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times

YOUR 2014 SUMMER GUIDE TO THE HIGH COUNTRY • www.HighCountryNC.com

Summer in the

BLUE RIDGE MOUNTAINS

Bike or Hike the

TRAILS

Visit

LOCAL TOWNS

BOONE BANNER ELK BLOWING ROCK WEST JEFFERSON and all of the High Country


2014

THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

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THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

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Table of Contents

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An Appalachian Summer Festival ............ 82 Art Activities .............................................88 Art Galleries ..............................................84 Arts & Crafts Workshops ........................ 104 Ashe County .............................................. 56 Blowing Rock ............................................ 43 Blowing Rock Art & History Museum ...... 92 Blowing Rock, The .................................... 55 Blue Ridge Parkway ...................................71 Breweries ................................................. 103 Calendar ................................................... 117 Camping .................................................... 50 Chambers of Commerce .............................. 8 Climbing ....................................................40 Cycling ....................................................... 47 Daniel Boone Native Gardens ....................61 Disc Golf .................................................... 54 Downtown Boone ...................................... 34 Farmers’ Markets .................................... 102 Festival of Tables ...................................... 96 Fishing ....................................................... 36 Frescoes ..................................................... 94 Golf ............................................................ 53 Grandfather Mountain ..............................48 High Country Host ...................................... 8 Highland Games ....................................... 73 Hiking ........................................................ 23 Horses ....................................................... 58 Linville Caverns ........................................ 64 Mountain Biking ....................................... 46 Music Festivals ..........................................80 Mystery Hill ..............................................60 Numbers of Note ......................................... 6 Outdoor Concerts ...................................... 78 Parkway Craft Center .............................. 105 Pet Page .....................................................30 Pet-friendly Places .....................................31 Restaurants ............................................. 106 Shopping ................................................. 107 Sugar Mountain ........................................ 65 Theater ...................................................... 74 Towns of the High Country ........................13 Tweetsie Railroad ..................................... 66 Valle Crucis ............................................... 33 Walking ..................................................... 45 Water Sports ............................................. 24 Wineries .................................................. 100 Ziplines ...................................................... 38

A Fresh View

The American red squirrel, or pine squirrel, is shown here defending its territory on the Tanawha Trail. They love conifer cone seeds and generally thrive in forests like these but have started to move into the hardwood forests. They have a red, rusty, fur coat and are common in the High Country. PHOTO BY ROB MOORE | MTNSNAPSHOTS.SMUGMUG.COM


2014

THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

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in the Mountains

here’s summer, and there’s High Country summer. We prefer the latter and think you will, too. Call it a hunch. Whatever your taste, summers in the North Carolina High Country are, simply put, perfect. It’s a place we’re happy to call home, and summertime is a season we welcome with open arms and windows. Whether it’s taking a hike along the Blue Ridge Parkway or the shop-lined streets of area towns; casting a line on the New River or a bid on some local artwork; or sharing s’mores around the camp¿re or ice cream in West Jefferson, the options are many.

2014’s Summer Times is here to help, delivering comprehensive, fact-¿lled rundowns of area attractions, activities, restaurants, galleries, music, theater and all the High Country has to offer. And since new events and things to do are always cropping up, be sure to grab a copy of The Mountain Times for up-to-date information on what’s happening in the High Country. Till then, welcome to your summer in the mountains.

Law Enforcement Watauga County Watauga County Sheriff’s Of¿ce (828) 264-3761 Boone Police Department (828) 268-6900 Blowing Rock Police (828) 295-5210 Appalachian Regional Healthcare System Police (828) 262-4168 Appalachian State Police (828) 262-2150

Ashe County Ashe County Sheriff’s Of¿ce (336) 846-5633 Jefferson Police (336) 846-5529 West Jefferson Police (336) 246-9410

Banner Elk Police (828) 898-4300 Elk Park Police Department (828) 733-9573 Newland Police Department (828) 733-2024 Seven Devils Police Department (828) 963-6760 Sugar Mountain Police (828) 898-4349 Beech Mountain Police (828) 387-2342

Health Care Watauga Medical Center (Boone) (828) 262-4100 Blowing Rock Hospital (828) 295-3136

Gene Fowler Jr. Publisher Frank Ruggiero Editor

Rob Moore Production Chief

Numbers of Note Avery County Sheriff’s Of¿ce (828) 733-2071

2014 Summer Times Staff

Charlie Price Advertising Director

Sincerely, Frank Ruggiero Editor

Avery County

2014

Cannon Memorial Hospital (Linville) (828) 737-7000 Ashe Memorial Hospital (Jefferson) (336) 846-7101 FastMed Urgent Care (Boone) (828) 265-7146 AppUrgent Care (Boone) (828) 265-5505

Animal Control Watauga County Animal Control (828) 262-1672 Watauga Humane Society (Boone) (828) 264-7865 Animal Emergency & Pet Care Clinic of the High Country (Boone) (828) 268-2833

Johnny Hayes Layout Artist Meleah Bryan Creative Services Director Andy Gainey Circulation Manager Sam Calhoun, Christina Call, Jesse Campbell, Jeff Eason, Caroline Harris, Allison Haver, James Howell, Anna Oakes, Adam Orr, Heather Samudio, Jamie Shell and Sandra Shook Writers Rex Goss, Mark Mitchell, and Leigh Ann Moody Sales Marianne Koch, Kristin Powers Creative Services On the front: The New River meandering through the High Country is a magnet for those who love the great outdoors. PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY ROB MOORE


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Love at First Site HighCountryNC.com raises the bar on tourism in Western North Carolina BY JAMIE SHELL AND ADAM ORR

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etting it right in the High Country has never been easier. You’ve reached the peak of Western North Carolina tourism with the new HighCountryNC.com. “With more than a dozen professional journalists on staff and more than 125 years of continually serving the High Country, we are in the unique position of providing unparalleled regional tourism content to both our locals and to our out-of-area visitors,” Mountain Times Publications publisher Gene Fowler said. “We are investing in digital infrastructure that will keep us at the forefront, providing the amassed content our team

of outstanding staff has created.” Established in May 2014, HighCountryNC.com incorporates the efforts of the largest media group serving the North Carolina High Country. Drawing on more than a century of local tourism promotion and press, HighCountryNC. com is the ultimate, all-inclusive resource for High Country tourism traditions, events and happenings. We’re here to help you get it right with the High Country’s authoritative source for all things recreation and tourism in our area. From hiking, bed and breakfasts, golf, snowsports, outdoor adventure, ¿ne and casual dining to everyday living, HighCountryNC.com is the de¿nitive resource for these activities and more for

visitors, tourists and guests. Whether it’s your ¿rst visit to our mountain home, or you’ve decided to make our home yours, HighCountryNC.com brings together the inside scoop on the best places to see and things to do the next time you explore North Carolina’s High Country. “HighCountryNC.com is a valuable clearinghouse for content and context that you can’t ¿nd anywhere else,” Mountain Times Publications executive editor Tom Mayer said. “No one has covered our area from a seasonal-publication perspective with more content in the past 20 years than Mountain Times Publications, and this endeavor will serve only to enhance that awardwinning coverage that our readers have come to expect.”

Mountain Times Publications has been at the forefront in showcasing the best of the best in the region for more than a century. That mission, expanded with the launch of the Summer Times print publication in the late 1990s, was followed by the introduction of the Autumn Times and Winter Times publications. Together, these publications have won multiple awards for content and design. Now, Mountain Times Publications is taking the lessons learned along the way to get it right with the launch of HighCountryNC.com. We invite you — locals and visitors, alike — to start your journey by clicking to www.HighCountryNC.com. Welcome to your website. We hope you love it, too.


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The High Country Host BY ALLISON HAVER

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he warm breezes of the summer season serve as beacons to a multitude of people from all over the region to the High Country surrounding Boone. For many of these tourists, this summer will be their ¿rst visit to the solace of the cooler summer nights; however, for others it is the continuing of a family tradition. Whatever the circumstance, the High Country Host Visitor Center is prepared and capable to assist travelers according to their needs and wants. The 2014 Mountain Vacation Planner, a helpful guide to visiting the High Country, is now available thanks to High Country Host Visitor Center’s marketing director, Candice Cook. “We also have regional and state maps available for people free of charge and keep an up-to-date list of events at the counter at all times,” she said. Cook said that the list of events, as well as lists of places to stay, eat, shop and

play are available on the organization’s website, which is mobile-friendly. “When people call, we either refer them to the website, offer them a vacation planner or invite them to come check out the center,” Cook said. During the busy summer months, the center will serve 100 to 150 people a day. Whether a visitor has a planned itinerary or has no idea what they want to do while vacationing, the staff of the High Country Host is there to accommodate and help them plan an enjoyable stay. Last summer, with ongoing roadwork, both entrances to the center were blocked, and Cook remembers people mostly having to call instead of coming inside. “Hopefully, with the road work complete, we will be able to see and help more people visiting the High Country,” she said. The High Country Host is open for business from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday. For those who miss the center’s

The High Country Host Visitor Center is located on Blowing Rock Road in Boone, across from Burger King. FILE PHOTO

operating hours or would like to take the technological approach can ¿nd a plethora of information at highcountryhost.com and the High Country Host Facebook page.

For more information, stop by the High Country Host Visitor Center at 1700 Blowing Rock Road in Boone (next to KFC), or call (828) 264-1299 or (800) 438-7500.

High Country Chambers of Commerce ASHE COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Ashe County, home to the Jeffersons (West Jefferson and Jefferson, that is), is just about as far as you can go in the High Country before entering Southwestern Virginia. The county is considered, in many respects, a step back in time to the way the Appalachian Mountains used to be. The chamber can direct travelers through the scenic and sparsely populated area of Christmas tree farms and rugged mountain landscapes, while offering a wide selection of brochures and maps. 1 N. Jefferson Ave. West Jefferson, N.C. 28694 (336) 846-9550 ashechamber@skybest.com www.ashechamber.com

AVERY COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

The Avery County Chamber of Commerce Visitor Center is conveniently located in the Shoppes at Tynecastle at the intersection of N.C. 105 and 184. The center offers information on lodging, dining, attractions, shopping and other businesses in Avery County. 4501 Tynecastle Highway, No. 2 Banner Elk, N.C. 28604 (828) 898-5605 chamber@averycounty.com www.averycounty.com

BANNER ELK CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Located in the heart of town, the Banner Elk Chamber of Commerce promotes

the area as a unique place to live in, work and visit. Information on area lodging, dining, shopping and more is available Monday through Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., and all the time by clicking to www.bannerelk.org. 100 W. Main St. Banner Elk, N.C. 28604 (828) 898-8395 bechamber@skybest.com www.bannerelk.org

BEECH MOUNTAIN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Whether you’re looking for a North Carolina mountain vacation full of adventure, or just a few days to relax and breathe the fresh mountain air, Beech Mountain, at an elevation of 5,506, Of-

fers plenty of activities and attractions for the whole family to enjoy, but also plenty of peace and quiet for a relaxing and rejuvenating time. The Beech Mountain Chamber of Commerce is here to help. 403-A Beech Mountain Parkway Beech Mountain, N.C. 28604 (828) 387-9283 chamber@beechmtn.com www.beechmountainchamber.com

BLOWING ROCK CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Blowing Rock is considered one of the crown jewels of the Blue Ridge. Its chamber of commerce knows this SEE CHAMBERS, PAGE 12


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THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

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Wine Country BY CHRISTINA CALL

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he beautiful scenery paired with the different varieties of wineries in the region makes High Country wine tasting a destination, not just a stop along the way. According to the N.C. Department of Commerce, North Carolina is ranked as a top-¿ve destination for wine travelers and enthusiasts, where visitors can enjoy more than 100 wineries and 400 vineyards. In fact, North Carolina is one of the only regions on earth that supports every major type of grape grown in the world.

GRANDFATHER VINEYARD & WINERY

One winery the High Country has to offer is Grandfather Vineyard & Winery, which opened in May 2011. Grandfather Winery is a terraced

mountainside vineyard at the base of Grandfather Mountain right on the Watauga River in Foscoe. At the bottom of the vineyard is the tasting room and winery. Steve and Sally Tatum started planting grapevines in their backyard in 2003, which led to Watauga County’s ¿rst winery. They opened the winery with the help of their son, Dylan Tatum, who studied viticulture and enology at Surry Community College and business and entrepreneurship at Appalachian State University. Grandfather Winery prides its self in being a community-based winery and vineyard. “We always try to keep it local and try to support the community that supports us,” Dylan Tatum said. According to Tatum, Grandfather bought more fruit from Watauga and surrounding counties than ever before this year — about 10 tons

of locally grown fruit, to be more speci¿c. The family is also always trying something new. For instance, the winery is currently in production of 100-percent Watauga-grown sparkling wines and hard ciders, Tatum said. Another way Tatum says Grandfather is supporting the community is by helping with Appalachian State University’s Fermentation Science program. “Appalachian State doesn’t have a winery on site, so the students come here,” he said. “Dr. Seth Cohen and Dr. Stephan Sommer bring the students here to see all aspects of the industry from picking the grapes to the bottling of the wine. ASU even helped create a wine we named ‘Scholar,’ and part of the proceeds go back to the university’s program.” SEE WINERY, PAGE 101


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Linville Falls Winery invites you to ‘elevate your taste in wine.’

WINERY

FROM PAGE 100

The winery also likes to give back to the community and visitors by providing a charismatic environment and delicious wine, according to Tatum. The tasting room offers a variety of white and red wines, and guests keep their wine glass as a memento. Live music is offered at the winery on some Sundays during the summer. “It is a perfect time for people to get a bottle of wine, sit by the river and listen to music,” Tatum said. Summer hours are noon to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 1 to 5 p.m. on Sunday. Grandfather Vineyard and Winery isn’t the only place in the High Country for wine production. Several other award-winning wineries offer unique options. Many visitors create their own tour of High Country wineries, visiting and sampling from all nearby sites, which is an action Tatum encourages. “We see each other as synergy, not competition,” Tatum said. For more information, visit www. grandfathervineyard.com, or call (828) 963-2400.

LINVILLE FALLS WINERY

Linville Falls Winery is located on U.S. 221, north of the Blue Ridge Parkway. Its slogan is “Elevate your taste in wine.” Nestled in the lower end of Avery County is a tasting room on a 40-acre farm, with its primary grapes Riesling and Cabernet Sauvignon, blueberries and raspberries. Family owned and operated, Linville Falls Winery is the result of a life-long passion for wine by owner Jack Wiseman. Tasting room hours are Wednesday through Monday, from noon to 6 p.m. The

Want to Go? BANNER ELK WINERY & VILLA 60 Deer Run Banner Elk, N.C. 28604 (828) 898-9090 www.bannerelkwinery.com

GRANDFATHER VINEYARD & WINERY

Vineyard Lane Banner Elk, N.C. 28604 (828) 963-2400 www.grandfathervineyard.com

LINVILLE FALLS WINERY

9557 Linville Falls Highway Newland, N.C. 28657 (828) 765-1400 www.linvillefallswinery.com

THISTLE MEADOW WINERY

102 Thistle Meadow Laurel Springs, N.C. 28644 (800) 233-1505 www.thistlemeadowwinery.com

WATAUGA LAKE WINERY

6952 Big Dry Run Road Butler, Tenn. 37640 (423) 768-0345 www.wataugalakewinery.com tasting room is closed on Tuesdays. Live music is offered every Saturday, from 3 to 6 p.m., during peak season. Linville Falls is also available for weddings, receptions and banquets. For more information, visit www.linvillefallswinery.com.

BANNER ELK WINERY & VILLA

Banner Elk Winery & Villa is located in Banner Elk and is the High Country’s

Grandfather Vineyard & Winery offers a vast array of wines, including its Dixie Classic Fair award-winning wine, Legacy. Legacy is a winemaker’s blend of 25 percent Cabernet Sauvignon, 25 percent Cabernet Franc, 25 percent Merlot and 25 percent Zinfandel. PHOTOS SUBMITTED

original winery. It also serves as a bed and breakfast. Winery tastings are offered year round, from noon to 6 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday. Tastings are $7 per person. Banner Elk Winery also offers private tastings for parties of 10 or more with advance scheduling of at least one-week notice. Vineyard tours are offered May through October at 2:30 and 4:30 p.m. Friday through Sunday and cost $12 per person. Banner Elk Winery also offers romantic packages, wedding opportunities and adventure packages. For more information, call (828) 260-1790, or visit www. bannerelkwinery.com.

Located in the heart of the Blue Ridge Mountains in Laurel Springs, Thistle Meadow Winery offers individualized tours, which include tastings of wines made from grapes grown around the world. Thistle Meadow Winery creates a wide variety of red, white and blush/sweet wines. Thistle Meadow Winery is located just off the Blue Ridge Parkway at milepost 246. Winery hours during the summer are Monday through Saturday, from noon to 4 p.m., and Sunday, from 2 to 4 p.m. For more information, call (800) 2331505, or visit www.thistlemeadowwinery. com.


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Area growers and producers have plenty to offer this summer at the Watauga County Farmers’ Market, including tomatoes, squashes, cucumbers, greens, apples, honey, peppers and much more. PHOTO BY ANNA OAKES

Buy fresh and local at farmers’ markets BY ANNA OAKES

Market Tips

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he High Country’s farmers, growers, producers and artisans ¿nd a way each week to bring their fresh bounties to your table, with multiple farmers’ markets in the area. Area growers and producers have plenty to offer this summer, including tomatoes, squashes, cucumbers, greens, apples, honey, peppers and much more. You’ll also ¿nd locally raised, grass-fed beef, chicken and pork; pastas, pastries and bread; jams, jellies and cheeses; and arts and crafts from local artisans.

WATAUGA COUNTY FARMERS’ MARKET

Saturdays through October, 8 a.m. to noon Saturdays through November, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. 591 Horn in the West Drive Boone, N.C. 28607 (828) 355-4918 www.wataugacountyfarmersmarket.org

BLOWING ROCK FARMERS’ MARKET Thursdays, May 29 through mid-October, 4 to 6 p.m. Park Avenue, Blowing Rock,

These tips will help make the most out of your farmers’ market shopping experience. • Arrive early for the best selection. • No pets, except service animals. • Carry small bills. It’s easier for vendors to make change. • Ask. Learn about unfamiliar varieties and even how to prepare them. • Use large, reusable bags or baskets. Eliminate the need for plastic or paper bags.

The Ashe County Farmers’ Market features an enclosed vendor area, as well as a covered section. PHOTO BY HEATHER SAMUDIO

N.C. 28605 (828) 295-7851

ASHE COUNTY FARMERS’ MARKET

Saturdays through Oct. 25, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Holiday markets: Nov. 22 and 29; Dec. 6, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Backstreet, West Jefferson, N.C. 28694

(910) 309-1932 ashe.farmers.market@gmail.com www.ashefarmersmarket.com

AVERY COUNTY FARMERS’ MARKET At Lees-McRae College Tate Lawn, Banner Elk: Thursdays through September, 5 to 7 p.m.

At Avery County Cooperative Extension, Newland: Fridays through September, 4 to 6 p.m. info@averycountyfarmersmarket.org www.facebook.com/averycountyfarmersmarket

JOHNSON COUNTY FARMERS’ MARKET

Saturdays through October, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. 110 Court St. Mountain City, Tenn. 37683 (423) 707-7093 johnsoncountyfm@gmail.com


THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

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Last year’s High Country Craft Food and Beverage Festival boasted hundreds of craft beer varieties and a capacity crowd. The festival will return in 2014 at a new location. PHOTO SUBMITTED

Beers to You!

Breweries growing in Boone area BY ANNA OAKES

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sheville may be the top beer city in the Southeast, but the Boone area is brewing its own craft beer scene. Soon to join the small community of breweries in the area will be Lost Province Brewing, opening up in downtown Boone at 130 N. Depot St. A family business of Andy, Lynne, J.P. and David Mason, the brewpub will serve beer brewed on site, as well as wood-¿red pizza. The business is aiming for an August opening date.

Appalachian Mountain Brewery is now in its second year of operation after becoming the ¿rst brewery to open in Boone since the Cottonwood brewpub closed more than a decade ago. AMB offers more than a dozen brews on tap and donates a portion of proceeds to area nonpro¿ts. The taproom also plays host to live music and yard games. The brewery and taproom are located at 163 Boone Creek Drive and are open Mondays through Thursdays from 4 to 11 p.m., Fridays from 3 to 11 p.m., Saturdays from 1 SEE BREWERIES, PAGE 104

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THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

Let’s Get Crafty!

MIXING IT UP: MIXED MEDIA

BY FRANK RUGGIERO

July 28 to 30, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Instructor: Vae Hamilton This workshop will cover working with acrylic paints, photo transfers and multimedia expanding creative imagery. http:// tcva.org/workshops/id/1330

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hen High Country adventure meets the arts, what do you get? Whitewater crafting, obviously. But for those looking to sport their creativity, one of the most artistically adventuresome places to do so is Appalachian State’s Turchin Center for the Visual Arts. With a full lineup of workshops for all skill levels, the Turchin Center is painting a picture of summer fun. Registration and pricing information can be found at www.tcva.org/workshops or by calling (828) 262-3017.

Workshop Schedule JUNQUE JOURNALS

PAINTING BOTANICALS Turchin Center workshops allow participants to explore their artistic side. PHOTO COURTESY OF THE TURCHIN CENTER FOR THE VISUAL ARTS

Instructor: Lisa Stinson This course will focus and explore various methods of glazing for a salt and reduction kiln. http://tcva.org/ workshops/id/1338

SALT GLAZING

May 31, 1 to 4 p.m. Instructor: Wendy Jessen Participants will create a journal, sketchbook or scrapbook out of recycled items. http://tcva.org/workshops/ id/1287

June 30, July 1, 2 and 5, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Instructor: Lisa Stinson This course will focus and explore various methods of glazing for a salt and reduction kiln. http://tcva.org/ workshops/id/1338

GOLD LEAF & ACRYLIC PAINTING

INTRO TO ENCAUSTICS

June 7, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Instructor: Beth Andrews Participants will explore the combination of metallic leaf with acrylic paint. http://tcva.org/workshops/ id/1318

TUESDAY AFTERNOON LANDSCAPES June 3, 10 and 17, 1 to 4 p.m. Instructor: Tara Belk Learn the basics of color mixing and brushwork, plus easy-to-master techniques for painting landscapes. http:// tcva.org/workshops/id/1342

CAPTURING THE ESSENCE OF WATER

June 21, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Instructor: Raney Rogers Learn how to paint water’s many different surfaces. http://tcva.org/workshops/id/1312

SALT GLAZING

June 30, July 1, 2 and 5, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Arts and Crafts at the Turchin Center

July 7 & Sept. 20, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Instructor: Greg Howser Participants will learn how to make encaustic wax, mix colors, apply it to the surface, make textures, cover a drawing, create incising ¿ne lines and fuse the wax. http://tcva.org/workshops/id/1320

PLEIN AIR PAINTING – GETTING STARTED

July 12, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Instructor: Kim Abernethy Enjoy a day of painting on location while learning some of the basic principles involved in creating art outdoors. http://tcva.org/workshops/id/1306

DISCOVERING YOUR INNER ARTIST

July 21 to 25, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Instructor: Debbie Arnold Using painting, drawing and collage techniques to expand and strengthen one’s intuition. http://tcva.org/workshops/id/1309

July 31, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Instructor: Raney Rogers Participants will paint the beauty of Àowering subjects in abstract and detailed ways. http://tcva.org/workshops/id/1332

BEGINNING ACRYLICS

Aug. 4 to 6, 1 to 3 p.m. Instructor: Anne Welch Participants will learn basic techniques of acrylic painting with an emphasis on landscape. http://tcva. org/workshops/id/1289

STUDIO FIGURE DRAWING

Aug. 11 to 14, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. & Aug. 15, 9 a.m. to noon Instructor: Tim Ford This course will focus on drawing and painting the human ¿gure from live models. http://tcva.org/workshops/id/1315

PAINTING ANIMALS

Aug. 16, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Instructor: Raney Rogers Learn how to capture expression in wildlife and present them in a natural setting. http://tcva.org/workshops/ id/1327

About the Turchin Center The Turchin Center is located at 423 W. King St. in downtown Boone. Hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday and Saturday and noon to 8 p.m. Friday. The Turchin Center is closed Sunday and Monday and observes all Appalachian State University holidays. There is no admission charge, although donations are accepted. For more information, call (828) 262-3017, or visit www.tcva.org.

2014

BREWERIES FROM PAGE 103

to 11 p.m. and Sundays from 1 to 10 p.m. For more information, visit www.appalachianmountainbrewery.com, or look the brewery up on Facebook. Blowing Rock Brewing Company debuted Blowing Rock Ale several years ago and last year opened the Blowing Rock Ale House at the former Maple Lodge on Sunset Drive in Blowing Rock. The venue offers eight rooms and a full pub and is open from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Thursdays through Mondays. For more information, visit www.blowingrockalehouseandinn.com. In Ashe County, Boondocks Brewing Tap Room & Restaurant is located at 108 S. Jefferson Ave. in West Jefferson, offering small batches of handcrafted beers, as well as more than 30 craft beers with a strong focus on North Carolina brews. The tap room is open from 11:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and until 11:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Check out www.boondocksbrewing.com for more information. In the Alpine Village at Beech Mountain Resort, Beech Mountain Brewing Co. has the capacity to brew up to 100 gallons per day and is open year round to serve skiers, snowboarders, mountain bikers and other resort visitors. Beech Mountain Brewing Co. is open Thursday through Sunday. Call (800) 438-2093 for hours of operation.

BEER FESTIVALS AND TASTINGS

Peabody’s Wine and Beer Merchants offers regular beer tastings at its retail location on N.C. 105 in Boone, while Glug on King Street also carries a wide selection. Beer tasting festivals have been a growing success in the High Country in recent years, with the High Country Craft Food and Beverage Festival (formerly High Country Beer Fest) leading the way. The festival typically takes place around Labor Day Weekend. For more information, visit www.hcbeerfest.com. SugarBrew returns to Sugar Mountain Resort on Saturday, Aug. 2, from noon to 6 p.m. Tickets are $30 online and $35 at the event. Visit www.sugarbrew.com, or call (800) SUGAR-MT. Bikes, Brews ’n Views takes place at Beech Mountain Resort July 18 through 20, with the beer tasting on Saturday, July 19. While you’re there, check out the dual slalom and downhill mountain bike competitions.


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Home to the Southern Highland Craft Guild, Moses Cone Manor in Moses Cone Park offers a variety of arts and crafts demonstrations throughout the summer and autumn months. PHOTO BY JEFF EASON

Parkway Craft Center: Demos on the Porch BY JEFF EASON

T

he Blue Ridge Parkway is craftier than you might think. Home to the Southern Highland Craft Guild, Moses Cone Manor in Moses Cone Park offers a variety of arts and crafts demonstrations throughout the summer and autumn months. Demonstrations take place in the screened in portion of the front porch of Cone Manor from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m., unless otherwise noted, and are closed for lunch at the demonstrator’s discretion. This season’s schedule of crafters includes Lin Oglesby (¿ber, yarn plying, knitting, crocheting) May 23 to 26, Jeff

McKinley (glass blowing) May 30 to June 1, Debbie Littledeer (paper, lithography) June 5 to 8, Beth Zorbanos (natural materials, corn shuck) June 5 to 8, David Crandall (wood, dove-tail box construction) June 12 to 15, Judi Harwood (mixed media, drum making) June 16 to 22, Lynn Jenkins (clay, raku) June 21 to 27, Jay Pfeil (paper, etching) June 28 to 30, Ellie Kirby (paper, block printing, book design) July 1 and 2, Sandy Adair (¿ber, tapestry, weaving), July 1 and 2, Ronnie McMahan (wood carving) July 7 to 10, Lee Entrekin (wood carving, Native American Àutes) July 11 to 14, Jack Rogers (wood carving, wood turning) July 16 to 20, Allen Davis (woodworking) July 24

to 27, Lynn Jenkins (clay, raku) July 28 to Aug. 1, Anne Freels (natural materials, corn shuck dolls) Aug. 2 and 3, Charlie Patricolo (¿ber, doll-making) Aug. 4 and 5, Sandy Adair (¿ber, tapestry weaving) Aug. 8 to 10, Betty Fain (¿ber arts, quilting) Aug. 8 to 10, Lee Entrekin (wood carving, Native American Àutes) Aug. 15 to 19, Lynn Jenkins (clay, raku) Aug. 20 to 26, David Crandall (wood carving, dove-tail boxes) Aug. 29 to Sept. 1, Lee Entrekin (wood carving, Native American Àutes) Sept. 4 to 7, Judi Harwood (mixed media, drum making) Sept. 8 to 14, Lynn Jenkins (clay, raku) Sept. 13 to 19, Tom Gow (wood carving, cottonwood bark carving) Sept. 20 to 23, Jeff Neil (wood

carving, Shaker box construction) Sept. 24 to 26, Bill and Tina Collison Sept. 27 to 29, Allen Davis (woodworking) Oct. 2 to 5, Marc Tickle (glasswork, kaleidoscopes) Oct. 6 to 8, Jeff McKinley (glass blowing) Oct. 9 and 10, Jack Rogers (wood carving, wood turning) Oct. 11 to 16, David Crandall (wood carving, dove-tail boxes) Oct. 17 to 19, Lee Entrekin (wood carving, Native American Àutes) Oct. 20 and 21, Lin Oglesby (¿ber arts) Oct. 22 to 27, and Sandy Adair (¿ber arts, tapestry weaving) Oct. 25 and 26. For more information, call the Parkway Craft Center at (828) 295-7938. For more on the Southern Highland Craft Guild, visit www.southernhighlandguild.org.


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2014

THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE Specialty Beers - Visit our new “BEER CAVE” Wines from the affordable to the rare & collectable Unique cheese from around the world Incredible chocolates Expanded selection of gourmet specialty foods, condiments & oils

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JUST SAY CHEESE The High Country’s largest selection of foreign and domestic cheeses, hand cut

Gluten-free products Exclusive distributor for L’Arrigo Olive Oil Gift baskets & party trays, wine & dining accessories Custom wine ordering Fat Cats Music & Video is an independent record store, located on Rivers Street in Boone. PHOTOS BY FRANK RUGGIERO

Shopping for Summer Treat yourself! You’re on vacation, after all, and the High Country has some of the most eclectic shopping this side of the Blue Ridge. From one-of-a-kind, local retailers to well-known national brands, there’s a bargain waiting for just about anyone.

Boone

Shopping in downtown Boone isn’t just about the merchandise. It’s about the experience, Downtown Boone Development Association director Pilar Fotta said. “I think sometimes people forget how many wonderful shops we have downtown and all the great things you can ¿nd downtown,” she said. “This is our home, and downtown Boone is the heart of our home.” With a variety of stores offering everything from apparel to that perfect bottle of balsamic vinaigrette, downtown Boone is the perfect partner for holiday shopping, so come with an empty car trunk. It won’t be empty for long. For a list and map of downtown Boone retailers, Àip to pages 34 and 35.

BOONE MALL

Boone Mall, located at 1180 Blowing Rock Road, offers a bounty of indoor shopping, including big name stores and local landmarks alike.

Blowing Rock

Blowing Rock offers a variety of unique shopping experiences downtown, as well as at the Tanger Shoppes on the Parkway, featuring 30 brand name and designer outlet stores. For more information on Blowing Rock shopping experiences, including a complete and comprehensive listing of stores, visit www.blowingrock.com, or Àip to page 34 for a map and some Blowing Rock shopping highlights.

Banner Elk

From clothing and souvenirs to produce and birding supplies, the Avery County town of Banner Elk features an eclectic variety of shopping, nearly as unique as its name.

West Jefferson

All along West Jefferson’s colorful Jefferson Avenue, customers will ¿nd an array of gifts and seasonal wares. From antiques, collectibles and hand-brushed paintings to a multitude of styles of clothing and jewelry, downtown West Jefferson will satisfy any taste not only during summertime, but throughout the year. For a list of local merchants and a map of businesses, along with a calendar of events, contact the West Jefferson Business Association or the Ashe Chamber of Commerce at (336) 846-9550 or www.ashechamber.com.

Grandfather Center NC 105 & NC 184, next to the ABC store Banner Elk, NC / 828.898.9424 erickscheeseandwine.com

Saturday Wine Tastings 1:00 - 5:00 pm


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EAT PIE EAT PIE EAT PIE EAT PIE EAT PIE EAT PIE EAT PIE EAT PIE EAT PIE EAT PIE EAT

SANDWICHES (Served on our homemade bread)

Pies • Cakes • Shepherd’s Pie • Steak & Ale Pie Chicken Pot Pie • English Specialties (on request) • Gourmet To Go • Catering

828.963.8228 • www.eatcrownc.com Dinner Served on Thursdays -- Twice a Month Reservations Recommended Fabulous British Chef/Owner

Dominic & Meryle Geraghty EAT CAKE EAT CAKE EAT CAKE EAT CAKE EAT CAKE EAT CAKE EAT CAKE EAT CAKE EAT

Open Tuesday - Saturday • 10 a.m-5 p.m. 9872 Hwy. 105 S. in Foscoe (across from Mountain Lumber)

A Favorite of High Country Locals • Extensive Wine List • Large Selection of Craft Beers • All ABC Permits • Daily Culinary & Beverage Specials

• Homemade Soups & Desserts • Kids Eat FREE All Day Wed • Large Parties Welcome • Reservations Accepted • Adjacent Tap Room with Billiards & Games

Live Dining Music Every Thursday 6-9 p.m. OPEN ALL DAY TUESDAY-SUNDAY Closed on Mondays

970 Rivers Street, Boone, NC 828-264-7772 • www.CafePortofino.net Follow us on Facebook & stay up to date on special events and daily specials!

2014


THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

2014

13 YEARS

Loaves & Fishes Restaurant and Catering “Country Gourmet�

HOURS: Tues.-Thurs., 11 a.m.-8 p.m.; Friday 11 a.m.-8:30 p.m., Saturday 4 p.m.-8 p.m. Appetizers: The Savory Avery - our homemade pimento cheese dip served with fresh warm pita chips Viking chips - homemade potato chips w/balsamic glaze and bleu cheese crumbles. Many more unique appetizers! Gourmet Burgers, Salads, Sandwiches, Fresh Vegetables & Dinner Specials

Take Homemade Casseroles

Truly Homemade Whole Desserts

(828) 733-5812

Catering for all events

Located on Hwy 221, close to Linville Falls Winery & Crossnore Academy 176 Maple Street, Crossnore, NC

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2014

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THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

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2014

Come and try our new menu items!

10% OFF 10% OFF ENTIRE BILL

WITH COLLEGE ID

* Excludes alcohol * Not valid with other offers * Expires 9/21/14

* Excludes alcohol * Not valid with other offers * Expires 9/21/14

HOURS: Call for Take Out MON-THURS: 11AM-10 PM 828-265-1674 FRI & SAT: 11AM-11PM New Market Center SUN: 11AM-9:30 PM www.dosamigosmexicanrestaurant.net

H Y NC IDA LU FR OD RY FO EVE A SE IAL EC SP

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER

Lou i s ’ Roc Hou s u o m a F

Corner of Burke, McDonald & Avery Counties

Home Pool Table Repairs, Recovery & Move & Setup Cues, Lights, Covers & Complete Billiards Accessories

HOURS: Closed Tuesdays • Mon, Wed, Thurs: 6 am-8am Fri, Sat: 6 am-8:30 pm • Sun: 6 am-7 pm

(828) 765-2702

23175 Linville Falls Hwy. Linville Falls, NC


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Chinese, Japanese, Sushi & Thai 100% No M.S.G. 240 Shadowline Dr., AA3 + AA4 - Boone Inside Harris Teeter Shopping Center

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK Mon-Thurs: 11:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m. Fri-Sat: 11:00 a.m.-10:30 p.m. Sunday: 11:00 a.m.-9:30 p.m.

828-386-1170 • 828-386-1179

BOONE’S

Authentic

ITALIAN RESTAURANT

Restaurant&Catering

DAILY BEERSPECIALSFOOD SELECTION BEST DRAFT IN BOONE &

ALL GAMES ALL WEEKEND

FIND US FOR SPECIALS! 421 Blowing Rock Road Across from Convocation Center 828-386-1216 • www.tapproom.com

Serving the High Country for 33 Years!

Catering of All Sizes Italian and American Cuisine Since 1981 Reservations Recommended 1348 Hwy 105 South, Boone ∙ 828-262-5128 ∙ casarustica1981.com


THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

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BURGERS SANDWICHES PIZZA SALADS

Discover the scenic splendor of paradise on Beech Mountain

Nestled on the Banner Elk side of Beech Mountain American Local Farm-to-Table with European Cuisine Influence Chef Anthony Burton

PASTA

OUTDOOR SEATING - PET FRIENDLY

5 West Main Street West Jefferson, NC 28694

STEAKS

336.846.2121

CHOPS

Open Tuesday-Saturday for Lunch & Dinner Open Sunday for Brunch Dinner on Sundays starting in June

SEAFOOD ALL ABC PERMITS

2014

Now Serving Breakfast Every Day 7:30am - 11am

Brunch on Sundays 10:30am - 2pm

Open for Dinner 5pm - 9pm 7 nights a week

Reservations are recommended. Book online or call.

www.thehoteltavern.com

2489 Beech Mountain Parkway, Banner Elk | 828-898-9004

Find us on Facebook at

www.archersinn.com

www.facebook.com/thehoteltavern

PAPA JOE’S IS NOW SERVING BREAKFAST!

Indulge Bakery

Unique and varied menu offerings that you’ll want to experience again and again!

Come enjoy your breakfast, lunch & dinner favorites at great prices.

Caterings, specialty cakes and breads, desserts

The Red Onion Dine in the cool mountain air, rain or shine, on our covered outdoor patio!

Call and let us help with your next event!

828-295-3239

8062 Valley Blvd. • Blowing Rock, NC 28605 •

227 Hardin Street, Boone, NC 28607

828-295-3239

828.264.5470

www.theredonioncafe.com


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The vivid blooms of the pink-shell azalea, a rare plant species now flowering on the Blue Ridge Mountains, can be found on sections of the Tanawha Trail and Grandfather Mountain. The blooms come out well before the leaves and attract bees and pollinators. PHOTO BY ROB MOORE

®

828-264-4660 2082 Blowing Rock Rd • Boone, NC 28607 www.cfarestaurant.com/boone/home

Follow us on at Chick-fil-A of Boone


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The Garden Goddess Theresa Foxx

G A L L E R Y

&

2014

Great Landscapes take Knowledge & Experience while Extraordinary Landscapes take Passion & Vision

WE HAVE IT ALL!

F R A M E M A K E R S

Serving the High Country since 1976

Proud to be a Local Woman-owned Business

828-898-5175 | Monday - Saturday 10am - 5pm | www.artcellaronline.com

JIM CHAPMAN

JOSEPH CAVE & RICHARD OVERSMITH

HERB JACKSON

“IS IT STILL...LIFE?” “TWO VIEWS” “FORM AND MYSTERY” June 11 - 28 July 2 - 26 July 30 - August 23 Reception June 13, 4-6pm Reception July 11, 4-6pm Reception August 1, 4-6pm

GRANDFATHER MOUNTAIN NURSERY GARDEN CENTER AND LANDSCAPING (828) 963-5025 • 1466 Hwy 105 • Banner Elk, NC 28604 WWW.GRANDFATHERLANDSCAPING.COM

920 SHAWNEEHAW AVENUE (HWY 184) BANNER ELK, NC

Gabriel Ofiesh Trunk Shows

GREATER BANNER ELK HERITAGE FOUNDATION presents

JULY 24 - 27

Banner House Museum

“Give us an hour and we will give you 150 years!”

DOCENT GUIDED TOURS BANNER ELK • NC

from mid-June to mid-October | Tuesday-Saturday 11AM to 4PM Final daily tour begins at 3:15PM

Admission: $5 adults • $1 children 7990 Hickory Nut Gap Road | Banner Elk, NC

www.bannerhousemuseum.org | 828-898-3634


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Your Summer Times Calendar COMPILED BY SANDRA SHOOK

May 24

KIDS TRIATHLON: The High Country Kids Triathlon will be held beginning at 10 a.m. May 24 at Watauga Parks and Recreation in Boone. Swim is in the pool and the bike and run are on the Greenway Trail. There will be three age groups: 8 and younger, swim 50m, bike 1 mile and run .5 mile; 9 to 12 age group, swim 100m, bike 3 miles and run 1 mile; and 13 to 18 age group, swim 200m, bike 4 miles and run 1.5 miles. Prizes and refreshments follow the race. Proceeds will bene¿t the Watauga Swim Team. Entry forms are available at parks and recreation or register online at http:// active.com/event_detail.cfm?event_ id=2126094. Call (828) 964-9378 for more information. FUNDRAISER: Watauga Lake Winery, 6952 Big Dry Run, Butler, Tenn., is holding a fundraiser for the Fisher House Foundation from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 24. The event is open to the public and there is no charge to attend. There will be arts and crafts vendors on the lawn, music, a silent auction, hot dogs, hamburgers and more. Proceeds from food purchases, silent auction and a 50/50 will bene¿t the Tennessee Fisher House Foundation. Bring a blanket and enjoy the day. Fisher House provides lodging at no charge to families of veterans who are having treatment at VA hospitals across the country. For more information, call (423) 768-0345 or (423) 768-3633. TRAIL WORK DAYS: Every Saturday now through the middle of November (except Sept. 13), staff and volunteers will meet at the Summit Trailhead at Elk Knob State Park at 9 a.m. and work until about 3:30 p.m., weather permitting. Tools are provided, but volunteers should wear close-toed shoes and bring work gloves, lunch and water. Most of the time will be spent building a new one-mile loop trail, the Beech Tree Trail, although the work may include some repair work on the Summit Trail. The next workday is May 24. For more information, call (828) 297-7261. 5K WALK: The inaugural Paws For Cause Doggie Fun Walk and 5K Run will take place May 24 in Newland. All funds raised will go to support the Avery

The Linville River provides some of the best trout fishing in the High Country, so make sure to bring your waders. PHOTO BY ROB MOORE

County Humane Society. Participants can run in the 5K with or without their dogs, or they can walk with their friends and pets in the Doggie Fun Walk. Registrants can set up their own fundraising page and are encouraged to invite friends and family to join in raising money for the cause. Those interested can also pick up a registration and fundraising form at the ACHS. Prizes will be awarded to top fundraisers, as well as top ¿nishers in the 5K. All well-behaved dogs are welcome. Participants must be 18 years of age or have the signature of a guardian. To sign up, visit runsignup.com/Race/NC/Newland/PawsForACause. Follow ACHS on Facebook at AveryCountyDoggie5kandWalk or at www.averyhumane.org/ catalog/dogrun.php.

May 25

CONCERT: A Memorial Day Salute with David Johnson and the Studio Band sponsored by Mountain Home Music will be held at 7:30 p.m. May 25 in Watauga County; location to be announced. Tickets are $20 in advance, $22 at the door. For more information, visit http://www. mountainhomemusic.com.

May 30

CONCERT: Mountain Home Music will host “The Fire and Passion of Scotland” with North Sea Gas at 7:30 p.m. May 31 in Watauga County, with the location to be announced. Admission is $20 in advance or $22 at the door. For more information, visit http://www.mountainhomemusic.com. PHOTOGRAPHY: A Nature Photography Weekend will be held May 30-June 1 at Grandfather Mountain in Linville. Learn from top nature photographers. Presentations are planned in the evenings, while participants photograph scenery and native animals during the day. Enter your best shots from the weekend into an informal contest, with winners announced Sunday. Call (800) 468-7325 or visit grandfather.com/ events/nature-photography-weekend-2/ for more information. RESTAURANT WEEK: A Blowing Rock Restaurant Week will be observed May 30- June 6. There will be a variety of three-course meals for $15 to $30 at

participating restaurants. Call (828) 2957851 for more details.

May 31

CONCERT: Summer sunset concerts at Beech Alpen Inn at 700 Beech Mountain Parkway at Beech Mountain will be offered on Sundays, May 31-July 20. The outdoor pavilion creates a spot to enjoy some food, drinks, tunes and sunsets. The concerts start at 5 p.m. and there is no fee to attend. Call (828) 387-2252 for more information. EMERGENCYFEST: The Watauga County Fire¿ghters Association will host the 11th annual EmergencyFest at the Raley Hall parking lot at Appalachian State University in Boone. The event will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on May 31. The free event will feature ¿re¿ghters and emergency personnel from the area giving demonstrations and meeting with the public. For more information, contact Jim Landis at (828) 406-0911. TRAIL WORK DAYS: Every Saturday now through the middle of November SEE CALENDAR, PAGE 118


THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

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CALENDAR FROM PAGE 117

(except Sept. 13), staff and volunteers will meet at the Summit Trailhead at Elk Knob State Park at 9 a.m. and work until about 3:30 p.m., weather permitting. Tools are provided, but volunteers should wear close-toed shoes and bring work gloves, lunch and water. Most of the time will be spent building a new one-mile loop trail, the Beech Tree Trail, although the work may include some repair work on the Summit Trail. For more information, call (828) 297-7261.

June 5

TASTE OF AVERY: A Taste of Avery will be held at 6 p.m. June 5 at the Best Western Mountain Lodge. Admission is $30. Taste the specialties of more than 20 Avery County restaurants and farm markets. Live music will be provided by Steve Fearey, acoustic guitarist. There will be a cash bar by local wineries and breweries. For more information, visit http://www.averycounty.com. LAND OF OZ TOURS: Enjoy a tour through the old Land of Oz theme park at Beech Mountain on Fridays, June 6, 13, 20 and 27. Start in Auntie Em’s house, and experience all of the thrills that Dorothy does as she makes her way down the yellow brick road. Tours leave at 11a.m. and 2 p.m. There is a $10 admission fee. For more information, call (828) 387-9283.

June 7

CANOE RACE: The 33rd annual New River Canoe Race will be held June 7 in Jefferson. Starting at Zaloo’s Canoes, this “family friendly” canoe and kayak race is organized by Friends of High Country State Parks, and proceeds go to the ¿ve area state parks. The cost to enter is $10 per person or $25 for a “family Àoat.” Boats can start any time between 9 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. For more information, visit friendsofhcsp.wordpress.com. CONCERT: Mountain Home Music will present Old Time Music East and West in concert at 7:30 p.m. June 7 in Watauga County, with location to be announced. Admission is $20 in advance or $22 at the door. For more information, visit www.mountainhomemusic.com. SYMPOSIUM: The second annual horticultural symposium sponsored by

Appalachian State University’s College of Arts and Sciences, will be held June 7. The theme is “Designing Your Garden”; the daylong event is designed for local gardeners and homeowners. The program runs from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and includes continental breakfast, catered lunch, free parking, and tour of the Daniel Boone Native Gardens. Preregistration is required. Registration online by April 30 is $59 per person. Registration after April 30 is $70. Seating is limited to 100 participants. Registration deadline is June 2. Register online at http:// conferences-camps.appstate.edu or mail in registrations to Horticultural Symposium, Appalachian State University, P.O. Box 34042, Boone, NC 28608. 5K RUN: Hunter’s Heroes Memorial Run and Celebration will feature 5K and 10-mile runs from Boone to Blowing Rock beginning at 8:30 a.m. on June 7. The post-run celebration will take place at Blowing Rock Memorial Park from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The events will bene¿t Rob Ellerbe David, son of fallen Major Ryan Scott David, whose National Guard MAFF7 airplane crashed while ¿ghting wild¿res out west two years ago. For more information, contact Emily Greer at greereg@email.appstate.edu.

June 9

TORCH CLUB: The High Country Torch Club has scheduled its meetings for 2014. They are held at 11:30 a.m. at the Sagebrush Steakhouse in Boone. Upcoming gatherings include June 9, with Robert Schneider, “Why Galileo Matters: ReÀections at 450”; July 14, with Stuart Omans, “Happy 450th, Shakespeare”; Aug. 11, with Wayne Clawson, “Sam Levenson”; Sept. 8, with Herbert Hash, “When All Hell Breaks Loose”; Oct. 13, with Loretta Clawson, “Mayors of Boone”; and Nov. 19, with Peter Petschauer, “Mystery of the Lost Plane.” For more information, call Bettie Bond at (828) 264-4275.

June 14

ART IN THE PARK: Blowing Rock’s free seasonal outdoor arts and crafts celebration, Art in the Park, is under way each month through Oct. 4. The next show is June 14. The juried art event features nearly 100 ¿ne arts vendors located next to the American Legion Hall on Wallingford Street and takes place from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. For more information, call (828) 295-7851.

MINE TOUR: A Black Light Mine Tour will be held at 8 p.m. June 14 at the Emerald Village in Mitchell County. Admission is $15 for adults, $10 for students. Reservations are recommended. For more information, visit http://www. emeraldvillage.com. CONCERT: Mountain Home Music will sponsor a a concert featuring the “Gospel with Elements of Country, R & B, and Soul” with the Junaluska Gospel Choir at 7:30 p.m. June 14, at a place to be announced. Admission is $20 advance, $22 at the door. For more information, visit http://www.mountainhomemusic.com. BLUEGRASS: The seventh annual Blue Ridge Music Hall of Fame Dinner and Induction Ceremony will be held at 7:15 p.m. June 14 at the Stone Center for the Performing Arts in Wilkes County. Admission is $35. The event will highlight inductees Roy Acuff, Jeff Little, Wayne Henderson, Dave Macon, Green Grass Cloggers, Ward Elle and Dock Walsh and the Carolina Tar Heels. There will be performances by Jeff Little, Elkville String Band, David Johnson, Wayne Henderson, John Doubler, Eric Ellis, Green Grass Cloggers, Jonah Horton, Scott Gentry, Ward Eller, Devin Huie and Scott Freeman. For more information, visit http://www.wilkesheritagemuseum.com. ART RECEPTION: An free art reception featuring the artist exhibits of the month and sponsored by the Watauga County Arts Council will be held at 5:30 p.m. June 14 at council facilities located at 377 Shadowline Drive, Boone. For more information, visit http://www. watauga-arts.org. COMMUNITY YARD SALE: A community yard sale will be held beginning at 9 a.m. June 14 at Beech Mountain. Vendor spaces are available for $10. Every year, Beech Mountain residents empty their closets and garages for the sale. The yard sale will take place in the meadows across from town hall, behind the Brick Oven Pizzeria. Call (828) 387-9283 to register for a space or for more details.

June 21

CONCERT: Mountain Home Music will feature a concert “An Americana Evening with Robin and Linda Williams” at 7:30 p.m. June 21, at a location to be

2014

announced. Tickets are $20 in advance, $22 at the door. For more information, visit www.mountainhomemusic.com. COOL 5: A Cool 5 Race will be held beginning at 9 a.m. June 21 beginning at town Hall on Beech Mountain. There is a registration fee. An annual race started in 2006, the Cool 5 Race is a fundraising effort for differing community projects. Visit www.beechrecreation.org for details.

June 22

SINGING ON THE MOUNTAIN: The 90th annual Singing on the Mountain will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. June 22 at Grandfather Mountain. The “Singing” is a daylong gospel sing and fellowship featuring a dozen top gospel groups and sermon from a wellknown speaker. Held out-of-doors in a meadow at the base of Grandfather Mountain, music begins at 8:30 a.m. and continues throughout the day with a break at midday for the sermon. Many families bring lawn chairs and picnics and make a day of seeing old friends and enjoying performances by top Southern gospel groups.

June 28

BIKE RIDE: The Blood, Sweat and Gears’ 100-mile ride will be held June 28. The BSG is a challenging to strenuous full English century 100-mile loop ride, starting and ending at the Valle Crucis Elementary School, approximately 5 miles south of Boone. The route roughly circles Boone through the outskirts of Watauga County, the heart of North Carolina’s High Country. For more information, visit http://bloodsweatandgears.org/. CONCERT: Mountain Home Music will feature a concert “Piano Man of the Blue Ridge” with the Jeff Little Trio at 7:30 p.m. June 28, at a location to be announced. Tickets are $20 in advance, $22 at the door. For more information, visit www.mountainhomemusic.com.

June 31

RHODODENDRON RAMBLE: A “Remarkable Rhododendron Ramble” will be held June 1-16 at Grandfather Mountain in Linville. Special programs designed to help visitors get the most out of the memorable sight of Catawba rhododendron blooming up the mounSEE CALENDAR, PAGE 119


THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

2014

CALENDAR

July 19

FROM PAGE 118

tain’s slopes in early summer will be presented. Staff naturalists offer programs and guided walks daily at 1 p.m. All events are included in the price of admission. Call (800) 468-7325 or visit grandfather.com/events/the-remarkable-rhododendron-ramble-2/ for more information.

June 24

SPEAKER: North Carolina Secretary of Transportation Tony Tata will speak to the public in Blowing Rock on June 24 as part of the “Outside the Rock” series. The event will take place at 4 p.m. in the community meeting room of the Blowing Rock Art and History Museum and is free and open to the public. Tata will speak about the new North Carolina Strategic Transportation Investments Law (House Bill 817), which goes into effect July 1, 2015, and its possible impact on the High Country. Afterward, he will answer questions from the public.

July 4

FINE ART SHOW: An Independence Day Fine Art and Craft Show will be held from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. July 4-6 at the old Banner Elk elementary school. More than 75 artisans will showcase their work. Admission is free. CHRISTMAS IN JULY: The 28th annual Christmas in July Festival will be held in downtown West Jefferson July 4-5. July 4 features bluegrass, old time, gospel and country music, a street dance and food vendors from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. July 5 brings the full festival to life with arts and crafts, Civil War reenactments, food, music and more from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. For more information, visit http:// christmasinjuly.info. TWEETSIE: Tweetsie Railroad will host a colorful Fireworks Extravaganza July 4. For more information, visit www.tweetsie.com, or call (877) 893-3874. PARADE: The traditional Banner Elk Fourth of July Parade will begin at 11 a.m. on July 4th and will line up at the Lees-McRae College library on the LMC campus. CONCERT: Mountain Home Music will feature a concert “Bluegrass and Brass” featuring the Mountain Home

PAGE 119

A white-tailed deer has a stare-off with the photographer in Julian Price Park at Bee Tree Creek. PHOTO BY ROB MOORE

Music Boys and the King Street Brass at 7:30 p.m. July 4, at a location to be announced. Tickets are $20 in advance, $22 at the door. For more information, visit www.mountainhomemusic.com.

July 5

FOURTH OF JULY: A 4th of July festival with a parade will be held from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. July 5 in downtown Blowing Rock. There will be an adult horseshoe tournament with prizes, a water balloon toss, watermelon eating contest, face painging, climbing town and bounce obstacle course, as well as entertainment. The parade will be at 2 p.m. There will be ¿reworks at 9:30 p.m. at the Blowing Rock Country Club. In addition, there will be a free Sunday park dance from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. MINE TOUR: A Black Light Mine Tour will be held at 8 p.m. July 5 at the Emerald Village in Mitchell County. Admission is $15 for adults, $10 for students. Reservations are recommended. For more information, visit http://www. emeraldvillage.com. CONCERT: A free concert on the lawn will be held at 5 p.m. July 5 at Fred’s General Mercantile at Beech Mountain. Concerts are held weekly on Saturday through Aug. 2. For more information, visit http://www.beechmtn.com or call (828) 387-4838.

July 12

CONCERT: Mountain Home Music will sponsor a concert featuring “Old Time Fiddle and Dance” with Rodney Sutton at 7:30 p.m. July 12, at a place to be announced. Admission is $20 in advance, $22 at the door. For more information, visit www.mountainhomemusic.com. ART RECEPTION: An free art reception featuring the artist exhibits of the month and sponsored by the Watauga County Arts Council will be held at 5:30 p.m. July 12 at council facilities located at 377 Shadowline Drive, Boone. For more information, visit http://www. watauga-arts.org. CONCERT: A free concert on the lawn will be held at 5 p.m. July 12 at Fred’s General Mercantile at Beech Mountain. Concerts are held weekly on Saturday through Aug. 2. For more information, visit http://www.beechmtn.com or call (828) 387-4838. GARDENS: Daniel Boone Native Gardens’ second annual Fairy Day in the Gardens will be held at 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. July 12. The gardens is located 651 Horn in the West Drive in Boone. Admission is free, with the option to pay the $2 entrance donation to the gardens. For more information, visit http://danielboonenativegardens.org/fairy-daypd-31.php.

HERITAGE DAY: The greater Banner Elk Heritage Foundation will hold a Heritage Day Celebration on July 19. The day will begin at 9 a.m. with a free bus tour of historic Banner Elk, sponsored by Lees-McRae College. Tours of the Banner House Museum will run from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Also, traditional music, craft displays and demonstrations are planned at the Banner House Museum from 9 a.m to 1 p.m. Starting at 1 p.m., the celebration will move to Tate Evans Park with musical entertainment by The Corklickers, cloggers, Amantha Mill, Rhody Jane. There will be inÀatables at the park for children. AC Pride (The old Banner Elk elementary school) will have an antique quilt display from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. A small donation for the preservation of the quilts will be asked. For more information, call (828) 898-3634. MINE TOUR: A Black Light Mine Tour will be held at 8 p.m. July 19 at the Emerald Village in Mitchell County. Admission is $15 for adults, $10 for students. Reservations are recommended. For more information, visit http://www.emeraldvillage.com. CONCERT: A free concert on the lawn will be held at 5 p.m. July 19 at Fred’s General Mercantile at Beech Mountain. Concerts are held weekly on Saturday through Aug. 2. For more information, visit http://www.beechmtn.com or call (828) 387-4838. ART IN THE PARK: Blowing Rock’s free seasonal outdoor arts and crafts celebration, Art in the Park, is under way each month through Oct. 4. The next show is July 19. The juried art event features nearly 100 ¿ne arts vendors located next to the American Legion Hall on Wallingford Street and takes place from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. For more information, call (828) 295-7851.

July 22

HORSE SHOW: The 91st annual Blowing Rock Charity Horse Show’s American hunter and jumper I division will be held July 22-27 at Mayview Park. The horse show is among the oldest continually operating horse shows in America. More Information: http://www.blowingrockhorses.com. SEE CALENDAR, PAGE 120


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THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

2014

CHAMBERS FROM PAGE 8

Its chamber of commerce knows this tight-knit community as no one else, and its representatives are always willing to share this knowledge with visitors. Aside from general information, lists of camping and ¿shing sites, and brochures, the Blowing Rock Chamber of Commerce also has a generous stock of menus from the town’s many eateries. 132 Park Ave. Blowing Rock, N.C. 28605 (828) 295-7851 info@blowingrock.com www.blowingrockncchamber.com

BOONE AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

The Boone Area Chamber of Commerce is one of the High Country’s most active, with both a dedicated membership and an overall commitment to the betterment of the area as both a vacation destination and business hub. Now at a new location in downtown Boone on King Street, the chamber is an ideal place to stop for information on area activities, brochures and maps of the community.

GOLF CLUB

Now Welcoming Public Play

Well-Maintained 2 Uniquely Different 9’s

Boone Area Chamber of Commerce president Dan Meyer hosts the chamber’s annual Spelling Bee for GrownUps, a fundraiser for local education efforts. PHOTO BY FRANK RUGGIERO

870 W. King St., Suite A, Boone, N.C. 28607 (828) 264-2225 info@boonechamber.com www.boonechamber.com

2 Miles South of Linville on 221

18 Hole Rates from $35 Food and Beverage Available

For more information call us or visit our website

828.733.8325 LinvilleLandHarbor.com


THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

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2014

The Watauga River is just one way to cool off while visiting the High Country. PHOTO BY ROB MOORE

CALENDAR FROM PAGE 119

July 25

SYMPHONY: The Symphony by the Lake at Chetola in Blowing Rock will be held July 25. A ¿reworks ¿nale will also be featured. Gates open at 5:30 p.m., opening bands begin at 5:45 p.m. and the symphony at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $32.50 for adults and $14 for children younger than 12. For more information, call the Blowing Rocket Chamber of Commerce at (828) 295-7851. HOME TOUR: St. Mary of the Hills Episcopal Church’s 55th annual fundraising Tour of Homes in Blowing Rock will be held from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. July 25. Admission. For more information, call (828) 295-7323.

July 26

CONCERT: Mountain Home Music will sponsor a concert, “Two Sides of Celtic” at 7:30 p.m. July 26, at a place to be announced. Admission is $20 in advance, $22 at the door. For more information,

visit www.mountainhomemusic.com. CONCERT: A free concert on the lawn will be held at 5 p.m. July 26 at Fred’s General Mercantile at Beech Mountain. Concerts are held weekly on Saturday through Aug. 2. For more information, visit http://www.beechmtn.com or call (828) 387-4838.

July 29

GEM SHOWS: The Grassy Creek Gem Show July 29-Aug. 3 is outdoors at the Parkway Fire Department in the Grassy Creek area of Spruce Pine. The N.C Mineral, Gem and Jewelry Festival July 31Aug. 3 is directed by the Mitchell County Chamber of Commerce and is held at the Pinebridge Coliseum, 70 Pinebridge Way, Spruce Pine.

July 31

ANTIQUE SHOW: The Blowing Rock Art and History Museum sill sponsor an Art and Antiques Weekend event July 31Aug. 3 at the museum. View hundreds of beautiful antiques and art pieces. For more information, call (828) 295-9099.

Aug. 2

CONCERT: A free concert on the lawn will be held at 5 p.m. Aug. 2 at Fred’s General Mercantile at Beech Mountain. Concerts are held weekly on Saturday through Aug. 2. For more information, visit http://www.beechmtn.com or call (828) 387-4838.

Aug. 9

BIKE RIDE: The Blue Ridge Brutal Bike Ride with 100-, 75- or 57-mile treks will be held Aug. 9 in Ashe County. Registration fee required. For more information, visit http://blueridgebrutal.org/. CONCERT: Mountain Home Music will feature a concert with The Dixie Dawn Band and the Day the Outlaws Came to Town at 7:30 p.m. Aug. 9, at a location to be announced. Admission is $20 in advance, or $22 at the door. For more information, visit www.mountainhomemusic.com. ART RECEPTION: An free art reception featuring the artist exhibits of the month and sponsored by the Watauga

County Arts Council will be held at 5:30 p.m. Aug. 9 at council facilities located at 377 Shadowline Drive, Boone. For more information, visit http://www.wataugaarts.org.

Aug. 16

CONCERT: Mountain Home Music will feature a concert, “Bluegrass Attack with the 23 String Band,” at 7:30 p.m. Aug. 16, at a location to be announced. Admission is $20 in advance, or $22 at the door. For more information, visit www.mountainhomemusic.com.

Aug. 17

MUSIC: A concert in the park will be held at 4 p.m. Aug. 17 at Memorial Park off Main Street in Blowing Rock. Bring a chair or blanket to enjoy this free concert Bring a chair or blanket and enjoy this free concert by Blowing Rock’s own Mountain Radio with blues, bluegrass and more. The American Legion Hall is the backup venue in case of inclement weather. American Legion Hall is the backup venue in case of inclement weather. For more information, call (828) 295-7851.


2014

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THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

Advertisers Index

4 Seasons Vacation Rentals & Real Estate Sales – 41, 56 A-1 Mountain Realty – 57 Abingdon Olive Oil Company – 20 Anna Banana’s – 34 Antiques on Howard – 35 Antiques on Main – 54 Appalachian Regional Healthcare System – 73 Art Cellar, The – 116 Artists Theatre, The – 56 ArtWalk – 34 Ashe Civic Center – 50 Ashe County Arts Council – 56 Ashe County Bluegrass & Old-Time Fiddlers Convention – 65 Ashe County Chamber of Commerce – 57 Ashe County Cheese – 52 Ashe County Farmers Market – 56 Ashe High Country Realty – 37 SkyLine SkyBest – 38 Avery County Humane Society – 30 Bandana’s Bar-B-Que & Grill – 109 Banner Elk TDA – 68 Banner House Museum – 116 Barking Rock, The – 88 Basil’s Fresh Pasta & Deli – 106 Best Western Eldreth Inn – 5 Blackberry Creek Mattress – 65 Bleu Moon Productions – 75 Blowing Rock Art & History Museum – 94 Blowing Rock Brewing Company Ale House & Brewery – 67 Blowing Rock Chamber of Commerce – 18 Blowing Rock Frameworks & Gallery – 11 Blowing Rock Furniture Gallery – 81 Blowing Rock Market – 62 Blowing Rock Produce & Provisions – 107 Blowing Rock, The - 10 Blue Ridge Mountain Club – 19 Blue Ridge Realty & Investments/Sunalei Preserve – 3 Bo’s – 55 Bolick and Traditions Pottery – 43 Buffalo Tavern – 57 Bumgarner Camping Center – 58 Cabin Fever – 43 Cabin Store, The – 76 Café Porto¿no – 108 Capone’s Pizza – 34 Carlton Gallery – 84 Casa Rustica Restaurant – 111 Cha Da Thai – 35 Char – 35, 111 Chestnut Grille – 88 Chick-¿l-A – 113 Christmas in July Festival – 94 Cilantro’s Mexican Grill & Cantina – 34 Clark Gallery – 99 CoBo Sushi Bistro and Bar – 35 Cook’s Sporting Goods – 114 Country Gourmet, The – 52 Country Retreat Family Billiards – 110 Crossnore School, The – 93 Dande Lion, The - 10 Dewoolfson – 91 Dianne Davant Interiors - 123 Doe Ridge Pottery – 76 Dos Amigos- 110 Downtown Boone Development Association – 35

Eat Crow – 108 Edge of the World – 26 Erick’s Cheese & Wine – 107 Everything Has a Story – 56 Famous Louise’s Rock house – 110 Festiva Hospitality Group/Blue Ridge Village Resort – 44 Fleetwood Max General Store – 56 Florence Thomas Art School – 61 Foggy Mountain Gem Mine – 61 Footsloggers – 90 Foscoe Companies -124 Foscoe Fishing Company – 18 Foscoe Rentals – 97 Fuller & Fuller – 84 Gaines Kiker Silversmith/Goldsmith – 14 Gilded Lily by Patra, The – 79 Glen Burney Grocery – 63 Grandfather Campground & Cabins – 23 Grandfather Mountain – 12 Grandfather Mountain Nursery Garden Center & Landscaping – 116 Grandfather Trout Farm – 31 Grandfather Vineyard & Winery – 77 Green Park Inn – 42 Greenhouse Crafts – 56 Gregory Alan’s Unique Gifts & Home Furnishings – 67 Hardin Fine Jewelers – 116 Hawksnest Zipline – 114 Hearthstone of Boone – 41 Hemlock Inn – 42 Hendricks Construction – 98 Heritage Hall – 45 Hickory Furniture Mart – 82 HighCountryNC.com – 46, 49, 55, 67 Honey Hole, The – 57 Hotel of West Jefferson – 122 Hotel Tavern, The – 112 Hound Ears Club – 28 Incredible Toy Company, The – 87 Jackalope’s The View Restaurant – 112 Jenkins Rentals – 103 Jim’s Corner Furniture – 57 Joy Bistro – 109 Kincaid Factory Direct Outlet – 48 Land Source – 115 Leatherwood Mountains – 100 Lees-McRae Summer Theatre – 81 Libby’s – 48, 57 Lililu on King – 38 Linville Falls Winery – 99 Linville Land Harbor – 12 Little Horse Creek Farm – 30 Loaves & Fishes – 109 Logs America – 93 Lucky Penny – 34 Magic Cycles – 90 Makoto’s – 113 Mast General Store - 2 Mast Mobile Pet Care & Acupuncture – 30 Melanie’s – 106 Mellow Mushroom – 69 Monkee’s – 83 Mountain Aire Golf Club – 72 Mountain City Antiques & Collectibles – 78 Mountain Dog and Friends – 31

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Mountain Home & Hearth – 16 Mountain Jewelers – 99 Mountain Land Company – 69 Mountain Out¿tters – 50 Mountain Sotheby’s International Realty – 63 Mountaineer Landscaping Inc. – 99 Mustard Seed, The – 21 My Best Friend’s Barkery – 30 Mystery Hill – 18 Nation’s Inn – 5 New River Building Supply & Lumber Company – 100 Nicks’ Restaurant & Pub – 110 Noble Kava – 34 Old World Galleries – 18 Olde Time Antiques Fair – 54 On the Same Page – 87 Originals Only Gallery – 57 Papa Joe’s – 112 Parker Tie Company Inc. – 56 Past & Present Antiques & Artisan Shoppes – 56 Perry’s Gold Mine – 14 Pet Place, The – 30 Petal Pusher Designs & Gifts – 56 Proper – 34 Ram’s Rack Thrift Shop – 34 Red Onion, The – 112 RedTail Mountain Resort – 70 River & Earth Adventures – 9 RiverCamp USA – 45 Rivercross – 98 Rock Dimensions – 90 Rooster Ridge Stairlifts – 82 Rose Mountain Butcher Shop – 57 Seven Devils – 44 Six Pence Pub – 108 Sky Valley Zip Tours – 72 SML – 44 Southern Highland Craft Guild – 98 Stick Boy Bread Co. – 106 Stick Boy Bread Co. Kitchen – 106 Sugar Mtn Lodging Inc. – 44 Sugar Ski & Country Club – 44 Sugar Top Resort Sales – 44 Tanner Women’s Apparel & Accessories – 43 TAPP Room, The – 111 Taste Grill – 111 Tatum Galleries and Interiors – 77 These Were the Days – 44 Timberlake’s Restaurant at Chetola Resort – 109 Tis the Season For All Seasons – 57 Trolly Stop, The – 34 Tweetsie Railroad – 58 Valle Crucis – 33 Village Inns of Blowing Rock, The – 42 Village Real Estate – 39 VisitWestJefferson.org – 5 Wahoo’s Adventures – 25 Watauga Lake Winery – 84 Watauga Lakeshore Resort – 27 Watauga Medical Center – 23 Westglow Resort & Spa – 10 Woodlands Barbecue & Pickin’ Parlor, The – 108 Woof Pack Pet Services – 30 Zaloo’s Canoes – 27


PAGE 122

THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

2014

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THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

2014

W

PAGE 13

Our Towns

elcome to your High Country vacation! But it’s more than that. A trip to the Blue Ridge Mountains is a veritable getaway, an escape to nature that area residents are lucky enough to call home. The towns and communities that make up the High Country are diverse and quaint, vibrant and picturesque, offering visitors amenities aplenty, from dining, lodging and shopping to top-notch entertainment and nightlife.

Watauga County Boone

No matter which activity draws you to the High Country, it’s likely that you’ll end up in Boone at some point during your visit. Boone is the hub of Watauga County, the gathering place for people of all walks of life, whether resident or visitor, student or retiree, socialite or seeker of peace and quiet. The town is home to Appalachian State University, one of the 17 colleges and universities that makes up the University of North Carolina system and draws about 17,000 students. Interest in the school boomed after the Mountaineers’ football team won three consecutive NCAA Division I national championships in 2005, 2006 and 2007. The university’s presence helps create a young and friendly vibe throughout the town. Just make sure not to cross anyone by mispronouncing the name: It’s “App-uh-latch-un.” Adjacent to the university is King Street and the surrounding area, one of the town’s best shopping destinations. One-of-a-kind stores and eclectic boutiques dot the landscape, interspersed with legal of¿ces and and a diversity of restaurants to suit almost any taste. Departing from downtown, big-box stores and other shopping areas ensure that residents and visitors lack nothing in the way of modern conveniences. But Boone has an eye on its past, too. Named for the pioneer and explorer Daniel Boone, the town dates back to about 1800, when Jordan Councill opened a store on what is now King Street. In 1820, he opened a post of¿ce, and other homes and stores began to spring up nearby. When Watauga County was created in 1849, Boone was picked as the county seat.

Boone is a town where old and new mix, and visitors are made to feel like part of the family. PHOTO BY FRANK RUGGIERO

Blowing Rock

The town of Blowing Rock is named after an immense cliff overlooking Johns River Gorge, where the winds whip in such a way that light objects thrown over the rock float back to their owners. PHOTO BY CHRISTINA CALL

It remained a typical small town until the university began to grow in the 1960s. A relic of Boone’s storied past, the historic Jones House Community Center, is located right on King Street. The house was built in 1908 and was given to the town in the early 1980s. Today, the home is a go-to source for art and community functions. Boone is a town where old and new mix, and visitors are made to feel like part of the family. For more information, visit www.townofboone.net.

Blowing Rock manages to cram a mountain of beauty and fun into just three square miles. The town’s name comes from an immense cliff overlooking Johns River Gorge, where the winds whip in such a way that light objects thrown over the rock Àoat back to their owners. Anyone wishing to experience the phenomenon ¿rsthand can visit The Blowing Rock attraction to experience the town’s namesake and the Native American legend that surrounds it. For another dose of history, visit the renovated and restored Green Park Inn, a site on the National Register of Historic Places that has been a hotel since 1882. After closing due to age and the recession in May 2009, the building was purchased a year later by Irace Realty Associates and immediately underwent a complete overhaul. While clinging to the small-town charm and Southern graciousness of its past, Blowing Rock also includes nearly 20 hotels and inns and more than 100 shops. Find a place to park early in the morning and spend the rest of the day on foot, exploring the shops and parks of downtown. Clothing, antiques, home furnishings, mementos and delicious treats will ¿ll your shopping bags and your stomach as you examine the town’s treasures. Make sure to visit Tanger Shoppes on the SEE OUR TOWNS, PAGE 14


PAGE 14

THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

2014

New, Fine & Estate Jewelry

A tuber floats on the Watauga River in scenic Valle Crucis. PHOTO BY FRANK RUGGIERO

OUR TOWNS FROM PAGE 13

Silversmith / Goldsmith

Parkway on U.S. 321 to ¿nd name-brand items at outlet prices. The benches in Memorial Park at the center of Main Street make the perfect spot to settle down with sweet tea or lemonade and watch the world go by. The less-traveled Broyhill Park down Laurel Lane paints the perfect summer scene, complete with a shady gazebo and glistening pond. The trails surrounding Moses Cone Memorial Park and Bass Lake offer another scenic stroll. The picturesque town of Blowing Rock is the perfect place to have an active summer vacation – or to relax and do nothing at all. For more information, visit www. blowingrock.com.

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Just off N.C. 105 south of Boone, Valle Crucis offers simplicity and serenity in a pastoral riverside community. The valley contains the site of the only known Native American village in the immediate area. The ¿rst European settler of Watauga County, Samuel Hicks, also built a fort in the area during the American Revolution. Today, the community offers several historic inns, art galleries, farms and churches that provide service and comfort to all who enter.

GAINES KIKER

Valle Crucis

Working Studio and Gallery 132 Morris Street - Blowing Rock 828.295.3992

The Episcopal church has played a role throughout the community’s history. An Episcopal bishop entered the community in 1842 and provided its name, which is Latin for the “Vale of the Cross.” The Valle Crucis Conference Center, on the National Register of Historic Places, stays busy with retreats for numerous groups, and Crab Orchard Falls is a short hike from the conference center. The original Mast General Store provides a central gathering space in the community, as it has since 1883. Residents appreciate the store for its post of¿ce, morning news and coffee, while visitors can also ¿nd gifts, apparel and souvenirs. Just down the road is the Mast Store Annex, which opened about 25 years later. Behind the annex is a gravel road to the Valle Crucis Park, a recreational area with walking paths, riverfront, picnic areas and sports ¿elds. Dining highlights include Simplicity at the Mast Farm Inn and the 1861 Farmhouse Market, formerly the Ham Shoppe, which boasts some of the best sandwiches in the High Country. For more information, visit www.vallecrucis.com.

Todd

Todd is a town so nice it’s claimed by both Watauga and Ashe counties. The community’s main thoroughfare, SEE OUR TOWNS, PAGE 15


2014

THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

PAGE 15

The annual Todd Liberty Parade showcases the mountain hamlet’s artistic side. PHOTO BY FRANK RUGGIERO

OUR TOWNS FROM PAGE 14

Railroad Grade Road, is popular with bicyclists and walking tours as it winds along with the New River, one of the few in the world that Àow north. The Todd General Store is an old-fashioned mercantile that dates back to 1914 and was built in anticipation of the Norfolk and Western “Virginia Creeper” railroad. Todd was the last stop of the route and got much of its supplies from the train. Today, the store offers dinner, bluegrass, book signings and demonstrations. The Todd Mercantile features the work of local artists and crafters, as well as mountain honey and other local goods, while also hosting monthly square and contra dances, with traditional mountain music by local performers. The ever-crafty Elkland Art Center, known for its colorful parades and environmentally conscious puppet shows, offers summer workshops and programs for those with a Àair for creativity. The river itself provides plenty to do, from canoeing and kayaking to excellent ¿shing. Several companies, including RiverGirl Fishing Company and Wahoo’s Adventures, have outposts near Todd to provide gear and instruction for anyone interested in hitting the river. For more information, visit www.toddnc.org.

Foscoe

Nestled between Boone and Banner Elk is the unincorporated community of Foscoe. But don’t let its size fool you. The community is brimming with shopping, art, dining and outdoor fun. Shopping includes mementos and more at Bear Creek Traders, treats, snacks and other tail-wagging goodies for your furry friends at Mountain Dog & Friends and the luxurious linens of Dewoolfson Down. If you’re shopping for outdoor fun, cast a line with Foscoe Fishing Company, or pan for gold with the Greater Foscoe Mining Company. Hungry? Sample some home-cooked Southern goodness at the Foscoe Country Corner and Deli. Some of the High Country’s ¿nest gourmet sandwiches and baked goods await at Eat Crow, while burgers, billiards and family fun are on cue at Country Retreat Family Billiards. Foscoe’s also home to one of the views that made Grandfather Mountain famous — the ridgeline’s iconic pro¿le of an old man reclining.

Seven Devils

From elevations of some 5,200 feet, the town of Seven Devils straddles both Watauga and Avery counties. From many areas in the town, one has views of Grandfather Mountain, as well as Beech Mountain, Sugar Mountain, Rich Mountain and Mount Rogers

in Virginia. Seven Devils is just a few minutes from Boone, Blowing Rock, Banner Elk and Valle Crucis and can be found off N.C. 105. One of the smaller towns in the region, Seven Devils began life in the 1960s as the Seven Devils Resort, and, in 1979, the resort became incorporated as the town. How did it get its name? According to the Seven Devils website,“The L.A. Reynolds Industrial District of Winston-Salem, N.C., formed the resort in 1965 and the founders were met with the challenge of naming the resort. At this time there was a rumor about an old man on the mountain who had seven sons ‘as mean as the devil.’ People were heard commenting that in the winter the mountain was ‘as cold as the devils’ or ‘as windy as the devil.’ “The founders wanted a catchy, unique name that would bring attention to the mountain. They noticed the repeated appearance of the number seven, including the seven predominant rocky peaks surrounding Valley Creek, as well as the many coincidental references to ‘devils.’ ‘Seven Devils’ seemed to suggest a frivolous, mischievous resort where people could ‘experience the temptation of Seven Devils.” In the 1960s, the town grew with a golf course, ski slope, lake, riding ground and camping area. After the resort venture experienced ¿nancial trouble, the town was incorporated. SEE OUR TOWNS, PAGE 16


THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

PAGE 16

2014

4912 US HWY 421 S. • BOONE, NC • (828) 262-0051 • WWW.MOUNTAINHOMEANDHEARTH.COM

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Lees-McRae Summer Theatre is a mainstay for summers in Banner Elk. PHOTO BY FRANK RUGGIERO

Kitchen Appliances

OUR TOWNS FROM PAGE 15

While the golf course and ski slope have been closed for a number of years, Hawksnest has become one of the town’s centerpieces. Among the attractions at Hawksnest (www.hawksnest-resort.com) are ziplining year-round and snow-tubing in the winter. For more information and events at Seven Devils, visit www. townofsevendevils.org.

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The mountain valley town of Banner Elk has grown from a tiny hamlet to a town offering year-round amenities and memorable vacations for the entire family. Banner Elk is home to Lees-McRae College, a small, private, four-year coeducational liberal arts college af¿liated with Presbyterian Church U.S.A. with more than 900 students from more than 20 states and countries. The old stone buildings nestled across campus make for a photographer’s delight.

The town hosts numerous shops and restaurants and stays abuzz with activities and events. Visitors can picnic or walk in the town park, hear live music, enjoy exquisite shopping or simply relax by the mill pond and stay in one of the inns after dinner in a ¿ne restaurant. Banner Elk is in the heart of the High Country’s many attractions, and just a short drive will take you to numerous natural settings where you can relax and revel in nature’s beauty. Banner Elk also offers many cultural happenings, with a celebrated summer theater program by Lees-McRae and art festivals by some of the area’s many galleries and artisans. Visitors are encouraged to return to Banner Elk each autumn for its annual Woolly Worm Festival, which attracts close to 20,000 people annually. Cutting between the peaks of Sugar Mountain, Beech Mountain and Grandfather Mountain, the topography of the town provides natural de¿nition and gentle undulation through the town’s boundaries. SEE OUR TOWNS, PAGE 17


THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

2014

PAGE 17

OUR TOWNS FROM PAGE 16

For more information or a calendar of events, call Banner Elk Chamber of Commerce at (828) 898-8395, or visit www.bannerelk.org.

Beech Mountain

At 5,506 feet, Beech Mountain is the highest town in eastern North America. That means two things: When winter comes, it’s a great place to ski, and, of importance right now, is that even on the hottest day of the summer, it’s cool on top of Beech Mountain. Even when it’s steamy in the “lowlands” of 3,000-plus feet, the temperature stays comfortable atop Beech. The rest of the world seems distant when you settle down on the front porch of a rental condominium and survey the magni¿cent view that is one of Beech Mountain’s trademarks. As the cool summer night air sends you looking for a sweater, you’ll probably smile at the thought of how hot it is in the lower elevations. Beech Mountain is a four-season resort. There are more than 5,000 beds available on top of the mountain. These range from rustic cabins to mountain chalets to luxury condominiums. When it’s time to eat, you can enjoy anything from a deli sandwich to pizza to a gourmet meal by candlelight. During the days, there are many specialty stores for shopping, a golf course, horseback riding, tennis, swimming and hiking. There are nearby canoe and raft runs that are among the best offered in the eastern United States. Nightlife is alive and well on the mountain. Whatever your musical taste, you can ¿nd a spot to enjoy an afterhours scene. There’s another good thing about Beech Mountain. The mountain is so large that much of it remains in a natural state, with rich forests dotted by rolling farmland. And it’s only a short drive from the “downtown” to the country or resorts. Take your pick. Our guess is if you spend some time in Beech Mountain, you’ll want to come back to do some real estate shopping. Or at least book a slopeside condo for the ski season. For more information,visit www.beechmtn.com.

Crossnore

Crossnore is a town steeped in educational history. The town is home to Crossnore Academy, founded by Drs. Eustace and Mary Martin Sloop. The Sloops traveled the steep dirt trails in isolated mountain valleys to bring medicine to the people and convince farmers to let their children come to school. Because of poverty and distance, the Sloop school in Crossnore eventually took in boarders and built dormitories to accommodate them. It gained a national reputation for effectiveness in changing lives and in breaking the cycle of poverty,

Visiting a four-star resort at Beech Mountain or your summer home? Take a ride on the lift to the top and enjoy the cool breeze, hike the trails or just relax. PHOTO BY ROB MOORE

moonshine and child marriages of mountain families. Mrs. Sloop eventually put these tales to paper in her autobiography “Miracle in the Hills,” which has since been used as the basis for a drama of the same name that takes place each summer in present-day Crossnore. The Sloops built a school, hospital, dental clinic and eventually, a boarding school to give children the basis for an improved life. They brought to Avery County the ¿rst electricity, telephone, paved road and boarding school. Through the Sloops’ advocacy, public schools Àourished in Avery County. Today, Crossnore Academy carries on the work of the original school and has reclaimed the educational foundation beneath its commitment to give hurting children a chance for a better life. The school’s teachers enable it to meet not only the special needs of Crossnore residents, but also the needs of area students that live at home and whose educational needs are best met at Crossnore. The school is also home to Miracle Grounds Coffee Cafe & Creamery, a working vocational classroom, featuring specialty coffee drinks, homemade snacks, sandwiches, milkshakes, ice cream, WiFi and more. Crossnore is famous for its Independence Day parade and celebration, and the town’s Meeting House is home to the Crossnore Jam, a series of gatherings and concerts by local musicians on the ¿rst Friday night through the summer and fall months. For more information, visit www.crossnorenc.com.

Elk Park

The town of Elk Park borders the state of Tennessee and offers a unique visiting experience. From the oldtime feel of Brinkley’s Hardware Store to the additional Lower Street antique shops and classic barbershop, Elk Park takes visitors back to a simpler time. The town’s original thoroughfare, Lower Street, and many businesses originated when Elk Park hosted a train depot for the old East Tennessee and Western North Carolina Railroad and Tweetsie Railroad. Elk Park thrived due to the industry and remained vibrant after the trains stopped running through town. For more information, call Elk Park Town Hall at (828) 733-9573.

Linville

The community of Linville is located just south of the intersection of U.S. 221 and N.C. 105 in Avery County. The community was founded in 1883, designed by Samuel T. Kelsey of Kansas and named for William and John Linville, who were reportedly killed by Cherokees in 1766. East Tennessee and Western North Carolina Railroad passed through the community from 1916 through 1940, when a major Àood washed away the tracks. The old rail route later became N.C. 105 in 1956. Linville has three country clubs in the area: Eseeola, SEE OUR TOWNS, PAGE 20


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THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

permanent home for the county’s annual Agriculture and Heritage Fair each September. Newland hosts an annual Christmas parade through downtown, with decorations adorning the town reÀecting the area’s rich Christmas tree industry. With a number of restaurants and boutiques downtown, Newland is a prime destination for dining and shopping, or just to stop in on a visit to nearby Roan Mountain or Grandfather Mountain. For more information, visit www. townofnewland.com.

OUR TOWNS FROM PAGE 17

Grandfather Golf and Country Club and Linville Ridge; all open late spring to early fall. Eseeola Lodge is also a popular destination for golf and lodging during the summer months. A number of local tourist areas within a short drive share the Linville name, including the Linville River and majestic Linville Falls, Linville Caverns on N.C. 221 and Linville Gorge wilderness area. For visitors considering making Linville a part-time or full-time home, they can visit Linville Land Harbor, where units are available for sale or rent in a cozy community featuring its own golf course and amenities. A number of residents live at Land Harbor part-time, while others stay year-round to enjoy the beauty of the area’s four seasons. During the winter months, Linville is only a short drive to nearby ski slopes at Sugar Mountain and Beech Mountain, popular skiing and snow-tubing destinations. Perhaps the most popular tourist attraction housed in Linville is Grandfather Mountain. The newest among North Carolina’s state parks, Grandfather

2014

Sugar Mountain

The observation deck on the upper portion of the Linville Falls is one of the first stops to view this powerfull waterfall. PHOTO BY ROB MOORE

Mountain offers hiking trails, picturesque views during all four seasons, animal habitats and attractions and the famous Mile-High Swinging Bridge.

Newland

With the highest county seat east of the

Mississippi River at 3,589 feet, the town of Newland was incorporated in 1913 as the county seat of the newly formed Avery County. Its original name was “Old Fields of Toe” because it is located in a broad Àat valley and is at the headwaters of the Toe River. Newland was a mustering place for Civil War troops. Toe is short for “Estatoe,” an Indian chief’s daughter who drowned herself in the river in despair because she could not marry a brave from another tribe. The town of around 700 residents, Newland succeeded over three other areas for the honor of county seat. The recently renovated courthouse, originally constructed in 1913, overlooks a classic town square, bordered by shops and churches and complete with a memorial to Avery County veterans. Adjacent to the courthouse building is the original jail, which has been converted into the Avery County Historical Museum. Exhibits in the museum, which is free of charge to visit, include the original jail cells, numerous artifacts and information about the history of Avery County. During the summer and fall months, visitors can check out the farmers’ market that meets on Saturday mornings outside of Newland Elementary School, and visitors traveling out of town can picnic or hike at Waterfalls Park, a unique recreation spot sponsored by Newland Volunteer Fire Department. Heritage Park hosts rodeo events on weekends during the summer and is the

If outdoor activity is your thing, look no further than the village of Sugar Mountain. Offering more than just great skiing, Sugar Mountain also provides its visitors with an array of ways to get outside and enjoy the beauty of the High Country. One attraction in particular is the summer lift rides on Sugar Mountain. On weekends, weather permitting, visitors can ride the ski lift to the 5,300-foot peak of Sugar Mountain. The 40-minute roundtrip ride features a spectacular view of the High Country and runs from Independence Day weekend to Labor Day weekend. If heights aren’t what you’re looking for, Sugar Mountain can also be seen on foot. With numerous trails that wind throughout the village of Sugar Mountain, you can see both the brilliant greens of the summer as well as the vibrant reds and yellows of fall. The trails of Sugar Mountain are not just for those on foot. Many cyclists choose the village of Sugar Mountain for its variety of challenging and picturesque terrain. The village of Sugar Mountain also gives tennis and golf lovers an opportunity to enjoy their favorite sports in the beautiful mountain setting. With Sugar Mountain’s golf course, six fast-dry clay courts and full service tennis pro shop, visitors will never be faced with the problem of ¿nding something to do. Whether you come for a day or stay in one of the many comfortable lodgings the village has to offer, Sugar Mountain will soon become your destination for great outdoor fun. For more information, visit www. seesugar.com. SEE OUR TOWNS, PAGE 21


THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

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OUR TOWNS FROM PAGE 20

Ashe County Creston

Located in the northwestern corner of Ashe County, Creston lies on the border of Tennessee. The curvy winding roads can offer travelers some of the most beautiful scenic byways in the area. The Riverview Community Center is located off of N.C. 88 West in Creston and is home to festivals and other events all year long. Worth’s Chapel at Creston United Methodist Church is located in Creston and was listed as a National Historic Building in 2005. The chapel was built about 1902. The interior of the chapel is ¿nished, in part, with American Chestnut wood, harvested before the blight reached the northwestern mountains of North Carolina.

Grassy Creek

Just south of the North Carolina-Virginia border, Grassy Creek is a tightly knit community that is dotted with smiling faces and countless rows of Fraser ¿r Christmas trees. Check out the sights around the nationally renowned New River, where you will also ¿nd the River House Country Inn and Restaurant for delectable dinners.

Jefferson

A rich history, dating from 1799, lies in the picturesque town of Jefferson. Jefferson was founded prior to its counterpart, West Jefferson, and stood at the base of Mount Jefferson. The town was ¿rst known as Jeffersonton, but then became Jefferson, and was one of the ¿rst towns in the nation to

Lansing

Whether you’re looking for a town reminiscent of the past or a town that offers whispers of tomorrow, the small, friendly town of Lansing beckons to travelers from near and far to visit and relax, while browsing its shops, trying some home cooking and tasting some locally made wine. The town, in the northwestern section of Ashe County, is 20 minutes from Jefferson and West Jefferson and only 45 minutes from Boone. Travelers can arrive in the town in less than an hour from Abingdon, Va., or Mountain City, Tenn. The town has one red light, and several businesses line the street. Home-cooked meals can be found at Country House Restaurant, while pizza, sandwiches and salad, along with specialty teas and fresh roasted coffee, are available at Pie on the Mountain. The ¿rst post of¿ce in the town was established in 1882 and served a rural community, made up of a village and outlying farms until the railroad made its

appearance, according to www.lansingnc.com. The economy and population begin to take off by 1914 as SEE OUR TOWNS, PAGE 22

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Glendale Springs

Home of the breathtaking and awe-aspiring fresco painting by Ben Long at Holy Trinity Episcopal Church, Glendale Springs has become revered for its budding arts scene. The community has become a must for anyone visiting Ashe County this summer. Proximity to the Blue Ridge Parkway is an added bonus as summer sets in and fall colors begin to explode.

bear the name of U.S. founding father Thomas Jefferson. The town is the county seat of Ashe and is home to the new courthouse, as well as the historic 1904 Courthouse. The Museum of Ashe County History is located in Jefferson and can be found in the 1904 Courthouse. The museum, through items collected and on display, offers a look at who the citizens of the county are, where they came from, how they got to the town, what did they do on the way and where do they go next? Ashe County Park and Foster Tyson Park are also located in Jefferson, the former of which hosts a nationally celebrated disc golf course.

TIVE SHRUBS & TREES · CRAZY CONIFERS · RHODIES GALORE ·

Located just off of U.S. 221 between West Jefferson and Deep Gap, Fleetwood is home of community gatherings at the Fleetwood Community Center and the local volunteer ¿re department. On your way to and from the busy towns of Boone and West Jefferson, stop by to look at local crafts, antiques and civic pride in Fleetwood.

First known as Jeffersonton, but later changed to Jefferson, this small town in Ashe County was founded in 1799 and sits at the base of Mount Jefferson. FILE PHOTO

NNIALS · VERTICAL GARDENS · NA

Fleetwood


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THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

A view of the mountain town of West Jefferson from the top of Mount Jefferson.

OUR TOWNS FROM PAGE 21

the Norfolk and Western Railroad, better known as the Virginia Creeper, came to town. A big commodity for area residents was iron ore mined from the mountains. The railroad served as an avenue to transport the ore to markets in Richmond, Va., and Pittsburgh, Pa. During its history, Lansing had a cheese plant, clothing store, cof¿n shop, doctor’s of¿ce, bank and a restaurant, according to the town’s website. The cheese plant allowed area farmers to bring their goods to sale instead of having to travel into West Jefferson. The town was chartered and incorporated in 1928. Lansing faced two devastating ¿res in the 1930s and 1940s and faced Hurricane Hugo later that century. Despite these setbacks, the town continued to Àourish and expand. The Works Progress Administration built the Lansing High School in 1941, using local granite stone. The school still stands today. The scenic Virginia Creeper biking trail is available to visitors, as is the town’s park. For more information about Lansing, visit www. lansingnc.com.

Laurel Springs

Another border community, Laurel Springs prides

itself with small town charm and beauty that entices motorists from the Blue Ridge Parkway for a quick bite to eat before continue their adventure on the scenic byway. Although it is located at the top mountain and touches Wilkes, Alleghany and Ashe counties, Laurel Springs is never more than a 30-minute drive from the listed county seats. Also, be sure to stop by the Thistle Meadow Winery for individualized tours of a family owned wine business.

West Jefferson

With a thriving arts district and Christmas trees galore, West Jefferson makes its mark on the High Country as a destination for locals, as well as visitors. The town was built around the Virginia-Carolina Railroad depot during the early 1900s. According to the town’s history, the ¿rst ownership of the valley now known as West Jefferson began in 1779 when N.C. Gov. Richard Caswell granted 320 acres to Col. Ben Cleveland, who battled the British at King’s Mountain. More than a century later, the West Jefferson Land Company surveyed the new town and ¿xed its limits as a square one-half mile north, south, east and west of the Virginia-Carolina Depot. The town was chartered in 1915. The town’s initial growth came through the railroad, but early development was also spurred by the opening of the First National Bank of West Jefferson in 1915. The bank’s branch of¿ce, built in 1962, is now home to

2014

PHOTO BY ROB MOORE

West Jefferson Town Hall. The town continues to thrive today and has a little something for everyone. Those visiting the town can browse one of the many art galleries, gift shops and retail stores. West Jefferson is home to many varieties of artwork, from paintings and photographs to sculptures and quilted items. More information about the area’s art district can be found at the Ashe Arts Center, located at 303 School Ave., just off of East Main Street. The center is home to the Ashe County Arts Council which sponsors a variety of community programming and exhibits throughout the year. A popular spot in the town is the Ashe County Cheese Plant where visitors can see cheese made and go across the street to the Ashe County Cheese Store to purchase a variety of cheeses, from cheddar to pepper jack and the celebrated cheese curds. Old-fashioned snacks and candies and locally made wines can also be purchased at the store. The cheese plant is open year round and located at 106 E. Main St. in West Jefferson. Just outside West Jefferson, in the Beaver Creek community, St. Mary’s Episcopal Church can be found. The church is the location for a fresco of Jesus on the cross by renowned artist Ben Long. A painting of Madonna with child also hangs on the sanctuary wall. Local eateries and cafes offer all sorts of tasty treats, coffee, spirits and more, from one end of the town to the other. For more information, visit www.visitwestjefferson. org.


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THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

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2014

h s a l p S h Splis

Water sports abound in the High Country

BY CHRISTINA CALL

O

ne of the biggest High Country attractions in the summer is water sports. Nothing cools a person off on a hot day like going out for some fun in the water. Outdoor fanatics have a wide range of options when it comes to enjoying the lakes and rivers of the High Country. The High Country offers endless opportunities for canoeing, tubing, kayaking, ¿shing, boating, paddle boarding or whitewater rafting. High Country out¿tters offer river excursions for every skill level; from gentle runs through rifÀes and moderate rapids suitable for young families to more extreme action and excitement for the more adventurous. Whether you imagine yourself surging slowly through small rapids or dropping off a shelf into foaming whitewater below, rafting in the High Country is for you. Touch base with the experienced, full-service, safetyoriented out¿tting businesses of the High Country, and you’ll soon ¿nd yourself on one of the North Carolina High Country’s world-class waterways. For tubing, kayaking, whitewater rafting, paddle boarding and more, visit Wahoo’s Adventures. Wahoo’s has been around the High Country for 36 years and was voted two-time “Out¿tter of the Year” by the Professional Paddlesports Association. Owner and founder Jeff Stanley has a huge focus on safety. All Wahoo’s Adventures’ guides maintain current CPR and First Aid certi¿cations. Trip leaders and river managers maintain either wilderness ¿rst responder or wilderness EMT certi¿cations — ensuring safety is the No. 1 priority. “Our season begins each year with the training of new guides and the re-certi¿cation of returning guides in the techniques of swiftwater rescue,” Stanley said. Stanley’s highly trained staff takes visitors through the waters of the High Country, with Wahoo’s offering all levels of experience to guests. Wahoo’s has bases on the New River, Watauga River and the Nolichucky River. Guests considering a canoeing, kayaking or tubing trip on the New River will be pleased to know that Wahoo’s owns more than 1,000 feet of river frontage. Wahoo’s also provides a private gated secure parking lot, covered picnic shelter, tree house accommodations,

Edge of the World, located in Banner Elk, offers white-knuckle, whitewater fun for the whole family. PHOTOS SUBMITTED

primitive camping and bathrooms. If you go whitewater rafting at either the Nolichucky or Watauga River, Wahoo’s provides your group with river stores, clean restrooms, private changing rooms before your trip and clean, hot showers for after your experience. Guests are shuttled upstream and then ¿nish their trip at the base, allowing them to conveniently jump right out of the boat and, in a few steps, be at riverside picnicking/camping areas. Each full day guided whitewater rafting trips are accompanied with a Wahoo’s “famous gourmet deli lunch.” Whether you are looking for an extreme trip or relaxation on the river, Wahoo’s offers a wide range of options for visitors. Wahoo’s Adventures is located at 3385 U.S. 321 between Boone and Blowing Rock. For more information or to make a reservation, call (828) 262-5774, or visit www.wahoosadventures.com. For whitewater rafting and kayaking, look no further

than Edge of the World. Edge of the World, located in Banner Elk, offers whitewater fun for the whole family. Join Edge of the World on a rafting adventure down the scenic Watauga River. Edge of the World has been rafting on the Watauga River for 30 years, and it’s just as fun summer after summer. Edge of the World offers everything from gear to professional whitewater guides to photos of your family to a real home-cooked lunch. “The trips are kind of a comedy show all day,” manager Jake Barrow, said. “Our guides are funny and personable, which makes for a really memorable day on the river. Our staff is the reason we are the most wellknown rafting company in area.” The Watauga River is dam-controlled, which means that the water level is great from spring to fall, guaranteed. Edge of the World will take ages 4 and older and sugSEE SPLASH, PAGE 27


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SPLASH FROM PAGE 24

gests calling in advance for reservations. For more information, call (800) 789EDGE or (828) 898-9550, or visit www. edgeoftheworld.com. For additional whitewater rafting adventures, River & Earth Adventures offers canoeing, kayaking, rafting and tubing. Voted the No. 1 outdoor adventure in Boone on TripAdvisor.com, River & Earth offers a memorable trip on the water. While whitewater rafting, participants will experience both serenity and adrenaline. During the trip, breathe in the fresh mountain air, soak up the serene scenery, splash your family and friends and listen as educated guides 多ll you in on all the local river trivia. River & Earth offers a variety of whitewater rafting trips for people of all ages and experience. Fill River & Earth in on your comfort, budget and the level of adventure you seek, and River & Earth will have a trip that suits you and your whole family. River & Earth also runs canoeing, tubing and recreational kayak shuttles

THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE on both the Watauga and New Rivers, depending on water level. The Watauga River winds through Valle Crucis, and the New River runs through the community of Todd. Both areas are known for their picturesque scenery, quaint shops and take-out lunch spots. No matter what kind of adventure you are looking for, River & Earth has it all. River & Earth has locations in Boone and Elizabethton, Tenn. For more information, call (828) 355-9797, or visit www. raftcavehike.com. Watauga Kayak provides guided whitewater rafting and river and lake kayaking adventures. Located in Elizabethton, Tenn., Watauga Kayak is an easy drive from Boone, Banner Elk, Roan Mountain, Blowing Rock, Mountain City, Johnson City, Kingsport, Bristol and Asheville. Watauga Kayak offers family whitewater rafting in North Carolina and Tennessee. All guides are certi多ed in CPR and First Aid and are committed to making sure you have a great time on the river. Select your whitewater rafting trip based on the level of excitement you want and the length of time you wish to SEE SPLASH, PAGE 29

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THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

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SPLASH FROM PAGE 27

spend on the river. Watauga Kayak also offers lake and river kayaking, which has a relaxed teaching style and paddling pace. All tours are designed around interests and abilities. For trip prices, or additional information, call (423) 542-6777, or visit www. wataugakayak.com.

TAKE IT TO THE LAKE

The Appalachian Trail travels through one of the prettiest sections of North Carolina and Tennessee. Hikers travel up the Roan Balds for spectacular views and casual hiking. Just hit Carvers Gap and you will have easy access to the famous trail and its beauty. PHOTOS BY ROB MOORE

If a day ¿shing at the lake is more your speed, several High Country lakes beckon for your ¿shing rod and reel. Boating and ¿shing enthusiasts, as well as swimmers, sailors and picnickers,

PAGE 29

can make the short jaunt across the state line into Tennessee to visit Watauga Lake. A number of marinas along the lake offers rentals of pontoon boats, jet skis and speedboats, with local restaurants dotting the shore with seafood and varieties of country or ¿ne cuisine. Near milepost 297 on the Blue Ridge Parkway is Price Lake, a picturesque part of the popular Julian Price Park. Visitors can rent a boat or canoe to take in the views — or the ¿sh — from the water. Nearby campsites allow lake-goers to make their visit into a vacation. Wildcat Lake in Banner Elk, located on Hickory Nut Gap Road, offers a sandy beach, playground, picnic area and water for swimming, canoeing and trout ¿shing. Lifeguards are on duty during summer hours.

River Outfitters EDGE OF THE WORLD

THE APPALACHIAN TRAIL

Georgia, North Carolina and Tennessee Regional Of¿ce 160A Zillicoa St. Asheville, N.C. 28801 (828) 254-3708 www.appalachiantrail.org

GRANDFATHER MOUNTAIN

2050 Blowing Rock Highway Linville, N.C. 28646 (800) 468-7325 www.grandfather.com

FRIENDS OF THE MOUNTAINS TO SEA TRAIL (919) 698-9024 www.ncmst.org

BLUE RIDGE PARKWAY (828) 298-0398

www.blueridgeparkway.org

BLUE RIDGE NATURAL HERITAGE AREA

(828)-298-5330 www.blueridgeheritage.com

NORTH CAROLINA STATE PARKS (877) 722-6762 www.ncparks.gov

Want to keep it simple? Try Bass Lake in Blowing Rock for easy, meandering hikes around the lake or up to Cone Manor.

HIKING

FROM PAGE 23 Running from one end of Boone to the other, it crosses several bridges that allow for some good views. An easy, alternative way to see Boone, this paved trail is about four miles long. Access to the greenway can be found in many locations throughout town. A good place to start is at the Watauga Swim Complex on Hunting Hills Lane in Boone. The Mountains to Sea Trail will eventually connect Clingman’s Dome in Tennessee to Jockey’s Ridge State Park on the Outer Banks of North Carolina with a walk-able trail. The Beacon Heights overlook on the Blue Ridge Parkway is one of the entry points for this trail. Named Section 14 of the Mountains to Sea, it is a challenging and scenic 16.2-mile hike to Deep Gap. Moses H. Cone Memorial Park near Blowing Rock is another easy hike. Just off the Blue Ridge Parkway, it preserves the historic country estate of Moses Cone, including a 13,000-square foot mansion that now houses the Parkway Craft Center. The 25 miles of carriage trails throughout the 3,500-acre estate are open to horseback riding and hiking. The park is open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. With mild temperatures all season, take advantage of the High Country’s many miles of trail this summer.

394 Shawneehaw Ave. Banner Elk, N.C. 28604 (828) 898-9550 www.edgeoworld.com

HIGH MOUNTAIN EXPEDITIONS

1380 N.C. 105 Boone, N.C. 28607 (828) 264-7368 www.highmountainexpeditions. com

RIVER & EARTH ADVENTURES 1655 N.C. 105 South Boone, N.C. 28607 (828) 963-5491 www.raftcavehike.com

RIVERCAMP USA

2221 Kings Creek Road

Piney Creek, N.C. 28663 (336) 359-2267 www.rivercampusa.com

WAHOO’S ADVENTURES

3385 U.S. 321 South Boone, N.C. 28607 (800) 444-RAFT www.wahoosadventures.com

WATAUGA KAYAK

1409 Broad St. Elizabethton, Tenn. 37643 (423) 542-6777 www.wataugakayak.com

ZALOO’S CANOES

3874 N.C. 16 South Jefferson, N.C. 28640 (800) 535-4027 www.zaloos.com

Watauga Lake Marinas COVE RIDGE MARINA

LAKESHORE MARINA

FISH SPRINGS MARINA

PIONEER LANDING MARINA & CAMPGROUND

947 Piercetown Road Butler, Tenn. 37640 (423) 768-3741 www.coveridgemarina.com

191 Fish Springs Road Hampton, Tenn. 37658 (423) 768-2336 www.¿shspringsmarina.com

2285 U.S. 321 Hampton, Tenn. 37658 (423) 725-2201 lakeshore-resort@earthlink.net

105 Cowan Town Road Butler, Tenn. 37640 (423) 768-3164 info@pioneerlanding.com


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THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

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A Tail-Wagging Vacation BY CAROLINE HARRIS

L

ooking for fun things to do in the High Country with your furry best friend? Not to worry, there are several places you can bring Fido along. Dine al fresco at one of several pooch-friendly restaurants in Boone, Blowing Rock or Banner Elk. In addition to municipal parks and hiking trails, let your pet off the leash in one of the High Country’s designated dog parks. Local pet stores offer everything your pet could need. From outdoor activities to patio dining, there are plenty of options that are pet-friendly.

Parks TATE-EVANS PARK

This park, located in the middle of downtown Banner Elk, offers a walking trail and plenty of open space. 210 Park Ave. Banner Elk, N.C. 28604 (828) 898-5398 www.townofbannerelk.org

Pet-friendly Places in the High Country

BEECH MOUNTAIN BARK PARK

The park is a fenced-in, off-leash dog park where wellbehaved dogs can exercise in a clean, safe environment. The park is a beautiful, well-maintained space open to all dog lovers and friends who are willing to uphold the park’s rules and restrictions. Features include two play areas, dog watering stations and a picnic shelter. 1330 Pine Ridge Road Beech Mountain, N.C. 28604 (828) 387-3003 www.beechrecreation.org

WATAUGA HUMANE SOCIETY DOG PARK

The dog park consists of approximately 3.5 acres of fenced land for dogs to play, and a smaller, half-acre section for smaller dogs. All dogs must have a current rabies certi¿cate, and their owners must submit an application. Day passes are $3. Open daily from 6 a.m. to sundown. (828) 264-7865 312 Paws Way Boone, N.C. 28607 www.wataugahumanesociety.org SEE VACATION, PAGE 32

Grandfather Trout Farm TROUT FISHING AT ITS BEST! EQUIPMENT SUPPLIED

You may bring your own or use our equipment. All bait and tackle are furnished at no charge. We will supply you with a bucket,

CLEANING • PACKING

For some people, cleaning their catch is par

clean your trout whole, then double bag and ice down your catch.

HWY. 105, 10 MILES SOUTH OF BOONE (across from entrance to Town of Seven Devils)

828-963-5098

PAGE 31

www.GrandfatherTroutFarm.com

Patches would love to dine at a pooch-friendly retaurant in Boone, Blowing Rock or Banner Elk. PHOTO BY ROB MOORE

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THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

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VACATION FROM PAGE 31

Trails BOONE GREENWAY TRAIL

The Boone Greenway Trail is a beautiful paved walk meandering several miles along the New River, crossing a covered bridge and several other stone and wooden bridges. The trail is landscaped, with Àowers, birds, butterÀies, picnic tables and park benches. The Greenway Trail is open year-round, free of charge, located off State Farm Road in Boone and can be accessed at the Watauga Parks and Recreation Center and other locations throughout town. For more information, including a map, visit www.townofboone.net/departments/public_works/ parks.php. (828) 264-9511 231 Complex Drive Boone, N.C. 28607 www.townofboone.net

PRICE LAKE LOOP TRAIL

Price Lake is a memorable walk with views of Grandfather Mountain that circles a beautiful mountain lake. The trail is 2.4 miles round trip on mostly Àat terrain. Trail access is at the Price Lake Overlook at Milepost 296.7 on the Blue Ridge Parkway.

TANAWHA TRAIL

Stretching 13.5 miles from Julian Price Park to Beacon Heights, this trail parallels the Blue Ridge Parkway on Grandfather Mountain and offers spectacular views. Tanawha Trail is moderate to easy with some strenuous areas. Access is at Milepost 305.5 on the Blue Ridge Parkway.

SIM’S POND

Sim’s Pond is the ¿rst stop after you enter Julian Price Park. The pond is a stop along the Green Knob Trail, which originates from the nearby Sim’s Creek Overlook. Hike a few hundred feet north on this trail and you will see the remnants of an old mill pond. Access is at Milepost 295 on the Blue Ridge Parkway.

Restaurants BANNER ELK CAFÉ

119 Central Way SW Banner Elk, N.C. 28604 (828) 898-4040

A.J. gets comfortable in the great outdoors. Pets are welcome on many trails throughout the High Country. PHOTO BY ALLISON HAVER

BAYOU SMOKEHOUSE AND GRILL 130 E. Main St. Banner Elk, N.C. 28604 (828) 898-8592 www.bayousmokehouse.com

CAFÉ PORTOFINO

970 Rivers St. Boone, N.C. 28607 (828) 264-7772 www.cafeporto¿no.net

COYOTE KITCHEN

200 Southgate Drive Boone, N.C 28607 (828) 265-4041 www.coyotekitchen.com

MURPHY’S RESTAURANT & PUB 747 W. King St.

Boone, N.C., 28607 (828) 264-5117 www.murphysboone.com

Foscoe, N.C. 28607 (828) 963-2470 www.mountaindogandfriends.com

TOWN TAVERN

MY BEST FRIEND’S BARKERY

1182 Main St. Blowing Rock, N.C. 28605 (828) 295-7500 www.towntavernbr.com

Retail Stores THE BARKING ROCK

131-1 Morris St. Blowing Rock, N.C. 28605 (828) 295-8883 www.thebarkingrock.com

MOUNTAIN DOG & FRIENDS 126 Taylor Road

176 Shawneehaw Ave. Banner Elk, N.C. 28604 (828) 898-5625 www.mybestfriendsbarkery.com

THE PET PLACE

240 Shadowline Drive Boone, N.C. 28607 (828) 268-1510 www.petplaceboone.com

PET SUPPLIES PLUS

2575 N.C. 105, Suite 100 (828) 266-2100 www.petsuppliesplus.com


2014

THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

PAGE 33

www.ValleCrucis.com

A haven for travelers since the 1800s, Valle Crucis, a National Rural Historic District, offers shops, beautiful bed and breakfast inns, delicious cuisine, wine tasting, rustic cabins, horseback riding, adventure and more.

Rivercross Made in USA 828-963-8623

Taylor House Inn Bed & Breakfast ca. 1911 800-963-5581

Valle Crucis Community Web Directory Apple Hill Farm - applehillfarmnc.com Baird House - bairdhouse.com Dutch Creek Trails - dutchcreektrails.com Lazy Bear Lodge - lazy-bear-lodge.com Mast Farm Inn - themastfarminn.com Mast General Store - mastgeneralstore.com Mountainside Lodge B&B - mountainsidelodgebb.com Rivercross Made in USA - rivercrossmadeinusa.com Taylor House Inn - taylorhouseinn.com Valle Crucis Bed & Breakfast - vallecrucisbandb.com Valle Crucis Log Cabin Rentals & Sales - logcabinrentals.com


THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

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2014

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THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

2014

PAGE 35

10

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FIRST FRIDAY ART CRAWL Visit downtown Boone the First Friday of every month to enjoy refreshments, entertainment, and local art. June 6th, July 11th, August 1st, and September 5th, 5:30 – 8:30 p.m. Downtown Boone downtownboonenc.com • 828.268.6283

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THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

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Hook, Line and Sinker

2014

Fishing in the High Country

BY JAMIE SHELL

F

ishing the waters of the High Country is a practice almost as old as the High Country itself. For generations, ¿shing has provided sustenance for early settlers and respite in modern times from the hustle and bustle of everyday life, as countless lines have been cast and hooks baited to catch some of the most prized ¿sh the region has to offer. North Carolina is home to hundreds of miles of ¿shing waters, with trout, in addition to smallmouth bass, walleye and musky, among others. “Anywhere you see a stream, if it is more than about three-feet wide, it’s got trout in it,” Kelly McCoy, owner of RiverGirl Fishing Company in Todd, said. Hot spots for landing the big catch locally are along the Watauga and New rivers, some portions of which are stocked. Local ¿shing shops offer a great opportunity for visitors and newcomers to the sport of ¿shing to get a leg up, with some companies offering tours and tips gleaned from their vast experience on the local waters. “Probably half of the people we take ¿shing have de¿nitely not ¿shed before, and a lot of them have not ¿shed at all,” Foscoe Fishing Company owner Slate Lacy said. According to Lacy, his company leads most of its operation at the Watauga River, where an 8- to 10-inch ¿sh is a prime catch, though it’s not out of the question to hook a ¿sh as large as 16 or 18 inches. Lending to the popularity of catching ¿sh in the High Country is the picturesque scenery surrounding a day at or on the water, according to N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission ¿sheries biologist Kevin Hining. “I think a lot of it is just the scenery — for the same reason folks want to go to the mountains in general,” Hining said. Besides the visual “hook,” High Country waters offer the chance to land three kinds of trout: Brook, brown and rainbow. NCWRC recommends that those interested in catching the trout varieties should try dry Àies, streamer or nymphs that imitate natural foods. Worms or corn work well for hatchery-related trout,

Hot spots for landing a catch locally are along the Watauga and New rivers, some portions of which are stocked. FILE PHOTO

while spinners, spoons and crankbaits are also feasible options. For those with other varieties of ¿sh in mind, NCWRC of¿cials are ¿nding that smallmouth bass ¿shing continues to trend upward. “Up here, what we’ve found historically has been trout ¿shing, but we’re ¿nding more and more people that are getting interested in smallmouth ¿shing,” Hining said. Rivers, including the New, the Watauga and the Nolichucky, all have solid smallmouth ¿sheries. Known for their “¿ght,” smallmouth bass will bite a variety of arti¿cial baits, especially those in orange and brown patterns that resemble cray¿sh, according to the commission. Safety and access are among the two most important factors to keep in mind when venturing out toward the waters. A vast majority of streams will require crossing private property, so keep an eye out for no trespassing signs. If you’re not

sure where you are allowed on the property, check with the landowner ¿rst. Those looking for a family-friendly adventure will ¿nd a number of local ponds and lakes during the summer that are stocked with ¿sh, including some with piers. In Watauga County, Price Lake outside Blowing Rock is stocked with multiple varieties of trout, as well as bullhead and redbreast sun¿sh. Lake Coffey on Beech Mountain also includes a pier for easy access. Banner Elk’s Wildcat Lake and Grandfather Trout Farm, as well as Ashe Park Pond in Jefferson, also make for familyfriendly spots to catch “The Big One.” A number of ¿shing companies in Watauga and Ashe counties offer out¿tting and/or guide services. Among those business (with phone numbers in parentheses) are Foscoe Fishing Company and Out¿tters (828-963-6556), Appalachian Angler (828-963-5050), Elk Creek Out-

¿tters (828-264-6497), RiverGirl Fishing Company (336-877-3099), Rock On Charters (540-520-9629) and Watauga River Anglers (828-963-5463).

WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO

Before hitting the waters to land that record ¿sh, it’s important to remember a few friendly pointers to make your ¿shing experience a memorable one for all the right reasons: • Fishing licenses are a must. Licenses are required for most adults and range in cost from $10 to $20 for individuals, depending on the type of license sought. Licenses are available at local sporting goods stores, superstores, general stores and outdoor shops. • A little research can go a long way. Some river portions allow only arti¿cial, single-barb lures or require catch-andrelease sanctions during certain seasons. Following the proper guidelines for a SEE HOOK, PAGE 37


2014

THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

Fishing

OUTFITTERS

APPALACHIAN ANGLER

North Carolina is home to hundreds of miles of fishing waters, with trout, smallmouth bass, walleye and musky, among others. FILE PHOTO

HOOK

FROM PAGE 36

respective body of water will not only prevent any violations, but may prove helpful in knowing what baits work best in a given ¿shing hole. • Take advantage of the information available about the area. NCWRC offers a searchable “Where to Fish” map online by clicking to www.ncwildlife.org/Fishing/ WhereToFish.aspx. The map helps ¿shermen locate public ¿shing areas and trout streams based on location, ¿sh species or by type of access (piers, boat ramps and/or universal access).

PAGE 37

174 Old Shulls Mill Road, Boone (828) 963-5050 www.appangler.com

GRANDFATHER TROUT FARM

10767 N.C. 105, Banner Elk (828) 963-5098 www.grandfathertroutfarm.com

ELK CREEK OUTFITTERS

RICK’S SMALLMOUTH ADVENTURES

FOSCOE FISHING COMPANY & OUTFITTERS

ROCK ON CHARTERS

8857 N.C. 105, Boone (828) 963-6556 www.foscoe¿shing.com

7449 Fernway Drive Roanoke, Va. 24018 (540) 520-9629 www.rockoncharters.net

RIVERGIRL FISHING CO.

WATAUGA RIVER ANGLERS

1560 N.C. 105, Boone (828) 264-6497 www.ecoÀy¿shing.com

4041 Todd Railroad Grade Road, Todd (336) 877-3099 www.rivergirl¿shing.com

1757 Pleasant Home Road, Sparta (336) 372-8321 www.¿shthenew.com

5712 N.C. 105, Vilas (828) 963-5463 www.wataugariveranglers.com


PAGE 38

THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

2014

Sky Valley Zip Tours includes 10 zip lines, a cliff jump, a swinging bridge and a series of countless views. The course is located on 140 acres, including a beautiful waterfall. PHOTOS SUBMITTED

ZIPLINES over the High Country BY CHRISTINA CALL

Z

iplining gives guests the opportunity to Ày, soaring through the mountains and gaining a view of the High Country that is in no other way possible. Zipline tours are composed of a series of steel cables ¿xed between trees, poles or towers and are traversed on pulleys. Canopy tours explore the treetops, giving guests a bird’s-eye view of the High Country. Safety is a prime concern — all participants wear harnesses and head protection to ensure safety, while Àying through the air. Hawksnest Ziplines currently has

20 ziplines, including four mega zips, two more than 2,000 feet long and two more than 1,500 feet long. Hawksnest has four miles of zipline riding, with heights that exceed 200 feet and speeds up to 50 mph. Ziplines are over trees, through trees, over lakes and creeks with panoramic views on almost every ride. At Hawksnest, you can experience the biggest and best with the spectacular views of the Blue Ridge Mountains. “This is de¿nitely a ton of fun, and the views are unbelievable,” a visitor from Charlotte said. “The ziplining was super fun by itself, but with our group and our guides, it was probably one of the best parts of our trip.” SEE ZIPLINES, PAGE 39


2014

THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE tains of Western North Carolina. Each three-hour tour takes guests on a thrilling journey through the trees. The tour begins with an off-road ATV ride through the river and up the mountain. Once at the top of the mountain, participants learn the simple techniques used to navigate the course before departing on the ¿rst ride across the valley. “Sky Valley is unique, because we offer a true canopy tour that offers guests a combination of zip lines, vertical cliff jumping and a 120-foot-long cable bridge spanning over a waterfall, all of which follow a course in and a lot of the times actually above the trees in the canopy,” owner Jack Sharp said. “One run, affectionately named Big Momma, takes guests across the valley starting at almost 300 feet above the ground below. “Ziplining, especially at Sky Valley, is a very surreal adventure where a person ¿nds themselves gliding through the tree tops and above the leaves, seeing the pristine Appalachian environment from the perspective of a bird gliding around on the breeze.” Sky Valley is located three miles from the Boone Mall in Boone at Camp Sky Ranch, located at 634 Sky Ranch Road. Sky Valley encourages guests to make reservations in advance. For more infor-

One of Sky Valley Zip Tours’ landmark features is a 120-foot-long cable bridge spanning over a waterfall.

ZIPLINES FROM PAGE 38

Hawksnest is open seven days a week. Tours begin at 10 a.m. daily. Tours start at 10 a.m., noon, 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. Early morning tours available on request and availability. Two different canopy tours are available, the Hawk Tour, which costs $75 per person, and the Eagle Tour, which costs $85 per person. Children must be at least 5 years old for the Hawk Tour and 8 years old for the Eagle Tour. Reservations are required for tours. Try to arrive 30 minutes before your scheduled tour starts. Tours take about 1.5 to two hours to complete. Hawksnest is located in Seven Devils,

just off of N.C. 105 South between Boone and Banner Elk. For more information about Hawksnest zipline canopy tours, call (828) 963-6561, or visit www.hasksnestzipline.com. The course at Sky Valley Zip Tours was professionally designed and installed with both safety and excitement in mind. Sky Valley includes 10 zip lines, a cliff jump, a swinging bridge and a series of countless views. The course is located on 140 acres, including a beautiful waterfall. “This was the third zip line tour that I have done, and it was de¿nitely the best. Awesome staff and a great course! I will de¿nitely go back,” visitor Dee Carter said. The tour groups are small — maximum of 10 zippers — and led by two trained canopy rangers who will help visitors have a great experience in the beautiful moun-

PAGE 39

mation, visit www.skyvalleyziptours. com, or call (855) 475- 947. Screaming Ziplines, located in Vilas, has two tours. The Original Tour contains six ziplines and lasts 2.5 hours. The Extreme tour has six ziplines and includes the Triple Wide 2,000-foot-long zipline and costs $79. Call (828) 898-5404, or visit www. screamingziplines.com, for more information. To get there, take U.S. 421 North. Visitors at Plumtree Canopy Zip Line Tours will have the opportunity to experience a canopy tour that has nine zips and four sky bridges. Plumtree Àies visitors 60 feet above Isaac’s Branch Creek. Tours cost $80 per person. All equipment is provided, including the added security of a full-body harness, helmet, trolley, gloves and two professional canopy guides per group. Included with all Plumtree Canopy Tours is a lunch or famous Sunday Brunch at the Vance Toe River Lodge. Morning canopy tours will have lunch after their tour and afternoon canopy tours will have lunch before their tour. For more information, call (828) 7659696, or visit www.vancetoriverlodge. com.


THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

PAGE 40

2014

Learn the ropes at the

DISCOVERY COURSE

R

ock Dimensions manages climbs on the 40-foot outdoor tower at its downtown Boone location, as well as excursions to real rock cliffs, providing all the equipment and guidance needed. Owner Ryan Beasley said many families prefer the convenience of climbing the tower, where they can show up without advance reservations. Others prefer to call ahead and plan a half-day session or full-day session at an area site, including the challenging multi-pitch climbs on larger rock faces such as Linville Gorge or Table Rock. “The neat thing about that is there’s climbs there that are real low-angle that are appropriate for beginners,” Beasley said. Rock Dimensions also leads tours of a high ropes course and zipline at the Blowing Rock Conference Center.

The three-level Discovery Course allows individuals or families to test their skills on ever more challenging obstacles before experiencing the rush of a zip line descent. The course also includes the “giant swing,” which allows harnessed participants to hop off a platform and free-fall for seconds before the rope catches and they swing high above the earth. “It takes people a while to build up their courage, because you are just sliding off the platform,” Beasley said. Beasley said the High Country’s climbing community is strong, and Rock Dimensions is ready to open its arms to those who want to learn the craft. “We get a lot of people here that say, ‘Hey, I’m not in the best physical shape. I can’t rock climb,’” Beasley said. “ … Somebody might think, my 5- or 6-yearold kid, they’re too little, they can’t

Go Climb a

Mountains. Grandfather Mountain is home to some of the area’s better known rock climbing attractions and is sure to test your grit and dexterity in scaling these oblong natural structures. Please be sure to stay on the trail ways while traversing Grandfather. There are several boulders scattered across the sides of the mountain, but heed the warnings of park of¿cials. If you are traveling from Boone, take N.C. 105 South toward Banner Elk and take a left onto U.S. 221 North. Stay alert, and pay attention to directional signs as the main entrance to the attraction will be on your left. A town like Blowing Rock, which literally sits at the edge of the High Country on more or less of a cliff, is ¿lled with boulder ¿elds to ¿t a variety of skill levels. According to booneboulders.com, the Lost Cove is a small, but impressive ¿eld of boulders with a “high concentration of problems” that is very close to Grandfather Mountain. To reach the Cove from Boone, take N.C. 105 South toward Banner Elk. Once you reach Tynecastle, stay straight until you reach a stop sign. When you reach a

ROCK! BY JESSE CAMPBELL

Y

our wind-whipped face sets the tone for the day. Muscles are aching, but you trudge on. Dirt and sweat seep into your eyes, but the prize is within sight. Inch by inch and foothold by foothold, you ¿nally reach your destination: the top. Nothing can beat this feeling. If hanging from the side of the mountain doesn’t get your adrenaline pumping, nothing will this summer, as the High Country is home to some of the nation’s best rock climbing sites. Millions of years of pressure, heat and other Earth-changing events have produced some of the most exhilarating climbs in the world as evident by countless mammoth boulders protruding from the rocky soils of the Appalachian

Kyle Scannell of Greensboro carefully makes his way across a rope on the Discovery Course tour with Rock Dimensions. FILE PHOTO

climb.” But he stressed the organization works with all ages and abilities. “We want people to be successful and feel good

about climbing,” he said. Visit rockdimensions.com, or call (828) 265-3544 for more information about local climbing options.

Michelle Melton demonstrates strength and skill at ’bouldering,’ which is a common sport in the High Country. PHOTO BY ROB MOORE

four-way stop sign, take Roseboro Road, and stay on this road until you reach the Blue Ridge Parkway. Go approximately 1.1 miles across the parkway down a gravel road. There will be a couple of boulders on the left, according to booneboulders.com. Before you set out to punish the rocks and dirt of Appalachia, heed a few simple

warnings from trained professionals and out¿tters. Regardless of where you go this summer, be sure to pack the appropriate rock climbing safety equipment and make sure you are not trespassing in reaching your destination. Jacob Crigler, a member of the sales SEE CLIMB, PAGE 41


2014

CLIMB

FROM PAGE 40

staff of Footsloggers and Rock Dimensions in Boone, said that before you go out and purchase the latest rock climbing equipment, contact a professional to show you the ropes before you are found dangling upside down at a nearby cliff side. “Rock climbing, for the most part, is really safe, but it can be unsafe if using ill practices,” Crigler said. Footsloggers and Rock Dimensions in downtown Boone are ready to equip any climber whether beginner or a rocky seasoned pro. For beginners, climbing shoes, harnesses and jock bags are all necessities. “From there, it depends on the style they are pursuing,” Crigler said. “We offer a climber anything they would need to go sport climbing and traditional climbing.” Sport climbing involves clipping quick draws into bolts permanently bolted into the rock. “That’s how you keep yourself safe in the event of a fall,” he added. Traditional climbing includes packing, carrying and placing climbing gear into weaknesses, such as cracks and crevices,

THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE into the side of the mountain. “Sport climbing focuses on the pure aspect of climbing,” Crigler said. “Sport can be more dif¿cult than traditional because you can just focus on climbing itself.” For more information on picking up the latest gear, call Footsloggers and Rock Dimensions at (828) 262-5111. You can also visit them at 139 Depot St. in downtown Boone. Younger and aspiring climbers should check out Rock Dimensions Climbing Adventure Camp 2014. The camp is opened to ages 8 to 16 and will held be held over ¿ve sessions. The climbing adventure camp provides ¿ve days of land based outdoor activities that includes rock climbing, rappelling, caving, ropes and a challenge course. The climate of the camp is positive, respectful and encouraging, according to the Rock Dimensions website. Each day, the camp begins at the Climbing Tower at Footsloggers before exploring sites in Blowing Rock, Linville Gorge and other areas across the High Country — each day brings a new adventure. The cost is $475 per person and includes a Rock Dimension T-shirt. Camp dates are June 23 to 27, July 7 to 11, July 21 to 25 and Aug. 4 to 8. For more information, call (828) 265-3544.

PAGE 41

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THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

PAGE 42

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2014

THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

PAGE 43


THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

PAGE 44

2014

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THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

2014

PAGE 45

Clawson-Burnley Park, located off the Boone Greenway Trail, is a popular spot for relaxing outdoor fun. FILE PHOTO

Going STROLLING Walking Trails of the High Country BYHEATHER SAMUDIO

I

f you don’t feel like spending the afternoon indoors or taking on a strenuous peak in the numerous hiking trails around Western North Carolina, consider these walking trails that offer a less strenuous, but just as beautiful view of local scenery.

HERITAGE HALL

BANNER ELK GREENWAY

Summer Events

This walk involves 1.1 miles of trail and begins in the park and goes through different paths to the Art Cellar Gallery, boasting a nice view.

Saturday, July 12 • 7 p.m. USO 1940 Radio Show by Jonesborough Repertory Theatre

LEE AND VIVIAN REYNOLDS GREENWAY TRAIL The greenway is located behind State Farm Road in Boone, with an entrance by the Watauga County Parks and Recreation complex and the National Guard Armory. The paved trail is 3 miles long, but relatively Àat, winding back and forth past a creek. Some other hiking trails go off the main path. More information is available at (828) 264-9511.

MOSES H. CONE MEMORIAL PARK Whether you are looking for a strenuous hike up a mountain or a light walk on the paved paths, Cone Memorial Park on the Blue Ridge Parkway has more than 25 miles of trails to suit the level of walking dif¿culty of your choice. Ask at the Manor House during operating hours for a recommendation of the best trail for your plan — some trails also allow horseback riding.

JULIAN PRICE MEMORIAL PARK The Price Lake Loop Trail on the Blue Ridge Parkway is a 2.7-mile trail around the ¿shing-and-canoeing hot spot Price Lake; the relatively Àat trail is ideal for trail runners and walkers alike. The park also has six other

Sponsored by: Maymead, Inc., The Final Touch

Boone’s Greenway Trail is a popular destination for walking, jogging, running and more, regardless of the weather. FILE PHOTO

trails that range from moderate to strenuous (including the famed 13.5-mile Tanawha Trail).

GRANDFATHER MOUNTAIN Although Grandfather has some of the most strenuous hikes in the High Country along the face-silhouette peaks, it also boasts some lower dif¿culty trails. The gentler paths can be reached via the summit road, creating a low-impact chance to view the area’s natural landscapes.

GLEN BURNEY TRAIL Within Blowing Rock, this trail is relatively steep, but only 1.5 miles with a turn-around, which goes past three waterfalls. More information is available at the Blowing Rock Chamber of Commerce.

Saturday, July 19 • 7 p.m. Slice of Bluegrass, Sunflower Festival Concert Sponsored by: Humphrey Masonry, Mountain City Funeral Home

Saturday, July 26 • 7 p.m. Amy Marie Young & Company Sponsored by: FUMC’s Unique Boutique

Saturday, August 2 • 7 p.m. Phantom, Rock ‘n Roll Band Sponsored by: Family Prescription Center, Mountain View Nursery & Landscaping

Saturday, August 16 • 7 p.m. David Holt & Josh Goforth Sponsored by: Danny Herman Trucking, Inc. & Farmers Barbecue & Grill

Saturday, September 20 • 7 p.m. Wayne Henderson, Jeff Little, & Helen White Sponsored by: Farmers State Bank TICKETS: $10 ADV/ $12 DOOR $5 YOUTH

Visit heritagehalltheatre.org for more in depth information Contact #: 423-727-7444 for tickets Location: 211 N. Church St., Mtn.City,TN 37683 30 min from Boone Box Office, 126 College St., Open Tues. – Fri. 12-2


THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

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2014

ROCKY KNOB Mountain Bike Park Boone venue offers new riding challenges, world-class terrain BY JAMIE SHELL

F

or the advanced beginning rider through intermediate and expert cyclists, perhaps no park offers the variety of challenges and excitement that is found at Rock Knob Mountain Bike Park, located off U.S. 421, just east of Boone. Although hard to believe, there was no legal mountain biking in Watauga County until Rocky Knob was conceived and constructed. “Several folks got together and started planning this idea to create a mountain bike park in Boone,” Rocky Knob Mountain Bike Park trail boss Kristian Jackson said. Watauga County Tourism Development Authority and Boone Area Cyclists partnered in 2010 to make the dream of a quality bike park in the Boone area a reality, securing North Carolina Parks and Recreation Trust Fund monies and other grant funding to help pay for construction of the park. Rocky Knob boasts 4,000-foot elevations at its highest peaks and spreads across 185 rugged acres. The park includes six- to eight-miles of mountain bike trails for all skill levels, multiple

EXPLORE

shelters, an adventure playground and picnic areas. In addition, sophisticated and fun skills-development parks are scattered throughout the trail layout, with a “modern-rustic” playground popular with parents and youngsters alike. “When we were thinking about designing this park, we really wanted a place where anybody who could ride a mountain bike could enjoy themselves on a bike,” Jackson added. “When we actually started developing the trails, we realized we were dealing with a very rocky mountain, which did not lend itself to truly beginner trails. What we’ve created is a kind of playground for intermediate riders, maybe advanced beginners, all the way up to more advanced trails.” Rocky Knob’s trails include the 1.6mile Rocky Branch trail loop, the onemile Middle Earth trail, nearly four-mile Boat Rock Loop, the downhill PBJ Trail and Ol’ Hoss, with more to come. “Rocky Knob is pretty close to as good as trails can get,” Watauga TDA executive director Wright Tilley said. “Rocky Knob shows that we’re serious about enhancing outdoor recreation infrastructure for visitors and locals. My son’s reaction was, ‘Can we come here every day?’” Rocky Knob is open and accessible to

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Boat Rock Loop is one of several challenging trails offered at Rocky Knob Mountain Bike Park in Boone. PHOTO BY ROB MOORE

both cyclists and hikers, so visitors are asked to be sure to abide by the recommended direction of travel for each so the two user groups can have easy visual access and make safe passage. The main trail splits momentarily in a number of locations to provide technical features for more advanced riders. Rocky Knob Mountain Bike Park is located east of Boone toward Wilkesboro

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on U.S. 421. The entrance is on the right, two miles from the N.C. 194 junction in Boone. Coming from the east, pass the light at the crossing of Old U.S. 421, and 1.4 miles later, make a U-turn beyond the median and turn right into the park after 0.2 miles. For more information, click to www. rockyknob.wordpress.com or www. booneareacyclists.com.

DISCOVER

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THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

2014

PAGE 47

Cycling in the High Country BY JAMES HOWELL

C

ycling in the High Country is as diverse as the High Country itself, and with the summer quickly approaching, cyclists will undoubtedly look to the region as a hub for cycling with fresh air, challenges and good times awaiting them. The High Country offers several beautiful locations for cycling, and none are more welcoming than the Blue Ridge Parkway. “The Blue Ridge Parkway is always a nice place to ride,” said Ryan Puckett, a cyclist and mechanic at Magic Cycles bike shop in Boone. “It’s very scenic, so it offers beautiful views.” Also, the slow traf¿c offers cyclists additional safety as they weave through the mountainous landscape. According to Puckett, cycling up and down the mountains of the High Country is fun and provides extra challenges. However, cyclists in the area need to take extra precautions. Because of the tight curves and steep inclines in the High Country, cyclists need to be aware of motor vehicles that could be coming around every corner. “Most people will just need to have some etiquette and follow the rules of the road,” Puckett said. “We try to stay two wide, MAGIC CYCLES so we don’t take up the whole 140 S. Depot St. road, and if a car comes by, Boone, N.C. (828) 262-5750 we move to single-¿le.” www.magiccycles.com A number of anticipated cycling events and races take BOONE BIKE AND TOURING place over the summer in the 774 E. King St. High Country. Boone, N.C. In Boone, the annual Blood, (828) 262-5750 www.boonebike.com Sweat and Gears race draws major crowds each year; crowds of eager fans waiting for cyclists to complete either a 50- or 100-mile ride. Another popular race, the Beech Mountain Metric, will feature a 100-kilometer ride from start to ¿nish. “I think they’re going to have a big turnout this year,” Puckett said about the Beech Mountain Metric. Also, for the more serious athlete, a triathlon featuring cycling will be held at Watauga Lake on Aug. 23. For cyclists who need to purchase a new bike, or repair an older one, Magic Cycles, located at 140 S. Depot St. in downtown Boone, is loaded with cycling a¿cionados who are eager to lend a hand. Also, Boone Bike and Touring, located at 774 E. King St., is equipped to help cyclists with their needs, even offering bike rentals for visitors and tourists. For cyclists new to the High Country who want to learn about the best spots to ride, Boone Area Cyclists is a great group to get in touch with. They can refer cyclists to locations that match their comfort levels and riding experience. The club welcomes cyclists of all ages, riding abilities and In Valle Crucis, the annual Blood, Sweat and Gears race draws major crowds each year; crowds of styles. Boone Area Cyclists’ website offers information about eager fans waiting for cyclists to complete either a 50- or 100-mile ride. group rides through the High Country. For more information, PHOTO BY ROB MOORE visit www.booneareacyclists.com.


PAGE 48

THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

2014

GRANDFATHER

MOUNTAIN

CLOSEOUTS • DISCONTINUED • SHOWROOM SAMPLES

offers a view from the top BY CAROLINE HARRIS

Visiting the High Country is not complete without braving the Mile-High Swinging Bridge at Grandfather Mountain. This 228-foot suspension bridge spans an 80-foot chasm between peaks. While walking across, enjoy being suspended in mid-air, 5,280 feet above sea level. The price of admission to Grandfather Mountain includes a trail guide and audio CD guide to the various attractions. Famously, the steep road’s hairpin curves up to the summit were featured in a scene from the movie “Forrest Gump.” As you drive up to the peak, overlooks include Half Moon Overlook, Cliffside

Overlook and Sheer Bluff. These provide an opportunity to stop and take in the view as you make your way up the mountain. Grandfather Mountain also features interesting rock formations accessible on foot, including the Sphinx and Split Rock. The Sphinx rock formation weighs more than 2 million pounds. Grandfather Mountain is home to 11 hiking trails that range in dif¿culty from an easy nature walk to a trek over rugged terrain. Trails can be accessed for free from trailheads outside of the Grandfather Mountain attraction. Interpretive Rangers are available to lead guided SEE GRANDFATHER, PAGE 49

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Just North of Hickory Located at corner of 321 & Alex Lee Road at the entrance to MDI

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THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

2014

PAGE 49

GRANDFATHER FROM PAGE 48

hikes, bird walks and wildÀower walks for families and groups. Animals native to Grandfather Mountain can be seen in Wildlife Habitats. The seven environmental habitats feature cougars, eagles, white-tailed deer, black bears and river otters. The Grandfather Mountain Nature Museum houses more than two dozen educational exhibits outlining the natural history of Grandfather Mountain and the surrounding region, including gems and minerals native to the region, stories of early explorers and local birdlife. The Top Shop gift shop and gallery at the summit offers local and seasonal souvenirs. Stop in for lunch at Mildred’s Grill for some elevated eating. Check the wildÀower calendar to identify what will be in bloom during your tour. For a more in depth look at Àora and fauna, go on a Remarkable Rhododendron Ramble. Grandfather Mountain offers this special program designed to help visitors get the most out of the memorable sight of rhododendron blooming on the mountain’s slopes in early summer. Staff naturalists offer programs and guided walks daily at 1 p.m. Summer hours are 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Ticket sales end at 6 p.m. Adult admission is $20, senior admission is $18, and child admission is $9. Children younger than 4 are admitted for free. For up to the minute weather information, check Grandfather Mountain’s website. The park is fully wheelchair accessible. Grandfather Mountain is located at 2050 Blowing Rock Highway in Linville. For more information, call (800) 4687325 or (828) 733-2013, or click to www. grandfather.com.

EXPLORE

Grandfather Mountain offers unparalleled views of the High Country from heights exceeding a mile above sea level. PHOTO SUBMITTED

Black bears are some of Grandfather Mountain’s more sizable inhabitants. PHOTO BY CHRISTINA CALL

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HighCountryNC.com

Grandfather Mountain is home to the world-famous Mile High Swinging Bridge. PHOTO BY CHRISTINA CALL

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2014

Camping in the High Country BY ANNA OAKES

N

othing beats a night under the stars in the cool mountain air. If a camping adventure is part of your High Country itinerary, the information about backcountry camping and vehicular camping below will help guide you to the perfect camping spot.

Backcountry Camping Backcountry camping is permitted in national forests; you must be at least 1,000 feet from vehicular roads and parking and recreation areas. Pack light and use maps and a compass to avoid getting lost. Fires are prohibited in many areas, and using a camp stove is recommended. Note that backcountry camping is prohibited on the Blue Ridge Parkway.

Linville Gorge

Camping is permitted in the Linville Gorge Wilderness, but permits are required on weekends and holidays May 1 to Oct. 31. Permits are available at the Linville Gorge Information Cabin on Kistler Memorial Highway from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week April through October.

Grandfather Mountain

Thirteen backcountry campsites are available. No fee is required, but campers are asked to self-register at trailheads either at the Pro¿le Trail or Blue Ridge Parkway parking areas.

Campgrounds

For those who prefer the convenience of vehicular access but still crave the thrill of camping outdoors, the High Country offers SEE CAMPING, PAGE 51

Marshmallows — don’t go camping without them.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

The High Country’s Complete Mountain Adventure Store

102 South Jefferson Ave West Jefferson, NC

336.246.9133 mtnoutfittersnc.com


2014

THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

PAGE 51

Both campgrounds and backcountry camping offer visitors a chance to embrace nature. PHOTO SUBMITTED

CAMPING FROM PAGE 50

numerous campgrounds. Several are listed below. Rates vary; call for more information.

KOA

123 Harmony Mountain Lane Boone, N.C. 28607 (828) 264-7250

Located just outside of the Boone town limits off of N.C. 194, the Boone KOA Campground has tent sites, cabins and full RV hookups, as well as a pool, mini golf, arcade games and a farm animal mini zoo.

Julian Price Park Campground

Blue Ridge Parkway Milepost 297 (828) 963-5911

Located a few minutes south of Blowing Rock on the Blue Ridge Parkway, Julian Price Memorial Park features a campground with nonelectric RV and tent sites, as well as bathroom and drinking water facilities. Campers have convenient access to hiking trails, ¿shing and boat rentals on Price Lake and picnic facilities. Park rangers offer regular interpretative programs at the campground’s amphitheater. The campground is open from early May through the fall leaf season.

Grandfather Campground 125 Pro¿le View Road Banner Elk, N.C. (828) 355-4535

Located just off of N.C. 105 about 10 miles south of Boone, Grandfather Campground offers full RV hookups, primitive tent sites and fully furnished cabin rentals. Features and amenities include three bathhouses with hot showers; a camp store with ¿rewood, ice and laundry machines; free WiFi access; and a hiking trail and playground. The campground borders the Watauga River. Pets are allowed on a leash in the campground but not in the cabins.

Honey Bear Campground

229 Honey Bear Campground Road Boone, N.C. 28607 (828) 963-4586

Honey Bear Campground features wooded camping sites, a small pond and a hiking trail. Pets are allowed, and a guest laundry service is available.

Flintlock Campground

171 Flintlock Campground Drive Boone, N.C. 28607 (828) 963-5325

SEE CAMPING, PAGE 52


THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

PAGE 52

See cheese made at You can visit us year round from 8:30 am to 5:00 pm Monday through Saturday

CAMPING FROM PAGE 51

Conveniently located off of N.C. 105 between Boone and Linville, Flintlock Campground offers tent sites, cabin rentals and full RV hookups. Also featured are hot showers, free WiFi, picnic tables, laundry services, a camp store and a covered pavilion.

Blue Bear Mountain Camp

196 Blue Bear Mountain Road Todd, N.C. 28684 (828) 406-4226

Ashe County Cheese is Carolina's oldest cheese plant, producing quality cheese since 1930. Our factory viewing room is open year round at no charge.

(800) 445-1378 Cheese Factory and Retail Store 106 E. Main Street • West Jefferson, NC 28694 www.ashecountycheese.com We ship ANYWHERE!

Blue Bear Mountain Campground is located eight miles from Boone in the beautiful community of Todd. The number of campsites is limited to provide spacious, private, low-density camping for RVs and tents. The campground offers full hookups, hot showers, a laundry room, camping supplies and trout ¿shing.

Vanderpool Campground 120 Campground Road Vilas, N.C. 28692 (828) 297-3486

Vanderpool Campground in Vilas offers RV and tent camping. No alcohol, ¿rearms or foul language is allowed on the grounds. The campground features a camp store that sells ice, ¿rewood, snacks and RV supplies. The facility also offers WiFi access and outdoor games.

Helton Creek Campground 2047 Helton Road Grassy Creek, N.C. 28631 (336) 384-2320

Gourmet Kitchen and Home Accessories

Cuisinart Le Creuset Scanpan Cookware Vietri Wüsthof knives All-Clad cookware All the kitchen gadgets & accessories you will every want 828-963-5269 7 days a week 10-5 M-S 12-5 Sun www.thecountrygourmet.com

Helton Creek Campground is nestled in the banks of Helton Creek in Ashe County. The campground is minutes away from the New River, Virginia Creeper Trail, Shatley Springs and Mount Rogers. Shady and peaceful sites are available for tents and RV hookups.

RiverCamp USA/RV Park and Campground 2221 Kings Creek Road Piney Creek, N.C. 28663 (336) 982-2267

Located on the New River, RiverCamp USA provides sites for tents, pop-ups and RVs with full hookups. Enjoy many outdoor activities, including ¿shing, hiking and biking. Canoes, kayaks and tubes are available for rent. The country store has snacks, beverages, beer and wine, ice, ¿rewood, ¿shing

2014

supplies, bait and limited groceries. Picnic tables, ¿re rings, playground, laundry and hot showers are also available to all campers.

Raccoon Holler Campground

493 Raccoon Holler Road Glendale Springs, N.C. 28629 (336) 982-2706

Raccoon Holler is located just off of the Blue Ridge Parkway between mileposts 257 and 258. The campground offers 150 sites with full hookups and 35 sites with water and electricity. Modern bathhouses, laundry facilities and cable access are available. The site features a recreation building, playground and activity ¿eld.

Down by the River Campground 292 River Campground Road Pineola, N.C. 28662 (828) 733-5057

Down by the River Campground offers RV and tent sites, an indoor activity center, a small outdoor pavilion and laundry services. Pets are allowed.

Buck Hill Campground 6401 South U.S. 19E Plumtree, N.C. 28664 (828) 766-6162

Located along 1,600 feet of the North Toe River, Buck Hill Campground offers 60 large shady RV sites, each equipped with picnic tables, ¿re pits and full hookups. Enjoy a lazy ride down the river on your inner tube or spend the day ¿shing from our trout ¿lled waters.

Camping Tips • Bring warm clothes and linens. High Country summers bring delightful weather during the day, but the mercury can dip into cool temperatures at night. Be prepared. • Lather on sunscreen and bug spray. Contrary to some beliefs, mosquitos and other bugs do thrive in the mountains. And while it may not be as muggy here as in the lower elevations, you’ll get sunburned just as easily. • Leave the ¿rewood at home. Firewood from locations outside of the High Country can transfer non-native, invasive species that can disturb the local ecosystem. Many camping facilities sell ¿rewood on site.


THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

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PAGE 53

Public Courses BOONE GOLF CLUB

18 holes over 6,680 yards with a par of 71 433 Fairway Drive Boone, N.C. 28607 (828) 264-8760

LINVILLE LAND HARBOR 1665 Goose Hollow Road Linville, N.C. 28646 (828) 733-8300

MOUNTAIN AIRE GOLF CLUB Golfing in the High Country offers something special for visitors — namely, beautiful scenery and prime weather. PHOTOS SUBMITTED

Fore! BY JAMES HOWELL

T

he peaks and valleys of the High Country offer locals and visitors ideal weather conditions and landscapes for golfing this summer. The clear air and smell of fresh-cut grass are consistent attributes for most golf courses, but gol¿ng in the High Country offers something special for visitors; namely, beautiful scenery and prime weather. “Obviously, if you’re playing on a mountain course in the High Country, you’re going to get a nice view of the Blue Ridge Mountains,” said Daniel Walsh, a local collegiate-turned-professional golfer. The beautiful weather also entices golfers to come back to the High Country for more rounds. “Another great thing about golfing here is it’s cooler than down the mountain,” Walsh said. “Watauga in the summer can be eight to 12 degrees cooler than other courses I’ve played on, and the surrounding counties are the

Golf in the High Country

same way.” While Walsh played colligate golf for Appalachian State University, he frequented several golf courses in the area. The Boone Golf Club was always one of his favorites. “For people looking to golf, Boone Golf Club might be their best bet,” he said. “It’s a nice course, and it’s open to the public.” Boone Golf Club offers visitors 18 holes of beautiful golf. The 6,680-yard course has a par of 71 and is perfect for leisurely golf enthusiasts, as well as competitive players. Of course, other top-notch golf courses made Walsh’s list, as well. “There are some courses in Linville that are absolutely beautiful,” Walsh said about Linville Land Harbor Golf Course and Linville Falls Golf, “and so is Mountain Aire Golf Club in West Jefferson.” Mountain Aire offers 18 well-maintained holes for golfers to enjoy. The course has a par of 72 and 6,404 yards that show off the rugged beauty of the High Country.

But maybe the best kept secret in High Country gol¿ng is Sugar Mountain Golf Course, which features a 4,560yard, par-64 course located just minutes away from the Boone/Banner Elk area. At an elevation of 4,000 feet, Sugar Mountain features nine par-threes, eight par-fours and one par-¿ve hole. The excellent putting surfaces make this course enjoyable for seasoned and novice golfers. Not everyone is willing to devote half a day to golf. Mountaineer Golf Center, a driving range located in Boone, can provide hours of enjoyment for people of all skill levels. Even for someone who has never attempted golf, picking up a driver and whacking a golf ball for the ¿rst time is thrilling. Golfers looking for a place to pursue their favorite pastime in the High Country have a variety of options to choose from. But no matter where golfers choose to spend their leisure time in the High Country, they’re likely to be met by the same things: fresh air, cool weather and the occasional sand or water trap.

18 holes over 6,404 yards with a par of 72 1104 Golf Course Road West Jefferson, N.C. 28694 (336) 877-4716

MOUNTAIN GLEN GOLF CLUB 18 holes over 6,723 yards with a par of 72 1 Club House Drive Newland, N.C. 28657 (828) 733-5804

MOUNTAINEER GOLF CENTER (DRIVING RANGE) 115 Beverly Heights Ave. Boone, N.C. 28607 (828) 264-6830

RED TAIL MOUNTAIN

18 holes over 6,884 yards with a par of 72 300 Clubhouse Lane Mountain City, Tenn. (423) 727-7931

SUGAR MOUNTAIN GOLF COURSE

18 holes over 4,560 yards with a par of 64 1054 Sugar Mountain Drive Sugar Mountain, N.C. 28604 (828) 898-6464

WILLOW CREEK GOLF COURSE 9 holes over 1,663 yards with a par of 27 354 Bairds Creek Road Vilas, N.C. 28692 (828) 963-6865


THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

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2014

Downtown West Jefferson, NC

September 19-20, 2014 Friday, 1-8pm • Saturday, 8am-5pm

Join the fun! The High Country’s largest antique fair of the year. Several antique & collectable vendors. Quality entertainment, food. Antique vendors welcome. Reserve your space today before August 15th deadline to get best vendor location. Contact Keith Woodie Antiques on Main at 336-846-1231 Today!

Discover Timeless Treasures

The High Country Disc Golf Course, located at Ashe County Park in Jefferson, is a place where the public can experience the beauty and challenge of an 18-hole mountain golf course, sans the expense and formality of a country club. PHOTOS SUBMITTED

Discover disc golf in the High Country

BY ALLISON HAVER

22,000 SQUARE FEET OVER A MILLION ITEMS Largest Antique Mall in the High Country Browse our extensive selection of antiques, collectibles, coins & paper money, jewelry & more

OPEN Monday-Saturday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Sunday 1 – 5 p.m.

842 S. Jefferson Ave., West Jefferson 336-846-1231 or 336-977-9165

T

hose who enjoy being outside, throwing a Frisbee and a little competition should branch out and try a sport that encompasses all the above: disc golf. Much like traditional golf, disc golf is actually a deceivingly dif¿cult sport to play, and instead of using a ball and club, players use their arms and a disc. The sport is also a lot cheaper than “ball golf,” more family-friendly, and teetime is whenever you say it is. The High Country Disc Golf Course, located at Ashe County Park in Jefferson, is a place where the public can experience the beauty and challenge of an 18-hole mountain golf course, sans the expense

and formality of a country club. Built in 2006 and featuring one of the highest elevation drops and placements of the 1,500 courses in the country, the Ashe County course was designed by Harold Duvall of the Innova Disc Golf Company. Duvall, who is a two-time world disc golf champion and world-class designer, designed the course to take in all the elevation changes and also made it accessible and playable for every disc golf skill level. The course attracts newcomers to the sport on a weekly basis, as well as hosts professional level tournaments multiple times every year. Disc golf players stand at a tee and Àing a disc toward a “hole,” an elevated SEE GOLF, PAGE 55


THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

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PAGE 55

Want to Disc Golf? Directions: To get to the course, take U.S. 421 South out of Boone to U.S. 221 North at Deep Gap. After travelling roughly 20 minutes and 14 miles, take a left onto Long Street at the second intersection off the highway. Off Long Street, take a right onto Main Street and the follow through downtown for a few miles until taking a left at the sign for Ashe County Park. Hours: Ashe County Park and High Country Disc Golf Course are open from 8 a.m. to dusk every day. Volunteer workdays take place every third Saturday at 10 a.m. Course map: For a map of the course, visit http://bit.ly/AsheDiscGolf

The High Country Disc Golf Course was designed to take in all the High Country’s elevation changes, while remaining accessible for players of all skill levels.

GOLF

FROM PAGE 54

metal basket out¿tted with a set of chains to catch the disc. The discs come in mass varieties, but are typically smaller and heavier than a traditional Frisbee. Like traditional golf, disc golf includes numerous trees, rocks and other hazards that must be avoided. Local residents and visitors have embraced the emerging sport over the past seven years locally, due in large part to the vision of 20-year disc golf veteran Todd Patoprsty, who started the initia-

EXPLORE

tive in 2005 as a way to bring his beloved sport to the High Country. When the town of Boone failed to ¿nd a space for a course in 2005, Patoprsty moved his attention to Ashe County, just down the road from Boone, where he found a wealth of people who agreed with his mission, as well as a 70-acre template for a world-class course. An afternoon spent playing disc golf can literally Ày by, and it is a sport everyone can do and enjoy at all ages and skill levels. For more information, visit www. thehighcountrydiscgolfclub.com, email comeplay@highcountrydiscgolf.com, or call (336) 982-6185.

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THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

PAGE 56

2014

A Complete Hardware & Building Supply Store With Good Old Fashioned Customer Service.

Sherrie Bare

Walt Petersen

BARN QUILT HEADQUARTERS Brings art to every part of your life!

The most unique gift & design shop in the high country! Custom Silk Arrangements Table Top Accessories Lamps • Candles • Home decor Pottery • Greeting cards

Original and Giclee Art from the High Country’s Best Custom Framing and Furnishing Ceramics, Pottery and Stained Glass Handmade Sterling Silver & Copper Jewelry Fun Beginner “Art Party” Classes for 1 or more! Artsy Women’s Apparel & Accessories Baggalini Handbags, Satchels and Duffels Sofas, Chairs and Antiques!

336 846 3355

Petal Pusher Designs & Gifts 08-B South Jefferson Ave West Jefferson (336) 846-1687

Gateway to Southern Ashe County Sandwiches, Healthy Snacks, Hot Coffee, Souvenirs & Specialty Items

and Art Parties!

Past & Present Antiques & Artisan Shoppes

Antiques, Local Made Furniture, Jewelry, Specialty Iron Works, Home Decor, Gifts, Object Art & more...

(33 336)87 )877-5599 -5599

Open 7 a.m. - 7 p.m. 133006 Hwy wy 221S Fleet eetwood, ood, NC C 28626

Open Mon thru Sat 10am - 4:30pm

Downtown West Jefferson 113 N. Jefferson 336-846-3311

Homegrown and Handmade!

8am-1pm


THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

2014

PAGE 57

Have some fun! for over 30 years The coolest corner of North Carolina. ™

Providing exceptional service with integrity is our goal

Every Room Needs a Spot of Color lift chairs in stock

Ellen 336.977.1229

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336.620.2446

Mon - Fri 9 - 5 PM Sat. 9 - 3PM • Free local delivery! 336-384-2929 • www.jimscornerfurniture.com 160 Northwest School Rd •Warrensville, NC

Honey Beekeeping Supplies 958 West Buffalo Road West Jefferson Brian “Doc” Adams, Innkeeper buffalotavernbnb@aol.com

Exceptional Gifts

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6 N. Third Ave In Historic Downtown West Jefferson (336) 846-BEES (855) 213-8800

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Tis The Season For All Seasons Seasonal Gift Shop

Our inventory is always changing! Unique Toys & baby items MUD PIE JIM SHORE DEPT 56 GREEN LEAF Thymes mark roberts Seasonal Decorations for all major holidays

Downtown West Jefferson 336-846-9488 TisTheSeasonNC.com


PAGE 58

THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

2014

Horseback Adventures in the High Country BY CHRISTINA CALL

O

ne of the best ways to see the mountains of North Carolina is on horseback. Mountains offer a serene setting for horse lovers from all over the world. The cool summers in the High Country offer an amazing landscape that provides pleasant days for riding horses through the range of riding trails, where riders can enjoy the scenery of Àowing rivers and beautiful mountain views. Vacationers have the opportunity to ride through the mountains with their own horse or with a guide and a horse from the local riding stables. High Country horse sport history began in 1898, when Moses Cone, the successful merchant and textile pioneer, ordered the ¿rst shipment of building materials to begin construction of Flat Top Manor, not far from Main Street in Blowing Rock. Cone’s passion for engineering and construction led to the building of 36 miles of

carriage roads and horse trails through his lush 3,000-acre estate. As Blowing Rock continued to grow as a tourist destination, a horseback ride on the Cone Estate became a “must do” activity for summer visitors. Blowing Rock offers a charity horse show event. The ¿rst Blowing Rock Charity Horse Show was held 91 years ago at Green Park Inn. Since then, it has brought equestrian fanatics to Blowing Rock every August for competition and camaraderie. The show lasts for a three-week period at the L.M. Tate Horse Show Grounds at the Blowing Rock Equestrian Preserve located just west of downtown Blowing Rock off of U.S. 221. The saddlebred portion of the show will be held Thursday through Sunday, June 5 to 8, and the hunter/jumper division will be held Tuesday through Sunday, July 22 to 27, and Wednesday through Sunday, July 30 to Aug. 3. SEE HORSEBACK, PAGE 59


2014

THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

PAGE 59

Visitors at Leatherwood Mountains hit the trails through the scenic High Country. PHOTO SUBMITTED

HORSEBACK FROM PAGE 58

CONE MANOR AND BASS LAKE

Located on the Blue Ridge Parkway in Blowing Rock, Moses Cone Memorial Park and Bass Lake both provide riding trails that are perfect for horse enthusiasts. Moses Cone Park is open year-round and sees 225,000 people each year being the most visited recreational place on the Blue Ridge Parkway. For access to Moses Cone riding, horse owners should drive their trailers to milepost 294 of the Blue Ridge Parkway and pull off at the Cone Manor and Parkway Craft Center. Riders can access the trails just past the manor. For Bass Lake trail access, horse owners should pull off U.S. 221 into a large parking area next to the Bass Lake vehicle entrance. For more information, call the National Park Service information desk at Cone Manor at (828) 295-3782.

LEATHERWOOD MOUNTAINS

Leatherwood Mountains is a premier gated vacation resort and residential community centered on the Equestrian Lifestyle. Established in the early 1980s, Leatherwood Mountains is located on more than 4,000 acres in the Blue Ridge Mountains. Known as a “horse lover’s paradise,” Leatherwood offers horseback riding seven days a week. There is something for every type of rider at Leatherwood. The horseback riding trails range from easy wide forest paths to rugged mountain

trails. Leatherwood’s facilities include 75 stalls, a show arena and round pen. Leatherwood has a ¿rst class guided trail ride service available to the public and an extensive riding lesson program. Leatherwood has a trail system that winds through lush mountain valleys and skirts high ridges, with close to 100 miles of trails. Lead line rides are available for younger children ages 2 and older. This is a one-on-one ride that is given by a trainer handler in a controlled environment. Leatherwood also offers horseback riding birthday parties. Leatherwood also offers full service month and nightly boarding for guests bringing their own horses. “Year-round equine events occur at our facility, so there is always something for every discipline,” Abbie Hanchey, event and marketing director, said. “Once Leatherwood Mountains gets into your soul, you may never want to leave.” Leatherwood Mountains is located at 512 Meadow Road in Ferguson. For more information, call (800) 462-6867, or visit www.leatherwoodmountains.com.

DUTCH CREEK TRAILS

Dutch Creek Trails, located in Vilas, is open year round for ages 6 and older. Trail rides last a little more than an hour and cost $50 each, payable by cash or check. Participants will enjoy wooded trails, old farm ¿elds and views of the valley surrounded by beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains. Dutch Creek Trails’ owner, Keith Ward, is also a “cowboy poet,” who provides

fun-¿lled entertainment for people of all ages. Rides start at 10 a.m., noon, 2 p.m. and 4 p.m., during the summer on Monday through Saturday. The trails are closed on Sunday. Riders sign up at the house and get on the horse at the guide shack. Dutch Creek Trails has a “shuttle service,” which is a hay wagon ride to and from the place where participants will be riding. It is best to call a week in advance for reservations to ensure you are able to ride on the dates you choose. To makes reservations, call (828) 2977117. For more information, visit www. dutchcreektrails.com.

BANNER ELK STABLES

Banner Elk Stables offers memorable horseback riding in the heart of the Blue Ridge Mountains on the Àanks of scenic Beech Mountain. Open year round, visitors can enjoy nature’s beauty and often the wildlife that inhabits the mountains all on horseback. There are many horses for visitors to choose from. No matter the level of experience, there is a horse to complement each rider. Riders have the opportunity to choose which horse to ride, including some that have been featured in ¿lms, such as “National Treasure,” Shallow Hal” and “Cinderella.” The riding tours follow a high mountain trail, offering scenic vistas of Beech Mountain. Banner Elk Stables is located at 796 Shoemaker Road in Banner Elk. For more information, call (828) 898-5424, or visit www.bannerelkstables.com.

YONAHLOSSEE RESORT SADLE CLUB

The equestrian center at Yonahlossee offers horse boarding and riding instruction in the High Country. The Saddle Club at Yonahlossee features a large indoor arena, outdoor arena, a cross-country course and miles of beautiful riding trails with views of Sugar Mountain and Grandfather Mountain. Barn manager and head trainer Tempe Hickman and her staff are available to assist both the beginning level rider and the more accomplished equestrian with all their riding needs. Yonahlossee Saddle Club services include boarding, grooming and exercise for horses whose owners are out of town. The Yonahlossee Saddle Club is located at 226 Oakley Green. For more information, call (800) 962-1986 or (828) 963-6400, or visit www.yonahlossee. com.

BURNT HILL STABLES

Located in Laurel Springs in Ashe County, Burnt Hill Stables offers miles of guided scenic mountain trails and back roads to explore the Blue Ridge Mountains. Horses are available for all skill levels. Burnt Hill Stables offers one- and twohour rides for $25 per hour per horse. Burnt Hill also offers riding lessons, carriage wedding services and horse boarding. Burnt Hill Stables is located at 1102 Burnt Hill Road in Laurel Springs. For more information, call (336) 982-2008, or visit www.burnthillstables.com.


THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

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Dating back to 1933, the Blowing Rock is North Carolina’s oldest tourist attraction. It is a massive cliff 4,000 feet above sea level, overhanging Johns River Gorge 3,000 feet below. PHOTO SUBMITTED

Intrigue awaits at Mystery Hill BY CHRISTINA CALL

The Blowing Rock: More Than a Namesake ‘The only place where snow falls upside down’ BY CHRISTINA CALL

V

isitors at the Blowing Rock have the opportunity to view the High Country at 4,000 feet above sea level. Dating back to 1933, the Blowing Rock is North Carolina’s oldest tourist attraction. It is a massive cliff 4,000 feet above sea level, overhanging Johns River Gorge 3,000 feet below. During the formation of the Blue Ridge Mountains, strong pressure in the rocks of the earth’s crust produced many features, which we now see at the Blowing Rock. It received its name because the rocky walls of the gorge form a force that enables the northwest wind to sweep through with such energy that it returns light objects thrown over the void. The current of air Àowing upward from the rock prompted the “Ripley’s Believe-It-Or-Not” cartoon about “the only place in the world where snow falls upside down.” Visible from the Blowing Rock are Hawksbill Mountain, Table Rock, Grandfather Mountain (the highest peak in the Blue Ridge chain) and Mount Mitchell (the highest peak east of the Mississippi). The legend of the Blowing Rock says that a Chickasaw chieftain, fearful of a white man’s admiration for his lovely daughter, journeyed far from the plains to bring her to the Blowing Rock. One day, the girl, daydreaming on the cliff, saw a Cherokee brave wandering in the wilderness far below and playfully shot an arrow in his direction. The Àirtation worked,

because soon he appeared before her hut, courting her with songs of his land, and they became lovers. One day, a strange reddening of the sky brought the brave and the girl to the Blowing Rock. To him, it was a sign of trouble, commanding his return to his tribe in the plains. With the girl’s requests not to leave her, the brave, torn by conÀict of duty and heart, leapt from the rock into the wilderness far below. The heartbroken girl prayed daily to the Great Spirit until one evening with a reddening sky, a gust of wind blew her lover back onto the rock and into her arms. From that day, an everlasting wind has blown up onto the rock from the valley below. For people of the past, this was explanation enough for the Blowing Rock’s mysterious winds that cause even the snow to fall upside down. The Blowing Rock is open all year, weather permitting, in Blowing Rock. During the summer, it is open from 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. General admission is $7 for adults and $2 for children ages 4 to 11. The Blowing Rock Snack Shop serves hot dogs, nachos, popcorn, ice cream and drinks, along with other items. The Blowing Rock also has a gift shop that offers a wide variety of souvenirs, including tees and sweatshirts, spoons, thimbles, magnets, pens and pencils, plates, mugs, puzzles, hats, pocket knives, stuffed animals, postcards and much more. The Blowing Rock is located on U.S. 321, near the Green Park Inn in Blowing Rock. For more information, call (828) 295-7111, or visit www.theblowingrock.com.

2014

Mystery Hill is a family-oriented entertainment complex, which is dedicated to enriching the lives of young and old alike. Mystery Hill has four main attractions that allow time for fun and games, offer a historical view of life throughout the Appalachian Mountains from the 19th century and give the chance for visitors to see Native American artifacts. Former owner of the land William Hudson operated a cider mill on an old wooden platform. Identical twins worked the mill, and no matter how they stood, the twin on the north end always looked taller. The Mystery Platform was discovered, and visitors can experience this same illusion today. The second phenomenon was Hudson’s apple trees. The trees in the orchard grew towards the north, directly into the prevailing winds. Hudson had a path through the apple orchard, which was crooked for no apparent reason. He had rebuilt the path, but to his surprise found himself being pulled onto the old path time and time again. Even the apples fell and collected on the old, crooked path, but not on the new, straighter path. In 1948, while reading a LIFE

Magazine, Hudson found an article about a strange place in California, which had similar idiosyncrasies. The Hudsons visited the site and built the ¿rst Mystery House when they returned to Boone. In 1957, Buford Stamey and Rondia J. Underwood were looking to build a restaurant and took a tour of Mystery Hill. Throughout the tour, Hudson explained about the phenomenon that existed throughout the mountainside. It seemed that the gravitational pull on the side of the mountain caused unusual things to happen. Underwood purchased the entire operation in 1958. Today, more than 65 years old, Mystery Hill is still open and growing. The current facility includes the original Mystery Platform, the Mystery House, Hall of Mystery, the Native American Artifacts Museum and the Appalachian Heritage Museum, providing hours of fun for visitors. Admission for children ages 5 to 12 is $7, $9 for ages 13 to 59 and $8 for senior citizens. Mystery Hill is located at 129 Mystery Hill Lane, just off U.S. 321 between Boone and Blowing Rock. For more information, call (828) 264-2792, or visit www.mysteryhill-nc.com.

Mystery Hill is a family-oriented entertainment complex between Boone and Blowing Rock that seems to defy the laws of physics. PHOTO SUBMITTED


THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

2014

Bloom with Boone BY ALLISON HAVER

Talk a walk through the Daniel Boone Native Gardens

F

rom delicate trilliums to wild geraniums, hundreds of native species from North Carolina are represented at the Daniel Boone Native Gardens in Boone. The gardens contain an outstanding collection of native trees, shrubs and wildÀowers. Hundreds of plant varieties provide a progression of blooms throughout the growing season. Opened in 1963, the three-acre Daniel Boone Native Gardens is an educational and conservation effort to nurture rare or endangered plant species. These public gardens comprise of a bog garden, fern garden, rhododendron grove, rock garden, rock wishing well, vinecovered arbor, pond alongside the historic Squire Boone Cabin and several grand vistas. A descendant of Daniel Boone, who hunted in the area, made the wrought-iron gates at the entrance. Programs for seniors, children, birders and artists are also planned at the gardens

Opened in 1963, the three-acre Daniel Boone Native Gardens is an educational and conservation effort to nurture rare or endangered plant species. A descendant of Daniel Boone, who hunted in the area, made the wrought-iron gates at the entrance. PHOTO COURTESY OF DANIEL BOONE NATIVE GARDENS

this summer. Every second Tuesday of the month, the High Country Audubon Society leads a free bird walk at 8:30 a.m. The second annual horticultural symposium sponsored by Appalachian State Uni-

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PAGE 61

versity’s College of Arts and Science and Department of Biology is slated for June 7. The theme, “Designing Your Garden,” features noted speakers, in addition to a tour of Daniel Boone Native Gardens. The daylong event with registration is

designed for local gardeners and homeowners. The program is sponsored in conjunction with the Daniel Boone Native Gardens and the Garden Club of North Carolina. This summer will also mark the second annual Fairy Day in the Gardens. The event will take place on Saturday, July 12, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Fairy Day in the Gardens is an event featuring activities for children and families. Participants are encouraged to wear fairy costumes and bring a picnic to the gardens. Sponsored by The Garden Club of North Carolina to protect native plants throughout the state, the gardens thrive due to community support and dedication of surrounding garden club members in Watauga County. The Daniel Boone Native Gardens are located at 651 Horn in the West Drive in Boone. Open from May to October, admission is $2 for adults and free for children younger than 16. For more information, visit www.danielboonenativegardens.org, or call (828) 264-6390.


THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

PAGE 62

2014

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THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

PAGE 64

Linville Caverns:

2014

An Exploration, 200 Years and Counting

BY SAM CALHOUN

A

re you afraid of the dark? Twenty-¿ve hundred feet below the pinnacle of Linville’s Humpback Mountain, North Carolina’s only “show caverns” lie waiting for you to take a plunge into total darkness. Two places exist in the entire world where people can experience total darkness — at the bottom of the ocean in a deep abyss and inside a fathomless cavern, such as Linville Caverns. Almost one century ago, two 17-yearold boys found out about total darkness the hard way. While ¿shing in a nearby stream, the boys spotted the entrance to the cave that had been discovered a century earlier. Fascinated and without permission, the boys ventured deep within the mountain, aided by only one oil lamp. They waded through the cave’s 42-degree streambed, enduring the cavern’s 52-degree air, watching their lamp’s light bounce off the stalagmites and stalactites, seeing what few had seen. Six hundred feet into the cave, their adventure reached new depths — a trip and fall by one of the boys cracked their only light. Total darkness took hold. According to Linville Caverns tour guides, humans go completely blind from total darkness in three to six months — they go crazy in a few weeks, and imaginary voices become present in just a few minutes. The boys were lucky; they had each other to talk to. But they had no light — an experience you can’t really imagine until a tour guide turns off the lights deep within Linville Caverns. The boys realized that they had fought the stream’s current while delving into the cave, so they began using their ¿ngers to feel the water and retrace their path. It took two days in total darkness and surviving many cuts and abrasions to make it out alive, but they did, and their story was immortalized in Linville Presbyterian Gazette. For centuries, the beauty and intrigue that lies deep inside Humpback Mountain was unknown to most people. In 1822, the mysterious appearance of trout swimming in and out of the crack in the rocks that is now the entrance led ¿sherman to explore the passageways within.

In a jam-packed half-hour, visitors to Linville Caverns see hundreds of stalagmites and stalactites; a bottomless crystal-blue pool that reaches more than 250 feet below the cave; rock formations that look like bowling pins, a wedding party, a polar bear and a mother-in-law; and a sandbar that once was home to Civil War deserters. PHOTO SUBMITTED

What they found was a total of 1,300 feet of subterranean environment, containing millions of years of geological activity. Today, the more than 100,000 annual visitors to the caverns explore 600-feet of the cave. The deepest 700 feet is too dangerous for human traf¿c, but contains a rock baring the signature of William Hidden, an explorer sent by Thomas Edison in the late 1800s to search for minerals necessary for the creation of the light bulb. Today’s cave explorers are led in small, 15-person groups along a level concrete path assisted by one of the caverns’ knowledgeable tour guides for a 30-minute expedition deep within the earth. A small stream — the same that led the boys out almost a century earlier — hugs the corner of the path and is ¿lled with rainbow and brook trout, which are blind because of their environment, swimming along the way. The path is wide and Àat enough for wheelchairs, creating

a unique adventure for those physically handicapped. In the jam-packed half-hour, visitors see hundreds of stalagmites and stalactites — “Remember stalactites hang tight to the ceiling, and stalagmites might reach the ceiling,” offered a tour guide — a bottomless crystal-blue pool that reaches more than 250 feet below the cave; rock formations that look like bowling pins, a wedding party, a polar bear and a mother-in-law; and a sandbar that once was home to Civil War deserters. On the sandbar, which is no more than ¿ve-feet-by-four-feet, Union and Confederate soldiers escaped the horrors of battle in the 1860s, building a continuous ¿re to cook, for light and to stay warm. Old tools and a cobbler’s bench were found at the site, leading locals to believe that the soldiers made or repaired shoes in exchange for food and supplies from local farmers. Toward the end of the war, search parties spotted the soldiers’ smoke

from their ¿re, and the hideout was busted and the soldiers arrested. This story, the tale of the boys losing light in the cave and an experiment in total darkness where tour guides shut down all lights and let visitors see for themselves — or rather not see — what total darkness is all about, are all part of the tour that boasts 40 percent repeat business. People from all over the world come to Linville Caverns — they realize that a trip to the mountains isn’t complete without a trip inside a mountain. Linville Caverns is located at 19929 U.S. 221 between Linville and Marion, four miles south of the Blue Ridge Parkway. Admission is $8 for adults, $7 for seniors (age 62 and older), $6 for children (ages 5 to 12) and free for children younger than 5, with adult supervision; group rates available. Linville Caverns is open year-round. For more information, call (828) 756-4171 or (800) 419-0540, or click to www.linvillecaverns.com.


THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

Entertainment with Altitude Sugar Mountain proves ideal destination BY JAMIE SHELL

S

ugar Mountain Resort is among the top destinations for ski and snow enthusiasts in winter. But the resort offers entertainment options for the entire family throughout the summer months, as well. With hiking and bicycle trails, top-notch outdoor events and the natural beauty of the High Country on center stage, Sugar Mountain Resort is a must-visit for anyone who loves the great outdoors. During the summer, Sugar opens hiking and biking trails for the outdoor enthusiast. The trails boast a diversity of terrain and dif¿culty, as miles of hiking and biking trails intertwine throughout the resort area and village of Sugar Mountain. “Sugar Mountain wants to share all of the activities that are available at the mountain year-round,” Sugar Mountain Resort marketing director Kim Jochl said. “It gives people who want to spend time in the mountains, in the woods and in nature the opportunity to experience the mountain. Every year we’ve done this, people have enjoyed and look forward to it. In the winter, our lift and trail services are dependent upon weather. We have a good, dry summer season, and we see a lot of activity. A lot of people use the trails, and a diverse group, from kids to seniors to downhill mountain bikers, use the trails.” Sugar appeals to many outdoor lovers. From the challenging fairways and recently renovated club shop at Sugar Mountain Golf Club to Sugar’s immaculate tennis courts, Sugar offers myriad activities for the outdoor sports lover. A unique offering at Sugar is its scenic chairlift rides, as its 5,300-foot peak may be viewed from lofty heights on rides that begin on Independence Day weekend and conclude on Labor Day weekend. Scenic chairlift rides operate from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. every Saturday and Sunday, weather permitting. The 45-minute roundtrip adventure carries viewers

on a breathtaking panoramic adventure on Sugar’s Summit No. 2 to the peak of the mountain, offering picturesque views of North Carolina, Virginia, Tennessee, nearby Grandfather and Roan mountains and beyond, where families can take advantage of the chairlift for a group outing, picnic lunch and more. The chairs include hooks on the back, offering mountain biking enthusiasts the unique thrill of carrying their bike to the top of Sugar Mountain. Lift ticket prices are $12 for one-time rides and $25 for an all-day ticket. Children age 4 and younger ride free with an adult, with a group rate of $8 for 20 or more people for one-time ride tickets. Advanced reservations are required for scenic chairlift rides during the summer. For more information, call Wendy Snider at (828) 898-4521, extension 202, or email groupsales@skisugar.com. A welcome sight in the heat of summer is a cold beverage, and Sugar is sure to wet the whistle with its annual SugarBrew event. On Saturday, Aug. 2, visitors age 21 years of age and older can sample an array of craft, import and domestic beer, wines and spirits, as well as listen to live music performances by local favorite artists. Connoisseurs can satisfy a hungry appetite with a slice of Americana, including hot dogs, hamburgers, sodas and ice cream that won’t disappoint. Cool mountain temperatures and fresh mountain air is among the additional amenities that makes SugarBrew a popular spot for locals and tourists alike. Although summer is in full swing at the time, winter is always in the air on Sugar. Visitors at SugarBrew can take advantage of Sugar Mountain Sports Shop’s 30-to 70-percent sales on all winter merchandise or purchase discounted 2014-15 winter season passes. General admission and parking are free to SugarBrew. For more information on all the great activities Sugar Mountain Resort has to offer this summer, call (828) 898-4521, or click to www.skisugar.com

PAGE 65

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THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

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2014

PHOTOS BY JEFF EASON

Tweetsie Railroad: BY JEFF EASON

F

olks have been visiting Tweetsie Railroad and Wild West Theme Park for so long now that greatgrandparents who enjoyed the park as kids in the 1950s are bringing their great-grandchildren to Tweetsie today. A lot has changed at the park in the past 58 years, but you can always count on a full day of family fun at Tweetsie. Once you’ve moseyed onto Tweetsie Main Street, your options are so numerous that you might be overwhelmed. You can start out with a locomotive ride to Fort Boone to ¿nd out what the local cowpokes are up to, or you may want to visit the Palace Saloon to take in a stage show featuring Diamond Lil and her amazingly talented can-can dancers. Tweetsie also features Miner’s Mountain Magic Show, Hopper and Porter’s Musical Celebration, cloggers, bluegrass musicians, the Deer Park petting zoo, gem mine, game arcade, carnival rides,

fudge shop and much more. This year, Tweetsie has nearly a dozen special events planned for the park, from the annual appearance of cowboy crooners Riders in the Sky to the ¿rst-time arrival of Scooby Doo and Shaggy. Here’s a list of some of the special events and appearances at Tweetsie this year:

DAVID HOLT AND THE LIGHTING BOLTS IN CONCERT — MAY 25

Tweetsie Railroad is honored to host Four-time Grammy Award winner David Holt and the Lightning Bolts for a oneday only special performance. David Holt and the Lightning Bolts enliven old-time music with a new time jolt, and a sound that is full, driving and energetic.

DAY OUT WITH THOMAS: THE THRILL OF THE RIDE – JUNE 6-15

Experience everyone’s favorite train like never before, as Thomas the Tank Engine chugs his way through the Blue Ridge Mountains. Children can meet

All Aboard for Family Fun

and take pictures with Sir Topham Hatt, listen to Thomas and Friends storytelling and enjoy activities in the Imagination Station.

SPONGEBOB SQUAREPANTS AND PATRICK – JUNE 27-29

Nickelodeon’s beloved characters, SpongeBob SquarePants and his best friend, Patrick, visit Tweetsie Railroad to entertain and take pictures with guests. Guests can spend the day with their favorite underwater friends at North Carolina’s ¿rst theme park.

FIREWORKS EXTRAVAGANZA FRIDAY – JULY 4

No July Fourth celebration in the High Country would be complete without a day of family fun at Tweetsie Railroad. Children young and old will watch with wonder, as the mountain night sky is illuminated with the High Country’s most dazzling ¿reworks display. The park will remain open until 9 p.m., and ¿reworks begin at 9:30 p.m.

COOL SUMMER NIGHTS – JULY 5, 12, 19 & 26

Enjoy long summer nights, while keeping cool, with a visit to Tweetsie Railroad during Saturdays in July, as the park stays open until 9 p.m. to make more time for family fun. First-time guests and regulars alike will delight in seeing Tweetsie come to life after the sun goes down.

SCOOBY-DOO AND SHAGGY – JULY 11-13

Scooby-Dooby-Doo, where are you? Meet the Cartoon Network’s Scooby Doo and his best friend, Shaggy, during their ¿rst ever visit to Tweetsie Railroad.

K-9S IN FLIGHT FRISBEE DOGS – JULY 19-27

Watch man’s best friend defy gravity, as a team of agile four-legged athletes delights the audience by jumping, Àipping, diving and catching Àying discs right into your heart. SEE TWEETSIE, PAGE 67


THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

2014

TWEETSIE

HOURS

FROM PAGE 66

RIDERS IN THE SKY – AUG. 9 & 10

Captivating audiences of all ages since 1977, the multi-Grammy Award-winning quartet is an event not to be missed. “America’s Favorite Cowboys” ¿ll the Blue Ridge Mountain air with sweet sounds by providing a rich blend of Western harmony and humor. A true Old West experience!

RAILROAD HERITAGE WEEKEND – SEPT. 6 & 7

Travel through the Blue Ridge Mountains on Tweetsie’s historic locomotives, as the park hosts its annual Railroad Heritage Weekend. Celebrate the rich history of steam railroading and tour the famous Tweetsie Railroad Train Shop, where steam locomotives from across the nation are repaired and restored. The weekend will also include performances and demonstrations by the Cherokee Tsalagi Touring Program.

Can-can girls welcome visitors to Tweetsie’s Palace Saloon.

GHOST TRAIN FESTIVAL – FRIDAY & SATURDAY NIGHTS SEPT. 26 TO NOV. 1

All aboard Tweetsie’s Ghost Train for a nighttime ride of thrills and chills, as the park hosts its 25th annual Ghost Train Halloween Festival. From The Boneyard to the park’s newest addition, the “Warp Tunnel,” beware of the fun and creepy Halloween characters that emerge after dark at Tweetsie. The theme for this year’s event is about a ¿ctional train wreck and its ill-fated crew and passengers. Each night of the festival will mark the anniversary of the “Great Train Wreck of 1914.”

PAGE 67

BREWERY

Tweetsie Railroad will be open Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays, including Memorial Day Monday, and seven days a week from May 30 through Aug. 17. The park returns to the weekend schedule from Aug. 18 through Nov. 2, including Labor Day Monday. The 2014 season ends Sunday, Nov. 2. The park’s regular hours are 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., but will be open until 9 p.m. on July 4 for the Fireworks Extravaganza and July 5, 12, 19 and 26. Daily admission to Tweetsie Railroad is $39 for adults and $26 for children ages 3 through 12. Children 2 and younger are admitted free. The Ghost Train Halloween Festival will take place Friday and Saturday nights Sept. 26 through Nov. 1, from 7:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m., when admission is $31 for adults and children. Tickets and Golden Rail Season Passes are available at Tweetsie.com. Tweetsie Railroad is located in the Blue Ridge Mountains on U.S. 321 between Boone and Blowing Rock. For more information about the 2014 season at Tweetsie Railroad, visit Tweetsie.com, or call (877) 893-3874.

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$6,599,000 $1,955,400 $2,248,000 $1,372,500 $1,298,325 $248,500 $546,381 $542,532 $1,498,000 $499,000 $353,000 $OLD $712,000 $991,000 $341,000 $357,753 $541,000 $299,000 $299,000 $420,000 $199,000 $236,162 $OLD $381,000 $263,480 $222,057 $209,900 $92,000 $206,024 $98,900 $59,900 $245,000

MOUNTAIN LAND

. . . never a better time! Paul Breden 828-263-2340

Chris Breden 336-927-4261

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More Than a Road:

The Blue Ridge

PARKWAY BY ALLISON HAVER

T

here is only one place where stop-and-go traf¿c is acceptable: the Blue Ridge Parkway. Not only is a slower pace acceptable on the parkway, it is also the suggested way to travel. Designed for leisurely motoring, the speed limit is typically 45 miles per hour and less in some places. Take your time, and discover the grandeur of this special place. The Blue Ridge Parkway is more than a road — it’s a beautiful journey, which entices visitors to explore a 469-mile highway to America’s rich cultural heritage and natural beauty. When construction for the Blue Ridge Parkway began in 1935, it helped provide jobs to the unemployed during the Great Depression. Today, the parkway offers an escape from the day-to-day stresses of work. Starting in Ashe County, near the Virginia line, rolling hills and thick meadows amalgamate with rock cliffs and breathtaking overlooks. Along the parkway, you will observe numbered mileposts. Those who make a stop at milepost 260 can take a short half-mile hike at Jumpinoff Rock and end up at a rock patio where visitors can observe soaring birds by just looking down. A few miles further down the highway, at milepost 279, Cascades offers easy accessibility to picturesque waterfalls by taking a moderate 1.5-mile loop. As the road gains elevation, the parkway weaves through two familiar places: Boone and Blowing Rock. The Thunder Hill Overlook at milepost 290 is among the most popular stops, and, once there, it’s easy to

understand why. Visitors could stay all day taking in the 360-degree views of the High Country. If you can’t get enough of this overlook, come back at night to take in the pristine, unharmed night sky from this well-liked spot. Back on the parkway, look for milepost 292.7, and explore Moses H. Cone Memorial Park, which boasts more than 3,000 acres of mountain beauty. The park includes many miles of horse and carriage trails, hiking trails and ¿shing. Further still at milepost 296, Price Lake is a place the entire family can enjoy. A 2.3-mile trail encircles the lake, providing access to dozens of ¿shing spots or a nice walking trail with beautiful views. Canoes can also be rented for a pleasure cruise on the lake. After passing Price Lake, the parkway’s scenery begins to change. The lush overlooks turn to sharp, rocky peaks, as the road climbs onto Grandfather Mountain. Try these stops, or explore others. With so much to see and do, it is no wonder that the Blue Ridge Parkway is among the most visited national parks. For more information, visit www. blueridgeparkway.org. SEE MILEPOSTS, PAGE 72

Milepost 295 is a well-visited part of the parkway. It has a campground, picnic area, lake, boating, fishing and hiking trails. PHOTOS BY ROB MOORE


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Cone Manor sits at Milepost 292.7 and has 3,600 acres with trails, hiking and ďŹ shing. PHOTO BY ROB MOORE

MILEPOSTS FROM PAGE 71

Mileposts of Interest

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248.1: NC 18 Crossover 2 Mi. west of Laurel Springs. 24 mi. east to North Wilkesboro, NC. 261: NC 16 Crossover. West 12 mi. to Jefferson, 14 mi. to West Jefferson, 26 mi to Grassey Creek. East 20 mi. to North Wilkesboro. 268: Benge Gap. 272: E.B. Jeffress Park. Picnic area, Comfort station, trail to Cascades. 276.4: Deep Gap. US 421 Crossover. W. 11 mi. to Boone. E 26 miles to North Wilkesboro. 291.9: US 221/321 Crossover. 7 mi. north to Boone, 2 mi. south to Blowing Rock. 292.7: Moses H. Cone Memorial Park, 3,600 acres. Many miles of horse and carriage trails, hiking, Âżshing. 294: Historic Flat Top Manor House; Parkway Craft Center; comfort station; visitor information, publications. 295: Julian Price Memorial Park. 4,344 acres. Campground, picnic area, lake, boating, Âżshing, trails. Alt. 3,400. Reservations for camping www. recreation.gov. 304.4: Linn Cove Viaduct Information Center. Visitor information, comfort station, publications. Trail access viaduct. Alt. 4,000. 305.2: Junction Parkway and US 221. 3 mi. west to Linville. 308.2: Flat Rock Parking Area. Selfguiding nature trail to superb view of Linville Valley and Grandfather Mountain. 312: NC 181 Crossover, 32 miles southeast to Morganton, 2 mi. north to Pineola. 316.3: Linville Falls. Visitor Center.

Campground and picnic area. Trail to overlooks of falls and gorge. For more information on Linville Falls, click here. For camping reservations www. recreation.gov. 316.4: Linville River Parking Area. One of the Parkwayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest stone arch bridges. Three spans of 80 feet each. Fish in Linville River. Picnic area. Comfort Station. Alt. 3,250. Take Spur Rd. to Linville Falls, campground and visitor center. 317.4: South 1 mi. to Linville Falls community. 24 mi. To Marion. 320.7: Chestoa View offers an unusually Âżne view from one of the many vertical cliffs on Humpback Mountain. 331: NC 226 Crossover. 6 mi. north to Spruce Pine. 14 mi. south to Marion. 331: Museum of North Carolina Minerals. Junction of Parkway & NC 226. Features minerals found in North Carolina and regional geology. County Chamber of Commerce OfÂżce. Restrooms. Open daily year around. 331: Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail - Commemorates the campaign leading up to the American victory at Kings Mountain in 1780. Route crosses the Blue Ridge Parkway at Gillespie Gap, near the Mineral Museum. Administered by the National Park Service. www.nps.gov/ovvi. 334: NC 226A Crossover to Little Switzerland. 339.5: Crabtree Falls. 250 acres. Hiking, picnic area, camping, comfort station, drinking water. 40-minute walk to Crabtree Falls.


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The Pipes are

CALLING

Grandfather Mountain Highland Games Each year, GMHG begins with the running of The Bear, an event added in 1995 that tests the endurance of particiince its opening year in 1956, pants courageous enough to tackle the Grandfather Mountain Highchallenging course. The event begins land Games has been an annual in downtown Linville and extends ¿ve summer tradition in the High miles, climbing greater than 1,500 feet in Country. elevation with a ¿nish at the picturesque Featuring an annual gathering of Mile High Swinging Bridge atop the the Scottish clans on and surrounding mountain. MacRae Meadows at scenic Grandfather A grand variety of events peppers Mountain, the games have become one of the landscape at the the most popular and Highland Games. The colorful events in the traditional torchlight entire country. ceremony, gathering Visitors near and of clans and parade far Àock yearly to the of tartans signal the mountain to reconnect of¿cial opening of the with their heritage, games, with varied participate in the wide entertainment. Scotvariety of athletic tish music fans can competitions, consume attend a “Celtic Jam” foods ranging from on Friday, spotlighting burgers and hot dogs the best and brightto haggis and Shepest in Scottish music herd’s pie, enjoy the in genres as diverse traditional music of as traditional pipe pipes and drums or tunes and heavy metal simply to reminisce music. with kith and kin. A Highland Games participant Scottish country Based on Scotland’s takes part in the opening torchlight dancing, classiBraemar Gathering ceremony. cal bagpipe music, and founded by Agnes sheepherding exhibitions, clan tents and MacRae Morton and former reporter for athletics keep MacRae Meadows abuzz The Charlotte News Donald MacDonald, with activity all weekend long. GMHS has become one of the signature Grandfather Mountain Highland Scottish gatherings and games in the Games Inc. is a charitable organization entire nation. with proceeds from each year’s event GMHG is held beside and within a bene¿ting an annual scholarship fund, 440-yard oval running track, as athletic which at one time awarded scholarships running harkens back to the traditional to graduate students wishing to study in Scottish games of yore. GMHG is one of Scotland, but now assists local students the few games in America to feature its with furthering their education in this own track. country. MacRae Meadows, site of the Games, The 59th edition of the Grandfather closely resembles Kintail in Scotland’s Mountain Highland Games takes place Wester Ross. The rugged terrain, the Thursday to Sunday, July 10 to 13. For wildÀowers and even the sometimesmore information, call (828) 733-1333, unpredictable weather conditions and or visit www.gmhg.org. temperatures are all similar. BY JAMIE SHELL

S

The annual Highland Games and Gathering of Scottish Clans march into Grandfather Mountain’s MacRae Meadows July 10 to 13. PHOTOS BY ROB MOORE


THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

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2014

Summer Takes the Stage Theater in the High Country

BY FRANK RUGGIERO

S

imply put, the High Country knows how to stage a show. The Blue Ridge Mountains are celebrated for the arts, crafts and creativity woven into its cultural landscape. Summer theater is showstopping proof. From professional to community theater and points in between, mountains of entertainment await on the summer stage.

LEES-MCRAE SUMMER THEATRE

Although Lees-McRae College is known for its academics and unique mountain campus, summertime brings a different curriculum: professional summer theater. “I think we’re very audience-friendly,” said artistic director Janet Speer, who’s now in her 30th year directing LMC Summer Theatre. “We try to make the plays very obtainable for the audience, and we really work to try to make the energy of it jump off the stage at you. We don’t have the bells and whistles, we don’t have a huge theater, but I think that’s part of our charm. People are often surprised that a little college like us can do what we do.” Audiences can see for themselves this summer, with LMC Summer Theatre’s productions of “Kiss Me, Kate,” “A Grand Night for Singing” and “Monty Python’s Spamalot.” “Kiss Me, Kate” runs June 29 through July 6 and is directed by LMC’s Dr. Michael Hannah. A crafty combination of William Shakespeare’s “The Taming of the Shrew” and the wit and musicality of Cole Porter, “Kiss Me, Kate” features such show-stopping numbers as “Why Can’t You Behave,” “Wunderbar,” “Brush Up Your Shakespeare” and more. This particular show is being dedicated to the late Stan Etkin, an avid supporter of LMC Summer Theatre. Next up is Rodgers and Hammerstein’s “Grand Night for Singing,” running July 16 to 20. “It’s a Rodgers and Hammerstein revue, done with a large group of outstand-

ing singers and dancers,” said Speer, who directs the musical. “Rodgers and Hammerstein did ‘The Sound of Music,’ ‘South Paci¿c,’ ‘The King and I,’ and the list goes on and on. Some of their major numbers will be put together in songs and dance … and we’re going to put the orchestra on stage, which we’ve never done before.” “Monty Python’s Spamalot,” directed by Speer, will close out LMC’s summer season Aug. 6 to 10. Written by Python star Eric Idle and longtime musical collaborator John Du Prez, “Spamalot” is described as “a new musical ripped off from the ¿lm, ‘Monty Python and the Holy Grail.’” “We’re going out on a limb with ‘Spamalot,’ and I’m hoping it’ll bring in some younger audiences,” Speer said. “I think it’s going to be great.” Each performance takes place at Hayes Auditorium, located off Main Street in downtown Banner Elk. Season tickets cost $112.11, and individual tickets cost $42.71 for adults and $21.36 for students and children. Tickets are available at the Hayes Auditorium box of¿ce or online at www.lmc.edu/conferencing_ and_events/summer_theatre. For more information, call (828) 898-8709.

ENSEMBLE STAGE

Ensemble Stage, the Blowing Rock-

based professional theater company, is preparing for one of its most exciting seasons yet, with “Tuna Does Vegas,” “The Kitchen Witches,” “Desperate Affection” and “Completely Hollywood (Abridged).” The season opens with “Tuna Does Vegas,” part of the popular “Greater Tuna” comedy series, running June 21 to 29. In this iteration, the Tuna townspeople ¿nd themselves in Sin City. And although the play boasts more than 20 characters, only two actors will portray them — Ensemble favorites Mark Allen Woodard and Stephen Moore. “It’s a look at small-town life and small-town values, but throw Las Vegas into the mix with the showgirls and Elvis impersonators, and it’s a lot of fun,” Smith said. “I’ve read a lot of the ‘Tuna’ plays out there, and to me, this is the funniest.” Next up is “The Kitchen Witches,” running July 5 to 13. The setting is a low-budget, cable-access TV station, on which two rival cooking show hosts are forced to work together. “One of them’s had this cooking show for a long time, but they’re cancelling it, so this is her last show, and it’s being broadcasted live with her studio audience,” Smith said. “An old rival of hers comes in to gloat … and a food ¿ght

ensues. But the audience loves it, so they put these two women together as cohosts on a cooking show.” “The Kitchen Witches” stars Burlene Franklin, Josephine Hall, Luke White and Daniel Armbrust. The season them moves into darker territory with “Desperate Affection,” a suspense thriller, running July 26 to Aug. 3. Starring San Francisco-based actor Greg Waller and Asheville’s Jennifer O’Rear, the story focuses on a couple whose relationship is hardly as it seems. “In the ¿rst act, you think you’re watching this perfect, ideal relationship between two people,” Smith said. “And then things change.” To say any more would spoil the play’s shocking twists and turns, he added, except that it’ll have audiences guessing up until the powerful conclusion. To lighten the mood, the season will conclude Aug. 23 to 31, with “Completely Hollywood (Abridged),” a madcap rundown of 186 of the greatest movies of all time, condensed into 90 minutes. From the same team that presented “The Complete History of America (Abridged)” and “The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged),” “Hollywood” is a vaudevillian take on ¿lm, Smith said. “Completely Hollywood (Abridged)” stars Mark Allen Woodard and Victor Rivera. For younger audiences, Ensemble presents a children’s play for all ages. “The Short Tree and the Bird That Could Not Sing” will run June 28, July 12 and 19, and Aug. 2 and 9. “It’s a neat little story about friendship between a short, stubby tree and a bird,” Smith said. “The other trees in the area have been cut down by loggers, but this one was so short that they left it. So, it’s lonely, and this bird comes along, and they strike up a friendship.” All of the productions are directed by Smith and will take place at the Blowing Rock School Auditorium on Sunset Drive in downtown Blowing Rock. Season passes for the Main Stage plays are available at $73 for adults and SEE STAGE, PAGE 75


2014

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STAGE

FROM PAGE 74

$65 for senior citizens, students and members of the military. To purchase a subscription, interested parties should visit www.ensemblestage.com to pick their dates and seats, and then call the box of¿ce at (828) 414-1844 to purchase tickets. Individual tickets go on sale June 1 and cost $21 for adults, $19 for senior citizens, students and members of the military and $11 for children 16 younger. Tickets to the children’s play cost $6 apiece. For more information, visit www.ensemblestage. com, or call (828) 414-1844.

APPALACHIAN STATE UNIVERSITY

As part of An Appalachian Summer Festival, Greensboro’s Triad Stage presents “All’s Well That Ends Well” July 10 at Appalachian State University’s Schaefer Center for the Performing Arts, located at 733 Rivers St. on campus in Boone. Written by William Shakespeare and directed by Preston Lane, this production is “¿lled with comedy, love, bold plans, dirty tricks and brilliantly drawn characters,” according to Triad Stage’s synopsis. “‘All’s Well That Ends Well’ is Shakespeare done Triad Stage-style — a classic re-invented.” Tickets cost $20 for general admission and $10 for students and children and are available at the Schaefer Center box of¿ce, by visiting www.appsummer.org, or by calling (800) 841-ARTS.

ASHE LITTLE THEATER

Broadway is coming to West Jefferson, with Ashe County Little Theatre’s production of “Les Miserables.” Written by Alain Boublil and Claude-Michel Schonberg, with lyrics by Herbert Kretzmer, this musical adaptation of Victor Hugo’s classic tale of the French revolution hits the Ashe Civic Center stage June 26 to 30. From Aug. 28 to 31, Ashe County Little Theatre puts the “fun” in “funeral,” with “Southern Fried Funeral.” Written J. Dietz Osborne and Nate Eppler, this comedy shows how funerals “bring out the best, the worst and the funniest in people,” centering on the Frye family’s struggles to stage a ceremony worthy of its late patriarch. Tickets for both productions are available at the Ashe Arts Center, located at 303 School Ave. in West Jefferson. The Ashe Civic Center is located at 962 Mt. Jefferson Road in West Jefferson. For more information or tickets, call (336) 846-ARTS, or visit www.ashecountyarts.org.

BEANSTALK COMMUNITY THEATRE

The High Country’s newest community theater, BeanStalk, presents “Disney’s Aladdin Jr.” Aug. 7 to 9 at the Harvest House, located at 247 Boone Heights Drive in Boone. Tickets will go on sale July 1. To purchase tickets, or for more information, visit www.beanstalkcommunitytheatre.com.

PAGE 75

Bleu Moon Productions

Shows at a Glance ENSEMBLE STAGE “Tuna Does Vegas” June 21, 23, 24, 27 & 28 at 7:30 p.m. June 22 & 29 at 2 p.m. Blowing Rock School Auditorium www.ensemblestage.com (828) 414-1844 “The Kitchen Witches” July 5, 7, 8, 11 & 12 at 7:30 p.m. July 6 & 13 at 2 p.m. Blowing Rock School Auditorium www.ensemblestage.com (828) 414-1844 “Desperate Affection” July 26, 28, 29 & Aug. 1 & 2 at 7:30 p.m. July 27 & Aug. 3 at 2 p.m. Blowing Rock School Auditorium www.ensemblestage.com (828) 414-1844 “Completely Hollywood (Abridged)” Aug. 23, 25, 26, 29 & 30 at 7:30 p.m. Aug. 24 & 31 at 2 p.m. Blowing Rock School Auditorium www.ensemblestage.com (828) 414-1844 “The Short Tree & the Bird That Could Not Sing” June 28, July 12 & 19, Aug. 2 & 9 at 11 a.m. Blowing Rock School Auditorium www.ensemblestage.com (828) 414-1844

LEES-MCRAE SUMMER THEATRE “Kiss Me, Kate” July 1, 2, 3 & 5 at 7 p.m. June 29, July 5 & 6 at 2 p.m. Hayes Auditorium, Banner Elk www.lmc.edu (828) 898-8709 SEE STAGE, PAGE 76

edge amphitheatre at historic fort hamby park, wilkesboro NC Seniors, Group Rates available or online at www.bleumoonproductions.com Hotel accommodations and area

Downtown Boone, NC Tom Dooley: A Wilkes County Legend recounts the famous 1860’s lovers’ triangle tale that became one passion. Performed outdoors at Fort Hamby Amphitheatre, the drama brings to life the romance, jealousy, and mystery surrounding the murder of Laura Foster. In this visually stunning portrayal, audience members are treated to the sights and sounds of frontier NC - from the cannon blasts of the Civil War to the fanciful tunes of a “mollasy boilin’” dance. Sit in on the trial of Tom Dooley and watch as the community gathers to witness his hanging. Written by NC native, Karen Reynolds, the show begs the question, who really killed Laura Foster that fateful morning?


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FROM PAGE 75

2014

Ashe Civic Center, West Jefferson www.ashecountyarts.org (336) 846-ARTS “Southern Fried Funeral” Aug. 28 to 31 Ashe Civic Center, West Jefferson www.ashecountyarts.org (336) 846-ARTS

“A Grand Night for Singing” July 16, 17, 18 & 19 at 7 p.m. July 17, 19 & 20 at 2 p.m. Hayes Auditorium, Banner Elk www.lmc.edu (828) 898-8709 “Monty Python’s Spamalot” Aug. 6, 7, 8 & 9 at 7 p.m. Aug. 7, 9 & 10 at 2 p.m. Hayes Auditorium, Banner Elk www.lmc.edu (828) 898-8709

ASHE COUNTY LITTLE THEATRE “Les Miserables” June 26 to 30

APPALACHIAN STATE UNIVERSITY Triad Stage’s “All’s Well That Ends Well” Thursday, July 10, 8 p.m. Schaefer Center, Boone www.appsummer.org (800) 841-ARTS

BEANSTALK COMMUNITY THEATRE “Disney’s Aladdin Jr.” Aug. 7 to 9 Harvest House 247 Boone Heights Drive, Boone www.beanstalkcommunitytheatre.com


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THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

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2014

Concerts in the High Country July 4 • Watauga Community Band July 11 • The Sheets Family Band July 18 • The Worthless Son-in-Laws July 25 • The Lucky Strikes Aug. 1 • 8 Miles Apart Aug. 8 • The Major Sevens Aug. 15 • Dashboard Hula Boys Aug. 22 • Zephyr Lightning Bolts Aug. 29 • Red June Sept. 5 • Folk and Dagger

COMPILED BY ANNA OAKES

S

pread out your blanket, kick off your shoes, and enjoy the tunes. If it’s Thursday, Friday, Saturday or Sunday, you have free musical entertainment options in the High Country this summer.

SUMMER CONCERTS AT THE JONES HOUSE • BOONE

Every Friday during the Summer Concerts at the Jones House series, bring a chair or blanket to enjoy the concerts on the front lawn of the Jones House Community Center in downtown Boone, beginning at 5 p.m. For more information, call (828) 262-4576. June 6 • Soul Benefactor/Spice Creek Ramblers June 13 • Mercury Dames/Swing Guitars June 20 • Doc Watson Celebration w/ the Elkville String Band, Strictly Clean and Decent, Charles Welch and Rich Kirby and the Kruger Brothers June 27 • Red Leg Husky/The Monroebots July 4 • Fat Face Band/Liz Hayes

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GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE Open 7 Days a Week Mon - Sat 10 am - 5 pm Sun 1 pm - 5 pm For More Information Call 423 727 1950 or Visit www.mountaincityantiques.com 101 South Church Street Downtown Mountain City, TN Just 22 miles north of Boone, N.C.

BACKSTREET PARK SUMMER CONCERTS • WEST JEFFERSON The Concerts at the Jones House begin June 6. PHOTO SUBMITTED

and Common Threads July 11 • Buck Haggard Band/The Buck Stops Here July 18 • Andy Ferrell and Oncoming Train/Carolina Crossing July 25 • Cathy Fink and Marcy Marxer/Kelley and the Cowboys Aug. 1 • Amantha Mill/Jazz Guitar Duo w/ Page and Schaller Aug. 8 • Never Too Late Bluegrass/Williams and Company Aug. 15 • Shane Chalke’s BE Jazz Band/Todd Wright Aug. 22 • Steve Katz Aug. 29 • David Childers/Dashboard Hula Boys Sept. 5 • Lazybirds/Sound Traveler Sept. 12, 4 p.m. • Traditional music and storytelling showcase with Glenn Bolick, Orville Hicks, Charlie Glenn, Rick Ward, Lonnie Ward, Trevor McKenzie, Mary Greene, Cecil Gurganus, Strictly Strings

MUSIC IN THE VALLE • VALLE CRUCIS

The Music in the Valle series takes place at Valle Crucis Community Park on Fridays beginning at 7 p.m. through Aug. 8 and beginning at 6:30 p.m. Aug. 15 to Sept 5. Concerts are free, but a $5 donation to the nonpro¿t park is suggested. Bring a chair or blanket. For more information, call (828) 963-9239. May 23 • The Forget-Me-Nots May 30 • Carolina Crossing June 6 • The Neighbors June 13 • Sound Traveler June 20 • The Mountain Laurels June 27 • Brother Gravity

The West Jefferson Community Partnership presents the BackStreet Park Summer Concerts series on selected dates from 5:30 to 7 p.m. on the Backstreet in downtown West Jefferson. Bring a chair, blanket and/ or picnic. In cases of rain, concerts will be held at the Ashe Arts Center. For more information, call (866) 6070093, or visit www.VisitWestJefferson.org. June 20 • Sheets Family Band June 27 • The King Bees July 18 • Elkville String Band July 26 • Crooked Road Ramblers Aug. 15 • Garden Variety String Band Aug. 22 • Grayson Highland Band Aug. 29 • Zephyr Lightning Bolts Sept. 5 • Carolina Crossing

BLUEGRASS AT TODD GENERAL STORE • TODD

Every Friday through Thanksgiving at Todd General Store in Todd, enjoy free bluegrass music. Come early for good seating. Dinner is served at 6 p.m. followed by music at 7 p.m. For more information, call (336) 8771067.

TODD SUMMER MUSIC SERIES • TODD

Every summer, concerts take place at Cook Memorial Park in Todd as part of the Todd Summer Music Series. All concerts start at 6 p.m. Bring a lawn chair or blanket. For more information, call (336) 877-5401, or click to www.toddnc.org. June 21 • The King Bees July 5 • New River Boys July 19 • Eric Ellis & Caldwell Line Aug. 2 • Elkville String Band Aug. 16 • The Tillers Sept. 6 • Melissa Reaves SEE OUTDOOR, PAGE 79


2014

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OUTDOOR

afternoon-concerts-return-this-week-id025299#sthash.lNXYJYOt.dpuf

FRED’S SUMMER SUNDAY CONCERTS • BEECH MOUNTAIN

CONCERTS IN THE PARK • BLOWING ROCK

FROM PAGE 78

Fred’s General Mercantile on Beech Mountain hosts Fred’s Summer Sunday Concerts on several Sundays, in July and August, typically beginning at 6:30 p.m. Some seats are provided, but bring a chair or blanket just in case. For more information and a schedule of performers, call (828) 387-4838.

FRIDAY AFTERNOON CONCERTS • BLOWING ROCK

The Inn at Ragged Gardens hosts outdoor music shows from May through October (weather permitting), and at the height of the summer, the concerts attract several hundred people to the front lawn of the historic inn for an afternoon of good music and socializing. A cash bar and lawn menu are available, courtesy of the Best Cellar. Guests are encouraged to bring lawn chairs and arrive early to secure a spot on the lawn. Dogs, coolers and outside food are not permitted. Each week, a local non-pro¿t organization is featured to educate the public about good work being done in the community. The 2014 Concert on the Lawn schedule includes: The Harris Brothers • May 30 Smokey Breeze • June 6 The King Bees • June 13 The Harris Brothers • June 20 Soul Benefactor • June 27 Supa Tight • July 4 Soul Benefactor • July 11 Matt and Bruce • July 18 The Harris Brothers • July 25 Smokey Breeze • Aug. 1 Drive South • Aug. 8 Worthless Son-In-Laws • Aug. 15 The Lucky Strikes Classic Jazz Band • Aug. 22 The Harris Brothers • Aug. 29 Supa Tight • Sept. 5 Rama Jay • Sept. 12 Soul Benefactor • Sept. 19 The Harris Brothers • Sept. 26 Smokey Breeze • Oct. 3 The Inn at Ragged Gardens is located at 203 Sunset Drive in downtown Blowing Rock. For more information, call the Inn at Ragged Gardens at (828) 295-9703. - See more at: http://mountaintimes.com/music/articles/Friday-

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Several free concerts take place at Memorial Park in Blowing Rock this summer as part of the Concerts in the Park series, presented by the Blowing Rock Chamber of Commerce. Concerts begin at 4 p.m. Bring a chair or blanket. Additional performances in August and September had yet to be ¿nalized as of presstime. For more information, call (828) 295-7851. May 18 • Bailey Mountain Cloggers June 15 • Owen Poteat July 20 • The King Bees

SUMMER CONCERTS IN THE PARK • BANNER ELK

Presented by the Banner Elk Chamber of Commerce, the Summer Concerts in the Park series takes place every Thursday from June 19 to Aug. 28 at 6:30 p.m. at Tate-Evans Town Park off of N.C. 194. Food vendors will be on site, or bring your own picnic. RafÀe tickets are sold, and there’s entertainment for kids. For more information, call (828) 898-8395, or visit www.bannerelkchamber.com. June 19 • Annie Robinette June 26 • The Major Sevens July 3 • Flying Saucers July 10 • Wolf Creek July 17 • Soul Benefactor July 24 • Dashboard Blue July 31 • Smokey Freeze Aug. 7 • The Extraordinaires Aug. 14 • Sharkadelics Aug. 21 • Deluge Aug. 28 • The Whip Daddies

RIVERWALK CONCERT SERIES • NEWLAND

The Newland Business Association will once again present the Riverwalk Concert Series in 2014 at Riverwalk Park. Concerts take place from 6 to 9 p.m., with door prizes, vendors and dancing, in addition to the music. The rain location is the Rock Gym in downtown Newland. For more information, visit www.newlandbusiness.org.

The Harris Brothers perform regularly at The Inn at Ragged Gardens’ Friday afternoon concerts in Blowing Rock. PHOTO BY FRANK RUGGIERO

July 18 • JJL Band July 25 • Jesse Smith, Elvis Show Aug. 1 • The Lucky Strikes Aug. 8 • Red Dirt Revelators

Aug. 15 • Tone Blazers Aug. 22 • Moore Brothers Band (with ¿reworks)

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THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

PAGE 80

2014

The Sounds of Summer

Tune into area music festivals BY JESSE CAMPBELL

Y

ou don’t have to go to a large concert hall in a metropolitan to ¿nd quality, soul-enriching music, as evident by the eclectic lineup of music festivals in the High Country this summer.

MUSICFEST ’N SUGAR GROVE

Music Fest ’n Sugar Grove returns to the High Country July 11 and 12, with a repertoire of jams and toe-tapping bluegrass music that could rival any larger venue, as audience members are treated to top notch traditional Americana music, while enjoying an intimate setting with the artists. Among those in attendance this year is Doyle Lawson and Quicksilver, who are credited with multiple Grammy nominations and are winners of vocal group of the year honors. The music series will span two stages in two days, while featuring national acts, like Willie Watson, formerly of Old Crow Medicine Show, and local and regionally celebrated acts, including He Said She Said, Ashley Heath, Spirit Fiddle, Carolina Crossing, The New River Boys, Snyder Family, Upright and Breathin’ and many more. For a full lineup, visit www.musicfestnsugargrove.org. Tickets are now on sale and can be purchased at Boone Drug, Mast General Store, Cove Creek Store in Sugar Grove, the Historic Cove Creek School, Boone Drug in Foscoe, the Ashe County Arts Council and the Welcome Center in Mountain City, Tenn. Two-day reserved tickets are $55 each. Tickets are also available at the gate. For more information, call (828) 297-2200.

OLA BELLE REED MUSIC FESTIVAL

Sometimes, you have to take a drive off the beaten path to ¿nd the ¿nely tuned mountain music in the ruff, so to speak. Former Ashe County railroad hub Lansing becomes the center for mountain music this summer during the annual Ola Belle Reed Music Festival, taking place Aug. 8 and 9 at the Lansing Memorial Park Stage. This year’s lineup features the Sheets Family Band, Time Sawyer, The Amigos Band, Whitetop Mountain Band, Melissa Reeves, Ashe Breeze Band, the Elkville String Band with Wayne Henderson, The Harris Brothers along with many more. For a full lineup, visit www.olabellefest.com/stagescehdule/. Tickets can be ordered online at www.olabellefest. com/tickets/. A full weekend pass is $15, $5 for Friday

Doyle Lawson and Quicksilver will headline 2014’s Doc & Rosa Lee Watson MusicFest ’n Sugar Grove. PHOTO BY FRANK RUGGIERO

only and $10 for Saturday only.

SIRENS ON THE MOUNTAIN

The sirens are calling, and it’s music to the High Country’s ears. Sirens on the Mountain, formerly Siren Mountain Jam, is a two-day celebration of women in the arts, and it’s returning for its second year June 20 to 21. Taking place at the High Country Fairgrounds (748 Roby Greene Road, Boone), the festival features such nationally celebrated acts as Rickie Lee Jones, Bettye

LaVette and Rising Appalachia. Additional main stage acts include Shannon Whitworth, Gigi Dover, Underhill Rose, Michelle Malone and Melissa Reaves. Laura Blackley, Redleg Husky, Amythyst Kiah, Sole Scheafer and Sam O round out the lineup. As with 2013’s inaugural festival, this year’s will also feature an Artisan Village and vendors aplenty. “Whether folks are hearty camping veterans, musicloving day-trippers or overnight hotel visitors, we SEE SOUNDS, PAGE 81


THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

2014

Rickie Lee Jones will headline the 2014 Sirens on the Mountain festival. PHOTO BY ASTOR MORGAN

SOUNDS FROM PAGE 80

wanted to make sure we gave them a music and art festival they’ll not only enjoy with their friends this time, but one they’ll want to return to for years to come,” promoter Beth Carroll said. “We’re carefully selecting the best in

regional craftspeople, and we’re being really demanding with the gourmet level of food vendors we’re choosing. But we know it really comes down to presenting world class music for most folks.” Tickets and detailed information (local hotels, camping options, alcohol policies, parking, etc.) are available online at www.sirensonthemountain.com.

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THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

2014

An Appalachian

SUMMER FESTIVAL

BY FRANK RUGGIERO

I

t’s a festival three decades in the making. An Appalachian Summer Festival returns for its 30th anniversary, bringing with it a month’s worth of entertainment. A performing arts celebration presented by Appalachian State University, this year’s festival features a bevy of performers that span the arts, including Sheryl Crow (July 24), Nickel Creek (July 15), Little Big Town (June 28) and many others.

“Because it’s our 30th anniversary, we’ve really tried to kind of ¿nd the balance between celebrating our history and bringing an exciting new lineup, as well,” said Megan Stage, marketing and public relations manager with Appalachian’s Of¿ce of Arts and Cultural Programs. “We believe in bringing a diverse mix of acts, but not always the same kind of artists. We’ve tried to ¿nd that balance, see what works for us in the past and what audiences really loved.” SEE SUMMER, PAGE 87

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2014

THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

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PAGE 84

THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

2014

The High Country’s Art

GALLERIES A

rt buyers and enthusiasts will ¿nd that the High Country’s art galleries have much to offer. Home to almost countless venues that host a variety of styles and mediums, the High Country has a gallery for just about every artistic disposition.

Fine Art

For two decades, Blowing Rock Frameworks & Gallery has provided its clientele with custom framing and artwork. During his business’s 20 years, owner Tim Miller has assembled a gallery featuring work from more than 25 of the most accomplished artists in the Southeast, including the renowned

Celebrating 32Years

Energetic Expressions by Egi and Edie Egi Antonaccio and Edie Maney

Spring Group Exhibition May 24th – July 15th

Expanding the Edge of Color Andrew Braitman

Mid-Summer Group Exhibition July 26th- September 15th Opening Reception July 26th 2-5pm CARLTON GALLERY Located 10 Miles South of Boone on Highway 105 in Grandfather Community 828-963-4288 | www.carltongallery.com | carltongallery@carltongallery.com

PAINTINGS • CLAY • GLASS • WOOD • FIBER ART • JEWELRY

Elliott Dainger¿eld. According to Miller, a stroll through Blowing Rock Frameworks is as pleasing to the ¿rst-time visitor as it is to seasoned collectors. The Art Cellar Gallery has been a celebrated arts destination for more than 20 years, featuring the works of regional, national and internationally acclaimed artists. From primitive to realistic, impressionistic to abstract, The Art Cellar features ¿ne quality artwork by both established and emerging artists, while providing clientele with a comfortable exhibition space in which to select the next treasured additions to their collections, large or small. The Art Cellar is located at 920 SEE GALLERIES, PAGE 85


2014

THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE Pottery, located in the Martin House on Main Street in downtown Blowing Rock, features the work of the Bolick and Calhoun families, which can trace their crafts back several generations to the Seagrove School of potters in Eastern North Carolina. Lula Owens Bolick and her husband, Glenn, and Janet Calhoun and her husband, Michael, continue a pottery tradition that goes back in the family for 190 years.

Jewelry

‘Red Birdhouse’ by Tonya Bottomley, one of many artists represented at Alta Vista Gallery in Valle Crucis.

GALLERIES FROM PAGE 84

Shawneehaw Lane in Banner Elk. For more information, call (828) 898-5175, or visit www.artcellaronline.com. Carlton Gallery in Banner Elk is one of the most established ¿ne art galleries in North Carolina. Representing more than 200 local, regional and national artisans, the gallery is ¿lled with art in all mediums, including paintings, glass, sculpture, wood, clay, wearable art and jewelry. The gallery is located 10 miles south of Boone and seven miles north of Linville on N.C. 105 in the Grandfather Mountain community. For more information, call (828) 963-4288, or visit www. carltongallery.com. Clark Gallery in downtown Banner Elk boasts an impressive collection of artists. While all have representational painting in common, the diversity of the group ranges from bold expressionism to examples of restrained neo-classicism and illusionistic realism and traditional materials, as well as mixed media. Established by Chris Clark in 2001, the gallery has grown considerably, due to its founder’s experience and passion for painting. Clark Gallery is located at 393 Shawnheehaw Ave. in Banner Elk. For more information, call (828) 898-2095, or visit www.clarkgallerync.com.

With more than 30 years of experience, Old World Galleries owners Charlie and Joy Travis value the relationship with each client, striving to ensure that every transaction provides true customer satisfaction. Old World specializes in ¿ne jewelry in platinum, gold, sterling silver, precious and semi-precious gemstones, as well as custom-designed jewelry for budgetminded customers. The gallery also buys, sells and appraises antique and estate jewelry, including diamonds and precious gems, while offering a full line of jewelry repair, cleaning, evaluation and more.

Continuing Education

The pottery of Bob Meier can be found in the artist’s studio and gallery, Doe Ridge Pottery, in downtown Boone. PHOTO COURTESY OF BOB MEIER

Pottery Doe Ridge Pottery is the High Country’s premier local pottery dealer. Bob Meier opened the gallery and store in 1988 and remains a resident pottery with numerous other artisans. With a freshly designed showroom and new displays, Doe Ridge’s collection of ¿ne pottery includes functional, specialty and home decor pieces. Doe Ridge Pottery is located at 585 W. King St., Suite D, in downtown Boone. For more information, call (828) 2641127, or visit www.doeridgepottery.com. Bolick Pottery and Traditions

West Jefferson’s Florence Thomas Art School & Gallery is an artist’s one-stop shop. The center offers resources for instruction, exhibition and experience in the ¿ne arts and heritage crafts for Ashe County and the entire region. The school and gallery are named after the late Florence Thomas, an Ashe County artist who, in her 98 years, created hundreds of paintings, capturing the soul, mystery and comfort of common thing — from farm animals to Àowers to landscapes. In addition, she taught painting in the basement of her home for 20 years. Thomas died in 2007, but her legacy continunes. Upon her passing, she provided the means to establish a nonpro¿t art school in Ashe County, thus continuing her legacy of providing quality instruction in the arts. Florence Thomas Art School & Gallery is located at 10 S. Jefferson Ave. in West Jefferson. For more information, call (336) 8463827, or visit www.Àorenceartschool. org.

PAGE 85

Gallery Listings Banner Elk The Art Cellar

920 Shawneehaw Ave. (828) 898-5175 www.artcellaronline.com

Art Purveyors World HQ

112 Aldridge Park (828) 963-7246 www.artpurveyors.com

Carlton Gallery

10360 N.C. 105 South (828) 963-4288 www.carltongallery.com

Clark Gallery

393 Shaneehaw Ave. (828) 898-2095 www.clarkgallerync.com

Maggie Black Pottery

1225 N.C. 105 (828) 773-2459 www.maggieblackpottery.com

Sally Nooney Gallery

7137 N.C.194 South (828) 963-7347 www.sallynooney.com

Blowing Rock Art & Artifacts

159 Sunset Drive (828) 414-9402 www.artandartifactsbr.com

Blowing Rock Frameworks & Gallery 7935 Valley Blvd. (828) 295-0041 www.blowingrockgalleries.com

Bolick Pottery & Traditions Pottery The Martin House 1116 Main St. (828) 295-6128 www.traditionspottery.com

Morning Star Gallery

257 Sunset Dr. (828) 295-6991 www.morningstargalleryusa.com

SEE GALLERIES, PAGE 86


PAGE 86

THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

2014

GALLERIES FROM PAGE 85

Rock Galleries of Fine Art

1153 Main St. (828) 295-9752 www.thomaskinkadeasheville.com/ blowingrock

Boone ArtWalk

611 W. King St. (828) 264-9998 www.artwalkboone.com

Blue Ridge ArtSpace

377 Shadowline Drive (828) 264-1789 www.watauga-arts.org

Doe Ridge Pottery

585-D W. King St. (828) 264-1127 www.doeridgepottery.homestead.com

Hands Gallery

543 W. King St. (828) 262-1970 www.handsgallery.org

Jones House Community Center

604 W. King St. (828) 262-4576 www.joneshousecommunitycenter.org

Kevin Beck Studio

1590 Shull’s Mill Road (828) 963-1181 www.kevinbeck.com

Blowing Rock Frameworks & Gallery features work from more than 25 of the most accomplished artists in the Southeast.

Linville & Newland 87 Ruffin Street Gallery 87 Ruf¿n St., Linville (828) 733-6449

414 E. 2nd St. (336) 846-4141 www.broom¿eldsgallery.com

Ripples Gallery

Crossnore Fine Arts Gallery

R.T. Morgan Art Gallery & Glass by Camille

2180 Goose Hollow Road, Pineola (828) 387-1944 www.linvilleriverpottery.com

Anvil Arts Studio

423 W. King St. Boone, N.C. 28607 (828) 262-3017 www.tcva.org

Broomfields Gallery

Linville River Pottery

Shed Studios

Turchin Center for the Visual Arts

www.bohemianc.com

Pineola, Crossnore & Linville Falls

182 Howard St.

555 W. King St.

106 N. Jefferson Ave. (336) ͺͶ͸ǦͳͶͻͺ

41 Redbird Lane, Newland (828) 733-5755 www.pambrewer.com

The Crossnore School 205 Johnson Lane (828) 733-3144 www.crossnoregallery.org

Modern Rustic

Bohemia

Pam Brewer Studio

9600 Linville Highway, Linville Falls (828) 765-6226 www.studiosculpture.com

Valle Crucis Alta Vista Gallery

2839 Broadstone Road (828) 963-5247 www.altavistagallery.com

Rivercross Market

3595 N.C. 194 (828) 963-8623 www.rivercrossmarket.com

101 N. Jefferson Ave. (336) 219-0089 www.claytonproctor.com

120 N. Jefferson Ave. (336) 246-3328 www.rtmorganartgallery.com

‘Trail to Cone Manor’ by Egidio Antonaccio, one of many artists represented at Carlton Gallery in Banner Elk.

The Artists’ Theatre

West Jefferson

Ashe Custom Framing & Gallery

Ashe Arts Center Gallery

303 School Ave. (336) 846-2787 www.ashecountyarts.org

Acorn Gallery

103 Long St. (336) 246-3388 www.acorngallery.com

8 E. Main St. (336) 846-3355 www.theartiststheatre.com

105 S. Jefferson Ave. (336) 846-2218 www.ashecustomframing.com

Originals Only

3-B N. Jefferson Ave. (336) 846-1636 www.originalsonlygallery.com


THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

2014

SUMMER FROM PAGE 82

One such act was Pilobolus (July 3), a nationally lauded modern dance company. “They were here for another of our anniversary years, and they’re such a fun, interesting group, so we knew we wanted to bring them back,” Stage said. Another festival mainstay is the Broyhill Chamber Orchestra (June 29, July 1, 20 and 22), which helped found the inaugural Appalachian Summer three decades ago. The Eastern Festival Orchestra, another perennial favorite, will also return. “But we also wanted to get artists that were a little bit different,” Stage said. “We announced Little Big Town, which is a huge concert for us. Sheryl Crow we’ve been trying to get here for many years. She’s kind of doing a crossover from pop to country, but she’ll be singing a lot of hits, as well as her new music. She’s an icon, so successful in her career, so we knew that once we got her, this would be a big year. As soon as we locked her and Little Big Town in, we knew this year would be bigger than we thought.” Stage is also delighted to see mandolinist Chris Thile return to

Sheryl Crow will perform July 24 for An Appalachian Summer Festival. PHOTOS SUBMITTED

Boone by way of Nickel Creek, his original band with Sara Watkins and Sean Watkins, all of whom have been performing on a Nickel Creek reunion tour. “Chris Thile is no stranger to this area … but Nickel Creek is just incredible,” Stage said. Once again, An Appalachian Summer will feature ties to the hit TV series, “Glee.” Whereas “Glee” guest star Idina Menzel performed in 2013, 2014 will feature a performance by series regular Matthew Morrison (July 12), who will

PAGE 87

perform his Broadway favorites with the Greensboro Symphony Orchestra. Greensboro’s Triad Stage will make its Schaefer Center for the Performing Arts debut with a production of William Shakespeare’s “All’s Well That Ends Well” (July 10). While most performing arts events take place during the evening, there’s also plenty of fun to be had on a warm, Appalachian Summer day. The festival will again feature a vast lineup of workshops, lunch-and-learns and family events at the university’s Turchin Center for the Visual Arts, among other venues on campus. The celebration will also have an international Àair. The TCVA will present an exhibition of contemporary art from South Africa, and a global ¿lm series will feature a movie every Monday, the dates for which have yet to be announced. A kids’ classic ¿lm night will also be held, as will a family event with the Harlem Dance Theatre. The Carnegie Hall Youth Orchestra will close out the season. For tickets and more information, visit www.appsummer.org, or call (828) 841-ARTS.

Season Highlights June 28: Outdoor Fireworks Concert: Little Big Town June 29: Broyhill Chamber Ensemble June 30: Film: The Rocket (2013) July 1: Broyhill Chamber Ensemble July 3: Pilobolus July 4: Westglow Resort & Spa July 4th Extravaganza with Sophie B. Hawkins and BETTY July 5: Michael McDonald July 6: Eastern Festival Orchestra with Sir James Galway, Àute July 7: Film: The Lunchbox (2013) July 9: Hayes School of Music Faculty Showcase Concert July 10: Triad Stage: All’s Well that Ends Well July 11: Summer Exhibition Celebration at the Turchin Center July 12: Matthew Morrison July 13: Rosen-Schaffel Competition July 14: Nickel Creek July 15: Film: Like Father, Like Son (2013) July 19: Dance Theatre of Harlem

Little Big Town will perform for An Appalachian Summer’s Outdoor Fireworks Concert June 28.

Broyhill Chamber Ensemble Film: Jappeloup (2013) Broyhill Chamber Ensemble Carol Grotnes Belk Distinguished Lecture: Frances Mayes July 24: Sheryl Crow July 25: Film: The Jungle Book (1967) July 26: National Youth Orchestra with Gil Shaham, violin

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THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

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2014

Get Artsy in the

MOUNTAINS BY JESSE CAMPBELL & FRANK RUGGIERO

W

hile the seasonable summer weather in the High Country can make it tempting to pass on indoor entertainment, such as plays and gallery ventures, you won’t want to miss out on the area’s vibrant art scene that isn’t always visible at ¿rst glance. Art councils across the region offer more than just your casual stroll through in the art gallery, as Appalachia’s enchanting and distinct culture comes to life in through an array of media.

ASHE COUNTY ARTS COUNCIL

The Blue Ridge Art Clan will host its annual artists’ reception at 5 p.m. on June 13 at the Ashe Arts Center. The event is free of charge and will feature contemporary

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and ¿ne art. Coffee House Live returns to West Jefferson this summer to offer local entertainment and a traditional music variety. Performers vary, but you’re sure to enjoy the local sights and sounds. Desserts, coffee and beverages will be available. The fun starts at 7:30 p.m. on June 14 at 107 W. 2nd Street in West Jefferson. Tickets are $10 and $5 for students. The classic “Les Miserables” takes center stage at the Ashe County Civic Center from June 26 to 30, presented by Ashe County Little Theatre. According to the arts council, the story of convict Jean Valjean has touched the ‘Picnic Under a Full Moon’ by Rebekah Mae Trapp at the Blue Ridge ArtSpace heart of its international audiences as few shows in history have done. As Ashe Fried Funeral.” be, our longings for individual peace and County Little Theatre described it, “‘Les For tickets, call (336) 846-2787. The liberty remain the same.” Miserables” reminds us that we are each Theater returns to the civic center Aug. part of the same human family and that 28 to 31, with the comedy, “Southern whatever our outward differences may SEE ARTSY, PAGE 89

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THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

2014

West Jefferson is home to numerous murals throughout its downtown area.

ARTSY

FROM PAGE 88

Ashe County Civic Center is located below Lowe’s Foods at 962 Mt. Jefferson Road. The council’s home, the Ashe Arts Center in downtown West Jefferson, will also host several art exhibits throughout summer. “Shadow of the Hills” will open June 13, and a special exhibit honoring the photography of agriculture and farming in Ashe County — “From Dusk to Dawn” — will be on display from July 9 to Aug. 2, from 5 to 8 p.m. A “Still Life” exhibit will come to life Aug. 8. In addition, the Ashe County Arts Council helps facilitate a monthly gallery crawl. Held every second Friday at 5 p.m. from June through October, the crawls see area galleries and businesses opening their doors in a celebration of art and community. The council also spearheads the annual On the Same Page literary festival, returning Sept. 16 to 20.

WATAUGA COUNTY ARTS COUNCIL

The Watauga County Arts Council is celebrating its one-year anniversary at its new home the Blue Ridge ArtSpace, located at the corner of State Farm Road and Shadowline Drive. To commemorate the event, the WCAC is holding a First Birthday Celebration from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. June 7 at the Art Space. Come to the ArtSpace for live music, food, art booths and interactive booths to participate in artful activities, WCAC executive director Cherry Johnson said.

PAGE 89

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Want to Go? ASHE COUNTY ARTS COUNCIL Ashe Arts Center 303 School Ave. West Jefferson, N.C. 28694 (336) 846-2787 www.ashecountyarts.org

WATAUGA COUNTY ARTS COUNCIL Blue Ridge ArtSpace 377 Shadowline Drive Boone, N.C. 28607 (828) 264-1789 www.watauga-arts.org

The ArtSpace is also rejuvenating its painted fence picket project, which encourages locals and visitors alike to purchase a plank and paint it as they please to spruce up the building’s fence in the side yard. Fence pickets can be purchased by visiting New River Building Supply (3148 NC Highway 105 Bypass, Boone)and picking one up or purchasing one on site for $10 or ¿ve pickets for $35 for a group picket painting party. The pickets at the ArtSpace are pre-primed, and paint is on available on-site. The ArtSpace also has a complete list of rotating exhibits for all tastes and ages. From June 10 to 14, the WCAC will present “Petal Pushers,” an open exhibition where any member artist may submit a work of which that ¿ts a Àoral theme. There will be prizes awarded. An entrance fee of $10 is required. A similar exhibition, titled “Wood You Believe It,” is open to any member who has made a piece of functional or nonfunc-

From left, author Bill Kaiser and ArtWalk owner Rich Jacobs have a chat during a Downtown Boone Art Crawl. PHOTO BY FRANK RUGGIERO

tional art out of wood. The Open Door Gallery for the month of June is Marion Cloaninger’s paintings, collages and mixed media. In July, the High Country Fiber Guild will be invited to share the creations they make from just about every type of ¿ber imaginable. In the Serendipity Gallery, “Be Still” — still life and Àoral works — and “Spirit of America: Celebrations” will be the featured exhibits. Folks can enjoy ArtSpace exhibits, workshops and more, with the council’s monthly Second Saturday Art Celebration. The celebration takes place every second Saturday of each month and features an opening reception for new exhibits, art, craft and music workshops, live music on the ArtSpace front porch and more. ArtSpace also boasts a gift shop, ¿lled to

the brim with locally made art and gifts, all crafted by the arts council’s talented members. For more information on the WCAC, call (828) 264-1789.

DOWNTOWN BOONE ART CRAWL

Every ¿rst Friday of the month in downtown Boone, participating galleries and businesses open their doors in celebration of art and community, showcasing area artists, live music and refreshments aplenty. Regular participants include Appalachian State University’s Turchin Center for the Visual Arts, Hands Gallery, Doe Ridge Pottery, the The NthÛ Gallery & Studios, Art of Oil and many, many others. Check www.mountaintimes.com before each First Friday for a current lineup of activities.


PAGE 90

THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE Magic Cycles celebrates its 21st anniversary this year.

Be sure to visit our downtown location for various specials to be running thru out the summer.

Visit our Rental Shop located at the Village of Ski Beech. Mountain bike rentals and lift passes will be available Fri., Sat. and Sun. from June 7th to Sept 30th.

2014


2014

THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

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THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

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2014

Where Art and History Come Alive

BRAHM to host exhibits, workshops, film series and more this summer BY JEFF EASON

I

n the early days of Blowing Rock tourism, folks would come from places like Atlanta, Richmond and Raleigh during the summer, because it was cool in this mountain village. Blowing Rock is still cool, but now we’re not talking about just the weather. One of the coolest places to visit in Blowing Rock is the Blowing Rock Art and History Museum (BRAHM), located just off of Main Street at 159 Chestnut St. In the recent past, BRAHM has displayed gallery exhibits, featuring American Impressionism, odd collections of items from North Carolina collectors, the history of the ski industry in the High Country, and the works of the late Boone street artist William “Wiili” Armstrong. This summer, the two main Àoor galleries at BRAHM will feature exhibits titled “Barns and Quilts” (July) and “Celebrating Strong Mountain Women” (August 2014 to January 2015). The Historic Objects Gallery at BRAHM will host the exhibits “Hound Ears: 50th Anniversary” (June through September) and “Scotch-Irish Heritage in the Mountains” (September 2014 to February 2015). But BRAHM is so much more than just artwork and exhibits. A truly interactive learning facility, BRAHM is constantly providing the public with interesting things to do through its documentary ¿lm series, adult workshops, camps for kids and other programs.

Film Series

BRAHM’s Appalachian Documentary Film Series explores topics related to Appalachian history and culture. Each ¿lm will be followed by a discussion and a wine and cheese reception. Admission is $8 per person. On Tuesday, June 10, the series presents “Anne Braden: Southern Patriot,” a ¿rst-person documentary about the extraordinary life of an American civil rights leader. Braden’s story explores not only the dangers of racism and political repression but also the power of a woman’s lifelong commitment to social justice.

Participants in BRAHM’s Cork and Canvas series show off their work. To learn more, call (828) 295-9099. PHOTO SUBMITTED

On Tuesday, July 29, the series presents “The Mystery of George Masa.” George Masa came to the mountains of Appalachia in 1915 from Japan. His photographic skills and leadership contributed to the creation of a pair of American icons — the Great Smoky Mountains National Park and the Appalachian Trail. Considered now to be the “Ansel Adams of the Southern Appalachians,” Masa mapped and explored with friend Horace Kephart. On Tuesday, Aug. 19, the series presents “Hazel Dickens: It’s Hard to Tell the Singer from the Song.” From the coal¿elds of West Virginia to the factories of Baltimore, Hazel Dickens has lived the songs she sings. A pioneering woman in bluegrass and country music, she has inÀuenced generations of songwriters and musicians. In this intimate portrait, interviews with Hazel and fellow musicians, such as Alison Krauss and Naomi

Judd, are interwoven with archival footage and recent performances. All ¿lms are shown at 5:30 p.m.

Adult Workshops PORTRAIT PAINTING DEMONSTRATION WITH RICHARD WHITNEY Sunday, July 20, 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. Along with the Florence Thomas Art School in West Jefferson, BRAHM will bring renowned portrait painter Richard Whitney to demonstrate his technique as he paints a portrait in the Education Center. For more information, or to learn how you can purchase a rafÀe ticket to have your portrait painted by Whitney, call (828) 295-9099, ext. 3006.

PAINTING WITH WATERCOLOR THE EASY WAY

Tuesday, July 22, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Instructor: Susan Powers Cost: $60 BRAHM members; $72 nonmembers This class will teach the basics of watercolor, composition and color theory. Each student will leave with an understanding of how to create a lovely and simple watercolor painting. Participants should bring their lunch. Drinks provided.

AN APPALACHIAN SAMPLER!

Aug. 5 to 7, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Cost: $160 BRAHM members; $180 non-members This workshop will be a fun celebration of the varied traditional arts of Appalachia. Each day, participants will explore an old-time art guided by an experienced local artist. Activities will include handson mountain dulcimer lessons, shape note singing, quilting and more. This SEE BRAHM, PAGE 93


2014

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The Blowing Rock Art and History Museum has become one of the hottest destinations in Western North Carolina. PHOTO BY JEFF EASON

BRAHM

FROM PAGE 92

workshop is appropriate for both men and women.

MONOPRINTING

Aug. 12 and 13, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Instructor: Cathy Taylor Cost: $160 BRAHM members; $180 non-members Create pieces of incredible work in a short period of time. A fun, productive workshop for beginners, as well as advanced students, you will learn to make high quality artwork — even if you can’t draw. Design and print notecards, frameable prints and more. Participants should bring their lunch. Drinks provided.

CAMPS FOR KIDS

Camp BRAHM (ages 6-10) Instructor: BRAHM staff, with special guest instructors Cost: $100 BRHAM members; $120 non-members; includes free Camp BRAHM T-shirt. Session I: June 16 to 18, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Session II: July 14 to 16, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Session III: July 28 to 30, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Campers will explore the visual arts in BRAHM’s Education Center and will experiment with painting, printmaking and three-dimensional art. This will be augmented by museum gallery tours, musical activities, educational games and lessons about traditional Appalachian culture. Cost includes all materials and a T-shirt. Campers should bring their lunch. Drinks provided.

BRILLIANT AT BRAHM

June 30 to July 3, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

(ages 6-10) Instructor: Dacia Trethewey Cost: $150 BRAHM members; $170 non-members What makes art brilliant? Is it the artist that creates the art or the materials that are used? This all-encompassing art camp covers a variety of media for children to explore: sculpture, painting, watercolor, collage and more. Campers will construct their own “brilliant” pieces of art. Campers should bring their lunch. Drinks provided. Enrollment for all workshops and camps is limited, and pre-registration is required. Limited scholarships for BRAHM kids’ camps are available. For more information, contact Leila Weinstein, educational programs coordinator, at (828) 295-9099, ext. 3006, or leila@ blowingrockmuseum.org.

Your Great Escape...

HOURS AND ADMISSION

The Blowing Rock Art and History Museum is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday and from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Thursday (admission between 4 and 7 p.m. is free). It is closed on Mondays and most holidays, including New Year’s Day, Good Friday, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Eve and Christmas Eve. Admission is $8 for adults, $5 for children, students and military personnel and free for children 4 and younger. Groups of 10 or more are admitted for $6 per person. Free parking is available in the parking deck adjacent to the museum. For more information, call BRAHM at (828) 295-9099, or visit www.blowingrockmuseum.org.

For some a weekend W 800-564-8496 www.logsamerica.com Location: 2999 Hwy 221 N Jefferson, NC 28640

HATEVER your reason, our talented team of professionals can help create your perfect log home getaway with our superior quality products, flexible designs and affordable luxury.

Logs America has been building log home dreams in the High Country since 1994. Our log and timber products are exclusively supplied by Log Homes of America. A local, family owned company manufacturing quality log and timber components supported with integrity for more than 22 years. Come visit our log showroom Monday – Friday 9-5 and Saturday 10-2 or by appointment.


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Finding Fresco Jewels in the High Country BY HEATHER SAMUDIO

T

he High Country is known for its scenic beauty and amid the majestic mountains of Appalachia, visitors will ¿nd artistic murals, sculptures and other masterpieces, which accentuate the area’s appeal. One such type of art is the frescoes which can be found in Ashe, Avery and Wilkes counties. The four frescoes that can be found in the area were created by world-famous fresco artist Benjamin F. Long IV and are among the nine frescoes found along the Benjamin Long Fresco Trail in the Blue Ridge National Heritage Area. Individuals visiting the area won’t be disappointed with the artistic gems or the scenic drive to get to any of the frescoes. Four of the frescoes are located in Ashe County. St. Mary’s Episcopal Church in West

Jefferson houses three frescoes, including “Mary Great with Child,” “John the Baptist” and “Mystery of Faith.” St. Mary’s is located at 400 Beaver Creek School Road in West Jefferson. “The Last Supper” fresco can be found at Holy Trinity Episcopal Church, sisterchurch to St. Mary’s, in Glendale Springs. It adorns the entire front wall of the sanctuary. Holy Trinity is located at 120 Glendale School Road in Glendale Springs. In Avery County, the Crossnore School features “Suffer the Little Children,” painted in the E.H. Sloop Chapel. The fresco features children who have lived at Crossnore with the Christian Bible verse, Mark 10:14. Daily viewings are available from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Crossnore School is located at 100 DAR Drive in Crossnore. It is a nonpro¿t children’s home and school. For more SEE FRESCO, PAGE 95

‘The Mystery of Faith’ fresco by Ben Long is featured on the wall of St. Mary’s Episcopal Church in West Jefferson. The church is also home to two other frescoes by Long. PHOTOS BY HEATHER SAMUDIO


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Visitors to Holy Trinity Episcopal Church can take a seat in one of the old pews and flip through the hymnals as they take in the view of Ben Long’s ‘The Last Supper’ fresco.

FRESCO

FROM PAGE 94

The map above shows where frescoes can be found throughout the region, from West Jefferson to Charlotte and locations in-between. IMAGE SUBMITTED

information about the school or the frescoes, call (828) 733-4305, or visit www. crossnoreschool.org. Frescoes of “St. Paul’s Conversion” and “St. Paul Writing His Epistles” adorn St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Wilkesboro. The works of art by Long can be found in the commons area. St. Paul’s is located at 200 W. Cowles St. in Wilkesboro. The frescoes in the High Country draw thousands of visitors to the area each year, whether for religious purposes or

just to enjoy Long’s creations. More of Long’s frescoes can be found in Buncombe, Burke, Iredell and Mecklenburg counties in North Carolina. The artist was born in Texas, but grew up in Statesville. He attended the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Art Students’ League in New York. After serving in the military, Long studied under Pietro Annigoni in Italy for almost eight years. He painted several frescoes in Italy, and, since 1978, Long has ¿nished 13 frescoes in North Carolina. To see some of Long’s other works, visit www.BenLongFineArt.com.


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The annual Festival of Tables features tables decorated with various themes, such as this Mountain Music theme with a banjo centerpiece and a jar of preserves for each guest at the table. PHOTO SUBMITTED

This table features ‘A Family Tree’ theme with an actual family tree of photos as the centerpiece during last year’s festivities. PHOTO SUBMITTED

2014

At the 2013 Festival of Tables, Mindy Wonsick and Cathy Clark feature an ‘Over the Rainbow’ theme for their table design, including a gift bag of ‘Wizard the Oz’ goodies. PHOTO BY TERESSA GOSS

Festival of Tables features food and flair BY HEATHER SAMUDIO

T

he ¿fth annual Festival of Tables offers guests dinner with Àair, featuring tables decorated with a theme, as well as a live auction and a silent auction. The festivities will begin at 6 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 16, in Hensley Hall at the West Jefferson United Methodist Church in Ashe County. The evening event is not just for fun; it also raises money for the Ashe County Free Medical Clinic. During the fundraiser, individuals, organizations and businesses sponsor a table that they decorate around a theme. The table features a centerpiece, as well as eight place settings to match. Some table sponsors also provide goodies and surprises for individuals who sit at their tables. An artist who sponsored a table at a previous event painted a picture for each of the diners at her table. Some past themes have included White

Attendees of last year’s Festival of Tables enjoy a catered meal by Chef Rozie Bolac, while admiring the Bingothemed table. PHOTO BY TERESSA GOSS

Christmas, Bingo, Over the Rainbow and Mountain Music, complete with a banjo

centerpiece. Table sponsors and their guests have even dressed along with the table’s theme in past years. Tickets for the event are $50 and are taxdeductible. Attendees are also welcome to give another tax-deductible donation while at the event, which will also go to help the clinic. There will be 18 themed tables at the festival, which was created by the WJUMC women. The meal features a catered dinner by Chef Rozie Bolac. During the past four years, the festival has raised more than $45,000 for the clinic, which goes even farther, according to Greg Bolac, ACFMC director, because $5.95 of free health care is provided to patients for every $1 donation received. On average, one patient can be sponsored for an entire year as the result of a $217.48 donation, Bolac said. According to Greg Bolac, the clinic has been able to decrease expenses from 2010 to 2012, from $139,849 to $109,176, while increasing the value of services. In 2010,

the value of services was $336,571, and in 2012, the value was at $758,641. During last year’s festival, 140 attendees raised approximately $10,000 for the clinic. “Each table was uniquely decorated, and the details were astounding,” Greg Bolac said, adding that the designs “highlight the creativity of our community.” The auctions feature a variety of items. Last year’s auctions included a Skeeter Boat, 50-inch Àat-screen TV, a private dinner for six at Jefferson Landing and more. The WJUMC women and volunteers begin working on the event early in the year, and it has become a popular festival to attend. For more information about the Festival of Tables, contact Nancy Kautz at (336) 982-5764, or email cincyfolks@skybest. com. To ¿nd out more about the Ashe County Free Medical Clinic, call (336) 846-4649, or visit www.acfmc.org. The clinic is located at 225 Court St. in Jefferson, behind the Museum of Ashe County History.


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Hendricks construction, inc.

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THE MOUNTAIN TIMES SUMMER GUIDE

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Come enjoy our award-winning wines in our tasting room!

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Summertimes 2014  

The 2014 issue of Summertimes