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Guyette & Deeter North American Decoys At Auction July 29 & 30, 2014


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Guyette & Deeter

North American Decoys At Auction Sheraton Harborside Hotel 250 Market Street Portsmouth, New Hampshire 603-431-2300 50 Table Buy, Sell, Swap July 28, 29, & 30

Monday, July 28, 2014

Preview 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM Join us for complimentary cocktails and hors d’oeuvres

Tuesday, July 29, 2014 Preview 8:00 AM - 10:45 AM Auction 11:00 AM

Wednesday, July 30, 2014 Preview 8:00 AM - 9:45 AM Auction 10:00 AM

For questions during the auction call 410-745-0485

Catalog $45. Out of Country $54 Absentee, Phone & Online Bidding accepted call 410-745-0485 for arrangements For Free Decoy Appraisal Contact: Gary Guyette | decoys@guyetteanddeeter.com | 410-745-0485 Jon Deeter | jdeeter@guyetteanddeeter.com | 440-543-1416


Important Notices: ■ Unofficial prices realized information will be available 5 business days after the auction. Official prices realized list will be available online approximately 2 weeks after the auction. ■ If you would like to consign decoys to our next auction please contact; Gary Guyette 410.745.0485 decoys@guyetteanddeeter.com or Jon Deeter 440.543.1416 jdeeter@guyetteanddeeter.com. Free appraisals are available with no obligation to consign and all correspondences are strictly confidential. ■ For delicate carvings a written statement from the purchaser assuming responsibility for pursuing any claims in the event of any damage incurred during shipping, these items are marked *. Under no circumstances will we be responsible for damage to glass, frames, or fragile decoratives, regardless of the cause. ■ Auctioneer James D. Julia, Fairfield, Maine. ■ Stands are not included with the decoys or weather vanes unless specified in catalog. Plexiglass cases are not included with shotgun shell boxes. ■ No Sales Tax. ■ Reserve a room at a discounted rate by calling The Sheraton at 603-431-2300 ■ Trade Up Program - A limited number of decoy purchases may be paid for by consigning decoys to the next Guyette & Deeter. auction. Ask Gary or Jon for Details.

Guyette & Deeter Harbor Cruise

Portsmouth Harbor Cruises - July 29 at 5:00 pm Guyette & Deeter will be hosting a harbor cruise for auction attendees who are staying at the Sheraton. The cruise departs at 5:00 and returns at 6:30. Cash bar will be provided. Space is limited! Only 49 passenger capacity. Call Guyette & Deeter at 410-745-0485 and reserve your complimentary ticket.

UPCOMING GUYETTE & DEETER DECOY AUCTIONS November 12 & 13, 2014

Talbot County Community Center Easton, Maryland

In Conjunction with the Easton Waterfowel Festival 50 Dealer buy, Sell, swap.

February, 2015

Southeastern Wildlife Exposition Marriot Hotel Charleston, South Carolina

In Conjunction with the Southeastern Wildlife Expo To consign Contact Gary Guyette | decoys@guyetteanddeeter.com | 410-745-0485 Jon Deeter | jdeeter@guyetteanddeeter.com | 440-543-1416


Guyette & Deeter

Dale & Gary Guyette PO Box 1170 St. Michaels, MD 21663 Tel: 410-745-0485 Fax: 410-745-0487 decoys@guyetteanddeeter.com

Jon & Leigh Ann Deeter 7980 Darby’s Run Chagrin Falls, OH 44023 Tel: 440-543-1416 Cell: 440-610-1768 Fax: 440-543-1466 jdeeter@guyetteanddeeter.com

Zac Cote Assistant Auction Manager, Online Auction Manager, & Photography Freeport, Maine Tel: 410.253.8616 Tel: 207.869.6004 zcote@guyetteanddeeter.com

Mike Stevenson Graphic Designer & Website Developer St. Michaels, Maryland Tel: 410.745.0485 michael@guyetteanddeeter.com

Ed Kenney Merchandise Manager & Shipping St. Michaels, Maryland Tel: 410.745.0485 shipping@guyetteanddeeter.com

Lynda Brooks Office Manager St. Michaels, Maryland Tel: 410.745.0485 lynda@guyetteanddeeter.com

Jane O’Malley Monetti

Bookkeeper St. Michaels, Maryland Tel: 410.745.0485 billing@guyetteanddeeter.com


Featuring Decoys From The Collections Of: William Grossman The Megargee Family Doug Knight Jim Rose Harry Seitz Paul Kelly

Peter Bartlett Phil Stanton Nancy Prince Don Beverly Carl Pryor Ellery Clark

William Grossman When on vacation in the early 1960’s Will Grossman was driving down a road near Brewster on Cape Cod when he spotted a small flea market. He pulled in and while shopping met early decoy collector and dealer Bob Clifford. They became friends and Will stopped to visit him on his annual summer vacation trips from New York City. They talked a great deal about both carving and collecting decoys. One time when Will and his wife Soony were visiting, Bob told them about a decoy auction that was going to be held in Hyannis a few days later. They wound up going to Richard Bourne’s first decoy auction. Will was captivated by the beauty of the decoys. The Grossman’s continued to time their vacations in New England to line up with the Bourne auctions and were there for the summer Mackey collection sales.. When Bourne went out of business in the early 1990’s they began attending the Guyette and Schmidt decoy sales at the Cliff House in Ogunquit, Maine. I remember that they were always smiling and thinking that they were there as much to enjoy their travels, surroundings, and the other people, not just to buy decoys. When we opened the preview for our joint sale with Sotheby’s of Jim McCleery’s collection in Manhattan I had no Idea of what to expect. Will and Soony were among the very first people through the door when the preview began. It was very reassuring to see both of them walking toward me smiling. Will passed away in March 2012.

- Gary Guyette

William Grossman


The Megargee Family The Megargee Collection stems from my family’s love of waterfowling, art, and the life of a progger (“progger” n., esp. Chesapeake Bay, one who forages about marshes and beaches). My grandfather, Henry P. Megargee, Sr., was an engineer, boat builder, and artist who was interested in anything to do with life on and around the water in coastal New Jersey. He instilled that love in his eldest son, my father, Henry, Jr. “Harry.” Both my father and grandfather were accomplished artists and carvers. My father won almost every division of the National Decoy Show in Working Waterfowl. He studied various carvers and their styles before arriving at his own idea of decoy perfection. It was only natural that his love of the art form and Jersey decoys would draw him to collect. He was adamant that the Jersey form was the most refined decoy in the country. Decoy collecting was not vogue at the time, and many of his birds were given to him by older friends who were hanging up their boots. There was not a real market for decoys as it exists today. My father’s collection was amassed primarily through trading with his friends. When I was a boy, it was not at all uncommon for us to sit on the tailgate of a station wagon with his friends, Bill Mackey, John Hillman, Somers Headley, Bill Purnell, and Joe French bartering for a rigmate of something one or the other did not have. Somers Headley once offered me a 20-guage Browning over-under if I could talk my father into trading him one of two Shourds bufflehead drakes he had. I remember sitting in Mackey’s cellar as a boy and listening to them discussing the intricacies of a certain decoy, debating its origin, whether it had been re-headed, or was original paint. These men were the deans of American waterfowl carving and collecting and my father, Harry Megargee, was the dean of New Jersey birds. His collection of exceptional New Jersey carvers and decoys was unrivaled at the time he was living. My mother, Sarah, shared his love of these decoys and continued to stay in collectors’ circles until her passing. Many of these decoys are featured in the various books that have been written and are still on loan to several museums. This exclusive offering of outstanding quality decoys from my family features some of the finest examples of their carvers and forms.

– Doug Megargee

Harry Megargee carving, with Horner brant in background


Artfact is Now Invaluable

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To bid using Invaluable: • Go to the Guyette & Deeter website and click on the Invaluable link below upcoming auctions. • Once on Invaluable’s website click on the Create Account button on the top right navigation bar. It’s free and only takes a few minutes. • Create your own username and password, along with your email address so Invaluable can send you important information. • Input your information. On the following page Invaluable will ask you for your interests. • Now that you are a member of Invaluable, not only can you browse and bid on our auctions, but you have access to all of Invaluable’s other auctions.

*Winning bids will be subject to a 3% Invaluable fee

Guyette & Deeter Online Auctions

We e k ly O n l i n e Au c t i o n s E n d i n g E ve r y T h u r s d ay N i g h t Gua ran te e d de s cri pti o n s , m ul ti pl e ph o t os, quick s h i ppi n g , g re at de al s

Pintail by Robert Elliston Sold for $560

Black duck by Madison Mitchell Sold for $135

Mallard by the Evans Factory Sold for $190

Pair of mallards by Ken Harris Sold for $230

For Questions Contact: 410-253-8616 | zcote@guyetteanddeeter.com | PO Box 159, Freeport, Maine 04032 | www.decoysforsale.com


Session One

Contemporary 1-21 Maine 22-26 Ontario 27-46 Ben Schmidt 47-59 Elmer Crowell 60-69 Miniatures 70-87 Mason Decoy Factory 88-108 Fish 109-115 New England Shorebirds 116-128 New England 129-146 Delaware River 146A-156 Items of Interest 157-177 Pacific Coast 178-181 Mark McNair 182-191 Ward Brothers 192-203 Maryland 204-217 Factory 218-238 New York State 239-256 Miniatures 257-279 Midwest 280-294 Ontario 295-316 Miscellaneous Decoys 317-337

Session Two

Decoratives 338-373 New England 374-381 New Jersey 382-391 Shorebirds 392-396 Mason Decoy Factory 397-410 New England 411-422 New Jersey 423-431 Shorebirds 432-446 Illinois River 447-461 Contemporary 462-472 New England 473-480 Louisiana 481-483 Miscellaneous Decoys 484-496 Virginia 497-504 Shorebirds 505-519 Canada 520-543 New England 544-562 Contemporary 563-577

Tuesday, July 29, 2014 11:00 AM Lots 1 - 337

Wednesday, July 30, 2014 10:00 AM Lots 338 - 587

Please read conditions of sale in the back of catalog


SESSION ONE

Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - 11:00 am

Contemporary Carvings

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1.

Hollow Canada goose carved in the Eastern Shore of Virginia tradition, Cameron McIntyre, New Church, Virginia.  “CTM” carved in the underside. Slightly turned head and raised “V” wing tip carving.  Original paint that has been aged; thin crack through neck.

Literature: “Decoys,” Loy Harrell, Jr.

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(3,000 - 4,000)

2.

Hollow carved sleeping Canada goose, George Strunk, Glendora, New Jersey.  Signed and branded “G. Strunk” on weight. Carved crossed wing tips, and fluted tail.  Very good and original.

Literature: “Decoys,” Loy Harrell, Jr.

(2,000 - 2,500)


3.

Well executed rigmate pair of goldeneye, Sean Sutton, Paulsboro, New Jersey.  Sutton stamp in weight, also signed. Both have slightly turned heads and wing tip carving.  Near mint original paint with good tone; structurally excellent.

Literature: “Decoys,” Loy Harrell, Jr. (900 - 1,200)

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7 Working black duck in resting pose, Marty Hanson, Prior Lake, Minnesota.  “MH” carved in underside. Cork body with wooden keel, bottom board, inserted wooden tail, and wooden head. Slightly turned head.  Excellent and original.

Provenance: From the hunting rig of Ken Cole, Grand Blanc, Michigan. (800 - 1,200)

5.

Working black duck, Marty Hanson, Prior Lake, Minnesota.  “MH” carved in underside. Cork body with wooden keel, bottom board, inserted wooden tail, and wooden head.  Excellent and original.

Provenance: From the hunting rig of Ken Cole, Grand Blanc, Michigan. (800 - 1,200)

6.

Mallard drake, Leo McIntosh, Woodville, New York.  Signed and dated 1984. Slightly turned head and raised, carved wing tips and fluted tail.  Very good and original. (1,200 - 1,500)

7.

Nantucket style eskimo curlew, Cameron McIntyre, New Church, Virginia.  “CTM” carved in underside.  Excellent and original.

Literature: “Decoys,” Loy Harrell, Jr.

(1,500 - 2,000) 9


Jim Schmiedlin

Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania

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Rigmate pair of redheads, Jim Schmiedlin, Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania.  Off white label on underside with “Return for reward.” Both branded “JAS” and have slightly turned heads.  Excellent and original.

Literature: “Decoys,” Loy Harrell, Jr.

(5,000 - 7,000) Jim getting the rig ready for the 2013 duck season on Lake Chautauqua

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“High head” style gadwall drake, Jim Schmiedlin, Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania.  Schmiedlin’s blue label on underside with “return for reward.” “JAS” is branded in underside. Slightly turned head with raised primaries.  Very good and original.

Literature: “Decoys,” Loy Harrell, Jr.

10.

Merganser hen, Jim Schmiedlin, Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania.  Relief wing carving and slightly turned head. Signed and dated 1998 with a hunting story on the underside. Original and good.   (3,500 - 4,500)

(3,500 - 4,500) 11


Delbert “Cigar” Daisey Chincoteague, Virginia

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Very rare pair of hooded mergansers, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Branded and signed. Both have carved wingtips and fluted tails.  Very good and original. (1,000 - 1,400)

14. Pair of pintails, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Branded and signed. Both have slightly turned heads and detailed feather carving.  Original paint with slight discoloration. (950 - 1,250)

12. Extremely rare gadwall drake, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Branded and signed. Cork body.  Excellent and original. (1,500 - 2,000)

15. Pair of bluebills, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Branded and signed. Carved wing tips and fluted tails.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200)

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Pair of mergansers, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Branded and signed. Hen has slightly turned head. Carved wing tips.  Very good and original. (1,000 - 1,500)

Rare pair of doves, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Branded and signed. Relief wing carving.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200)


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Pair of buffleheads, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Branded and signed. Both have relief wing tip carving, hen has fluted tail and is in rare sleeping pose. Drake is not quite as smooth as hen.  Very slight discoloration on drake’s breast, otherwise very good and original. (900 - 1,200) Very rare male scoter, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Branded and signed. Detailed wing tip carving and fluted tail.  Very good and original. (1,500 - 2,000) Pair of mergansers with lead weights, Cigar Daisey,

Chincoteague, Virginia.  Branded and signed. Drake is in swimming pose. Both have carved wing tips.  Very good and original. (1,000 - 1,500) 20. 21.

Ruddy duck hen and drake, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Branded and signed. Both have carved, crossed wingtips and fluted tails.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200) Four cork body decoys, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Branded and signed. Pair of mallards and two black ducks.  Original and very good. (1,600 - 2,000) 13


Gus Wilson

1864 - 1950 South Portland, Maine

The early “Monhegan Island” mergansers made by Gus Wilson are the only decoys that he took the time to carve the extended wooden crests on. The use of horse hair and leather crests came later and was no doubt a result of the delicate and slow process of carving that detail into the heads. This example, similar to the merganser in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, has a relatively thin crest with extra stylized feather carving. The racey, elongated body and reared back head create the movement that Wilsons decoys are famous for. Mergus Serrator-Red Breasted Merganser-Duck-III-Von Wright-1917 22.

Rare oversize Monhegan island style merganser drake, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine, circa 1900.  Inlet head, carved eyes and crest, and relief wing carving. Fine form with reared back neck and head.  Original paint with minor wear and very good patina; professional repair to the bill.

Literature: “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph, p. 42. “Great Book of Decoys,” Joe Engers, editor, p. 36. (40,000 - 60,000)

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Scoter, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine.  Inlet head with carved eyes. Relief wing carving.  Original paint with very minor wear; a few small dents. (2,000 - 2,500)

24.

Very early and rare eider drake, Thomas Alexander, Harpswell, Maine.  Large serifed “TA” is carved in to the underside with the date 1846. Detailed bill carving.  Original paint with good patina and minor wear; professional repair to the tip of the bill; small cracks in body.

Literature: “Decoys of the Atlantic Flyway,” George Ross Starr, p. 123. “Great Book of Decoys,” Joe Engers, editor, p. 41 (3,500 - 5,500)


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Monhegan style eider hen, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine.  Inlet head with open bill and carved mussel in mouth.  Appealing in use repaint; originally painted as a scoter; hit by shot.

Literature: “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph, p. 37. (6,500 - 9,500)

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Orlando Bibber

1882 - 1971 South Harpswell, Maine

Orlando Bibber served as engineer on the SS Governor Cobb, running from Boston to New Brunswick and during WWI when the ship was used by the Merchant Marines.

Merganser decoys, especially the hens, by Orlando Sylvester Bibber are some of the rarest and most refined of all the Maine carvers. As a professional marine engineer Bibber did not carve decoys commercially or to supplement his income but carved decoys to hunt over in his own rig. Bibber’s exaggeratedly long and slender decoys are thinly hollowed and are products of a man familiar with precision tooling. A machinist and engineer on early steamships, Bibber was initiated into the No. 7 Portland, Maine Marine Engineers Beneficial Association (MEBA) in early 1907 at the age of 24. Working on the first American built passenger steam ship, the SS Governor Cobb, which ran from Boston to New Brunswick, Bibber almost certainly had exposure to the racey merganser decoys of Massachusetts and its islands. The thinly hollowed bodies and lack of the inlet joint between neck and body make Bibbers decoys atypical Maine tollers. This is surprising since he lived on the same small peninsula as carvers such as Willie Eastman, Phineas and Thomas Alexander, Jesse Johnson and the Wallace Family. This extremely rare rigmate pair of mergansers was purchased by the consignor directly from the Bibber family 35 years ago and has never been offered for public sale.

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26 Detail


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Important rigmate pair of mergansers, Orlando Bibber, South Harpswell, Maine.  Both have turned heads and early tie straps. “TB” is carved in the underside of the drake.  Original paint with good patina and minor wear; most of the horse hair on the drake’s crest is missing; hen’s bill was replaced, likely by Bibber; a few tiny dents.

Provenance: Purchased directly from the Bibber family by the consignor. Literature: “The Great Book of Decoys,” Joe Engers, editor, p. 32, exact decoys. (30,000 - 40,000)

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Ontario 27. Hollow carved bluebill drake, D.K. Nichol, Smith Falls, Ontario.  Highly detailed feather carving.  Near mint working repaint by DW Nichol; small chip missing from one wing tip.

Provenance: Knight collection. Formerly in the collection of Hal Evans, Evans stamps on underside. (2,500 - 3,500)

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Rare “low head” model mallard, George Warin, Toronto, Ontario, last quarter 19th century.  With unusual champhered bottom edge. Branded “MC” for Manson Campbell.   Original paint that has darkened with age; minor wear; tail chip missing; lightly hit by shot; head has lifted slightly from body a long time ago a small nail was added to each side.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys II,” Bernie Gates, p. 64. (3,000 - 4,000)

29.

Wood duck drake, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario.  Shows good age.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Knight collection. Purchased at the April 1990 Julia and Guyette decoy auction. (3,000 - 5,000)

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30. Rare “round head” style redhead drake, Thomas Chambers, Toronto, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century. A combination of original paint with minor to moderate wear and old touch up; crack in breast; several small dents and shot marks. (1,200 - 1,500)

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31. Wood duck drake, D.W. Nichol, Smith Falls, Ontario.  Raised “V” wing tip carving.  Very good and original. 32.

Provenance: Knight collection. Old tag on underside indicates the decoy was at one time owned by Frank Ash. (1,250 - 1,750) Black duck from Smith Falls, Ontario.  Relief wing carving. Stamped loop feathering and raised neck seat.  Very good and original; tiny rough spot on one edge of tail. (1,500 - 2,000)

33.

Solid body black duck, John R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario.  Unusual and fancy subtle feather painting on head and body.  Original paint with minor wear; a few tiny dents.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates. (1,500 - 2,500)

34.

Hollow carved redhead hen, George Warin, Toronto, Ontario, last quarter 19th century.  Branded “EPH,” for

St. Clair Flats shooting company member EP Hannaford, 1881 - 1887. Also branded “AH Buehl” for shooting club member A.H. Buehl 1914 - 1933.  Original paint with minor wear; moderately hit by shot. (2,000 - 3,000) 35.

Hollow carved mallard drake from the Long Point Club, last quarter 19th century.  Tack eyes.  Original paint with minor wear; roughness on one edge of bill; moderately hit by shot.

Literature: “Decoying Lake St. Clair to the St Lawrence,” Barney Crandall, p. 186 exact decoy. (2,000 - 3,000)

36.

Very rare swimming black duck, William Hart, Belleville, Ontario.  Hollow carved with scratch feather paint.  Original paint with minor wear; worn area on top of head and edges of bill; a few tiny dents; one shot mark under tail.

Provenance: Kelly collection.

Literature: “The County Decoys,” Jim Stewart, p. 136. (2,000 - 3,000) 21


David Ward

1839 - 1912 Toronto, Ontario Born on Ward Island off Ashbridges Bay Lake Ontario, the eldest of three brothers, Ward was a prominent resident of the area. He was a giant of a man, an accomplished amateur boxer, lifeboat oarsman, commercial fisherman, boat builder, decoy maker, sportsman, market gunner and later a highly respected businessman (pawn broker). He lived on Ward Island and later, in Toronto. David Ward and the Warins, who were close friends, hunted together for the entire season at “The Flats” from the 1870’s into the early 1900’s. David Ward, along with George Warin was a founding member in 1874 of The St. Clair Flats Shooting Company, also known as The Canada Club. This outstanding Ward goose is one of 5 known in original paint that were originally found at the club.

Early photo of Wards Island in Toronto where David Ward Lived.

“Traditions in Wood,” Patricia Fleming.

Flats Geese are very rare. Usually made by “men of the water”, often boat builders, the decoys exhibit the fine form, workmanship and function of master craftsmen – wonderfully painted, durable and thin combining feather detail, blending and outstanding color, striking profiles, lightly hollowed construction and thin bottom boards. As you might surmise, identification of the makers of Flats Decoys is more art than science. Toronto’s Ashbridges Bay had at least 19 boat building companies at the turn of the century. Most made decoys. David Ward’s brother made decoys. George Warin’s brother obviously made decoys. Wells, Chambers, Humphries, Rennardson, Dewar, Beatty, Durnan, Dawson and more – the list is long. Why is the David Ward goose branded “Tom Chambers”? It was likely inherited and branded after Ward’s death. What is known is that these Flats Geese, whether knowns or unknowns are all wonderful examples of the Toronto School. They are often historically important, used at the best waterfowl clubs by important sportsmen of the day. Many decoy collectors believe that “The Toronto School Flats Geese”, of which this very rare David Ward goose is an example, best illustrates the features that make flats decoys so compelling. The “Ward Goose” resided at the St. Clair Flats Shooting Club for over 100 years until the 1970’s when friends Judge Harry Seitz of Monroe, Michigan partnered with Bernard W. “Barney” Crandell of Birmingham, Michigan purchasing it as part of the historic Flats Decoy group. Judge Seitz and his wife Midge included this Ward decoy in their family collection where it remained until now. 22


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37 Detail

Very rare and important Canada goose, David Ward, Toronto, Ontario, circa 1870s.  Hollow carved with glass eyes. Branded “HNT, Meredith and Thos. Chambers.”  Original paint that has darkened with age; small cracks through neck that have been strengthened with small nails a very long time ago; filler has fallen out of screw hole in one side of neck base.

Provenance: Seitz collection. Literature: “Decoying St. Clair to St. Lawrence,” Barney Crandall, p. 138.

(12,500 - 17,500)

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Delicate rigmate pair of bluebills, Iver Fernland, Hamilton Bay, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century.  Very light weight, hollowed with bottom board. Typical thick paint, some of which is combed on the back of the drake.   Original paint with minor wear; drake has three shot marks and a few rubs at end of bill and tail; hen has minor paint flaking on back; edge wear on tail and tip of bill; two shot marks. (5,000 - 8,000)

39.

Hollow carved redhead drake, Iver Fernland, Hamilton, Ontario.    Original paint with minor wear; professional paint restoration to a small area near one speculum. (3,000 - 4,000)


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Two hollow carved goldeneye hens attributed to Earnest Fowlie, Smith Falls, Ontario.  Detailed feather carving.  Appealing old in use repaint; a few small dents; one has slightly blunted bill.

Provenance: Knight collection.

41.

Two decoys from Eastern Ontario.  Wood duck and bluewing teal. Both have raised wing tip carving and raised heads.  Original paint protected by an old coat of varnish; minor wear.

Provenance: Kelly collection.

(800 - 1,200)

(800 - 1,200)

42. Bluebill drake, Peter Pringle, Dunnville, Ontario.    Original paint with moderate wear; appears to have old touch up on top of bill; moderately hit by shot; minor roughness to one edge of bill. (900 - 1,200)

43. Hollow carved redhead drake, Tom Chambers, Toronto, Ontario.  Branded “Thos Chambers maker,” and “JT McMillan.”  Mixture of original paint and repaint; moderate wear at tail; small dents; small crack in underside. (900 - 1,200) 44. Goldeneye hen D.K. Nichol, Smith Falls, Ontario.  Detailed wing feather carving.  Appealing old in use repaint on a lot of the decoy; combing on back and breast appear to be original; minor wear and a few tiny dents.

Provenance: Knight collection.

45.

Rigmate pair of goldeneye, William Hart, Belleville, Ontario.  Solid body style with “RW” carved in the undersides.  Original paint with minor shrinkage and wear; two shot marks on drake’s tail.

(1,200 - 1,500)

Provenance: Kelly collection. Literature: “The County Decoys,” Jim Stewart, p. 136. (1,200 - 1,500) 25


Branded “M C� For Manson Campbell. Born March 25, 1856 Port Perry, Ontario Died 1927 Chatham, Ontario Mayor of Chatham, Ontario 1895

Manson Campbell

Prominent sportsman and citizen

Manufacturer of farm equipment, specifically the Chatham Fanning Mill, used to clean and separate grain.

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Hollow carved Canada goose from St. Clair Flats, last quarter 19th century.  Branded “MC” for Manson Campbell.  Original paint with moderate wear on most of the body; minor wear on head; small area on one side of tail where it has been gnawed at by rats; several short hairline cracks in underside. (17,500 - 22,500)


Ben Schmidt

Detroit, Michigan

Ben Schmidt’s true working decoys tend to be limited to the species that flourished around Michigan’s Great Lakes. Predominantly, they include canvasbacks, redheads, bluebills, goldeneye, bufflehead, mallards, blacks, pintail, widgeon and teal. Most of his working geese are Canadas. The story that has been passed down among Michigan historians is that sometime between 1925 and 1935, a large group of snow and blue geese started using the Saginaw Bay area of Lake Huron. It appears as if both Ben and Frank received small orders to fit this unique demand. Some of the snow and blues that Ben made are identified with the name Port Austin carved in the underside, but some are not. It is interesting that all are hollow with bottom boards indicating that they were likely made in a similar time frame with similar construction and all very early in his carving career.

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Extremely rare immature blue goose in swimming pose, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan.  Hollow carved with rounded bottom edge.  Original paint with good patina, minor discoloration and wear; crack at small bullet hole through neck; small cracks in lower body; body seam has separated slightly.

Provenance: Used on the Eastern Shore of Wildfowl Bay on Lake Heron. Lot 299 in the April 1988 Julia and Guyette decoy auction.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid, p. 58. “Decoys: A North American Survey,” Gene and Linda Kangas. (7,500 - 9,500)

29


48

48 Detail

48.

30

Rare pair of wood ducks, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan.  Signed and dated 1956. Good feather carving detail.  Near mint original paint; hen has a tiny chip missing from the tip of the tail and hairline crack partway down back. (6,500 - 9,500)


49. Rare greenwing teal drake, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan.  Signed. Approximately 10 1/2” long with slightly turned head.  Near mint original paint; structurally excellent. (3,500 - 5,500)

49 50.

Unusually hollow carved Canada goose, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan.  With four piece laminated body. Hollowed out from the underside. Good carving detail.  Original paint with minor wear; slight separation at some of the body seams; a few tiny dents. (2,000 - 3,000)

50

51. Widgeon drake, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan.  Slightly turned head.   Original paint with minor wear; old touch up on keel. (1,250 - 1,750)

51

52.

Pair of canvasback, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan.  Drake has slightly turned head.  Near mint original paint; short hairline crack in hen’s tail. (1,000 - 1,400)

52 31


53

54

55

56

57

58

53.

Rigmate pair of redheads, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan.  Both are branded “EAO” and have very slightly turned heads.  Original paint with very minor wear; drake has a small shot scar on the back. (1,000 - 1,400)

54. Canvasback drake, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan.  Very slightly turned head. Branded “GEB” on keel. Hollowed out from the underside.  Near mint original paint that has darkened with age; structurally good. (800 - 1,200) 55. Mallard drake, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan.    Standard grade with minor wear; crack in one side of back; two short hairline cracks to other side of back. (800 - 1,200) 32

56.

Mallard hen, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan.    Original paint with very minor wear; tiny rough spot on one edge of tail; keel has been removed. (800 - 1,200)

57.

Black duck, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1950.  Heavily stamped. “FB” stamped on underside.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200)

58.

Black duck, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1940.  Slightly turned head. Feather stamping. Branded “HLR” on underside.  Very good and original; one shot mark in cheek.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(800 - 1,000)


Born in 1885 in Detroit, Schroeder loved the outdoors. A tremendously successful business career in Marketing, eventually provided him the opportunity to carve for pleasure. He made and hunted over his own decoys, regularly competed in National carving competitions and made a variety of styles and unusual species, like this barnacle goose which is possibly unique.

Tom Schroeder holding his first place pintail from the 1951 North American Decoy makers contest in New York City.

59

59.

Exceedingly rare barnacle goose, Tom Schroeder, Detroit, Michigan.  Possibly the only known example. Slightly turned head. Decoy was hollowed out from the underside. Fluted tail and unusual horizontal feather carving in upper back.  Near mint original paint protected by its original coat of varnish that has darkened somewhat; structurally excellent. (6,000 - 9,000) 33


Decoratives by Elmer Crowell

60

60 Detail

34

60.

Full size decorative tern, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s oval brand is in the underside of the base.  Excellent and original.

Literature: “The Songless Aviary,” Brian Cullity.

(8,000 - 12,000)


61

61 Detail

61 Detail

61.

Exceptional full size blue jay mantle carving, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s oval brand is in the underside of the base.  Original paint with fine feather detail and good patina; tiny chip missing from jesso on one foot and where bill joins head.

Literature: “The Songless Aviary,” Brian Cullity.

(15,000 - 20,000)

35


62

63

62 Detail

62.

36

Full size sandpiper, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s rectangular stamp and signature are on underside of base.  Very good and original. (3,500 - 4,500)

63 Detail

63.

Full size ringneck plover, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s rectangular stamp and signature are on underside of base.  Original paint that has darkened somewhat with age; gesso thighs are missing; several tiny paint flakes missing from feet and carved clam shell base. (3,500 - 5,500)


Miniatures by Elmer Crowell

64

65

66

67

68

69

64.

Pair of miniature redheads, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.    Very good and original. (3,500 - 4,500)

67.

Miniature gadwall, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.    Very good and original. (1,750 - 2,250)

65. Rare large miniature shoveler drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  No stamp or label.  Excellent and original. (2,000 - 3,000)

68. Miniature mallard drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Traces of Crowell’s circular ink stamp on underside.  Very good and original. (1,200 - 1,500)

66.

69.

Large pair of miniature mallards, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Drake has slightly turned head. No stamp or label.  Excellent and original. (3,500 - 4,500)

Miniature goldeneye drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s rectangular stamp in underside.  Two small screw holes in underside of base; tiny paint rub at end of bill; otherwise very good and original. (1,200 - 1,500)

37


A.J. King

North Situate, Rhode Island

Most of what is written about A.J. King is compiled in the book, “Birds in Wood and Paint”, by Joseph H. Ellis. A full chapter is dedicated to King and his work. Ellis introduces King this way; “Of all the carvers of miniatures and decorative birds in the early and mid twentiety century, Allen J. King was without a doubt the most gifted and versatile artist. Born on March 26, 1881, in Norh Scituate, Rhode Island. King was the son of a farmer, and lived in North Scituate his entire life. Although he never had any formal education as a naturalist or artist, he developed remarkable skills in a variety of art forms. Because of his modest lifestyle and ambitions, and perhaps because he did not produce large scale carvings that might have attracted greater attention in the world of decoy collecting, the full range of his artistry has been little known and vastly under appreciated. Fortunately, many of his finest works now reside at Massachusetts Audubon’s Visual Arts Center in Canton, Massachussets, where his broader artistic legacy is thus preserved.”

69A. Miniature redhead drake, A.J. King, North Scituate, Rhode Island.  Signed. Highly detailed feather carving.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Grossman collection. A gift from Bob Clifford. (1,000 - 1,400)

69A 38


70. Rare triple mount, A.J. King, North Scituate, Rhode Island.  Signed. A white fronted goose, snow goose and blue goose. Fine paint detail and raised wing tips.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Grossman collection. A gift from Bob Clifford. (3,000 - 4,000)

71.

Pair of miniature American mergansers, A.J. King, North Scituate, Rhode Island.  Signed. Both have fine carving detail with extended wing tips.  Excellent and original.

Provenance: Grossman collection. A gift from Bob Clifford. (2,000 - 3,000)

70

71

72.

Pair of miniature canvasbacks, A.J. King, North Scituate, Rhode Island.  Signed. Highly detailed feather carving.  Excellent and original.

Provenance: Grossman collection. A gift from Bob Clifford. (2,000 - 3,000)

72 73.

Pair of miniature mallards, A.J. King, North Scituate, Rhode Island.  Signed. Fine carving detail.  Excellent and original.

Provenance: Grossman collection. A gift from Bob Clifford. (2,000 - 3,000)

73

39


74

75

76

74. Three miniatures, Russ Burr, Hingham, Massachusetts.  Burr’s ink stamp is on the undersides.  Tiny chip missing from kingfisher’s tail, otherwise very good and original. (1,200 - 1,500) 75.

40

Well carved and painted miniature shorebird and mallard.  Signed “GT McFarland, South Bristol, Maine.”

76.

Both show good age.  Very good and original. (1,400 - 1,800) Three miniatures, Wendell Gilley, Southwest Harbor, Maine.  A pelican, Canada goose, and pintail. All are signed.  Pintail has minor wear; the rest are very good and original. (950 - 1,250)


77

78

79

77. 78.

Three songbirds, Jess Blackstone.  Signed and inscribed, “tree sparrow, 19,” “Cape May warbler 6318,” and “Chestnut sided warbler 55.”  Very good and original. (1,200 - 1,500)

79.

Three songbirds, Jess Blackstone.  All are signed and inscribed, “Goldfinch 147,” “Chickadee, 1881,” and “Chickadee 1704.” Goldfinch has lifted wing tips.  Very good and original. (1,200 - 1,500)

Three miniature songbirds, Jess Blackstone.  All are signed and inscribed, “Nuthatch 231,” “Red breasted nuthatch, 484,” and “Black throated warbler,” no number.  Very good and original. (1,200 - 1,500)

41


80

81

82

83

80. Four miniatures, James Lapham, Dennisport, Massachusetts.  All are signed. Bufflehead is stamped, “J.B. French”. All have good paint detail and raised wing tips.  Very good and original. (950 - 1,250) 81.

42

Four miniatures from Massachusetts.  All by the same Massachusetts maker. A Canada goose, wood duck, pintail, and black duck. All show good age.  Minor wear on pintail’s bill, otherwise very good and original. (800 - 1,200)

82.

Large pair of miniature goldeneye, James Lapham, Dennisport, Massachusetts.  Both are signed and stamped “J.B. French”. Drake is approximately 6” long. Both have good paint detail and raised, carved wing tips.  Very good and original. (600 - 900)

83.

Pair of miniature flying mallards, Russ Burr, Hingham, Massachusetts.  Burr ink stamp on underside of base.  Original and good. (350 - 450)


85

84

86

87

84.

Miniature mallard drake, Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts.  An earlier unstamped miniature.  Near mint and original.

Provenance: Grossman collection.

(1,500 - 2,500)

85. Miniature godwit, George Boyd, Seabrook, New Hampshire.    Original paint with good detail; light paint shrinkage over much of the carving. (650 - 950)

86. Pair of miniature Canada geese, George Boyd, Seabrook, New Hampshire.  One is in swimming pose, the other has a slightly turned head.  Near mint original paint; structurally excellent. (3,000 - 5,000) 87.

Pair of miniature mallards, George Boyd, Seabrook, New Hampshire.  Hen has slightly turned head.  Very good and original.

Literature: Finely Carved and Nicely Painted,” Jim Cullen, p. 73. (3,500 - 4,500)

43


Mason Decoy Factory 1896 - 1924 Detroit, Michigan

88

88.

Rigmate pair of bluewing teal, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1900.  Strong sponge painting on undersides. Drake has double blues.  Both have strong original paint and very slight wear; drake has restoration around seam of neck filler, a tail chip repair and areas of restoration on left side of face; hen has neck filler replaced, small tail chip repair, and numerous shot marks on left side of body and head.

Provenance: Seitz collection. (7,000 - 10,000)

88 Detail

44


89

90

90 Detail

89 Detail

89.

Rare merganser drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Challenge grade.  Original paint with good patina and very minor wear; tight “in factory” crack partway down back; small crack in underside; several tiny dents; bill crack repair.

Provenance: Rose collection.

90.

Rare merganser hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Challenge grade with early snakey head style.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; filler is added to the back of the neck seam with touch up in that area. (6,000 - 9,000)

Literature: “Mason Decoys: A Complete Pictorial Guide,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid. (6,500 - 9,500)

45


91

92

93

94

95

91.

96

Pair of canvasbacks, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century.  Premier grade. Hen is branded “WLB” on underside, for William Barber, Detroit, Michigan.  Both decoys have small amount of shot scars; very slight seam separation; a few chips where paint is missing to exposed wood; drake has rope marks on one side and back of head.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

92.

Very rare widgeon drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade.  Worn original paint; crack under tail; old touch up at speculums. (1,500 - 2,000)

(2,000 - 3,000)

93. Redhead drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade. Weight is stamped “CM”.  Original paint with minor wear; a few small dents. 46

Provenance: Rose collection.

(1,500 - 2,000)

94. Bluebill drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Challenge grade with wide spoon bill.  Original paint with minor wear; very slight roughness at one side of neck base, with possible touch up at a small area there.

Provenance: Rose collection.

95.

Rare tucked head redhead drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century.  Joe French inventory number “408” stamped on underside.  Strong original paint with flaking to top of head, around neck seam, and side of body; slight seam separation.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(1,500 - 2,000)

(1,500 - 2,000)

96. Pintail drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Standard grade with glass eyes.  Near mint original paint; small hole drilled in underside; neck filler has been professionally replaced.

Provenance: Rose collection.

(1,500 - 2,000)


97

98

99

100

101

102

97.

Rare rigmate pair of bluewing teal, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Standard grade, painted eye models.  Original paint with very minor wear; neck filler has been professionally replaced; each has a crack in the underside.

Provenance: Old tag on undersides read “Amos and Jack Waterfield Collection 11/70.” (1,250 - 1,750)

98. Black duck, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade.  Original paint with very slight wear; structurally good.

Provenance: Rose collection.

(2,500 - 3,500)

99. Grey coot, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Challenge grade. Branded “HHB” for Harvey Brown.  Original paint with very minor wear; thin crack in underside; tiny tail chip missing; a few very small dents. (2,500 - 3,500) 100. Redhead hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit,

Michigan.  Very rare early premier grade style circa 1905. Branded “J. Chas McCullough”. Retains original Mason weight.  Professional repair to a chip in the top of head and part of bill. (2,000 - 3,000) 101. Very rare rigmate pair of oversize mallards, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade, Back Bay models.  Original paint with moderate wear; each has some touch up on the head and numerous cracks; drake has a tail chip repair; hen has a tail chip missing; filler added to drake’s neck base; small chip missing from one side of drake.

Provenance: From the False Cape Gun Club, branded “FC GC.” (2,000 - 3,000)

102. Pair of goldeneye, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Standard grade with glass eyes.  Original paint with minor wear mostly on hen’s back; crack in underside of each and a small amount of neck filler missing.

Provenance: Rose collection.

(2,000 - 3,000) 47


103. Rare greenwing teal hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century.  “H.T.C.” painted on underside.  Original paint worn; wear at edge of bill; around 5 shot marks in body.

Provenance: Seitz collection. Ex Hillman collection. Hillman collection stamp on underside. (4,000 - 6,000)

103 104. Pair of bluebills, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; shallow rough area to wood in center of hen’s back from when the decoy was made.

Provenance: Rose collection. (4,000 - 6,000)

104 105. Redhead hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Early premier grade style. “DR. O” is painted on the underside. Retains Mason weight.   Original paint with minor wear; a few small dents and shot marks; minor roughness where head joins body.

Provenance: Rose collection. (3,000 - 4,000)

105

106. Bluewing teal hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade with early snakey head style, circa 1905. Branded “J. Charles McCullough”.  Original paint with minor wear; moderate flaking on top edge of head, lightly hit by shot; retains original Mason weight. (3,000 - 4,000)

106 48


107

108

107. Pair of canvasbacks, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade.  Original paint with minor wear; drake has been hit by shot and has a small amount of paint missing at the neck seam.

108. Pair of canvasbacks, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Challenge grade.  Original paint with very minor wear; each has a crack in the underside and a shallow surface crack in the back.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of John Hillman, Hillman collection stamp on underside. Drake is branded “HHB” for Harvey Brown. Rose collection. (6,000 - 9,000)

Provenance: Rose collection.

(5,000 - 8,000)

49


Fish

109

110

110

110 109. Wooden fish plaque of a landlocked salmon, Lawrence Irvine, Winthrop, Maine.  Fish measures 23” long and 10” tall. Written on pencil on back are details about fish’s weight and where it was caught.   Excellent original paint; front right side fin has been broken off and reattached. (1,200 - 1,500)

111

110. Three vintage trout plaque carvings.  Approximately 9” long. Good detail.  Very good and original. (900 - 1,200)

112

111. Carved wooden plaque of a perch, Albert Mitchell, Maine.  Signed. Approximately 18” long. Good carving detail.  Original paint with minor shrinkage; small chips missing from one eye. (400 - 600)

50

112. Four fish decoys, Leroy Howell, Hinkley, Minnesota.  Lengths vary from 6 1/2” to 4 3/4”.  Original and good. (1,250 - 1,750)


113

113. Carved wooden fish model of a 22.5 lb. salmon, carved by Malloch’s Studios.  Mounted on wooden backboard. Approximately 41” long with inscription “Caught by E. A. Webster. 12/4/42. Tower Poole, Armathwaite. On B. & P. Phantom”. Detailed carving.  Original paint with moderate wear; small cracks in tail; small crack in backboard; small amount of damage in trim. (4,000 - 7,000)

113 Detail

114

115 114. Very rare trophy fish carving of a pike.  Wooden. Written at bottom of back board “Pike. 9lb.5 oz., Caught by R.J. Free at Freewarren Bridge, Crofton. August 31 1930.” Back board measures 39” x 12 1/2”. Fish measures 33” in length. Carved eye with slightly open mouth and inset metal teeth, side fins are metal.  Original paint; structurally good; crack at left side of back board. (2,000 - 3,000)

115. Large salmon plaque, Byron Bruffee, Plymouth, Massachusetts.  Good carving detail. Mounted on framed wooden back board approximately 45” long.  Small crack in one fin, otherwise very good and original. (600 - 900)

51


New England Shorebirds

116

116. Very rare running black bellied plover, Elijah Burr, Hingham, Massachusetts, last quarter 19th century.  Relief wing carving with extended tips. Shoe button eyes. Fine feather paint detail.  Original paint with very minor wear and a few tiny dents.

116 Detail

52

Literature: “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph, p. 111. (15,000 - 20,000)


117

117 Detail

117. Rare feeding yellowlegs, Walter Savory, Wareham, Massachusetts, circa 1880.  Wax eyes.  Original paint with moderate flaking and wear; structurally good.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Justin Glide.

(7,500 - 9,500)

53


Elmer Crowell

1864 - 1954 East Harwich, Massachusetts

Anthony Elmer Crowell spent most of his life, working and hunting in the outdoors. He was a market gunner, cranberry farmer, hunt club manager and well known carver. He probably started carving decoys around 1880, making gunning shorebirds and duck decoys. After 1912, he started to carve full-time from his home in East Harwich. Crowell’s best decoys show his exceptional skill as a carver and painter. This gunning black bellied plover is a perfect example of his best period. The flawlessly incised wing and tail carving combined, with a black and white vermiculation on the breast, imitates a bold breading plumage. Author and collector, Bill Mackey was so impressed with Crowell’s plovers from this period that he chose to use three similar examples for the cover of his book, American Bird Decoys. Since that time, this style of gunning black bellied plovers have been identified as “Dust Jacket” style.

54

118 Detail


118. Rare “dust jacket” style black bellied plover, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts, circa 1900.  Relief wing carving with layered, carved, extended wing tips and shoe button eyes.  Original paint with minor shrinkage and very minor wear; structurally very good. Provenance: Commissioned from Crowell by Harry V. Long, Cohasset, Massachusetts and sold as part of the Long collection in 2009. At that time the catalog photo for this decoy was reversed. Literature: “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph, p. 119.

(125,000 - 150,000)

118

55


118 Detail

118 Detail 56


119

120

119 Detail 119. Black bellied plover, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts, 1st quarter 20th century.  Tack eye gunning model.  Near mint original paint with good patina; small tail chip repair, otherwise structurally very good.

Literature: “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph, p. 145. (6,000 - 9,000)

120.

Rare oversize yellowlegs, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Over 12” long. Fine paint detail and tack eyes.  Near mint original paint; minor wear on eyes; bill

120 Detail

has a professional repair to a crack through the center. Provenance: One of five oversize yellowlegs and three oversize plover by Crowell, along with a string of Mason Factory Canada goose decoys and a Mason Factory challenge grade teal purchased by Gary Guyette from a hunting camp in Tabusintac, New Brunswick, 1981. Gary broke the bill when putting it in his truck hurrying the decoys out of the camp. Grossman collection. (10,000 - 14,000) 57


121

122

123

124

125

126

121. Golden plover, Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts, circa 1900.  Wax eyes. Fine paint detail with good patina.  Minor wear on most of the decoy; moderate wear on one side.

Literature: “Joseph Lincoln,” Cap Vinal, p. 68. (1,200 - 1,500)

122. ”Lincoln type” golden plover, South Shore, Massachusetts, circa 1900.  Tack eyes.  Original paint with minor wear; bill is a professional replacement.

Provenance: Grossman collection.

(1,500 - 2,000)

123. ”Lincoln type” golden plover, South Shore of Massachusetts, circa 1900.  Tack eyes and three piece body construction.  Original paint with minor wear; a few tiny dents. (1,500 - 2,000)

58

124. Yellowlegs from Cape Cod, Massachusetts, last quarter 19th century.  Abstract feather carving on the entire decoy. Similar to the carving on the mergansers from the Tizzer Family rig from Martha’s Vineyard.  Original paint with minor wear; mostly on top of head and tail; lightly hit by shot; tiny chip missing from one side of tail. (2,000 - 2,500) 125. Golden plover from Nantucket, last quarter 19th century.   Relief wing carving.  Original paint that has darkened with age; very minor wear; a few small dents; chip missing from underside of tail and minor wear on underside.

Provenance: Grossman collection.

(2,500 - 3,500)

126. Yellowlegs from Kingston, Massachusetts, last quarter 19th century.  Relief wing carving. Similar in form to the work of Lothrop Holmes.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; moderately hit by shot; chip missing from top of tail; bill is a well done replacement. (1,750 - 2,250)


127

128

128 Detail

127 Detail

127. Black bellied plover, George Boyd, Seabrook, New Hampshire, circa 1900.  Head is lifted a little more than typically. Fine paint detail and tack eyes.  Original paint with very slight wear; worn spot at tip of bill; lightly hit by shot.

Provenance: Grossman collection.

(6,500 - 8,500)

128. Yellowlegs, George Boyd, Seabrook, New Hampshire, last quarter 19th century.  Fine feather paint detail and tack eyes.  Near mint original paint; minor discoloration on underside.

Provenance: Grossman collection.

(6,500 - 8,500)

59


New England

129

130

131

133

132

134

129. Calling bluewing teal hen, probably 2nd half 20th century.  Stamped “P.H. Gregory, Maple Street, Essex Junction, Vermont” on underside. Additionally stamped “S” once under tail and once in underside. Skillfully carved with slightly turned head, open mouth, carved wings, tail, and primaries. Inset weight on underside.  Original paint and structurally very good. (800 - 1,200) 130. Hollow carved scoter, Morris Eaton, Vinalhaven, Maine.  Raised “V” wing tip carving and carved eyes.   Original paint with very slight wear; a few small dents. (1,400 - 1,800) 131. Pair of goldeneye attributed to Leigh Witherspoon, North Haven, Maine, 1st quarter 20th century.  Original paint with good patina and minor wear; a few small dents. (1,200 - 1,600) 132. Goldeneye drake, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine.  Relief wing carving, carved eyes, and inlet head. Head is turned approximately 45 degrees. Two piece head 60

134A construction.  Good old paint with moderate discoloration and wear; small cracks; two square plugs are in one side where there are defects in the wood. (800 - 1,200) 133. Monhegan island style scoter, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine.  Relief wing carving and slightly turned head.  Old in use repaint; minor roughness to extremities; lightly hit by shot; cracks in underside; small rough area on one side. (650 - 950) 134. Eider hen, Frank Rice.  Inlet head.  Original and good. (600 - 900) 134A. Oversize black duck, Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts. Approximately 22” long. From the Spear rig, branded “C.F. SP” with the remainder not visible. Old overpaint worn to the original and bare wood in many places; small cracks; age split in underside.

Provenance: Ellery Clark collection.

(800 - 1,200)


135

136

135 Detail 135. Classic self bailing brant, Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts.  Head is in slightly forward pose. Bottom edge is champhered.  Near mint original paint with good patina; hairline crack in one side.

136 Detail

136. Rigmate pair of mergansers, Jack Brayton, Westport, Massachusetts.  Carved eyes and wooden crests. Fine feather paint detail.  Original paint with very minor wear; crack through drake’s neck. (6,500 - 9,500)

Literature: “Decoys of the Atlantic Flyway,” George Ross Starr, p. 155. (5,000 - 7,000) 61


137

138

139

140

141

137.

138. 139.

62

142

Brant, Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts.  Branded “E. Tobey”. From Clark Tobey’s hunting rig, Plymouth, Massachusetts.  Old in use repaint on much of the decoy; some original showing on lower sides and back; age split in underside; small cracks. (1,500 - 2,000) Early black duck, Keyes Chadwick, Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts.  His earliest carving style.  Original paint with moderate wear; a few small dents and shot marks. (2,000 - 3,000) Eider drake from the South Shore of Massachusetts, 1st quarter 20th century.  Carved bill delineation.  Original paint with minor discoloration and moderate wear; small cracks and dents; underside is fairly rough. (2,000 - 3,000)

140. Rare merganser hen, Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts. From the Spear rig, branded “CF Spear, Scituate.” Original paint on head; the rest has old in use repaint as a drake; Approximately ½ of bill is missing.

Provenance: Ellery Clark collection.

(1,500 - 2,000)

141. Bluebill drake, Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts, 1st quarter 20th century.  From the hunting rig of Arthur Merritt.  Original paint with moderate wear; typical Lincoln age split in underside; minor roughness to edge of tail. (1,500 - 2,500) 142. Oversize eider drake from Massachusetts, circa 1900.    Worn old paint; numerous small cracks. (1,250 - 1,750)


143. Wood duck drake, Einer Menges, Burlington, Vermont.  Relief wing carving and slightly open bill.  Near mint original paint; two hairline cracks at neck base.

Provenance: Knight collection.

Literature: “Decoys of Lake Champlain,” Loy S. Harrell, Jr. (2,000 - 3,000)

143 144. Oversize eider drake or Labrador duck, Kingston, Massachusetts, last quarter 19th century. Hollow carved with inlet bottom board. Partially repainted for use as an eider.   Old in use repaint on much of the decoy; original with moderate wear on some of white area; crack in lower breast and under tail. (2,000 - 3,000)

144 145. Swimming merganser hen by a member of the Nickerson Family, Bourne, Massachusetts, 1st quarter 20th century.  Paddle tail.  Original paint with good patina and minor wear; crack in back and neck; small crack in upper breast; small chip missing from one edge of tail. 4,000 - 6,000)

145 146. Very large canvas over wooden frame Canada goose, Captain Clarence Bailey, Kingston, Massachusetts, circa 1900.  Body is over 36” long.  Paint on head, neck, and back appears to be original; the rest appears to be a second coat; small chip missing from underside of bill; several tears in canvas. Provenance: Formerly in the George Ross Starr collection, Duxbury, Massachusetts, Starr collection stamp on underside.

Literature: “Decoys of the Atlantic Flyway,” George Ross Starr, p. 155. (4,000 - 6,000)

146 63


Delaware River 146A. Very rare “lowhead” style widgeon hen, William Quinn, Yardley, Pennsylvania.  Quinn stamp in weight. Raised “V” wing carving.  Original paint with very slight wear; a few tiny dents.

Provenance: Grossman collection.

Literature: “Floating Sculpture,” Harrison Huster and Doug Knight, p. 98. (9,000 - 12,000)

146A 147. “Lowhead” style black duck, Dan English, Florence, New Jersey, 1st quarter 20th century.  Raised “V” wing carving. Wing tip carving and fluted tail. Fine feather paint detail on back.  Original paint with very minor wear; several tiny dents.

147

Literature: “Floating Sculpture,” Harrison Huster and Doug Knight, p. 57. (3,000 - 4,000)

148. Blair school pintail hen, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, circa 1900.  Solid body with tack eyes.  Original paint with good detail and minor wear; small dents; crack at neck seam.

Provenance: Bartlett collection. (3,000 - 5,000)

148

149. Bluebill drake, attributed to Jack English, Florence, New Jersey.    Paint appears to be a second coat by John Dawson, which shows minor wear; very good structurally.

149 64

Provenance: Bartlett collection. (2,500 - 4,500)


150

151

152

153

154

155

150. Pair of redheads, William Quinn, Yardley, Pennsylvania.  Both have Quinn’s stamp in weight.  Both appear to have second coat of paint by Quinn, a few tiny dents.

Provenance: Bartlett collection.

(2,000 - 3,000)

151. Hollow carved black duck, John Baker, Edgley, Pennsylvania.  Baker stamp in weight. Raised “V” wing tip carving and very slightly turned head.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Russ Aiken. (2,000 - 2,400)

152. Black duck, John English, Florence, New Jersey.  Branded “J English,” “JP Perkins,” and “WS Marter.”  Old in use repaint; small chip missing from top of tail. (1,250 - 1,750)

153. Black duck, Clark Madera, Pitman, New Jersey.  Well done second coat of paint by the Ward Brothers.  Very minor wear and some filler missing at neck seam. (1,250 - 1,750) 154. Mallard drake, John English, Florence, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  Branded “B Perkins,” and “RS Marter”.  Working repaint by Chris Sprague, Beach Haven, New Jersey; small crack through neck; two small chips missing from top of tail. (1,250 - 1,750) 155. Rare pair of American mergansers, Tony Bianco.  Both have Bianco brands in the underside, also written is “Collection of John Levinson, 4/83”. Somers Headly stamp is in the underside as well.  Original and good. (1,200 - 1,600)

65


English/Dawson

John Dawson

John English was a masterful carver as well as painter. His carving was exceptional and always found in nearly perfect proportions. His plumage patterns were applied in greater detail than most other makers from the region. 1 About a hundred of John English’s decoys were masterfully repainted around 1920 by John Dawson (1889-1959), who lived in Trenton. Dawson was a carpenter and potter who also painted landscapes of the river. His very distinctive patterns were highly stylized and abstract, and a readily recognizable when compared to his contemporaries. 2 1

The Great Book of Wildfowl Decoys, Engers, chapter on Delaware River, Bruce Williams, p. 132 2

Bird Decoys of North America Nature, History and Art, Robert Shaw, pp. 195-197

156 Detail

66


156. Redhead drake, John English, Florence, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century, painted by John Dawson, Trenton, New Jersey, 1st quarter 20th century.  Hollow carved with good feather paint detail and good patina.  Paint surface has very slight wear; several tiny dents.

Provenance: Grossman collection. Formerly in collection of Dr. James McCleery, who purchased it at the July 1973 Richard Borne decoy auction in Hyannis, Massachusetts. Formerly in collection of William J. Mackey, Jr., Bedford, New Jersey, Mackey collection stamp on underside. Purchased by William and Soony Grossman at the Guyette & Schmidt/Sotheby’s decoy auction in January 2000. Auction tag #8 is on the underside.

Literature: “Call to the Sky,” Robert Shaw, p. 67, exact decoy. “Floating Sculpture,” Harrison Huster and Doug Knight, p. 20. “American Bird Decoys,” William Mackey p. 139. (22,500 - 27,500)

156 Detail

156

67


Items of Interest

157

158

160

162

159

161

163

157. Barrel style snipe whistle, circa 1900.  Larger than most, approximately 3 1/2” tall.  Original and good. Provenance: Purchased from the Harry Phillips family, Marshfield, Massachusetts. Literature: “Decoys of the Atlantic Flyway,” George Ross Starr, p. 62. (800 - 1,200) 158. Pewter barrel style snipe whistle, circa 1900.    A few small dents, otherwise very good and original. Provenance: Purchased from the Harry Phillips family, Marshfield, Massachusetts. Literature: “Decoys of the Atlantic Flyway,” George Ross Starr, p. 62. (800 - 1,200) 159. Barrel snipe whistle, circa 1900.    Original and good. Provenance: Purchased from the Harry Phillips family, Marshfield, Massachusetts. Literature: “Decoys of the Atlantic Flyway,” George Ross Starr, p. 62. (800 - 1,200) 68

160. Two calls, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois.  One duck call and one crow call. Both have the Perdew patent stamp.  Original and good. (350 - 450) 161. Three calls. Two by Charles Perdew and one by Hadden Perdew, Henry, Illinois.  One crow call and two duck calls. One duck call has tear drop motif with “MF” carved in to it.  Small cracks in mouth piece of plain duck call, otherwise good.

Provenance: From an estate in Iowa.

(950 - 1,250)

162. Wooden carved bailing scoop for a boat, 1st quarter 19th century.  Carved in the shape of a goose foot. Approximately 12 1/2” long.  Minor wear; a few small den ts. (600 - 800) 163. Smoking Tobacco Trade sign, 1st quarter 20th century.   Approximately 15”. Carved wooden pipe. Pleasant Smoke painted in gold on stem, some discoloration and rough area, probably from sun exposure to one side of bowl; crazed surface.   Original paint and structurally good. (800 - 1,200)


164

165

165 Detail

167

166

166 Detail

167 Detail

168

168 Detail

169

169 Detail

164. Early two sided trade sign, 1st half 20th century.  37” x 10”. Painted on both sides “Canary Beauty Shop”. A carved and applied bird sitting in a tree on both sides. Black and silver background with silver lettering outlined in yellow.   (300 - 500)

167. Smiling steer or cow head handle cane, probably John Simmons (Schtockschnitzlet).  Sawtooth carved band divides handle carving form the rest of the cane. Typical Simmons style from Berks Co, Pennsylvania. Provenance Christie’s.  Small cracks. (500 - 600)

165. Expressive and well carved turkey vulture or buzzard perched on top cane, American, circa 1900.   Small chip missing from bill, otherwise good. (200 - 400)

168. Alligator stalking human baby cane.  Shaft inscribed with “Cut at Lake Ashley, Dec. 05” with carvers or customer’s name, “E.W. Bond.” Probably Ashley, South Carolina, 1905.  Old varnish is worn in some places. (600 - 800)

166. Bird sitting on table or stool while a snake sneaks up shaft cane, American, circa 1920-1930.  Table has red paint, bird is black-green, and snake is black with multi color spots.  Small cracks; small chip missing from back of head. (300 - 400)

169. Humorous dog with collar carved as cane handle, probably from Lancaster, Pennsylvania, circa 18701890.  Old patina with evidence of black paint.  Small crack at base (700 - 900) 69


171

170

172

173 174

174A

170. Tramp Art trinket box.  With heart motif on top and felt liner. Shows some age. Approximately 7” x 10” x 12”.  Very minor damage to extremities. (400 - 600)

173. Vintage mallard door stop.  Approximately 9” tall.  Original paint with minor flaking and wear; structurally good. (450 - 650)

171. Vintage wooden ammunition box with a carved bird on the cover.  6” x 7” x 8 1/2”. Compartments on the inside for 22 caliber ammunition.  Very good and original. (650 - 950)

174. Two items.  Scottie dog cast iron door stop, approximately 6” long and cast iron cat boot scrapper, approximately 16” long.  Original and good. (400 - 600)

172. Wicker side hole creel, Turtle Manufacturing Company.    Very good and original. (800 - 1,200)

70

174A. Zinc whale weather vane with original roof mount, circa 1940s.  Approximately 24” long.  Minor pitting; otherwise good. (1,200 - 1,500)


174B

174C

174D

174E

174F

174B. 100 count Winchester Repeating Arms company 12 gauge shotgun shell box. Good.

174E. Hundred count UMC Arrow 12 gauge shotgun shell box. Fair to good.

Provenance: Powell collection

(1,200 - 1,500)

174C. Eley Brothers 100 count 10 gauge shotgun shell box. Good.

Provenance: Powell collection.

(650 - 950)

174D. 100 count Winchester leader 12 gauge shotgun shell box. Good. Provenance: Lucas collection

Provenance: Powell collection.

(400 - 600)

174F. Full body copper horse and jockey weathervane, circa 1910.  Horse head and jockey are cast zinc. Horse measures approximately 33” long and 18” tall.  Surface has darkened, perhaps cleaned a very long time ago; areas of verdigris appear in cracks on tail, head, and body. (3,000 - 5,000)

(200 - 300) 71


174H

174G

174I

174J

174K

174L

174G. Watercolor of partidge flying through forest, David Hagerbaumer. Signed and dated 1964. Image size approximately 12-1/2 x 16-1/2”. Very good and original. (1,200 - 1,500) 174H. “The Start,” an etching by Frank Benson. Paff #211, in an edition of 150. Signed in the margin. Professionally matted and framed. Image size approximately 4-3/4” x 3-3/4”. Very good and original. (800 - 1,200) 174I. Two wooden gunning boxes, from Shelburne County, Nova Scotia, circa 1900. Both are covered with canvas. The larger one has slots for 40 shotgun shells. Repainted

72

50 or so years ago and signed Lee Perry; top of one has a Ross’s goose; the other has a pair of mergansers; some roughness to canvas. (400 - 600) 174J. Lot of approximately 15 old bobbers ranging in length from 12” to 7”. Some have wear; most are very good. (1,500 - 2,000) 174K. Lot of approximately 28 old bobbers. Fair to good. (500 - 800) 174L. Lot of approximately 20 bobbers. Eight are cork. Fair to very good. (400 - 800)


Edgar Tolson

1904 - 1984 Campton, Kentucky Edgar Tolson, of Campton, Kentucky was one of the states most famous woodcarvers. His carved figures are world-renowned and are included in numerous public and private collections in this country and in West Germany, France, Switzerland, Japan and Africa. His work has been widely exhibited in galleries and museums, most notably in the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1973. In 1971 he was a recipient of a grant from the National Endowment of Arts. Despite the acclaim that Tolson received, he remained in Eastern Kentucky throughout his life and did not change his rural lifestyle. Michael Hall, while a professor of art, at the University of Kentucky, was one of Tolson’s most ardent supporters and was largely responsible for bringing his work to the attention of the art world, and introducing it to other artists, collectors and museums. This piece, inspired by the army recruiting poster, “I want you”, that hung in the Campton, Kentucky post office is one of about twenty five Uncle Sam carvings made by Tolson in the late 1960’s or early 1970’s. It is taller than most and has been near perfectly preserved. It was included in a 1981 exhibit of Tolson’s work at the Speed Art Museum in Louisville Kentucky.

177 Detail

Speed Museum exhibit, exact piece 1971 Tolson with this exact carving in his workshop

177

177. Uncle Sam carving by Edgar Tolson, Campton, Kentucky, last half 20th century.  Approximately 30” tall. Painted body and hat with natural finish on face. Base reads “Made by Ed Tolson, Campton, Kentucky.”  Small age cracks in top hat; Plexiglas case helped to maintain near perfect condition. (8,000 - 12,000)

73


Pacific Coast Decoys John Luedtke 1901 - 1956 Stockton, California

178

178. Very rare pintail drake, John Luedtke, Stockton, California, circa 1945.  Balsa body and fine feather paint detail.  Original paint that has darkened with age, small crack in one side and bill.

Literature: “Decoys of the Pacific Coast,” Mike Miller and Fred Hanson, p. 306, where they state “the most stylish decoys carved on the Pacific Coast where the pintails made by John Luedtke of Stockton. Exquisite carving detail in the bills and heads and the fine paint detail create a decoy of extraordinary quality.” (6,000 - 9,000)

179. Set of three brant decoys from Northern California.    Original paint with minor flaking and wear; a few small dents; neck crack repair on one. (1,250 - 1,750)

179

74

179

178A 178A. Rare pintail hen, John Luedtke, Sacramento, California. Branded “EJA”. Original paint with very minor wear; several small dents in underside.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Jerry Rosenthal, Rosenthal collection ink stamp on underside.

Literature: “Decoys of Pacific Flyway,” Mike Miller and Fred Hanson. (3,000 - 4,000)

179


180

180

181

181A

180. Pair of pen and ink drawings with watercolor wash, Shang Wheeler, Stratford, Connecticut.  A wood duck drake and a salmon. Both are professionally matted and framed. Frames are original. Remarqued by Wheeler, also signed with the word “Shang” represented by a hand holding five playing cards. Frame size approximately 23” x 14”.  Very good and original. (2,000 - 3,000)

181. 1942 Hercules Powder Company Calendar.  Calendar pages are unopened. There is some writing and several labels added to calendar area.  Retains top and bottom bands; minor roughness. (800 - 1,200) 181A. Carved scoter head mounted on oval plaque, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts. Crowell’s rectangular stamp is on the underside. Very good and original.

Provenance: Ellery Clark collection. Purchased at an August 1989 Eldridge’s auction in East Dennis, Massachusetts. (800 - 1,200) 75


Mark McNair

Craddockville, Virginia 182. Very rare early example of a hooded merganser, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Carved when he still lived in Essex, Connecticut in the late 1970s. In preening pose and carved in the Delaware River tradition.   Original paint that has been aged; a few tiny dents.

Provenance: Knight collection. (2,500 - 3,500)

182 183. Exceptional hollow carved pintail drake, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Carved in the Delaware River tradition with slightly turned head. And raised “V” wing tip carving.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Knight collection. (2,000 - 2,500)

183

184. Hollow carved wood duck drake, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Slightly turned head and raised “V” wing tip carving.  Original paint that has been aged.

Provenance: Knight collection. (2,000 - 3,000)

184

185. Pair of curlew, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Large, the one with a forward head position is 19” long. Both have relief wing carving and are on McNair bases.  Original paint that has been aged; hairline crack in one head and small crack in one side. (2,500 - 3,500)

185 76


186

188

190

187

189

191

186. Running sandpiper, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.    Original paint aged and stressed to look old; a few tiny dents. (600 - 800)

189. Rare pigeon, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Detailed wing tip carving.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200)

187. Running willet, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Original paint with very minor wear; structurally good.   (600 - 800)

190. Working pintail drake, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Branded “Walsh.”  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; structurally excellent. (900 - 1,200)

188. Root head curlew, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.    Minor to moderate wear; small cracks and shot marks. (800 - 1,200)

191. Plover with relief wing carving, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia. Signed. Raised extended wing tips. Very good and original. (650 - 950)

77


Ward Brothers

Crisfield, Maryland

The Ward Brothers judging at the 1975 Ward Foundation Decoy Competition

“Ward Brothers Decoys,” Ron Gard and Brian McGrath

In the book, “Ward Brothers Decoys” by Ron Gard and Brian McGrath, they have a section dedicated to describing the 1932 pinch breast design. “The design is considered the best in the Ward pintails and is valued with that of earlier Ward styles. The birds have very high heads and long narrow bills giving a sleek and racey impression.”

192 Detail 78


192. Exceptional pinch breasted pintail drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland, circa 1932.  Longer and sleeker than most pintails from the rig. The decoy exhibits a particularly stylish slightly turned head with delicate bill and a much more pronounced “pinch breast” style than typical. Marks from horseshoe shaped weight in underside.  Original paint with minor wear; professional neck crack repair done quite a while ago; several tiny dents and shot marks; worn area to wood on one edge of underside.

Provenance: Jim Keegan collection. From the White Mallard Gun Club near Colusa, California.

Literature: “Ward Brothers Decoys,” Ron Gard and Brian McGrath, p. 63.

(65,000 - 85,000)

192 Detail

192

79


193

194

193. Pair of “collector’s grade” mallards, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Balsa bodies with slightly turned heads and lifted wing tips. Signed and dated 1957. Good paint detail.  Original paint with very minor wear; couple small holes in underside; a few tiny dents.

80

Provenance: From a home in Texas.

(6,000 - 9,000)

194. Pair of shooting stool model mergansers, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Faintly signed and dated 1966 for the John Hopkins collection. Both have turned heads.  Near mint original paint; structurally very good. (5,000 - 7,000)


195

195 Detail

195 Detail

195. Classic 1936 model canvasback hen, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Slightly turned head with very good style. Flared bill and squared off top of head. Subtle paint detail and good patina. Long graceful neck.  Original paint with very minor wear, mostly on one edge of bill and tail; crack in underside. (12,000 - 15,000)

81


Ward Brothers

Crisfield, Maryland

The White Mallard ranks as one of the most famous duck clubs on the Pacific Flyway. It’s located in the Butte Sink, Colusa County, right in the middle of the 500,000 acres of Northern California rice land

196 Detail

196 Detail

82


196

196 Detail

196 Detail

196.

Rigmate pair of 1936 model mallards, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Both have slightly turned heads and original horseshoe shaped weights.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; small crack in the underside of the drake, extending through the tail; each has a few small dents; very slight roughness to tip of hen’s bill.

Provenance: Jim Keegan collection. From the White Mallard Gun Club near Colusa, California. (27,500 - 32,500) 83


197

198

197.

Rigmate pair of canvasbacks, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Balsa bodies with slightly turned cedar heads and keels. Both are signed.  Original paint with minor wear; a few small dents in balsa. (4,000 - 6,000)

198. Classic greenwing teal hen, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  1936 model with slightly turned head.  Near mint original paint; professional bill and tail chip repair; several tiny dents; slight paint shrinkage at knot in one side.

84

Literature: “Ward Brothers Decoys,” Ron Gard and Brian McGrath, p. 97. (6,500 - 9,500)


199 199 Detail

199 Detail

199. Canvasback drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  1936 model with slightly turned head and flared bill. “LT Ward and Bro” stamp under tail and signatures on underside.  Original paint with minor flaking and wear; hairline crack in bill; a few tiny dents. Literature: “Ward Brothers Decoys,” Ron Gard and Brian McGrath, p. 18. (12,000 - 15,000)

85


200. Mallard hen, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Balsa body with slightly turned cedar head and inserted cedar tail signed and dated 1948.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; slight separation where tail joins body; a few small dents.

Provenance: From a home in Texas. (2,500 - 3,500)

200

201. Pintail hen, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  1936 model with slightly turned head.  Original paint with moderate wear; bill broken off and reattached; small cracks in neck; lightly hit by shot; small crack in back.

Provenance: Grossman collection. (3,000 - 5,000)

201

202. Canvasback drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  1936 model with flared bill and slightly turned head.  Old in use repaint on much of the decoy; worn original paint on part of the back and head; filled crack in one side; small cracks and dents. (2,000 - 2,500)

202

203. Pintail drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Slightly turned head.  Original paint with moderate wear on much of the decoy; all the white paint and the tail have working repaint; bill is a professional replacement; small cracks and dents.

203 86

Provenance: Purchased by the consignor in Cape Charles, Virginia. (1,500 - 2,000)


204

205

206

207

208

209

204. Two bluebill drakes, Sam Barnes, Havre de Grace, Maryland, last quarter 19th century.  Wide body style.  Original paint worn to the primer in a few areas; crack in one neck; a few small dents and hairline cracks in bodies. (1,000 - 1,500) 205. Canvasback drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.   Slightly turned head. “LT Ward and Bro” stamp in underside.  Second coat of paint by the Ward Brothers; old repair to a crack in bill before it was repainted.

Provenance: From a home in Texas.

(800 - 1,200)

206. Canvasback drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  1938 model with balsa body.  Old repaint appears to have been done by the Ward Brothers; significant wear to balsa at bottom edge of body. (500 - 800)

207. Shooting stool model bluebill drake circa 1970s, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed with a poem on the underside. Slightly turned head.  Very good and original. (1,500 - 2,000) 208. Large and stylish pintail drake, Lloyd Sterling, Crisfield, Maryland.    Worn old paint, some of which appears to be original; reglued cracks through neck; cracks in body with some filled small rough areas in the back. (1,500 - 2,000) 209. Redhead drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  1948 model with balsa body, slightly turned cedar head and inserted cedar tail. “LT Ward and Bro” ink stamp on underside.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; a few small dents in balsa; crack in one eye. (1,600 - 2,000)

87


James Holly

1855 - 1935 Havre de Grace, Maryland

Barnes Ice House in 2013

Many carvers from the upper Chesapeake Bay did not carve teal decoys and instead focused their efforts on attracting the more abundant species of canvasback, blackduck, redhead, and blackhead. With so few rigs of teal being made, finding one in original condition can be extremely difficult. This James Holly teal and a small group of other Holly decoys were recently discovered in the Captain Perry K. Barnes icehouse on the Charlestown, Maryland waterfront. When clearing the circa 1890 structure before starting renovations, the decoys were found in an old wicker basket branded “PKB� under piles of debris. This teal has never been offered for sale and is an exciting piece of Chesapeake Bay gunning history.

88


210

210

210. Important bluewing teal hen, James Holly, Havre de Grace, Maryland, last quarter 19th century.  Fine subtle paint detail with unusual scratch feathering in back. Original weight and tie strap remain and are attached with square nails.  Original paint with very minor wear; several tiny dents; short and very small sliver of wood missing from one side of neck base; a crack in the other side of neck base has been professionally secured by Russ Allen. Provenance: Recently found in an ice house in Charlestown, Maryland. Literature: “Decoys of the Mid Atlantic Region,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr., 141. (17,500 - 22,500)

210 Detail

89


211

212

213

214

215

216

211. Bluebill drake, Ed Phillips, Cambridge, Maryland, 1st quarter 20th century.    Original paint with minor wear; structurally very good.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mid Atlantic Region,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr. (2,500 - 3,500)

212. Swan carved in the style of Sam Barnes, Edson Gray.  Hollow carved with “EG” carved in to the underside.  Original paint that has been aged; structurally good. (1,500 - 2,500) 213. Canvasback drake, Lloyd Tyler, Crisfield, Maryland.    Original paint with minor to moderate wear; numerous cracks in body; chip missing from one side of tail. (800 - 1,200)

90

214. Two widgeon, Crisfield, Maryland.    Original paint with minor wear; several cracks in the larger one. (650 - 950) 215. Canvasback drake, Jim Currier, Havre de Grace, Maryland.    Old in use repaint; small cracks and shot marks. (250 - 350) 216. Wooden wing duck, John Graham, Charlestown, Maryland, last quarter 19th century.  Rare high head model.  Old repaint; cracks in body; professional repair to the center area of the neck; lightly hit by shot. (800 - 1,200)


John “Daddy” Holly

1819 - 1892 Havre de Grace, Maryland

217

217 Detail

The sailing scow “Reckless” was used as a gunning boat in the late 1880s. It was based at the Reckless Yacht Club of

217. Extremely rare teal, John “Daddy”Holly, Havre de Grace, Maryland, last quarter 19th century.  Weight is attached with square nails. “Reckless” brand in underside.  Decoy has been taken down to mixture of original paint and old in use repaint; small dents; small rough spot on top of head; professional repair to much of the bill. (5,000 - 7,500)

Harford County

91


Mason Decoy Factory 1896 - 1924 Detroit, Michigan

“The Sibley Field Guide to Birds of Western North America,” David Allen Sibley

In the book “Mason Decoys” by Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid they describe the differences between the long billed curlews and the Whimbrel this way; “The Whimbrel is a medium sized curlew with a shorter 4 inch curved down bill. It has a brown gray colored body with a black and white stripe on the head running from the bill to the neck, an identifying feature. It is the most common curlew in North America today. Its average weight is 1 pound. Mason must have had a call for a different stlye than the three kinds of Long billed models they were already making”. “They are the rarest of the four types of curlew that Mason made.”

92


218

218 Detail

218. Very rare whimbrel, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1905.  Delicate features and loop feather painting on sides. More delicate carving and a different paint pattern than the other Mason curlew in the sale.  Original paint with minor wear; as with most decoys from this rig, the front part of the face and the iron bill have been professionally replaced. (16,000 - 20,000) 93


219

220

221

223

219. Yellowlegs, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1900.  Tack eye model with iron bill.  Very strong dry original paint; scratch mark near one eye; one very small dent; two small areas of rubs that expose primer. (1,500 - 2,000) 220. Yellowlegs, Dodge Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1880s.    Original paint with minor discoloration and very slight wear; small amount of filler missing where nail bill joins head. (2,000 - 3,000) 221. Black bellied plover, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Tack eye model.  Original paint with moderate discoloration and wear; traces of old overpaint on back; lightly hit by shot; small dents.

94

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Joe French,

224

Marathon, Florida. French’s early number 430 is stamped on the underside. Grossman collection. (2,000 - 3,000) 223. Very early Canada goose, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, last quarter 19th century.  Challenge grade with glass eyes. Branded on underside “J.S.Hand” and “AH” carved in underside.  White and part of the brown on the underside appear to be original; top half of the decoy, along with neck and head, have been repainted; repair to bill and possibly crack in neck; body has areas of flaking and light wear. (2,500 - 3,500) 224. Canada goose, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Rare early premier grade model.  Old in use repaint; crack in underside; several surface cracks in back and side; small dents. (1,250 - 1,750)


225

226

225 Detail

225. Exceptional robin snipe with glass eyes, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.    Near mint original paint with good patina; very lightly hit by shot.

Provenance: Grossman collection. Formerly in the collection of Dr. James McCleery, McCleery collection stamp on underside. (6,500 - 9,500)

226 Detail

226. Extremely rare yellowlegs with original wooden bill, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1898.  Decoy is in spring plumage and is glass eye model.  Original paint with good patina and fine detail; very minor wear; numerous small dents in one lower side; several tiny dents in other parts of the decoy. Literature: “Mason Decoys, “ Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid, p. 103, rigmate. (6,000 - 8,000)

95


Davis Island Club

The “Big House�

In 1890 Bernard Leckler purchased around 350 acres on Davis Island, North Carolina and the adjacent main land to build a home and hunting lodge. In 1904 George Deming purchased the club and it was used mostly for shorebird hunting

96


227

227 Detail

227. Large and very rare curlew, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1905.  Subtle paint detail with paint on tail reminiscent of decoys of the Dodge Decoy Factory.  Original paint with very slight wear; professional repair to a small crack with a couple tiny chips missing where the bill joins the head by Russ Allen.

Provenance: From the Davis Island Club. Rigmate to lot 364A in our April 2014 auction. (12,500 - 17,500)

97


228

229

230

231

232

233

234

228. Merganser drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1900.  Challenge grade.  Overpaint on body was taken down to the original surface with some strengthening on back; minor wear; structurally good. Provenance: Seitz collection. (1,000 - 2,000) 229. Blackduck, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Premier Grade with Premier stamp on underside. Original paint with minor wear; tail chips. (1,200 - 1,600) 230. Rare rigmate pair of mallards, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Standard grade with painted eyes.  Original paint with minor wear; chips missing from neck filler; small cracks; minor roughness to one edge of hen’s bill. Provenance: Rose collection.

(950 - 1,250)

231. Mallard hen and drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Standard grade with glass eyes. Drake is branded “SCSC”.  Original paint with minor discoloration

98

and wear; both have had the neck filler professionally replaced; a few small dents.

Provenance: Rose collection.

(900 - 1,200)

232. Black duck, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Challenge grade.  Original paint with moderate wear; a long time ago some neck filler was replaced and an age split in the underside was filled with touch up in those areas. (350 - 550) 233. Black duck, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Standard grade with glass eyes.  Original paint with minor wear, mostly on underside; small crack and a few chips missing from neck filler.

Provenance: Rose collection.

(400 - 600)

234. Merganser drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Challenge grade.  A mixture of worn original paint and repaint; professional repair to a chip missing from the tip of the crest; cracks in body. (600 - 900)


235. Exceptional rigmate pair of oversize mallards, Dodge Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, last quarter 19th century.  Both have exaggerated wing patch painting. Breast and high back. Fine feather painting on back of each.  Strong original paint; worn to bare wood on areas around neck; high spots on head and a few other small areas; drake has three tight cracks in back that were filled during production. (2,000 - 3,000)

235

236. Pair of mergansers, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Standard grade with tack eyes.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; neck filler has been replaced with some cracking; drake has been lightly hit by shot; thin cracks and a few dents.

Provenance: Rose collection. (3,000 - 5,000)

236

237. Pair of mallards, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Hollow challenge grade. Weights are stamped “Burkhard St. Paul”.  Original paint with minor to moderate wear; each has small chip missing from tip of tail; both have minor touch up on tails.

Provenance: Rose collection. (3,000 - 4,000)

237

238. Pair of pintails, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century.  Premier grade.  Drake is mostly original paint with strengthening to wing patches and some areas of body and on head, body seam has separated slightly, hairline crack running length of back; hen is in original paint, branded “S” in underside, slight separation at seam, rough areas on body and tail.

Provenance: Seitz collection. (3,000 - 5,000)

238 99


New York State

239

241

243 239. Goldeneye hen, Chauncey Wheeler, Alexandria Bay, New York, circa 1930s.    Original paint with minor wear; small dents; old repair to a crack in the bill. (1,500 - 2,500) 240. Bluebill hen, Chauncey Wheeler, Alexandria Bay, New York, circa 1930.  Short body style with unusual lifted head. Subtle paint detail.  Original paint with very minor wear; worn spot on top of tip of tail; small cracks in one lower side with two finish nails added for strength; several tiny dents. (2,000 - 3,000) 241. Merganser hen, Long Island, New York, last quarter 19th century.  Probably by Henry Osbourne, Belleport, New York. Carved eyes, crest, and “V” marks around where face meets bill.  Areas on back where paint has worn off; darkened area at front of breast; several small dents and shot marks; brown on head; approximately 1/2 of back and orange on bill has been strengthened a very long time ago. (2,000 - 2,500) 100

240

242

244 242.

Merganser drake, Long Island, New York, last quarter 19th century.  Probably by Henry Osbourne, Belleport, New York. Carved eyes and carved crest. Stippled feather painting on breast.  Original paint, old repaint to bill and around eye; crack to one side of neck; imperfection to wood on back where paint is missing; worn areas to paint and knicks to wood where paint is missing around neck and lower areas of body. (2,000 - 3,000)

243. Redhead drake, Stevens Brothers, Weedsport, New York, circa 1880s.  Branded “WSO”.  Original paint on back; the rest has old in use repaint; small dents and shot marks. Provenance: Knight collection.

(800 - 1,200)

244. Goldeneye hen, Chauncey Patterson, Wellesley Island, Alexandria Bay, New York.    Original paint with good feather detail and minor wear; a few tiny dents. (500 - 800)


Chauncey Wheeler

1862 - 1937 Alexandria Bay, New York The most popular and talented of “The Holland Street Whittlers”, Chauncey Wheeler, called the thriving resort town of Alexandria Bay his home. Other members of the loosely associated carving club included, Frank Coombs, Roy Conklin, and Ed Dingman. The Alexandria Bay area of Up State New York had become a destination for summer tourists and fall duck hunters alike at the turn of the twentieth century. Demand for Wheelers decoys was growing and his reputation for making the best stools in the area was well deserved. Orders for working decoys comprised mostly of canvasbacks, bluebills, goldeneyes and black ducks. Wheeler went on to enjoy a long carving career with production spanning from 1890 to 1930.

245

245 Detail Chauncey Wheeler 245. Rare rigmate pair of bluebills, Chauncey Wheeler, Alexandria Bay, New York, circa 1920s.  Good feather paint detail and combing. The drake is very rare, as with any style, as Wheeler made mostly hens.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; drake has been lightly hit by shot and has several small drips of black paint on the back; hen has dents in the underside from where the weight was pried off and a few small dents in body.

Provenance: Drake is formerly from the collection of Gary Giberson and marked on the underside with his initials. The hen was formerly in the collection of Frank Ash. (10,000 - 12,000) 101


246

248

247

249

250

251

252

253

254

246. Root head merganser from Long Island, New York, last quarter 19th century.  Branded “R. Peavey” in back.   Appealing old repaint with moderate wear; small cracks; bill appears to have been re-whittled a long time ago. (350 - 450)

250. Pair of bluebills, Clovis Lefebvre, Alexandria Bay, New York.  Original paint with minor to moderate wear; plugged defect in one side from when the decoy was made; hen has a chip missing from underside of bill and has been repainted.   (350 - 450)

247. Two folding tin shorebirds, Stator and Sohier, Boston, Massachusetts.  Golden plover and dunlin. Both have their 1874 patent date stenciled on the inside.  Original and good. (300 - 400)

251. Merganser, unknown maker, Long Island, New York, last quarter 19th century.  Carved eye, and “V” marks around where face meets bill. Written on underside, “shell drake Seaford”.  Old layers of paint have been scraped and worn away; numerous shot marks to head and body. (400 - 600)

248. Goldeneye hen, George Blevins, Alexandria Bay, New York, 1st quarter 20th century.  Branded “CYIT.”  Old in use repaint; a few small dents. (300 - 400) 249. Black duck from Alexandria Bay, New York, circa 1900.  Branded “Harrington” twice in the underside. Two piece body construction with shoulder carving and fluted tail.  Worn original paint; crack through neck; bill is a professional replacement.

102

Provenance: Grossman collection. Ex collection of William J. Mackey, Mackey collection stamp on underside. (400 - 600)

252. Wood duck drake, Ken Harris, Woodville, New York.  Harris stamp on underside. Signed and dated 1958 by Frank Ash.  Reglued tail chip, otherwise excellent and original.

Provenance: Knight collection.

(400 - 600)

253. Goldeneye eye hen from Alexandria Bay, New York.  Original paint with good detail and slight wear; a couple of tiny dents.   (500 - 700) 254. Two black ducks, Ken Harris, Woodville, New York.  Both have Harris stamps on the underside.  Original and good. (500 - 800)


255

256

256 Detail

255 Detail 255. Extremely rare canvasback drake, Frank Coombs, Alexandria Bay, New York.    Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; several tiny dents.

Literature: “Decoys a North American Survey,” Gene and Linda Kangas, p. 79 exact decoy. (4,000 - 6,000)

256. Old squaw drake or Labrador duck from Long Island,

New York, last quarter 19th century.  Hollowed out from the back with an applied top plate.  Old in use repaint with moderate wear; slight separation at neck seam.

Provenance: Rigmate to lot 816 in April 1995 auction, purchased from William Mackey.

Literature: “American Bird Decoys,” William J. Mackey Jr., p. 62, rigmate. (3,000 - 4,000) 103


Miniatures

257

258

257. 23 miniature waterfowl carved in the style of Elmer Crowell, Jerome Howes.  Howes ink stamp on undersides.  Very good and original. (2,500 - 3,500)

104

258. 20 miniature song birds carved in style of Elmer Crowell, Jerome Howes.  Howes ink stamp on undersides.  Very good and original. (2,500 - 3,500)


259

260

262

261

259. Seven miscellaneous miniatures carved in style of Elmer Crowell, Jerome Howes.    Original and good. (800 - 1,200) 260. Four 1/4 size carvings, Oliver Lawson, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed. A pair of redheads and a pair of greenwing teal.  Very good and original. (650 - 950)

261. 1/4 size Canada goose in calling pose, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Stamped, “Best grade miniature” and signed 1985.  Very slight paint shrinkage, otherwise excellent and original.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Somers G. Headly, stamped “SGH” in underside. (800 - 1,200)

262. Pair of 1/4 size pintails, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Both have slightly turned heads and raised wing tips. Fine feather paint detail.  Near mint original paint with good patina; slight roughness to hen’s wing tips and end of drake’s tail. (800 - 1,200) 105


263

264

267

265

268

266

269

270

263. Miniature redhead drake, Robert McGaw, Havre de Grace, Maryland.  On original wooden base.  Very good and original. (500 - 800) 264. Miniature merganser drake from the South Shore of Long Island, last quarter 19th century.  Approximately 5 1/2 “ long.  Original paint with good patina and slight wear at the extremities; slight wear to wood at one edge of crest. (400 - 600) 265. Flying miniature bluebill drake, 1st quarter 20th century.    Original paint with good patina; structurally good. (350 - 450) 266. Miniature quail, AJ Dettman.  Signed on base. Slightly turned head. Fine feather paint detail.   (350 - 450) 267. Miniature Canada goose and mallard hen, Jack Rider.  Fairly large, goose is over 6” from bill to tail. Wing 106

tip carving. Goose is signed.  Very good and original.

Literature: “Great Lakes Decoy Interpretations,” Gene and Linda Kangas, p. 293. (350 - 450)

268. Pair of 1/4 size wood ducks, Jack Rider, Port Clinton, Ohio.    Very good and original. (350 - 450) 269. Goldfinch, Jess Blackstone, New Hampshire, mid 20th century.   Finely carved. On signed base, numbered 383.  Very good and original; slight edge wear on one side of tail. (300 - 500) 270. Ten 1/4 size decoys, Ken Harris, Woodville, New York.  All have Harris stamp on the underside.  Crack through Canada goose’s bill; otherwise original and good. (950 - 1,250)


271

275

272

273

276

277

274

278

279 271. Miniature pintail drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  His earlier carving style.  Original paint with minor discoloration; professional repair to tip of bill; structurally good. (1,000 - 1,400)

276. Pair of miniature flying quail, Russ Burr, Hingham, Massachusetts.  “Burr” ink stamp on underside. Good carving detail.  Near mint original paint with good patina; structurally vey good. (350 - 450)

272. Miniature bluejay, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Fairly large, approximately 3 1/2” tall. Crowell’s rectangular stamp is in the underside.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200)

277. Large miniature merganser drake from Massachusetts, circa 1900.  Approximately 6” long. Very slightly turned head.  Original paint with minor wear; slight roughness to edge of tail. (450 - 650)

273. Miniature redhead drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Signed by Crowell on the underside of the base.  Small worn area at top of head and tip of bill. (950 - 1,250)

278. Pair of 1/4 size pintails, Joe King, Newtown, Pennsylvania.  Signed and dated 1971. Both have raised “V” wing tip carving.  Very good and original.

274. Miniature black duck, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s rectangular stamp on the underside.   Minor paint loss at crack in neck, otherwise very good and original. (950 - 1,250) 275. Fairly large miniature tern, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts. Approximately 4 3/4” long. Crowell’s rectangular stamp is in the underside of the base. Very good and original. (1,500 - 2,500)

Literature: Floating Sculpture,” Harrison Huster and Doug Knight. (2,500 - 3,500)

279. Four 1/4 size carvings, R. Sabatini.  Signed. Pair of wood ducks and pair of shovelers, all have slightly turned heads and raised wing tips.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Bartlett collection.

(400 - 600)

107


Midwest 280.

Rare bluewing teal drake, Paul Lipke, Whiting, Indiana.  Stamped “PL” in weight. Unusual slightly turned and lifted head. Hollow carved.  Original paint with minor wear; structurally good. (3,000 - 4,000)

281.

Pair of bluebills, Paul Lipke, Whiting, Indiana.  Hollow carved with “PL” stamped in weights. Hen is in rare preening pose.  Original paint with very minor wear; structurally good. (3,000 - 4,000)

280

281

282. Redhead drake, Chris Smith, Algonac, Michigan, circa 1930.  Hollow with bottom board and slightly turned head.  Strong original paint; several shot marks and hairline slight separation at neck seam. (1,200 - 1,500)

282

283. Redhead drake, Chris Smith, Algonac, Michigan, circa 1930.  Paint coloration appears to represent an immature drake. Hollow with bottom board.  Head is turned slightly; several shot marks to one side of head; original paint with several shot marks. (1,200 - 1,500)

283 108


285

284

287

286

289

288

284. Hollow carved redhead drake, Tobin Meldrum, last quarter 19th century.    Old in use repaint; several shot marks. (800 - 1,200) 285. Canvasback drake, Ed “One Arm” Kelly, Monroe, Michigan.   “Hy Dalka” brand in underside.  Original paint that has darkened with age; small dents; underside was repainted a long time ago. (800 - 1,200) 286. Mallard drake, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois.    Original paint with minor to moderate wear; paint is scorched on one lower side; retains Perdew weight; small dents. (600 - 800)

287. Mallard hen, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1950.  Slightly turned head and feather stamping. Wide body.  Original paint with light wear.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(800 - 1,200)

288. Three oversize canvasbacks from Wisconsin, circa 1940.  Two drakes and one hen. Very similar paint pattern and carving to decoys made at the Evans Factory. Two have slightly turned heads.  Dry original paint with minor wear; structurally sound. (1,500 - 2,500) 289. Three coot decoys, Gus Nelow, Omro, Wisconsin.  All have glass eyes. Dowels run through tops of heads that have pushed up slightly.  All are in original paint with light gunning wear and tight age cracks. (800 - 1,200) 109


290

291

292

293

293A

294

290. Bluebill drake, Warren Dettman, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.  Snuggle head. Carved wings and crossed wing tips. Thick stipple painting on back.  Original paint; a few small dents and chips to stipples on back; both glass eyes are cracked; light edge wear at tip of bill. (400 - 600)

293. Mallard drake, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1950.  Stamped “FB” for Fred Buck numerous times on underside.  Original paint with light gunning wear.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(800 - 1,200)

291. Hollow carved pair of canvasbacks, Budgen Sampier.  The drake has the Mackey collection stamp on the underside.  Original paint with minor wear; a few small dents. (650 - 950)

293A. Redhead drake, Tom Schroeder, Detroit, Michigan, last half 20th century.  Stamped Tom Schroeder on underside.  Paint is a mix of old original and working repaint that has partially been removed; several shot scars. (500 - 800)

292. Mallard hen and drake, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan.  Hen has slightly turned head.  Both have been repainted and it appears to have been done by Schmidt; minor wear; small dents. (500 - 800)

294. Bluebill drake, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan.    Original paint with minor wear; professional repair to one edge of bill. (350 - 450)

110


Ontario

295

296

297

298

299

300

295. Black duck, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario. Incised wing carving. Original paint with minor wear, mostly on bottom edges; structurally good. (650 - 950)

298.

296. Greenwing teal hen, D.W. Nichol, Smith Falls, Ontario.  Signed and dated 1971.  Excellent and original. (600 - 900)

299. Solid body style redhead drake, George Warin, Toronto, Ontario.  Branded “AH Buehl,” “S Hendry,” and “FH Walker.” All St. Clair Flats shooting company members.  Old overpaint has been taken off to mostly original; old repair to a defect in the back. (750 - 1,000)

297. Solid body redhead from the Toronto area.    Worn original paint on body; old touch up on head; hit by shot. (650 - 950)

Hollow carved bluebill drake from Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century.    Original paint with minor to moderate wear; lightly hit by shot. (650 - 950)

300. Ringbill drake, D.W. Nichol, Smith Falls, Ontario.  His earlier style.  Original paint with a few small rubs; small piece missing from underside of body. (800 - 1,200) 111


301

302

304 303

305

306

307

301. Black duck with slightly turned head, William Hart, Belleville, Ontario.  Solid body style with good scratch feather paint detail.  Original paint with minor to moderate shrinkage and wear; lightly hit by shot; wear to wood on one edge of tail; small cracks in underside; underside was repainted a long time ago.

Provenance: Kelly collection.

(600 - 900)

302. Black duck, Prince Edward County, Ontario.  Raised wing tips. Decoy is covered with cross hatched carving.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Kelly collection.

(600 - 900)

303. Goldeneye drake, Addie Nichol, Smith Falls, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century.    Original paint with minor wear; old coat of varnish has been applied to most of the decoy; small crack in neck base.

Provenance: Kelly collection.

304.

Hollow carved black duck, William Chrysler, Belleville, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century.    Original scratch

112

(500 - 700)

paint with minor to moderate wear; bill and speculums appear to have old repaint; small tail chip missing. Provenance: Kelly collection.

(550 - 850)

305. Hollow carved goldeneye hen, William Hart, Belleville, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century.  Small “H” carved under the tail.  Original paint with minor wear; structurally good; small shot scar.

Provenance: Kelly collection.

(500 - 800)

306. Goldeneye hen from Smith Falls, Ontario.  Detailed feather carving.  Old in use repaint; a few small dents.

Provenance: Knight collection.

(400 - 600)

307. Bluebill drake, William Rumble, Prince Edward County, Ontario, last quarter 19th century.  Hollow carved.  Old paint with traces of original showing; a few small dents. Provenance: Kelly collection.

(500 - 800)


308

309

310

311

312

313

314

315

316

308. Hollow carved canvasback drake, John R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario.  Branded “CEC” in underside twice.  Appealing old repaint; numerous small dents. (500 - 800) 309.

Black duck, Harve Davern, Brighton, Ontario.    Original paint with good scratch feather detail; minor wear on most of the decoy, moderate wear on top of tail; a few small dents. Provenance: Kelly collection.

(400 - 600)

310. Hollow carved black duck from Prince Edward County, Ontario, last quarter 19th century.    Worn original paint; lightly hit by shot; small cracks and dents; old working touch up on bill and part of neck.

Provenance: Kelly collection.

(400 - 600)

311. Wood duck drake, Reg Bloom, Wolfe Island, Ontario.  Relief wing tip carving.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Knight collection.

(400 - 600)

313. Two redheads, Prince Edward County, Ontario.  Attributed to Bob Jones. Both are branded “RW” and have “HS” painted on the undersides.  Original paint with minor wear; minor to moderate discoloration and wear; old touch up on lower sides of one; chip missing from underside of one bill.

Provenance: Kelly collection.

(400 - 600)

314. Redhead drake, John R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario.  Solid body style. Branded “CEC” twice in underside.  Working repaint with some original showing; a few small dents and shot marks. (300 - 400) 315. Bluebill drake, George Poyton, Hamilton Bay, Ontario, mid 20th century.  “Poyton” is painted on underside. Maintains original swing weight. Body and head are rasp carved with shoulder relief and wing and tail detail.  Bill appears to have a black coat of primer with original gray coat on surface; light wear to high point on head, bill, and wings. (300 - 500)

312. Bluebill hen, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario.  Rare flat back style with no incised wing carving.  Original paint with minor wear; small dents.

316. Redhead drake, Tom Chambers, Long Point, Ontario.  Hollow carved. Early “round headed” style.  Worn old repaint; small cracks in one side of neck; hit by shot.

Provenance: Grossman collection.

(350 - 450)

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Somers G. Headly, stamped “SGH” in underside. (350 - 450) 113


Miscellaneous Decoys

317

318

319

320

321

322

323

324

325

317. Sandpiper with relief wing carving.  “T” carved in the underside. Of undetermined age.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; structurally good.

Provenance: Grossman collection.

(300 - 400)

318. Two decorative song birds on wooden bases with wire legs.  Possibly a kingfisher and a finch. Both are well carved and show considerable age. Measures approximately 5” tall including base. Found in New England.  Original paint; very light age wear; finch has chip to one side of tail. (300 - 500) 319. Two cork body black ducks from New England, 2nd quarter 20th century.    Paint appears to be original; roughness to cork. (300 - 500) 114

320. Four lesser yellowlegs with relief wing carving.  Tied together with old line. Sticks are in leather carrying strap.  Chip missing in crack in one bill, otherwise original and good. (300 - 500) 321. Hardwood carved patriotic eagle, 1st quarter 20th century.  Spread wings. 20” wide x 10” tall. Detailed feather caving and glass eyes. Appears to be carved of hardwood. Stain is protected by a light coat of varnish.  Very good and original. (300 - 500) 322. Mallard drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Challenge grade.  Mostly repainted in the Mason style; crack in neck filler and underside. (300 - 500)


323. Miniature mallard, Frank Finney, Virginia Beach, Virginia.  Signed.  Very good and original. (250 - 350) 324. Two bluebills from New Jersey. Both are from the head of the bay. Old repaint; small cracks and minor roughness.

Provenance: Bartlett collection.

(350 - 450)

325. Goldeneye drake, Chauncey Wheeler, Alexandria Bay, New York.  Branded “JRH”.  Old in use repaint; small dents. (300 - 400) 326. Miniature merganser drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s rectangular stamp is in the underside.  Worn original paint small chip missing from wing tips; small crack in one side. (250 - 350) 327. Bluebill drake from the South Shore of Long Island, New York, last quarter 19th century.  Square nail construction.  Old in use repaint; numerous cracks.

Provenance: From a home near Pemberton, New Jersey. (250 - 350)

333. Bluebill drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Challenge grade with premier grade head. Appears to have been made that way.  Paint has been restored; small dents. (150 - 250) 334. Two bird carvings.  A robin by Roy Robbins and a goldfinch by an unknown carver. Robin is done in style of Gus Wilson and signed on underside.  Both have glass eyes and are very good and original. (200 - 300) 335. Flat sided yellowlegs from Massachusetts, circa 1900.   Carrying hole through tail.  Original paint with minor wear; bill is a professional replacement.

Provenance: Grossman collection.

(200 - 400)

336. Large vintage cranberry scoop from Southern Massachusetts.  Approximately 22” wide.  Original and good. (100 - 300) 337. Stick up Canada goose, made from plywood and particle board.  Appears to be around 40 years old.  Minor damage at front of wings, otherwise good. (100 - 200)

328. Bluebill hen, Ken Harris, Woodville, New York.  Balsa body with pine head and keel. Harris ink stamp on underside.  Original and good. (200 - 300) 328A. Balsa body black duck, Wildfowler Decoy Factory.  Unstamped.  Near mint original paint ; several very small dents and paint scrapes in center of back; keel has been removed. (175 - 225) 328B. Crow on wooden base, Pratt Manufacturing Company, Joliet, Illinois.    Paint appears to be original; small crac ks. (100 - 150) 329. Pair of folky carved and painted songbirds from New England, 1st quarter 20th century.  On new bases, carved eyes, wings, and tails.  Crazed original paint. (200 - 400) 330.

Pair of miniature hooded mergansers.  Signed McKenzie. Both have slightly turned heads.  Very good and original. (200 - 400)

331. Hollow carved black duck, William Ethington, Columbus, New Jersey.  Large “E” stamped in weight. Raised “V” wing tip carving and fluted tail.  Very good and original. (175 - 275) 332. Preening widgeon drake, T. Boozer.  “TB” carved in underside.  Very good and original. (175 - 225)

End of Session One

115


Session Two

Wednesday, July 30, 2014 – 10:00 AM

Decoratives Ward Brothers

Crisfield, Maryland

338

338. Black duck, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Finely detailed paint with raised primaries and secondaries. Head is turned 75 degrees, in a back preening pose. Underside reads “LT Ward, Crisfield, Maryland 1964, Deluxe grade”. Hollow carved with bottom board.  Excellent and original. (7,500 - 10,000)

338 Detail

116


339

340

340 Detail

339 Detail

339. Shoveler drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and dated 1967. Shoulder carving, carved primaries and fluted tail. Slightly turned head.  Very good and original.

Provenance: From a home in Texas.

(5,000 - 7,000)

340. Pintail drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed “Resting drake pintail, Lem Ward, 1966.” Slightly turned head, relief wing carving, and fluted tail.  Minor discoloration on white areas, otherwise, very good and original.

Provenance: From a home in Texas.

(5,000 - 7,000)


341

342

343

341. 1/4 size Canada goose, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  11” long with slightly turned head and open mouth. Signed and dated 1962.  Very good and original.

Provenance: From a home in Texas.

(800 - 1,200)

342. Black duck carved in the style of the Ward Brothers, Oliver Lawson, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed. Balsa construction.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200)

343 Detail

118

343. Bufflehead drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and dated 1969. Relief shoulder carving and carved primaries. Fluted tail.  Very good and original.

Provenance: From a home in Texas.

(5,000 - 7,000)


344 344 Detail 344. Full size standing mallard hen, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland, circa 1930.  Raised primaries and secondaries are made from peach basket staves. Slightly turned head.  Original paint with minor wear; structurally very good; feet and base have been professionally replaced.

Provenance: Faint signature on underside of decoy dated 1930. When the carving was sold in a July 1997 auction catalog, it was indicated that the consignor knew Lem Ward, and Lem indicated it was the first decorative he made.

Literature: “Ward Brothers Decoys,” Ron Gard and Brian McGrath, p. 117, exact decoy. (9,500 - 12,500)


Gus Wilson

1864 - 1950 South Portland, Maine

His good friend and neighbor, Fred Anderson, passed down most of what we know about Gus Wilson. Known primarily for his working decoys, with animated expressions, he also earned quite a strong reputation as one of America’s great folk art carvers. Included in his non decoy creations are full size standing herons, tigers, seagulls and songbirds. While it is known that Wilson made and sold some of his whimsical carvings, he also just seemed to enjoy making them for friends. Anderson can remember his garage and workshop being filled with flying ducks hanging in all types of different poses. And as one would imagine, the windows of his house were all filled with song birds perched on the sills looking out into the yard.

Gus Wilson

344A 344A. Full size flying mallard drake, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine. Approximately 23� long. Original paint with very slight wear; chips missing from both wing tips and one foot; small cracks in body. (3,000 - 4,000)

120


345

346

347

348

349

345. Full size standing male cardinal, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine.  Extended wing tips.  Original paint with minor flaking and wear; structurally good.

Provenance: From an estate in Upstate New York. (2,000 - 2,500)

346. Full size standing blue jay, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine.  Carved crest and extended, carved wing tips.  Original paint with moderate discoloration and wear, mostly on one side; slight wear to the wood at the tip of the crest.

Provenance: From an estate in Upstate New York. (2,000 - 2,500)

347. Full size standing meadowlark, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine.  Carved, extended wing tips and tack

eyes.  Original paint with very minor wear; small amount of off white paint on one foot and lower breast.

Provenance: From an estate in Upstate New York. (2,000 - 2,500)

348. Full size standing Baltimore oriole, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine.  Dropped wing carving.  Bill has been slightly blunted.

Provenance: From an estate in Upstate New York. (2,000 - 2,500)

349. Full size standing bobolink, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine.  Dropped wing carving.  Very good and original.

Provenance: From an estate in Upstate New York. (2,000 - 2,500) 121


350

350. One of a kind full size flying bufflehead drake, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine.  Wing span is approximately 21”. Carved wooden feet. Feather carving on wings and tail.  Original paint with very minor discoloration and wear on most of the decoy; flaking on back, particularly where the wings join the body; numerous short surface cracks in back; small space underneath one of the wings where it has lifted up slightly from body.

350 Detail

122

Literature: “Great Book of Decoys,” Joe Engers, editor, p. 38. (6,500 - 9,500)


351

351 Detail

352 352 Detail

351. Very rare, possibly one of a kind, full size standing barnacle goose, Robert Kerr, Smith Falls, Ontario.  Highly detailed paint and feather carving. With carved, crossed wing tips and slightly turned head. On wooden base.  Very good and original. (2,000 - 2,500)

352. Full size standing snow goose on carved wooden base, Robert Kerr, Smith Falls, Ontario.  Highly detailed paint and feather carving with slightly turned head and crossed wing tips.  Very good and original. (2,000 - 2,500)

123


353

354

355

356

357

358

353. Pair of 1/3 size flying canvasbacks, George Strunk.  Signed. Mounted on wooden back board, total length just under 19”. Finely detailed paint and feather carving.  Very good and original. (750 - 950) 354. Hard to find pair of 1/3 size flying wood ducks, George Strunk. Signed. Mounted on wooden back board. Total length is just under 17” Good carving and feather paint detail.  Excellent and original. (750 - 950) 355. 1/4 size swan, Charlie Joiner, Chestertown, Maryland.  Signed and dated 2006. Slightly turned head.  Excellent and original. (800 - 1,200)

124

356. Hollow carved gunning model canvasback drake, Nick Prudo, Detroit, Michigan.  Signed. Carved primaries and secondaries, fluted tail, and slightly turned head. Signed on the underside with inscription “Second place award at international decoy contest, Davenport, Iowa.” Contest label on underside.  Tiny amount of wear at extremities, otherwise excellent and original. (800 - 1,200) 357. Miniature flying bald eagle, Roy Conklin, Alexandria Bay, New York.  Bird is approximately 6” long. Attached to wooden base with small metal post. Good paint detail.  Very good and original. (1,200 - 1,500) 358. Greenwing teal drake, Leo McIntosh, Woodville, New York.  Signed and dated 1986. Turned head and relief wing carving.  Very good and original. (1,000 - 1,400)


Chauncey Wheeler

1862 - 1937 Alexandria Bay, New York

359

359 Detail 359 Detail 359. Very rare 3/4 size flying goldeneye drake, Chauncey Wheeler, Alexandria Bay, New York.  Approximately 16” long. Fine form with concave wing carving, well sculpted head, and subtle feather carving under wings.  Original paint with a few small rubs and tiny dents.

Literature: “Chance,” Harold Rieser, p. 87, exact decoy, p. 86. (6,000 - 9,000)

125


360

361

362

363

360. Flying Canada goose, Ira C. Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Approximately 29” long and 36” wing span.  Original paint with slight wear; small chip missing from tail. (950 - 1,250) 361. 1/2 size flying mallard drake similar to the work of Ira Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Notched tail. 13 1/2” wing span.  Original paint with minor wear protected by an old coat of varnish, reglued crack at neck base; thin crack on underside.

126

Provenance: Purportedly from Skillagulleys Bar in Richmond, Virginia. (1,000 - 1,500)

364

362. Bluebill drake paperweight, Frank Adams, West Tisbury, Massachusetts.  Approximately 10 1/2” long.  Original paint with minor wear on most of the decoy; moderate wear on sides; slight rough spot on one edge of bill. (350 - 550) 363. Bluebill drake carved in the 1936 style of the Ward Brothers, Oliver Lawson, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed. Slightly turned head.  Very good and original. (650 - 950) 364. Full size heron on carved wooden base, Grayson Chesser, Jenkins Bridge, Virginia.  Large “C” carved in underside.  Original and good. (600 - 900)


365

366

365 Detail

366 Detail

365. Flying widgeon drake, Delbert Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Signed and dated 1949. Approximately 14” long.  Original paint with fine scratch feather detail; very slight wear, protected by its original coat of varnish; slight roughness to tip of bill; small amount of paint missing from underside.

366.

Well sculpted 1/2 size flying mallard drake, Ira Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Gracefully turned head and fluted tail. 10” long. Scratch loop feather painting.  Original paint with very minor shrinkage and wear; tiny chip missing from each wing tip; both wings have been off and professionally reattached quite awhile ago.

Literature: “Ira Hudson and Family,” Henry Stansbury, p. 145. (4,000 - 6,000)

Literature: “Ira Hudson and Family,” Henry Stansbury, p. 146. (6,500 - 9,500)

127


367. Pair of 1936 model mallard bookends, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed “LT Ward Brothers 1950”.  Excellent original paint; drake has sliver of bill that has been broken and reattached; hen has tight age crack through one side of face and slight crack at top of back; one side of drake’s body has a small smudge of white paint. (2,000 - 3,000)

367

368

369

370

368. Seven song birds, Del Higgins, Maine.  Each is individually mounted on a piece of driftwood. All appear to be mid 20th century. Species include, chickadee, nuthatch, robin, tree swallow, purple finch, cerulean warbler, scarlet tanager.  All are very good and original. (800 - 1,200) 369. Full size carved wooden blue jay on tree branch base.  Signed Eastern blue jay by FI Keller. Detailed feather carving.  Original paint with significant discoloration; numerous small old chips at underside of tip of tail. (350 - 550)

128

371

370. Well made copy of a Charles Hart penguin.  Approximately 11 1/2” tall.  Original paint showing some age; structurally good. (1,500 - 2,000) 371. Penguin, Charles Hart.  5 1/2” tall.  Original paint with mild flaking around head, bill and where wings are attac hed. (1,200 - 1,500)


372

373

372.

Full size standing wood duck, Charles Hart, Gloucester, Massachus-etts.  Glass eyes and detailed feather carving in wing tip area.  Small crack in underside; hairline crack at part of the neck filler. (3,000 - 5,000)

373. One of a kind pair of flying mallards, Philippe Sirois, Arrowsic, Maine, circa 1950s.  Each is approximately 25” long. Fine paint detail. Feather carving on wings.  Original paint with almost no wear; crack in one side of drake; feet are actual duck feet. (6,000 - 8,500)

129


Charles “Shang” Wheeler 1872 - 1949 Stratford, Connecticut

Like Elmer Crowell, Charles E. “Shang” Wheeler was recognized as a being a superior carver and painter while he was still active, which kept him busy filling orders for sportsman from around the country. When a decoy or rig of decoys was being crafted for a close friend or wealthy patron however, these men put their absolute best efforts into their creations, leaving us with some of the most refined and superior examples of waterfowl sculpture. Wheeler carved three “presentation” blackducks for friends Eugene V. Connett, Dr. Edgar Burke, and Lynn Bogue Hunt. This example was gifted to author Eugene Connett and bares an inscription to him on the underside. The blackduck gifted to Dr. Edgar Burke can be seen on page 51 of “The Art of Deception: Waterfowl Decoys from the Collection of Paul Tudor Jones II”.

374 Detail

374 Detail 130

374 Detail


374 Detail

374. Important presentation black duck, Shang Wheeler, Stratford, Connecticut.  Quite large, almost 19” long. Wheeler’s finest paint, with scratch feather painting on head and fine feather paint detail on body. Particularly fine form with turned head. One of only three known presentation black ducks made by Wheeler. This one was made for Eugene V. Connett. The others were made for Dr. Edgar Burke and Lynn Bouge Hunt. Inscribed on underside “To Eugene Connett,” and signed “Shang”.  Excellent and original.

Literature: “Shang,” Dixon Merkt, p. 71.

(65,000 - 85,000)

374

131


375

376

377

378

380

379

375.

Redhead drake, Shang Wheeler, Stratford, Connecticut, circa 1930s.  Balsa construction.  Original paint with good comb detail; minor wear; small dents; two worn areas to wood at bottom edges. (1,000 - 1,400)

376. Bluebill hen, Shang Wheeler, Stratford, Connecticut, circa 1930s.  Balsa body with slightly turned cedar head and relief wing carving.  Original paint with minor wear; most of the paint has worn off of the underside; wear to wood and paint on edges of tail; small dents. (950 - 1,250) 377. Redhead drake from Eastern Connecticut, last quarter 19th century.  Carved eyes and paddle tail. Remains of tie strap are attached with a square nail.  Original paint with minor wear; moderate wear on lower sides, a few small dents. (650 - 950)

132

378. Black duck, Lou Rathmell, Stratford, Connecticut.  Slightly turned head.  Old working repaint on most of the decoy; original paint and moderate wear on head; a few small dents.

Provenance: Knight collection.

(1,200 - 1,500)

379. Old squaw hen from Massachusetts, last quarter 19th century.    Original paint with good patina and minor wear; a few small dents. (900 - 1,200) 380.

Merganser hen from Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts, circa 1900.  Hollow carved with body halves attached by two small dowels. Slightly turned head with raised neck seat.  Original paint with minor to moderate wear; reglued cracks in tail; thin crack through neck. (800 - 1,200)


Keyes Chadwick

1865 - 1958 Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts

381

381 Detail

381.

Important redhead drake, Keyes Chadwick, Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts.  His early carving style. Slightly turned head.  Original paint with minor wear and good patina; several tiny dents; small crack in underside.

Provenance: Grossman collection. Formerly in the collection of Dr. James McCleery. Lot 433 in the Guyette & Schmidt/Sotheby’s, January 2000 auction.

Literature: “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph, p. 70. “Decoys of the Atlantic Flyway,” George Ross Starr Jr., p. 157. “Call to the Sky,” Robert Shaw, p. 27, exact decoy. (15,000 - 20,000)

133


New Jersey Harry V. SHourds 1861 - 1920 Tuckerton, New Jersey

Harry V. Shourds in Tuckerton, New Jersey

Photo collection of Henry Fleckenstein

H.V. Shourds, a house painter by trade and a part time guide, earned his livelihood by providing some of the finest decoys made in New Jersey. Considered to be the most prolific carver from the Tukerton school, Shourds produced Canada geese, brant, ducks, shorebirds, seagulls and even a blue heron. Any collector of Shourds decoys will quickly learn however, that examples in original paint are considered rare. His decoys were sold to hard hunting baymen that used them to harvest waterfowl in salt water. Only about a dozen H.V. Shourds geese are known to exist in original paint.

134


382

382 Detail

382 Detail

382. Very rare Canada goose, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey, 1st quarter 20th century.    Original paint with good detail; minor wear and good patina; professional repair to three cracks in the neck; a few small dents; crack in tail.

Provenance: Megargee collection. Acquired from Al Kurtz Absecon, New Jersey in 1960.

Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James Doherty, p. 77.

(25,000 - 35,000) 135


Red breasted merganser drake and hen commonly found along the Eastern Coast

383. Very rare rigmate pair of mergansers, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey, circa 1900.  Each has a Ward Foundation Smithsonian Exhibit 1987 sticker on the underside.  Original paint with minor to moderate discoloration and wear; a few small dents and shot marks; drake’s bill was cracked down and reset.

Provenance: Megargee collection. Acquired from Capt. Al Kurtz, Adsecon, New Jersey in 1956. On loan to Smithsonian Exhibit in 1987.

Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James Doherty, p. 83.

383 Detail

136

383 Detail

(40,000 - 60,000)


383

383

137


384

385

386

387

389

388

384. Merganser drake head, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey.    Original paint with minor wear; slight roughness to tips of crest and to bottom edge of neck where it joins the body.

Provenance: Megargee collection.

(1,500 - 2,500)

385. Bluebill drake, William Quinn, Yardley, Pennsylvania.  Quinn’s stamp in weight.  Appears to have a second coat of paint by Quinn; structurally good.

Provenance: Bartlett collection.

(1,200 - 1,500)

386. Canada goose, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey, 1st quarter 20th century.   Old in use repaint; neck crack that has been repaired with nails to secure the two pieces in that area. (800 - 1,200)

387. Rare merganser hen, George Huff.  Branded “CH and GW Huff, boat builders”. Applied bill. Unusual flat wing duck style with large added bottom section.  Original paint with minor wear; structurally good. (1,200 - 1,600) 388. Pair of goldeneye, Jessie Birdsall, Point Pleasant, New Jersey.    Hen has original paint with minor wear on most of the decoy, white has old in use repaint; drake is repainted; a few small dents and shot marks.

389. Two decoys.  Goldeneye drake, Jake Barrett and Bluebill drake, Henry Grant.  Both have been repainted; structurally good.

138

Provenance: Bartlett collection. Formerly in the collection of John Hillman, Seagirt, New Jersey. Hillman collection stamp on underside. (800 - 1,200)

Provenance: Bartlett collection.

(900 - 1,200)


390

391

390 Detail

390. Redhead drake, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey, 1st quarter 20th century.    Original paint with good detail and minor wear; small rough area at tip of tail; tiny rough area at one edge of bill with a tight check next to it; small worn area on underside.

Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James Doherty. (5,000 - 7,000)

391. Classic brant, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey, 1st quarter 20th century.  Hillman collection stamp on underside and McCleery collection stamp on underside.  Original paint with minor wear on most of the

391 Detail

decoy; minor to moderate wear on back; several small dents.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of John and Isabelle Hillman, Sea Girt, New Jersey. Formerly in the collection of Dr. James McCleery, Pasadena, Texas.

Literature: “Distinguished Collection of Dr. James McCleery,” Guyette & Schmidt/Sotheby’s, Jan. 2000, lot 390. Auction sticker is on the underside. “New Jersey Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr. p. 10. “Decoys of the Mid Atlantic Region,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr, p. 14. (6,000 - 9,000) 139


“Slot Neck” Black Bellied Plover

One of the most unusual and expertly crafted early hunting shorebirds is this black bellied plover constructed with a removable head. The construction includes a finely crafted dovetailed style connection which slides easily front to back, which allowed the hunter to simply remove the head when the birds were not in use. This method of construction obviously helped prevent damage to the head and fragile bills while the birds were being transported to and from the field and while being stored. The plover being offered in this sale was featured on the cover of the May/June 2001 issue of Decoy Magazine and again within the article in that issue written by Joe French. The article discusses Mr. French’s acquisition of this bird in 1954, referred to as “The Greene Collection,” from the collection of noted New Jersey carver Walter Bush, Newark, New Jersey

Lot 392 shows similarities with the slot neck goose sold in our April 2014 auction

140


392

392 Detail

392 Detail 392. Extremely rare and early hollow black bellied plover, maker unknown, late 19th century.  Most interesting construction with a dovetailed head and neck attachment designed so that the head can be removed. Both the neck seat on the body and the bottom of the head are stamped with the number 2. This construction very much resembles the construction of noted slot neck Canada geese, such as the one sold by Guyette & Deeter with Sotheby’s in 2000, Guyette & Deeter and Christie’s in 2007, and Guyette & Deeter in April 2014. The body is hollowed with a horizontal seam. Intricately carved with draw knife marks over some of the body, while much of the remaining is sanded smooth.  Outstanding dry original paint mellowed to a superb patinated surface; structurally excellent.

Provenance: Ex collection of Joe French. Ex-collection of noted early Jersey carver Walter Bush, Newark, New Jersey. Lot 115 in the July 2007 Guyette & Schmidt, Inc. auction.

Literature: “Decoy Magazine,” May/June 2001, article by Joe French, pp. 8-13, exact bird pictured on cover and p. 13 of article. Discusses some of the history of this bird and how Mr. French acquired it with reference to the Greene collection. (90,000 - 120,000)

141


393

393 Detail

393. Exceptional greater yellowlegs attributed to Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts.  Approximately 14” long with relief wing carving and tack eyes. Three piece laminated body construction. Fine feather paint detail.  Very slight roughness at stick hole. (7,500 - 9,500)

142


394

395

394 Detail

394. Rare lesser yellowlegs, Lothrop Holmes, Kingston, Massachusetts, 3rd quarter 19th century.    Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; slight roughness at tip of bill; wax eyes have fallen out; one shot hole in side. (6,500 - 9,500)

395 Detail

395. Golden plover from the Morton rig, Quincy Massachusetts, last quarter 19th century.  Relief wing tip carving and inset wax eyes. Branded “WS Morton” under tail. Fine paint detail with good patina.  Near mint original paint; wing tips have been slightly blunted; small crack in top of head.

Literature: “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph, p. 86. (5,000 - 7,500) 143


Thomas Wilson

1896 - 1940 Ipswich, Massachusetts John James Audubon’s encounter with the Golden Pover The golden plover has been a famous game bird. It was a most desirable table bird, as it was usually very fat and its flesh had a delicious flavor on account of its clean, upland feeding habits. The uncertainty of its appearance and its enormous numbers at favorable times made its pursuit most interesting. During the years of its abundance it was slaughtered in almost incredible numbers. Audubon (1840) writes: While at New Orleans, on the 16th of March, 1821, I was invited by some French gunners to accompany them to the neighborhood of Lake St. John to witness the passage of thousands of these birds, which were coming from the northeast and continuing their course. At the first appearance of the birds early in the morning, the gunners had assembled in parties of from 20 to 50 at different places, where they knew from experIence that the plovers would pass. There stationed, at nearly equal distances from each other, they were sitting on the ground. When a flock approached, every individual whistled in imitation of the plover’s call note, on which the birds descended, wheeled, and, passing within 40 or 50 yards, ran the gauntlet, as it were. Every gun went off in succession, and with such effect that I several times saw a flock of a hundred or more reduced to a miserable remnant of five or six Individuals. The game was brought up after each volley by the dogs, while their masters were charging their pieces anew. This sport was continued all day, and at sunset, when I left one of these lines of gunners, they seemed as intent on killing more as they were when I arrived. A man near the place where I was seated had killed 63 dozens. I calculated the number in the field at 200, and supposing each to have shot 20 dozen, 48000 golden plovers would have fallen that day.

396 Detail

144

396 Detail


396. Important hollow carved golden plover attributed to Thomas Wilson, Ipswich, Massachusetts.  Fairly large, 13” long with shoebutton eyes. Very thinly hollowed out including head and neck. Top of the head was made as a separate piece to accommodate hollowing out that area when the decoy was made.  Original paint with a few tiny dents; minor wear, mostly on edges of tail; very slight roughness to tip of bill and tip of tail. (30,000 - 40,000)

396

396 Detail 145


Mason Decoy Factory 1891 - 1924 Detroit, Michigan

397

397 Detail

397 Detail

397. Pintail hen and drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade. Hen retains premier grade stamp.  Original paint with minor wear; slight separation and paint loss at small knots in lower sides of drake; crack in hen’s breast.

146

Provenance: Rose collection.

(8,000 - 12,000)


398

398 Detail

398. Very rare and important black duck, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Mich-igan.  Premier grade. Early snakey head model, circa 1900 with slightly turned head. Hollow carved.  Original paint with very minor wear; several short surface cracks in breast area; small “in factory” crack in back.

Literature: “Mason Decoys,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid, front cover, exact decoy. (10,000 - 14,000)

147


399

400

399 Detail

399. Rare D.B. Day rig style mallard hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade. Branded “E.L.P.”  Original paint with good patina and minor wear; professional repair to a chip at the tip of the bill; minor roughness to top of tail; minor touch up at neck seam.

Provenance: Grossman collection. 148

(7,500 - 9,500)

400 Detail

400. Rare goldeneye drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade.  Original paint with minor wear; a few small dents; very slight roughness at one edge of tail.

Provenance: Rose collection.

(6,000 - 9,000)


401

402

401 Detail 401. Exceptional mallard hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Very early premier grade.  Near mint original paint; tiny hole in underside of body has been filled and touched up; professional repair to several tiny chips in neck filler.

Provenance: Rose collection.

Literature: “Mason Decoys: A Complete Pictorial Guide,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid, p. 20. (6,500 - 9,500)

402 Detail 402. Extremely rare bufflehead drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Challenge grade.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; worn area at neck base; short crack in back of head; two very small tail chips missing; hairline crack in side and underside; tiny rough spot on one edge of bill; head has been glued in place. Provenance: Jersey.

From an estate in Basking Ridge, New (6,000 - 8,000) 149


403

404

405

406

408

407 403. Canvasback drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade. Retains Mason weight.  Original paint on the white and gray areas; the rest has old in use repaint; structurally good. (1,200 - 1,500) 404. Black duck, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Challenge grade with challenge stamp on underside.  Original paint with good detail and very slight wear; cracks in underside. Provenance: Rose collection.

(2,000 - 2,500)

405. Early style black duck, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, circa 1890.  Challenge grade.  Original paint with very minor wear; several small dents in back; minor wear on underside.

150

Provenance: Rose collection.

(2,000 - 3,000)

406. Early bluebill hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Challenge grade with very wide bill style.  Original paint with very slight wear; thin crack at neck base; a few tiny dents.

Provenance: Rose collection.

(2,000 - 2,500)

407. Canvasback drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade.  Original paint with minor wear; old overpaint has been removed; small cracks and dents.

Provenance: Rose collection.

(1,000 - 1,400)

408. Canada goose, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade.  Worn original paint on most of the body; old touch up on head; small chips missing from tail; age splitting in underside; numerous cracks and dents. (1,200 - 1,600)


409

410

409. Rare redhead hen and drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade.  Original paint with minor wear; slight separation at one side of drake’s body seam; hen has small crack in head and an eye missing; a few small dents.

Provenance: Rose collection. Drake has George Thompson collection stamp on the underside. (6,000 - 9,000)

410. Canvasback hen and drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade.  Original paint with minor wear; drake has been moderately hit by shot; drake’s head is a little loose; small crack in underside.

Provenance: Rose collection.

(4,000 - 6,000)

409 Detail

151


New England 411. Large root head Canada goose found on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, near Falmouth, 1st quarter 20th century.  Body is approximately 25” long.  Original paint with moderate wear; mostly on head; small cracks; fairly narrow age split on underside. (2,000 - 3,000)

411

412

413

412. Oversize merganser drake from Maine, 1st quarter 20th century.  Attributed to Floyd Wallace, Small’s Point, Maine. 23” long. With inlet head and carved wooden crest.  Original paint with minor wear on much of the decoy; working touch up on the white areas; bill is a professional replacement. (1,500 - 2,000) 413. Hollow carved merganser drake, Fred Nickerson, Bourne, Massachusetts, and Reynoldscroft, Nova Scotia. Relief wing carving and glass eyes. Original paint with moderate wear; some strengthening on the black area of one wing; small dents; crack in underside; most of horsehair crest remains. (3,500 - 4,500)

414. Rare hollow carved scoter, Fred Nickerson, Bourne, Massachusetts and Reynoldscroft, Nova Scotia. Relief wing carving. Original paint with minor wear; large crack in tail; other small cracks and dents. (3,500 - 4,500)

414 152


415

415 Detail

415 Detail

415. Pintail drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s oval brand is in the underside. Slightly turned head.  Original paint with minor wear; structurally very good.

Provenance: From the Hoover Rig, marked “Hoover” on underside. Used at the Toussaint Shooting Club, Port Clinton, Ohio. Collection of George Ross Starr, Starr collection stamp on underside.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid, p. 148.

(17,500 - 22,500)

153


416

417

418

419

421

420 416. Goldeneye drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Pre brand.  Original paint with moderate wear; old touch up on part of the white areas; age split in underside.

Provenance: Purchased by the consignor from Alfred Gardner. Ex collection of Alfred Gardner. (1,000 - 1,500)

417. Stylish bluebill hen from Martha’s Vineyard, 1st quarter 20th century.    Near mint original paint; very slight wear to wood at tip of bill.

Provenance: Formerly in collection of Robert D. Congdon, Nantucket Massachusetts, Congdon label on underside. (1,250 - 1,750)

418. Pair of goldeneye, Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts.    Paint has been restored in its original style; both have been lightly hit by shot and have small cracks; hen has minor roughness to the tail. (1,200 - 1,500) 419. Early style redhead drake, Keyes Chadwick, Martha’s 154

Vineyard, Massachusetts.  Branded “OSM” twice on underside for Dr. Orlan S. Mayhew, Martha’s Vineyard Massachusetts. Identified by Mrs. Benjamin Mayhew.  Old in use repaint with minor wear; small cracks and shot marks.

Provenance: Grossman collection.

(1,200 - 1,600)

420. Large Canada goose, attributed to Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts, circa 1900.  Branded “CIGC” for Cedar Island Gunning Club. Tack eyes.  Original paint with minor wear; several cracks and dents in body; two piece body construction, seam has opened up somewhat. (800 - 1,200) 421. Large black duck, Keyes Chadwick, Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts.  Slightly turned head. Inset circular weight.  Original paint with minor shrinkage and numerous small scuffs; structurally very good.

Literature: “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph, p. 421. (950 - 1,250)


422 422 Detail

422 Detail

422. Exceptionally well preserved black duck, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s oval brand is in the underside. Slightly lifted head. Fine feather paint detail.  Near mint original paint on most of the decoy; very slight wear at tip of the tail. (5,500 - 7,500)

155


New Jersey Rowley Horner

1881 - 1942 West Creek, New Jersey

Its no coincidence that Horner’s decoys are similar in style to those made by H.V.Shourds. Shourds was in fact a neighbor, and it is said that young Rowley would visit Shourds shop on a regular basis. Learning to make decoys in the “Tuckerton style” Horner would go on to perfect both his carving and painting, which would eventually earn him the reputation of making the finest decoys on the New Jersey coastline. His decoy-making career spanned approximately 40 years but the majority was made from the turn of the century until about 1930.

Rowley Horner

423 Detail

156


423 Detail

423

423. Exceptional brant, Rowley Horner, West Creek, New Jersey, 1st quarter 20th century.  Fine paint detail and patina. Inscription on underside states that Edwin Megargee got the decoy from Somers Headley.  Original paint with a few small rubs and tiny dents. Provenance: Megargee collection. Considered to be one of the best Horner brant. Acquired from Somers Headley in 1967. Won “Best Brant” Mid Atlantic decoy festival 1987. Literature: “New Jersey Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein Jr., p. 43.

(25,000 - 35,000) 157


424. Very rare brant with cocked head, Giddeon Lippencott, Wading River, New Jersey, Last quarter 19th century.  Body halves are joined with two small dowels.  Appealing old in use repaint on the white area of the tail; otherwise original with minor shrinkage and wear; a few small dents.

424

425

Provenance: Found by Fred Noyes around 1950. One of 5, and formerly in the Noyes museum collection.

Literature: “Working Decoys of the Jersey Coast and Delaware Valley,” Kenneth Gossner, p. 126. “Great Book of Wildfowl Decoys,” Joe Engers, editor, p. 11 rigmate. (2,000 - 3,000)

426

427

428

425. Stick up frigate gull, Hurley Conklin, Manahawkin, New Jersey.  Raised, extended wing tips. Branded “HC”.  Very good and original. (500 - 700)

427. Swimming Canada goose, Hurley Conklin, Manahawkin, New Jersey.  Branded “H. Conklin.”  Very good and original. (600 - 900)

426. Two silhouette brant.  One by Sam Soper, the other by Eugene Birdsall.  Original paint with minor wear; one has a chip missing from the bill.

428. Bluebill drake, Tony Bianco, Bordentown, New Jersey, circa 1930s.    Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; a few tiny dents.

Literature: “Floating Sculpture,” H. Harrison Huster and Doug Knight, p. 25, exact decoy. (600 - 900)

158

Provenance: Bartlett collection.

(500 - 800)


429

430

430 Detail

429. Exceptional rigmate pair of bluebills, Rhodes Truex, Absecon, New Jersey, 1st quarter 20th century.  Carved eyes.  Original paint with very little discoloration and wear.

Provenance: Megargee collection.

Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James Doherty, p. 154. (5,500 - 8,500)

430. Rare stick up flying brant, Ellis Parker, Parkertown, New Jersey, circa 1900.  Canvas over wire frame wings and notched tail. Painted feet and legs.  Original paint with minor wear; small chip missing from one edge of tail; a few small dents and cracks.

Provenance: Megargee collection.

(4,000 - 6,000)

159


Rowley Horner

1881 - 1942 West Creek, New Jersey

431

431 Detail

431 Detail

431. Important and very rare bluebill hen, Rowley Horner, West Creek, New Jersey.    Original paint with very slight wear; original pad weight.

Provenance: Formerly in the collections of Bill Kross and James Doherty.

Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James Doherty. “New Jersey Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein Jr. (17,500 - 22,500)

160


Shorebirds

431A

431A. Rigmate pair of yellowlegs, Ira Hudson, Chincoteague Virginia, first quarter 20th century. Original paint with moderate wear; one bill is an old replacement; lightly hit by shot; each has a filled chip in the tail; one has a small piece shaved off the tail; each was shaved flat slightly at the stickhole a long time ago.

Literature: “Ira Hudson and Family,� Henry Stansbury, p. 140, exact decoys pictured.

(5,000 - 8,000)

161


432

433

434

433 Detail

432. Verity Family black bellied plover, last quarter 19th century.  Relief wing carving with crossed wing tips.  Original paint on gray area of back; the rest is early working repaint; moderately hit by shot; shallow rough area near stick hole. (3,000 - 5,000) 433. Rare running lesser yellowlegs, William Southard, Seaford, Long Island, New York.  Carved eyes and relief wing carving.  Well preserved original paint that was varnished a long time ago and has darkened with age; lightly 162

434 Detail

hit by shot.

Literature: “Shorebird Decoys,” John Levinson and Somers Headley. (4,000 - 6,000)

434. Robin snipe from the South Shore of Long Island, New York.  Small “H” carved under the tail. Relief wing carving and shoe button eyes.  Near mint original paint protected by an old coat of varnish; structurally excellent. (5,000 - 8,000)


435

436

436 Detail

435. Classic robin snipe in spring plumage, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey.  Slightly flat sided. Fine paint detail.  Original paint with minor wear; small crack near stick hole otherwise structurally good.

436. Very rare black bellied plover in transitional plumage, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey.  Very wide body style.  Original paint with minor wear and good patina; very lightly hit by shot.

Provenance: Megargee collection.

(6,000 - 8,000)

Provenance: Megargee collection.

(17,500 - 22,500)

163


437

438

439

440

437. Curlew from the South Jersey Shore, last quarter 19th century.    Original paint with moderate wear; two cracks in underside; small dents; minor roughness on one side of neck.

Provenance: Megargee collection.

(2,000 - 3,000)

438. Rare curlew from the Rogers Rig, Long Island, New York, last quarter 19th century.  Branded “T Rogers.”  Original paint with moderate wear; dents and small crack in one side; small crack in breast. (2,000 - 3,000)

164

439. Robin snipe, Harry V. Shrouds, Tuckerton, New Jersey.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; a few small dents.  

Literature: “New Jersey Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr. (3,000 - 4,000)

440. Group of seven shorebirds, unknown maker, South Shore of Long Island, New York, last quarter 19th century.  Four red knots, two black bellied plovers, and one peep. All are flat sided.  Bills on four are replaced; paint is original on all except the breast coloring on one of the red knots. (3,000 - 4,000)


441

442

441 Detail

441. Rare sandpiper, Daniel Lake Leeds, last quarter 19th century.    Near mint original paint; small crack and tiny chip missing from one side of bill.

Provenance: Megargee collection.

(8,000 - 12,000)

442 Detail

442. Curlew, Daniel Lake Leeds, Pleasantville, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  Relief wing carving.  Near mint original paint with good patina; slight roughness to tip of the bill.

Provenance: Megargee collection.

(12,000 - 15,000)

165


John Dilley

Quogue, New York

The long billed dowitcher is a shorebird with long legs for wading and a long beak for probing for insects, worms and crustaceans. As with many shorebirds, its plumage is variegated browns, grays and whites and often challenges the identification skills of even the most careful birders. On their fall migration, flocks are a mixture of birds still in rufous breeding plumage, half-andhalf rufous breeding and bland gray winter plumage into which they’re molting. They’re plump and the flocks are densely packed. Which is why they were such popular game birds for the market. John Dilley, whom we know very little about was a fastidious painter who must have known shorebirds intimately, for there are very few makers of gunning rigs who paid such incredible attention to the plumage phases of each species he created. Dilley Photo Credit: “Advances in the Field Identification of North American Dowitchers,” Andrew Birch

443 Detail

166

captured the bright sunrise colors perfectly in this pristine example of a summer plumage dowitcher.

443 Detail


443 Detail

443

443. Important dowitcher in summer plumage, John Dilley, Quogue, Long Island, New York, last quarter 19th century.  Relief wing carving and shoe button eyes. Finely detailed loop feather painting and pleasing paint tones. Loop feather painting extends to most of the underside.  Near mint original paint; several tiny dents.

Literature: “Shorebirds,” Somers Headly and John Levinson, p. 73. (50,000 - 75,000)


444

445

445 Detail

444. Large curlew, Thomas Gelston, Quogue, Long Island, New York.  Approximately 18” long. Fine paint detail and shoe button eyes.  Original paint with very minor wear; bill is a professional replacement.

Provenance: Grossman collection. One of a group of Gelston shorebirds found in Southern New England around 1990. (6,500 - 9,500)

445. Important curlew by an unknown maker, South Jersey Coast, last quarter 19th century.  The initial “J” is carved into the underside. A large decoy with a hooked bill.

168

Approximately 15” long.  Dry original paint with minor wear and nice patina; old repair to a defect in the wood in the tail; two small nails are driven horizontally in this area to secure the filler; small crack part way through tip of bill.

Provenance: Collection of William J. Mackey, Jr. by descent through the Mackey family.

Literature: “American Decoys,” Quintina Colio, p. 67, exact decoy shown in a reversed photo. “American Bird Decoys,” Mackey collection exhibition, item 15 in exhibition catalog, Saint Paul Art Center, St. Paul, Minnesota, and the Paine Art Center and Arboretum, Oshkosh, Wisconsin, 1967. (6,000 - 9,000)


William Bowman 1824 - 1906 Lawrence, New York

446

446 Detail

446 Detail

446. Yellowlegs, William Bowman, Lawrence, Long Island, New York.  Relief wing carving with extended wing tips and shoe button eyes.  Original paint with minor wear; moderate wear near stick hole; most of the paint is worn off of the hard wood bill; lightly hit by shot; small dents; very minor roughness to tip of bill.

Provenance: Grossman collection.

(17,500 - 22,500)

169


Illinois River

447

448 447. Excellent mallard drake, Bert Graves, Bureau, Illinois, circa 1910.  White sided paint by Catherine Elliston.   Excellent feather painting and wet on wet blending. Strong original paint; hairline crack in neck; light staining around area on underside; retains Graves weight. (5,000 - 7,000) 448. Rigmate pair of mallards, Fred Allen, Monmouth, Illinois, last quarter 19th century.    Original paint with minor wear on drake, moderate wear on hen; small dents and shot marks.

447 Detail 170

Provenance: Connecticut.

Recently found in a storage shed in Branford, (4,000 - 6,000)


449. Canvasback drake in rare eclipse plumage, Bert Graves, Peoria, Illinois, circa 1930s.  Retains Graves weight.  Original paint with very minor wear; protected by an old coat of varnish; lightly hit by shot; several filled and touched up shot marks on breast.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid, p. 87. (3,000 - 4,000)

449

450. Mallard drake, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois.    Original paint with very minor wear; a few tiny dents; retains Perdew weight. (3,000 - 4,000)

450

451. Mallard drake, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois.  Retains Perdew weight. Slightly turned head.   Original paint with moderate wear; very lightly hit by shot. (1,500 - 2,000)

451

452. Mallard drake, Bert Graves, Peoria, Illinois.    Original paint that has darkened with age; minor wear; a few small dents; red paint on part of underside is a hunter’s mark; old tag on underside that states the red mark indicates Bert and Merkigun club (950 - 1,250)

452

171


453

454

455

456

457

458

453. Mallard drake, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois.    Much of the paint was restored quite a while ago by Charlie Moore; retains Perdew weight. (800 - 1,200) 454. Crow, Hadden Perdew, Henry, Illinois, 2nd half 20th century.  Brass plaque on underside with Perdew’s name etched into it. Glass eyes, slightly turned head, and wire legs.  Strong original paint; tip of bill was blunted with resulting stress crack that runs along part of underside. (650 - 950) 455.

Mallard drake, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois.    Working repaint appears to be by Perdew; structurally good. (650 - 950)

456. Two crows with wire legs, Hadden Perdew, Henry, Illinois.  Both have slight turned heads, one has raised wing tips.  Very good and original. (900 - 1,200)

172

459

457. Mallard drake, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois.  Repainted in the 1930s by Hector Whittington.  Significant wear; lightly hit by shot; retains Perdew weight; crack through neck was repaired a long time ago by tacking two thin copper strips onto the sides of the neck; repaired and repainted by Fred Colpin. (500 - 800) 458. Mallard drake, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois.    Two coats of paint by Perdew; more recent paint restoration on gray areas of sides and underside; weight has been removed; thin crack in one side. (650 - 950) 459.

Coot, Otto Garren.  Hollow carved with glass eyes. Slight crazing.  Original paint with very light wear. (500 - 800)


460

461

460. Rigmate pair of mallards, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois.  Charlie Perdew’s paint.  Slight wear at tip of drake’s tail and top of head, otherwise both are near mint; both retain Perdew weights. (6,500 - 9,500)

461. Classic bluebill drake, Robert Elliston, Bureau, Illinois, circa 1880s.  Strong feather paint with good comb painting on back and sides.  Original paint with very minor wear; professional neck crack repair with touch up.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid, p. 158. (6,000 - 8,000)

173


Contemporary

462

463

464

465

466

467

462. Canvasback drake, Corbin Reed, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Reed stamp in underside and slightly turned head. Two 1976 federal waterfowl stamps on the underside.  Small cracks in eyes, otherwise very good and original. (750 - 950) 463.

Well carved wood duck with turned head and raised wing tips, Corbin, Reed, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Stamped, signed and dated 1975.  Very good and original. (1,200 - 1,600)

464. 1/3 size swan, Corbin Reed, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Signed. Slightly turned head and detailed feather carving.  Very good and original; hairline crack partway through bill. (950 - 1,250)

174

465. Three 1/3 size decoys, Corbin Reed, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Reed stamp in underside as well as 1978 federal waterfowl stamps.  Original paint with minor wear; slight roughness to one goose tail. (1,250 - 1,750) 466. 3/4 size canvasback drake, Corbin Reed, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Reed stamp in underside. Detailed feather carving.  Very good and original. (650 - 950) 467. Pair of bluebills, Oliver Lawson, Crisfield, Maryland.   Signed and dated 1983. Slightly turned heads.  Very good and original. (950 - 1,250)


George Strunk 468

George Strunk with lot 468

468. Carved striped bass on back board, George Strunk.  Signed. Approximately 46” long. Detailed fin and scale carving.  Very good and original. (1,250 - 1,750)

George Strunk of Glendora, New Jersey has been caving with traditional tools, in the Delaware River style, for the last 30 years. Known primarily for his working decoys, George has been a featured carver in articles for both Decoy Magazine and Hunting & Fishing Collectibles Magazine, he can also be found visiting or displaying at number of shows on the East Coast. Growing up an outdoorsman, hunting and fishing with his father and brother, he has always hunted over his own wooden decoys. Recently, George has had an interest in the early trophy fish models. “They were really the earliest forms of taxidermy. A hundred years ago, if you wanted to replicate a fish you caught, you would take it to a wood carver, who would carve and paint the fish. The backboard would then be attached along with a description of the catch and fish”. George has enjoyed learning about this segment of fishing history and has started to resurrect this art for today’s fisherman. “It’s really a way to preserve the memory without killing the fish, or ordering a plastic mold that is spray painted, hopefully they will someday be as cherished as the ones from a hundred years ago”

469

470

471

472

469. Rare hollow preening black duck, George Strunk.  Slightly oversize. Stamped “G. Strunk” in weight. Flat bottom style with carved, raised wing tips, and fluted tail. Wing is raised very slightly with tip of bill buried in feathers.  Excellent and original. (600 - 900) 470. Hollow pair of pintails, George Strunk.  Signed and stamped “G. Strunk” in weight. Both have carved, crossed wing tips, fluted tails, and slightly turned heads. Both have extra fine paint detail.  Drake has light discoloration on some of the white areas, otherwise excellent and original. (1,000 - 1,400)

471. Hollow pair of mergansers, George Strunk.  Both are signed and stamped “G. Strunk” in the weights. Both are carved in the Delaware River tradition with raised wing tips and fluted tail. Hen is in preening pose and drake has a slightly turned head.  Excellent and original. (1,000 - 1,400) 472. Hollow pair of wood ducks, George Strunk.  Both are signed and are stamped “G. Strunk” in the weight. Both are carved in the Delaware River tradition with raised wing tips and fluted tail. Both have slightly turned heads.  Excellent and original. (800 - 1,200) 175


New England Joseph Lincoln

1859 - 1938 Accord, Massachusetts

473

473. Classic widgeon drake, Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts.  Well sculpted head and neck.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; numerous small dents; fairly thin age split in underside. Literature: “Joseph Lincoln,” Cap Vinal, p. 55. (8,000 - 12,000)

473 Detail 176


Elmer Crowell

1864 - 1954 East Harwich, Massachusetts

474

474. Well sculpted bluebill drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Pre stamp. Slightly turned and lifted head.  Original paint that has darkened somewhat with age; minor wear; structurally very good.

Provenance: Made as a gift by Crowell for his friend Alfred Gardner. Oval unpainted area on underside reads, “A.B. Gardner, Accord, Mass.”

Literature: “Songless Aviary,” Brian Cullity, p. 71, exact decoy. (12,000 - 15,000)

474 Detail

177


475.

Solid body black duck, Charles Hart, Gloucester, Massachusetts.  Fine father carving detail.  Near mint original paint; structurally very good.

Literature: “Decoys: A North American Survey,” Gene and Linda Kangas. (2,500 - 3,500)

475

476

477

478

479

476.

Early canvasback drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Detailed feather carving across wing tips and slightly turned head. Pre brand.  Old in use repaint; small dents.

Provenance: Knight collection.

(650 - 950)

477. Black duck, Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts.    Paint appears to be a mix of old original and old working repaint; protected by an old coat of varnish; two checks in wood on underside; numerous rubs and flakes exposing original paint and bare wood. (700 - 900) 478. Very early goldeneye drake, Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts, last quarter 19th century.  Branded

178

“MEIGGS” on underside and stamped “14F” as it was the 14th decoy in collection of Joe French. French’s notes mentions that he purchased the decoys in August in 1954 while on vacation. French goes on to say that Menges was a market hunter and this decoy was from the rig of George Andrews of Nantucket.  Very old working repaint; the area where black paint was has mostly worn away leaving a very desirable oxidized surface; hairline crack through top of bill and head. (500 - 800) 479.

Old squaw drake from the south shore of Massachusetts, last quarter 19th century. Inlet head, weight is attached with square nails. Original paint with moderate wear; moderately hit by shot; hairline crack through neck. (950 - 1,250)


480

480. Exceptional self bailing scoter, Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts, 1st quarter 20th century.  Champhered bottom board.  Original paint with minor wear; lightly hit by shot; shot scar on top of head; hairline crack in one side. Provenance: One of two found near Plymouth, Massachusetts.

Literature: “Joseph Lincoln,” Cap Vinal. (8,000 - 12,000)

480 Detail 179


Louisiana

Lots 481 - 483 are being sold for Duck Commander, Inc. A portion of the proceeds will be donated to charity.

481 Detail

481 Detail 180

483 Detail


481. Pair of wood ducks or morning squealers, Skip Couvillion, West Monroe, Louisiana.  Signed and numbered 12. Written on underside, “Hunted over by Duckmen of Louisiana 2013/2014.” Signed by Phil Robertson, with Duck Commander stamp in the underside and US Department of Interior conservation stamp of old squaw on underside.  Original paint with very minor wear; structurally good. (2,500 - 3,500)

481

482. Ringbill drake or “blackjack,” Skip Couvillion, West Monroe, Louisiana.  Slightly turned head. Limited edition, signed “# 18/100, 2007. Made for Duck Commander, West Monroe, Louisiana.” Written on keel is “Hunted over by the Duckmen of Louisiana in 2013/2014.” Also signed by Phil Robertson. US Migratory Bird hunting stamp of ringbills is attached to underside.  Original paint with minor flaking and wear; structurally good. (1,250 - 1,750)

482 483. Mallard drake, Skip Couvillion, West Monroe, Louisiana.  Made for Duck Commander and signed “#28 mallard drake, 2013.” Written on underside, “Hunted over by the Duckmen of Louisiana 2013/2014.” Signed by Phil Robertson. Also US Migratory Bird hunting stamp of flying mallard is on underside.  Very good and original. (1,250 - 1,750)

483

181


Miscellaneous Decoys

484

486

489

485

488

487

490

484. Preening pintail drake, Mike Frady, New Orleans, Louisiana.  Signed. Raised crossed wing tips and unique self winding device for weight.  Original paint with minor wear, mostly on head; slight roughness to very tip of tail.

Provenance: Knight collection. Purchased at the July, 1988 Richard Bourne decoy auction.

Literature: “Decoys of Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid, p. 261. “Louisiana Duck Decoys,” Charles Frank, p. 117. (1,500 - 2,000) 485. Two decoys by the same maker from Louisiana, circa 1950.  Mallard drake and pintail drake. Both have relief wing carving.  Original paint with very slight shrinkage and wear; drake has small dent on tail. (600 - 900) 486. Two decoys, Hays Decoy Factory, Jefferson City, Missouri.    Canvasback and bluebill drake. Canvasback has original paint with minor discoloration and wear, crack in underside, a few small chips missing from neck filler with touch up in that area, one eye is missing, and lightly hit by shot; bluebill has original paint with minor wear, crack in breast and underside, and lightly hit by shot.

182

Provenance: Grossman collection. Formerly in the collection of William J. Mackey, Mackey stamp on underside. (500 - 800)

491 487. Pair of goldeneye, Downeast Decoy Factory, Freeport, Maine.    Original paint with very minor wear; glued crack in lower side of hen; small “in the making” rough spot on drake’s tail. (400 - 600) 488. Canvasback drake, Evans Decoy Factory, Ladysmith, Wisconsin, circa 1930s.  Evans stamp on underside.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; thin crack in back; some working touch up on top of tail.

Provenance: Grossman collection.

(350 - 450)

489. Preening decoy from Europe.  Turned head with open bill and relief wing carving.  Original and very good. (350 - 550) 490. English wood pigeon, 1st quarter 20th century.  Relief wing carving, cast metal bill, and screw eyes.  Original paint with minor to moderate wear; small crack partway down back. (450 - 650) 491. Two decoys from New Jersey.  Bluebill drake, Henry Grant, Barnegat, New Jersey. Bluebill hen, Harry M. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey.  Old in use repaint; some of the paint on the Grant decoy appears to be original; a few small dents.

Provenance: Bartlett collection.

(800 - 1,200)


492

493

495 492. Two Massachusetts limited edition duck stamp prints.  With stamps. One is of a Lothrop Holmes ruddy turnstone, limited edition 16/175, Randy Julius. The other is of a preening Elmer Crowell black duck, 97/100 remarked . Both have been professionally triple matted and framed.  Very good and original. (400 - 600) 493. Watercolor signed “WB Gillette.”  Subject matter is canvasbacks landing in marsh. Image size approximately 9” x 11”.  Very good and original. (200 - 300)

492

494

496 495. Carved wooden primitive black bear head with paws on wall mount, Southeastern US, circa 1940s  Approximately 36” wide.  Minor chipping to claws; minor damage to one side of wall mount. (650 - 950) 496. Primitive black bear carving on wooden wall mount, Southeastern US, circa 1950s.  Approximately 16” long.  Age cracks, otherwise good. (400 - 600)

494. Oil on board entitled, “Startled,” by Nandor Horthy.  Subject matter is a dog in the woods flushing out a partridge. Professionally framed, image size approximately 8” x 9”.  Very good and original. (350 - 450) 183


Virginia 497. Early style bluebill drake, Ira Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia.    Old original paint with moderate wear; crack through neck and in underside; professional bill repair. (1,200 - 1,500)

497

498

499

500

501

498. Black duck, Doug Jester, Chincoteague, Virginia, 1st quarter 20th century.    Original paint with moderate flaking and wear; small cracks at neck base. (300 - 500)

500. Very full body black duck, Ira Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia.    Worn original paint with touch up on the speculums; cracks and dents. (300 - 400)

499.

501. Oversize bluebill hen, Lynwood Dudley, Knott’s Island, North Carolina.    Old in use repaint; age split in back; neck was shortened a little bit a long time ago with a couple of pieces added to chips at the bottom edge; lightly hit by shot. (400 - 600)

184

Rare gadwall drake, Lou Birch, Chincoteague, Virginia, circa 1920.  Raised neck seat.  Paint has been restored by Cameron McIntyre; minor wear to wood at edges of tail and bill. (950 - 1,250)


501A

501B

501A. Very rare mallard with turned head, Ira Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia, circa 1930. Mallards by Hudson are extremely rare and this sharply turned head model may be one of a kind. Worn original paint; small cracks; small dents in tip of bill; repair to a crack at the neck base. (5,000 - 8,000) 501B. Rare merganser drake, Ira Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia, circa 1920. Raised neck seat and carved wooden crest. A mixture of worn original paint and old touchup by Doug Jester; minor roughness to top of crest; a few small dents. (5,000 - 8,000)

501A Detail

185


501C

501D

501C. Unusual Canada goose with raised “V” wingtip carving, Ira Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia, circa 1930s. Ice groove behind neck and tack eyes. Original paint with moderate wear; age split in underside; numerous small cracks and dents.

Literature: “Ira Hudson and Family,” Henry Stansbury, p. 94, exact decoy pictured. (4,500 - 7,500)

501D. Pintail drake, Ira Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia, cira 1930 with classic football body style and banjo tail. Appealing old repaint with small areas of original showing; crack thorugh neck and lower side.

186

Literature: “Southern Decoys,” Henry A. Fleckenstein, Jr., p. 82, exact decoy. “Ira Hudson and Family,” Henry Stansbury, p. 123. exact decoy. (4,000 - 6,000)

501D Detail


502

502. Hissing Canada goose, Ira Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia.    Appealing old repaint; cracks in underside; thin crack through neck; bill has been blunted slightly. (3,500 - 5,500) 503.

Bluebill drake, attributed to a member of the Cobb Family, Cobb island, Virginia, last quarter 19th century.  Raised “V” wing carving and inlet head. Carved eyes. Remnants of the initials “A.F.” are visible on the underside, possibly for Alma Fitchett, Smith Island, Virginia.  Worn original paint on much of the decoy, white areas have old in use repaint; numerous cracks and worn area; area of dry rot on back part of underside; three nails were added to one side to keep the decoy from cracking more a long time ago.

503

Literature: “Southern Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr, p. 169. (2,500 - 4,500)

504. Brant from Cobb Island, Virginia, circa 1900.  Raised “V” wing tip carving, inlet head, and carved eyes. Applied bill is doweled through to back of head.  Appealing old repaint; numerous cracks; small rough area at wing tips. (2,000 - 3,000)

504

187


Shorebirds

505

506

507

507 Detail

505. Feeding Eskimo curlew from Massachusetts.  Three piece laminated body construction that is joined with small dowels. Relief wing carving and iron bill.  Original paint with minor flaking and wear; small amount of touch up on one side of head; lightly hit by shot. (3,500 - 4,500) 506.

188

Large willet, Charles Thomas, Assinippi, Massachusetts, last quarter 19th century.  Over 14” long. Relief wing carving and tack eyes.  Original paint with minor shrinkage and wear; lightly hit by shot. (3,000 - 4,000)

507. Eskimo curlew from Nantucket or Cape Cod, last quarter 19th century.    Original paint with very minor wear and good patina; tip of bill has broken off; several tiny dents.

Literature: “Bird Decoys of North America,” Robert Shaw, title page. (3,500 - 5,500)


508

509

510

511

512

508. Yellowlegs, Captain Al Ketchum, Copiague, Long Island, New York, last quarter 19th century.    Original paint with minor to moderate wear; small dents; slight defect at wood at one side at knot.

Provenance: Grossman collection.

(1,500 - 2,500)

509. Golden plover by a member of the Harris family, Nantucket, Massachusetts, last quarter 19th century.  Two piece body construction.  Near mint original paint on most of the decoy; small rub on breast; tiny chip missing from one edge of tail; two fairly large shot marks on one side; slight roughness to tip of bill. (1,200 - 1,500) 510. Yellowlegs, George Boyd, Seabrook, New Hampshire.  Good paint detail.  Original paint with minor

wear; discoloration on underside; crack through neck. (2,500 - 3,500) 511. Golden plover, Thomas Gelston, Quogue, New York, last quarter 19th century.  Relief wing carving. Whale bone bill.  Original paint with moderate wear; lightly hit by shot; whale bone bill is old, but probably not original. (1,250 - 1,750) 512.

Yellowlegs from Massachusetts, last quarter 19th century.  Shoe button eyes, carrying hole through tail.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; hairline crack in head, two tiny chips missing from tail.

Provenance: Grossman collection.

(800 - 1,200)

189


513

514

515

516

517

518

519

513. Plover, John Dilley, Quogue, Long Island, New York, last quarter 19th century.  Slightly oversized.  Original paint; numerous shot marks to body; bill is a professional replacement. (800 - 1,200)

517. Golden plover with tack eyes from Massachusetts, last quarter 19th century. Original paint with good patina and very slight wear; several tiny dents and shot marks. (600 - 900)

514. Two curlew from the Eastern Shore of Virginia, last quarter 19th century.  One has relief wing carving.   Original paint with minor wear; one has a small crack in the breast and replaced bill. (650 - 950)

518. Lesser yellowlegs from Marshfield, Massachusetts, last quarter 19th century.  Carrying hole through tail.  Original paint with good patina and minor wear; bill is an old replacement.

515. Dunlin in fall plumage, so called windbird, from Massachusetts, last quarter 19th century.  Carved shoulder and tail. Hollowed from underside.  Old working repaint. (800 - 1,000) 516. Running yellowlegs, Alfred Gardner, Hingham, Massachusetts. Original paint with good detail and minor wear; small chip missing from underside of tail; minor roughness to tip of bill. (350 - 450)

190

Provenance: Grossman collection.

(400 - 600)

519. Cork yellowlegs, Thomas Gelston, Quogue, New York, last quarter 19th century.    Original paint with moderate wear; small areas of old touch up; lightly hit by shot. (550 - 750)


519A

519A Detail

519A Detail

519A. Running red backed sandpiper, Obediah Verity, Seaford, New York, last quarter 19th century. Relief wing carving and carved eyes. Original paint with minor discoloration and wear, mostly on one side; small scratch in top of tail. (17,500 - 22,500)

Fall plumage on left and Spring plumage breading on right.

191


Harry Townson 1858 - 1926 Toronto, Ontario

Harry Townson

Harry and his brother John (1856 – 1935) were both serious duck hunters, but only Harry carved the decoys. Both brothers knew and hunted with George and James Warin, as well as John R. Wells. Harry’s decoys show the influence of both Warin’s and Wells’s carving style. Some of Harry’s decoys are branded “H.T.”

519C Detail

192

519C Detail


519C. Very rare greenwing teal hen, Harry Townson, Toronto, Ontario, last quarter 19th century. Fine scratch feather painting on head and breast. Loop scratch feather painting on back with subtle feather paint on lower sides. Hairline crack at neck seam; near mint original paint; decoy was rigged but barely used.

Provenance: From the Townson family.

Literature: “Traditions in Wood,� Patricia Fleming, p. 126.

(8,000 - 12,000)

519C Detail

519C

193


519D

519E

519F

519G

519H

519I

519D. Hollow carved blackduck, Harry Townson, Toronto, Ontario, his later “lowhead” style, circa 1910. Original paint with minor wear; lightly hit by shot; hairline crack partway through bill.

519G. Very rare bufflehead hen, Harry Townson, Toronto, Ontario, last quarter 19th century. Hollow carved with raised neck seat. Old repaint by Townson; bill has been blunted somewhat.

Provenance: From the Townson family.

(1,500 - 2,000)

Provenance: From the Townson family.

(500 - 800)

519E. Hollow carved blackduck, Harry Townson, Toronto, Ontario, last quarter 19th century. Loop scratch feather painting. Original paint; moderate wear on body; head and neck has old repaint by Townson; lightly hit by shot.

519H. Hollow carved blackduck, Harry Townson, Toronto, Ontario last quarter 19th century. Raised neck seat and glass eyes. Old in use repaint by Townson; lightly hit by shot; small tail chip repair.

Provenance: From the Townson family.

Literature: “Traditions in Wood,” Patsy Fleming, p. 127. (1,500 - 2,000)

519F. Hollow carved blackduck, Harry Townson, Toronto, Ontario, his later “lowhead” style, circa 1910. Original paint with minor wear; mostly on one side; structurally good. 194

Provenance: From the Townson family.

(1,500 - 2,000)

Provenance: From the Townson family.

(600 - 900)

519I. Mallard drake, Harry Townson, Toronto, Ontario, his later “lowhead” style, circa 1910. Signed “HY Townson 75 George St.” on underside. Original paint with moderate flaking and wear; lightly hit by shot.

Provenance: From the Townson family.

(650 - 950)


John R. Wells

1861 - 1953 Toronto, Ontario

519J

519K 519K Detail

519J Detail 519J. Hollow carved canvasback drake, John R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario, circa 1900. Branded “GEO.H Hendrie,” for George Hendrie St Clair Flats Shooting Company member 1899-1943. Fine original paint that has mellowed to a good patina; several shot marks.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Barney Crandall.

Literature: “Decoying: St. Clair to the St. Laurence,” Barney Crandall, p. 201. “Traditions in Wood,” Patricia Fleming, pp. 128-129. (5,000 - 8,000)

519K. Rare canvasback hen, John R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario, circa 1900. Hollow carved with glass eyes. Branded “HNT” and “Meredith” for Harry N. Torrey, St Clair Flats Shooting Company member 1935-1946 and Howard g Meredith St Clair Flats Shooting Company member 18941935. Original paint with minor flaking and wear, mostly on one side of head; several tiny dents.

Literature: “Traditions in Wood,” Patricia Fleming, p. 128. (5,500 - 8,500) 195


519L

519L. Very rare ruddy turnstone from Toronto Harbor, Ontario, attributed to Harry Townson, last quarter 19th century. Wire legs with thighs. Original paint with minor to moderate wear; bill has been slightly blunted; lightly hit by shot; wire legs have been bent with ends inserted into lower breasts so decoy will stand on a shelf.

Provenance: From the Townson family. (4,000 - 6,000)

519M. Redhead drake, Tom Chambers, Toronto, Ontario. Hollow with “J.T.N.” brand in underside for John T. Nichols, St. Clair Flats Shooting Company member from 1901-1935. Original paint areas on back and sides of body have been covered by an old wash of black paint to fill in worn areas; several hairline cracks; small crack in one eye. (800 - 1,200)

519M

519N. Two early roothead cane-style Canada goose decoys, Ostrea Lake, Nova Scotia, last quarter 19th century. Both have carrying holes drilled to the bottom of the stakes. This style of decoys was typically made by Micmac or Maliseet indians. They were pushed into the mud with a mound of seaweed piled behind them to simlulate the body. Defects and small cracks in wood; original paint with moderate wear.

Literature: “Decoys of Maritime Canada,” Dale and Gary Guyette, p. 85. (400 - 600)

519N 196


520

521

520. Exceptional canvasback hen, Orel Leboeuf, Saint Anicet, Quebec.  Finely detailed wing feather carving and fluted tail. Subtle combing on back. Stamped “OL” twice in underside.  Near mint original paint; structurally excellent.

Provenance: Knight collection. Purchased at the April 1989 Julia and Guyette decoy auction.

521. Merganser drake, Percy Shupe, Chester Basin, Nova Scotia.    Old repaint crack in back; leather crest is a replacement; small dents.

Literature: “Decoys of Maritime Canada,” Dale and Gary Guyette, p. 81. (3,500 - 4,500)

Literature: “Decoys a North American Survey,” Gene and Linda Kangas, p. 129. (4,000 - 6,000)

197


522

523

524

525

526

527

528

522. Blue wing teal hen, Jess Baker, Trenton, Ontario. Slightly turned head. Original paint with good detail; minor wear mostly on one lower side; small crack at neck base.

Provenance: From the Townson family.

523.

Hollow carved black duck, J.R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario. “A BOYCE” or “DOYCE” is painted on underside. Worn paint on head appears to be original; body and bill are an old working second coat; several shot marks in body and head. (900 - 1,200)

524.

(300 - 500)

Hollow mallard hen, Tom Chambers, Toronto, Ontario. “G.L.S.” painted on the underside. Old overpaint has been taken off revealing some original paint with minor wear and some old in use repaint; several small dents. (800 - 1,200)

525. Rare hollow mallard hen, Tom Chambers, Toronto, Ontario. Branded “GEO. M. Hendrie” twice on under198

side. Worn paint some of which appears to be original, as well as old working repaint; one eye missing; several small shot marks and scratches; and hairline cracks in neck. (800 - 1,200) 526. Canada goose from Northeastern New Brunswick, 1st quarter 20th century.    Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; age split in underside; small cracks. (300 - 400) 527. Rigmate pair of eiders from Musquodoboit Harbor, Nova Scotia.  Ridged tails. Heads are attached with squared off dowels.  Appealing old in use repaint; small cracks and dents. (500 - 750) 528. Very early old squaw drake or Labrador duck from Nova Scotia.  Weights are attached with square nails, as was the tie strap.  Original paint with moderate wear; crack in back and underside; lightly hit by shot; bill has been slightly blunted. (500 - 800)


529

530

531

532

533

534

529. Wood duck drake from St. Anicet, Quebec.  Detailed feather carving on back and crest.  Original paint with good patina and very slight wear; crack in underside.

Provenance: Knight collection.

(2,000 - 3,000)

530. Black duck with turned head, Bill Cooper, Verdun, Quebec.  Scratch feather painting and elaborate feather carving detail.  Original paint with minor wear; several worn areas to wood on edges of carved feathers; old repaint on underside extends about half way on lower sides and under tail. (1,200 - 1,600) 531. Preening black duck, Carmen Johnson, Murray Corner, New Brunswick, circa 1930s.  Made with the char and scrap surface typical for carvings in that area.  Crack in neck, otherwise original and good.

Literature: “Decoys of Maritime Canada,” Dale and Gary Gueytte, p. 174, exact decoy. (900 - 1,200)

532. Full size flying Canada goose with open bill, Stacey Bryanton, Kensington, Prince Edward Island.    Original paint with minor wear; small crack in back; tiny cracks in underside.

Literature: “Decoys of Maritime Canada,” Dale and Gary Guyette, p. 127. (1,000 - 1,400)

533.

Pair of Canada geese field decoys, Roy Mill, Kensington, Prince Edward Island.    Original paint with minor wear; age split in back of feeder; a few small dents and shot marks.

Literature: “Decoys of Maritime Canada,” Dale and Gary Guyette, p. 533. (600 - 900)

534. Hollow carved black duck, Clyde Edwards, Eastern Passage, Nova Scotia, circa 1930.    Original paint with minor wear; moderate wear on head; small rough area on bottom edge.

Literature: “Decoys of Maritime Canada,” Dale and Gary Guyette, p. 89. (600 - 900)

199


535

538

541

537

536

540

539

542

535. Stylish bluebill hen from Trois Riviere, Quebec, circa 1900.  “FD” carved in underside. Highly detailed feather carving on body and head.  Original paint with subtle detail and minor wear; crack through neck; most of the bill is a professional replacement.

Provenance: Knight collection.

(500 - 800)

536. Canvasback drake, Orel Leboeuf, St. Anicet, Quebec.  Stamped “OL” in underside.  Working repaint worn to the original in a few spots; small dents. Provenance: Knight collection.

(500 - 800)

537. Hollow carved Canada goose similar to work of John Leslie, Kensington, Prince Edward Island, circa 1900.    Old in use repaint; crack in one side of breast.

Literature: “Decoys of Maritime Canada,” Dale and Gary Guyette. (300 - 400)

538. Greenwing teal hen, Quebec, 2nd quarter 20th century.  Incised wing and tail carving. Small “H” carved under the tail.  Original paint with very minor wear; small crack partway through neck base. (300 - 500) 539. Greenwing teal hen, Pierre Emile LaCombe, Trois Riviere, Quebec, 2nd quarter 20th century.  Relief wing carving, fluted tail and tack eyes.  Original paint; very 200

543

slight wear; chip missing from one side of bill. (350 - 450) 540. Bluewing teal hen similar to work of Bill Cooper, Verdun, Quebec.    Original paint with minor to moderate wear; speculums have been repainted; small cracks. (400 - 600) 541. Canvasback drake, John R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario.  Solid body style. Branded “CEC” twice in underside.  Original paint with minor wear on some of the decoy; white appears to have second coat; thin cracks in breast.

Provenance: From the hunting rig of Dr. Paul Ferris.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 47. (450 - 650) 542. Canvasback hen, Orel Leboeuf, St. Anicet, Quebec.    A mixture of original paint with some strengthened paint; lightly hit by shot; professional bill repair.

Provenance: Knight collection.

543.

Eider drake attributed to Arthur Silver, eastern shore Nova Scotia, 1st quarter 20th century. Appealing old in use repaint on most of the decoy; hairline cracks in back. (450 - 650)

(500 - 800)


New England

544 544. Four vintage eider decoy heads from Monhegan Island, Maine.  Two were never painted and two were painted. One is mounted on a wooden plaque.  Original and good. (1,250 - 1,750)

545. Oversized scoter, Wendall Gilley, Southwest Harbor, Maine. Head is made with square pin attaching it to the body and is removeable so it can be set in several different poses. Original paint with minor wear; separations at body seams; small crack in back; on one side body seam was covered with some sort of sealant a long time ago.

Literature: “Decoys of the Atlantic Flyway,” George Ross Starr, p. 141, exact decoy pictured. (2,000 - 3,000)

545

547

546

546. Old squaw hen from Massachusetts, last quarter 19th century.  Carved eyes and slightly turned head. Good scratch feather paint detail.  Original paint with minor wear; bill has been broken off and reattached with small chip missing. (650 - 950)

547. Rare bluebill drake, Charles Haines, Milford, Connecticut.  Inlet head.  Original paint with moderate discoloration and wear; hairline crack in bill; two cracks in underside; two hairline cracks in tail.

Literature: “Connecticut Decoys,” Henry Chitwood. (650 - 950)

201


549

548

547A

551

550

553

553B

553A

547A. Oversize scoter, South Shore Massachusetts, 1st quarter 20th century. Hollow with bottom board and very wide (11”). Old in use repaint; cracks.

Provenance: Ellery Clark collection.

(500 - 800)

548. Scoter, William Alley, Beales, Maine, circa 1950.  Inlet head and incised wing carving.  Original paint with minor wear and good patina; a few small dents. (400 - 600) 549. Pair of canvasbacks, Chet Reneson, Lyme, Connecticut.  Stamped “Reneson” on undersides.  Original paint with very slight wear and minor discoloration. (500 - 700) 550.

Hollow carved goldeneye drake, Ben Holmes, Stratford, Connecticut, last quarter 19th century.    Old in use repaint; small dents and chips; old bill repair lightly hit by shot. (400 - 600)

551. Large merganser hen from Massachusetts.    Original paint with minor wear; age split in underside; small cra cks. (400 - 600) 202

552

552. Rare double silhouette scoter, Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts.    Original paint with minor wear; a few small dents and shot marks; roughness to one wooden crossbar. (400 - 600) 553. Teal from Hingham, Massachusetts, 1st quarter 20th century.    Original paint with minor wear; reglued crack in neck.

Provenance: Grossman collection. Bourne auction tag on underside, from 1986. (400 - 600)

553A. Brant, circa 1920s, Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts. Made with applied wooden bill. Old in use repaint with traces of original showing; several small cracks; small chip missing from edge of tail.

Provenance: Ellery Clark collection.

(800 - 1,200)

553B. Canvas over wooden frame scoter, Joseph Lincoln Accord, Massachusetts, circa 1920. Old in use repaint; several small patches in canvas; chips missing form underside of bill.

Provenance: Ellery Clark collection.

(500 - 800)


554

556

555

557

558

560

561

554. Brant with tack eyes, South Shore, Massachusetts, circa 1900.    Original paint with moderate wear; crack through neck; small cracks under tail; white paint on much of tail area appears to be an old second coat. (350 - 450) 555. Silhouette brant from Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 1st quarter 20th century.  Nail holes on underside indicate it was connected by a board to another silhouette.  Original paint with good patina and minor wear; small chip missing from underside of bill. (350 - 550) 556. Black duck, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine.   Slightly turned inlet head, carved wings and carved eyes.  Original paint with moderate wear on much of the decoy; some old touch up; cracks and dents; small rough area on one side of head; small defects in wood under tail. (400 - 600) 557. Large eider drake from Orr’s Island, Maine.  Approximately 21” long. Inlet head and two piece head construction with tack eyes and carved bill.  Appealing old in use repaint; age split in back; crack in underside. (350 - 450)

559

558. Goldeneye drake from the central Maine coast.  Inlet head, tack eyes, and large paddle tail.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; small cracks in underside. (350 - 550) 559. Breast preening wood duck drake, Roswell Bliss, Stratford, Connecticut.  Relief wing tip carving.  Excellent and original.

Provenance: Knight collection.

(350 - 550)

560. “Turtleback” style scoter, from the Eastern shore of Nova Scotia, 1st quarter 20th century.  Old in use repaint with moderate wear; numerous small cracks; chip missing from tail and front part of underside.   (200 - 300) 561. Brant from Massachusetts, 1st quarter 20th century. Old in use repaint; fairly large crack in back.

Provenance: Grossman collection.

562.

Large group of wooden, cardboard, and paper patterns by Shang Wheeler, Stratford, Connecticut.    Good to fair.

Provenance: Knight collection.

(300 - 500)

(350 - 550) 203


563. Oversize eider from the central Maine coast, 1st quarter 20th century. Original paint protected by an old coat of varnish; small cracks and dents. (800 - 1,200)

563

564

567

566

564. Very early goldeneye drake from Central Maine Coast, last quarter 19th century. Inlet head, serifed initials “A.E.W.” are carved in the underside. Old in use repaint; worn to the original in some spots; crack through neck; several tiny cracks and dents. (800 - 1,200) 565.

204

565

Merganser hen from Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts, last quarter 19th century. Initials “AJS” are carved into the underside. Original paint; moderate wear; several cracks and dents. (600 - 900)

566. Large eider drake from Stonington, Maine. Approximately 24” long with inlet head and carved bill with mussel in it. Body is hollowed out from the underside. Orignal paint with moderate flaking and wear; decoy is weathered and worn with numerous small cracks; dry rot at back of inlet head and in body at inlet head as well on one side; cracks through neck base; nails were added to that area at one time; two shot marks on bill. (400 - 600) 567. Oversize scoter drake from South Addison, Maine, 1st quarter 20th century. Inlet head. Old in use repaint; cracks and shot marks. (500 - 800)


Contemporary Carvings 568. Full size hollow carved Canada goose, Gordon Harde, Sidney, Maine. Made as a replica of the “slot neck” Canada goose sold in Guyette & Deeter April 2014 auction. Detailed bill carving and removeable dove-tailed head. Original paint with a few tiny rubs; structurally very good. (900 - 1,200)

568

569. Very rare loon with inlet head, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia. His earlier carving period signed, “MSM”. Open bill with mussel in it. Original paint with minor wear; decoy was made from an old piece of wood with roughness to underside and some area of the back; small cracks in neck base. (1,500 - 2,500)

569

570

571

570. Running curlew, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia. Relief wing carving; very good and original. (900 - 1,200)

572 572. Dowitcher, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia. Very good and original. (800 - 1,200)

571. Willet with iron bill, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia. His earlier carving period signed, “MSM”. Original paint that has been aged; made from an old piece of wood with some cracks in one side. (800 - 1,200) 205


573

574

575

576

577

578

573. Widgeon drake, Marty Hanson, Prior Lake, Minnesota.  Signed and dated 1988. Hanson ink stamp on underside.  Very good and original. (600 - 900) 574.

Two shorebirds, David Ward, Essex, Connecticut.  Both are stamped “DBW”. Both have detailed paint and feather carving.  Excellent and original. (650 - 950)

575. Three curlew, David Ward, Essex, Connecticut.  Two are stamped “DBW 79”. One is stamped “DBW 86”.  Original paint with very slight wear; thin chip missing from edge of one tail. (800 - 1,200)

206

576. Pair of shovelers, Oliver Lawson, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and dated 1981. Both have slightly turned heads and relief wing carving.  Very good and original. (1,200 - 1,500) 577. Hollow carved canvasback hen and drake carved in style of John R. Wells, Torrey Ward, Manitoba, Canada.  One is stamped “JRW Maker” and “JFB”. The other is stamped “JRW maker.”  Original and good. (650 - 950) 578.

Three shorebirds, David Ward, Essex, Connecticut.  All are stamped “DBW 82”.  Original and good. (650 - 950)


579

581

580

582

583

584

585

586

587

579. Large black duck, David Ward, Essex, Connecticut.  Stamped “DBW”. Cork body with wooden tail, head, and bottom board.  Very good and original. (500 - 800) 580. Pair of mergansers, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Both are signed. Branded and inscribed “For my friends Oliane and George Becker 1978.”  Drake has some sap bleeding through, mostly in the breast area; hen has significant sap bleeding through paint and lower half of decoy; crack in underside, and small dent in one side; paint shrinkage where sap is coming through. (600 - 900) 581. Pair of redheads, Grayson Chesser, Jenkins Bridge, Virginia.  Both have a large “C” carved in the underside. Carved in the Cobb Island tradition with raised “V” wing tip carving.  A few small dents; slight separation at hen’s neck seam. (450 - 650) 582. Greater yellowlegs, William Gibian, Onancock, Virginia.  Relief wing carving and slightly turned head.  Original paint with a few tiny scrapes. (350 - 450) 583. Swimming black duck with cocked head, Cameron McIntyre, New Church, Virginia.  Raised “V” wing tip

carving. “CTM” carved in underside.

(600 - 900)

584. Speckled eider drake, Bill Conroy, Orland, Maine.  Signed. Slightly turned head with detailed carving.  Near mint original paint; thin crack in back. (350 - 550) 585. Black duck, David Ward, Essex, Connecticut.  Branded “DBW.” Cork body with turned cedar head as well as cedar bottom board and inserted cedar tail.  Very good and original. (350 - 450) 586. Preening curlew, David Ward, Essex, Connecticut.  Stamped “DSW, 78”.  Original paint with minor wear; structurally good. (350 - 450) 587. Hollow carved merganser drake, Richard Belote, Lewes, Delaware.  Signed and branded “REB”. Raised, carved wing tips and highly detailed, carved crest.  Very good and original. (250 - 350)

End of Session Two 207


Index of Carvers Adams, Frank................................................................................. 362 Alexander, Thomas.......................................................................... 24 Allen, Fred..................................................................................... 448 Alley, William................................................................................ 548 Anger, Ken............................................................................... 29, 312 Bailey, Clarence............................................................................. 146 Baker, John..................................................................................... 151 Barnes, Sam................................................................................... 204 Belote, Richard.............................................................................. 577 Bianco, Tony.......................................................................... 155, 428 Bibber, Oscar................................................................................... 26 Birch, Lou...................................................................................... 499 Birdsall, Jessie................................................................................ 388 Blackstone, Jess..................................................................77-79, 269 Blevins, George.............................................................................. 248 Bliss, Roswell................................................................................ 559 Bloom, Reg.................................................................................... 311 Boozer, T........................................................................................ 332 Bowman, William.......................................................................... 446 Boyd, George......................................................85-87, 127, 128, 510 Brayton, Jack.................................................................................. 136 Bruffee, Byron............................................................................... 115 Bryanton, Stacey............................................................................ 532 Burr, Elijah..................................................................................... 116 Burr, Russ, 83, 276........................................................................... 74 Chadwick, Keyes................................................... 138, 381, 419, 421 Chambers, Tom........................................................................ 43, 316 Chesser, Grayson................................................................... 364, 571 Chrysler, William........................................................................... 304 Conklin, Hurley...................................................................... 425, 427 Conklin, Roy.................................................................................. 357 Conroy, Bill.................................................................................... 574 Coombs, Frank............................................................................... 255 Cooper, Bill.................................................................................... 530 Couvillion, Skip......................................................................481-483 Crowell, Elmer............................ 60-69, 188-120, 271-274, 326, 415, 416, 422, 474, 476 Currier, Jim.................................................................................... 215 Daisey, Cigar.......................................................................11-21, 570 Davern, Harve................................................................................ 309 Dettman, AJ.................................................................................... 266 Dettman, Warren............................................................................ 290 Dilley, John............................................................................ 443, 513 Dodge Decoy Factory............................................................ 220, 235 Downeast Decoy Factory............................................................... 487 Dudley, Lynwood........................................................................... 501 Eaton, Morris................................................................................. 130 Edwards, Clyde.............................................................................. 534 Elliston, Robert.............................................................................. 461 English, Dan................................................................................... 147 English, John.................................................................. 152, 154, 156 Ethington, William......................................................................... 331 Evans Decoy Factory..................................................................... 488 Fernland, Iver............................................................................. 30, 38 Finney, Frank................................................................................. 323 Frady, Mike.................................................................................... 484 Garred, Otto................................................................................... 459 Gelston, Thomas............................................................ 444, 511, 519 Gibian, William.............................................................................. 572 Gilley, Wendell................................................................................. 76 Graham, John................................................................................. 216

Graves, Bert................................................................... 447, 449, 452 Gray, Edson.................................................................................... 212 Haines, Charles.............................................................................. 547 Hanson, Marty........................................................................ 4, 5, 563 Harris, Ken............................................................. 252, 254, 270, 328 Harris Family................................................................................. 509 Hart, Charles.................................................................. 371, 372, 475 Hart, William.............................................................. 36, 45, 301, 305 Hays Decoy Factory....................................................................... 486 Hercules Powder............................................................................ 181 Higgins, Del................................................................................... 368 Hinkley, Leroy............................................................................... 112 Holly, James................................................................................... 210 Holly, John..................................................................................... 217 Holmes, Ben................................................................................... 550 Holmes, Lothrop............................................................................ 394 Horner, Rowley...................................................................... 423, 431 Horthy, Nandor.............................................................................. 494 Howes, Jerome........................................................................257-259 Hudson, Ira..................................................... 361, 366, 497, 500, 502 Hudson, Ira C................................................................................. 360 Huff, George.................................................................................. 387 Irving, Laurence............................................................................. 109 Jester, Doug.................................................................................... 498 Johnson, Carmen............................................................................ 531 Joiner, Charlie................................................................................ 355 Kelly, Ed “One Arm”..................................................................... 285 Kerr, Robert........................................................................... 351, 352 Ketchem, Al................................................................................... 508 King, A.J..................................................................................69A-73 King, Joe........................................................................................ 278 LaCombe, Pierre Amiel................................................................. 539 Lapham, James........................................................................... 80, 82 Lawson, Oliver....................................................... 260, 363, 467, 566 Leboeuf, Orel................................................................. 520, 536, 542 Leeds, Daniel Lake................................................................ 441, 442 Lefebvre, Clovis............................................................................. 250 Lincoln, Joseph........ 84, 121, 135, 137, 141, 418, 473, 477, 480, 552 Lipke, Paul............................................................................. 280, 281 Lippencott, Giddeon...................................................................... 424 Luedtke, John................................................................................. 178 Madera, Clark................................................................................ 153 Malloch Studion............................................................................. 113 Mason Decoy Factory................ 88-108, 218-238, 322, 333, 397-410 McGaw, Robert.............................................................................. 263 McIntosh, Leo............................................................................ 6, 358 McIntyre, Cameron................................................................ 1, 8, 573 McNair, Mark..........................................................................182-190 Meldrum, Tobin............................................................................. 284 Menges, Einer................................................................................ 143 Mill, Roy........................................................................................ 533 Mitchell, Albert.............................................................................. 111 Nelow, Gus..................................................................................... 289 Nichol, Addie................................................................................. 303 Nichol, D.K................................................................................ 27, 44 Nichol, D.W..................................................................... 31, 296, 300 Nickerson Family, ......................................................................... 145 Parker, Ellis.................................................................................... 430 Patterson, Chauncey....................................................................... 244 Perdew, Charles...... 160, 161, 286, 450, 451, 453, 455, 457, 458, 460 Perdew, Hadden..................................................................... 454, 456


Phillips, Ed..................................................................................... 211 Poyton, George.............................................................................. 315 Pratt Manufacturing.................................................................... 328B Pringle, Peter.................................................................................... 42 Prudo, Nick.................................................................................... 356 Quinn, William............................................................ 146A, 150, 385 Rathell, Lou.................................................................................... 378 Reed, Corbin...........................................................................462-466 Reneson, Chet................................................................................ 549 Rider, Jack.............................................................................. 267, 268 Rumble, William............................................................................ 307 Sabatini, R...................................................................................... 279 Savory, Walter................................................................................ 117 Schmidt, Ben....................................................... 47-59, 287, 292-294 Schmiedlin, Jim............................................................................8-10 Schroeder, Tom........................................................................... 293A Shourds, Harry V.....................382-384, 386, 390, 391, 435, 436, 439 Shupe, Percy.................................................................................. 521 Sirois, Philippe............................................................................... 373 Smith, Chris........................................................................... 282, 283 Southard, William.......................................................................... 433 Sterling, Lloyd............................................................................... 208 Stevens Brothers............................................................................ 243

Strator and Sohier....................................................................... 224A Strunk, George....................................................2, 353, 354, 468-472 Sutton, Shawn.................................................................................... 3 Thomas, Charles............................................................................ 506 Tolson, Edgar................................................................................. 177 Truex, Rhodes................................................................................ 429 Turtle Manufacturing..................................................................... 172 Tyler, Lloyd............................................................................ 213, 214 Ward, Torrey.................................................................................. 567 Ward Brothers........... 192-203, 205-207, 209, 261, 262, 338344, 367 Ward, David (ONT)......................................................................... 37 Ward, David, (CT)................................. 564, 565, 568, 569, 575, 576 Warin, George.................................................................... 28, 34, 299 Wells, John R........................................................... 33, 308, 314, 541 Wheeler, Chauncey........................................ 239, 240, 245, 325, 359 Wheeler, Shang.......................................................180, 374-376, 562 Whittington, Hector....................................................................... 324 Wildfowler Decoy Factory.......................................................... 328A Wilson, Gus...................................22, 23, 25, 132, 133, 345-350, 556 Wilson, Thomas............................................................................. 396


Collection Planning Program

Enjoy Collecting Now and Plan Ahead With a forty year history, you can rely on the Guyette & Deeter decoy auction house as the most trusted decoy auction firm to handle your estate planning and collection management needs. Whether it’s for tax purposes, estate planning, gifting, charitable giving or insurance purposes, let us manage and periodically update a comprehensive written appraisal of your collection. Gary and Jon are available to work with banks, attorneys, trust and estate officers, probate court, private clients and family members who may be responsible for the dispersal of estates and collections. Let professionals document your collection with accurate values and descriptions. We will work closely with you to ensure that your wishes are established at agreed upon terms and conditions now, to make it easier to administer your estate later.

Please contact Gary or Jon to discuss our Collection Planning Program today.

With several options, we make it easy for you to reach us: Gary Guyette PO Box 1170 • St. Michaels MD 21663 (410) 745-0485 • (410) 745-0487 fax decoys@guyetteanddeeter.com Jon Deeter 7980 Darbys Run • Chagrin Falls OH 44023 (440) 610-1768 • (440) 543-1466 fax jdeeter@guyetteanddeeter.com For more information, visit our website: www.guyetteanddeeter.com


The Sheraton Portsmouth Harborside Hotel

Situated in the heart of the downtown historic waterfront district, our neighborhood includes historic homes and sites, boutiques, galleries, fine dining, and live entertainment. Harbor cruises depart from the dock directly across from the hotel. Located just one hour north of Boston, MA and south of Portland, ME, our hotel offers 181 beautifully appointed guestrooms.

250 Market St., Portsmouth, NH 03801 603-431-2300 www.sheratonportsmouth.com


Celebrations 150 Banquet Hall

740 E. Rte. 6, Utica, IL (Right off of Interstate 80 near Route 39)

Duck Decoys, Game Calls, Shell Boxes, Lures, other hunting and fishing collectibles, and appraisals. Dealer Tables $40 for one table, $35 for each additional table. This is the 6th Annual show, for more information contact: Dave or Jeannette Kneebone Phone- (815) 663-1568 Email: muddywaterdecoys@yahoo.com

Watch for updates at muddywaterdecoys.com

Ward_GuyetteAd_2014_Layout 1 1/3/14 12:15 PM Page 1

Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art

Glimpse the beauty of wildfowl from around the world

Gallery Hours: Monday-Saturday 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday: Noon-5 p.m. Members enjoy free admission 909 S. Schumaker Drive, Salisbury, MD 21804 410-742-4988

WARDMUSEUM.ORG

Ira Hudson Duck Family

The Museum features the world’s largest and finest public collection of decorative and antique decoys Join as a member, make a donation or plan a legacy gift today! Contact Executive Director Lora Bottinelli at 410-742-4988, Ext. 111


2014 Clayton Decoy/Wildlife Art & Sporting Collectibles Show July 18th & 19th (Friday and Saturday) TIDCA Display: Goldeneyes of the Thousand Island

Goldeneyes by Sam Denny, Clayton, NY

TIDCA Vintage Decoy Contest - Friday, July 18th: Song bird carving: any area, any maker, any vintage.

Canadian black duck: Lake Ontario or St. Lawrence River.

Ken Harris puddle duck: 315-686-5794 | www.timuseum.org 312 James Street | Clayton, New York

Decoy and Antique Auction - Friday, July 18th: ( www.chappysplace.com or www.auctionzip.com )


N O R T H

A M E R I C A N

Vintage Decoy & Sporting Collectibles Show

THANK YOU for making this year’s show a success!

50th

Anniversary

2015

Make plans now for our 50th Anniversary next year. Planned events • • • •

Vintage Ohio decoy display State-specific spearing fish decoy display Marty Hanson carving exhibit Special 50th Anniversary Show surprises

Make your reservations now

Discover • Preserve • Celebrate

Pheasant Run Resort, St Charles, IL April 21–25, 2015, 800-474-3272 For more information go to midwestdecoy.org or call Jeff Seregny at 586-530-6586


A Dinner With Joe Lincoln

Please join us for a evening celebrating the life and work of Joe Lincoln. Our chapter is fortunate to have this legendary figure as our inspiration and will have on display several Lincoln decoys and other memorabilia. This is Minot's Ledge signature dinner/auction event held on SEPTEMBER 19, 2014 at the Nantasket Beach Hotel in Hull, MA. For information, please contact: Tony Jones (781) 545-9234 or www.mlcdu.org/lincoln

MINOT’S LEDGE CHAPTER DUCKS UNLIMITED World Leader in Wetlands Conservation

Courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones photograph.


Find us on Facebook facebook.com/mymaritimemuseum


wild abu nda n ce

wild abundance publishing chronicles, celebrates and preserves the unique culture and tradition of American sportsmen and their intense devotion to land and wildlife. Two of our collectable series now available!

first shooting l ight a photogr a phic jou r na l r ev e a l s the l egac y a n d l u r e o f h u n t i n g c l u b s i n t h e m i s s i s s i p p i f ly way

“...close your eyes and take a trip down memory lane to the greatest days of your life spent like the ones mentioned in the following pages.”

$70

WILD ABUNDANCE ritual, revelry & recipes of the south ’s finest hunting clubs

$45

“This book is a real gift to anyone who loves the South and its traditions, and above all good food.” JULIA REED

PAUL TUDOR JONES II

First Shooting Light and Wild Abundance, volumes edited by Susan Schadt, are perfect for the hunter, outdoorsman, cook or Southern enthusiast. To find a local retailer or online outlet, visit wildabundancepublishing.com. A division of ArtsMemphis, Wild Abundance Publishing produces and sells books that celebrate the best of the sporting South, the proceeds from which benefit the arts, conservation and environmental education.


JDJ


JDJ


Order Now!

by James R. Doherty • Featuring New Jersey’s finest coastal decoys in original paint • 216 pages with 426 color photographs • Accurate decoy maker identification • 1000 numbered First Edition copies

To Order: Send a check payable to Jim Doherty in the amount of $66.00 for each book ordered. Mail to: Weber Display & Packaging Attn: Jim Doherty 3500 Richmond Street Philadelphia PA 19134


CONDITIONS OF SALE ‑- PLEASE READ 1.

GUARANTEE ‑ We have made a consistent effort in correctly cataloging and describing all items to be sold. The decoy catalog descriptions are guaranteed for authenticity and condition. All other items sold “AS IS” Should the need arise, the auctioneer reserves the right to make verbal corrections and provide additional information from the block, at the time of the sale. Absentee bids will not be executed on items that are found to be other than described in the catalog. Since opinions can differ, particularly in the matter of condition, the auctioneer will be sole judge in the matter of refunds. 2. DURATION OF GUARANTEE ‑ Request for refund for items purchased IN PERSON at the auction must be made within 3 days of the sale. If you are an absentee or phone bidder it is your responsibility to examine the lot immediately upon receipt. On items purchased in absentee, the guarantee will end 3 days from the time of delivery. Therefore, all guarantees on items purchased will become null and void 7 calendar days from the date of shipment. IT IS VERY IMPORTANT TO NOTE THAT IF YOU PAY LATE, YOU WILL NOT BE ELIGIBLE FOR THE GUARANTEE. Payment must be postmarked no later than 30 days after the auction. 3. PROTESTED BIDS‑ In case of a disputed bid, the auctioneer is the sole determinant as to whom the successful bidder is, and at his discretion, may reoffer and resell the article in dispute. If a dispute arises after the sale, the auctioneer as sales records shall be conclusive as to whom the purchaser was, and the purchase price. 4. BIDDING- Bidding usually starts below the low estimate and advances in increments of approximately 10% of the opening bid subject to the auctioneer’s discretion. The auctioneer reserves the right, at his sole discretion, to refuse any bids that he deems unreasonable. The minimum bid increment guideline is as follows: $500 to $1000 - $25 $10,000 to $20,000 - $500 $100,000 and above - $2000 $1000 to $10,000 - $100 $20,000 to $100,000 - $1000 5. ABSENTEE BIDS‑ Phone or mail bids, at the discretion of the Auctioneer, will be accepted with a 20% deposit. In such case the bookkeeper will execute such bids competitively. Absentee bids are executed by the bookkeeper on behalf of the bidder in accordance with the bid increment policy shown above. Please review the rules governing both absentee and phone bids in the back of the catalog. 6. TERMS‑ All items are to be paid for in U.S. funds at the day of the auction. No items will be released until they are paid for. Those who have not established an account with us and wish to pay by check, must do so prior to the beginning of the auction, by presenting a current letter of reference from their bank, or by providing references, that are suitable to the Auctioneer. The Auctioneer reserves the right to hold merchandise purchased by personal check, until the check has cleared the bank. Phone and absentee bidders ‑ You will be notified one week after the auction of your bids/results. PAYMENT IS DUE UPON RECEIPT. A late charge will be accessed on all balances not paid, at the rate of 12% A.P.R. commencing 30 days after the auction. If any accounts become more than 60 days overdue, the consignor will be given the name of the buyer who is responsible for holding up their funds. Guyette & Deeter will not carry insurance on items that are not paid for within 30 days of the auction. Also, the auctioneer may retain and/or recover the deposit specified as liquidated damages. In addition, the property can be resold at public or private sale without further notice. Any deficiency resulting from such resale shall be paid to the auctioneer by the defaulting buyer, together with all charges, fees, and expenses incurred by such resale, or the enforcement of the obligation hereunder. Buyer agrees to pay all charges and expenses incurred by reason of any breach of the Terms and Conditions of sale, including without limitation, reasonable attorney fees. 7. RESERVES ‑ A very small percentage of the decoys in this auction carry reserves. A reserve is a confidential minimum price established between the auctioneer and the consignor. The reserve will not exceed the low estimate printed in the catalog, and is usually much less. Reserves are executed by the bookkeeper on behalf of the consignor. 8. PAYMENT FOR PURCHASES MAY BE MADE WITH VISA , MASTERCARD, CASH OR CHECK. 9. BUYERS PREMIUM- The buyer’s premium, assessed on each selling lot, is 15% of the hammer price up to and including $1,000,000, plus 10% on any amount in excess of $1,000,000. For payments made using Visa or MasterCard, the buyer’s premium is 18% up to and including $1,000,000, plus 13% on any amount in excess of $1,000,000. 10. TAX ‑ THERE IS NO SALES TAX IN NEW HAMPSHIRE. 11. ACCEPTANCE OF CONDITIONS ‑ Bidding on any articles in this catalog indicates your acceptance of all the above items. 12. BIDDING AGENT RESPONSIBILITY ‑ If you are registering for someone or if you execute a bid for someone else under your number, you are responsible for the settlement of that account. You are also responsible for examining the decoy(s) for your client regarding the guarantee. 13. WITHDRAWAL ‑ We reserve the right to withdraw any property before the sale and shall have no liability whatsoever for such withdrawal. 14. TITLE ‑ Title passes upon the fall of the auctioneer’s hammer. It will then be the responsibility of the buyer to make full payment prior to removing the goods from the premises. Removal is at both the buyer’s risk and expense, and must be made at the conclusion of the sale, unless other arrangements are made with the Guyette & Schmidt staff. Any lots we might make arrangements for moving or storing are solely at the risk of the owner, and any damage or loss occurring after the fall of the hammer becomes that of the buyer. 15. LEGAL DISPUTE ‑ Any legal disputes arising from this auction shall be settled in the court system of the State of Maine. UNIFORM COMMERCIAL CODE - The Maine Uniform Commercial Code, Title II, Section 2328 applies to this auction. THE OFFICE WILL NOT BE OPEN UNTIL WEDNESDAY AFTER THE AUCTION.


ABSENTEE AND PHONE BIDS 1. Absentee bids are a service provided to our customers free of charge. Every effort is made to execute all absentee bids, however, in the event of an error of omission, or failure to properly execute absentee bids, the Auctioneer shall not be held liable. 2. All absentee bids must be accompanied by a 20% deposit, which will be refunded immediately after the auction if your bid is unsuccessful. If your bid is successful, the deposit will be applied to the purchase price and the balance due upon presentation of your bill. All absentee bidders are notified by mail, whether succesful or unsuccesful. 3. Visa and Mastercard numbers can be given in place of a check deposit, if your bid is submitted by phone. Your card number will not be used to make payments for purchases, it is only used as collateral. Your card number will only be used to make payment for purchases if you default on payment. 4. To execute an absentee bid, fill out the enclosed form, listing catalog number, description and your top bid price (not including the 15% buyer’s premium). Send this together with your deposit as soon as possible. If your bids are sent seven days or less prior to the auction, you should call our office three days prior to the auction, to confirm that we have received your bids. If they have not been received at that point in time, we will take your bid over the phone. We cannot guarantee that bids received after the auction has started will be executed. 5. If two or more bids are received on the same item from different people, the bidding will open at the next logical raise above the second highest bid. If two absentee bids are received with the exact same amount, the first one received will take precedence. 6. All bids must be in even dollar amounts. Bids in fractions of dollars will be considered the next lower even dollar amount. 7. Bid increments: The bid increment policy, which also applies to both absentee and phone bidders is listed under “CONDITIONS OF SALE” (item #4), in the front of the catalog. 8. Open bids, bids with no set top amount, or orders to just simply buy the lot, cannot be accepted. You must have a definite top limit before we can execute your bid. Alternatives to this are as follows: a. To bid over the telephone. This can be done by simply sending a 20% deposit for what you wish to bid on the object. This will bind whatever bid amount you wish to bid over the telephone. (NOTE: There are only 7 phone lines into the auction room and phone bids will be handled on a first come, first served basis.) b. Some bidders concerned that a lot might just go for one bid above their top limit, leave a top bid plus one bid. This works as follows: the top bid submitted might be $1000, but not wishing to lose the lot for simply $25 more, the party might bid $1000 + 1 bid if they definitely don’t want to go over a certain price, they would indicate $1000 +1 ($1,025) (NOTE: One possible problem that occasionally arises with absentee bids is when someone in the audience bids exactly the amount, which you specify is your limit. In such a case, we would not go one extra bid unless your bid sheet indicates plus one bid.). 9. If you are a successful bidder, a bill will be sent one week after the auction. Purchasers should indicate their desired method of shipment, if such is necessary. There is a charge for shipping, labor, materials, and insurance. Shipping is done on a first come, first served basis, and can take up to 4 weeks. Please note that a certified check, Visa, Mastercard, or any other form of guaranteed funds will expedite shipping. 10. All purchases are shipped COD to the address on your invoice, or as otherwise instructed, approximately 10 days after payment has cleared. In place of COD, you can call the office with your credit card number to pay shipping & handling charges, or to make other arrangements. According to UPS regulations, we must now crate all paintings. In addition, for expensive oil paintings and delicate carvings, we need a written statement from the purchaser, assuming the responsibility of pursuing any claims, in the event of damage incurred during shipping. Valuable lots need to be sent 2nd day air UPS due to values. Under no circumstances will we be liable for damage to glass or frames, or fragile decoratives, regardless of cause. 11. TERMS — Phone and absentee bidders — You will be notified one week after the auction of your results. Payment is due upon receipt. Interest will be charged on all balances not paid within 30 days after the bill is sent at the rate of 12% APR. If any accounts become more than 60 days overdue, the consignor will be given the name of the buyer who is responsible for holding up their funds. If an account is 75 days overdue, the items may be returned to the consignor and overdue buyer will pay the buyers premium and commission from the sale, if they wish to participate in future Guyette, Schmidt & Deeter auctions. 12. Bidding on any article(s) indicates your acceptance of these terms above. If you have any questions concerning absentee bids, please call us.


OFFICE:

ABSENTEE AND PHONE BID FORM

PO Box 1170 St. Michaels, MD 21663 410-745-0485 Fax 410-745-0487 decoys@guyetteandschmidt.com

OFFICE USE ONLY TIME DATE OF BID AUCTION DATE MANAGER ABSENTEE OR PHONE BID

NAME ADDRESS CITY

STATE

ZIP

TELEPHONE DEPOSIT $

(Check Amount or Visa or MasterCard # & Exp.)

IIdesire following items in the sale.sale. The The bids bids are toare be to executed by Guyette & Deeter, up to but desiretotobid bidononthe the following items in the executed by Guyette & Schmidt, Inc.,not upexceeding to but notthe amount(s) on the below bids.on Allthe bidsbelow will be executed and will accepted subject to theaccepted Terms ofsubject Sale andtoAbsentee Bids exceedingspecified the amount(s) specified bids. All bids be executed and the Terms of Procedure outlined inBids the catalog. (Please be sure you understand before using thisour Absentee and Phone Sale and Absentee Procedure outlined in that the catalog. (Pleaseour be procedures sure that you understand procedures before Bid Form.) will not open Bid untilForm.) Wednesday using this Office Absentee andbe Phone Officeafter willthe notauction. be open until Wednesday after the auction.

Signature A PREMIUM OF 15% WILL BE APPLIED TO ALL ITEMS SOLD, TO BE PAID BY THE BUYER OFFICE USE

IN CATALOG # ORDER

DESCRIPTION

A SECOND PAGE IS PROVIDED ON BACK SHOULD YOU REQUIRE ADDITIONAL SPACE TOTAL BIDS $

x 20%

EQUALS DEPOSIT ENCLOSED $

BID AMOUNT


Page 2

NAME OFFICE USE

PHONE IN CATALOG # ORDER

AUCTION DATE DESCRIPTION

BID AMOUNT


46

436

443


Guyette & Deeter

PO Box 1170, St. Michaels, MD 21663 410-745-0485 | www.guyetteanddeeter.com

North American Decoys at Auction - July 29 & 30, 2014  

Guyette & Deeter's annual summer decoy auction held in Portsmouth, New Hampshire on July 29 & 30, 2014.

North American Decoys at Auction - July 29 & 30, 2014  

Guyette & Deeter's annual summer decoy auction held in Portsmouth, New Hampshire on July 29 & 30, 2014.