percent of MTSU students are from Tennessee, and 78 percent of MTSU alumni live in Tennessee. This means that we are more than fulfilling our mission to educate Tennesseans and, even better, most of those we educate stay in Tennessee. That means a better educated, more capable workforce for our state. And in the area of skilled workforce development, MTSU graduates account for one in every two adults with a higher-education degree (bachelor’s and above) in Rutherford County.

• The University is Murfreesboro’s second-largest employer, resulting in $88 million of local, state, and federal tax revenue.

According to BERC’s report 38

•  MTSU is responsible for more than $300 million in student spending, along with more than 1,800 jobs tied to student spending.

•  MTSU is the overwhelming education choice of Rutherford County and the Nashville MSA.


UNIVERSITY IMPACT •  MTSU is responsible for about 8,400 jobs across the state, which generate $1.12 billion in revenues and over $408 million in wages and salaries.

• •

• •

• •

•  MTSU is a source of diverse cultural, academic, business, community, educational, and sports events and activities. That not only contributes to the quality of life of our citizens, but also brings dollars to these areas.

•  One of every five adults in the Nashville metro area with a higher education degree (bachelor’s and above) graduated from MTSU. In other words, we’re not just keeping students from Rutherford; we’re keeping many of those college-educated students who hail from other parts of Tennessee. That means our entire area benefits from this continuous flow of graduates.

• The study shows MTSU brings nearly 500,000 people to Rutherford County each year. Spending by visitors accounts for more than $56 million, and that translates to almost 830 jobs.

There is no question that MTSU is unrivaled in what we bring to the table for our city, county, and region. Much of who we are now, and what we want to become in the future, depends upon the continued health and prosperity of your University.

39


BOARD OF TRUSTEES

A True New Era The creation of our new governing board and our newfound independence as an institution is the second-most important event in the history of the University, behind our founding. This represents a true new era for MTSU, as well as an opportunity to invigorate and inspire the entire MTSU community about the impact this will have on our University. The 10-member board stems from the FOCUS Act, championed by Gov. Bill Haslam and signed into law in 2016. The law established local governing boards for MTSU and the other five former Tennessee Board of Regents (TBR) universities. The state’s creation of individual governing boards was the next logical step in better aligning our postsecondary education system to ensure Tennessee reaches the aforementioned Drive to 55, a goal to have 55 percent of residents with a postsecondary degree or credential by 2025.

Passing of the gavel: (l–r) MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee, Board Chair Stephen B. Smith, and Gov. Bill Haslam

Haslam also commented that one of the most critical responsibilities for the MTSU Board was its singular focus on the University, and that in nominating potential board members he was looking for men and women who got up each day thinking about ways to make MTSU better.

Formal oversight of MTSU shifted from the TBR to the local Board When you are part of a diverse system like we were with the TBR, of Trustees after our new governance board met for its inaugural it’s simply impossible for board members to have that type of focus session in April 2017. Joined by and commitment to the needs Gov. Haslam and with faculty, of a single campus. With six They know the University and understand staff, and community members universities, 13 community the important role MTSU plays in educating on hand, I was honored to colleges, and 27 colleges of convene the group for the first Tennesseans. Also, they have a sense of what applied technology, the TBR time inside the Student Union had to consider a vast array of MTSU can become. Ballroom and to call that historic differences in needs, missions, meeting to order. and student demographics. In his remarks, Gov. Haslam reminded our trustees that MTSU remains a vital part of the larger state higher education system, yet the new local structure will allow greater latitude in setting our own strategic priorities and lets each institution play to its strengths. 40

Decisions were often focused on the larger general needs of the entire group. As such, the TBR was not always capable of addressing the unique needs of our campus.


BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Almost all members of MTSU's new board have some history and experience with our campus. We have several alumni on the board, as well as representatives of some of the state’s leading corporations who have been involved with MTSU for many years. They know the University and understand the important role MTSU plays in educating Tennesseans. Also, and I think this is important, they have a sense of what MTSU can become. It’s a little too early to talk about specific actions; but, as we move forward with this new form of governance, and as our board gains an even deeper understanding of our great institution, I believe you will see them begin to help shape our mission and identify new opportunities that will complement the quality programs and activities we have on our campus. While I think it’s safe to say that we’re going to see some new directions and changes over time, I’m confident that our board understands that our first and most important priority will always be our students and providing them with the support and skills they need to be successful. MTSU has been recognized as the state’s top comprehensive university, and our board is committed to maintaining that status. What changes if any will people see quickly? Without question, one of the most immediate changes our students and faculty will note will be the speed with which certain things get accomplished. Being able to address issues here on campus allows us to be more responsive and timely in our decision-making. In addition, having our own board will help remove one layer of bureaucracy, since we’ve transferred some of the decisions formerly made at TBR to our campus.

Gov. Bill Haslam attended the inaugural Board of Trustees meeting, as Stephen B. Smith was elected chair, Darrell Freeman as vice chair, and Lindsay Pierce Weaver as our student representative.

One of the most immediate changes our students and faculty will note will be the speed with which certain things get accomplished. 41


BOARD OF TRUSTEES

One unknown in all of this is how this change will affect higher education funding and support from the state. Gov. Haslam has been very clear that he doesn’t expect this to become a “free-for-all” with the legislature. However, there undoubtedly will be some competition among our universities as everyone seeks what’s best for their institution. We’re very fortunate that the Tennessee General Assembly has long recognized the important role that MTSU plays in our state’s higher education system, but we will have to expand our efforts in educating the legislature and keeping our needs in front of them. I expect our new board will play a critical role in assisting us in that area. In the end, I believe this new level of independence for the former TBR universities is truly bold and potentially transformational for MTSU. I look forward to exploring the opportunities it can provide toward our mission of ensuring student success and providing more graduates for the state’s workforce.

42


BOARD OF TRUSTEES

MTSU Board of Trustees and staff Front (l–r): J.B. Baker, Pete DeLay, Student Representative Lindsey Pierce Weaver, and Pamela J. Wright Back (l–r): Kimberly S. Edgar, Chief of Staff; Heidi Zimmerman, University Counsel; W. Andrew Adams; Vice Chair Darrell Freeman Sr.; Christine Karbowiak; Chair Stephen B. Smith; Joey A. Jacobs; Faculty Representative Tony Johnston; and Sidney A. McPhee, MTSU President

43


44


The Road Ahead It has been my pleasure to provide this overview of our campus and update you on our progress as we successfully transition to an independently governed institution. As you are well aware, while we have experienced remarkable growth over the past two decades, we are justifiably proud that we have maintained the atmosphere of a much smaller campus. With a faculty-student ratio of 18:1 and a proactive, intrusive approach to advising, we stay connected to our students, helping them plot the most appropriate pathway to their academic and personal success. This engaged environment does have a cost, but we are proud that we still maintain the second-lowest administrative cost to the state of all the LGIs. As the oldest and largest institution among the LGIs, we are proud of our heritage as a normal school—an institution dedicated to educating teachers for our state’s K–12 learners. While we continue to be a state leader in educating teachers—our teacher education program was recently elevated to Tier 3 status, demonstrating improvements in every state metric—we have also evolved into a much more complex, dynamic institution. As president, I am extremely proud of our accomplishments and successes. I am, however, concerned that education, especially higher education, too often gets lost as a top priority amidst the ever-increasing demands of our citizens. As we seek to continue our more than 105-year tradition of institutional success, we look to the governor’s office and the Tennessee General Assembly to provide the foundation of our budget. An increasing concern we must address is the growing gap between MTSU and our national peers regarding faculty and staff salaries. MTSU faces ever-increasing competition for

the best faculty and staff. Our faculty salaries are currently 89 percent of our peer average. As an example, the average salary for a full professor in Accounting in our Jones College of Business is $115,654, as compared to the $140,379 average of our peer universities. This gap has grown steadily the past few years and has created hiring challenges for many of our disciplines. The need to maintain the integrity of our campus infrastructure is also paramount. For many years, we have promoted the philosophy of the state and retrofitted and repurposed facilities whenever it was cost-effective. With an aging campus, the primary challenge to accomplishing this approach is the general condition of our buildings. Without ongoing and regular maintenance and repair, these facilities can quickly become unusable and make restoration or refurbishment impractical. Let me conclude by offering my thanks for the continued support of higher education by Gov. Bill Haslam and the General Assembly. We are extremely grateful for Gov. Haslam’s longstanding commitment to expanding and enhancing the educational opportunities available to our residents. The investment of state dollars in our institutions is extremely important in helping us to keep our tuition and fees low, thereby reducing the negative impact of tuition increases on student retention. MTSU has long been a place to obtain an excellent education. The University has been the marketplace for the exchange of ideas. It has been a place where students obtain a better understanding of human rights, civic virtues, and ethical values and learn their duties as citizens of a democracy. MTSU is still all those things. But it is more, too. Grounded in outstanding tradition, MTSU faces a future that has never been brighter. True Blue!

45


BY THE NUMBERS

ACT Scores Freshman ACT Profile Fall 2016 Score

English Headcount

Math Headcount

%

Reading Headcount

%

Science Headcount

%

Composite Headcount

%

%

01-10

12

0.46%

0

0.00%

4

0.15%

0

0.00%

0

0.00%

11-15

234

8.93%

161

6.15%

129

4.93%

105

4.01%

68

2.60%

16-20

671

25.62%

1,155

44.10%

689

26.31%

801

30.58%

863

32.95%

21-25

980

37.42%

855

32.65%

947

36.16%

1,232

47.04%

1,065

40.66%

26-30

465

17.75%

419

16.00%

548

20.92%

365

13.94%

532

20.31%

257

9.81%

29

1.11%

302

11.53%

116

4.43%

91

3.47%

2,619

100%

2,619

100%

2,619

100%

2,619

100%

2,619

100%

31-36 TOTAL

Average ACT Scores 2014-2016 Fall 2014

Fall 2016

25

25

25

20

20

20

15

15

15

10

10

10

5

5

5

0

ENGL

MATH

READ

MTSU Avg.

MTSU Avg. Nat'l Avg.

Fall 2015

ENGL 22.6 20.3

MATH READ 20.8 23.0 20.9 21.3

SCI

COMP

0

ENGL

Nat'l Avg.

SCI 22.1 20.8

MATH

READ

MTSU Avg.

COMP 22.3 21.0

ENGL MATH READ 22.3 20.7 22.7 20.4 20.8 21.4

SCI

0

COMP

ENGL

READ

SCI

MTSU Avg.

Nat'l Avg.

SCI 22.1 20.9

MATH

COMP 22.1 21.0

ENGL MATH READ 22.7 20.9 23.3 20.1 20.6 21.3

SCI 22.3 20.8

Academic Years 46

Category English

2013-14

2014-15

COMP

Nat'l Avg.

2015-16

MTSU (1)

National (2)

MTSU (1)

National (2)

MTSU (1)

National (2)

22.2

22.2

22.4

22.1

22.3

22.2

COMP 22.5 20.8


5 0

5

ENGL

MATH

READ

MTSU Avg.

SCI

COMP

5

0

ENGL

Nat'l Avg.

MATH

READ

MTSU Avg.

SCI

0

COMP

BY THE NUMBERS ENGL

MATH

READ

SCI

MTSU Avg.

Nat'l Avg.

COMP

Nat'l Avg.

ACT Scores ENGL 22.6 20.3

MTSU Avg. Nat'l Avg. Score

MATH READ 20.8 23.0 20.9 21.3

English Headcount

01-10

SCI 22.1 20.8

Math Headcount

%

12

0.46%

234 Category

16-20

671 25.62% English 980 37.42% Usage/Mechanics 465 17.75% Rhetorical Skills

26-30 31-36

0

11-15 21-25

ENGL MATH READ SCI COMP Freshman ACT Profile 22.3 20.7 22.7 22.1 22.1 Fall 2016 20.4 20.8 21.4 20.9 21.0

COMP 22.3 21.0

8.93%

161 1,155 855 419

257 29 Mathematics9.81% 2,619 100% 2,619 Elementary Algebra

TOTAL

Alg./Coord.Geometry Plane Geom./Trig.

Reading

0.00% 2013-14

10

ENGL

ENGL 22.6 20.3

100% 10.7

548 11.4 302 22.3

2,619 11.8

20.92% 11.5 11.53% 20.6

100% 10.8

116 22.3 2,619 11.8

10.4

11.3

10.6

801 22.1 1,232 11.2 365 11.4

22.7

Fall 2015 11.6

11.3

10.6

11.3

11.2

10.3

11.2

22.4

22.8

22.3

11.5

11.6

11.5

11.6

11.5

11.6

21.3

22.1

21.5

22.1

22.5 21.9 Composite 20 21.6 (1) Only freshman class that enrolled at MTSU. 15 (2) National average norm represents the HS Graduating Class in the previous year. (3) n/a = not available.

22.5

MATH

READ

MATH READ 20.8 23.0 20.9 21.3

SCI

COMP

20

5

5

0

ENGL

MATH

READ

ENGL MATH READ 22.3 20.7 22.7 20.4 20.8 21.4

SCI

2.60% 32.95% 40.66% 20.31% 3.47% 100%

22.9

Fall 2016 11.7

11.4

11.7

21.6

22.3

21.9

22.6

0

COMP

Source: MTSU Admissions database; www.act.org

ENGL

MATH

READ

SCI

MTSU Avg.

Nat'l Avg.

SCI 22.1 20.9

0.00%

15 10

MTSU Avg.

COMP 22.3 21.0

25

10

Nat'l Avg.

SCI 22.1 20.8

13.94% 11.4 4.43% 20.7

91 22.3 2,619 11.7

Average ACT Scores 2014-2016 10.2 11.2 10.3

%

863 22.2 1,065 11.2 532 11.4

100% 10.9

11.2

MTSU Avg.

MTSU Avg. Nat'l Avg.

30.58% 22.3 47.04% 11.3

16.00% 11.3 1.11% 20.4

25

5 0

26.31% 22.4 36.16% 11.3

11.4

Arts/Literature

15

689 22.2 947 11.2

44.10% 22.2 32.65% 11.3

COMP 22.5 20.8

Composite Headcount

%

0.00% 2015-16 0 (1) 4.01% 68 MTSU National (2)

22.1

Science Reasoning

SCI 22.3 20.8

0.15% 2014-15 0 (1) 4.93% 105 National (2) MTSU

129 (2) National

Fall 2014 Social Studies/Sci.

20

4

6.15%(1) MTSU

Reading

25

Science Headcount

Academic Years Headcount %

%

ENGL MATH READ 22.7 20.9 23.3 20.1 20.6 21.3

COMP 22.1 21.0

COMP

Nat'l Avg.

ENGL MATH READ 22.7 20.9 23.3 20.1 20.6 21.3

SCI 22.3 20.8

COMP 22.5 20.8

Academic Years Category English

2013-14

2014-15

2015-16

MTSU (1)

National (2)

MTSU (1)

National (2)

MTSU (1)

National (2)

22.2

22.2

22.4

22.1

22.3

22.2

47


BY THE NUMBERS

Snapshot of Fall 2016 Student Body Total Headcount = 22,050

Gender

Status

14,000

20,000

12,121

12,000

18,000

10,000

16,807

16,000

9,929

14,000 12,000

8,000

10,000

6,000

8,000

5,243Transferred Types4,000of Institutions From Which Undergraduate Students 6,000 2,000 by Class and4,000 Gender 2,000 0 Fall 20170 Male Female 76%

Freshmen

Sophomore

24%

Junior

Senior

All Classes

Women Men Women College Men Women Men WomenTransferred Men Women Types ofMenInstitutions From Which Undergraduate Students 6,000

Tennessee Institutions 5,097 5,000 253 All 2-Year All 4-Year 4,000 118 All Less Than 2-Year 4 3,000 All Others 2Freshmen

Sub-totals Tennessee Institutions Out of State All 2-Year All 4-Year Unknown All Less Than 2-Year Grand All OthersTotals

Sub-totals

2,000

377

Men

1,000

4,746

397 162 4 4

567

Women

by Class and Gender 821 1,042 Fall 2016 221 300

419 555 177 225 3,145 1 1 4 1 Sophomore

601

Men

0 129

4 2,581

1 Junior

1,272 782

Women

138 209 230 Basic and 357 Beh. and Health474Business Applied Sciences Sciences 14.3% 105 24 23.1% 138 40 21.5% 2025 2 2 1 745 815 5530 4 1

226 583 Education 5.8% 2629 3 1,017 4

342

852

501

678

1,047

Men

307 737 Liberal Arts 11.7% 2448 1 1,362 0

119

6,000

Unknown

5,000 5

Grand Totals

4,000 466

149 14 4,273

664

215

194

319

6

12

4,437 17

899

1,058

3,922

1,349

Women

266

975 & Media Entertainment 329 11.3% 14 4

1,629 1

Classification 982 1,309

7,000

Out of State

3 4

2,500

1,318

1,053 1,311 381 507 2 6 0 Senior 3 1,887

1,436

Men

579

1,019 University College 385 8.6% 53 2

2,068 1

501

Non1,366 Degree Seeking 589 3.7% 42

2

2,370 6

3,461

4,525

5,851 2,091 25 19

7,986

Men

Women

TOTAL

1,224 2,460 936 90 6 4,775 7

1,131 3,281 1,318 105 11 5,761 15

2,355 5,741 2,254 195 17 10,536 22

1,407

1,963

3,409

4,625

8,034

298

591

583

1,244

1,224

2,468

10

73

51

101

87

1,617

2,071

2,597

4,754

5,936

6,366

3,000

48

1,827

Women 822

2,546 3,305 897 1,194 11 14 7All Classes 12

TOTAL

188

10,690

2,357

2,000 1,000 0

695

Source: SZRTRSR Report


4,000

5,243

6,000

BY THE NUMBERS

4,000

2,000

2,000

0

0

Female of Fall 2016 Student Body Snapshot 76%

Male

24%

Total Headcount = 22,050

College 6,000

Gender

5,097

14,000 5,000

Status

4,746

20,000

12,121

12,000 4,000

9,929

10,000 3,000

18,000

3,145

2,581

2,500

14,000

2,000 8,000

1,887

12,000

1,272

822

10,000

1,000 6,000

8,000

0 4,000

Basic and Beh. and Health Applied Sciences Sciences 2,000 23.1% 21.5%

Business 14.3%

Education 5.8%

6,000

Liberal Arts 11.7% 4,000

Male

Media & Entertainment 11.3%

2,000

0 Female

6,000 6,000

5,097

4,273

5,000

4,000

4,000

4,746

24%

6,366

4,437

3,922 3,145

3,000

5,243

Non Degree Seeking 3.7%

76%

Classification College

5,000

University College 8.6%

0

7,000

2,581

3,000

2,357

2,500 1,887

2,000

2,000

1,272

1,000 1,000 00

16,807

16,000

Basic and Beh. and Health Business Freshman Sophomore Applied Sciences Sciences 14.3% 19% 18% 23.1% 21.5%

695822

EducationJunior Liberal Arts 5.8% 11.7%

20%

Media & Senior Entertainment 29% 11.3%

University Non Special Degree Undergrad. College Seeking 3% 3.7% 8.6%

Graduate 11%

Source: MTSU Office of Institutional Effectuveness, Planning and Research

Classification 7,000

6,366

6,000 5,000 4,000

4,273

3,922

4,437

3,000

2,357

2,000 1,000 0

695

49


BY THE NUMBERS

Headcount, Student Credit Hours, & Full-Time Equivalents Summary- Fall 2016

Undergraduate

Graduate

Full-Time Part-Time Total Full-Time Part-Time Total

Headcount 16,019 3,674 19,693 788 1,569 2,357

Student Credit Hours (SCH) 229,240 22,680 251,920 7,946 7,909 15,855

Full-Time Equivalents (FTE) 15,283 1,512 16,795 662 659 1,321

22,050

267,775

18,116

Total

Note: Totals may vary fom the summed parts due to rounding. Also, one Undergraduate FTE = 15 credit hours and one Graduate FTE = 12 credit hours.

Headcount by College, Classification and Gender

Source: TBR 14th-day Enrollment Data

Headcount by College, Classification and Gender Gender- Academic Year 2013-14 to 2015-16 Term

Gender

Summer

Female

Term

Male Gender

Summer

Fall

Total Female

Fall

50

100% 56%

10,906 8,697

46% 100%

Total Female Male Total

Spring

8,697 4,882

12,975 3,815

Female Male

Total Female

% of Total

3,815 % of Total 44% 2013-14

Female Male Male Total

Spring

2013-14

2014-15

3,755 % of Total 45% 2014-15 8,398 4,643

100% 55%

10,402 8,398

46% 100%

54% 44%

12,327 3,755

23,881 12,975

100% 54%

9,943 23,881

46% 100%

11,705 10,906

54% 46%

21,648 11,705

100% 54%

21,648

100% % of Total

55%

3,571 % of Total 45% 2015-16 7,935 4,364

100% 55%

10,199 7,935

45% 100%

100% 54%

22,511 12,312

100% 55%

9,742 22,729

46% 100%

9,477 22,511

45% 100%

11,541 10,402

54% 46%

21,283 11,541

100% 54%

21,283

100%

28,081 27,166 College- Fall 2014 to 2016 2014

% of Total

22,729 12,327

Unduplicated Total College

4,364

12,312 3,571

9,943 28,081

46%

2015-16

54% 45%

Male Unduplicated Total

Total

% of Total

Gender- Academic Year to 2015-1655% 4,882 56% 2013-144,643

9,742 27,166

2015

46%

11,426 10,199

55% 45%

55% 45%

20,903 11,426

100% 55%

20,903

100%

9,477 26,837

45%

26,837 % of Total

2016

% of Total


Spring

Total

23,881

100%

22,729

100%

22,511

Female

11,705

54%

11,541

54%

11,426

9,943

46%

9,742

46%

9,477

Male

100%

BY THE NUMBERS 55%

Total 21,648 100% 21,283 100% 20,903 Headcount by College, Classification and Gender

Unduplicated Total

28,081

27,166

45% 100%

26,837

Fall 2014 to 2016 Gender-CollegeAcademic Year 2014-15 to 2016-17 College Term

Gender

Summer Basic and Applied Female Sciences MaleSciences Behavioral and Health

Business Fall Education Liberal Arts

Total

Female Male

Total Media and Entertainment Spring Female Non-Degree Seeking Male

University College Total Total Undergraduates Unduplicated Total Graduate Studies

Total College Basic and Applied Sciences

2014 2014-15

%%ofofTotal Total 4,643 55% 4,596 20% 3,755 45% 4,897 22% 8,398 2,800 12,327 893 10,402 2,551 22,729 2,342 11,541 334 9,742

1,849 21,283

2015 2015-16

%%ofofTotal Total 4,364 55% 4,656 21% 3,571 45% 4,630 21%

100% 12% 54% 4% 46% 11% 100% 10% 54% 1% 46%

7,935 2,770 12,312 794 10,199 2,316 22,511 2,402 11,426 694 9,477

8% 100%

1,878 20,903 20,140 26,837

89%

19,693 26,134

89%

11%

2,371

11%

2,357

11%

College- Fall 2015 to 22,511 2017 22,729 100% 2015

% of Total

4,656

2016

21%

Total

Classification

2,316 4,111 2,402 4,356 694 6,729 1,878 334 20,140

121 2,371 1,959 22,511 65

10% 18% 11% 19% 3% 30% 8% 1% 89%

4,734

2,292 3,978 2,436 4,566 695 6,397 1,641 694 19,693

1% 11% 9% 100%

146 2,357 1,850 22,050

0%

50

22,729

100%

% of Total

22,511

2016

Freshman 4,505 20% Source: MTSU Office of Institutional Effectiveness, Planning and Research Sophomore 3,978 18%

22,050 2017

100% % of Total

21%

4,838

22%

20%

4,293

20%

12% 2015 2,706 % of Total 732 3% 4,505 20%

322 1% 325 ClassificationFall 2015 to 2017

2015

100% % of Total

12% 2014 2,770 % of Total 794 4% 4,732 21%

Doctoral

7% 100%

89%

Business Classification Education Freshman

Specialist in Education

1,641 20,236

45% 20% 100% 12% 55% 3% 45% 10% 100% 11% 55% 3% 45%

2,467

ClassificationFall 2014 to 2016 4,630 21% 4,457

Graduate Graduate Special Studies Master's Total

8% 100%

3,544 4,457 7,824 2,706 12,121 732 9,929 2,292 22,050 2,436 11,114 695 9,122

20,262 27,166

Behavioral and Health Sciences

Liberal Arts Sophomore Media and Entertainment Junior Non-Degree Seeking Senior University College Undergraduate Special Total Undergraduates

100% 12% 55% 4% 45% 10% 100% 11% 55% 3% 45%

2016 %%ofofTotal 2016-17 Total 4,280 55% 4,734 21%

10% 18% 11% 20% 3% 28% 7% 3% 89%

12% 2016 2,667 % of Total 633 3% 4,273 19% 2,227 3,922 2,450 4,437 923 6,366 1,492 695 19,523

10% 18% 11% 20% 4% 29% 7% 3% 89%

1% 11% 8% 100%

136 2,390 1,831 21,913

1% 11% 8% 100%

1%

307

1%

22,050

% of Total

0%

100%

% of Total

83

2017

0%

100%

4,273

19%

4,383

20%

3,922

18%

3,695

17%

Junior

4,566

20%

4,437

20%

4,489

20%

Senior

6,397

28%

6,366

29%

6,033

28%

Undergraduate Special

694

3%

695

3%

923

4%

Graduate Special

146

1%

136

1%

161

1%

1,850

8%

1,831

8%

1,826

8%

Master's

51


BY THE NUMBERS

Undergraduate Majors by College Fall 2016 Total = 19,693 Non-Degree Seeking 695 3%

University College 1641 8%

Basic and Applied Sciences 4734 24%

Media and Entertainment 2436 12%

Liberal Arts 2292 12% Behavioral and Health Sciences 4457 23%

Educaon 732 4% Business 2706 14%

52


BY THE NUMBERS

53


BY THE NUMBERS

BY THE NUMBERS

Headcount, Student Credit Hours, and Full-Time Equivalents (FTEs) Fall Terms 2014 - 2016 2014 Headcount

22,729

% Change

-4.8%

2015

22,511

% Change

-1.0%

2016

22,050

% Change

-2.0%

Student Credit Hours (SCH)

275,775

-4.5%

270,442

-1.9%

267,775

-1.0%

Full-Time Equivalents (FTE)

18,664

-4.6%

18,295

-2.0%

18,116

-1.0%

Student Credit Hours by Classification Fall Terms 2014 - 2016 Level

2014

% of Total

2015

% of Total

24.1%

63,901

Sophomore

54,780

19.9%

53,146

19.7%

53,243

19.9%

Junior

56,390

20.4%

59,997

22.2%

58,662

21.9%

Senior

80,092

29.0%

75,328

27.9%

76,267

28.5%

1,266

0.5%

2,110

0.8%

2,522

0.9%

557

0.2%

595

0.2%

633

0.2%

13,837

5.0%

13,149

4.9%

13,017

4.9%

366

0.1%

280

0.1%

475

0.2%

Graduate Special Masters Specialist in Education Doctoral Total Student Credit Hours

61,226

% of Total

66,496

Undergraduate Special

23.6%

2016

Freshman

22.9%

1,991

0.7%

1,936

0.7%

1,730

0.6%

275,775

100%

270,442

100%

267,775

100%

Full-Time Equivalents (FTE) by Classification Fall Terms 2014 - 2016 Level

Freshman

2016

23.8%

4,260

23.3%

Sophomore

3,652

19.6%

3,543

19.4%

3,550

19.6%

Junior

3,759

20.1%

4,000

21.9%

3,911

21.6%

Senior

5,339

28.6%

5,022

27.4%

5,084

28.1%

Undergraduate Special

84

0.5%

141

0.8%

168

0.9%

Graduate Special

46

0.2%

50

0.3%

53

0.3%

1,153

6.2%

1,096

6.0%

1,085

6.0%

30

0.2%

23

0.1%

40

0.2%

Specialist in Education Doctoral Total Full-Time Equivalents Full-Time Faculty Headcount Student-to-Faculty Ratio

4,082

% of Total

4,433

Masters

54

% of Total Fall Semester Growth, 2014 2014 2015 - 2016 % of Total

22.5%

166

0.9%

161

0.9%

144

0.8%

18,664

100%

18,295

100%

18,116

100%

963

918

1033

20:01

18:01

18:01

Headcount by Student Type Note: One Undergraduate FTE = 15 credit hours One-Graduate Falland 2014 2016 FTE = 12 credit hours.


Undergraduate Special Special BY THE Graduate NUMBERS Masters

1,266

0.5%

2,110

0.8%

2,522

0.9%

557

0.2%

595

0.2%

13,837

5.0%

13,149

4.9%

13,017

633 BY

0.2% THE NUMBERS

366

0.1%

280

0.1%

475

0.2%

Specialist in Education

4.9%

Headcount, Student Credit Hours, and Full-Time (FTEs) Fall0.6% Doctoral 1,991 0.7% 1,936 Equivalents 0.7% 1,730 Total Student Credit 275,775 100% 270,442 100% 267,775 100% Terms 2014 - Hours 2016 2014 % Change 2015 Change Full-Time Equivalents (FTE) by Classification Fall Terms 2014 - % 2016

Headcount

22,511

-1.0%

4,260 18,295 3,543

23.3% -2.0% 19.4%

3,759Fall Terms 20.1% 4,000 Credit Hours by Classification 2014 - 2016

21.9%

Level Student Credit Hours (SCH)

Freshman Full-Time Equivalents (FTE) Sophomore Junior Student Senior

Level Undergraduate Special Freshman Graduate Special Sophomore Masters Junior Specialist in Education

Senior Doctoral Undergraduate Total Full-Time Special Equivalents

Graduate Faculty Special Headcount Full-Time Masters Student-to-Faculty Ratio Specialist in Education

22,729

-4.8%

4,433 18,664 3,652

23.8% -4.6% 19.6%

% of Total 2014 275,775 -4.5%

5,339

28.6%

66,496 46 54,780 1,153

24.1% 0.2% 19.9% 6.2%

1,266 18,664 557 963

0.5% 100% 0.2%

2014 84 % of Total 0.5%

56,390 30 80,092 166

13,837 20:01 366

20.4% 0.2% 29.0% 0.9%

5.0% 0.1%

2015 270,442 % of Total -1.9%

5,022

27.4%

63,901 50 53,146 1,096

23.6% 0.3% 19.7% 6.0%

2,110 18,295 595 918

0.8% 100% 0.2%

2015 141 % of Total 0.8%

59,997 23 75,328 161

13,149 18:01 280

2016

22,050

% Change

-2.0%

2016 267,775 % of Total -1.0% 4,082 18,116 3,550

22.5% -1.0% 19.6%

3,911

21.6%

5,084

28.1%

61,226 53 53,243 1,085

22.9% 0.3% 19.9% 6.0%

2,522 18,116 633 1033

0.9% 100% 0.2%

2016 168 % of Total 0.9%

22.2% 0.1% 27.9% 0.9%

58,662 40 76,267 144

4.9% 0.1%

Note: One Undergraduate FTE = 15 credit1,991 hours and One Graduate1,936 FTE = 12 credit hours. Doctoral 0.7% 0.7%

21.9% 0.2% 28.5% 0.8%

13,017 18:01 475

4.9%

1,730

0.6%

0.2%

Total Student Hours 275,775 Students 100% 270,442 Students)/(Full-Time 100% 267,775 100% Note: Student Credit FTE-to-Faculty Ratio = (Full-Time + 1/3 Part-Time Faculty + 1/3

Part-Time Faculty) Full-Time Equivalents (FTE) Classification Fall Terms 2014 2016 Common Data Set -This is based on method used to by calculate student-to-faculty ratio for the-national Level

Freshman

% of Total

2014

2015

3,652

19.6%

3,543

19.4%

3,550

19.6%

Junior

3,759

20.1%

4,000

21.9%

3,911

21.6%

Senior

5,339

28.6%

5,022

27.4%

5,084

28.1%

Undergraduate Special

84

0.5%

141

0.8%

168

0.9%

Graduate Special

46

0.2%

50

0.3%

53

0.3%

1,153

6.2%

1,096

6.0%

1,085

6.0%

30

0.2%

23

0.1%

40

0.2%

Doctoral Total Full-Time Equivalents Full-Time Faculty Headcount Student-to-Faculty Ratio

4,082

% of Total

Sophomore

Specialist in Education

23.3%

2016

23.8%

Masters

4,260

% of Total

4,433

22.5%

166

0.9%

161

0.9%

144

0.8%

18,664

100%

18,295

100%

18,116

100%

963

918

1033

20:01

18:01

18:01

Note: One Undergraduate FTE = 15 credit hours and One Graduate FTE = 12 credit hours.

55


BY THE NUMBERS

BY THE NUMBERS Headcount by Student Type Fall 2014 - 2016 New Students

New First Time Freshmen New Transfer New Undergraduate Special New Graduate Special

2,018

1,865

3.1%

49

20

15

-69.4%

73

66

6.5%

486

6.6%

0

1

19

-

New Doctoral Student

14

9

30

114.3%

Total New Students Freshman Continuing

5,322 1,346

5,412 1,213

5,322 1,006

0.0% -25.3%

Sophomore

3,274

3,130

3,116

-4.8%

Junior

3,487

3,598

3,519

0.9%

Senior

6,051

5,705

5,741

-5.1%

246

266

159

-35.4%

41

46

55

34.1%

1,419

1,302

1,254

-11.6%

Graduate Special Continuing Masters Candidate EdS Continuing

50

37

54

8.0%

292

293

256

-12.3%

16,206 164

15,590 135

15,160 136

-6.5% -17.1%

Sophomore Readmitted

203

204

184

-9.4%

Junior Readmitted

237

244

213

-10.1%

Senior Readmitted

425

396

377

-11.3%

5

3

4

-20.0%

Graduate Special

18

27

15

-16.7%

Masters Candidates

84

60

91

8.3%

EdS Readmitted

15

12

10

-33.3%

Doctoral Continuing Total Returning Students Freshman Readmitted

Undergraduate Special

Doctoral Readmitted

Overall Growth

1,809

488

Undergraduate Special

High School

Fall 2016 2,841

62

New EdS

Re-Enrollees

Fall 2015 2,803

456

New Masters Candidate

Returning Students

Total Re-Enrollees Concurrent High School

16

23

21

31.3%

1,167 34

1,104 405

1,051 517

-9.9% 1420.6%

22,729

22,511

22,050

-3.0%

Source: MTSU Office of Institutional Effectiveness, Planning and Research

56

% Change 2014-2016 -3.1%

Fall 2014 2,932


BY THE NUMBERS

57


Fall 2014

BY THE Level NUMBERS

Headcount

First-time Freshman

1,800

Junior

Men

Total Number of Admissions

Special

(%)

Women

Total 6,729Men

(%)

4,063

43.4%

5,290

56.6%

Undergraduate 2,800

41.5%

3,940

58.5%

1,352

44.6%

1,682

55.4%

37

60.7%

24

39.3%

1,389

44.9%

1,706

55.1%

Graduate Number Enrolled (full-time) Master's

Special

Number Enrolled (part-time)

Specialist in Education

Total Enrolled (full-time/part-time)

Doctoral

Age

2,803

21

4,356

Fall 2014

Undergrad Number of Applicants

19

Headcount

Fall 2016 19

1,702

% of Admission (full-time/part-time) Total Graduate

49.6%

43.3%

9,3533343,579

20,2622,549 6,740

3,0341211,300

3,095

43.8% 43.0%

25 4,585

4,566

(%) 6,397Total

23 3,378

20,140 5,927 57.0%

22

47.8%

24

52.2%

1,322

46.6%

1,517

53.4%

65

45.9% 2,467

51.9%

22,729

31 37 36

50

325

32

42.6% 44.3%

23

Women 6,366

695 4,922

42.4%

37 1,247

19,693 3,364

(%) 57.6% 57.4%

136 1,568

55.7%

21-24 Number of Applicants

25-34

2,922

Number of Admissions 35-64

1,197

Total Enrolled (full-time/part-time)

Over 64

Total

21

14.8%

1,169

6,7406.1%

694

0.1%

8

9,353 3,095

38.5%

16

61.5%

31

2,839

1,257

44.2%

1,584

55.8%

2,841

32

50.4%

2,357

47.1%

22,511

35 37

24 Source: Census

19,693

Total

83

307

22,050

434

2.0%

7,363

33.4%

8,242

8,164

49.6%

4,091

5,927 29.4%

1,891

0.3%

29

2,839

2,357

37.4%

Fall 2016

18.6%

8,538

5,8588.6%

2,841

0.1%

22,050

Student Headcount Age 25 and Over

Average Age by Student Fall 2014-2016 Fall 2014 LevelFall 2015 Fall 2016

Level 58

First-time Freshman Source: TBR 14th-day Enrollment Data Continuing Freshman Sophomore

6,493 Fall 2014

Headcount

2,932 1,800 4,111

Age

6,364

19 21 22

Fall 6,011 2015

Headcount

2,803 1,702 3,978

Age

Fall 2016 19 21 21

Headcount

2,841 1,432 3,922

Age

26

38 37

48.5% 32

24

Student Age Information- Fall 2014 - 2016 Headcount

35 2,815

10

Student Headcount by Age Group- Fall 2016

18-20

23 5,858

46

10,000 Number of Applicants9,353 8,164 8,538 9,000 Number of Admissions6,740 5,927 5,858 8,000 Graduate Total Enrolled (full-time/part-time) 3,095 2,839 2,841 7,000 Undergraduate 6,000 434 2.2% 0 0.0% 5,000 4,000 7,363 37.4% 0 0.0% 3,000 2,000 1,000 7,756 39.4% 486 20.6% Fall 2014 Fall 2015

17 or less

19 8,538

1,831

Admission Application Statistics: Three-year Enrollment Rate FallFall 2014-Fall Fall 2014Fall 2015 2016 2016

Age

Total 27

31

44.9% 2,37147.9%

24

21

Fall 2016 4,437 (%)

19 21

3,922

23

23 2,494

53.5%146 2,793

1,850

1,432

21

20 3,616

Age

2,841

Men27

56.2%694 8,164

35 1,493

322

Total

(%) 27 Women

46.5%

1,959 61

Fall 2015 24

Headcount

21

Admission Application Statistics: Three-year Enrollment Trends 4,111 Fall 2014-Fall 222016 3,978

Sophomore Senior

Age

2,932

Continuing Freshman

Fall 2015

19 21 21


BY THE NUMBERS

Student Age Information- Fall 2014 - 2016 Average Age by Student Level- Fall 2014-2016 Fall 2014 Level

Headcount

First-time Freshman

2,932

Continuing Freshman

1,800

Sophomore

4,111

Junior

4,356

Senior

6,729

Undergrad Special

334

Total Undergraduate

20,262

Graduate Special Master's Doctoral

Age

2,803

21

1,702

22

3,922

23

6,397

25

1,432

21

4,566

27

2,841

21

3,978

24

19

Headcount

4,437

27

694

20

6,366 695

Age

19 21 21 23 27 19

20,140

23

19,693

35

146

37

136

35

65

37

50

35

83

38

2,467

Total

19

Headcount

23

322

Total Graduate

Age

Fall 2016

121

1,959

Specialist in Education

Fall 2015

22,729

31

1,850

36

31

325

32

2,371

24

22,511

1,831

37

307

32

2,357

24

22,050

23 31 37 32 24

Student Headcount by Age Group- Fall 2016 Age 17 or less

Undergraduate 434

2.2%

18-20

7,363

21-24

Graduate

Total

0

0.0%

434

2.0%

37.4%

0

0.0%

7,363

33.4%

7,756

39.4%

486

20.6%

8,242

37.4%

25-34

2,922

14.8%

1,169

49.6%

4,091

18.6%

35-64

1,197

6.1%

694

29.4%

1,891

8.6%

21

0.1%

8

0.3%

29

0.1%

Over 64

Total

19,693

2,357

22,050 59

Student Headcount Age 25 and Over


FINANCIAL INFORMATION

THE DOLLARS AND CENTS Unaudited Statement of Revenues, Expenses, and Changes in Net Assets For the Year Ended June 30, 2016, with Comparative Figures for the Year Ended June 30, 2017 Revenues

2017

2016

Operating Revenues Net Tuition and Fees $129,970,164.02 Operating Grants and Contracts $11,413,418.10 Sales and Services of Educational/Other Activities $20,032,596.43 Net Auxiliary Enterprises $26,048,389.13 Other Operating Revenues $188,543.02

$129,129,037.42 $11,833,267.36 $20,117,013.77 $25,753,240.82 $358,320.91

Total Operating Revenues

Other Revenues State Appropriations Capital Appropriations Nonoperating Grants and Contracts Gifts and Capital Gifts Investment Income–Net of Expense Other Capital Revenues

Total Revenues

Expenses Operating Expenses Salaries and Wages Benefits Utilities, Supplies, and Other Services Scholarships and Fellowships Depreciation Expense

60

Total Operating Expenses

$187,653,110.70 $187,190,880.28 $91,620,650.00 $11,653,575.99 $69,814,104.00 $7,525,128.66 $1,680,833.04 –

$86,841,312.50 $18,678,650.17 $71,227,199.00 $5,098,814.60 $953,870.77 $1,982.40

$369,947,402.39 $369,992,709.72 2017

2016

$161,200,829.16 $56,811,675.61 $80,345,307.39 $30,211,807.71 $20,614,210.46

$159,301,040.63 $52,263,505.62 $73,687,911.70 $31,719,982.04 $19,416,010.33

$349,183,830.33 $336,388,450.32


FINANCIAL INFORMATION

University Editor Drew Ruble

Expenses (Continued) Other Expenses Interest on Capital Asset-Related Debt Other Nonoperating and Capital

Total Expenses

2017

2016

$7,839,005.07 $41,799.54

$8,185,298.34 $133,775.54

$357,064,634.94 $344,707,524.20

Net Assets

Net Assets–Beginning of Year Increase (Decrease) in Net Assets Cumulative Effect of Change in Accounting Principal Prior Period Adjustment

Net Assets–End of Year

Total Operating Revenues Total Revenues Total Operating Expenses Total Expenses Net Assets– End of Year

$383,165,030.11 $12,882,767.45

$361,120,919.44 $25,285,185.52

– –

– ($3,241,074.85)

$187.7 MM

2016

$187.2 MM $369.9 MM

2017

$370.0 MM

2016

2016 2017 2016 2017 2016

Director of Creative and Visual Services Kara Hooper University Photographers Andy Heidt, J. Intintoli, Eric Sutton 700 Copies Printed at MTSU Printing Services. Designed by MTSU Creative and Visual Services.

$396,047,797.56 $383.165,030.11

2017

2017

Contributing Editor Carol Stuart

$349.2 MM $336.3 MM $357.1 MM $344.7 MM $396.0 MM $383.1 MM

1017-5032 - Middle Tennessee State University does not discriminate against students, employees, or applicants for admission or employment on the basis of race, color, religion, creed, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity/expression, disability, age, status as a protected veteran, or genetic information or against any other legally protected class with respect to all employment, programs, and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries related to nondiscrimination policies for MTSU: Assistant to the President for Institutional Equity and Compliance. For additional information about these policies and the procedures for resolution, please contact Marian V. Wilson, assistant to the president and Title IX coordinator, Institutional Equity and Compliance, Middle Tennessee State University, Cope Administration Building 116, 1301 East Main Street, Murfreesboro, TN 37132; Marian.Wilson@mtsu.edu; or call 615-898-2185. MTSU’s policy on nondiscrimination can be found at http://www.mtsu.edu/titleix/.

61


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President's Annual Report 2016-17  

MTSU President's Annual Report 2016-17

President's Annual Report 2016-17  

MTSU President's Annual Report 2016-17

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