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THE PRESIDENT’S REPORT SPOTLIGHT ON EXCELLENCE


TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION

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ATTRACT

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ENGAGE 18 RETAIN 24 TRAIN 30 CULTIVATE

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GRADUATE 50 CONCLUSION 64


DR. SIDNEY A. MCPHEE University President

KIMBERLY S. EDGAR Executive Assistant to the President and Chief of Staff

DR. MARK BYRNES University Provost

MR. WILLIAM J. BALES Vice President for University Advancement

MR. ANDREW OPPMANN Vice President for Marketing and Communications

MR. BRUCE PETRYSHAK Vice President for Information Technology and Chief Information Officer

DR. DEBRA SELLS Vice President for Student Affairs and Vice Provost for Enrollment and Academic Services

MR. ALAN THOMAS Vice President for Business and Finance

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TRUE LEADERSHIP Board of Trustees MR. W. ANDREW ADAMS Chair, National Health Investors (Jan. 16, 2017, three-year term)

MR. J.B. BAKER Owner and CEO, Sprint Logistics (Jan. 16, 2017, three-year term)

MR. PETE DELAY Executive, Forterra Building Products (Jan. 16, 2017, four-year term)

MR. DARRELL FREEMAN SR., VICE CHAIR Founder, Zycron Inc. (Jan. 16, 2017, six-year term)

MR. JOEY A. JACOBS Past Chair and CEO, Acadia Healthcare (Jan. 16, 2017, four-year term)

MS. CHRISTINE KARBOWIAK Executive Vice President, Chief Administrative Officer, and Chief Risk Officer, Bridgestone Americas (Jan. 16, 2017, four-year term)

MR. STEPHEN B. SMITH, CHAIR Chair, Haury and Smith Contractors (Jan. 16, 2017, six-year term)

MS. PAMELA J. WRIGHT Founder, Wright Travel (Jan. 16, 2017, three-year term)

DR. TONY JOHNSTON, FACULTY REPRESENTATIVE Professor, School of Agriculture (Two-year term, 2017—2019)

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DR. MARY MARTIN, FACULTY REPRESENTATIVE Professor, Department of Mathematical Sciences (Two-year term, 2019—2021)

MS. LINDSEY PIERCE WEAVER, STUDENT REPRESENTATIVE Master’s Candidate, Administration and Supervision (One-year term, 2017—2018), non-voting member

MR. PEYTON J. TRACY, STUDENT REPRESENTATIVE M.B.A. Candidate, Marketing (One-year term, 2018—2019), non-voting member

MS. SAMANTHA EISENBERG, STUDENT REPRESENTATIVE Master’s Candidate, Clinical Psychology (One-year term, 2019—2020), non-voting member

Good Governance: The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC) approved a substantive change in governance for MTSU in 2017. The substantive change was required when Tennessee’s FOCUS Act established an independent Board of Trustees to govern MTSU—a major milestone for the University. The commission reviewed all aspects of governance, from board duties and responsibilities to policy processes and revisions, in making its decision to approve compliance with SACSCOC governance standards.


TRUE VIEW MTSU at a Glance Founded Sept. 11, 1911, at the geographic center of Tennessee, Middle Tennessee State University is proud of its more than 100-year com­ mitment to academic excellence and student success. Starting out as a teacher training institution, MTSU today is a major comprehensive university accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges. The University is composed of eight undergraduate colleges offering 41 departments/schools and more than 140 majors/degree programs. MTSU houses a wide variety of nationally recognized academic degree programs at the baccalaureate, master’s, and doctoral levels. The College of Graduate Studies offers 90 master’s and specialist’s programs and nine doctoral degrees. A comprehensive, Carnegie Doctoral-Research Intensive institution, MTSU boasts the largest student enrollment among the six locally governed institutions (LGIs). We currently enroll approximately 22,000 students, with 90% being from the state. We serve students from every county in Tennessee, as well as students from 44 states and 77 foreign countries. MTSU is also the No. 1 choice of transfer students, adult learners (ages 25 and up), and college students attending summer school. MTSU boasts almost 1,000 full-time faculty members and nearly 3,000 full- and part-time employees. Located on a 550-acre campus, MTSU is really the equivalent of a mid-size city. The University is among the largest employers in the Nashville metropolitan statistical area and has an estimated regional economic impact in excess of $1.1 billion annually. MTSU is the largest supplier of college-degreed workers in the mid-state, providing the vibrant Music City economy and workforce with more graduates than all other local universities combined (approximately 5,000-plus each year). According to the Business and Economic Research Center at MTSU, one in every five collegeeducated individuals in the Nashville area is an MTSU graduate.

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Introduction As a valued MTSU stakeholder, thank you for joining me in taking stock of the accomplishments of the past and the promise of the future at MTSU. As I approach my second decade as MTSU’s president, I have never been prouder of the work being accomplished by the University and the achievements of our student body. Innovative and life-changing work emanates from MTSU on a daily basis. MTSU has indeed carved out a unique position among public universities. Our work is shaped by our history and traditions, and defined as a state institution and the value that we bring to Tennesseans, and to residents in our neighboring states. We can, and should, take great pride in the faculty accomplishments and institutional progress achieved throughout the past year, our student success stories, and the steps we’ve taken to make it possible for students to stay enrolled and complete their degrees, as well as the overall enhancements we’ve made to the academic experience. At the same time, we must plan for the challenging and unpredictable road ahead and MTSU’s future. In our rapidly changing global society, the demographics and the needs of our students are also changing. This calls for our University leaders, faculty, and staff to develop strategies addressing the challenges that our students face and to use data-informed processes to make higher education an achievable reality for our diverse student population.

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prepare our students to deliver on industry demands, and connecting our students to opportunities in the workplace. Indeed, we can embrace the challenges facing higher education and work together to fulfill the needs of our students while we also prepare our students to fulfill the needs of our society.

Employers expect newly hired graduates to be productive from day one on the job. That means we must ensure that students graduate with a high level of knowledge and the advanced competencies that employers require. We must continue to improve our graduation rates, which has been a real challenge for our institution. We’ve laid a solid foundation. We’ve set a standard for student success that other universities seek to emulate in their own programs. Yet, the field of higher education is not static. The target is continually moving. Therefore, to remain relevant, the strategic plans that we create to accomplish our goals and the metrics we use to measure our achievements must change correspondingly.

OUR COLLECTIVE TRUE BLUE GOAL IS TO ATTRACT, ENGAGE, RETAIN, TRAIN, CULTIVATE, AND GRADUATE STUDENTS WHO ARE READY TO WORK FOR TENNESSEE.

MTSU, though, strives to do much more than just remain relevant. Through our unwaivering commitment, we have earned a reputation for identifying the needs that exist in society, creating innovative academic programs to

Eight years ago, I introduced the phrase “I am True Blue” in an effort to recognize that MTSU is a community committed to learning, growth, and service. I still hold these values dear. They underscore our core values of honesty and

integrity; respect for diversity; engagement in the community; and commitment to reason, not violence. Each time these words are repeated, they express not only the ideals the University wishes to share with its students but also our devotion to student success. True Blue stands for the very best of what Blue Raiders expect from one another, as well as our commitment to students succeeding. Our collective True Blue goal is to attract, engage, retain, train, cultivate, and graduate students who are ready to work for Tennessee. This annual presidential report is intended to celebrate the truly exciting advances and achievements that the University’s collective efforts in these areas have produced over the past year. Sincerely,

Dr. Sidney A. McPhee, President

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MTSU staff work tirelessly both to sustain our ongoing operations and to fuel our plans for growth and improvement by attracting the best and brightest young scholars from across Tennessee, the region, and the world to Murfreesboro.

TRUE ATTRACTION attract: “to cause to come to a place or participate in a venture by offering something of interest, favorable conditions, 6

or opportunities . . .


TRUE ATTRACTION

TRUE CONNECTION True Blue Tour

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In all, our student body represents some of the state’s best and brightest, as evidenced annually by the record average GPA (3.6) and ACT (22.6) scores of our freshman classes and by the fact that more than 70% of our incoming first-year students qualified for Tennessee’s HOPE Lottery Scholarship. This is the direct result of our focus on attracting quality applicants and ensuring their success once on our beautiful campus.

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During the most recent reporting period, we attended a record 14 stops on the True Blue Tour. The quality

of prospective students attending increased as well. Many of our TBT guests have come to Murfreesboro for a campus tour and/or Preview Day since we saw them in their hometowns. In addition, our recruiters traveled an additional 64,000 miles to share opportunities at MTSU with prospective students and their families.

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Our key annual recruiting event, the True Blue Tour, gets bigger and better each year. Joining me on these recruitment tours to various locations throughout Tennessee—and even beyond the state’s borders to Alabama, Georgia, and Kentucky—are top University administrators, deans from all the University’s academic colleges, and counselors from Financial Aid and Admissions. The end result is a wonderful opportunity for prospective students and their parents to hear firsthand from MTSU representatives in their own backyards, as well as get important information about admission and financial aid. This is a prime opportunity to explain the unique educational experience MTSU offers.

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TRUE OPPORTUNITY We recognize that our mission isn’t just about attracting and serving traditional students. It is about providing an education to all Tennesseans. We are extremely proud that we continue to serve many of the state’s first-generation students, as roughly 40% of our undergraduates are the first in their families to attend college. We also continue to serve the state’s most at-risk students, with more than 40% of our students qualifying for Pell grants or other need-based loans. Here is a brief look at some of the very special populations MTSU purposefully seeks out to serve and which the University excels at educating in a manner no other Tennessee institution can boast.


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TRUE VALUE MTSU’s standing as a destination of choice for first-generation students and its long success in helping low-income students who meet admission standards overcome obstacles often posed by tuition and fees are well established.

MTSU

for first-generation students

THE UNIVERSITY NOW REFINES ITS FOCUS TO SHAPE A DISTINCTIVE MTSU STUDENT EXPERIENCE THAT SUPPORTS ENGAGED LEARNING, BUILDS SELF-CONFIDENCE IN LEARNING, INSPIRES LIFE-LONG LEARNING AND CIVIC ENGAGEMENT, AND REWARDS LEARNING SUCCESS.

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Student success is the core and fiber of MTSU—central to its mission and defining the strength of its integrity as an institution of higher education. The University is committed to: recruiting students who value student success and have the potential to achieve in a studentcentered culture; enhancing the academic experience of students to better ensure their success; and, facilitating student success through innovation and the use of data-informed best practices.

DESTINATION OF CHOICE

MTSU’s full-time undergraduate tuition and fees of $9,206 remains the lowest of the state’s three largest universities. The University of Tennessee–Knoxville charges $13,006, while the University of Memphis costs $9,701. Our affordability makes MTSU more accessible to students from all income levels seeking a top-tier educational experience.

UT-K

Pell aid recipients

The University of Tennessee System recently announced that students eligible for Pell Grant aid (family income of $50,000 or less) and who qualify for the HOPE Lottery Scholarship can attend one of their institutions without paying tuition or mandatory fees. I’m proud to say that MTSU students in this category have attended our institution for years without paying tuition or mandatory fees. Our Admissions and Financial Aid teams are among the best at helping our low-income students qualify for the full range of federal and state scholarships and assistance. In all, about 50% of MTSU’s student population receives Pell aid; about 30% of UT–Knoxville’s population receives Pell aid. That’s why we are a destination of choice for first-generation college students. And we’ve done all of this while raising our admissions standards and setting records on average ACT scores of our incoming freshmen.

30%

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TRUE DEMAND MTSU is proud to provide the largest adult degree program in the state. The University has focused upon and developed a streamlined program unrivaled in the state of Tennessee and which is designed to help adult learners complete their degrees as quickly as possible. Our Prior Learning Assessment program lets adult learners who return to college earn college credit for what they already know and have learned through their many and varied professional experiences. Our University College’s adult outreach initiative specifically works diligently and proactively to draw students back to campus who departed MTSU without completing their degrees. As just one example, with funding support from my office, staff from University College and other areas from across campus conducted an outreach calling campaign for four weeks. The dedicated team contacted students who had left MTSU more than a year prior but had completed at least 60 credit hours. The results were impressive: We made 4,574 phone calls to students; we left 1,952 voice mails; 500 of the students requested transcript evaluations to see what they needed to compete their degrees; 15 students learned they had sufficient credits to graduate immediately; and 30 students enrolled.

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TRUE JOURNEY Tennessee’s Reverse Transfer program provides students with a unique opportunity to complete degrees that were started, but not completed, at one of our state community colleges. More than 47,000 students started their studies at a Tennessee community college but transferred to a four-year institution without finishing their associate’s degrees. Under the state’s reverse transfer program, credits earned at a fouryear institution can be counted toward the community college associate’s degree. Based on data released during the reporting period, MTSU is the best in Tennessee for the number of transfer students taking advantage of this program. Since it began in Spring 2015, 646 MTSU students have been awarded associate’s degrees through reverse transfer, an important program for students to apply credits they have earned.

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As just one example of MTSU’s ranking as the preferred destination in Tennessee for transfer students, Gareth Laffely (pictured at right) is an uber-talented multi-instrumentalist known most prominently as a flutist and the youngest artist to reach No. 2 on the Billboard New Age chart. He enrolled at MTSU to pursue marketing as a means to help him promote his career as a musician after earning an associate’s degree from Volunteer State Community College.

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TRUE SERVICE MTSU’s veterans-support program made another appearance in the Military Times Best Colleges 2018 ranking by the Vienna, Virginia-based publication. It represents the sixth consecutive straight time MTSU has received the honor, formerly known as Best for Vets, and the first year the University cracked the top 50. MTSU rose to 49th out of 140 four-year schools on the 2018 list after being 75th out of 130 four-year schools selected in 2017. The University ranked 65th out of 125 schools in 2016 and 94th out of 100 in 2015. The only other Tennessee school making the 2018 list was the University of Tennessee– Chattanooga at 114th. At the heart of our service to vets is one of the finest military centers on any college campus in America. The 3,200-square-foot Charlie and Hazel Daniels Center (named after the country music superstar and his wife, who have donated generously to the center) is the largest and most comprehensive veterans’ center in Tennessee and among the largest in the nation. It serves MTSU’s nearly 1,000 student veteran and military family members, giving them a one-stop shop to meet many academic, Veterans Affairs, and career needs. 12


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A major enhancement in the Daniels Center’s efforts during the reporting period was the ramping up of the center’s assistance to aid graduating vets transition not just from combat to campus but from college to career—securing full-time employment after graduation from MTSU. Daniels Center representatives also now routinely recognize area corporations like Dollar General (photo at left) for their strong partnerships in hiring veterans and placing MTSU vets specifically in full-time positions.

During the reporting period, hall of famer Charlie Daniels performed at the inaugural MTSU Veteran Impact Celebration at The Grove at Williamson Place. By night’s end, Daniels, Journey Home Project co-founder David Corlew, and the nonprofit foundation’s newest board member, MTSU alumnus and U.S. Army Maj. Gen. Terry “Max” Haston, presented a $100,000 check for the Daniels Center. Coupled with more than $41,000 raised through corporate sponsorship of tables, gifts in kind, and pledges, officials estimated about $171,000 was raised for MTSU’s nationally recognized center in one magical night. 14


TRUE CHAMPIONS

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MTSU also shared the American Football Coaches Association’s 2017 Academic Achievement Award, along with Alabama, Cincinnati, Northwestern, Utah, Utah State, and Virginia. All seven schools recorded a 100% graduation rate for members of its freshman football student-athlete class of 2010.

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For example, during the Fall 2017 semester, 13 of 15 teams had a semester team grade point average of

Our NCAA Graduation Success Rate for studentathletes set a new school record at 88%. Six of our athletic programs recorded a perfect 100% GSR score: men’s basketball, men’s tennis, women’s basketball, soccer, women’s tennis, and volleyball.

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The statistics I get the most excited about are the ones our student-athletes—a special student population by any measurement, given the level of commitment required to both maintain academics and excel in Division I sports—are generating in the classroom.

3.0 or higher. Overall, 196 of 329 student-athletes (60%) recorded a 3.0 GPA or higher.

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Blue Raider sports teams experienced another exciting and productive year in 2017–18. Since our University accepted an invitation to join Conference USA in November 2012, Blue Raider squads have consistently reached postseason play, won championships, and earned C-USA All-Academic team status.

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Student-athletes by the numbers

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awarded Conference USA Commissioner’s Academic Medal Highlights from the Spring 2018 semester included: 185 of 323 (57%) of all student-athletes had a 3.0 or higher GPA; 11 of 15 teams earned a semester GPA of 3.0 or higher; and the cumulative GPA for all student-athletes was 3.096. MTSU saw 53 student-athletes win the Conference USA Com­ missioner’s Academic Medal (3.75 or higher cumulative GPA) and 179 student-athletes listed on the C-USA Commissioner’s Honor

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57% with 3.0 or higher GPA

Roll (3.0 or higher cumulative GPA) during the 2017–18 academic year. Blue Raider baseball, women’s golf, and volleyball all earned NCAA Public Recognition Awards for scoring in the top 10% in their respective sport based on their most recent multi-year Academic Progress Rate (2016–17). The women’s golf program, led by 11th-year head coach Chris Adams, was recognized for the fifth straight year and had a perfect

179 listed on the C-USA Commissioner’s Honor Roll

score of 1000. Volleyball also had a 1000. Every Blue Raiders sports team came in at over 969 (out of 1000). MTSU had 13 of 15 sports (indoor and outdoor track count as one) post at least 975 for the multiyear report. Such record performances again confirm our commitment to winning in the classroom as well as on the playing field. It reflects that student success is our top priority.


TRUE FLEXIBILITY MTSU celebrated 20 years of its online educational offerings during the reporting period. The University also announced a record enrollment for its online courses and accepted an international award for online course quality. Offered through University College, MTSU Online courses began in fall 1997 with seven classes and 53 student enrollments. It now offers more than 400 courses. The not-for-profit Online Learning Consortium, which assesses the quality of online educational programs around the world, formally presented the University with its Exemplary Endorsement award. MTSU is the only Tennessee university to have received this designation. Nationwide, nearly one-third of all college students take at least one online course, and two-thirds of those online learners are at public institutions like MTSU. MTSU Online Learners range from the age of 17 to 82. Online courses increasingly have become an important part of the instruction at MTSU. In Fall 2017, the number of students enrolled in online courses surpassed the 10,000 mark for the first time. That number was 2,819 in 2008 and 7,876 as recently as 2015.

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Also in 2017–18, faculty developed a total of 70 new online courses, while redesigning an additional 54 existing online courses.

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TRUE ENGAGEMENT

engage: “to occupy, attract, or involve (someone’s interest or attention) . . . 18

“to

participate or become involved in . . .

The formula for student success involves more than just ensuring students enroll, make it to class, fulfill course obligations, and get consistent and proper academic advising on their journey toward a degree. After all, college life is more than just books and classrooms.


TRUE PRACTICE Whether it’s one-of-a-kind, hands-on learning in real-life situations outside the classroom, incredible research pairings with a professor that are usually only available to grad students at other universities, or building an ePortfolio documenting and reflecting on academic and co-curricular connections and involvement as they prepare to enter the workforce, MTSU offers students myriad opportunities not just to attend college but to engage their minds and spirits in an immersive experience.

TRUE PREPARATION

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The school unveiled its latest endeavor—the MTSU Creamery—in summer 2017, along with its new bottling process. It marked the first time in nearly 50 years MTSU had bottled milk products, which are now for sale to the students and public at campus locations and some retail spots locally.

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Days start early for School of Agriculture students at the farm laboratory at MTSU’s Experiential Learning and Research Center, the University’s flagship agricultural outpost. The cows need milking, the livestock need care, the crops need tending to, and even the drone may need to be charged before taking flight.

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TRUE COUNTRY A five-student team of our Media and Entertainment students got a behind-the-scenes look at the Academy of Country Music Awards in Las Vegas in April 2018 and 2019, thanks to a grant from Brentwood-based American Addiction Centers—yet another great example of extending our classroom to the country’s biggest entertainment capitals.

TRUE ’ROO CREW For the fifth straight summer in 2018, MTSU’s College of Media and Entertainment deployed a team of student multimedia communicators to cover the Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival on the 700-acre farm affectionately called by MTSU administrators as “the Bonnaroo campus.” 20


TRUE INNOVATION MTSU is continuing to ramp up research efforts at a rapid pace. Scholarly research not only provides the foundation for MTSU’s strong academic programs but also drives innovation and economic progress across the region, state, nation, and globe. Creating a culture of research and inquiry is at the heart of the University’s mission among faculty and students and in vital industry partnerships. This work often involves undergraduate research opportunities that simply are unique for non-master’s and non-doctoral students at MTSU.

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On top of that, MTSU has aggressively transitioned from a primarily undergraduate institution to a doctoral research university with significant research activity. Increasing graduate student enrollment helps strengthen MTSU’s position as a publicly funded research university; enhances MTSU’s reputation as a research institution from both faculty and students’ points of view; meets market need for a more educated workforce in Tennessee, within the region, and across the nation; and increases revenue from both tuition and fees and the state funding formula.

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During the 2017–18 fiscal year, MTSU submitted 192 proposals for external funding, representing 105 faculty and professional staff serving as principal investigator (PI) or project director (PD) from 46 academic departments, centers, or administrative offices. The University received 55 new grants and contracts by 41 PIs with a total award value of $7,399,000, across 23 departments, centers, and offices. MTSU managed a total of 215 active grants and contracts during 2017–18, with a total portfolio value of $41,458,000. Examples abound of recent awards and proposals illustrating the depth and diversity of excellence and contributions among MTSU employees:

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new grants

$7,399,000 total award value

TRUE NUMBERS Jeremy Strayer (Mathematics) earned a five-year, $727,437 award from the National Science Foundation for “Collaborative Research: Mathematics of Doing, Understanding, Learning and Educating for Secondary Schools.” The project will strive to improve pre­service secondary mathematics teachers’ mathematical knowledge for teaching, which is a national need.

TRUE HEALTH Cynthia Chafin (right), associate director of the Center for Health and Human Services, here pictured her with her former intern, Christina Byrd (left), was awarded $554,400 from the Tennessee Department of Health to continue the statewide training to better prepare first responders and medical examiners regarding the “Sudden Infant Death and Death Scene Investigation” program. 22

215 active grants

$41,458,000 total portfolio value


TRUE VENTURE During this reporting period, the University continued its commitment to MT Engage, its current Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP) to improve student learning through enhancing the curriculum. The five-year initiative, a requirement by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC), the regional accreditation body for higher education institutions in the South, affects the entire campus. MT Engage, which serves as the University’s QEP from 2016 until 2021, reached several milestones midway through its second year. •O  ur inaugural MT Engage Sophomore Scholarship competition began. Qualifying sophomores who have taken at least two MT Engage courses submitted ePortfolio presentations in which they document and reflect on connections across their academic and cocurricular experiences. Up to 15 students annually will be selected for scholarships valued at $6,000 (based on cost of attendance), and all qualifying applicants will earn priority registration.

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•T  he MT Engage leadership team and assistant director wowed their audience at the 2017 Quality Enhancement and Accreditation Institute of the SACSCOC. Dianna Rust, Michelle Boyer-Pennington, Lara Daniel, Lexy Denton, and Jason Vance shared their insights from the development of the MT Engage QEP in their presentation, “Engaging Your Campus with a New Quality Enhancement Plan.”

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•M  ore than 3,500 students successfully completed MT Engagedesignated courses in Fall 2017, representing 187 sections of 64 courses taught by 98 faculty—already double the benchmarks specified for the full 2017–18 academic year in the MT Engage plan. MT Engage faculty taught a similar number of course sections in Spring 2018 as well.

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TRUE QUEST

retain: “to continue to have (something); keep possession of . . . “to not abolish, discard, or alter . . . 24

“to keep in one’s memory . . .

Launched in 2013, the Quest for Student Success radically rethought the University’s approach to student attrition. While MTSU has always supported at-risk populations, the Office of Student Success we created in 2013 continues to work to boost every student’s chance to succeed.


TRUE SUPPORT

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At the same time, it’s using predictive analytics—an approach more commonly associated with health care than higher ed—to fight attrition in a highly surgical way. Predictive data can help identify students who are at statistical risk of attrition even if they don’t fit into any traditionally “at-risk” population. Armed with this knowledge, faculty and advisors can watch them to spot any problems early and get them back on track.

Like our True Blue tradition, I also remain fully committed to the Quest. The results of the Quest have been dramatic, and it has become a standard by which other such initiatives are measured. In 2017, MTSU was one of just 45 American universities invited to join Re-Imagining the First Year, an initiative sponsored by the American Association of State Colleges and Universities and funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, to help other institutions improve their student success too. In short, MTSU has become a model nationally for successfully retaining students once enrolled.

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Working collaboratively, the University has overhauled student advising, developed fresh options for academic help, and redesigned courses that are traditional stumbling blocks to graduation.

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It is well established that some student populations are vulnerable to attrition from day one. Hence, the University routinely performs standard outreach to first-generation and Pell-eligible students, as well as admitted freshmen with lower ACT scores. But even established college students who don’t fit any “at-risk” demographic and appear to be chugging along in school can have subtle warning signs in their academic record. For example, sophomores and juniors with GPAs between 2.0 and 3.0 have a disproportionately high dropout rate. Because they’re not getting targeted support for being on probation or targeted praise for doing really well, they often get ignored by the institution. These average students, known as “the murky middle,” can fall through the cracks before anyone notices and intervenes. That’s the sort of trend EAB’s data scientists study. Pulling from 475 million course records provided by the 500 member institutions of EAB’s Student Success Collaborative, they isolate specific academic patterns linked with failure or success in college—whether that’s making a certain grade in a certain class, or taking certain classes in a certain order. Using those subtle historical trends, EAB helps universities like MTSU build predictive risk models based on a decade of their own student data. 26


TRUE BELONGING Students rely on MTSU academic advisors, who work tirelessly to guide them toward a successful educational future, even if that means countless appointments, emails, and phone calls. The 47 new advisors MTSU hired (a significant investment made during a period marked by budget tightening) restructured a patchwork system that had offered mostly transactional relationships between advisors and students. With an ideal new advisors 300 students, advisors now have time to get to know advisees and offer interventional support at the first sign of a problem. For example, if the tough STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) curriculum still threatens to derail their graduation, there are options to recalibrate. Advisors have been training on Degree Works, new software that gives students a “roadmap� to graduation and lets advisors gauge the impact of changing course.

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TRUE ENCOURAGEMENT Adopted by MTSU as part of the Quest, Supplemental Instruction is another datainformed strategy: Regular SI participants historically see a half to a full letter grade improvement on their exams. The program has worked so well at MTSU that the University expanded it from 21 to 70 course sections over just two years. The Supplemental Instruction leaders, who are students paid to attend highDFW (Drop/Fail/Withdrawal) courses in which they themselves have excelled, utilize voluntary review sessions to help classmates understand and retain challenging material. Supplemental Instruction has quickly become a core component of our system of learner support, and MTSU’s SI efforts have been recognized nationally.

TRUE BENEFIT Free tutoring through the Tutoring Spot in Walker Library, with satellite locations that include the College of Basic and Applied Sciences, is now offered for more than 200 courses each semester. In 2017, students spent 15,557 hours in tutoring, a 120% increase over 2015. MTSU’s tutoring program was highlighted nationally in an article published in EDUCAUSE Review.

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FREE TUTORING FOR MORE THAN

200

courses each semester

IN 2017 STUDENTS SPENT

15,557 hours in tutoring

TUTORING INCREASED

120% over 2015

TRUE PROGRESS

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Input is being solicited from across the University for the revised plan, Quest for Student Success 2025. During the reporting period, a group of dedicated academic advisors began meeting to devise a comprehensive professional development and training plan. Through their efforts, the Advisor Mastery Program (AMP) was created and implemented. AMP provides our advisors with access to a wide-ranging series of professional development and training opportunities. This includes anything from webinars and lunch-and-learns to sessions led by advisors and others from across campus and workshops featuring nationally recognized student success experts. Twenty-nine advisors were recognized for completion of the Advisor Mastery Program at an advisor annual retreat.

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Since the launch of the original Quest, MTSU has witnessed unprecedented outcomes on key student success measures. For example, the full-time freshman retention rate has increased from 69% to 76.8%. Similar increases in retention have been observed for every student category (sophomores, juniors, seniors) and

across all colleges. Accomplishments like these have drawn national attention, and MTSU’s student success initiatives have been highlighted in the New York Times, Washington Post, Chronicle of Higher Education, and more than a dozen other national publications.

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Considering the cost of college, students can’t afford not to graduate, especially if they have student debt. Yet, American universities suffer from chronic attrition. About a third of college freshmen don’t return for a second year. Universities have tried various strategies to keep students on a path to graduation, but nationally the six-year completion rate hovers at 57%. Attrition isn’t just expensive for students. Universities take a hit too—especially in Tennessee, which in 2010 began using outcomes rather than enrollment numbers to calculate higher education funding. At that time, a 3,000-student freshman class at MTSU could expect to lose 900 students the first year. Only half the class would graduate within six years. The Quest radically rethought the University’s approach to attrition.

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TRUE TRAINING train: “to teach a particular

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skill or type of behavior through practice and instruction over a period of time . . .

Whether it’s state-of-the-art facilities, world-class teachers and leaders, or new and innovative academic endeavors, MTSU’s focus is exposure to and training in the jobs of tomorrow.


TRUE GROWTH

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Also during the reporting period, $924,000 in renovations were made to Peck Hall, including new lighting at corridors and refinishing of terrazzo flooring on the second and third levels, new ceilings and lighting at breezeways, and new furnishings for the courtyard area.

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A long-term lobbying effort led to legislative budget approval funding for the desperately needed College of Behavioral and Health Sciences building, a 91,000-squarefoot, $38 million facility to house classrooms, lab space, and faculty offices for Criminal Justice Administration, Psychology, and Social Work. One of the primary centers of our new building will be a simulation fusion center that will offer students opportunities in homeland security, emergency management, and disaster relief operations. These are areas of increasing importance and will further enhance employment opportunities for our graduates.

Dedicated lab space and labs in the same building will allow more graduate and undergraduate students to engage in research. The recommendation actually provided $35.1 million in state funding, thereby requiring the University to raise $2.9 million through other sources.

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Facility planning at MTSU is always done with an emphasis on students and with modern training techniques and methodologies top of mind.

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TRUE ANALYSIS Usually the researcher chooses the research. Sometimes it’s the other way around. In 2004, while volunteering with a voter registration drive at a Nashville housing project, Pippa Holloway (pictured at left) noticed that a large number of the residents she met had prior felony convictions. Holloway, now an MTSU professor of History, has spent much of her academic life since then unraveling the relationship between voting rights and our legal and penal systems, and their combined effect on minority voters. Her early interest in the subject might seem prescient now that voting rights are such a hot-button issue.

TRUE MASTERY MTSU provides students the opportunity to interact with and be guided and trained by some of the nation’s leading educators and practitioners. At the administrative and staff level, MTSU has become a true talent magnet, attracting the best and the brightest professionals to top posts in the academic, administrative, and athletic spaces. Here are some examples of faculty/administrative/staff and athletic/coaching members at MTSU who achieved deserved recognition during the reporting period and whose work and profile are key to retaining students who wish to learn from the best.

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Holloway’s Living in Infamy: Felon Disfranchisement and the History of American Citizenship describes how white southern Democrats in the Jim Crow era limited AfricanAmerican political power by tying voting to criminal history. The parallel trends of draconian prison sentences and high-visibility punishments, like forced labor, fed the public perception that felons couldn’t be rehabilitated and shouldn’t be allowed to vote. While the Voting Rights Act of 1965 eliminated poll taxes and literacy tests, it did not prevent majority-party lawmakers in the South from limiting voting through felon disfranchisement. Even today, in four Southern states including Tennessee, one in five African-Americans cannot vote due to a felony conviction, Holloway said. And the ripple effect of disfranchisement has spread far beyond the South. Holloway’s research has been cited in court cases in Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, and Iowa. She also has become a sought-after speaker at universities and legal symposiums.


TRUE HERITAGE A significant preservation partnership between former Senate Majority Leader Dr. Bill Frist, wife Tracy Frist, and MTSU Anthropology professor Kevin Smith (pictured at right) relates to a Frist-owned property on the banks of the Harpeth River in Williamson County. Dr. Frist, a heart and lung transplant surgeon and former majority leader of the U.S. Senate, and his wife, an educator, writer, and accomplished equestrian from Virginia who is one-quarter Native American, purchased the land in 2015 with the aim of preserving the site called “Old Town.” The property contains the remains of a people whose nomadic forbearers arrived in the region some 12,000 years ago. Smith, an internationally recognized scholar on middle Tennessee’s archaeology, was the 2017 recipient of the MTSU Foundation’s Career Achievement Award, the pinnacle of recognition for stellar MTSU professors.

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MTSU’s Board of Trustees in September 2017 confirmed the appointment of Mark Byrnes as the institution’s provost and chief academic officer. Interim provost since May 2016, Byrnes completed a B.S. in Political Science at MTSU in 1983. He earned a diploma in International and Comparative Politics from the London School of Economics, as well as a master’s degree and a Ph.D. in Political Science from Vanderbilt University. A specialist in American government and politics, Byrnes joined the Political Science faculty at MTSU in 1991. He is a nationally recognized expert on the presidency and has published books on NASA, President James K. Polk, and Tennessee politics. Byrnes previously served as dean of the College of Liberal Arts from 2010 until his appointment as interim provost. He also was elected to the Rutherford County Board of Education from 2004 to 2012, chosen chair for four years, and selected vice chair for three years.

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TRUE ENERGY

TRUE DIAMOND

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We don’t just attract some of the best student-athletes around—we also attract the best coaches. In 2017–18, Jim Toman was named the 22nd baseball coach in MTSU history. He brings a wealth of experience and success to the program as both a head coach and top assistant in two Power 5 conferences (ACC and SEC). Regarded as a top-flight national recruiter, he fashioned a 329-205-1 record in his nine seasons as head coach at Liberty in the Big South Conference. Toman also spent 18 years as Ray Tanner’s top assistant at the University of South Carolina and at North Carolina State University. During his career, Toman has presided over 15 Top 25 recruiting classes, including 11 consecutive during one stretch.

Next, a new era for Blue Raiders men’s basketball began in March 2018 as Nick McDevitt was selected as the 20th head coach in MTSU school history. McDevitt arrived in Murfreesboro following a five-year tenure as head coach at the University of North Carolina–Asheville, where he led the Bulldogs to a 98-66 overall record, including three consecutive 20-win campaigns in the last three seasons. McDevitt’s teams also made three consecutive postseason appearances, starting with a trip to the NCAA Tournament in 2016.


TRUE EXPLORATION

Charles H. Apigian, director of the Data Science Institute in the Jones College of Business, with MTSU students

MTSU’s newest degree programs, majors, and academic initiatives and endeavors match student curricula with real-world preparedness, providing students the inspiration to remain enrolled in classes and in pursuit of their dreams.

last few years, data science has moved to the forefront, adding business value and helping businesses make better decisions based on data.

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Many companies don’t know how to analyze and bring that together to make good business decisions. So in the

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Mars colonization, self-driving cars, and integrated health care databases are all big topics that require “big data” to address and are among research areas being explored initially by MTSU’s new Data Science Institute. The mission for the institute, which launched during the reporting period, is to promote funded interdisciplinary research and develop public and private collaborations around the emerging field of big data.

The Data Science Institute seeks to create opportunities for faculty and students to collaborate on interdisciplinary research; bring in substantial grants and funding for interdisciplinary data projects; and establish big data partnerships and projects with companies and other external entities. The interdisciplinary nature of the institute is critical because a given big data project could require the expertise of faculty from disciplines ranging from agribusiness and sociology to chemistry and information systems.

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People who are engaged in the world around them, who are intellectually curious and understand nuance, add a great deal to our Tennessee citizenry and have a much better chance of achieving innovation and solutions than people who lack those abilities.

TRUE COMMUNITY

cultivate: “to prepare and use . . . “to try to acquire or develop 36

(a quality, sentiment, or skill) . . .

In a day and age where our society seems to constantly transform and shift, the ability to cultivate students and graduates who can keep their eyes open and to see the big picture—the picture that serves the community, the state, and the nation best—may be the most valuable skill we impart at MTSU,


TRUE EXPRESSION As the 2018 midterm elections approached, MTSU announced the dynamic new True Blue Voter initiative designed to engage students in civic participation and leadership through voting. A model partnership between MTSU and the local election commission, True Blue Voter sets an example for other colleges and universities throughout the state to connect with students on campus during events like orientation and in other places where they live and study, making it easy and convenient for them to register to vote. Throughout our summer CUSTOMS orientation sessions and at several fall semester events leading up to the November 2018 election, the Rutherford County Election Commission, MTSU Student Government Association, and leadership of the MTSU American Democracy Project (ADP) provided expertise on registration procedures and voting practices. This effort is needed. According to the National Study of Voting, Learning, and Engagement, 44.5% of MTSU students voted in 2016. That’s a slight increase from 44% in 2012, but still ranked below the national average of 50.4% for college students.

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Spearheaded by MTSU Board Chair Steve B. Smith, the True Blue Voter initiative seeks to increase the number of MTSU students who are registered to vote to 85% and those who vote to 55% by 2020.

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Civically engaged college students are more likely to carry forward their civic involvement as they move into careers and future home communities, becoming engaged and active citizens for life.

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TRUE DIVERSITY Hundreds of students, faculty, staff, and alumni joined hands and formed a human chain across the campus of MTSU on Nov. 6, 2017, in a strong show of unity and as a demonstration of solidarity across a diverse campus. Participants linked hands for about 15 minutes in between classes. The event, one of several programs and activities on campus recently as an outgrowth of a meeting between myself and the MTSU Intercultural and Diversity Affairs Advisory Board, mirrored the 1986 Hands Across America event. During that historic event, Americans embraced each other in a human chain to show their support in the fight against hunger and homelessness. Hands Across MTSU celebrated the University’s strength through its diversity. 38


TRUE EXPERIENCE Thousands of people descended upon MTSU’s campus for the Great Tennessee Eclipse event Aug. 21, 2017. They cheered wildly as the epic, coast-to-coast solar eclipse reached totality over Murfreesboro—with the sky literally darkening and exposing the planets Venus and Jupiter to the naked eye—around 1:29 p.m. in the central campus area called the Science Corridor of Innovation. Braving 90-plus degree heat and bringing popup tents, folding chairs, picnic blankets, or even hammocks, several thousand attendees gathered for the event. Visitors from as far away as China and other foreign countries joined Americans from across the country at MTSU to observe the awe-inspiring celestial phenomenon. Murfreesboro City Schools brought 600 children to the MTSU campus. A group of 140 attended from the University of Alabama–Huntsville. High school groups came from Florence, Alabama, and The Webb School in Bell Buckle, Tennessee.

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The event was designated by NASA as one of its six official viewing sites in the greater Nashville area. Via coverage in USA Today, MTSU’s event was mentioned in newspapers from the Carolinas to Arizona.

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More than 9,000 free safety glasses sponsored by Turner Construction were distributed at the event and to schools in both Rutherford County and Murfreesboro City districts. MTSU’s event featured a main stage that showcased student musical performances in the hours leading up to the total eclipse, as well as on-stage interviews with faculty about eclipse viewing safety, the science behind it, the fascinating visuals, and responses from it.

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TRUE FAMILY

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On Nov. 16, 2017, when Luz Cortes hugged her son, former MTSU basketball star Raymond Cintron, the reason for MTSU’s trip to Puerto Rico was clear. MTSU Board of Trustees Vice Chair Darrell Freeman, who led the trip, said that moment was when we realized what we did—all the fundraising, the donations, the flight there—was helping Raymond’s family survive. And they were so very happy, so very grateful, for our True Blue family.

of Aerospace, Cintron’s family got the aid they desperately needed. Freeman flew Cintron, myself, and University pilot Terry Dorris, who served as co-pilot, on the seven-hour journey.

Coined “Raider Relief,” Freeman’s effort raised money and supplies for Cintron’s extended family, which had been devastated by Hurricane Maria, a Category 4 storm that hit Puerto Rico in September 2017. Cintron, a star guard for the Blue Raiders during 2011–13, had family members on the island who were in dire need of medicine, food, and generators, all of which were stuffed into Freeman’s personal aircraft. With the help of the Puerto Rico Wing of the Civil Air Patrol, MTSU’s partner with its Department

Civil Air Patrol (CAP) volunteers made the final stages of Raider Relief possible. CAP is the volunteer civilian auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force. Our CAP partners overcame an island-wide power outage to assemble in Puerto Rico, along with volunteers and trucks, and get this aid to Raymond’s family. Without Trustee Freeman’s plane and the Civil Air Patrol, none of this would have happened.


students attended

The following are just a few examples of MTSU-related events, activities, and camps that cast a long shadow over

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Over 900 elementary-age students from Christiana, Campus School, Thurman Francis, Blackman, and Smyrna schools visited various agriculture-related stations at MTSU’s Tennessee Livestock Center at the fourth annual Ag Education Spring Fling.

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AG EDUCATION SPRING FLING EVENT

The result is that MTSU’s campus is a place where memories are made and where young minds perhaps for the first time experience a college campus environment and hatch a dream to one day earn a degree.

More than 800 young inventors presented their creations at MTSU’s 26th annual Invention Convention for students in fourth, fifth, and sixth grades.

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For instance, each summer, the campus of MTSU becomes a hotbed for various educational camps benefitting youth from across Tennessee.

the lives of schoolchildren from across Tennessee.

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Tens of thousands of young Tennesseans journey to MTSU each year for reasons other than college attendance.

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PRESENTATIONS FROM MORE THAN

TRUE LEARNING

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Innovation J-Camp at MTSU is a weeklong, hands-on summer camp for high school students interested in multimedia journalism. The five-day workshop targets students who have a passion for creating stories using mobile, social, digital, and video platforms. Based at the Center for Innovation in Media and in partnership with the College of Media and Entertainment, campers learn about news basics and new media platforms each day, then tackle hands-on assignments in the field with camp instructors. At week’s end, campers post video, photos, and written stories online to showcase their multimedia projects.

At the sixth annual Middle Tennessee STEM Expo, held in April 2017, more than 600 fifth-12th-grade students from across the mid-state took part in a showcase of STEM projects. “Conceptual Forensic Retrieval System,” “Pet Zoomer,” “The Quick Feet Baseball Cleat,” and “Energy Drinks vs. Orange Juice” were just a sampling of project titles. Braden Cole, 11, fifth-grader at Madison Creek Elementary School in Goodlettsville, is pictured here wearing his “Survival Helmet.”

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TRUE INVESTMENT

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Among the key donations received was a gift of valuable software from the Siemens Corp. for our Mechatronics Engineering program.

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Private support continues to provide valuable resources for our students.

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Aerospace students also claimed their prize—use of a new, custom-branded Cessna Skyhawk 172—as part of Textron Aviation’s 2018 Top Hawk program, accepting delivery during an April ceremony at Dwight D. Eisenhower National Airport in Wichita, Kansas. MTSU’s application, which was one of five chosen by Textron Aviation, allowed MTSU to utilize the plane to support flight training, recruiting efforts, and promotional activities. 44

More than $325,000 in donations came in during our inaugural True Blue Give, a 48-hour giving campaign, far surpassing our $250,000 goal. The Feb. 15–16, 2017 event drew donations from more than 600 friends of the University in our drive to support academics, athletics, and scholarships. Donors could pledge any amount, and matching contributions were secured for certain portions of the campaign. Raising scholarship support is a key priority since 90% of MTSU students qualify for some form of financial aid.


TRUE ENTERPRISE Developing creative, new partnerships with government and private sector entities demonstrates MTSU’s ability to be responsive to the economic and educational needs of our state, further enhancing our value as a major contributor to Tennessee’s growing economy. University partnerships and public service initiatives also support our educational efforts and provide students with the breadth and relevance of experience needed to be successful both in college and eventually in the professional workplace.

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The Middle Tennessee Council of the Boy Scouts of America signed a partnership allowing MTSU to be a greater resource for Scouting programs, particularly in science and technology, and boosting opportunities to reach and recruit prospective students in the council’s service area of 37 counties and Fort Campbell, Kentucky. I was joined by former MTCBSA President J.B. Baker, who is now a member of the University’s Board of Trustees, and Scout Executive Larry Brown in signing the memorandum of understanding. The council, based in Nashville, has more than 18,600 youths and their families participating in programs. It has been the fastest-growing of 270 nationwide councils in recent years.

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MTSU was one of only eight universities selected for Delta Air Lines’ innovative Propel program to fast-track the next generation of pilots because of looming retirements across the industry. Successful candidates will be provided a “qualified job offer,” detailing a defined path and an accelerated timeline for becoming a Delta pilot.

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ORAL HISTORY ASSOCIATION

ORAL HISTORY ASSOCIATION One of the nation’s most prestigious and respected groups of historians is now housed at MTSU. The Oral History Association selected MTSU for its headquarters. The organization boasts a diverse membership of scholars, activists, journalists, psychologists, folklorists, and others interested in bringing the historical experiences of both everyday people and elites to light. 46

From 2007 to 2019, MTSU alumni, faculty, and former students have brought home 17 Grammy awards in categories from classical to gospel to bluegrass to rap. I was in New York City in 2018 and Los Angeles in 2019 to congratulate the nominees and recognize MTSU’s ties to the Grammys. It was the fifth consecutive year MTSU held pre-Grammy events at the site of the music industry’s biggest ceremony. Importantly, students from MTSU’s College of Media and Entertainment worked behind the scenes at the event, held at Radio City Music Hall. MTSU was able to participate as a sponsor to the event thanks to the generosity of Brentwood-based American Addiction Centers, led by former MTSU student Michael Cartwright.


TRUE EXCHANGE MTSU has strengthened its international initiatives both on campus and around the world. Those efforts boost student success through creating opportunities for travel, exposure to culture, and research.

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The garden has been designated one of China’s top 10 research facilities in funding priority. He also outlined the garden’s plans to hire up to 130 researchers and staff devoted to the institute.

I traveled to China with Rutherford County Mayor Bill Ketron and businessman Paul Martin, the first graduate of our Honors College. The trip was organized by and in support of MTSU’s Confucius Institute. I was accompanied at the signing by two local businessmen, Ted LaRoche and Edward Chiles, whose Greenway Herbal Projects firm has given $2.5 million toward MTSU’s herbal research. Martin arranged for the first contribution to the new institute: a $2,500 check from the Walter and Edith Loebenberg Foundation. The University’s ginseng research goes back to 2013, when then-state senator Ketron encouraged MTSU to use its China ties to help Tennessee farmers add ginseng as a cash crop.

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In addition, MTSU and its primary research partner in China, the Guangxi Botanical Garden of Medicinal Plants, agreed to create a joint ginseng institute that will study, develop, and promote Tennessee-grown herbal products for sale in Asia and other emerging markets. Miao Jianhua, director of the Guangxi Botanical Garden, said the garden planned to spend the equivalent of about $30 million in U.S. dollars for the construction of a new lab at the Nanning complex to support the effort.

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As part of my ongoing China Initiative, 38 students from Guangxi University in Nanning, China, enrolled in the fall semester as part of the University’s first 3+1+1 program. The students are part of a special cohort which was designed and implemented as early as 2014 and includes majors in both the Jones College of Business and the College of Basic and Applied Sciences.

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MTSU played host in summer 2017 to a delegation of schoolchildren, teachers, and administrators from China’s Dongcheng Educational Group for the sixth in a series of reciprocal visits between the institutions. Dancing, singing, and classroom work greeted Nashville-area schoolchildren, parents, and educators, including MTSU first lady Elizabeth McPhee, in China as MTSU renewed its reciprocal exchange with the top Chinese magnet school system. Dongcheng is an affiliate of Hangzhou Normal University, MTSU’s partner in the creation and operation of the 48

Confucius Institute on the Murfreesboro campus. Dongcheng oversees a network of magnet-style schools in Hangzhou, China. The visit was the third time MTSU has hosted the Dongcheng delegation, which also visited in 2013 and 2015. Students, parents, and teachers from Rutherford-area schools were hosted by Dongcheng in China in 2012, 2014, 2016, and 2018. Guests pay their own way here. Private donations, including title sponsorship by campus food vendor Aramark, pay most of the local expenses, with additional support coming from the Confucius Institute.


MTSU’s connections to China are strong and well-documented. But the University has a presence around the globe. MTSU is always seeking to increase its international undergraduate and graduate student enrollment, expand its study abroad opportunities, and develop more faculty and student exchanges. The University also actively seeks out student exchange and research collaborations with international partners. Here are just a few other recent highlights from our International Affairs efforts in the reporting period: •D  uring the 2016–17 academic year, 23 MTSU Signature faculty-led programs served a total of 233 students. Approximately 70% of our students who studied abroad through MTSU participated one of these Signature programs in Argentina, Belize, Brazil, Canada, China, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, England, Finland, France, Ireland, Israel, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, Russia, Taiwan, and Vietnam.

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a scholar-residency exchange program in the fall, a student exchange of four students during the academic year, and the co-sponsorship of an academic conference held at Salford in Manchester, England.

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•S  tarted by International Affairs five years ago, MTSU’s partnership with University of Salford in the United Kingdom had a banner year of activity with

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TRUE FUTURE graduate: “to successfully complete a course of study 50

or training . . .

The end result of this commitment to student success is the completion of a degree and the preparation of a wave of graduates who are ready to work.


READY TO WORK One in five college graduates in greater Nashville holds an MTSU degree, making us the No. 1 provider to the region’s workforce. In all, MTSU has more than 64,000 alumni working across greater Nashville. Our alumni run companies. They win Grammys. They teach our children. They cure diseases. They create, innovate, and succeed. They also give our current students the largest area alumni network to help locate jobs.

our grads are ready to work.

Here are a few highlights of some of our programs that have a direct industry focus and strong experiential ties. True Blue!

• 1 of only 183 institutions worldwide with an additional AACSB accreditation for accounting •G  rads in senior positions at Deloitte, HCA, and Pinnacle

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From aerospace to agriculture, and finance to health care and concrete management,

•R  anked 34th nationally for Best Online Master’s in Finance Programs by OnlineMasters.com (only Tennessee university listed)

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ACCOUNTING AND FINANCE

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MTSU is the No. 1 choice of transfer students, adult learners, and first-generation college students in the Volunteer State.

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The University plays a crucial role in helping community college students, technology center graduates, and adults alike finish their degrees and join Tennessee’s workforce more quickly and prepared to lead.

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AEROSPACE

AGRICULTURE

• Top 3 program in the nation • 1 of 8 schools recently selected for new

•5  00-acre, hands-on agriculture laboratory produces milk (and honey) bottled by MTSU students and sold at campus and retail shops

• Only 360-degree, seamless virtual air traffic control tower of its kind in the world

•M  TSU Creamery first awarded the state’s new Tennessee Milk logo, along with another dairy

partnership supplying pilots to Delta Air Lines

• 1 of 5 unmanned aircraft degree programs in U.S. •G  rads in senior positions at FedEx, Southwest, and Nashville International Airport

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•G  rads in senior positions at Jack Daniel’s, Tennessee Farm Bureau, and Tennessee Farmers Coop


BUSINESS •R  anked 17th among the nation’s top schools for aspiring entrepreneurs by LendEDU • I nnovative sales laboratory for students in new Professional Selling concentration to hone skills to become ready-to-hire graduates •P  rofessional training for all grads through an exclusive arrangement in Tennessee with Dale Carnegie •U  niversity-owned real estate brokerage firm gives students real-world experience before graduation •M  aster’s in Management ranked No. 21 in the nation by Top Management Degrees (behind only Duke in eight states bordering Tennessee) • Accreditation in top 1.5% of business schools nationwide

APPAREL DESIGN

•C  ustomizable M.B.A. degree, now with Music Business and Health Care Management concentrations, that can be completed online or on campus in only 12 months—a ticket to greater opportunities for employment, promotions, and income

•P  artners for student experience in annual Nashville Fashion Week

•G  rads in senior positions at Healthways, Caterpillar Financial, and Dollar General

•N  ashville ranks fourth in the U.S. in numbers of fashion designers, earnings, and industry activity— behind New York, Los Angeles, and Columbus, Ohio (corporate home of retail giants)

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•G  rads in senior positions at Genesco, Fruit of the Loom, and Belk

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• Only public university in Tennessee offering an Apparel Design program

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CRIMINAL JUSTICE •N  ew $38 million academic building opening in 2020 with emergency management simulation facilities •P  artnership with TBI enabling State Academy graduates to earn 9 hours of college credits from MTSU •G  rads in senior positions at U.S. Secret Service, Tennessee Bureau of Investigation, Tennessee Highway Patrol, and U.S. Border Patrol

COMPUTER SCIENCE • State’s largest Computer Science program, helping fill the approximately 1,500 open tech positions in the Nashville area •M  TSU graduated 1 in 5 area students earning a tech-related degree in 2017, the most of 36 local institutions •H  olds 36-hour annual Hack-MT for students to invent new web platforms, mobile apps, and electronic gadgets •G  rads in senior positions at Dell, Google, Gibson Guitar, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Passport Health 54

CONCRETE AND CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT •F  irst-of-its-kind academic program in concrete industry management in the nation (launched in partnership with industry) •B  lend of technical, business, and general education coursework providing entry into jobs such as quality control, estimating, technical sales, operations, project management, superintendent, purchasing, marketing, and BIM specialist •R  equired internship/co-op allowing every student to experience the industry from the inside before graduation • 9+ job offers per concrete industry grad

(average starting salary: $80,000+)

•G  rads in senior positions at Beazer Homes, Turner Construction, and TVA


EDUCATION • Produces 250–300 teaching license candidates each year, feeding a critical pipeline facing an ever-growing teacher shortage in the state and nation • Piloted the innovative Ready2Teach training program •T  eacher candidates heavily recruited by ever-expanding Rutherford County Schools district, one of state’s largest, which hired about 500 teachers last year alone •L  aunched a first-of-its-kind doctoral degree in 2013, Ed.D. in Assessment, Learning, and School Improvement targeting Pre-K through 12th grade •G  rads in senior positions throughout Tennessee and surrounding states

INDUSTRIAL/ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY •S  tudents working with real clients in MTSU’s Center for Organizational and Human Resources Effectiveness (COHRE), such as Tennessee Highway Patrol and Jack Daniel’s Distillery

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•G  rads in senior positions at U.S. Bank, SMS Holdings, and Rutherford County government

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•F  astest-growing occupation in the U.S., according to the Department of Labor

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• Ranked best in the nation for master’s program by the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, the premier organization in the field

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MASTER OF PROFESSIONAL SCIENCE •G  roundbreaking two-year program combining business and science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) curricula to produce in-demand, working graduates

• 70%+ of students offered a job after internship • 90%+ of students employed at graduation • $60,000–$70,000 average salaries for graduates •G  rads in senior positions at Aegis Sciences, BlueCross/ BlueShield of TN, Novus International, and Tennessee Valley Authority

JOURNALISM AND STRATEGIC MEDIA • Cross-trains new-age multimedia journalists in fast-changing industry, who chronicle the so-called “first rough draft of history” • Multiple Emmy Award-winning alumni

and faculty

•B  oasts Center for Innovation in Media, along with two TV studios and two radio stations •G  rads in senior positions at NBC News, Associated Press, The Tennessean, and DVL Seigenthaler 56


MASTER OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES •D  esigned for working professionals who want to enhance their skills and advance their careers • Available completely online •T  hree concentrations: Strategic Leadership, Human Resources Leadership, and Training and Development •G  rads in senior positions at Kirkland’s, United Way, Tractor Supply, and the State of Tennessee

MECHATRONICS ENGINEERING

eering Engin in grads ology n h c a e T ns t positio ral senior , Gene al Mills r t e n g e G Vou h s, and Motor ries Indust

•L  aunched in partnership with Bridgestone

and Nissan in response to their needs

• Only Siemens Level 3 certification program in the U.S. •E  arned Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) accreditation in five years

• $65,000–$75,000 average yearly salary

•G  rads in senior positions at Boeing, Insequence Corp., and CalsonicKansei

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• Enhanced state-of-the-art computer-aided design software available to students from recent Siemens gift valued at $2.2 million

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•A  mong the fastest-growing degree programs in Tennessee, now boasting approximately 400 students

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MEDIA ARTS •S  tudent experiential learning opportunities include working relationship with Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival •B  oasts $1.7 million mobile production lab for students to work live events •N  o. 33 best public animation school in the U.S. (and one of the first digital animation programs in the world) •G  rads in senior positions at DreamWorks Animation, Industrial Light & Magic (ILM), ESPN, National Public Television, and Disney

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NURSING •9  4% pass rate for graduates on Nursing Licensure Exam in 2018 •M  aster of Science in Nursing (M.S.N.) program ranked No. 15 in the U.S. for online graduate programs by SR Education Research Publishers •G  rads in senior positions at Nashville General, Vanderbilt Medical Center, and LifePoint


RECORDING INDUSTRY

SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT

•N  o. 1 audio engineering program in U.S. (Audio Assemble)

•S  trong network of industry partners, including Schneider Electric, Schwan Cosmetics, Nissan North America, Yoplait/ General Mills, and Ingram Content Group

•T  op 25 for music business (Billboard and Hollywood Reporter)

•S  potlighted by NBC News as a standout in educating the next generation of music industry pros

•C  onducted inaugural Supply Chain Management Camp for area high school students, with plans to pursue community college partnerships that culminate with MTSU degrees

•G  rads in senior positions at CMT, BMI, and the Grand Ole Opry

•G  rads in senior positions at PepsiCo, State Farm, Nissan North America, The Hershey Co., and Walter Meier Manufacturing

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• 1 7 Grammy-winning projects by MTSU alumni and faculty (9 alumni nominated in 2019)

•N  ew undergraduate concentration (to go along with master’s program) to help meet industry demand of six to nine unfilled openings in the global distribution hub of Tennessee and midstate for each supply chain graduate

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TRUE IMPACT After graduation, MTSU alumni have a tremendous impact on middle Tennessee, the state, and indeed, the world!

ANNUAL EXTENDED REVENUE IN TENNESSEE

$9 billion generated by MTSU alumni

ECONOMIC IMPACT OF MTSU ALUMNI Alumni from Middle Tennessee State University generate more than $9 billion in extended total revenue annually for Tennessee businesses. This contributes significantly to state, regional, and local economies, according to the 2018 MTSU Alumni Impact study by the Business and Economic Research Center (BERC) at MTSU.

1.4% of Tennessee’s total business revenue of $655 billion

4% of the Nashville MSA’s total business revenue of $223 billion

23% of Rutherford County’s total business revenue of $41 billion


TRENDS AND KEY FINDINGS •T  he report shows the necessity of a college education for the increasingly competitive Tennessee job market, with 36% of U.S. workers who recently relocated to the state holding a bachelor’s degree or higher—compared to 25% of resident Tennesseans. •M  TSU alumni are concentrated in counties surrounding major cities in the state (and likewise in the nation). Alumni account for 71% of the recent degreed population increase in Rutherford County; 16% in the Nashville MSA, which is experiencing rapid economic growth; and 13% in Tennessee. •T  he total MTSU alumni impact is shown in the following data by analyzing: the value of a degree from MTSU (Core Impact); spending by alumni (Economic Contributions); and spending of alumni, plus that of their employees (Extended Economic Contributions).

MTSU ALUMNI IMPACT IN TENNESSEE Core Impact $3 billion

Economic Contributions $8.3 billion

Extended Contributions $9 billion

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The earning potential of MTSU alumni is substantially higher than in-state workers with only a high school diploma. MTSU’s importance as a vital learning environment for people across Tennessee will increase further as competition for educated, skilled workers continues to intensify. With calculations based on differences in purchasing power, Davidson ($613.7 million) and Rutherford ($603.5 million) top individual counties with the biggest additional business revenue from MTSU graduates’ earning power. Next were Williamson, Wilson, Sumner, Maury, Shelby, Hamilton, Knox, and Coffee, ranging in descending order from $564 million to $65 million.

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THE VALUE OF AN MTSU DEGREE

61


ADDED VALUE OF DEGREES EARNED $2.3 billion to greater Nashville economy

$2.16 billion in personal income

110,000 jobs including MTSU alumni

SPENDING BY MTSU ALUMNI BERC estimated the business revenue within Tennessee based on median income and numbers of degree-holders in each area. MTSU alumni support 126,747 jobs statewide as the result of their economic activities, with the largest impact in the Nashville MSA (90,976 jobs). The counties with the highest MTSU alumni-generated revenue are Rutherford, Davidson, Williamson, Wilson, Sumner, Maury, Shelby, Hamilton, Coffee, and Knox, ranging in descending order from $2.1 billion to $170 million.

ALUMNI ECONOMIC CONTRIBUTIONS $8.3 billion from activities within Tennessee

62

$6.3 billion to greater Nashville in business revenue

$2.1 billion to Rutherford County in business revenue


EXTENDED ECONOMIC IMPACT OF ALUMNI Clarksville MSA $57.5 million

Kingsport-Bristol MSA $23.8 million

Nashville MSA $6.8 billion

Johnson City MSA $25.8 million Morristown MSA $20.8 million Knoxville MSA $282.3 million Memphis MSA $295.7 million

Jackson MSA $59.7 million

Chattanooga MSA $164.5 million

Cleveland MSA $43.4 million

Using data from an earlier MTSU alumni survey, the BERC project also measured entrepreneurial activities of MTSU alumni and estimated the economic impact of both alumni and their employees. These calculations are very conservative. Davidson County ($1.7 billion) accounted for 20% of the business revenue MTSU alumni generated within the state. Williamson ($1.3 billion) surpassed expectations to rank second ahead of Rutherford ($1 billion), followed by Wilson, Sumner, Maury, Shelby, Coffee, Knox, and Bedford in the remaining top 10, ranging in descending order from $463 million to $146 million.

$1 billion to Rutherford County in business revenue

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$1.3 billion to Williamson County in business revenue

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$1.7 billion to Davidson County in business revenue

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$6.8 billion to Nashville MSA in economic activity

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ALUMNI AND THEIR EMPLOYEES

63


64


TRUE DISTINCTION Conclusion Formal oversight of MTSU shifted from the Tennessee Board of Regents (TBR) to the local Board of Trustees during the reporting period. Our new governance board met for its inaugural session in April 2017. As such, this report reflects the first year of activities under the new governance structure. It’s been a historic start with our Board of Trustees’ guidance and support. This governance allows the University to be more nimble and strategic. The board’s input and support is helping move us to the next level. This new level of independence for the former TBR universities is truly bold and potentially transformational for MTSU. I look forward to exploring more opportunities toward our mission of ensuring student success and providing more graduates for the state’s workforce.

–1

20

17

Board of Trustees group (l–r): Peyton J. Tracy, Joey Jacobs, Darrell Freeman, Pam Wright, Stephen Smith, Gov. Bill Lee, Sidney A. McPhee, J.B. Baker, Christine Karbowiak, Pete DeLay, W. Andrew Adams, and Tony Johnston

8

With our faculty, students, and staff working together to find creative solutions, we embrace the challenges facing higher education and chart new ways of propelling ourselves to reach MTSU’s potential. We are truly blessed to give back through our work and mission in so many meaningful ways! I thank each member of our faculty, staff, and administration for being a part of this important work, for choosing to make a difference in the lives of others, and for choosing MTSU as your University. I thank you for your passion and True Blue commitment as we begin a new year and forge MTSU’s bright path ahead!

65


TRUE SUCCESS ACT Scores Freshmen ACT Profile Fall 2017

Score

English Headcount

Math Headcount

%

Composite Headcount

%

%

5

180

6.61%

173

6.35%

87

3.20%

80

2.94%

1,136

41.72%

731

26.85%

784

28.79%

821

30.15%

902

33.13%

930

34.15%

1,336

49.06%

1,154

42.38%

474

17.41%

529

19.43%

393

14.43%

577

21.19%

9.14%

31

1.14%

355

13.04%

122

4.48%

91

3.34%

100%

2,723

100%

2,723

100%

2,723

100%

2,723

100%

7

11-15

248

9.11%

16-20

685

25.16%

21-25

1,070

39.29%

26-30

464

17.04%

249 2,723

TOTAL

Science Headcount

%

0.00%

01-10

31-36

Reading Headcount

%

0.26%

0

0.18%

1

0.04%

0

0.00%

Average ACT Scores 2015-2017 Fall 2015

Fall 2017

Fall 2016

25.0

25.0

25.0

20.0

20.0

20.0

15.0

15.0

15.0

10.0

10.0

10.0

5.0

5.0

5.0

0.0 ENGL

MATH

READ

MTSU Avg.

MTSU Avg. Nat'l Avg.

ENGL MATH READ 22.3 20.7 22.7 20.4 20.8 21.4

SCI

COMP

0.0 ENGL

Nat'l Avg.

SCI COMP 22.1 22.1 20.9 21.0

MATH

READ

MTSU Avg.

ENGL MATH READ 22.7 20.9 23.3 20.1 20.6 21.3

SCI

COMP

0.0 ENGL

MATH

READ

MTSU Avg.

Nat'l Avg.

SCI COMP 22.3 22.5 20.8 20.8

SCI

ENGL MATH READ 22.7 21.2 23.3 20.3 20.7 21.4

SCI COMP 22.5 22.6 21.0 21.0

Academic Years

66

2015-16 Category

MTSU (1)

National (2)

2016-17 MTSU (1)

National (2)

2017-18 MTSU (1)

COMP

Nat'l Avg.

National (2)


15.0

15.0

15.0

10.0

10.0

10.0

5.0

5.0

5.0

0.0 ENGL

MATH

READ

MTSU Avg.

SCI

COMP

0.0 ENGL

Nat'l Avg.

MATH

READ

SCI

MTSU Avg.

0.0

COMP

ENGL

MATH

READ

SCI

MTSU Avg.

Nat'l Avg.

COMP

Nat'l Avg.

ACT Scores MTSU Avg. Nat'l Avg. Score

ENGL MATH READ 22.3 20.7 22.7 20.4 20.8 21.4 English Headcount

01-10 16-20

ENGL MATH READ SCI COMP Freshmen ACT Profile 22.7 20.9 23.3 22.3 22.5 Fall 2017 20.1 20.6 21.3 20.8 20.8

Math Headcount

%

7

11-15

SCI COMP 22.1 22.1 20.9 21.0

0.26%

0

248 Category 9.11% 685 English 25.16%

180

21-25

1,070

26-30

464

1,136

39.29% Usage/Mechanics 17.04% Skills Rhetorical

902 474

9.14% 31 249 Mathematics 2,723 2,723 100% Elementary Algebra

31-36 TOTAL

Alg./Coord.Geometry Plane Geom./Trig.

0.00% 2015-16 5 (1) 6.61% 173 MTSU National (2) 41.72% 22.3 33.13% 11.3

731 22.2 930 11.2

17.41% 11.4 1.14% 20.7

529 11.4 355 22.3

Arts/Literature

20.0

1,336 11.2 393 11.4

49.06% 11.4 14.43% 11.6

1,154 11.3 577 11.4

42.38%

122 22.3 2,723 11.7

4.48% 20.8 100% 10.9

91 22.3 2,723 11.7

3.34%

11.3

10.8

11.3

11.2

10.2

11.2

10.6 22.3

22.9

22.7

11.5

11.7

11.7

11.7

11.4

11.7

11.5

22.3

21.6

22.3

22.0

22.4

22.620.0

22.1

22.7

Fall 11.7 2016

11.4 21.6

25.0

20.0 21.9 22.6 21.9 Composite (1) Only freshmen class that enrolled at MTSU. 15.0 (2) National average norm represents the HS Graduating Class in the previous year. (3) n/a = not available.

15.0 10.0 5.0 0.0 ENGL

MATH

READ

MTSU Avg.

SCI

COMP

10.0

5.0

5.0

0.0

Nat'l Avg.

MATH

READ

MTSU Avg.

SCI

2.94% 30.15% 21.19% 100%

23.0

Fall 2017 11.8 11.8

15.0

10.0

ENGL

0.00%

34.15% 11.3 19.43% 11.4

11.3

11.5

%

0

80 (2) National 821 22.3

10.6

25.0

0.04% 2017-18 3.20%(1) MTSU 28.79% 22.5

Average ACT11.2 Scores 2015-2017 10.3 10.3 22.9

Composite Headcount

%

87 (2) National 784 22.2

2,723 11.7

22.3

1

SCI COMP 22.5 22.6 21.0 21.0

6.35%(1) MTSU 26.85% 22.3

100% 10.9

FallSocial 2015 Studies/Sci.

Science Reasoning

Science Headcount

0.18% 2016-17

13.04% 20.7 100% 10.9

Reading

25.0

Reading

Academic Headcount Years%

%

ENGL MATH READ 22.7 21.2 23.3 20.3 20.7 21.4

COMP

Source: MTSU Admissions database; www.act.org

0.0 ENGL

MATH

READ

MTSU Avg.

Nat'l Avg.

SCI

COMP

Nat'l Avg.

ENGL MATH READ 22.7 20.9 23.3 20.1 20.6 21.3

SCI COMP 22.3 22.5 20.8 20.8

ENGL MATH READ 22.7 21.2 23.3 20.3 20.7 21.4

SCI COMP 22.5 22.6 21.0 21.0

Academic Years 2015-16 Category

MTSU (1)

National (2)

–1

SCI COMP 22.1 22.1 20.9 21.0

17

ENGL MATH READ 22.3 20.7 22.7 20.4 20.8 21.4

2016-17 MTSU (1)

National (2)

2017-18 MTSU (1)

National (2)

20

MTSU Avg. Nat'l Avg.

8

19

67


Snapshot of Fall 2017 Student Body Total Headcount = 21,913

Gender

Status

14,000

20,000 11,966

12,000

18,000

10,000

16,575

16,000

9,947

14,000 12,000

8,000

10,000

6,000

8,000

4,000

5,338

6,000 4,000

2,000

2,000

0 Male 45%

0

Female 55%

Full-Time 76%

Part-Time 24%

College 5,212 Types of Institutions From Which Undergraduate Students Transferred 4,590 5,000 by Class and Gender 4,000 3,095 Fall 2017 2,510 2,505 3,000 6,000

2,000 1,000 0 Tennessee Institutions All 2-Year All 4-Year All Less Than 2-Year All Others

Sub-totals Out of State

7,000

Freshmen Men Basic and Applied 253 Sciences 118 23.8%

Women Beh. and Health Sciences 397 20.9%

Sophomore1,173 Men Business 14.1% 419

Women

Men

Education 5.4% 555

Liberal Arts 11.4% 821

221 4 1

Grand Totals

68

5,000 4,000

Women

Women

Men

Non Degree 1,311Seeking 2,546 4.9%

Women

TOTAL

3,305 1,194 14 12

5,851 2,091 25 19

1,436

1,827

3,461

4,525

7,986

266 6,033

579

501

1,224

1,131

2,355

8

14

53

42

90

105

1,362

1,629

2,068

2,370

4,775

5,761

4 2

377

567

601

782 Classification 1,047 1,349

129

138

209

226

24

40

5

9

745

815 3,762

1,017

307 4,505

300 3 4

381 2 0

3,000

2,390

2,000 1,000

All Classes

897 11 7

225 1 1

530

1,079

507 6 3

177 1 4

4,300

Men

Media & University Entertainment 1,053 College 1,042 11.5% 8.0%

162 4 4

6,000

Unknown

1,749 Senior

Junior

923

195

10,536


4,000

4,000

2,000

2,000

0 Male 45%

0 Female Snapshot of Fall 2017 Student Body

Total Headcount = 21,913

11,966

18,000

3,095

9,947

1,173

Beh. and Health Sciences 20.9%

Business 14.1%

Education 5.4%

6,033

College

3,762 4,590

2,390 3,095

2,510

2,505 1,173

Freshman 20% Basic and Applied Sciences 23.8%

Part-Time 24%

4,505

4,300 5,212

Full-Time 76%

Sophomore 17%

Beh. and Health Sciences 20.9%

Business 14.1%

Junior 20% Education 5.4%

Senior 28% Liberal Arts 11.4%

Media & Entertainment 11.5%

923 1,749 1,079 Undergrad. Special 4% University College 8.0%

Graduate 11%

Non Degree Seeking 4.9%

Classification 49

4,505

–1

4,300

8

6,033

3,762

3,000

2,390

2,000 1,000

Non Degree Seeking 4.9% 5,338

Classification 0

6,000

4,000

University College 8.0%

2,000

Female 55%

7,000

5,000

1,079

Liberal 8,000 Arts Media & 11.4% Entertainment 11.5% 6,000

6,000

0

1,749

12,000

4,000

Male 45%

7,000

5,000 3,000 4,000 2,000 3,000 1,000 2,000 0 1,000

2,510

10,000 Basic and Applied Sciences 23.8%

0

5,000

16,575

16,000 2,505 14,000

2,000

6,000 4,000

Status

923

17

4,000

Part-Time 24%

20,000

4,590

4,000 12,000

6,000 0

College

Gender

5,212

3,000 10,000 2,000 8,000 1,000

Full-Time 76%

55%

20

6,000 14,000 5,000

5,338

6,000

69


Headcount, Student Credit Hours, & Full-Time Headcount, Student Credit Hours, & Full-Time Equivalents - Fall EquivalentsSummary Summary - Fall 20172017 Undergraduate

Total

Full-Time Part-Time

Student Credit Full-Time Student Hours (SCH) Credit Equivalents (FTE)Full-Time 15,111 Hours226,667 (SCH) Equivalents (FTE) 22,293 1,486 226,667 15,111 248,960 16,597 7,760 22,293 647 1,486 8,044 248,960 670 16,597 15,804 1,317

Full-TimeTotal Part-TimeFull-Time Graduate Part-Time Total Total 763 7,760 17,914 Total Full-Time 21,913 264,764 Part-Time 1,627 8,044 Note: Totals may vary fom the summed parts due to rounding. One Undergraduate FTE=15 credit hours and one Graduate FTE=12 Total 2,390 15,804 credit hours.

Undergraduate Graduate

Headcount 15,812 Headcount 3,711 15,812 19,523 763 3,711 1,627 19,523 2,390

21,913

264,764

647 670 1,317

17,914

Note: Totals may vary fom the summed parts due to rounding. One Undergraduate FTE=15 credit hours and one Graduate FTE=12 credit hours.

Headcount by College, Classification and Gender Headcount by College, Classification and Gender Gender - Academic Year 2014-15 to 2016-17 Term

Summer Term

Summer

Fall

Spring

Fall

Spring

Gender

FemaleGender Male

Female Male

3,755

45%

Total Total FemaleFemale

8,398 8,398

12,327 12,327

100% 100%

Male Male

10,402 10,402

Total Total

Female

Female

Male

Male Total TotalTotal Unduplicated

Unduplicated Total 70

Gender - Academic Year 2014-15 to 2016-17 2014-15 % of Total 2015-16 % of Total 2016-17 % of Total 2014-15 % of Total 2016-17 % of Total 4,643 % of Total 55% 2015-16 4,364 55% 4,280 55% 4,643 55% 4,364 55% 4,280 55% 3,755 45% 3,571 45% 3,544 45%

College Basic and Applied Sciences

College Behavioral and Health Sciences Basic andBusiness Applied Sciences

22,729 22,729 11,541

11,541

9,742

9,742 21,283

21,283 27,166

3,571

45%

54% 54%

7,935 7,935

12,312 12,312

100%100%

46% 46%

10,199 10,199

45% 45% 100%

100% 100%

22,511

22,511

55% 55%

100%

54%

11,426

55%

46%

9,477

45%

54% 46% 100%

100%

27,166

11,426

9,477 20,903

20,903 26,837

26,837

55%

3,544

7,824 100%

9,929

9,92945%

12,121 12,12155% 22,050 11,114 9,122

4,656 2,770

21% 12%

2015

4,630 % of Total 21% 23

4,734

2016 4,457

4,734 2,706

55%

11,114

45%

100% 55% 45% 100% 55% 45% 100%

26,134

2015 Total 2016 College%- ofFall 2015 to 2017 % of Total 21%

100% 22,050

100% 45% 20,236 9,122 100% 100% 26,134 20,236

College - Fall 2015 to 2017 4,656

45%

7,824

2017

% of Total

21%

4,838

22%

12% 21%

2,667

4,83812%

% of Total 20%

2017 4,293

% of Total 20%

22%


12,327

54%

12,312

55%

12,121

55%

Male

10,402

46%

10,199

45%

9,929

45%

Total

22,729

100%

22,511

100%

22,050

100%

Female

11,541

54%

11,426

55%

11,114

55%

Total

21,283

100%

20,903

100%

20,236

100%

Headcount College, Classification Gender Headcount byby College, Classification and Gender 9,742 46% 9,477 and 45% 9,122 Male Term

27,166 Gender - Academic Year 2014-1526,837 to 2016-17

Gender

Summer Gender Female Term College Summer FemaleMale Total Basic and Applied Male Sciences Fall

Female

Behavioral and Health Sciences Total Business Fall EducationSpring

Male

FemaleTotal Male Female

Total Male Total Media and Entertainment Spring Female Unduplicated Total Non-Degree Seeking Male Liberal Arts

University College Total Total Undergraduates Unduplicated Total College

Graduate Basic Studies and Applied Sciences

Total

Behavioral and Health Sciences Business

26,134

Gender - Academic Year 2014-15 to 2016-17 2014-15 % of Total 2015-16 % of Total 2016-17 % of Total College 2015 to 2017 4,643 % -ofFall 55% 4,364 55% 4,280 55% 2014-15 Total 2015-16 % of Total 2016-17 % of Total 3,755 % of Total 45% 20154,643 55% 8,398 100% 4,656 21% 3,755 45% 12,327

4,630 8,398 10,402 2,770 12,327 22,729 11,541 794 10,402 9,742 2,316 22,729 21,283 2,402 11,541

27,166

54%

21% 100% 46% 12% 54% 100% 54% 4% 46% 46% 10% 100% 100%

11% 54% 3% 46%

3,571 45% 2016 Total 4,364 % of 55% 7,935 100% 4,734 21% 3,571 45% 12,312

4,457

7,935 10,199 2,706 12,312 22,511

11,426 732 10,199 9,477 2,292 22,511

20,903

2,436 11,426 26,837 695 9,477

694 9,742 1,878 8% 1,641 21,283 100% 20,903 College - Fall 2015 to 2017 20,140 89% 19,693 27,166 26,837 2015

2,371 4,656

% of Total

11% 21%

2016

12%

55% 45% 3% 45%100% 10%

100%

4,838 3,544 55% 4,293 7,82445%

9,929 2,667 22,050 12,121 100%

63355% 9,929 9,122 22,050 2,22745%

11,114

100% 11% 20,236 11,114 2,450 55% 26,134 3% 923 45% 9,122 7% 1,492 100% 20,236

% of Total

89%

19,523 26,134 % of Total

2017

21% 11%

4,838

2,39022%

2,706

12%

2,667

12%

2,227

4,83810%

4% 45% 7% 100% 89% 11%

100%

2,402 11% 2,436 11% 20% 2,450 4,29311% 4,630 21% 4,457 20% 2015 % of Total 2016 % of Total 2017 % of Total 694 3% 695 3% 12% 923 2,667 4% 2,770 12% 2,706 12% 4,505 20% 4,273 19% 4,383 7% 20% 1,878 8% 1,641 7% 1,492 794 4% 732 3% 633 3% 3,978 18% 3,922 18% 3,695 17% 20,140 89% 19,693 89% 19,523 89% 2,316 10% 2,292 10% 2,227 10% 2,371 11% 2,357 11% 20% 2,390 4,48911% 4,566 20% 4,437 20% 2,402 11% 2,436 100% 11% 21,913 2,450 11% 22,511 100% 22,050 100% 6,397 28% 6,366 29% 6,033 28% 694 3% 695 3% 923 4% 694 3% 695 3% 923 4% 1,878 8% 1,641 7% 1,492 7% Classification - Fall 146 1% 2015 to 2017 136 1% 161 1% 20,140 89% 19,693 89% 19,523 89% 1,850 % of Total 8% 8%2017 1,826 8% 2015 2016 1,831 % of Total % of Total 2,371 11% 2,357 11% 4,505 20% 4,273 19% 11% 4,383 2,390 50 0% 83 0% 10620% 0%

Total Sophomore Doctoral Total

Junior

Senior Undergraduate Special Graduate Special

Classification

Master's

FreshmanSpecialist in Education

3,978 22,511 325

18% 100% 1%

3,922 22,050

18% 100%

22,511 6,397

100% 28%

6,366

22,050

29%

146

1%

4,566

20%

307

4,437

Classification - Fall 2017 694 3% 2015 to 695 2015

1,850

4,50550

8%

20% 0%

2016

3,695 21,91317%

297

100% 1%

6,033

21,91328%

100%

3%

923

4%

1%

161

1%

8%

1,826

20%

1%

100%

% of Total

1,831

4,273 83

22%

19% 0% 1% 18%

4,489

20%

2017

% of Total

8%

20%

297

4,383 0% 3,695 1%

100% 20% 21,913

4,489 100%

20%

106

18% 1%

3,922 307

20% 100%

4,437 22,050

6,397

28%

6,366

29%

6,033

28%

Undergraduate Special

694

3%

695

3%

923

4%

Graduate Special

146

1%

136

1%

161

1%

1,850

8%

1,831

8%

1,826

8%

50

0%

83

0%

106

0%

Junior

Total

Senior

Master's Specialist in Education

3,978 325

% of Total

136

% of Total 3%

4,566 22,511

17%

20

Sophomore Doctoral

10% 21%

2017 633

10% 100% 11% 55%

Entertainment BehavioralMedia and and Health Sciences Classification Business Non-Degree Seeking FreshmanUniversity College Education Sophomore Total Undergraduates Liberal Arts Graduate Studies Junior Media andTotal Entertainment Senior Non-Degree Seeking Undergraduate Special University College Graduate Special Total Undergraduates Master's

4,656 4,734 Classification - 21% Fall 2017 2,316 10% 2015 to 2,292

% of3% Total

4,293 21,91320%

12% 55% 3% 45%

2015

Classification

2016732

20% 100%

22% 45% 20% 100%

College Education Basic andLiberal Applied ArtsSciences

Graduate Freshman Studies Specialist in Education

794 % of Total 4%

20%

45%100% 12% 100% 55%

12,121

2,357 4,734

4,630 - Fall 21% 4,457 22,511 100% 22,050 College 2015 to 2017 2,770

55%

3,544 20174,28045% % of Total 55% 7,824 100%

8

Unduplicated Total

45%

–1

Spring

Female

17

Fall

71


Undergraduate Majors by College Fall 2017 Total = 19,523 Non-Degree Seeking 923 3%

University College 1,492 8%

Basic and Applied Sciences 4,838 25%

Mass Communications 2,450 12%

Liberal Arts 2,227 11% Education 633 3%

72

Behavioral and Health Sciences 4,293 22% Business 2,667 14%


Full-Time and Part-Time Headcount Fall Terms 2007 - 2017 Percent Change 1.2% -7.2% -6.3% -1.0% -5.4% -5.1% -1.6% 4.1% 4.3% 2.4% 1.2%

Number of Students 5,338 5,825 6,132 5,242 6,218 6,720 6,773 6,447 5,983 5,454 5,251 ,

Part-Time No. Change -794 583 890 -976 -502 -53 326 464 529 203 168

TOTAL Percent Change -12.9% 11.1% 17.0% -15.7% -7.5% -0.8% 5.1% 7.8% 9.7% 3.9% 3.3%

Number of Students 21,913 22,050 22,511 22,729 23,881 25,394 26,442 26,430 25,188 23,872 23,246 ,

No. Change -598 -679 -218 -1,152 -1,513 -1,048 12 1,242 1,316 626 383

Percent Change -2.7% -3.0% -1.0% -4.8% -6.0% -4.0% 0.05% 4.9% 5.5% 2.7% 1.7%

Fall Semester Growth, 2015 - 2017

8

158

New Students

New First Time Freshmen

Fall 2015 2,839

Fall 2016 2,893

Fall 2017 3,016

% Change 2015-2017 6.2%

17

–1

Headcount by Student Type Fall 2015 - 2017

20

Year 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007

Full-Time Number of No. Students Change 16,575 196 16,225 -1,262 16,379 -1,108 17,487 -176 17,663 -1,011 18,674 -995 19,669 -314 19,983 778 19,205 787 18,418 423 17,995 215 ,

73


Student Enrollment Hours Carried by Classification - Fall 2017 Student Credit Hours

Total

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Freshman

2 0 31 6 1 55 18 7 63 26 11 462 384 427 1,775 870 154 89 1 1 0 0 0 4,383

Sophomore

5 0 44 10 1 83 35 12 95 49 22 601 606 333 945 611 138 90 10 3 1 0 1 3,695

Junior

8 0 83 20 4 155 51 30 141 55 32 1,051 501 264 1,297 452 121 198 13 3 8 2 0 4,489

Senior

17 5 341 59 7 494 139 61 362 139 43 1,490 575 329 1,090 435 130 266 31 9 9 1 1 6,033

Undergrad Special

59 0 649 12 1 126 9 1 27 5 0 13 3 4 11 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 923

54

74

Graduate Special

0 0 111 4 0 33 3 2 5 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 161

Master's

59 10 225 30 36 628 95 46 391 73 47 133 23 12 17 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1,826

Ed.S.

0 0 8 5 2 87 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 106

Doctoral

69 4 32 0 4 113 8 11 32 8 2 14 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 297

Total Students

219 19 1,524 146 56 1,774 360 170 1,117 355 157 3,768 2,092 1,369 5,135 2,371 543 644 55 16 18 3 2 21,913

Total Credit Hours

219 38 4,572 584 280 10,644 2,520 1,360 10,053 3,550 1,727 45,216 27,196 19,166 77,025 37,936 9,231 11,592 1,045 320 378 66 46 264,764


High School

Overall Growth

% Change 2015-2017 6.2% -3.0% -25.0% 17.8% 8.2% 1100.0% 144.4% 3.5% -21.1% -5.5% -4.8% -4.6% -61.3% 30.4% -5.3% 113.5% -10.6% -6.8% -10.4% -10.8% -23.4% -4.3% 133.3% -44.4% 8.3% 25.0% -43.5% -10.9% 97.0%

22,511

22,050

21,913

-2.7%

8

Re-Enrollees

Fall 2017 3,016 1,958 15 86 528 12 22 5,637 929 2,957 3,426 5,445 103 60 1,233 79 262 14,494 121 182 187 379 7 15 65 15 13 984 798

–1

Returning Students

New First Time Freshmen New Transfer New Undergraduate Special New Graduate Special New Masters Candidate New EdS New Doctoral Student Total New Students Freshman Continuing Sophomore Junior Senior Undergraduate Special Graduate Special Continuing Masters Candidate EdS Continuing Doctoral Continuing Total Returning Students Freshman Readmitted Sophomore Readmitted Junior Readmitted Senior Readmitted Undergraduate Special Graduate Special Masters Candidates EdS Readmitted Doctoral Readmitted Total Re-Enrollees Concurrent High School

Fall 2016 2,893 1,865 15 66 486 19 30 5,374 961 3,111 3,517 5,741 159 55 1,254 54 256 15,108 136 184 213 377 4 15 91 10 21 1,051 517

17

New Students

Fall 2015 2,839 2,018 20 73 488 1 9 5,448 1,178 3,129 3,598 5,705 266 46 1,302 37 293 15,554 135 204 244 396 3 27 60 12 23 1,104 405

20

Headcount by Student Type Fall 2015 - 2017

75


Age Level Headcount Age Headcount Age Headcount First-time Freshman 2,839 19 2,893 19 3,016 Continuing Freshman 1,667 21 1,387 21 1,373 Sophomore 3,977 21 3,917 21 3,689 Admission Application Statistics: Three-year Enrollment Trends Junior 4,566 23 4,435 23 4,489 AdmissionFall Application Statistics:2017 Three-year Enrollment Trends 2015-Fall Senior 6,397Fall 2015-Fall 2017 27 6,366 27 6,033 Fall 2015 Fall 2016 Undergrad Special 694 695 19Fall 2017 923 Fall 2017 Fall 2015 Fall20 2016 20,140 23 (%) 19,693 19,523 Total Undergraduate Men Women (%) Total Men Women Men (%)23Women (%) Men (%) Women (%) (%) Total Men (%) (%)Women (%) Total Total Men (%) TotalWomen Graduate Special 146 37 136 35 Number of Applicants 3,579 43.8% 4,585 56.2% 8,164 3,616 42.4% 4,922 57.6% 8,538 4,393 44.2% 5,545 55.8% 1619,938 Master's 1,850 31 1,831 31 1,8265,898 5,545 3,579of Admissions 43.8% 4,585 56.2% 57.6% 5,858 8,538 44.2% Number 2,549 43.0% 8,164 3,378 57.0%3,616 5,927 42.4% 2,494 42.6% 4,922 3,364 57.4% 2,612 44.3% 4,393 3,286 55.7% Specialist in Education 50 35 83 38 106 Number Enrolled (full-time) 1,300 46.5% 1,493 53.5% 2,793 1,247 44.3% 1,568 55.7% 2,815 1,398 47.0% 1,578 53.0% 2,976 2,549 43.0% 3,378 57.0% 5,927 2,494 325 42.6% 3,364 3,286 Doctoral 37 57.4% 307 5,858 372,612 44.3% 297 Number Enrolled (part-time) 22 47.8% 24 52.2% 46 10 38.5% 16 61.5% 26 15 37.5% 25 62.5% 40 2,371 32 2,357 32 2,390 Total Graduate Total Enrolled46.5% (full-time/part-time) 1,322 46.6% 2,793 1,517 53.4%1,247 2,839 44.3% 1,257 44.2% 1,568 1,584 55.8% 2,841 2,815 1,413 46.9% 1,398 1,300 1,493 53.5% 47.0% Total 22,511 24 55.7% 22,050 24 1,603 53.1% 21,9133,016 1,578 % of Admission (full-time/part-time)

e)

51.9%

22

47.8%

24

52.2%

1,322

46.6%

1,517 Age

53.4%

51.9% 17 or less 44.9%

46

44.9%

47.9%

10

38.5%

50.4%

16

47.1%

48.5%

61.5%

26

54.1%

Source: Census Student Headcount by Age Group- Fall 2017 2,839 1,257 44.2% 1,584 55.8% 2,841

1,413

Admission Application Statistics: Three-year Enrollment Rate Fall 2015-Fall 2017 Fall 2015 Fall 2016Fall 2017

Undergraduate Graduate Total Number 8,164 50.4% 8,538 9,938 47.9%12,000 47.1% 48.5% 662 662 3.4% 0 0.0% Number 5,927 5,858 5,898 10,000 Total Enr 8,000 7,571

18-20

6,000

21-24

7,559 4,000

2,839

2,841 38.8%

3,016

38.7%

48.8%

51.1%

37.5%

25

62

46.9%

1,603

53

54.1% 3.0%

2

0.1%

7,573

34.6%

521

21.8%

8,080

36.9%

48

Source: Census

2,000 Admission Rate 2,664 13.6% Application 1,163 Statistics: 48.7% Three-year 3,827 Enrollment 17.5%

25-34

2017 Fall 2015 Fall 2016 1,052 5.4% 29.1% 1,747 Fall 2015 Fall 2016Fall 2017 695Fall 2015-Fall Number of Applicants 8,164 8,538 Number 8,164 15 8,538 0.1% 9,938 Number of Admissions 5,927 5,858 Over 6412,000 9 0.4% 24 Total Enrolled (full-time/part-time) 2,839 2,841 Number 5,927 5,858 5,898 Total 10,000 19,523 100% 2,390 100% 21,913 Total Enr 2,839 2,841 3,016 8,000 -

35-64

6,000 4,000 2,000 Headcount -

76

15

8.0%

Fall 2017 9,938 5,898

0.1%

3,016

100%

Student Headcount Age 25 and Over Fall 2015 Fall 2016 Fall 2017 6,364 6,011 5,598 Fall 2015

18

19 21 21 23 26 18 23 ( 35 30 55 39 55 37 32 53 24

Fall 2016

Fall 2017

Number of Applicants

8,164

8,538

9,938

Number of Admissions

5,927

5,858

5,898

Total Enrolled (full-time/part-time)

2,839

2,841

3,016


Student Age Information - Fall 2015 - 2017 Average Age by Student Level- Fall 2015-2017 Fall 2015 Headcount Age 2,839 1,667 3,977 4,566 6,397 694 20,140 146 1,850 50 325 2,371 22,511

Level First-time Freshman Continuing Freshman Sophomore Junior Senior Undergrad Special Total Undergraduate Graduate Special Master's Specialist in Education Doctoral Total Graduate Total

19 21 21 23 27 20 23 37 31 35 37 32 24

Fall 2016 Headcount Age 2,893 1,387 3,917 4,435 6,366 695 19,693 136 1,831 83 307 2,357 22,050

19 21 21 23 27 19 23 35 31 38 37 32 24

Fall 2017 Age Headcount 3,016 19 1,373 21 3,689 21 4,489 23 6,033 26 923 18 19,523 23 161 35 1,826 30 106 39 297 37 2,390 32 21,913 24

Student Headcount by Age Group- Fall 2017 Undergraduate 662 3.4%

Graduate 0 0.0%

Total 662

3.0%

18-20

7,571

38.8%

2

0.1%

7,573

34.6%

21-24

7,559

38.7%

521

21.8%

8,080

36.9%

25-34

2,664

13.6%

1,163

48.7%

3,827

17.5%

35-64

1,052

5.4%

695

29.1%

1,747

8.0%

15

0.1%

9

0.4%

24

0.1%

19,523

100%

2,390

100%

21,913

100%

Over 64

Student Headcount Age 25 and Over Fall 2015 Fall 2016 Fall 2017 6,364 6,011 5,598

8

Headcount

–1

Total

17

17 or less

20

Age

77


THE DOLLARS AND CENTS Unaudited Statement of Revenues, Expenses, and Changes in Net Assets For the Year Ended June 30, 2017 with Comparative Figures for the Year Ended June 30, 2018

Revenues Operating Revenues Net Tuition and Fees Operating Grants and Contracts Sales and Services of Educational/Other Activities Net Auxiliary Enterprises Other Operating Revenues

Total Operating Revenues

Other Revenues State Appropriations Capital Appropriations Nonoperating Grants and Contracts Gifts and Capital Gifts Investment income-Net of Expense Other Nonoperating and Capital Revenues

Total Revenues

Expenses Operating Expenses Salaries and Wages Benefits Utilities, Supplies, and Other Services Scholarships and Fellowships Depreciation Expense

Total Operating Expenses

Other Expenses

Interest on Capital Asset-Related Debt Other Nonoperating and Capital

Total Expenses

78

2018 2017 2016 2015 $131,627,943.38 $11,528,522.81 $20,370,284.64 $26,737,690.69 $187,146.38

$129,970,164.02 $11,413,418.10 $20,032,596.43 $26,048,389.13 $188,543.02

$129,129,037.42 $11,833,267.36 $20,117,013.77 $25,753,240.82 $358,320.91

$128,423,342.20 $12,416,146.01 $17,320,945.95 $26,093,259.76 $433,319.39

$190,451,587.90

$187,653,110.70

$187,190,880.28

$184,687,013.31

$97,834,560.44 $6,050,949.42 $73,580,430.00 $7,261,307.71 $2,690,515.47 96,028.55

$91,620,650.00 $11,653,575.99 $69,814,104.00 $7,525,128.66 $1,680,833.04 -

$86,841,312.50 $18,678,650.17 $71,227,199.00 $5,098,814.60 $953,870.77 1,982.40

$83,799,712.50 $10,783,661.95 $74,087,082.00 $7,834,915.37 $826,345.62 -

$377,965,379.49 $369,947,402.39 $369,992,709.72

$362,018,730.75

2018 2017 2016 2015 $168,128,603.17 $60,630,109.11 $82,206,415.29 $30,840,252.01 $20,584,848.16

$362,390,227.74

$161,200,829.16 $56,811,675.61 $80,345,307.39 $30,211,807.71 $20,614,210.46

$159,301,040.63 $52,263,505.62 $73,687,911.70 $31,719,982.04 $19,416,010.33

$157,108,461.40 $50,595,871.67 $80,164,600.98 $34,128,720.88 $19,444,805.86

$349,183,830.33 $336,388,450.32

$341,442,460.79

2018

2017

2016

2015

$6,587,795.95 $0.00

$7,839,005.07 $41,799.54

$8,185,298.34 $133,775.54

$7,738,603.56 $269,713.78

$368,978,023.69 $357,064,634.94 $344,707,524.20

$349,450,778.13


Net Assets

Net Assets-Beginning of Year Increase (Decrease) in Net Assets Cumulative Effect of Change in Accounting Principal Prior Period Adjustment

Net Assets-End of Year

Total Operating Revenues

Total Revenues

Total Operating Expenses

Total Expenses

2018

2017

2016

2015

$396,047,797.56 $8,987,355.80 - (13,504,448.93)

$383,165,030.11 $12,882,767.45 - -

$361,120,919.44 $25,285,185.52 - (3,241,074.85)

$378,104,821.82 $12,567,949.62 ($29,551,852.00) -

$391,530,704.43

$396,047,797.56

$383,165,030.11

$361,120,919.44

2018

2017

2016

2015

$190.5MM

$187.7 MM

$187.2 MM

$184.6 MM

2018

2017

2016

2015

$378.0MM

$369.9 MM

$370.0 MM

$362.0 MM

2018

2017

2016

2015

$362.4MM

$349.2 MM

$336.3 MM

$341.4 MM

2018 $369. 0MM

Net Assets-End Of Year

2018 $391.5MM

2017

2016

2015

$357.1 MM

$344.7 MM

$349.4 MM

2017

2016

2015

$396.0 MM

$383.1 MM

$361.1 MM

University Editor Drew Ruble Contributing Editor Carol Stuart Director of Creative Marketing Solutions Kara Hooper University Photographers Andy Heidt, J. Intintoli, Eric Sutton, Kimi Conro Design by Sherry Wiser George 100 Copies Printed at CMS-Printing

0519-7707 / Middle Tennessee State University does not discriminate against students, employees, or applicants for admission or employment on the basis of race, color, religion, creed, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity/expression, disability, age, status as a protected veteran, genetic information, or any other legally protected class with respect to all employment, programs, and activities sponsored by MTSU. The Assistant to the President for Institutional Equity and Compliance has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the non-discrimination policies and can be reached at Cope Administration Building 116, 1301 East Main Street, Murfreesboro, TN 37132; Marian.Wilson@mtsu.edu; or 615-898-2185. The MTSU policy on non-discrimination can be found at mtsu.edu/iec.

79


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