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MOUNTAIN town Winter/Spring 2021

C O L O R A D O ’ S M O U N TA I N T O W N M A G A Z I N E

Clear Creek County

+ Wellness +

Get Out & Explore

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TRILOGY M O U N TA I N - C O N T E M P O R A R Y D E S I G N

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YOUR MOUNTAIN SPIRIT

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Locals' Choice

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publisher’s greeting

What a long strange trip it has been. We’re back and it feels Good! While we hunkered down in our homes we kept news and information coming our on our website and social media feeds. There was a lot but printing a magazine was out of the question as there was no place to distribute them. We saw no good in printing a ton of publications without anywhere to place them, until now, and the future although uncertain feels much brighter.   We open the new Winter/Spring magazine with our story on Clear Creek County. The communities of this county offer everything but golf. It is a locale worth some exploration time. Pull off at any one of their I-70 exits and you will find something to explore.  We have some trip ideas within the pages of the magazine. These stories are here to help you find new ways to explore our mountain towns and their surrounding environments. It will make you want to pack your bags, backpacks, or vehicles to head out and explore.  We spent a lot of time in our homes over the past six months and rediscovered all of its nooks and crannies,

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some of which may need some upgrading as we enter into the warmer months. Our Real Estate section covers the gambit; New homes, decorating, financial planning, and ways to keep your home healthy. Oh! We have a new department, Pets. If you live in a mountain town, then most likely you have a pet. My pup goes everywhere with me, and we want to make sure all of our fur babies are well taken care of. We see a lot of poo bags along the trail and we think it is high time to end that trend. Pack it out easily without the smell and yuck with our suggestions. As always we have some great articles on where to eat. Our restaurants need your support so read, enjoy and get out, it’s still winter but the warm sun is peeking its head out. Check the calendar too. There are some events popping up to discover and a feeling of good change in the air. Cheers! Holly Battista-Resignolo, Publisher


Hideaway Park


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contents The next stop, Crested Butte. At this point in our trip, Mort and I thought we were pretty good at riding our lightening-fast bikes, but it was time to test just how good on the 401.

Hot Springs/ Aspen

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PLACE FAVORITES MOUNTAIN DISPATCH 20 ART 22 TRAIL 24 TREKS & TRAVEL 26 FAMILY 28 PETS 30 ENTREPRENEUR 33 WELLNESS 34 Chris Anthony’s Knee 46 HOMES & REALTY 54 STAY 56 DINE LOCAL 68 GO!GUIDE 74 RAISE A GLASS

Magazine Cover Image ‘In Search of Pretty’ photo by Holly Go Spritely

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The wildflowers on the 401 were literally up to our handlebars and they clicked, twinkled and clicked against them as we rode. My clothes became wet with dew from the flowers, and my skin was a little bit itchy, but Mort and I didn’t mind because the views took our mind off of it.

Next stop, Ouray to eat ice cream! At the end of our day mountain biking, Mort and I thought things couldn’t get any better. But our next stop was Ouray, and Western Town surrounded by jagged mountains to eat some ice cream! In the center of town was an old fashioned ice cream shop and candy store. And because we were on a special trip, our parents let us order a double scoop. I said to Mort, “If you added gummies to this ice cream it would be life changing.” Mort was too busy eating to comment.

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Next stop, Telluride. Telluride has the only public gondola transportation system in the world. Mort, my li’l sis and I decided to ride the gondolas around and around again with my dad. If you looked down from the gondola you could sometimes see deer, elk and even a bear if you were lucky.

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PLAY WELL

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GUIDING MOUNTAIN RETIREMENT STRATEGIES

published by

MTN Town Media Productions

publisher

Holly Battista-Resignolo

associate publisher Joy Elizabeth Martin

communications Gaynia Battista

contributors

Scott Rappold, Steve Snyder, Jason Blevins - The Colorado Sun, Holly Resignolo, Pepper Hamilton, Brooke Johnson, Scott Pugsley, Gaynia Battista, Steven Smith, Steven Callaway Brown, Lauren Glendenning, Luis G. Benitez

advertising sales

Sharon Burson, Isabelle Kunz

visionaries

Linda Rokos Watts, Mark Battista, Noelle Resignolo

Get on the RightPath to Financial Well Being Supporrng Your Reerement Planning with an Array of Fee-Only Services: Income Harvessng Estate and Legacy Investment Planning Wealth Management Sustainable Invessng Philanthropy Contact Steven R. Smith, JD, CFP Your Mountain Reerement Resource Expert

www.RightPathInvestments.com 970-668-5525

cover image

Tara Noelle Photography

method behind the means Publications Printers

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Please visit us at MTNTownMagazine.com to subscribe to our publication released quarterly

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Contact our corporate office or request a Media Kit: Email: MTNTownMagazine@gmail.com Office Phone: 970 485 0269 www.mtntownmediaproductions.com

features

If you would like us to consider you for a feature, please contact us at 970 485 0269 or email us at mtntownmagazine@gmail.com 2018 MTN Town Magazine. All rights reserved. No portion may be duplicated, in whole or in part, without the written consent of its publishers. Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this publication. The publisher assumes no responsibility for accuracy of information or omissions from the material provided. MTN Town Magazine cannot be held liable for the quality or performance of goods and services rendered by the advertisers published in this magazine.


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place

Clear Creek County by Holly Resignolo

A must stop for those looking for Food, History, Fun & Adventure! 12

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Coming from the Colorado West there’s hardly a mountain town community member who doesn’t pass through the county of Clear Creek at some point each year. If you’re not familiar with its location then all you have to do is exit the Johnson tunnel heading East on Interstate 70 and for about 30 miles along that stretch you will find yourself in Clear Creek County. This county’s first notable landmark is the Loveland Ski area. You literally pass underneath it as you drive through the tunnel and Exit 216 will lead you to its entrance. Loveland (pictured left) was founded and has continually operated since 1936 when a portable rope tow operation was installed by J.C. Blickensderfer as snow began to fall. It is still in many ways a secret and is listed as one of the Colorado Gems ski areas created by Ski country USA. Loveland Ski Area boasts one of the longest seasons in Colorado, often opening mid-October and running through early May. Is a fantastic family ski area that offers everything to make a first-timer feel at home as well as challenge expert skiers and snowboarders on their exceptional Alpine terrain. As you continue down Interstate 70 you can exit at Bakerville and proceed to Grays and Torreys trailheads for a challenging climb up these two famous 14ers. These mountains are the 9th and 11th highest mountains in Colorado respectively and are explored heavily in the summer months. The town of Silver Plume is a fabulous pit stop. Incorporated in 1880, This historic “Colorado ghost town that never dies” Is a former silver mining camp. There are some beautiful homes and buildings as well as a mercantile, coffee shop and the famous Bread Bar. You can jump on the Georgetown Loop Railroad from the Silver Plume Depot for a historic rail adventure in this valley. Stretch your legs and take a hike on the Argentine Trail or the 7:30 Mine Trail. Just a few miles downhill from Silver Plume is Georgetown. This historic town was established in 1859 during the Historic Colorado Gold Rush. It is a picture of Victorian living that offers history adventure and fantastic food and drink. You could spend an entire day exploring the town of Georgetown. Start at the Hamel House Museum, A stunning property that interprets 19th-century living complete with furnishings

Loveland Ski Area - photo by Dustin Schaefer

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plants landscaping social and cultural lifestyles. Then head over to the Hotel de Paris, a former French Inn that is now a site of the national trust for historic preservation. Schedule a tour and experience some early Colorado history. There are plenty of activities to participate in. You can access the Georgetown Loop railroad from their Georgetown train stop or grab a fishing rod and enjoy Georgetown lake or Clear Creek that rushes through this adorable town. The town also boasts a plethora of hiking trails, mountain biking and serves as a base camp for Mount Bierstad another 14’er you might be interested in conquering. 14

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Exit 232 will bring you to Winter Park and Granby as well as a route to Rocky Mountain National Park. However, you can’t get there without going through Empire where you will find some good food and cute shops along Park Avenue. There is a unique ADA accessible trail here as well, the Paw Education Research Trail aka the Pert Trail showcasing the old Berthoud Pass wagon road. Lawson is your next stop as you travel East on I-70. Exit 233 and you will find quite a bit of adventure. Try the Lawson Adventure Park and Resort where you will find cabins, yurts, glamping tents, zip lines, Via Freratta, UTV Tours, Rafting, and more. ATV Tours Colorado offers guided atv tours to explore the area.


Just a few miles east is Dumont, exit 234. Some folks just see the Starbucks and gas stations, we have to tell you, it is more than a truck stop. Jump off their exit, and you can find Self Sponsored Snow & Dirt offering Snowmobile, Dirt Bike, and ATV/UTV rentals, apparel, and accessories. A little further down the frontage road is the Colorado Adventure Center - Sky Trek Aerial Adventure Course offering zip lining, rafting, and a challenging aerial park that their staff will train you to experience. Fall River Road, exit 238, will bring you to the unincorporated town of Alice and St Mary’s glacier. There are a plethora of hiking, biking, dirt biking, and jeeping trails as well as lakes to fish and primitive camping sites. The City of Idaho Springs has three exits as you head east to the Front Range. Exit 239 brings you into the residential end of Idaho Springs where beautiful turn-ofthe-century homes grace Colorado Blvd. This road runs through the length of the town. Exit 240 allows you to access the road up Mount Evans Scenic and Historic Byway and to the downtown core of Idaho Springs. All along Miner Street, you will find gift and gear shops, delicious restaurants, cafes, a cidery, two breweries, and the county’s information center. Take a right off of Miners Street onto Soda Creek Road and you can head up to Indian Hot Springs Resort to soak in their geo thermal healing waters. One location you won’t miss is the Argo Mill and Tunnel perched up on the north side of the town. It is Idaho Springs #1 Attraction and offers an incredible tour of the mill and tunnel that has made Idaho Springs great. Exit 243 will bring you along a scenic hilltop drive to Central City and Blackhawk. Exit 244 is an incredible drive through Clear Creek Canyon to Golden and has some great trails to explore including the start of the Peaks to Plains Trail, a 65-mile trail of statewide significance. The goal is that the Peaks to Plains Trail will one day connect the South Platte Trail in Denver to the headwaters of Clear Creek at Loveland Pass. Once completed, it will connect four counties and seven cities, with a total elevation gain of more than 1 mile. As the Clear Creek Tourism Board proudly states, they’re open for Adventure! Contact them at www. visitclearcreek.com. Head to our website to read more about the area’s amazing attractions, restaurants, and history: www.mountaintownmagazine.com IMAGES Top Left- Guenella Pass Brewery in Georgetown, Argo Mill & Tunnel in Idaho Springs, Shops in Georgetown. Middle Left- Rafting Clear Creek County with Raft Masters, Tommyknocker Brewery & Restaurant in Idaho Springs, Empire, Colorado sidewalk, shops, and restaurants. Bottom Left- Lawson Adventure Park Resort Lodging

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favorites

The SMARTWOOL + SOS OUTREACH Sock SOS Outreach, a nonprofit dedicated to changing lives for kids in our communities teamed up with Smartwool to provide a unique opportunity for their kids, to create a ski sock—learning about the design, development, production, & marketing process along the way. The chosen design was a team effort between three North Lake Tahoe, CA participants. A true collaboration, Chris, Adrian & Emiliano worked together to show how the 6 SOS core values are deeply rooted in all aspects of the program. “I worked on the top portion of the drawing. I tried to incorporate the SOS logo in a fun way by having the plane dragging the SOS banner across. The inspiration for the background is a deep purple sunset because I really like being out in nature. And, I tried to incorporate all the colored pencils that we used. The cloud at the top represents the wisdom the SOS members have by setting goals high & soaring above the clouds.”-Chris Head to the SOS Outreach website to learn how to purchase:

www.sosoutreach.org.com

OPEN SUMMIT

60 Hikes within 60 Miles Plan your next adventure with expert-level weather data that’s easy to use with the Open Summit app. With OpenSummit, you’ll receive hourly forecasts for your mountain location (and elevation). with precipitation, lightning, temperature, and wind forecasts when planning your next mountain objective. Choose the safest day and time for your adventure with colorcode detailed hourly data so you can quickly find your best weather window. 5-day hourly forecasts include the chance of precipitation, chance of lightning, temperature, wind speed & direction, and cloud cover.

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As we head out of the mountains and into the Front Range you can still find great hikes to Get Outdoors. Local authors and hiking experts Mindy Sink and Kim Lipker released a new fullcolor edition of 60 Hikes Within 60 Miles: Denver and Boulder. A perfect blend of popular trails and hidden gems, the selected hikes transport you to scenic overlooks, wildlife hot spots, and historical settings. Each hike description features key at-a-glance information on distance, difficulty, scenery, traffic, hiking time, and more, so you can quickly and easily learn about each trail. Detailed directions, GPS-based trail maps, and elevation profiles help to ensure that you know where you are and where you’re going.

www.menasharidge.com


INDEPENDENCE PASS FOUNDATION

ROCKY MOUNTAIN RAFTS Rocky Mountain Rafts started in Crested Butte, Colorado on the banks of the Taylor River. with a mission to produce and distribute the best value rafts and inflatable products in the industry and to deliver consistent, outstanding customer service. Their goal is to give everyone the opportunity to own a quality inflatable at a price they can afford so they can enjoy the great outdoors. Check out their rafts, catarafts, tubes and crash pads here:

www.rockymountainrafts.com

The mission of the Independence Pass Foundation is to restore and protect the ecological, historical, and aesthetic integrity of the Independence Pass corridor and to encourage stewardship, safety, and appreciation of the Pass. This amazing organization has a variety of projects to keep the area pristine with tree plantings, trail restorations, historical area protection, noxious weed eradication, trail maintnence as well as ecology studies. Follow them on social media and learn more here

www.independencepass.org

MAWA’S GRAINFREENOLA

Chef Mawa McQueen, the founder of Mawa’s Kitchen in Aspen and the Crepe Shack in Snowmass Village, has launched a new organic snack brand: Mawa’s GrainFreeNola (MGFN)! Unlike most granola that is made with oats, grains, and lots of sugar, MGFN is organic, paleo, vegan, and gluten-free. We were lucky enough to experience every crunchy morsel of her brand’s selections and absolutely adore this extraordinary snack food. There are five flavors to choose from: BerryMe, Green Machine, Health Nut, Out of Africa, and Tropical Paradise. The Health Nut variety, for instance, mixes organic pumpkin, flax, hemp, and chia seeds with raw, organic almonds, walnuts, and cashews—no added sugars, grains, or fillers of any kind, all ingredients are viewable online. Each product is sold online as well, priced at $16.95 per 8 oz bag. Load up for all of your snacking needswww.grainfreenola.com

www.grainfreenola.com

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mountain dispatch

N EV ER TOO L ATE TO PROTECT YOUR HOME FROM WILDFIRE

Some fast forward thinking about wildfire and our homes. Tips To Protect Your Home From Wildfire: •

Actively manage your roof. Clean roof and gutters of pine needles and leaves at least twice a year to eliminate an ignition source for potential fires. This eliminates an ignition source for firebrands, especially during hot, dry weather. Stack firewood away from your house. Locate firewood at least 15 feet uphill from your home. Do not stack firewood under the deck.

Remove unhealthy vegetation. Trees and shrubs that are stressed, diseased, dead or dying

should be removed so that they do not become a fuel source for potential fires. Create defensible space on flat ground a minimum of 75 feet around a home. Increase this diameter if the structure is located on a slope. Thin out continuous tree and brush (shrub) cover around structures. Remove flammable vegetation from within the initial 15 feet around structures. Beyond the initial 15 feet, thin trees to achieve 10-12 foot crown spacing. Occasionally, clumps of two or three trees are acceptable for a more natural appearance, if additional space surrounds them.

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Mow grasses and weeds to a height of six inches or less for a distance of 30 feet from all structures. Prune tree branches within the defensible space up to a height of 10 feet above ground. Dispose of all slash and debris left from thinning by either chipping, hauling away or piling and burning if allowed. Contact your local fire department or local Colorado State Forest Service forester for burning restrictions and/or assistance. Remove shrubs and small trees or other potential ladder fuels from beneath large trees. Left in place, these fuels can carry a ground fire into tree crowns.

BRECKENRIDGE SPRING SKIING & NEWS Spring skiing at Breck is one of our favorite times of the year, and there is plenty of time to get in your spring turns with the resort scheduled to operate through Monday, May 31 (Memorial Day)! Thanks to a base elevation of 9,600 feet above sea-level and usually an abundance of spring snow (Feb. and March tend to be the snowiest months of the season), Breck offers great late season skiing and riding conditions and the opportunity to ski long after many resorts have closed for the season. This year, due to the construction of a brand new chairlift on Peak 7, late spring ski operations (which previously were based out of Peak 7) will take place out of Peak 8. The resort plans to operate lifts and terrain across all five peaks through April 18 and then will transition to Peak 8 for the remainder of the season on April 19. (Please be advised that there is no beginner terrain available during the late season and available terrain is primarily for intermediate-, advanced- and expert-level skiers and riders.) As a part of the resort’s COVID safety protocols,

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reservations are required for mountain access and are currently available through April 18 on EpicPass.com. Reservations for dates beyond April 18 will become available as we get closer to those dates in order for the resort to accurately release reservations based on available terrain during the late spring ski season. www.breckenridge.com


Tumbling rock destroys bridge to Ouray Ice Park, pipeline to the country’s oldest running hydroelectric power plant by Jason Blevins, The Colorado Sun Workers arriving early at the Ouray Ice Park on Tuesday, March 16 found a disaster. A boulder the size of a pool table had sheared off the canyon wall and destroyed the metal walkway accessing the park’s popular ice climbs. And it ripped out the penstock that ferries water to the oldest operating hydropower plant in the U.S. “Just water squirting everywhere and the access bridge, laying at the bottom of the canyon,” said Eric Jacobson, who owns the hydroelectric plant and pipeline that runs along the rim of the Uncompahgre River Gorge. The rock tore through the penstock, its trestle and the decades-old steel walkway in the park’s popular Schoolroom area late Monday. There was no one in the gorge and no injuries. “We are incredibly fortunate it happened at night,” said the park’s executive director Peter O’Neil. Ice farmers stopped sculpting routes about a week ago as overnight temperatures climbed. “If this had happened at the start of the season, we would have lost half the ice park,” O’Neil said, describing how pipes from the destroyed penstock supplied the water to build as much as 70% of the park’s routes. “If this had happened earlier in the season, we would have been up the creek.” Jacobson, who has leased 60 acres along the gorge to the City of Ouray for ice climbing for a dollar a year since he bought the property in 1992, has dealt with rock fall for 20 years. But those were smaller rocks and pipe damage was easy to access and fix. Monday night’s rockfall ripped out an entire section of pipe in an area where vehicles cannot reach. “This is probably the worst spot for replacing pipe in the gorge and certainly the biggest rockfall we’ve had,” he said. When the overnight temperatures are cold enough in December, January and February, a team of ice farmers use as much as 200,000 gallons of water a night trickling from the penstock to create internationally renowned ice-climbing routes. More than 15,000 climbers flock to Ouray every winter to scale the 150-foot fangs of ice, supporting the city’s winter economy. And Jacobson generates about 4 million kilowatt hours a year from water flowing into his antiquated but updated Ouray Hydroelectric Power Plant. He sells the power to the San Miguel Power Association. The plant generates about 5% of the association’s power needs, which has a robust collection of green power sources, including several small hydropower plants and a solar array in Paradox. “The Ouray hydropower plant, while unfortunate, it’s not going to have a huge impact on our power or profile,” San

Miguel Power Association spokesman Alex Shelley said. “We are really pulling for Eric to get it repaired and we will help in any way we can. None of us wants that plant to fall into disuse.” Ouray Ice Park opened in mid-December and is set to close Sunday March 21, 2021. In January, thousands watched the 26th annual Ouray Ice Festival online, with the world’s top ice climbers competing in the only ice climbing contest in North America this winter. The online event was supported by the Colorado Outdoor Recreation Industry Office, the Colorado Office of Film, Television and Media, the Colorado Lottery, the Colorado Tourism Office and the City of Ouray. The first-of-its-kind collaboration also supported the creation of a half-hour documentary detailing the 2021 event and the history of the park. Jacobson is preparing a report for the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the power plant shutdown. And he’s hoping he can work with the nonprofit Ouray Ice Park Inc.board to scrape up funding to rebuild the trestle that accesses the park’s busy Schoolroom. When his contract with San Miguel Power expires soon, Jacobson will make 2.2 cents for every kilowatt hour of electricity he produces with water-powered turbines that have been delivering power to Ouray since the 1890s. That will provide about $100,000 in gross revenues. It costs more than that to operate, he said, so he’s got little capacity for pricey repairs. The main access to that part of the park was on a metal grate atop his penstock. A budget fix likely won’t be as climberfriendly and likely will not have the access bridge and pipes to feed the ice farmers. “We can figure out a cheap repair but I’m not sure it will be a purpose-built structure like the old one,” he said. O’Neil met with the park board on Wednesday night. They have a lot of work ahead, he said. A structural engineer is estimating the cost of replacing the penstock, the climber’s walkway and the trestle that supports the steel pipeline, all of which is a mangled mess in the bottom of the gorge. “It’s not going to be $1.98,” O’Neil said. “This is going to be expensive.” And the repairs need to happen this summer if the park hopes to open next winter. “Otherwise, literally half the park will not open,” he said. Volunteers, members and industry sponsors keep the Ouray Ice Park afloat. Like public radio, O’Neil said. “We are going to have to put a call out to our members,” he said. “The park is free, but we need your support. Especially this year.”

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art


Brewer Clifton Wine + Cardinale Wine ... charcoal on watercolor paper Faulkner Summer - light yellow clay from Oxford, MS Boreal Dusk - grey clay from Ottawa, Canada Cotton Silver - white clay from Oxford, MS by Eunika Rogers, Eunika Rogers Gallery, Telluride

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trail

A Beginner’s Guide to Backpacking Colorado BY R SCOTT RAPPOLD

I remember very clearly the first time I ever went backpacking... I was 14 and living in Pennsylvania. My Boy Scout troop leaders had planned a week-long excursion on the Appalachian Trail, a 40-mile trek through the rolling hills and deep green forests that make up this pretty part of the East Coast.

It was a nightmare... I remember well the external-frame backpack that I suspect permanently altered the shape of my spine; the foam sleeping mattress that never quite provided cushion from the rocks; the drinking water that tasted like a swimming pool from the acrid purification tablets; the backpacking meals we all suspected were leftovers from World War II; the 10-pound canvas tent that neither dried nor kept out the rain. Naturally, I was hooked. The freedom of the trail, sleeping in a new place every night, the camaraderie of isolation with my fellow Scouts, having campfires deep in the wilderness where no cars could venture - I never looked at camping the same way again. Fortunately, 30 years later, nearly everything about the gear has improved. Tents are lighter. Air mattresses have replaced bulky foam pads. Delicious water can be filtered directly from lakes and streams. Dehydrated backpacking meals are made by actual chefs, not Army quartermasters. And there’s no better way to experience the majesty of the Rocky Mountains. So whether you’re new to the sport or, like I did, rediscovering it after a long break, this is your guide to backpacking Colorado.

The gear Online shopping may be cheaper, but I believe an overnight pack should always be bought in person. Stores like REI employ experts to help fit you and your camping style with the right pack, and you’ll never know if it fits your body comfortably at a cheap gear website. 22

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In deciding on a pack, you need to decide what level of luxury you want in the backcountry. If you’re interested in covering 10+ miles a day and sleeping where you collapse, go with an ultralight pack. On the other hand, if you plan to haul luxuries like a hammock or pillow and spend ample time relaxing at camp, go with a larger-volume pack. The same goes with your shelter. Minimalists might go with a bivouac shelter. I go a different direction, with a tent sized for one person more than I have; my wife and I used a three-person tent. Generally, the more expensive the tent, the less it will weigh. It’s money well-spent. Your water system should also match your hiking style. Going to be filling from creeks while on the go? Get a hand pump water filter that can be used in the tiniest babbling brooks. Plan to establish a base camp for a couple days? A gravity-powered filter (essentially a bag you hang on a tree that filters as it drips) may be a better bet. Other essentials include hiking boots, a flashlight, matches or lighter, first aid kit, camp stove and fuel if you want hot meals, sunscreen, insect repellent and rain gear.

Know before you go A backpacker shouldn’t just step into the wilderness without planning. Research your trip on the Internet. Talk to local gear shop employees about good backpacking options. Buy a detailed map such as the National Geographic Trails Illustrated series. Most maps published by the U.S. Forest Service are too large-scale to be much use on a hiking trip. Check the weather forecast. If it’s July or August, you can count on afternoon thunderstorms to be your daily companion, so it’s a good idea to not be hiking above timberline after noon if you can help it. If it’s early spring or late fall, it might snow on you. And speaking of snow, many high-alpine locations can hold snow well into July and begin falling just as early, so it’s a good idea to bring some kind of boot traction, such as crampons, just in case. Figuring out what you will be eating is essential, learning to pack it well is crucial but is not as difficult as you might


think. There are great resources out there on the subject. We also learned there is a service called Right on Trek, which will allow you to buy all of your meals wether you are going out for one day or a week. Other considerations you should check in advance: Are bear canisters (to protect food from the wildlife) required, as they are in many national parks? Are permits required, like in the Indian Peaks Wilderness? Is there a campfire ban? Is the road to the trailhead open (many mountain roads are closed for snow and mud into June)? Many websites allow users to write reviews of individual trails, which can also be a great resource.

Where to go Colorado has nearly 24 million acres of public land, including 3.5 million acres of wilderness, where only hikers and horse-riders are allowed, so deciding where to go backpacking can seem overwhelming. Decide what kind of trip you’re looking for. If you want a more relaxing experience, find a mountain lake where you can establish a base camp and go fishing or take day hikes, or visit a backcountry hot springs. If you’re looking to explore a larger chunk of Colorado, plan a loop. If you have multiple vehicles, you can do a shuttle loop so everything you see is new to you. If you’re interested in a truly epic adventure, try hiking the entire Colorado Trail, which runs from Durango to the outskirts of Denver, or sections of the Continental Divide Trail. In Colorado, the opportunities are limitless. You can spend a weekend exploring the wilderness, a week or a lifetime.

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MTN

treks & travel

ROAD TRIPPING

Taking a trip in an RV is all the rage these days. State and National Parks are seeing a big uptick of visitors taking an interest in their sights and campgrounds. There are many travel options, road tripping in an RV is one of them and Brooke Johnson, Founder and Owner of Tumbleweed Travel has provided a few benefits of traveling in an RV, Camper or Van for you to discover.

The Benefits of Traveling in an RV or Camper

All-in-one Space

Usually when you are traveling, your mode of transportation, place to stay, place to eat, storage space, place to shower, and places to see are all separate. But, with an RV, you have all of the necessities + added luxuries in one place! The convenience is unbeatable.

Views

Aside from the actual destinations you will be visiting in your RV, the views you get from the driver’s seat along the way are insane. No matter how big the RV, most have pretty epic panoramic views through the larger windshield + side windows. Take all the scenic drives, and see them clearly too! Even better? Wake up next to your new favorite view out the back of your van or down the steps of your RV.

Flexibility

Speaking of those views, you can stop as many times as you want and stay wherever you’d like (for the most part) on your trip. Sometimes a place you didn’t even know about catches your eye along the way. With an RV, you have the time and the means to actually explore it! Being in total control of your schedule and your route perfectly showcases the freedom of the open road.

Unlimited Access

When you provide your own roof over your head, the possibilities of places to stay are endless. Allow yourself to get creative with them. RV park by the beach? Sure! How about parked ON the beach? Or secluded in the trees under the stars. Maybe even overlooking a lake or canyon. Winery more your style? Whatever your scene is, there’s a place to park within it. All you have to do is find it.

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Unplug, If You Want To

How connected do you want to be with the world? Whether you absolutely need your wifi or you are craving a totally remote weekend – the choice is yours. There are plenty of RV parks that have full hookups, access to wifi, cell service, and more. But there are just as many secluded spots where it’s just you and the great outdoors (and your favorite new home on wheels of course!)

Saves You Money

Because it’s an all-in-one travel companion, traveling in an RV starts to save you serious bucks. Your biggest expense will probably be gas. You can nix the expensive hotel rooms out of the plans, as most of the spots you’d be parking and staying in your RV will be pretty cheap. We’re talking $0 – $50/night on average! Also, you don’t have to resort to eating out for every meal since you have a mini kitchen handy (cost conscious + healthy!) Just think, all the money you aren’t blowing on these “extras,” you can put towards the experiences of your choosing.

Authenticity

The people you choose as your co-pilot(s), camping set-up, pull-off spots you take last minute, how close (or how little) you follow your initial route, laughs you share, sunsets you see, trails you hit, experiences you have, and memories you make are completely unique to you and your RV crew. There will never be a road trip exactly like yours. How exciting is that? These are just a few of the benefits of traveling in an RV, but we can promise you there’s more. The best thing about this type of travel is that it’s what you make of it. Whether you are looking for luxury or a low-key, bare-necessities trip – there’s an RV out there. We can even assist you with all of your travel plans and logistics to make it happen. www.tumbleweedtravelco.com


Sage Creek Canyon, Silverthorne $2,695,000 Enjoy the scenic Lower Blue River right from your own back yard of this beautiful log home in the Sage Creek Canyon neighborhood located just north of the Silverthorne town limits. Featuring 5 bedrooms and 4 baths this spacious home has room for the whole family. The interior has been tastefully upgraded with designer finishes throughout the entire house. This lot is one of the finest in the Sage Creek neighborhood with privacy, sweeping views of the river from the house, majestic cottonwoods and stunning views of the rugged beauty of the Gore Range mountains. A generous sized back yard provides an added entertainment area.

Located less than three miles from Interstate 70, this HOA enjoys generous open space with semi private trail access to the Ptarmigan Wilderness. Private fishing through the entire neighborhood for the anglers in your family and a sense of exclusivity with convenient access to all shopping and town amenities. Additional features of this home include: Private River Frontage on the Lower Blue 5 Bedroom / 4 Bath 4,4487 Square Feet Main Floor Master Game Room Hot Tub

Julie Magliocchetti Julie@keytotherockiesrealestate.com (970) 406-0871 MikeMagliocchetti Michael@keytotherockiesrealestate.com (970) 470-3001 w w w.key totherockiesrealestate.com

23024 US Hwy 6, Suite 203, Keystone CO


MTN

family

Eli and Mort

Eli and Mort the Moose are on their next adventure! This time they are going on an epic Colorado summer road trip adventure! While on their Colorado Road Trip Adventure, Eli and Mort the Moose mountain bike the 401 in Crested Butte, snowboard down sand dunes, imagine orcas swimming in waterfalls, feed gators, roast marshmallows, sleep under the stars, and experience the joy and wonder of Colorado in the summer. The making of the book was truly an adventure of epic proportions! Hundreds of children from across the State of Colorado were involved in drawing for the book. 38 children’s images were chosen for the background images of the final book. www.eliandmort.com

The next stop, Crested Butte.

By Elyssa and Ken Nager Illustrated by Eduardo Paj

Hot Springs/ Aspen

At this point in our trip, Mort and I thought we were pretty good at riding our lightening-fast bikes, but it was time to test just how good on the 401. The wildflowers on the 401 were literally up to our handlebars and they clicked, twinkled and clicked against them as we rode. My clothes became wet with dew from the flowers, and my skin was a little bit itchy, but Mort and I didn’t mind because the views took our mind off of it.

Next stop, Ouray to eat ice cream! At the end of our day mountain biking, Mort and I thought things couldn’t get any better. But our next stop was Ouray, and Western Town surrounded by jagged mountains to eat some ice cream! In the center of town was an old fashioned ice cream shop and candy store. And because we were on a special trip, our parents let us order a double scoop. I said to Mort, “If you added gummies to this ice cream it would be life changing.” Mort was too busy eating to comment.

Next stop, Telluride. Telluride has the only public gondola transportation system in the world. Mort, my li’l sis and I decided to ride the gondolas around and around again with my dad. If you looked down from the gondola you could sometimes see deer, elk and even a bear if you were lucky.

The WeeklyPause Times are interesting right now and if you are like many of us they are quite stressful too. We discovered the Weekly Pause, a resource that offers parents simple tips and tools to navigate the challenges of raising children and teens... especially in these uncertain times. Evidence shows that the daily practice of taking care of our own mental, emotional and physical health helps us manage stress in our bodies and minds so our kids can feel calmer too.

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Well-being is a skill that can be strengthened, just like a muscle. Each week UB.U in the Vail Valley delivers easy-to-use resources rooted in self-awareness and emotional regulation that can be shared with your children, friends and other family members. Our hope and theirs is that these five minute, science based tools, will bring greater ease and connection to your home and family. Subscribe to The WeeklyPause here: www.ubunity.com


Socially-Distant by Nature www.sunlightmtn.com


MTN

Pets

You have seen them we are sure. Bright little blobs of pink, green, and teal, littered alongside a trail. Some are smushed and dried, others are puffy, condensing in the sun. We all know what I am talking about – PoopBags! Yuck. I have a few ideas on how to help you Pack out the Poop!

GO BAG

The Outward Hound GoBag carries the load so you don’t have to. This easy to use pet waste storage solution has a compartment for poop bags and a separate compartment with a unique roll bottom design that adjusts to accommodate large or multiple poopy loads. www.outwardhound.com

DooDoo Tubes

Mayor Parker the Snow Dog @officialsnowdog says, “If you can take the time to bag the poop, than most likely you can figure a way to pack it out.” We are on a mission! Dog Poop Bags left on the trail by folks is unsightly, unsanitary, and unnecessary! Leave No Trace says 9 out of 10 people in the outdoors are uninformed about their impacts. Here are several different products you can use to place your poop bags in to Pack It Out and Leave No Trace! Check the MountainTownMagazine.com Pet Page for more suggestions.

PACK OUT BAG

The Pack Out Bag is a convenient solution for carrying full pick-up bags (read: poop) hands-free between drop points. A water-resistant shell fabric and waterproof lining work in tandem with a waterproof zipper for easy-to-clean odor containment. Includes an adjustable belt to carry it around the waist. Or, directly attach it to a pack or your waist with the integrated clip. The Pack Out Bag makes it a little easier for all of us to doo-doo our part to keep our trails clean.

www.ruffwear.com

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The Doo Doo Tube Carries filled dog poo bags while walking and hiking with your dog. Their plastic “can” seals in the odor and the germs and includes a carabiner to easily attach to any leash, belt loop or backpack. The tube holds filled bags from dogs weighing up to 110 pounds or 4 dogs weighing 40 pounds each. The best part, it is easy to keep clean and does not retain odor.

www.doodootubes.com


Lorem Ipsum

Homegrown, reader-supported, paywall-free journalism for every corner of Colorado. GET OUR FREE DAILY NEWSLETTER AT

COLORADOSUN.COM/NEWSLETTERS


MTN

entrepreneurs

ENGAGING WITH A PROFESSIONAL BUSINESS BROKER Steps to Sell and Buy a Business, like any first-time journey, a well-qualified and experienced guide is critical for success. 33 years ago, at the age of 27, I made the decision to leave my corporate sales position to move to Summit County to open a business. By chance, a phone call from a former boss derailed my plans and I spent another 20 years climbing the corporate ladder before I rediscovered the courage to start one business and then another, both of which I successfully sold. Like most business owners I had envisioned the day when I would leave the business behind and spend my days knee-deep in fresh powder or lounging away on a beach in the tropics. Also like most business owners, I had no idea how to sell my business. After quite a bit of searching, I discovered that there was a small but highly active industry devoted to selling businesses – the Business Brokerage industry. Engaging with a professional business broker to sell my business was one of the smarter decisions I made not once, but twice, and it allowed me to finally realize my dreams of opening

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a business in Colorado. Having been down the same path that virtually every business owner travels I made it my mission to ensure that successful business owners had someone to rely on to unlock the value of their business – many times a business which they have spent a lifetime building. This led me to found Rocky Mountain Business Advisors. Our sole focus is to enable business owners to sell their businesses for the highest price possible while protecting their legacy. The High Country has seen unprecedented growth over the last several decades. No longer only known as a winter sports destination, Colorado’s Rockies are now a vibrant year-round destination serving the needs of both visitors and locals alike. Despite the pandemic, the number of buyers looking for good businesses has never been higher. Interest rates remain at historic lows and banks are keen to lend – both of which bodes well for both Buyers and Sellers alike. Like any first-time journey, a well-qualified and experienced guide is critical for success. When it comes time to sell your business you cannot put a For Sale sign in the window. It requires professional analysis to determine the

likely selling price, a detailed understanding of the business, the competitive landscape, as well as its growth opportunities, and most importantly the leadership of an experienced business broker who will attract qualified buyers to guide both parties to a successful transaction. Our clients measure our success by one primary metric: the amount of cash we can put into their bank account with the smallest tax impact possible. Business owners considering the sale of their business in the next several years should seek professional advice as early as possible to learn how to prepare their business well in advance of beginning the sales process. Far too often, when a business owner is ready to sell, their business may not be ready, and most likely they no longer have the time to make the changes necessary to obtain the business’s highest possible sales price. The author is the founder of Rocky Mountain Business Advisors, a Colorado-based Business Brokerage firm dedicated to advising its clients on how to maximize the value of their business in advance of and when selling their businesses. If you are interested in selling your business for the highest price possible you can contact these professionals at 303-474-5582 or info@rockymountainba.com.


Explore the heart of Summit County this winter and discover a winter wonderland full of sledding, ice skating, snowshoeing, cross country skiing and more! Find your next adventure in Silverthorne, Colorado.

SILVERTHORNE.ORG


MTN

business

SWEET REJUVINATION BY WHITNEY SMITH Spring in the mountains is one of the best times for all. If you look past the rain, mud, and melting snow, it is a time of rebirth, rejuvenation, renewal, resurrection, and regrowth. During this period, we recognize the Easter holiday. For some, they celebrate the resurrection of Jesus Christ as a matter of their faith. For others, they enjoy the visits of Peter Rabbit and the Easter egg hunts. Easter eggs come in all different shapes and sizes. Originally, Easter eggs were all colored red – representing the blood of Christ. Now, we no longer limit Easter eggs to just mere eggs, it covers chocolate, candy, and plastic. The use of Chocolate and candy to replace eggs on Easter continues to grow for good reason. It eliminates the mess. It is sweet and tastes good. It is convenient and easy. Chocolate is an important part of Easter. More chocolate is sold during Easter than any other holiday such as Christmas, Valentine’s Day, and Halloween. According to the retail sales of chocolate in 2018, by holiday event, $ 935 million of chocolate were sold during Easter. These sales outpaced the amount sold at Christmas - $776 million, Valentine’s Day - $524 million, and Halloween - $383 million https://www.statista. com/statistics/383246/us-retail-seasonal-chocolateconfectionery-sales-by-holiday/. If you are purchasing your Chocolate eggs as a compliment to the hard-boiled dyed eggs you created yourself or just diving into them to save time, you can be amazed at the wide range of choices you have. Prices range from 59 cents to $40 according to the article from Good Housekeeping Institute called “22 Best Chocolate Eggs to Fill Your Easter Basket This Year” (2020) https:// www.goodhousekeeping.com/holidays/easter-ideas/ g1034/easter-chocolate-eggs/. And of course, you can

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order them online. Though some of us still prefer getting our chocolate the old fashion way – at the local store. Who knew that Chocolate was such a key issue of the Easter celebration? As in many things, it is difficult to know all there is about anything. This is a key part of understanding the science of investing. Dr. Eugene Fama, Nobel Prize-winning economist, created the “Efficient Market Theory” which simply states the price of a security contains all the knowable information available at any point in time. Only unknowable information or news can be obtained. Whether you knew that Chocolate was a key part of the Easter holiday and that sales of Chocolate are key to the profitability of those companies making it or not, this information is already built into the price of their stock. The only thing not already included in that price is what no one could possibly know. We see investing based on a prediction of the future. This prediction is an attempt to speculate and gamble on future unknowable events. Using the scientifically proven method of investing can eliminate speculating and gambling from your investment portfolio. This Spring no matter how you celebrate your Easter holiday and enjoy your chocolate delights, you can eliminate speculating and gambling from your investing. Although we cannot help you avoid cavities you risk by enjoying your chocolate, we can show you how to manage your risk using the scientific method of investing. Give Whitney at Stone Advisors a call and she can show you how to rejuvenate your investment portfolio this Spring. Stone Advisors Inc. is a registered investment adviser. Information presented is for educational purposes only and does not intend to make an offer or solicitation for the sale or purchase of any specific securities, investments, or investment strategies. Investments involve risk and, unless otherwise stated, are not guaranteed. Be sure to first consult with a qualified financial adviser and/or tax professional before implementing any strategy discussed herein. Past performance is not indicative of future performance.


Health & Wellness


MTN

THE KNEES- A SKIER’S MOST USED AND ABUSED TOOL OF THE BODY

And why I got a new one...

In December 2000, during the annual 24 Hours of Aspen ski race, where two-person teams raced non-stop for 24 hours from the top of Ajax Mountain to the bottom reaching speeds sometimes over 90mph, I made a miscalculation and it changed my biomechanics forever. I was with my teammate Eric Archer and we were representing the United States in this international televised event. We trained for months preparing for this competition along with organizing all the logistics needed to be successful in this race. We wanted the win. Each of us had 6 pairs of 225 Downhills skis that would be rotating with a fresh coat of wax for each run. Our pit-crew was prepped, ready to be up all night taking in data and preparing our gear for every non-stop run. I felt we were more prepared than any team had ever been except 34

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the final training day did not goes as I hoped. On this day I blew it all and we had to forfeit as a team despite the fact my teammate Archer would start the event unofficially on his own. I miscalculated how to absorb a road already gone over in practice twenty-plus in inspection and at speeds of 85 MPH. I was on the only pair of skis in my large quiver that had an older pair of bindings that did not have a vertical toe release. The incident happened because a snow groomer crossed the course between training runs and in doing so left a lip where one did not exist prior in training in earlier training runs. Now at full gas, The small change in terrain caught me off guard. The smallest change can create a large variation in the geometry of the slope at speed. I did not adapt and I ended up launching a few hundred feet out of control, flying through the air.


I’m sure I was swinging my arms in circles trying to save myself as I was kicked backward through the air downslope for a hundred feet. I can clearly remember my teammate Eric Archer in a perfect tuck to my right beneath me as I was flying out of control over his head. The first thing I felt hit the ground was the tail of my left ski. Without the vertical release of the toe piece, the energy jerked my lower leg forward with so much power the leverage snapped my ligaments immediately. I heard the pop. Fractions of a second later my entire body came down hard upon my back and I spun, sliding and whirling on the snow for another hundred yards into the fencing. Eventually, I came to a stop tangled in the netting. I was devastated, I knew something bad just happened to my knee, but I didn’t want to believe it. I had fallen a few hundred times in my career like this and walked away every time. I would certainly be able to do it one more time. The safety crew was there immediately cutting me out of the fencing. I was asked if I was ok. I said “yes” except I think I may have hurt my knee. Instantly one of the doctors did a little manipulation and said “Yep, it’s gone”. In other words, my ligaments were no longer holding my knee in place, my legs muscles had immediately seized up to protect it. I thought no way. I tried to stand up with help and ended up in the sled. The pain didn’t kick in for a few hours until my body’s adrenaline subsided. The swelling came on immediately, along with the depression. For the next 20 years, I would deal with a limited range of motion, loss of power, constant swelling, and at times pain so severe my eyes would water up while in the middle of a ski run. With all that I was determined not to let the sport of skiing slip away. So I sucked it up, adapted where I could, and lied about my injury so I could continue to be a part of the sport. Was it worth it? Hell ya! I have been able to limp my way through some amazing experiences filming with Warren Miller Entertainment for 28 years, competing as well as continue guiding in some of the most amazing locations on the planet and terrain. I just had to adapt, change the way I approached the sport, and work with some of the best doctors around. I held off the initial surgery on my knee following the Aspen crash in Dec 2000 until April 2001 and managed to painfully make it through that entire season that included two Warren Miller segments. One of which was training with the United States Marine Corps and the other in Canada at Mike Wiegles Heli-Skiing Operation. I accomplished this by bracing my knee, building muscle, and making frequent trips to the doctor to have it drained and injected with cortisone. Ironically it was one of the most productive seasons I had on record. If I did not put myself through this I believe my career would have come to a stop that season.

When the time came for surgery that April 2001, I was relieved to have it cut open and go into a summer of rehab. However, that surgery did not go well. I never regained full range of motion and the swelling never stopped. For years I dealt with this, went to doctor after doctor, telling them what I felt like was happening in my body. Meanwhile, my right leg was being damaged by the fact I was favoring it and my back was starting to have problems for the same reason. Eventually out of the blue an amazing doctor called me. Dr. Millett from The Steadman Clinic. He sent me a text and said, “it sounds like I need to see you”. Dr. Millett was the only doctor I had come across who understood athletes and the awareness we have of our bodies. While doing surgery on my better right knee he looked in my left knee too and dig into what I theorized was going wrong. He woke me up from the surgery and said he found the problem. I had a free-floating bone fragment that was tangled in my Peroneal Nerve. Two days later I went back under the knife and Dr. Millett removed the fragment. It provided some relief but the amount of damage done by this object was extensive. My left knee had already started to shift its mechanics to compensate and mentally I was in a negative cycle. Dr. Millett suggested that one day I might need a new knee. The thought scared the crap out of me. Around 2015 I backed away from a double knee replacement at the last minute. Then I met a very unique woman, Dr. Bramley. Dr. Bramley introduced me to the world of regenerative medicine. I was invited to fly to Hong Kong for a series of tests and was injected with stem cells and several rounds of PRP (Platelet Rich Plasma). At a minimum, Dr. Bramley told me that she could control my inflammation, which I have learned creates a variety of health problems. At maximum, we could reverse the damage. Which I do feel took place on my healthier right knee. The experience was life-changing. Dr. Bramley ran me through a series of tests and determined I would greatly benefit from a changed diet, exercise, and lifestyle regimen. She accomplished this by analyzing my blood panels and DNA background and calculating my future diet through the data. I came home from Hong Kong with a new approach to how I was going to eat, stem cells, and a plethora of supplements. My overall fitness went through the roof and my inflammation went way down. I did not need to have my knee drained all the time and ultimately I canceled a double knee replacement and ultimately any replacement by five more years. At the beginning of the 2019 – 2020 winter season, I took another horrific crash while speeding under flat light. With the lack of sharp vision, I hit a huge ridge left in the slope by a groomer. Once again, I was skiing with a friend who watched me fly through the air facing the wrong way, upside down. Had I had two healthy knees I would have

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been able to better absorb the impact of the ridge instead of using only one leg, the impact ultimately ripped my ski off and sent me on another trajectory of pain. I limped through the rest of 2019-20 season skiing in more pain than ever. By my last run during an annual trip I guide in Italy I had to send my group to the bottom of the mountain and told them I would have to meet them at the bar. I side slipped my last run that day. Back in Colorado during the beginning days of Covid I painfully started to get in shape for surgery that I decided was inevitable with replacement specialist Dr. Kim. Yes, I worked to get in the best physical shape possible before going under the knife at The Steadman Clinic Vail Valley Surgery Center. I had never been so nervous about going under the knife, while for Dr. Kim this just seemed as standard as an oil change. Sometimes I think surgeons should go through their procedures as a requirement.

BEFORE SURGERY

AFTER KNEE REPLACEMENT

A FRIGHTENING SIGHT TO SEE AFTER SURGERY

I arrived early in the AM for the procedure and woke up later that afternoon in the recovery room. I briefly remember Dr. Kim coming in and giving me a thumbs-up before I went back to sleep. That evening I was out on crutches and home. I passed out and woke up the next morning feeling like a champ. I thought I would be a tough guy and skip the meds as I crutched my way into the kitchen. I made breakfast, got to work on my computer, and felt excited to get back on track with life. By 9 PM that evening I was in agony, my pain would not subside and I was calling 911. Painkillers were necessary and I needed them for quite a few weeks, of course, I tried not to overdo my prescriptions but I gave in to the fact that they are crucial. The nights were hell. The days I kept myself occupied by rehabbing, elevating, and icing. I was more conservative than what was prescribed for crutch use. I stayed on them and made sure that I was retraining the gate of my walk for 4 weeks. However, a week out of the surgery I did get a full rotation on the indoor bike. The hardest thing was trying to get a full extension. The knee wanted to be bent. Extending it was incredibly painful but had to be done. Sitting for hours watching TV with weight on my knee to push it flat was exhausting but was absolutely necessary. Every day I would walk through the village on crutches, working on my gate and going up and down every staircase I could find. Every two days I would go in and work with a Physical Therapist. The best part of this was the elevate and ice that came with it. At 4 weeks I could spin the bike with no resistance but I purposely stayed on crutches a bit longer. I was up to 3 hours of some sort of rehab a day on my own. The downtimes just trying to get the full extension of my leg, trying to decrease inflammation as well a constantly trying to break up the scar tissue. That is probably the most important thing you can do and the least fun.

PHYSICAL THERAPY

Breaking through the stiffness of the scare was the most difficult. When you first see the incision running across the


top of your knee when you wake up you instantly think Oh My God, This is horrible and wonder if the body can come back from this type of damage. The scare is horrible. The spin bike needs to become your best friend no matter how uncomfortable it feels bending the knee. At Week 6, I was finally starting to sleep a little better. I woke up every morning and laid on this recovery pad called the BEMER which helps to increase blood flow through the body. I moved my biking from an indoor spin bike, outside onto a townie with flat pedals. I stuck to level terrain and rode with very little resistance for a couple of hours. I ended the day elevating and icing while still continuously massaging as to break down the scar tissue around the knee. Increasing the range of motion is extremely important. Especially extension. Sitting down with your leg extended in front of you while gradually pushing down on the knee so that the back of the knee eventually is touching the ground is very uncomfortable but necessary.

BACK AT IT AND BETTER THEN EVER!

The little things are huge. Especially diet. I ate for months so clean and tons of protein. Thankfully I had a wonderful girlfriend at the time and we made the healthiest homemade meals during the deepest part of the lockdown. Restaurants not being opening might have been a blessing.

uncomfortable feeling of trying to sit at the computer while my leg was elevated and iced was too much. Seven months in and my muscle tone started to come back and at 9 months I was riding my road bike hard every day and felt amazing. In fact, I was climbing and descending mountains again. I was in a better place physically than I had been in almost 20 years. I was in heaven and for a moment did even want to think about putting ski boots on and skiing with the chance of destroying this amazing physical and mental place I had reached. I was not in a rush to get back on the slopes. Some of the most significant pain over the years besides the joint pain came from the alignment issue pressing on the Peroneal nerve. I had to have ski boots custom made to try and engineer around the nerve. It was bad. But Thanksgiving came and went, the snow started to fall and I put my ski boots on and nervously took my first run. It took about one half of a run before my brain figured out I did not have any feedback coming from my left knee. Then another two runs for my brain to realize I was not in pain. On day three I did something without a thought that I had not done in years, a hockey stop on my left leg as well as clicking into my bindings without manually assisting. But perhaps the most amazing thing is, I am skiing stronger than in years past because the pain is not shutting down my muscles activation.

By week 9 I able to get on my road bike with clip-in-pedals. This allowed me to become more aggressive and start building power. It is very important to make sure your knee alignment is correct in the clip-ins. The last thing you want to do is develop improper muscle alignment.

I took things a few steps further. I invested in a very complicated footbed system from Gorsuch. These footbeds have been inserted into my street shoes, bike shoes, and ski boots. They have helped me with alignment and cushioning.

By week 12, I was starting to get out of the saddle on my road bike and hammering up Vail Pass. The knee was stiff at the beginning of the ride but would loosen after 15 -20 minutes. I was also starting to hike again. Something that I had given up on years ago unless it was near a lift I could ride back down. Most staircases had even become an issue.

I have used everything to get back to a place where skiing has become freedom again, Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics combined with a very structured rehab and nutrition program brought me back into this wonderful sport I enjoy so much. I hope my story helps give you hope and the courage to fix what ails your body too. ~ Chris

I did everything slow and meticulously. Granted Covid cleared my calendar of work other than sitting in an editing room working on a documentary I plan to release in the fall of 2021 about the 10th Mountain Division. Which I could not get back to this for at least a month in a half. The

Chris Anthony is a 2018 Colorado Snowsports Hall of Fame Inductee, a featured athlete in 28 Warren Miller films, Veteran of 9 World Extreme Skiing Championships, Executive Director & Founder, Chris Anthony Youth Initiative Project, Former Alaskan Extreme Skiing Champion, Beaver Creek Ski and Snowboard School Trainer, Alaska Helicopter Ski Guide, Producer, Ski Personality and Write Motivational Speaker. Learn more about him at www.chrisanthony.com

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wellness

Planning for Financial Wellness BY STEVEN SMITH

The COVID pandemic scrambled our priorities, elevating health and wellness to the top of the list for many of us. As we grieved those who lost their lives or suffered illness with the Coronavirus, we prioritized our own physical and mental well-being. Financial planners also witnessed an uptick in investing for financial wellness. We spoke with Steven Smith of RightPath Investments, mountain-based financial planner and retirement specialist, to explore the nexus between financial and personal health. MTN Town: Steve, what is Financial Wellness? Financial wellness is financial confidence, yet it’s hard to feel confident during a global pandemic. I work with my clients to manage their risk so they feel comfortable with their portfolio’s performance no matter what the markets are doing. Financial wellness also means having a sense of control over your financial responsibilities. Again, the corona virus up-ended our feelings of authority over our own lives. A skilled financial planner can help clients regain control of their financial lives, by aiding in prioritization, sustainable spending plans, and designing action steps to achieve long-term goals.

MTN: What do you mean by “sustainable spending plans”? A maxim of retirement planning is to estimate the percentage of your savings that you are able to withdraw each year throughout retirement without running out of money. It’s called the Sustainable Withdrawal Rate. This goes hand-in-hand with prioritization of your spending goals. One of the best lessons of the coronavirus of 2020 has been prioritization. It provided a test for which spending priorities are truly “needs” and which are “wants.”

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Whatever you spent money on in 2020 are the “needs.” The “wants” – leisure travel, theater, dining out and the like -- were foreclosed. As a fiduciary financial planner, I help clients discern and prioritize their goals. As we move out of the pandemic, priorities like a new kitchen or family gifts will rise in your personal ranking of “wants.” Working with clients, we explore what your sustainable spending plan will accommodate.

MTN: How does this relate to personal mental and physical health? If we are confident in our financial future, that removes a huge weight from our psyche. Estate planning is a good example. The pandemic heightened awareness of our own limited time on this Earth. Many of my clients are reevaluating their estate plans. Because of my legal background and significant experience with estate issues, I am able to communicate with their lawyers to help my clients negotiate this most challenging aspect of financial wellness. When there is peace of mind, that carries over into our sense of personal wellness.

MTN: Steve, what trends in Financial Wellness have you seen since the pandemic? Interest in ESG investing has grown tremendously since the pandemic with now over $17 Trillion in professionallymanaged ESG assets around the globe. ESG investing focuses on Environment, Social and Governance issues. In the past year, several clients realigned their portfolios to reflect their personal values and priorities, such as supply chain equity, worker safety, and environmental protection. ESG investing has always been part of RightPath’s financial considerations for my clients. Learn more about financial wellness, responsible investing, and retirement planning for mountain lifestyles by contacting Steve Smith, JD, CFP, at RightPath Investments & Financial Planning, Inc. 970-668-5525 or visit www.RightPathInvestments.com.


RECOVER Well The Westin Riverfront Resort & Spa Avon, Vail Valley is welcoming medical tourists to Colorado with Westin RECOVER, a program that caters to guests seeking a relaxing Vail Valley resort experience while they recover from surgical procedures. Medical tourists can enjoy up to 20 percent off lodging rates on all of The Westin Riverfront’s available room types – which range from traditional hotel rooms to spacious Studio Suites with custom kitchens and one, two and three bedroom residences. Month-long stay pricing is available for stays of 30+ nights or more. Participating Vail Valley medical facilities include Vail Health, The Steadman Clinic, Vail Summit Orthopaedics & Neurosurgery and Howard Head Sports Medicine. The dog-friendly resort offers medical guests complimentary GMC transportation to and from surgery, off-site doctors and physical therapy appointments. The Westin Riverfront also features an on-site Howard Head Sports Medicine physical therapy clinic, where RECOVER guests can receive innovative physical therapy techniques from highly trained therapists. Westin Riverfront RECOVER guests can enjoy a wide variety of

other perks, including 20 percent off all rejuvenating massages, facials and body treatments at Spa Anjali, plus 20 percent off food & beverage at Maya, The Lookout lobby bar and in-room dining and discounted ski & snowboard rentals at Beaver Creek Sports. Owned and managed by Colorado’s East West Hospitality, the award-winning Westin Riverfront offers 230 guest residences, each featuring a custom kitchen, five-piece bathroom, gas fireplace and Westin Heavenly Bed. Amenities at The Westin Riverfront include Spa Anjali, an Athletic Club offering 45+ group exercise classes weekly, Ski Valet service and a year-round outdoor pool and three infinity hot tubs. Skiers & snowboarders can enjoy direct access to the Beaver Creek Mountain terrain via the Riverfront Express Gondola. Located in the heart of Colorado’s Vail Valley, The Westin Riverfront is home to Maya, a modern Mexican kitchen created by Chef Richard Sandoval which is now offering heated outdoor dining this winter, along with a Starbucks, The Lookout Lobby Bar and the new Riverfront Market For more information on Westin RECOVER, please call 970-790-2000 Monday – Friday from 9am-5pm MST, or e-mail Reservations@WestinRiverfront.com.

1000 Pine Grove Road, Steamboat Springs, CO

Call (970) 879-8533 for appointments

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SKINCARE

Everything You Need to Know to Protect Your Skin at Altitude Whether traveling to or living at high altitude, Colorado’s extreme weather can be particularly unforgiving on your skin. We talked with skin expert and paramedical esthetician, Lisa Haigh at The Face Experts in Denver on ways to help locals and visitors with the changes high altitude can bring to your skin. No matter if you live here or are just visiting, how you take care of your skin is virtually the same, said Haigh who has been a paramedical esthetician for ten years. “You need to moisturize, protect and drink more water. It’s also important to use skin care products that don’t strip the skin (i.e.; no squeaky clean cleansers). Skin is healthier when natural oils aren’t stripped from it.” Adding serums can also help. Haigh suggests looking for anything with Hyaluronic acid. “Hyaluronic binds moisture to the skin and prevents water loss. If you are visiting Colorado, it is especially important in addition to hydrating and moisturizing, to protect your skin with sunscreen using an SPF of at least 30,” she says. Scientific evidence proves using sunscreen can help to prevent skin cancer. “Sun rays at higher altitudes can be very harsh,” said Haigh. “The protection offered by the atmosphere from sunlight decreases the higher up you are causing your skin to become dry and much more prone to burning very quickly. “ If you are skiing, snowboarding, hiking or biking, it is important to keep in mind that extra sunlight bounces off of mountains, snow, or water and can hit you at different angels leaving you prone to burning in places you wouldn’t normally expect like: the chin, under the nose, ears and lips, said Haigh. “Try to remember all areas when applying sunscreen and remember to reapply at least every two hours. Regardless of what your sunscreen bottle says, water resistant doesn’t mean waterproof. If you are sweating, you need to reapply sooner.” If you do get a sunburn, Haigh recommends treating the burn by cooling your skin immediately, hydrating often, and taking aspirin or ibuprofen to help reduce swelling, redness or discomfort. Haigh also advises using Vitamin C serum to maintain and keep your skin healthier at high altitude. “Sun damage is an oxidative process,” said Haigh. “UV rays and other environmental stressors cause the release of damaging free radicals. Free radicals lead to

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premature signs of aging. Vitamin C neutralizes the free radicals and helps shield your skin from this damage so pairing Vitamin C and sunscreen is ideal. It’s also important to exfoliate but not over exfoliate, I would suggest starting at once a week. Of course sunscreen protection and hydration, internally and externally is still essential.” Must-haves for a day in the mountains: Sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher Lip balm with sunscreen Sunglasses Rimmed hat or helmet (for skiing, snowboarding or biking) Moisturizer with antioxidants Water bottle Haigh also suggests regular skin treatments to keep skin looking younger and healthier and endorses the following for monthly treatments with descriptions from The Face Experts website: Exfoliating facial treatments: Exfoliation helps remove dead skin cells, smooths the texture of your skin, and improves the penetration of medical grade products. Dermaplane and microdermabrasion: Exfoliating treatments come in two forms: physical or chemical. Physical exfoliation is exfoliation with the use of small grains (microdermabrasion) or a scalpel (dermaplane). Not all physical exfoliation treatments are the same. Dermaplane is less aggravating to sensitive skin and additionally removes unwanted “peach fuzz” from the face. Microdermabrasion grains tend to be harsher on skin, especially for patients who have rosacea or redness. Light chemical peels: All chemical exfoliations mean the product is doing the work, rather than microderm grains or a scalpel. Chemical peels are great for exfoliation and can also smooth and brighten the skin and stimulate collagen and elastin. “These treatments exfoliate the top layer of skin which leaves the skin looking bright and allows your serums and moisturizers to penetrate better. For skin already damaged by the sun, I recommend IPL (Intense Pulse Light) treatments to pick up sunspots and lay down red vessels, leaving the complexion even and vibrant.” For more information on how to take care of your skin at higher altitudes go to www.thefaceexperts.com.


SELF CARE The Act of Self Care

We sat with Amy Beckett of Blue Sage Spa in Breckenridge, Colorado and discussed the “trend” that is now a necessity, Self Care. The concept is not new but it’s need in our society today is huge. It can refer to taking moments at home to boost your health and well being but can extend to anything that allows you to relax and take some time out. Many of us have so many responsibilities in life that we forget to take care of our personal needs. This is particularly true for mothers, who have many caregiving responsibilities, but moms certainly don’t have a monopoly on letting life get in the way of taking care of themselves. And while it’s hard to prioritize something like taking a bath when you have so many other items on your to-do list, self-care is an important aspect of stress management.

How Self Care Benefits You

We are all less able to handle the stresses that come our way when we’re depleted by physical and emotional exhaustion. We are more resilient and more able to handle life’s stress when we are feeling our best both physically and emotionally. A massage, soak in the tub or other forms of pampering revitalize you inside and out.

Taking time out to maintain self-care has several benefits:

TAKE TIME ALONE While different people have varying degrees of introversion and extroversion, having some time alone is important for most people’s functioning. When you’re relaxing by yourself, it’s much easier to slip into a state of quiet meditation, enjoy some self-reflection, or let your problems work themselves out in the back of your mind, without taking all of your focused concentration. GIVE YOURSELF A BREAK Taking a break amidst a tub of warm bubbles or under the warm hands of an experienced masseuse can help you feel like you’re escaping a stressful reality and taking a mental and emotional vacation. As previously mentioned, it triggers the relaxation response and allows you to come back to the reality of your life feeling refreshed and relaxed. ASSIST YOUR EMOTIONAL HEALTH Taking time out to care for yourself can remind you and others that you and your needs are important, too. Having a well-cared-for body can make you feel good about yourself and your life,

and conveys to others that you value yourself. This can contribute to long-term feelings of wellbeing. Try a guided meditation practice and get plenty of sleep. MAINTAIN YOUR PHYSICAL HEALTH While self-pampering doesn’t always lead to major improvements in overall health the way healthy diet and exercise do, the relaxation you get from Exercise can trigger the relaxation response, which can prevent chronic stress from damaging your health. Go for a hike, head to the gym, grab your skis or snowboard, hit a Yoga session. BECOME A BETTER CAREGIVER People who neglect their own needs and forget to nurture themselves are at danger of deeper levels of unhappiness, low selfesteem, and feelings of resentment. Also, sometimes people who spend their time only taking care of others can be at risk of getting burned out on all the giving, which makes it more difficult to care for others or themselves. Taking time to care for yourself regularly can make you a better caretaker for others. SELF SOOTHE Giving your body some special treatment is a natural way to relieve stress. Other than keeping your skin soft and your body in good repair, spa-related activities like massage and warm baths have been known to soothe even small colicky babies like nothing else. Such activities continue to be effective tools for relaxation as we get older, but we sometimes forget to utilize them.

Self Care Strategies That Work

Once you’ve decided it’s time to start nurturing yourself and your body, be sure to block off some time for this. Try to schedule a block where you won’t be interrupted. You need only to have a bathroom to give yourself a home-spa experience; you can put on some soothing music, and try some or all of the following self-care strategies. Take a Bath Deep-Condition Your Hair Deep-Clean Your Pores: Care For Your Feet: Nourish Your Skin: Tend to Your Nails Get a Massage Go to Bed Early

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Building Hope: “Let’s be Perfectly Imperfect Together” BY SUZANNE ACKER, BUILDING HOPE SUMMIT COUNTY This is a story about hope; about building it within our community and within ourselves.

In 2016, thirteen people in Summit County took their lives by suicide. “The shock brought everyone together – funders, city/county offices, schools, behavioral health specialists, to learn how to prevent these tragedies,” said Building Hope Executive Director Jen McAtamney. “Together, through research and assessment, partnership and practice, we learned a lot, and Building Hope Summit County was born.” Today, through nine different program areas, Building Hope works to reduce mental health stigma; remove barriers to mental health care by providing therapy scholarships as well as increasing the number of therapists who will take insurance; share lifesaving mental health information; offer peer support for people in non-crisis situations; and promote emotional wellness in the community through ‘connecting’ events (in English and Spanish) to all members of the Summit County community, including youth. In its young history, Building Hope has become a vanguard for systemslevel responses to mental health and wellness, ensuring that everyone

in Summit County who needs and wants support can have it.

said. “Each story is an act of courage and love.”

The benefits of stigma reduction

The twelve “Faces of Hope” stories encompass a wide range of mental health challenges and emotions, from recovering from the suicide of a loved one, to trauma, substance use disorder, anxiety and self-harm, among others.

“It’s okay to not be okay,” says McAtamney. “These simple, yet powerful words have broken the ice in countless conversations across the county -- from bars to dinner tables to chair lifts -- to get people talking about their own mental health.”

Those words, “It’s okay to not be okay,” are part of a stigma reduction campaign that includes multiple messages (including “perfectly imperfect”) on colorful cards distributed to local businesses, on bus wraps, social media, radio spots, even bar coasters. “The campaign has succeeded in getting people talking and understanding that everyone – everyone -- struggles with something and that’s okay!” she said. “When we open up, we find ways to help each other.” But changing public attitudes about mental health takes time and multiple strategies, says McAtamney. Building Hope’s “Faces of Hope” campaign is one that features stories told by locals of their own struggles with mental health and/or substance use disorder. “These individuals have opened their hearts, knowing their stories will open conversation around mental health in Summit County,” she

“These community heroes have publicly shared their journeys to help normalize talk around mental health,” she said. “We’re a small, tight-knit mountain community. When people we know share their struggles it gives us permission to share ours and when we do, it brings us closer, makes us stronger. It creates a culture of hope.” “When we speak openly about our mental health, our words have the power to help heal, to open doors,” says McAtamney. “Talk -- to your friends or family or call the Building Hope Caring Connections support line 970-485-6271. Let’s be perfectly imperfect together.” Building Hope is a community-wide initiative designed to create a more coordinated, effective and responsive mental health system that promotes emotional health, reduces stigma and improves access to care and support for everyone in Summit County. www.BuildingHopeSummit.org

Breathe for Teens BY JILLIAN LIVINGSTON, ASPEN REAL LIFE Here in Aspen, we seem to have it all, yet our teens suffer from the highest rates of anxiety and suicide in the nation for a town of our size. We also tend to make huge positive waves when we take something on and that is exactly what Founder of Intrinsic, Emily Lubchenco Hightower, is doing, in partnership with Health and Human Performance Foundation, Brian MacKenzie, and local Aspen High School teacher, Cerena Thompson. Together they have created the Breathe For Teens Program, a novel stress

reduction curriculum to help teenagers at home that will also curate much-needed research in the field of youth stress management that will help kids in public schools across the country. Fund Breathe for Teens

Implementing a program of breath protocols to study their effects on CO2 Tolerance, stress, and anxiety, their research component needs funding to be completed and published.


The experience our kids have will allow them to create and disseminate an evidence-backed curriculum to disseminate here and in public schools nation-wide. You have a chance to help our youth today in a way that involves them with real research, and gives them the tools to manage anxiety for life. Please do what you can to pitch in. You can learn more about their team and their efforts by clicking here.

Emily Hightower is also available to grab for a phone call or local visit to share more about where your money will go, and how these slow breathing protocols make a difference. Emily has personally shared these protocols with combat-wounded veterans at Challenge Aspen Military Opportunities since it began in 2006, and with trauma, recovery, and neurology patients across the valley and from around the world. Email Emily: emily@intrinsicway.com.

Cannabis - The Good, The Bad and The Helpful BY DORI WELCH,RN,BSN,NURSE COACH Mountain towns in Colorado have unique characteristics to which any visitor or resident would attest. In general, our residents love the beautiful outdoors, embrace active (and daring) lifestyles, and seek out a sense of community among others who choose to make it home. The most dedicated accept the variables for which mountain living is notorious; perpetual housing shortages, high cost of living, harrowing driving experiences, weatherdependent livelihoods, all without city conveniences, and likely states away from family. To some, all of the perceived tribulations are worth the constant chance to catch a sleepy powder day and follow it with a relaxing après ski while watching the sun drag colorful blankets behind her as she tucks in behind the peaks. As a pioneer state in the legalization of recreational cannabis (2012), drink specials at the bar aren’t the only tricks of Après available to people in Colorado looking to unwind. While it is yet illegal to consume in public places, people are settling into their postski, snowboard, hike, and bike, evenings differently. Cannabis was approved for medicinal use in Colorado in 2000. Early utilization geared toward nausea relief and appetite

stimulation for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy treatments. Currently, some doctors claim widespread benefits for a variety of health issues including anxiety, insomnia, and pain while using CBD-dominant strains with little to no THC, the chemical that causes the “high”. Some also report successful use in other ailments such as tremors in Parkinson’s, childhood seizure disorders, and a long list of afflictions with the common final pathway being chronic pain. Still, citing federal laws, anecdotal data, and addiction risks, many doctors remain hesitant to include cannabis in their treatments and care. Legally available cannabis has some people turning to treat themselves for chronic issues like the ones listed above. Consumers have often tried other pharmaceuticals with either no effects or undesirable side effects, and claim better relief. Specifically to mountain towns and the seasonal nature of jobs with no benefits, people are less likely to have an established doctor or insurance. That said, if anyone feels they are using recreational cannabis to treat a medical condition, I urgently advise them to work with a doctor for a proper diagnosis and a workable safe treatment.

Occasionally, the incredible bike ride, the pillow top powder day, or the scenic hike can end in an unlucky injury. For anyone who uses cannabis on a regular basis, this is the time to be completely honest with the doctor who is there to help. While the doctor is delivering narcotics to relieve pain, cannabis may be sitting in those opioid receptors and keep narcotics from getting to work. Acute pain control can become a real issue for regular Cannabis consumers, but medical staff who have been working with recreational users over the last several years may have some other avenues to try. Doctors want your pain to be tolerable so you can function, heal, and get back to outdoor fun! For all cannabis users, please continue to indulge responsibly and safely! Although there is less of a risk for physical addiction, it can happen if someone is using it regularly. However, unhealthy habits can form either way. Please be mindful of your well-being and if you have any concerns, reach out to local mental health agencies for their wonderful assistance. Our physical and mental health is paramount to pursuing our active, outdoor lifestyles. Stay safe and healthy!


Resources for you, your family and friends: Crested Butte - CB State of Mind www.cbstateofmind.org Eagle Valley Behavioral Health www.eaglevalleybh.org The Hope Center (Eagle and Pitkin County - Crisis Resource www.ourhopecenter.org Recovery Resources - Pitkin www.recoveryresourcescolorado.org REPS Steamboat Springs https://steamboatsuicideprevention. com/

Two Words

Me Time

Building Hope Summit County www.buildinghopesummit.org Go 4 Graham - Denver Stigma Reduction & Peer Program  www.go4graham.org Durango Cares C.O.D.Y. Initiative www.durangocares.com

For the Spanish Speaking Community: LaCocina www.lacocinahome.org Hearts Reign www.facebook.com/ loscorazonesreinan

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224 South Main Street Breckenridge, CO 80424 970-453-7676 Open 7 Days a Week

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real estate

A H A SSLE FR EE HOME

No Hassle, Beautifully Built Homes are on the Rise in

Colorado’s Mountain Towns ef Building the luxury home of your dreams may seem overly complicated now more than ever in this time of high stress, social distancing and sheltering in place. But Colorado mountain communities, new real estate offerings allow for hassle-free construction and serene, comfortable living. At the exclusive Alpine Mountain Ranch & Club in Steamboat Springs, the Hygge Haus brings together minimalism and luxury in homage to Scandinavian style. This Colorado mountain community offers an array of resort-style amenities and concierge services that make life even easier. Scandinavian Style in Steamboat The new Hygge Haus at Alpine Mountain Ranch & Club takes its name from the Danish term encompassing comfort, contentment, well-being and luxury. “Hygge has really gained traction over the past five years as its own kind of design style,” says Sarah Tiedeken O’Brien, the home’s interior designer and partner at Vertical Arts Architecture. “There isn’t a direct translation for Hygge (pronounced hoo-guh) in English, but it’s best

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Alpine Mountain Ranch


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Hygge Haus

summed up as offering a feeling of comfort and an atmosphere promoting serenity and well-being.” The Hygge Haus’ architecture and design embrace clean, simple lines, minimalism and functionality without sacrificing beauty. Interior spaces, free of clutter and ornamentation, feature open floor plans, with flexible spaces that can accommodate a variety of activities, furthering their practicality. “Floor-to-ceiling windows frame 270-degree views spanning from Emerald Mountain clear across the South Valley to Walton Peak, with the Steamboat Ski Resort as the focal point,” said Architect Ian Wagner. “A modern and sophisticated kitchen and multiple dining areas, including a unique breakfast nook, encompassed by glass that opens completely to the outdoors, highlights the entry level, and at sunset invites in pink light from Steamboat Springs’ famous Alpenglow.” The 4,500-square-foot home features four bedrooms and six bathrooms, with master suites

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on each of its two levels. The lower level includes a walkout area with a hot tub. Outside, materials such as stone, wood and metal accents complement the surrounding aspen grove and wildlife habitat. “The home offers an airy, inviting environment with a lot of rich, tactile materials. And it’s got a soothing color palette, but within that is a lot of depth and texture,” says O’Brien. “The goal is to create a vibe that easy for families to come in and feel like they can put their feet up.” AMRC is a 1,200-acre ranch community with 63, five-acre homesites from $1.5 million and more than 900 acres dedicated to wildlife preservation. Owners have access to the ranch’s trail system for hiking and horseback riding, a lake for canoeing and paddleboarding, private waters for fly-fishing and concierge services for an abundance of other activities on and off site, with Champagne Powder skiing just minutes away. www.alpine mountainranch.com


S T E A M B O AT S P R I N G S

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PHOTO CR EDITS: DAVID PAT TERSON

S OP H I S T ICAT E D W I N T E R PA R K L I V I NG

Rendezvous Colorado, together with Koelbel and Company, announces the official grand opening of Rendezvous Center, a redevelopment on Winter Park’s Main Street. This new building officially opens its doors to the public on September 24th and will become an iconic welcoming place for the Town of Winter Park as the home of the Chamber of Commerce, and a new Visitor Center as well the Rendezvous Center Residences, and the new Rendezvous Colorado Development and Sales Offices. This $15MM project is one of many investments currently underway in Winter Park that will upgrade the look, feel and overall infrastructure of the Town. Koelbel and Company developed the project with the goal of continuing their longstanding commitment to the region. The half-acre site was purchased by Koelbel from the Town of Winter Park in 2017, as part of the purchase the naming 50

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MTN

rights to the adjacent stage at Hideaway Park is now known as the “Rendezvous Event Center.” After significant planning and working with the Town of Winter Park, they have completed a three-story, state-of-the-art facility that will become a landmark for the town and a gathering place for residents and visitors alike. It is adjacent to the Rendezvous Event Center, which is home to numerous events and concerts annually. It was important to incorporate the Chamber of Commerce and Visitor Center in the new design along with the town’s beloved mascot, a giant bronze Moose. Flanking both sides of the statement commercial corner are five residential townhomes and two stacked flats. 52

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“This high-profile building is one of the first things people see when they arrive in town,” said Koelbel. “As one of the first parcels to be redeveloped along Main Street, we’ve created a mountain contemporary architectural design that reflects the new attitude of Winter Park but is incredibly welcoming at the same time.” In addition to office space, Koelbel has built 7 luxury for sale townhomes/flats and podium covered parking starting in the high $900’s. The contemporary mountain architecture of the townhomes with pitched roofs, expansive glass, and mix of rich materials including stone, metal, and wood, augment the commercial corner and provide a nice backdrop for the park. Showcasing mountain modern design, the limited-edition three- and four-bedroom Rendezvous Center Residences designs will deliver the ultimate in mountain living – marrying mountain escape with an entertainment hub, shops, restaurants and instant access to trails for hiking and biking. Winter Park Resort is a short distance away and can be accessed via shuttle bus or car. Make this your home, outdoor basecamp, and company headquarters with high tech office space located within the building. www.koelbelco.com


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stay

Glamping Ways to Experience America’s Hottest Travel Trend

BY STEVE SNYDERS

River Run The new River Run Resort in Granby, Colorado offers furnished yurts and conestoga wagons for an unforgettable glamping experience. Guests can also bring their own tents to sleep under the stars or rent one of River Run’s tents to make life even easier. The resort also offers three distinct vacation rentals featuring open-concept spaces to make guests feel at home. www.sunrvresorts.com/river-run/

High Lonesome Ranch “Glamping” – the portmanteau of “glamour” and “camping” – brings together luxurious accommodations and the beauty of the natural world. While luxurious tents often first come to mind, accommodations in a variety of styles are now available at glamping destinations around the world, ranging from domes to yurts to tiny homes and tree houses. Imagine being surrounded by nature and tranquility with all the comforts of luxury accommodations of a 5-star resort – comfortable beds, flat screen TVs, built-in kitchens, gourmet cuisine, AC, hot tubs, and saunas. Sounds amazing doesn’t it? While it is trendy, glamping is not a fleeting trend. The number of camping households recently reached 80 million in the US market, with relaxation and de-stressing being the primary motivators behind this travel craze. A new report by KOA shows that 30 percent of North American travelers have taken a glamping trip over the past two years. In fact, studies project the glamping market in the US to reach revenue of $1 billion by 2024. Like camping, younger and more diverse people glamp more than other groups. Sixty percent of leisure travelers who reported that they had glamped in the past two years are from the millennial or Gen Z generations, meaning they were born after approximately 1980. Millennials make up the largest group of glampers at 48 percent. Travelers in states such as California, New York, Colorado, Washington, and Texas are leading the glamping charge, and new glamping operations are popping up all across the globe. The options are seemingly endless, so we’ve put together a list of ideas fo glamping options for you and your significant others in Colorado and Montana. 54

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High Lonesome Ranch in Western Colorado is home to diverse wildlife and provides a vast playground for sports and wilderness activities. It also offers glamping in safaristyle tents. Thermostatically controlled heaters take the chill off the night air. Fire pits make good gathering spots to watch starry skies. Private, locked marble baths are close by for each of the tents. The 1,200-square-foot log pavilion with a roaring stone fireplace nearby provides a great space for festive group meals, happy hours, gatherings and more. www.frontierstravel.com/the-high-lonesome-ranch-birdshootin Fireside Resort By combining the amenities of a luxury boutique hotel with the atmosphere of a wooded campground, Fireside Resort offers Wyoming’s best glamping experience. The lodging options ref lect the heritage of the valley’s original homesteader cabins, with cozy fireplaces, full kitchens, private furnished decks, and outdoor fire pits. Situated on wildlife-filled acres where moose, elk, red-tailed hawks, bald eagles and deer roam, Fireside Resort is a mere seven miles from Jackson’s bustling town square. www.firesidejacksonhole.com

Royal Gorge Cabins Royal Gorge Cabins are owned and operated by Echo Canyon River Expeditions, one of the oldest and largest tourism companies in the Royal Gorge region. The resort offers a variety of whitewater rafting adventures on the Arkansas River, full-service restaurant and bar, event space, luxury cabins and beautiful glamping tents., pictured top left. www.royalgorgecabins.com


PHOTO CREDITS: WILLIAM GEORGE

UNTAPPED. UNTAMED

www.KremmlingChamber.com


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southwest colorado dining

“A quiet mountain town escape, with the luxury you deserve” Our elegantly appointed guest rooms and suites have all of the historic details that embrace our heritage complete with all of the modern amenities you desire. Experience The Dining Room’s elegant yet comfortable fine dining with old west f lair. We proudly host weddings, special events and business meetings. Whether it’s f ly fishing the Rio Grande River, mountain biking our numerous all terrain trails, golfing on our championship golf courses, or simply enjoying the Colorado mountain lifestyle, we have something for everyone.

605 Grand Avenue, DelNorte Colorado - www. windsorhoteldelnorte.com

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AN ANONYMOUS DONOR AND A RESTAURANTEUR DOING GOOD

S

haron Stone, owner of Sharon’s Restaurant in Steamboat Springs, Colorado, knows what community is all about. She has been serving breakfast in Steamboat for 32 years and has never seen anything impact the community as drastically as the Covid-19 pandemic. The economic hardship has been tough to bear for so many people in rural Routt County, Colorado and throughout the country. While restaurant owners have been particularly hard hit during this health crisis, Sharon has been part of a local grassroots movement that has turned lemons into lemonade and made a difference for so many who are struggling to get by. With the help of an anonymous donor last December, Sharon started serving free breakfast and coffee to help those affected by job loss and pandemic-related closures, no questions asked. It all started with a regular customer who has requested to remain anonymous. He ate his breakfast, went to pay the bill and then donated $1,200 to offer free breakfasts to those who could use a leg up. “He said, ‘There’s something I want to talk to you about,’” Stone said. “’If I leave you this check, could you do some

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free breakfasts?’” This one gesture has turned into a micro-movement. “It’s become quite the thing, where people just leave $5, $10 or $20 extra dollars, and pay it forward,” says Stone. “As long as the meals are needed, and the community keeps pitching in, I’ll continue to offer free breakfast. It means a lot to people; you can see it in their eyes. I am happy to think that my free breakfasts are chipping away at the local economic and mental health crisis.” The original donor also offered to match the first $1,500 and the donations have streamed in. “It’s really been a win-win-win,” said the anonymous donor. “The people who can spare a little feel good for giving, local business gets a life-line and so do those who are in need.” The donor continued, “There are people not only struggling financially. The mental anguish and fatigue are debilitating. A warm cup of coffee and good meal go a long way to lift the spirit.” Watching how the community has continued to move the program forward, the donor feels that this is something that can be a winning formula for communities in need around the country. “It doesn’t take much to get it started, the giving can perpetuate itself, and it makes an impact on the community as the whole. It saves businesses and jobs, while feeding the needy.” There have been some days Sharon has served more free meals than paid meals, but it keeps her in business and the community intact. The gratitude she feels for her community is overwhelming and she knows that she is making a difference in people’s lives. The free breakfast includes a choice of biscuits and gravy with eggs, baby pancakes with eggs or a breakfast burrito with green chili or salsa every Monday-Saturday, starting at 7am. Sharon’s Restaurant is located at 2851 Riverside Plaza, Steamboat Springs, CO 80487 and is open Monday-Saturday 6am-2pm, and Sunday 7-1. You can find her on Facebook at Sharon’s. Give her a follow and share the good news and create a movement in your local community.


chaffee county dining Great adventure calls for great spirits Introducing the lightweight Aluminum “Backcountry Bottle”

Perfect for your outdoor lifestyle

MOVING TO 113 N. Railroad May 10, 2021!

Salida, Colorado

Tasting Room and Tours Open Daily woodsdistillery.com @woodsdistillery 719-239-4315

Our ideal customer is hungry, and the rest should take care of itself. We aim to provide elevated comfort food on the heart of Main Street, Buena Vista.

BURGERS . MELTS . TOTS . LIL”L VIKINGS 321 E. Main St. Buena Vista, Colorado www.buenaviking.com


steamboat dining

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4pm-close 4-5:30pm

happy hour

i ta l i a n h o t s p o t

s m a l l p l at e s , a n t i pa s t i , p i z z a , pa s ta ,

d e c a d e n t d e s s e r t s , c r a f t c o c k ta i l s , wine list, kids menu

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l i n c o l n av e .

mambos.com

970.870.0500

4pm-close happy hour 4-5:30pm open

a k i s s o f l at i n

ta pa s , e n t r e e s , c r a f t c o c k ta i l s ,

wine list, kids menu

818

l i n c o l n av e . b e s a m e s t e a m b o at . c o m

970.761.2561

open

7:30am-close

local, organic

b r e a k fa s t

&

+

s u s ta i n a b l e f o o d

lunch, espresso bar,

c r a f t c o c k ta i l s , o - p r o o f c o c k ta i l s , wine list, soft serve ice cream, kids menu

207 9th

st.

ya m pava l l e y k i t c h e n . c o m

970.875.3989 find us on:

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C H EE R S

EXPERIENCE STEAMBOAT WHISKEY COMPANY COCKTAILS, BOTTLE SALES & TASTINGS Have You Tried Our New Food Menu? We Have Dessert!

Be In the Know! DINE LOCAL

OPEN Weekdays 3PM , Weekends 12PM VISIT US 1103 Lincoln Ave k DOWNTOWN STEAMBOAT

Access all of our restaurant reviews

www.SteamboatWhiskeyCo.com 970-846-3534


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dine local

Redefining Fine Dining

C o smopoli tan Telluride BY ERIN RIES

With 60 percent of restaurants forced to close their doors as of September 2020, and 70 percent expected to permanently close before we even approach herd immunity, this is the story of one restaurateur in a small resort town that repeatedly and relentlessly reinvented his restaurant, and very simply refused to quit … no matter what. The story of Chad Scothorn, 25-year owner and operator of Cosmopolitan Telluride, “Cosmo” in Telluride, Colorado is still being written. While early chapters revolved around Chad’s considerable culinary skills, dedication to food integrity and artistry, more recent chapters showcase his never say die attitude… absolutely required to weather a deadly global pandemic, keep his local and national patrons safe, and his doors open so that his employees could continue to work safely, and provide for their families. That Cosmo’s 25th anniversary, February 16, 2021, arrived in the midst of this pandemic was not in the cards. Clearly, there were no expectations of the arrival of such a scourge. Absent COVID, Cosmo would have carried on very successfully as a fine dining indoor establishment operating at their usual 5-9 PM only. In the face of COVID, and its myriad challenges, Scothorn has guided Cosmo from a much celebrated, indoor fine 62

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dining Telluride establishment into an innovative hub of dining flexibility and creativity. A transition that required learning the ins and outs of to-go meals, reheat and eat packaging, labeling, food-safe reusable containers, outdoor dining, takeout apps, and retraining his entire team. Dictated by ever-changing health and safety standards from the state and county, Cosmo’s offerings, hours, accessibility, seating options and business plans frequently changed weekly. Below are some of the “out of the box” tools, ideas and strategies that Scothorn implemented to keep his doors open and his employees working. With the closing of the Telluride Ski Resort and restaurants (mandated by the Governor of Colorado) on March 14, 2020, Scothorn, abruptly pivoted to focus his efforts on what could be done safely. He created a menu with reheat-and-eat foods in vacuum sealed packages that could survive being transported in takeout containers. Chad along with his Bookkeeper and Assistant Manager learned how to use the Toast APP for takeout and created instructional labels for reusable containers—all options never before offered or considered by Cosmo. Eight weeks later, Cosmo opened for takeout only with a myriad of


options for locals and the second homeowners that never left town because they felt safer in the tiny box canyon. He also pursued the desires and needs of his customers by going to great lengths to offer precisely what locals wanted using surveys on social media and talking to people directly. Scothorn drove around town for three weeks, masked and gloved giving away many different types of bread he’d baked to learn what people liked most. Suddenly, the stunningly, elegant single-serve desserts were a no-go as they didn’t transport well and often included accompaniments, which would melt or dissolve before the diner could consume. Chad retrained his pastry chef to make family-styled whole cakes. He had his pastry chef refine the sponge cakes, making multiple iterations to perfect this offering for online takeout. In the process throwing away dozens of cakes until they were absolutely perfect. Switching from indoor fine dining to takeout was a massive adjustment. An innovative “drive-through station” was built to allow customers and employees to have zero point of contact when picking up takeout orders. People flocked to the restaurant to buy takeout and then walked across the street to sit and eat and drink alcohol on random benches conveniently located on this small parcel of land.

Then, in June, with indoor dining permitted, but limited to 25 percent capacity, Scothorn took dining outside. He petitioned the towns of Telluride and Mountain Village for permission to create an attractive dining spot with socially distanced seating using open air tents and heaters on that very same small piece of land across the street from his restaurant. In late fall with the colder temperatures, Scothorn started working on building a deck on this same piece of land. He brought in a lighting consultant to create warm and inviting ambient lighting on the open-air deck. Dining tables with fire pits to keep diners warm, were retrofitted by adding larger tops to allow people to actually dine without burning themselves in the process. He began offering après’ ski dining and al fresco dining at 3pm. Upon reflection, Scothorn describes the last year as pure “survival mode” where he was forced to go to the well and use everything he knew. Said Chad, “with the addition of drive through takeout and the outdoor deck dining starting at 3pm, for the month of March we were able to match sales from 2019.” 301 Gus’s Way ,Telluride www.cosmotelluride.com

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YA MPA VA L L E Y KITCHEN S T E A M B O A T

S P R I N G S

BY HOLLY RESIGNOLO If I had to describe a restaurant in one word the Yampa Valley Kitchen’s would be Beautiful. Beautiful food, beautiful decor, beautiful surroundings, beautiful service. As you pull up to their front door a full garden of flowers, vegetables and herbs engulf you as you enter their outdoor patio seating. The interior is just as welcoming, filled with greenery and a vibrant bar area that pops with flowery wallpaper that was chosen to accent the room. This newly opened eatery in Steamboat Springs is a meeting spot where you will want to sip, nosh, and linger with friends and family. Jeremy MacGray & co-owner Hannah Hopkins, Executive Chef Joe Campbell, 64

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Manager Natasha Krefft, Cocktail Curator Rena Day and Gardener Pat Tormey have crafted a soulful and delicious experience for those looking for Breakfast and Lunch in Downtown Steamboat Springs. They pride themselves in fulfilling a mission to serve uncompromised food. The team states, “Yampa Valley Kitchen is uncompromising in its selection and sourcing of ingredients. We only use local, organic, or sustainable foods of the highest quality. This includes everything, down to the salts, oils, and spices we use. Instead of the commitment to use organic or local foods “ when available ”, YVK will not serve it when it’s not available. BOOM! As you’ll see, our menu changes as we strictly adhere to this principle. Yampa Valley


dillon dining

Kitchen- UNCOMPROMISED FOOD - “. Open 7:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. daily their menus consist of hardy, light, and classic breakfast selections of eggs, crepes, toasts, bowls, and waffles. Lunch offers salads, sandwiches, small-plate snacks, soups, and hardier plates for carnivores, vegetarians, and vegans alike. We adored the carrot Vegan Dog, Rosti, and colorful 9th Street Salad. The drink menu has so many delicious options from specialty lattes, organic loose-leaf tea, delicious smoothies, and juices to zero proof + proof cocktails, it was hard to choose what to consume. We watched a “Garden Mary” pass by garnished to the hilt with beautiful findings from the kitchen’s garden outside. Sparkling water, sparkling wine, and mimosas all lent to the dreamy atmosphere. Take in the experience and the fabulous food by making a reservation and enjoy everything this seasoned food and beverage team has to offer. 207 9th Street, Steamboat Springs CO www.yampavalleykitchen.com

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frisco dining

Bar & Grill

The Finest Seafood, Steaks and Entrees Casually Elegant, Moderately Priced with Great Specials 601 Main Street, Frisco 970-668-0345

www.silverheelsrestaurant.com

605 Main Street, Frisco CO 970-668-2100 www.KemosabeSushi.com

DINNER MENU . SALOON MENU & HAPPY HOUR

At Frisco Prime our food is made with all-natural ingredients. And as long as we can get it (and usually do), everything is also organically grown; free of antibiotics, chemicals, and preservatives, locally sourced; humanely raised, and hormone-free.

Steak . Seafood . Pasta . Farm Fresh Vegetables 20 Main Street, Frisco www.friscoprime.com

Vinny’s New location Opening Soon on Main Street Vinny’s and Frisco Prime are operating out of the Frisco Prime location at 20 W Main St in Frisco!


breckenridge dining

MENU BY DAVID BURKE

MODERN AMERICAN CUISINE WITH ALTITUDE 1925 Airport Road | (970) 547-9759 (ext. 9)

BRECKENRIDGEDISTILLERY.COM/RESTAURANT ©2019 Breckenridge Distillery Restaurant, Breckenridge, Colorado.

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK ALL SEASON LONG Join us for breakfast, lunch and dinner any day of the week!

Sustainably roasted coffee, fresh baked pastries, and grab-and-go items — 7 am – 6pm daily 605 South Park Avenue, Breckenridge, CO 80424 gravityhaus.com cabinjuice.com unravel.coffee @gravityhaus @cabinjuice @unravelcoffeeco

La Cima Mall, 520 S Main Street, Breckenridge

www.sanchotaco.com

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ASPEN

Mawa’s Kitchen 305 Aspen Airport Business Center #F Aspen, CO (970) 710-7096 mawaskitchen.com

BRECKENRIDGE

B reckenridge Distillery 1925 Airport Road Breckenridge, CO (970) 925-9788 breckenridgedistillery.com Briar Rose 199 Lincoln Avenue Breckenridge, CO (970) 925-9788 briarrosechophouse.com Goldenhorseshoe Tour Co. Breckenridge, CO (970) 453-2005 coloradosleighrides.com Hearthstone Restaurant 130 South Ridge Street Breckenridge, CO (970) 453-1148 hearthstonebreck.com Mi Casa Restaurant 600 South Park Avenue Breckenridge, CO (970) 453-2071 micasabreck.com Quandry Grille Main Street Station 505 South Main Street Breckenridge, CO (970) 547-5969 quandrygrille.com Sancho’s Tacos & Tequila La Cima Mall 500 South Main Street Breckenridge, CO (970)453-9343 www.sanchotaco.com

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Sauce on the Maggie Village at Breckenridge 655 South Park Avenue Breckenridge, CO (970) 547-5959 sauceontheblue.com Spencer’s Peak 9 at Beaver Run Resort Breckenridge, CO (970) 453-6000 beaverrun.com

BUENA VISTA

Wesley & Rose Surf Hotel Buena Vista, CO (719) 966-7048 surfhotel.com

CRESTED BUTTE

Montanya Distillers 212 Elk Avenue Crested Butte , CO (970) 799-3206 montanyarum.com Dogwood Cocktail Cabin 309 3rd Street Crested Butte (970) 453-9802 thedogwoodcb.com

DURANGO

Cyprus Cafe 725 East Second Avenue Durango, CO (970) 385-6884 cypruscafe.com Eno Cocktail Lounge & Wine Bar 723 East Second Avenue Durango, CO (970) 385-0105 enodurango.com Ore House 147 East College Drive Durango, CO (970) 247-5707 orehousedurango.com

FRISCO

Silverheels Bar & Grill 601 Main Street Frisco, CO (970)668-0345 silverheelsrestaurant.com Frisco Prime & Vinny’s Restaurant 20 Main Street Frisco, CO (970) 668-5900 friscoprime.com Highside Brewery 720 Main Street Frisco, CO (970) 668-2337 highsidebrewing.com The Uptown on Main 304 Main Street Frisco, CO (970) 668-4728 theuptownfrisco.com

GEORGETOWN

The Alpine 1106 Rose Street Georgetown, CO (303) 569-0200 alpinerestaurantgeorgetown. com

SALIDA

Woods Distillery 144 W 1st St Salida, CO (719) 207-4315 woodsdistillery.com

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS

Steamboat Whiskey Company 55 11th Street Steamboat Springs,CO (970) 761-2467 steamboatwhiskeyco.com Besame 818 Lincoln Avenue Steamboat Springs,CO (970) 761-5681 besamesteamboat.com Mambo 521 Lincoln Ave Steamboat Springs,CO (970) 879-9500 mambos.com

Kemosabe Sushi 605 Main Street Frisco, CO (970) 668-2100 kemosabesushi.com www.MountainTownMagazine.com


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Get active F e s t i va l N o t e s High Country Events Calendar

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events calendar PLE ASE NOTE THAT ALL LISTED E VENT S ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. WE SUGGEST FOLLOWING THE LINK TO THEIR INFORMATION TO CONFIRM.

March March 15th, 2021 Exclusive Day for Season Passholders. Silverton Mountain We’ll be spinning the POWDER Lift for unguided skiing for 2020/2021 Season Pass Holders only. This includes the Solid Gold Pass, the Unguided Season Pass, and the Kids Pass. Quantities of these passes are limited, get yours today or you’ll miss out! https://silvertonmountain.com/experience/ events/ March 17, 2021 The Aspen Snowmass Town Race Series, Aspen/Snowmass The Aspen Snowmass Town Race Series presented by HEAD skis celebrates its 40th season as the longest running town race series in North America. The Snowmass Series consists of six giant slalom races on Wednesdays, and the Aspen/Aspen Highlands Series on Thursdays features slalom and giant slalom races. Racing is open to all, in five disciplines: Adaptive, Alpine Ski, Tele Ski, and Snowboard. Racers may register as an individual, team, or family, and age classes range from 12 & under to 80+. https://www.aspensnowmass.com/whileyou-are-here/events/town-race-series March 18, 2021 Music on the Mall, Aspen/Snowmass Every Thursday, starting December 3, 2020 through April 15, 2021, Music on Mall returns to Snowmass, featuring live music on the Tower Stage during après. Thursday, January 28th, Smokin’ Joe and Rockin’ Randall bring music to the mall, s’mores and of course apres. Bring your

dancin’ ski boots! Music on the Mall runs from 2:30pm-4:30pm in December, January and February and moves to 3:00pm-5:00pm in March and April. Performances feature local Roaring Fork Valley musicians. Apres the Snowmass way means music and s’mores, what better way to end your day on the slopes?! https://www.gosnowmass.com/events/ March 18, 2021 Thursday Night Wonder: Guided Art Walk, Beaver Creek Explore Beaver Creek Wonder, an interactive series of oversize art installations, in the heart of Beaver Creek Village. Art Walks each Thursday at 4:00PM, 4:30PM, 5:00PM, and 5:30PM . Reserve your spot in advance! www.beavercreek.com/explore-the-resort/ activities/beaver-creek-events March 18 – 20, 2021 Oteil Burbridge Trio And Special Guests, Beaver Creek The Dead & Company bassist announced Friday Oct. 30th his upcoming run in Beaver Creek. John Kimock (drums) and Tom Guarna (guitar) will join Burbridge in the trio. Due to reduced capacity requirements, the Oteil Burbridge Trio residency February 4-6, 2021 have rescheduled to March 18-20, 2021. If you have purchased tickets to these shows the VPAC box office will be in touch regarding rescheduling or refund options. If you are interested in buying tickets please contact the VPAC box office to be alerted once tickets become available for purchase. https://vilarpac.org/event/oteil-burbridgetrio-march-18/

March 18, 2021 Sister Neapolitan Virtual Moonlight Concert. Gunnison/Crested Butte (VIRTUAL) Virtual Live Moonlight Concert Series: Sister Neapolitan Saturday, March 13. 7:30 pm. Live on ZOOM, doors open 20 minutes prior to concert. Sister Neapolitan is made up of three part harmony, lyrical storytelling and engaging performance. The three young women that make up the band, also known as the ice cream ladies, rise to new heights at every show. https://gunnisoncrestedbutte.com/event/ sister-neapolitan-virtual-moonlightconcert/ March 18, 2020 Watercolor & Wine, Gunnison Watercolor & Wine – in partnership with the CB Music Festival Thursday, March 18. 6:00 – 9:00 pm. Watercolor & Wine is not your typical art class… It’s a small art party in a fun, relaxing environment. This year we are joining forces with the CB Music Festival team and will be hosting a live concert while you paint in our Main Gallery. Artist and instructor, Karen Hill, will lead you step by step through an exciting project using a variety of watercolor techniques. Instructor: Karen Hill. $50/person includes two drinks, light appetizers and instruction. https://gunnisoncrestedbutte.com/event/ watercolor-wine-22/ March 19, 2021 Crested Butte Art Walk, Crested Butte Winter 2020-2021 ArtWalks 5-8pm Join us in Downtown Crested Butte to experience beautiful art and meet the artists at all of our participating locations. https://gunnisoncrestedbutte.com/event/ crested-butte-art-walk-4/ March 20 – 28. 2021

VOLUNTEERING is a really great way to get and stay active. Caring for Colorado’s Outdoors has never been easier! Volunteers for Outdoor Colorado has a new app: #YourCO that allows you to complete more than 50 DIY stewardship tasks anywhere, anytime. Download it and check it out! 70

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Leadville Winter Mountain Bike Series, Leadville (VIRTUAL) Join a self-timed fat bike race and support mountain biking trails near Leadville! You get groomed trails and new places to ride! Get a fastest time and


GREAT ACTIVITIES

Puerto Viejo de Talamanca Limon, Costa Rica • www.PuertoViejoClub.com

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MTN you’ll win a prize. Everyone registered is also entered into a prize drawing.

The Leadville Winter Mountain Bike Series is a major fundraiser for the Cloud City Wheelers, which have built over 20 miles of trail in Lake County. https://www.leadvilletwinlakes.com/event/ leadville-winter-mountain-bike-series-4/ March 21, 2021 Beaver Creek Snowshoe Race Series, Beaver Creek Challenge yourself to a race like no other! The Beaver Creek Snowshoe Race Series draws first-time snowshoers, world class snowshoe athletes, and everyone in between with a series of courses that highlight the sparkling beauty of Beaver Creek in winter. Join for a single race or the entire series with the 10K course or the 5K course. www.beavercreek.com/explore-the-resort/ activities/beaver-creek-events March 21, 2021 Demo Day, Purgatory Resort Come try all the latest gear! Just $20 for unlimited demos, all day long. Your favorite local shops will be on the mountain offering demos of their newest skis and snowboards. Demos start at 9am, and last demo is at 2:30pm. Come find us right at the base of Lift 1, and be sure to bring a photo ID and $20 cash. https://www.purgatoryresort.com/events/ demo-day-2020-21/?rec=1616317200 March 24, 2021 Ice Sculpture Ice Carving Demos, Aspen/ Snowmass See the Snowmass Ice Sculptures take shape at live ice carving demos with renowned sculptor, Thomas Barlow. Every other Wednesday, between December 16 and March 24, from noon to 4pm, Barlow will create a new ice masterpiece in front of your eyes. https://www.gosnowmass.com/events/ March 24, 2021 The Aspen Snowmass Town Race Series, Aspen/Snowmass The Aspen Snowmass Town Race Series presented by HEAD skis celebrates its 40th season as the longest running town race series in North America. The Snowmass Series consists of six giant

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slalom races on Wednesdays, and the Aspen/Aspen Highlands Series on Thursdays features slalom and giant slalom races. Racing is open to all, in five disciplines: Adaptive, Alpine Ski, Tele Ski, and Snowboard. Racers may register as an individual, team, or family, and age classes range from 12 & under to 80+. https://www.aspensnowmass.com/whileyou-are-here/events/town-race-series March 25, 2021 Music on the Mall, Aspen/Snowmass Every Thursday, starting December 3, 2020 through April 15, 2021, Music on Mall returns to Snowmass, featuring live music on the Tower Stage during après. Thursday, January 28th, Smokin’ Joe and Rockin’ Randall bring music to the mall, s’mores and of course apres. Bring your dancin’ ski boots! Music on the Mall runs from 2:30pm4:30pm in December, January and February and moves to 3:00pm-5:00pm in March and April. Performances feature local Roaring Fork Valley musicians. Apres the Snowmass way means music and s’mores, what better way to end your day on the slopes?!

March 25, 2021 Thursday Night Wonder: Guided Art Walk, Beaver Creek Explore Beaver Creek Wonder, an interactive series of oversize art installations, in the heart of Beaver Creek Village. Art Walks each Thursday at 4:00PM, 4:30PM, 5:00PM, and 5:30PM . Reserve your spot in advance! www.beavercreek.com/explore-the-resort/ activities/beaver-creek-events March 25, 2021 Thrive Together: Women’s Leadership Summit, Steamboat Springs The Steamboat Springs Chamber and Alpine Bank are proud to present Steamboat’s premier women’s leadership summit, Thrive Together, a collaboration that promotes, motivates, and empowers women in all phases of life through personal and professional development. Transform Into A Highly Effective Public Speaker The ability to set goals and to make written plans for their accomplishment is the secret of success. Goals positively impact your life in several ways:

https://www.gosnowmass.com/events/

Goals give you a feeling of power and purpose in life.

March 25, 2021

Goals build persistence, drive and determination.

Stay the Course with Chad Armijo – Avon (Virtual Class) The Athletic Club at The Westin is excited to be hosting a March wellness events– an interactive workshop titled Stay the Course led by trainer & life coach Chad Armijo. A trainer at the Athletic Club at The Westin since 2014, Armijo holds two Masters of Science degrees in Business Management and Adult Teaching and has a B.A. in Psychology. He is also an NLP (neuro-linguistic programming) Certified Master Life Coach as well as NLP Certified Ericksonian Hypnotherapist. Free & open to everyone, Armijo’s Stay the Course lecture will be held on Zoom and is the second session on “Mapping a Healthier Year.” This interactive session will focus on helping you capitalize on your opportunities, celebrate your wins and continue to raise the bar for a healthier and happier you. Advanced registration is required, please call 970-790-2051 to sign up. www.athleticclubwestin.com.

Goals are the foundation for high levels of performance, achievement and fulfillment. In this session, you will learn the keys to effective goal setting, answer important questions to help you define your authentic goals, and set goals across three important areas of your life. https://www.steamboatchamber.com/ events/ March 26, 2021 Yoga + Sound Bowl Class, Avon Rest & renew with 75 minutes of self-care and relaxation led by Athletic Club Yoga Instructor Lindsay Berman and visiting Life Coach Jessica Chase. Berman will lead a 30-minute restorative yoga flow class to help you stretch out, then Chase will use healing vibrations from Quartz and Tibetan sound bowls in a 30 minute sound bowl meditation to help calm the nervous system, release stress and bring you into a deep meditative space. This practice will conclude with a hot tea


guests and $50 for the public. Capacity will be limited. Masks are required & social distancing will be enforced.

Camp at 8:30 a.m.Open to individuals and teams!

Advanced registration is required, please call 970-790-2051 to sign up.

Over 18 – $25 entry & $50 lift ticket

18 and Under – $15 entry & $27 lift ticket

www.athleticclubwestin.com

Sign-up in Base Camp at 8:30 a.m. Space is limited so show up early!

March 26 – 28, 2021

All proceeds go to support the Wolf Creek Ski Team

The Grand Traverse: Crested Butte to Aspen, Crested Butte

https://wolfcreekski.com/special-events/

At Midnight, backcountry ski racers set out from Crested Butte for Aspen, climbing through the Crested Butte Mountain Resort before racing to Taylor Pass and finishing with an exciting run down Aspen Mountain. Racers climb more than 6,800’ and travel more than 40 miles to complete the course. Finishers cross the finish line at the base of Aspen Mountain where they are welcomed by family, friends, live music and a sponsor exp

March 31, 2021

https://travelcrestedbutte.com/eventscalendar/grand-traverse-crested-butteaspen/

Injury Prevention Exercises, Avon Led by professional athlete and XTERRA World Champion Middaugh, this special class will focus on injury prevention exercises to activate underactive muscle groups and lengthen & inhibit overactive muscle groups. Middaugh will address specific movement impairments associated with lower crossed syndrome that arise from sitting in chairs, sitting on bikes and repetitive exercises such as running.

Snowmass Fireworks, Aspen/Snowmass Guests and locals alike can enjoy festive fireworks on select Saturday nights throughout the season. With the spectacle launched from Fanny Hill, all can enjoy the colorful show from socially distanced balconies, trails, and restaurants around Snowmass Village. December 25, Times vary with the sunset!

The 2015 XTERRA World Champion, Middaugh is a 13-time XTERRA USA National Champion and 6-time USSSA National Snowshoe Champion. Well known throughout the Vail Valley as an elite level, multi-disciplined athlete, he coaches the Athletic Club’s Masters Swim program.

https://www.gosnowmass.com/events/

Capacity will be limited. Masks are required & social distancing will be enforced. Advanced registration is required, please call 970-790-2051 to sign up.

March 28, 2021 Comedian Jim Breuer Presents The New Normal, Beaver Creek The freewheeling, New York bred comic storyteller – who made the list of Comedy Central’s “100 Greatest Standups of All Time” – is hotter than ever, a global touring sensation and regular presence on radio and television whose rabid audience, he’s thrilled to note, is filled with “lifetimers.” https://vilarpac.org/event/jim-breuer-6pm/ March 28, 2021 Wolf Creek Challenge Series, Wolf Creek Giant Slalom 40+ gate Giant Slalom course on middle and lower Charisma. Sign-up in Base

https://www.gosnowmass.com/events/ April 1, 2021

The event will be held in The Westin’s Riverside Ballroom on Wednesday, March 31st at 5 p.m. It is free for Athletic Club at The Westin members, $20 for Westin Riverfront guests and $50 for the public.

March 27, 2021

Music on the Mall runs from 2:30pm4:30pm in December, January and February and moves to 3:00pm-5:00pm in March and April. Performances feature local Roaring Fork Valley musicians. Apres the Snowmass way means music and s’mores, what better way to end your day on the slopes?!

www.athleticclubwestin.com

Thursday Night Wonder: Guided Art Walk, Beaver Creek Explore Beaver Creek Wonder, an interactive series of oversize art installations, in the heart of Beaver Creek Village. Art Walks each Thursday at 4:00PM, 4:30PM, 5:00PM, and 5:30PM . www.beavercreek.com/explore-the-resort/ activities/beaver-creek-events April 1 – 3. 2021 Firefighter High-5s, Sunlight Mountain Resort High-5s to the Firefighters and Fire Responders! This season Sunlight is offering five (5) free days of skiing or riding to all https://sunlightmtn.com/ mountain/events-calendar April 2, 2021 First Friday, Carbondale Come celebrate First Friday in Carbondale. Join us every month in the heart of Carbondale’s Creative District, and enjoy a wide range of local arts, galleries, shopping, award-winning restaurants and spirits, and live music and entertainment. We are proud to announce our partnership with FirstBank, the sole financial services entity associated with First Friday. https://www.carbondale.com/First-Friday/

April

April 3, 2021 Wolf Creek Challenge Series, Wolf Creek

April 1, 2021 Music On The Mall, Aspen/Snowmass Every Thursday, starting December 3, 2020 through April 15, 2021, Music on Mall returns to Snowmass, featuring live music on the Tower Stage during après. Thursday, January 28th, Smokin’ Joe and Rockin’ Randall bring music to the mall, s’mores and of course apres. Bring your dancin’ ski boots!

Giant Slalom 40+ gate Giant Slalom course on middle and lower charisma Sign-up in Base Camp at 8:30 a.m. 18 and Under – $15 entry & $27 lift ticket Over 18 – $25 entry & $50 lift ticket Sign-up in Base Camp at 8:30 a.m. Space is limited so show up early! All proceeds go to support the Wolf Creek Ski Team

mo unta i ntow nm a ga zi ne.com | W I N T E R / S PR I NG 2 0 2 1

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events calendar

MTN April 2, 2021

Reserve your spot in advance!

Reserve your spot in advance!

First Friday, Carbondale

www.beavercreek.com/explore-the-resort/ activities/beaver-creek-events

www.beavercreek.com/explore-the-resort/ activities/beaver-creek-events

April 11, 2021

April 15, 2021

Edesia Showcase, Palisade

Resin Buckles & Riesling, Gunnison

Edesia, an annual signature event that benefits MarillacHealth, is an opportunity for the community to come together and celebrate philanthropy, delectable food paired with local wines, and to support the work that Marillac provides to local communities.

Resin Buckles & Riesling Thursday, April 15. 6:00 – 9:00 pm. Try something exciting and new in April! Using upcycled materials and old jewelry, you will create a unique belt buckle by rearranging the components inside new shapes with colorful backgrounds, and then preserving them in doming resin. It’s easy and fun! Instructor: Deirdre Jones. $40/person includes two drinks, light appetizers and instruction.

Come celebrate First Friday in Carbondale. Join us every month in the heart of Carbondale’s Creative District, and enjoy a wide range of local arts, galleries, shopping, award-winning restaurants and spirits, and live music and entertainment. We are proud to announce our partnership with FirstBank, the sole financial services entity associated with First Friday. https://www.carbondale.com/First-Friday/ April 3, 2021 Wolf Creek Challenge Series, Wolf Creek Giant Slalom 40+ gate Giant Slalom course on middle and lower charisma Sign-up in Base Camp at 8:30 a.m. 18 and Under – $15 entry & $27 lift ticket Over 18 – $25 entry & $50 lift ticket Sign-up in Base Camp at 8:30 a.m. Space is limited so show up early! All proceeds go to support the Wolf Creek Ski Team

This one-of-a-kind event benefits Marillac Clinic, a community health center serving Mesa County residents that are uninsured or underinsured with low and moderate incomes.

https://wolfcreekski.com/special-events/

https://visitpalisade.com/portfolio-item/ edesia-culinary-wine-spirits-adventure/

April 8, 2021

April 15, 2021

Music On The Mall, Aspen/Snowmass Every Thursday, starting December 3, 2020 through April 15, 2021, Music on Mall returns to Snowmass, featuring live music on the Tower Stage during après. Thursday, January 28th, Smokin’ Joe and Rockin’ Randall bring music to the mall, s’mores and of course apres. Bring your dancin’ ski boots! Music on the Mall runs from 2:30pm4:30pm in December, January and February and moves to 3:00pm-5:00pm in March and April. Performances feature local Roaring Fork Valley musicians. Apres the Snowmass way means music and s’mores, what better way to end your day on the slopes?!

Music On The Mall, Aspen/Snowmass Every Thursday, starting December 3, 2020 through April 15, 2021, Music on Mall returns to Snowmass, featuring live music on the Tower Stage during après. Thursday, January 28th, Smokin’ Joe and Rockin’ Randall bring music to the mall, s’mores and of course apres. Bring your dancin’ ski boots! Music on the Mall runs from 2:30pm4:30pm in December, January and February and moves to 3:00pm-5:00pm in March and April. Performances feature local Roaring Fork Valley musicians. Apres the Snowmass way means music and s’mores, what better way to end your day on the slopes?!

https://gunnisoncrestedbutte.com/event/ resin-buckles-riesling/ April 15, 2021 Thrive Together: Women’s Leadership Summit, Steamboat Springs The Steamboat Springs Chamber and Alpine Bank are proud to present Steamboat’s premier women’s leadership summit, Thrive Together, a collaboration that promotes, motivates, and empowers women in all phases of life through personal and professional development. Transform Into A Highly Effective Public Speaker The ability to set goals and to make written plans for their accomplishment is the secret of success. Goals positively impact your life in several ways: Goals give you a feeling of power and purpose in life. Goals build persistence, drive and determination. Goals are the foundation for high levels of performance, achievement and fulfillment.

https://www.gosnowmass.com/events/

https://www.gosnowmass.com/events/

In this session, you will learn the keys to effective goal setting, answer important questions to help you define your authentic goals, and set goals across three important areas of your life.

April 8, 2021

April 15, 2021

https://www.steamboatchamber.com/ events/

Thursday Night Wonder: Guided Art Walk, Beaver Creek

April 22, 2021

Thursday Night Wonder: Guided Art Walk, Beaver Creek Explore Beaver Creek Wonder, an interactive series of oversize art installations, in the heart of Beaver Creek Village. Art Walks each Thursday at 4:00PM, 4:30PM, 5:00PM, and 5:30PM .

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Enjoy an exquisite experience of fine dining and entertainment. Join us for an exclusive Chef’s Table luncheon, chef demos, wine and spirits, live music and a silent auction.The main event has been rescheduled for April 11,2021, 2-5 p.m, or attend the VIP luncheon from 11 am – 1 pm.

W IN T E R /S PR ING 2021 | mo unta intow nm a ga z ine.com

Explore Beaver Creek Wonder, an interactive series of oversize art installations, in the heart of Beaver Creek Village. Art Walks each Thursday at 4:00PM, 4:30PM, 5:00PM, and 5:30PM .

Thursday Night Wonder: Guided Art Walk, Beaver Creek Explore Beaver Creek Wonder, an interactive series of oversize art installations, in the heart of Beaver Creek.


April 30, 2021

benefit the Crested Butte Devo High School Race Team

Thrive Together: Women’s Leadership Summit, Steamboat Springs

http://gunnisoncrestedbutte.com/events/

The Steamboat Springs Chamber and Alpine Bank are proud to present Steamboat’s premier women’s leadership summit, Thrive Together, a collaboration that promotes, motivates, and empowers women in all phases of life through personal and professional development.

May 1, 2021

Transform Into A Highly Effective Public Speaker

https://www.visitestespark.com/events-calendar/spring-events/ duck-race/

The ability to set goals and to make written plans for their accomplishment is the secret of success. Goals positively impact your life in several ways: Goals give you a feeling of power and purpose in life. Goals build persistence, drive and determination. Goals are the foundation for high levels of performance, achievement and fulfillment. In this session, you will learn the keys to effective goal setting, answer important questions to help you define your authentic goals, and set goals across three important areas of your life. https://www.steamboatchamber.com/events/

MAY ay 1, 2021

CB Devo 2nd Annual Bike Swap, Crested Butte

Come shop for used bikes and bike related gear. All proceeds

Duck Race Festival, Estes Park (VIRTUAL)

Due to the uncertainty around COVID-19, the 33rd annual Rotary Duck Race Festival will be live-streamed from the Estes Valley Community Center as the ducks race the facility’s lazy river.

SO MUCH MORE! Scan our QR Code to continue reading about upcoming events:

Scan for More Events!


Raise A Glass

MTN

Remembering Andy Jessen: A friend and leader who forged community BY: LUIS BENETIZ & THE COLORADO SUN How do you measure the arc of a life? You think the math is simple. Take the impact of the things you do, multiply by the love you give, and subtract the mistakes along the way. Three fathers, husbands, sons, businessmen and public servants died Feb. 1 in an avalanche near Silverton in the San Juan Mountains of Colorado. One of these men was my good friend: Andy Jessen, 40.

The measurement of his impact will be felt in the Town of Eagle for eons to come. Andy was, as I used to tell him, “a mystery wrapped in an enigma.” Trained as a lawyer and tired of city life on the Front Range, he relocated to Eagle to live out a very Colorado dream with his beautiful and talented wife, Amanda. They started a brewing company in their garage, eventually growing into the community hub of Bonfire Brewing. Slowly but surely, he became a major employer in town, pulling in those talented people who strive valiantly at making mountain life work. Bit by bit, Bonfire beer started appearing in the fancy restaurants upvalley. We all toasted his successes, as well as our luck that we were blessed enough to have his talents in Eagle. His taproom is the town’s living room, rec room, ballroom, and sometimes courtroom. Everyone — and I mean everyone — at some point sat at the bar and got quiet, sage advice from Andy. From champions of industry jetting into the Eagle airport en route to Vail to the truckers coming in off Interstate 70, they would sit and listen to this brewing artisan or admire artwork by his wife (really the brains of the operation) that hangs behind the bar. It seemed like whenever I was there, he was opening early or closing late for some reason or another. Typically, those reasons were somehow connected with trying to make our little town better. A free case of beer for a fundraiser here, a few T-shirts, hats and growlers for a cause there. From that brewery, we watched the birth of a public servant. At that very same bar we hatched a plan in 2014. Andy, another business owner in town and I would run for Eagle’s Town Council. On a joint ticket. Our platform would be the outdoor economy: How to bring it to town and how to reinvigorate a tired downtown. We would be the youngest on the council by a country mile. We campaigned hard, stood shoulder-to-shoulder swinging at the “establishment,” and to the surprise of all of us — most of all Andy — we won. After town meetings that would run well past midnight, Andy would often walk over to the taproom with a few of us. We’d sit around and vent, curse and discuss how we were going to move the needle. It seems like Andy was always the wise one, thoughtfully keeping us balanced and focused on the right direction. His vision and purpose saw the town create a more integrated and expansive trail system. He guided the completion of our white-

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W IN T E R /S PR ING 2021 | mo unta intow nm a ga z ine.com

water park. And he always had the fire going in the backyard of the taproom, a respite for weary paddlers, hikers and bikers who, again and again, descended upon Bonfire Brewing to “gather ’round.” The impact of this simple act of gathering around a firepit to share stories of adventure, life and love will continue to reverberate and regenerate for years to come. The arc of Andy’s life in Eagle eventually turned to love. There are no words to describe how much he loved his wife, Amanda. Seeing them at the bar together on crowded weekend nights stealing glances at each other felt like the looks Adam must have given Eve and vice versa. It was the pure, loving gaze between true life partners. As Andy’s political experience grew, he saw that the job of helping to run a town must eventually turn into taking care of the people in that town. When Andy and Amanda saw the need for more yoga space in town, they turned the brewery floor into a weekend yoga studio. Revitalize Main Street? How about starting music festivals from scratch. Andy had that magnetic draw, the capacity to see that a town and its citizens were a single, living, breathing, symbiotic organism. He understood that for people to fall in love with a town, they first had to see that their town loved them. Andy worked hard every day to make that a reality. Mistakes. Everyone makes them. Some are regrettable. More often than not, some of them turn into lessons. What to do, what not to do. Andy was so excited that he was recently elected mayor pro tem. When he sent me a message about it, I dug up an old email that he sent me talking about why he didn’t run in 2016. He felt like he had more to learn, before he could be “trusted” with the town. We stepped on more political landmines than I could count in our first few years on the council and Andy always seemed to relish the explosion in his special, irreverent way. Back then, we were learning as we went along. To see him choose his words so carefully about this work and then see him come to be the next in line to lead Eagle, that made all the mistakes we made along the way worth it. He reminded me over and over again that to truly be of service, you have to lead with your whole heart, mistakes and all. The arc of Andy’s impact and love will continue to circle back to the bonfire of a bright and beautiful life. Gather ’round, my friends, gather ’round. Luis Benitez is the mountaineer-turned-councilman who was the first director of the Colorado Outdoor Recreation Industry Office. He is now the head of government affairs and global impact at VF Corporation. The Colorado Sun is a reader-supported, non-partisan news organization dedicated to covering Colorado’s people, places and policies. Learn more at coloradosun.com.


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Profile for Mountain Town Magazine

Mountain Town Magazine - Winter/Spring 2021  

We are Colorado's mountain town magazine! Mountain Town Magazine promotes Colorado's incredible mountain towns and the people who make these...

Mountain Town Magazine - Winter/Spring 2021  

We are Colorado's mountain town magazine! Mountain Town Magazine promotes Colorado's incredible mountain towns and the people who make these...

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