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VOL. 43 #3 Spring 2016

PAGE 14

Elk Shoulder Seasons – PAGE 11 2016 MBA Convention Preview – PAGE 16 Kara’s Mule Deer Adventure – PAGE 27

ANNUAL

C ONVENTION

Return service requested Montana Bowhunters Association PO Box 23611 Billings, MT 59104

Non-Profit Org. U.S. POSTAGE PAID Permit # 120 Bozeman, MT 59718


MBA

Regional Representatives Region 1

Al Kelly

PO Box 219, Libby, MT 59923 ............................ 406-293-2900 alman@frontiernet.net

www.mtba.org

MBA

officers PRESIDENT

Joelle Selk

3470 Kase Road • Helena, MT 59602

Region 2

Marlon Clapham

4455 Hoover Lane, Stevensville, MT 59870..........406-777-2408

jselkmt@3riversdbs.net • 406-422-6798

mbaregion2@gmail.com… 1ST VICE PRESIDENT

Region 3

Brian Koelzer

80 Jansma Lane Manhattan, MT 59741 ............. 406-570-7997 rocknrollbowhunter3@yahoo.com

Barrett Haugan

560 Clovehitch Road Belgrade, MT 59714 .......... 406-539-0602 btreasurestate@aol.com

Region 4

David Stratton

2120 3rd St. South, Great Falls, MT 59405 .......... 406-452-3238

Vacant 2ND VICE PRESIDENT

Steve Schindler

134 Sawney Drive • Glasgow, MT 59203 sas@nemont.net • 406-228-9024

destratton@gmail.com

Mark Schwomeyer 60 Hruska Ln, Lewistown, MT 59457 ................. 406-350-0173 markschwo@gmail.com

Region 5 Region 6

TREASURER

Jenn Schneider

PO Box 23611 • Billings, MT 59104

Vacant

mtba@mtba.org • 406-697-7668

David Moon

97 Aberdeen, Glasgow, MT 59230...................... 406-942-0659 djmoon9876@gmail.com

SECRETARY

Marian Stratton

Region 7 Region 8

Bob Morgan

P.O. Box 1995 Colstrip, MT 59323 ..................... 406-749-0706 robertredface@gmail.com

Jerry Davis

725 Middlemas Road, Helena, MT 59602 ...........406-475-2226

2120 3rd St South, Great Falls, MT 59405 mnstratton1@gmail.com • 406-452-3238 PAST PRESIDENT

pipelinejerry@gmail.com

AT LARGE DIRECTORS MAGAZINE CO-EDITORS

EVEN YEARS

Teri and Al Kelly

Roger Peffer

2517 9th Ave So., Great Falls, MT 59405 – regorp77@msn.com .................. 406-452-0911

Seth Rogers

1425 Prickley Pear, Billings, MT 59105 – srogers@lamar.com ...................... 406-670-5435

PO Box 219 • Libby, MT 59923 teray1979@yahoo.com

ODD YEARS

Paul Martin

110 Sage Lane, Kalispell, MT 59901 - paulhmartin99@gmail.com ............... 406-261-4456

Ray Gross

355 Antelope Drive Dillon, MT 59725 – raygross0144@gmail.com ............. 406-660-1019

Dan Moore

75 Haywire Trail, Kalispell Mt 59901 - bigdanmt@yahoo.com ....................... 406-756-7395

WEB DESIGNER

EDITORIAL COMMENTS The MBA Magazine is a quarterly publication of the MBA and is intended to inform, entertain and educate its members on happenings within the organization and to bowhunting in general.

or email teray1979@yahoo.com. All materials are the opinion of the author unless otherwise stated, and are subject to being edited. All photos will be placed in the MBA Photo Ablum and can be viewed at the annual conventions. Any questions as to policies of MBA please write the President.

PUBLICATION DATES AND DEADLINES

FALL ISSUE, DEADLINE, July 15 WINTER ISSUE, DEADLINE, October 15 SPRING ISSUE, DEADLINE, January 15 SUMMER ISSUE, DEADLINE, April 15 Stories, photos, or cartoons should be sent to Al or Teri Kelly at PO Box 23611, Billings, MT 59104

MEMBERSHIP INQURIES

Please send new memberships or renewal memberships to MBA Tresurer, PO Box 23611, Billings, MT 59104 or call 406-697-7668, register online at www.mtba.org or ask a member.

Lyle Hebel

www.pixelelk.com Liberty Brown

Branding Iron Marketing MAGAZINE DESIGN

K Design Marketing, Inc.

1613 South Ave. W. • Missoula, MT 59801 kim@kdesignmarketing.com 406-273-6193


Spring 2016

1


Teri Kelly

EDITOR’S NOTE

A

nother year has gone by and it’s once again convention time! The MBA convention is one of my favorite events to attend. I get the opportunity to see old friends and make new ones, learn some new skills, hear some great speakers, play some games, try to win some cool prizes and just all around, have a good time. I’m really looking forward to Fairmont, I can already hear those warm soaking pools calling my name…. I may even fling myself down that 350 foot slide once or twice. Hope to see all of you there. Our diligent MBA board has been working hard as usual in the past year and you’ll read more about some of the prominent issues and ideas in this issue and will have the chance at the General Membership Meeting to enter the discussions and hear the overall state of the MBA and bowhunting in Montana. I would encourage you all to attend that meeting on Saturday morning at 8am. It’s also time for elections so please read thru the information about the members who are running for various positions. Some of these are folks who’ve been with the MBA for a while and others are new to the board. I believe most of them have included contact information if you have any questions for them. The ballots will come out in the mail so please exercise your right to VOTE and return those in a timely fashion. You’ll see some of the prizes in this issue that will be up for auction, raffles and drawings and some of the donors who generously give to support the MBA. This is by no means all of the donors that are giving products and services for this convention as we have them still rolling in as this issues goes to press. Look around at the convention and see who these generous vendors are and please show your support by frequenting and supporting these businesses after the convention ends. Please continue to send us your harvest photos, stories, articles and anything of interest that you’d like to share with other bowhunters.

Teri Kelly

2

Montana

BOWHUNTER

WWW.MTBA.ORG


TABLE OF CONTENTS VOL. 43 #3 Spring 2016

ANNUAL

C ON V ENTION PREVIEW

PAGE

PAGE

PAGE

On the Cover

2 4

VOL. 43 #3

EDITOR’S NOTE

Teri Kelly PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

Joelle Selk TREASURER’S MESSAGE

Spring 2016

Jenn Schneider

PAGE 14

6

2ND VICE RESIDENT’S MESSAGE

SteveSchindler MONTANA’S BOWHNTER

16 25 26 28 30 31

th C OA N N U A L

N V E N T IO

N

6 11 12

REGIONAL REPORTS TENTATIVES REPORT

OFFICIAL MBA ELECTION BALLOT 2015 CONVENTION ORDER FORM KARA’S MULE DEER ADVENTURE CARP SAFARI ENTRY FORM BUSINESS & CLUB MEMBERS FWP COMMISIONER CONTACTS

GROWTH 1953-PRESENT Elk Sh 2016 MBA Co oulder Seasons – PAGE 11 nvention Previ 2016 Carp Sa ew – PAGE 16 fari – PAGE 30

2016 CONVENTION PREVIEW

32 33

MBA MEMBERSHIP FORM MEMBER GALLERY

MBA FINAL SHOULDER SEASON COMMENT

Jeff Hill black bear.

13

RECOVERY AND REDEMPTION A BEAR HUNTING STORY

Jeff Hill & Cami Hill

Spring 2016

3


OFFICER’S REPORTS

President’s

Message

MBA Committees

T

he MBA has been busy as ever throughout this Tentatives cycle. Shoulder seasons went from a pilot project at the close of the 2015 season to a proposed major implementation for the 2016-17 seasons. It was very heartening to see the groundswell from the members to oppose intrusion of firearms into archery seasons. While I take great pride in the strong core we’ve built on the board of directors, the success of our organization depends upon our members’ passion and participation in the process. Joelle Selk New Officers and Board Members After 15 years on the board, it’s time for me to close this chapter of my service to the MBA. I’m very happy to see several reps stepping up into committee chairman positions and new board members being elected. We’ve got a very broad set of skills and statewide representation on the board, so you’ll be in good hands. I plan to stay involved in some of the advocacy side of the MBA during legislative and tentatives activities as well as the fun stuff like the Carp Safari! 2016 Convention Update I’m very excited to announce that our convention is fast approaching! We’re at Fairmont Hot Springs, April 1-3, and it promises to be a fantastic time for the whole family. You’ll see the schedule of activities and info on raffles and auctions within these pages and you’ll receive raffle tickets and the board election ballot in the coming weeks.

Joelle Selk

Legislative: Joelle Selk, Chair Jerry Davis (heir apparent) Steve Schindler • Ray Gross Marlon Clapham • Dan Moore

Tentatives: Chair, vacant Joelle Selk • Paul Martin Mark Schwomeyer Marlon Clapham • Steve Schindler Schindler Dan Moore • Steve Ray Gross

Financial: Chair, vacant Jenn Schneider • Jerry Davis Seth Rogers • Joelle Selk David Stratton

Landowner/Sportsman: Mark Schwomeyer, Chair Dan Moore Mark Schwomeyer • David Moon

Nominations: Chair, vacant Al Kelly • Paul Martin Steve Schindler

Treasurer’s Message

Awards:

I

am really looking forward to the convention in Fairmont this year. Most of you have probably seen my 2 crazy boys being not so patient while I’m working over convention weekend and the pool will be a wonderful distraction! If you see Chris wrinkled to a prune, grab him a bottle of water for me… We look forward to seeing everyone and enjoy the stories and company, but please don’t forget this is our biggest avenue for fundraising. Our convention crew works so hard to gather donations and put on a good event so that people come and contribute. There are some big contenders vying for our seasons, including this Elk Shoulder business and we need the funds to continue as an organization if we are going to fight for what we have. Ok, I’ll step down from the soapbox now.

Roger Peffer, Chair Al Kelly • Steve Schindler Marlon Clapham Jenn Schneider

Membership: Chair, vacant Jenn Schneider • Joelle Selk Seth Rogers • Ray Gross

Can’t wait to see you in Fairmont!

Jenn Schneider

Convention 2016:

Brian Koelzer, Chair Jenn Schneider • Sean Dunn Joelle Selk • Barrett Haugan

Magazine: Al & Teri Kelly, Co-Chairs Steve Schindler Roger Peffer • Joelle Selk Brian Koelzer • Jerry Davis

Website: Webmaster, Lyle Hebel Joelle Selk • Jenn Schneider

Carp Shoot: Joelle Selk, Chair

Bow-Ed: Al Kelly, Chair Marlon Clapham • Brian Koelzer Bob Morgan • Mark Schwomeyer David Moon • Ray Gross

4

Montana

BOWHUNTER

WWW.MTBA.ORG


Steve Schindler

OFFICER REPORTS

Second Vice President’s Report

T

hey say that about 3% of the population hunts. I’m guessing it’s quite a bit higher in the western states and considerably higher in Montana. Of the people who actually hunt, those who bowhunt would be less. What got me thinking about this is how tough it is to get people fired up about protecting our hunting heritage. With the above numbers, it appears we really don’t have many to draw from. I really think we should have thousands of bowhunters at least fired up enough to help themselves. But we have less than 50 who make the effort to help all 45 thousand bowhunters in the state. It is rather amusing the excuses we hear, I don’t like the MBA because they are against, (insert your pet peeve here). With the very wide differences in the bowhunters within the state we have different views on how things should be run. What seems to be the norm is, if I don’t get my way I’m not going to play. Those of us who have been in the game for a long time realize just where we started and the diligence and effort that was put in along the way to get where we are. You know we didn’t just wake up one morning and have our bow season handed to us out of the goodness of someone’s heart. It was guys like former MNA President Bob Savage from Bozeman who testified in front of a very leery FWP Commission and convinced

them that archery tackle was actually a lethal means of taking a big game anima. How many of you realize that archery Antelope used to start in mid-September, rather than August 15th as it does now. This was something the MNA worked hard to achiever for many years. Past president Buck Danone out of Lewistown directed two area reps from eastern Montanan to draw up a proposal to ask for an earlier archery antelope opener. At that time the Regional rep from R-7, Marty Mann and I wrote up the proposal on the back of a napkin and it took off from there. It is amazing to me how many attacks our archery season has had over the years and the MBA successfully fought them off. Today we have the absolutely best archery opportunities of all the States and Providences in North America, heck; we might as well say the world. The crossbow still remains our biggest threat. We fight this horrible concept every year and we have facts on our side. Crossbow got their popularity when the fish and game managers from other states had to deal with an extreme urban deer population and rifle hunting these deer was out of the questions. They decided that to increase the harvest of these pest deer they had to increase the hunter population and they needed to get the rifle hunter involved without the rifle. As one MBA board member said the only difference between the crossbow and rifle is the BANG, hence the choice to use the crossbow. They could get lots of hunters without them having to practice skills that ordinarily would have taken years to develop, but rather they needed an “instant bowhunters” (ha, remember that term). So crossbows became very popular. The situation is very different here in the west and in particular, here in Montana. At one time the Muzzleloaders wanted their own season and wanted half of ours. It was the MBA and those 20 to 40 guys who rallied and saved the archery season once again. It’s hard to believe someone could actually say the MBA doesn’t represent bowhunters of Montana. I know I’m preaching to the choir but I want the choir to know that somebody didn’t just give us our seasons and somebody didn’t just give us anything. The MBA has worked very hard for all bowhunters in the state whether they were members or not. I find it disappointing, and even insulting when someone who is a bowhunter enjoying the opportunities we have in Montana, says the MBA didn’t do anything for me, why should I join…. It’s true…… ignorance is bliss.

Steve Schindler

Montana’s Bowhunter Growth 1953 – Present Data Excerpts from our MBA Jan/Feb 1986 Issue and FWP 2015 data Bowhunting recruitment is alive and well in Montana. Following is historical bowhunter data gathered by Mike Shepard, longtime BowEd instructor and stalwart MBA supporter. Compare this to 2015 data of 39,684 resident bowhunters, 2945 of whom are women. Nonresidents comprise 6515 of bowhunters in the field, of which 147 are women.

Spring 2016

5


REGIONAL REPORTS

REGION 2

REGION 1 REGION

REGION

1

1

4

REGION

2

REGION

3

4

2

REGION REGION

7

REGION

8

REGION

7

REGION

5

REGION

5

3

AL KELLY

6

REGION

REGION

8

REGION

REGION

REGION

6

REGION

MARLON CLAPHAM

Friends, ere we are coming up on another convention. I always have a great time at the convention and am especially looking forward to having some fun with my granddaughter Morgan at Fairmont Hot springs in Anaconda. If you have not yet been to a convention this will be a great one to try. Brian Koelzer and crew are working hard to make it a great event. Our region one MBA meeting on the west side will be at the downtown Frontier office at 114 east 4th St. on the 16th of March at 6:00 pm. If you want to have some input and can’t make it, give me a call at 406-293-2900 any evening. I am always glad to talk with fellow members. Another MBA event coming this spring on April 17th is our annual MBA member appreciation 3-D shoot at the Libby shooting complex. We put out 20 targets and you can shoot several rounds if you like. The shoot will be free for MBA members or those who sign up at the shoot and $10 dollars for non-MBA members. Time will be from 10:00 am to 3:00 pm. We will also have some hot dogs and chips so nobody runs out of calories. I would also like to take this opportunity to thank the MBA members who all worked together to put our shoot on the last few years and those that are going to help this year. We have a great bunch of bowhunters here who pitch in and make events like this a fun time for all. I hope to see some new faces this year, so bring a friend.

Marlon Clapham

H

W

ell here we are again, at the end of another Archery Season. Merri harvested another nice 4x4 Wt. buck, which makes five in a row for her. The rest of the family worked over time to fill a buck tag but just couldn’t close the deal. That’s Bowhunting I guess. We have already started the tentative process, having meetings way back in September. I’m sure that everyone is aware of the shoulder seasons coming hot and heavy to a HD near you. We are working hard to keep them out of the Archery Season, but we have a long way to go. Here in our own back yard the department is proposing another weapons season in 260. I tried to get support to keep the proposal off the agenda, but didn’t receive much of a response. So under the circumstance I didn’t have backing to fight the proposal. This is why it is so important to respond to the E-Mails we send out in a timely manner.

MBA business is that it is an even year and region 2 rep. will be back on the ballot. We have Neil Maier from Frenchtown stepping to run for area rep. I have known Neil for well over twenty years and taught many Bow-Ed classes with him. He has been a long standing MBA member and I think he will bring new and fresh ideas to the board. There are still 3 more positions left open. We can use new blood from someone willing to step up and make a difference. Joelle will be stepping down at the end of her term, so there is a need for someone to step up and run for the President’s position. I have been asked to run so I will be running for the president position; I hope to receive the support it will take to keep the MBA moving forward. There will be many hurdles and obstacles to work through. We have a very good core with the board now so the transition should go without too much of a to-do. Joelle has been an inspiration to me and a very good leader. Well-spoken and known in the circles of the department and commission, she has been a great asset to the MBA and will be surely missed from the board. The convention is just around the corner at Fairmont Hot Springs, I hope everyone will be able to attend. The crew from Bozeman has been working very hard to put this together from afar. Lets make this one memorable convention. Bow-Ed will be starting soon and class schedules will start showing up, and I know that many of the instructors are also MBA members, and I would like to personally THANK each and every one of you. Without you there would not be the quality we so desperately try to maintain in MT. Bow-Ed classes. Again THANK YOU. So I guess I’ll see you all in Fairmont the first of April Keep-em sharp and shoot-em straight.

Marlon Clapham

Al Kelly REGION 3 REGION

REGION

1

6

REGION

4

REGION

2

REGION

8

REGION

3

REGION REGION

7

5

BRIAN KOELZER BARRETT HAUGAN

H

ey everyone convention time is upon us! It is with great enthusiasm that myself and a dedicated bunch of region 3 folks are bringing this year’s banquet to Fairmont Hot Springs. Mark your calendars for the weekend of April first and make your reservations early. There is something at Fairmont for the whole family so I hope to see a lot of young’ns there. Never too early to get them exposed to the bowhunting lifestyle. Loads of great prizes, fantastic food and lots of hunting stories await! Be sure to keep an eye on our social media pages for updates and spotlights of prizes leading up to our big weekend. See you there!

Al Kelly

Brian Koelzer

6

Montana

BOWHUNTER

WWW.MTBA.ORG

Brian Koelzer


REGION

REGION

1

6

REGION

2

1

REGION

8

REGION

3

REGION REGION

REGION

REGION

4

REGION

REGIONAL REPORTS

REGION 6

REGION 4

2

5

W

8

3

REGION REGION

7

5

DAVE MOON

W

ell, I have no recent news regarding the Bullwhacker/Durfee hills land exchange. Supposedly in two weeks there will be a decision and hopefully the BLM realizes this isn’t in the best interest and by banquet time we can all celebrate. This is the time of year for banquets and indoor league, and here in Lewistown we had a great turnout for youth archery sign ups. Recently I attended a FWP meeting on tentatives and to my surprise there were nearly 40 sportsmen attending! Most of the concern was focused on elk and bowhunting. There are several proposals that are area specific throughout the state and could potentially open a rifle season during archery season from August 15 through February 15! We all need to voice our opinions and collaborate with FWP to work out all the quirks in these tentatives. In my opinion we don’t need a shoulder season in an area that is at/or 10% below objective, and we definitely don’t want rifles going off during archery season especially on PUBLIC LAND! I do understand the debacle and sympathize with the landowners who allow public access and still have a elk problem. These are the areas that need to be addressed. I’m confident many of you have ideas or suggestions on how to help this work, I encourage you to let your ideas be heard. You can contact anyone of us on the MBA board and we will gladly help you direct your comments in the right direction. In the end the decisions made now will affect hunting seasons for you and your friends and family for years to come. I hope to see you all at the banquet and share a few stories. Drive safe! Sincerely

REGION

REGION

DAVID STRATTON MARK SCHWOMEYER

Mark Schwomeyer

4

REGION

7

6

REGION

hile I was bowhunting this year I would stop and gas up my vehicle before heading into the hills in the m morning. When I would go and pay for the fuel tthere was a bunch of ranchers having coffee at a ttable. After a bunch of times of me coming in and p paying for the gas, one of the ranchers approached m me and told me that he did not allow hunting as h he was upset with Montana FWP. He said he had aasked FWP to change the boundary so it would iinclude his ranch in the area where anyone can sshoot an elk without a special permit. He also ssaid that he was tired of the elk eating up his land. I introduced myself, shook their hands, and then h headed out to go hunt. To me the answer seemed so simple. If he w wants the elk to be thinned out, let people hunt. T The area was not the area I had a permit for but iif it was, why would he not let me hunt. I get aalong very well with the people that let me hunt on their land. I treat them and their land with lots o of respect as I know how much of a privilege it is. o This person was a rancher, who as far as I kknow, did not have an outfitter on his land and was not a person with a lot of money who was w rraising wildlife to hunt himself. Another place iin the area, there was a wealthy rancher who was rraising wildlife. In some ways it is good, as it is like having a Yellowstone Park in your hunting area h where the elk have a safe haven, and that makes w ffor more elk for me to hunt. The bad part is when tthey come off the wealthy rancher’s property and overgraze other, not so wealthy ranchers’ land. In o tthat case, I think the wealthy rancher should be held accountable. It would be the same as if he h dammed up a water source for his use and then d when he was done with it he removed the dam w aand allowed it to flood his neighbor’s property. This hunting season I also met a block management landowner who I have hunted on for m

Dave Moon years, but have never met as he is not living in the area. He was out bowhunting himself. He was upset with the shrinking open land to hunt in the area but was still generous enough to allow his property to be in block management. He was also upset about the outfitters using his land to scout for elk and not signing in on the block management. This was the same outfitter who had leased one of the local block management areas till October 3 to only allow his few bowhunters on it. And the same one that could be seen dropping his hunters off on the public land instead of having them hunt on his land. I was glad I had gotten to meet the land owner of the block management and enjoyed talking to him. The other night I was watching a show on TV. The guy was from London and had traveled to the USA. His friends had arranged for him to meet a guy in Arizona who was a gold miner. The gold miner was letting him shoot his rifle. The London man was so afraid of the rifle that it looked like he thought it was going to blow up in his hands. Growing up in London he had probably never got to shoot a gun. The same man from London then went to an Amish Community. He was impressed with how they grew their own food. He said that in London he would just get on a computer and order his food. Then someone would come and deliver it. Think about how detached this man is from how he gets his food. He does not even have to go to the store to get it. And think how many more with the same mindset there are even in our country.

David Moon

Mark Schwomeyer

Dan Moore

Spring 2016

7


REGIONAL REPORTS

REGION 7 REGION

REGION

1

6

REGION

4

REGION

REGION

8

2

REGION

REGION REGION

3

7

5

BOB MORGAN Bob Morgan

K

ids and Bows! Pictured are three of my five grand kids. They got bows from Grandpa. The twin boys, Archer and Fletcher are only six months old, they will get there’s later. Noticed the looks on their faces, I think they are hooked! We need to start with our children, neighbors kids and all youth to get them involved in the sport of hunting and shooting bows and arrows in order to keep this sport alive. This will require some time, effort and money from each of us individually within our families, neighborhoods and communities as well as at state levels. This time of the season is not the best, but let’s all take some kids rabbit bow hunting. We had a men’s outing at our church this

8

Montana

BOWHUNTER

WWW.MTBA.ORG

summer down at the Tongue River Dam. One of my youth bow students from last year remembered his bow. The rest of us forgot our bows but I had brought my flintknapping stuff with me. So, I made a couple spear heads and tied them to some willow shoots. Let the fun begin. We tried spearing carp, some good throws, but no carp. And the fun continued. We’ve be out coyote hunting unfortunately not with our bows. But did see a few turkeys first time I’ve seen them around Rosebud County for a while. We had two Game Fish and Parks guys come to a gun club meeting to talk about the upcoming quotas for deer and elk for region seven. They want to increase the quotas for bull elk from 175 to 300 permits. However most of the elk are on private land. At least half of the group attending were bow hunters. The bow class I teach will start Wednesday the 20th of January if I have at least six participants. It’s my way of introducing people to bow hunting by building self-bows. It’s a challenge to take a stave of wood and turn it into a re-curve or longbow. It

is also interesting to see their excitement when they get closer to a finished bow. I’m looking forward to meeting some new faces at the Fairmont Hotsprings MBA Convention this year. God Bless and get them kids out there. Give me a call at 406-749-0706

Bob Morgaqn


REGIONAL REPORTS

REGION 8 REGION

REGION

1

6

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4

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8

2

REGION

3

REGION REGION

7

5

JERRY DAVIS

H

ello again. 2016 has brought with it some interesting if not destressing events. On January 3rd a friend of mine, John Borgreen of Russel Country Sportsmen’s Association, had an editorial in the Helena IR talking about the “extremists” who have attempted to “hijack” our public lands. Then later in the day as if on que I heard news of the Nevada Bundy bunch, which were armed, occupying a Wildlife Refuge HQ in Oregon. I think there is no better example of what the real intent is of recent Federal Land transfer legislation that has failed to pass in our legislature, thank the Lord. This group has deemed Federal Land ownership to be illegal even though the legal opinion is to the contrary. Because legal opinion does not support their cause they have decided to take up arms against the Federal Government. The intent is to terrorize the public and the legal system into submission. This is a land of laws, and we live by the rule of law, laws created by a Congress elected by us, not some oligarchy. We may not all agree with some laws but regardless we abide by them or we have anarchy. If we don’t like a law we pursue

legal avenues to get it changed or removed, but regardless of the outcome we still abide by the law. These lands belong to all US Citizens, not just those who covet them and wish to have them for their own gain. Another issue that has come up is that of the 44 Shoulder Seasons that have been proposed by FWP through the Tentatives process. The ink was hardly dry on the “Pilot” Shoulder Seasons for 6 HDs when FWP put in a Tentatives to expand the Shoulder Seasons from 6 to 44 next year. I thought the idea of a Pilot or Test was to try something and then using the results from the Pilot one could either amend or discontinue whatever is being tested. Because the Pilot Shoulder Seasons are still ongoing there has been no analysis of the results. These were not pilots and to state such was a falsehood. And finally crossbows, no we have not heard the last from crossbow proponents. One individual has asked that the Commission revisit the use of crossbows by disabled bowhunters. Because MBA also asked the Commission to consider allowing the use of lighted nocks (a majority of our members supported lighted nocks in a recent ballot) the Commission has deemed it only fair to also consider crossbows. When the Commission will be considering lighted nocks and crossbows has not yet been determined. Therefore we in MBA have some time to formulate a strong argument as to why crossbows should not be allowed for disabled bowhunters during ArcheryOnly seasons and HDs. To that end we need to know who out there uses a Permit to Modify Archery Equipment (PTMAE)

DirectorsAt Large

I

was waiting to attend the Fish & Game meeting before I wrote my report this quarter. Our bow seasons in Montana could be in big trouble. This elk shoulder season in August and September will end bow hunting as we know it. At the meeting most of those that got up and spoke were opposed to having gun hunts in our early season. It seems someone in the Fish & Game Department is thinking of property owners instead of bow hunters. I also asked Commissioner Wolf why the lighted nock proposal was not put in the tentatives? He told me that only one person showed up at the Tentatives meeting asking for it, so they felt that there was little interest. I did point out that the one person was the MBA president, representing all of us. We also had another guy get up and ask for crossbows for the handicapped. I don’t know how much longer we can hold off the ‘wolves’ with this issue. We need to prepare for the Montana State Legislature in 2017. So get your permits in and let’s get ready for the 2017 Legislature next year Let’s work to heal this divide in the MBA over lighted nocks and get on with more important issues.

Danny Moore Danny Moore

Jerry Davis for use during Archery-Only seasons and HDs. As of January 2016 there are 494 certifications for a PTMAE If you are one of those permit holders we would like to hear from you. You can call me at (406) 475-2226 or email me at pipelinejerry@ gmail.com. We need your help. Finally March 16th is the deadline for applying for Special Deer and Elk permits, don’t forget. See you at the Convention in April at Fairmont.

Jerry Davis

W

inter is here and the Convention is just around the corner... I hope to see everyone at Fairmont Hotsprings. It will be a great event and Montana Bowhunters really needs your support. Bring your family and your friends for this very important event. A few weeks ago I received an e-mail from a bowhunter (former MBA member) who basically wrote demanding a certain season opportunity. “IF” MBA would get him what he wanted he would join again but if we didn’t well then just “forget it”. MBA had pursued what he wanted. We did get a few great gains that year but were shut down on this one particular issue by FWP and the Commission. But this guy, instead of saying- “Gee, Thanks MBA for everything you do for bowhunters in Montana”, instead said- “screw you, you didn’t get me what I wanted so I quit your organization.” Kinda reminds of the temper tantrums my 3 year old niece used to throw all the time when she did not get her way. How many of you know people like this? I am very repulsed by people like this and I run into them all too often. If you hunt with a bow in Montana, you benefit from the efforts of the MBA. We all contribute to the cause in different ways. I’m curious how many letters this person has written to the FWP or the Commission regarding bowhunting issues? Or how many times he went to Helena to testify in front of legislative committee sessions? Or how many kids he helped teach archery? How many sportsman’s shows has he worked at to promote membership and support for conservation organizations? The Board members of MBA do a tremendous amount of work to support bowhunters and bowhunting opportunity in MT. So I’m asking you... Please don’t be “this guy”. I want you to think about what you can do to help us help you? Can you please step up to the plate and help us with our efforts? Check your calendars and make your reservations for the convention. Bring along your friends. Consider making a donation to the convention. We can always use more donations of auction and raffle items. Talk to your buddies and family and explain to them how important it is to be a member of MBA. Everyone is shooting in winter indoor leagues right now and this is a perfect time to talk to other people about everything that MBA has accomplished. Spring shoots will be starting soon. Talk to people at those shoots and encourage them to support MBA. We have more clout with more membership. Thank You for your support of the MBA. See you at convention.

Roger Peffer Spring 2016

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REGIONAL REPORTS

DirectorsAt Large

I

nstead of reporting on the shoulder season issue, I thought I would give you an update on the MBEF property. Last Spring we invited the Flathead Valley Archers to have their Spring Fling Membership shoot at the MBEF property. This was a 30 target 3D fun shoot and recruited many new memberships for the local club. I set up a good group of volunteers on Sunday afternoons to help take down about a mile of fence to open up the property for easier access, from the open meadow to the wooded area, to the areas for primitive camping and parking. We are developing various projects for the property such as an outdoor archery range; providing two youth hunts on the property and portable block targets for youth organizations. At the Pre-Season Count Down Shoot put on by the Flathead Valley Archers, (as was mentioned in the Fall MBA newsletter) on the MBEF property, we raffled off two youth hunts, one boy and one girl. Each youth (accompanied by a parent or guardian) had the opportunity to hunt the property from an elevated blind utilizing the property. On Oct. 9 (Neil Jacobson and I were on our way back from an adventurous but unsuccessful elk hunt), when I got a call from Jeff Yerks to tell me that Zack Walker, (the boys raffle winner), had just arrowed a deer from the blind. It wasn’t much later when an excited Zack called me to let me know they had found his deer and relayed the story of shooting and finding the deer. I congratulated Zack on his trophy doe and thanked him for making a little history for the MBEF by harvesting the first deer on the property. The projects will resume this Spring. I will build another elevated blind for youth hunts and 3D shoots. We will begin the project of the portable youth block targets with the help of a very generous $2,000.00 grant from Cabela’s, through their Outdoor Fund program. Another goal for this summer is to build a pavilion to provide a place for gatherings, outdoor events, meetings and classes. These projects are stepping stones to our eventual goal of building an archery and bowhunting education center which will also contain a museum of archery and bowhunting in the state of Montana. As you can see, we have our work cut out for us. Now for the regional report. I attended FWP’s region 1 meeting here in Kalispell where I was able to present the MBA’s stance on the Shoulder season proposals to the region 1 officers. These meetings offer a great opportunity for your public comment. Throughout the meeting I was surprised at the majority of support to create an archery only area in the Flathead Valley, something that I have wanted for years. Yippe Kie Yeah ! Well, looks like we have another project to work on. PS We are excited about the location of this year’s Convention. Hope to see you all there.

Paul Martin

Elevated Blind

Paul Martin

H

ope everyone is wintering well. It’s been a very busy year, but still try to make time to shoot a few geese to stock up on jerky for bow season. I’ve also heard of a few horns hitting the ground, but haven’t made it out yet. My apologies for the lack of a voice from region 5, John Grimstad and I will be looking to increase the involvement and membership in 2016. Hope to see you at the convention.

Seth Rogers

Zack Walker Doe first youth hunt on MBEF property 10

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Tentatives

TENTATIVES REPORT

Report

Elk Shoulder Seasons At their November meeting, the Commission adopted a pilot project in five hunting districts to allow extended rifle elk hunting “shoulder seasons.” The hunting districts included 410–Missouri Breaks, 445–Hound Creek, 446– Northeast Big Belt Mountains, 449–Castle Mountains East, and 452–Castle Mountains West. Within these pilot districts, the Department appeared to ensure checks and balances in response to sportsmen concerns. Early archery seasons were not included within the pilot project hunts, only antlerless elk were allowed to be harvested, and public lands were excluded. At the December Commission meeting, the Department followed up with a formal proposal for shoulder seasons in 44 hunting districts during the 20162017 hunting seasons. Shoulder seasons were proposed during archery seasons, either-sex and bull permits were proposed, and the protections of public lands were removed, with State and BLM lands included in many of the 44 proposed districts. Interestingly, multiple landowners voiced opposition to the shoulder seasons at both the November and December Commission meetings. They requested controlled damage hunts for their land rather than shoulder season hunts, and threatened to close down all public access if shoulder seasons were forced on them. In light of the Department’s efforts to bring elk populations to objective, these landowner concerns were interesting and showed the conflict between the landowner’s desire for game damage relief versus hunter impact and safety issues. One would hope that landowner and sportsmen concerns will prevail in the final determinations of shoulder seasons. The MBA issued a member alert in response to this threat to archery seasons, soliciting input from the membership on specific concerns for each hunting district. We submitted formal written comments opposing early shoulder seasons and also provided testimony during the February Commission meeting. The Commission will make final determinations on seasons and quotas during the February meeting.

HD 313 Mountain Goat The MBA supported a quota change in HD 313 (Crazy Mountains) which would add 25 nanny tags to the current either sex goat tags. In response to Department concerns that incidental, unintentional billy harvest might occur, the MBA lobbied for unlimited archery-only nanny tags in this HD. HD 313 (Crazy Mtns): Introduce 313-30 Female-only licenses (quota 25, range 5-35). Adjust ES license quota from 50 to 30 and adjust range from 40100 to 15-100.

Update on Archery Equipment Proposals – Lighted Nocks The MBA submitted its formal proposal supporting lighted nocks to the Department in late August. Proposals are reviewed by the Department and if approved, advance as formal proposals for Commission review at the December meeting. In late October, the MBA received word that the Department was not interested in endorsing lighted nocks as a formal proposal to the Commission. Joelle testified at the November Commission meeting that based on a recent ballot vote, our membership was in favor of lighted nocks. There was a question from Gary Wolfe (Region 1 Commissioner) requesting clarification from the Department’s legal team whether the commission has the authority to regulate all archery equipment. The Commission opted to delay any decision until FWP legal completed research prior to the December 10th meeting. During the December Commission meeting, Joelle again rose to revisit the lighted nocks proposal. The Commissioners replied they weren’t sure what they were going to do about it, given additional written comments and phone calls which they received opposing lighted nocks. During the general comment period at the end of the meeting, a disabled individual rose to submit a formal request for crossbows to be allowed during archery season. Joelle got up to present legal counterpoints to the crossbow proposal and restated MBA’s past offer to outfit him with adaptive equipment and train him how to use the equipment. Given the lack of time to adequately discuss both the lighted nocks and crossbow proposals, Joelle requested delaying the discussion to a later time to allow for a broader archery equipment discussion. Chairman Vermillion agreed that a targeted conversation at a later work session would be most beneficial rather than to put both crossbows and lighted nocks out for public comment at this time. The Commission work session will take place this spring after the Tentatives cycle is completed. While this does forgo a decision on the use of lighted nocks as legal equipment, the MBA will have the opportunity this spring to more comprehensively educate the Commission regarding our historical stances on archery equipment. This affords us a much better opportunity to guide the discussion on adaptive equipment as well as electronic equipment and to assist in developing a formal Commission policy regarding archery equipment. This accomplishes two goals: updating the Commission on the justifications for our equipment recommendations and strengthening our position regarding archery regulations ahead of next year’s legislative session.

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MBA FINAL SHOULDER SEASON COMMENT

Montana Bowhunters Association P.O. Box 23611 Billings, MT 59104 January 21, 2016 Chairman Vermillion and Members of the Commission:

For all those who purchase the plate, the MBEF would like to invite you to send us a photo of your plate on your vehicle. Be creative, include yourself, pets, family, trophies of all sorts, etc.

Photos will be posted on the website. www.mtbowhuntermuseum.org

The MBA understands the need to adjust elk harvests to meet desired elk objectives. We are supportive of efforts to provide relief to landowners who are experiencing game damage to crops. We specifically encourage the harvest of cows to manage elk populations for the benefit of landowners who offer public access during the regular hunting seasons. However, we cannot support an extension of rifle seasons which shortens archery only seasons and creates unsafe situations for bowhunters on public land. It is critically important to identify problematic concentrations of elk within specific portions of hunting districts and to tailor solutions for landowners. Wherever groups of landowners can work on collaborative solutions such as with the Devil’s Kitchen Group, these partnerships should be fostered. Regional FWP staff can engage citizen’s advisory councils to assist in identifying concentrations of elk and finding solutions to achieve desired population objectives in concert with landowners. We live in a time that without these collaborative processes, some landowners will attempt to defy the public wildlife trust. They will harbor elk for profit while demanding remedy from game damage. In contrast to these profiteering landowners are the landowners who actively engage in game management through public access hunting. It was clear during the public meetings that landowners in certain districts are not comfortable with the shoulder season approach. We can ill afford to alienate the very landowners who participate in Block Management or allow public access through simple generosity. While we acknowledge that the Department feels shoulder seasons are an important tool in specific areas, we urge you to select those areas very judiciously. Our common goal is to attain desired elk numbers through Commission and Department action rather than legislating wildlife management. In addition to these suggestions, our members request your adoption of two other proposals. The first one relates to a mountain goat quota increase in HD 313. The Department has proposed the following quota change in HD 313: HD 313 (Crazy Mtns): Introduce 313-30 Female-only licenses (quota 25, range 5-35). Adjust ES license quota from 50 to 30 and adjust range from 40-100 to 15100. The MBA supports this quota change to add 25 nanny tags to the current either sex goat tags. Since population control is clearly desired in this district, the MBA proposes additional archery nanny tags in this district. This would provide additional opportunities for harvest while decreasing the chance that unintentional billy harvest might occur, since bowhunters can better discriminate between sexes at closer ranges. The second proposal we support is one advanced by FWP Department staff and the Citizens Advisory Council in Region 1. Under this proposal, the Owen Sowerwine Natural Area and the connecting Otter Island property would be changed from a weapons restriction area (WRA) to an archery only area. This area encompasses approximately 510 acres along sections of the Flathead River and Stillwater River just outside of Kalispell and the involved WRA is the Flathead Weapons Restriction Area in HD 170. Department staff proposes the change to archery only due to safety concerns expressed by the general public. The MBA supports the change of the Owen Sowerwine Natural Area/Otter Island to an archery only area. Thank you for the opportunity to comment. Sincerely, Joelle Selk MBA President

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Spring 2016

13


COVER STORY

Story and experience by Jeff Hill | Revised and edited by Cami Hill

Recovery and Redemption A Bear Hunting Tale

I

heard a small noise to my left, and slowly turned my head to investigate. Barely 10 yards away stood a beautiful black bear, and it was looking right at me. It all started a year before, in late August of 2014. I had gone in for surgery to repair a bulging disk in my neck. After years of wear and tear, and a small accident, the pain was finally too much. The disc between my C3 and C4 vertebrae had to be removed. The surgeon then “glued in” a bone block and anchored the two vertebrae together with a titanium square and screws. I was limited to lifting no more than 10 pounds for 6 weeks, and had to wear a neck brace for 12. As you can guess, this meant missing all of archery season that year, and all but the last four days of rifle season. By the time I was finally released to start shooting a bow again it was late January. I knew it was not going to be easy, but there was no way I was going to give up one of my favorite passions. My Martin Hatfield recurve bow pulled 65 pounds, and I was going to get back to shooting it, no matter what it took. 14

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I started out shooting 3-5 arrows a day, to slowly build up my strength again. It was hard. I was still working with a physical therapist, and after some more serious pain it was determined that I had a pinched nerve around my C7 vertebrae. Bam, back to square one, no shooting for 3 weeks, and then easing into it with a lighter weight bow. I borrowed my sweetie’s Mission Craze, adjusted it to 40 pounds, and started shooting again. I gradually increased the weight over time, and used rubber tubing for exercises build strength once again. During this time, as the Missoula County Chief Bow Hunter Education Instructor, I continued to teach classes. One particular class had three 12 year old young ladies who had just completed their hunter education course. They were very knowledgeable, eager and willing to complete their Bow Education course with their dads in attendance. We called them the “Peanut Gallery” because of their enthusiasm and willingness to learn. When these youngsters passed their classroom tests and their field courses were completed, they presented us with

something. In thanks, they gave each of the instructors a small gift card. They then presented me with a half dozen arrows that they had fletched themselves for my recurve bow. This special gift from those wonderful young ladies fired up my resolve even further. I was bound and determined to use those carefully crafted arrows with my recurve that fall, and with archery season fast approaching, I knew I had to kick it in gear. I worked even harder and continued to shoot until I was confident that I had an effective range of 20 yards. I was going to harvest some type of game animal or turkey with the gift from the “Peanut Gallery”, and I was not going to let my own body stop me. When opening weekend of archery season came around I found myself tied up with other obligations the first day, and most of the second, but was finally able to get out to my tree stand on the second afternoon. I was hoping to at least get the chance to fill a doe B tag. As I was getting settled into my stand I heard a small noise to my left. I slowly


COVER STORY

turned my head to investigate. I looked and saw a beautiful black bear standing 10 yards away under my tree. He was watching me, and when I reached for my bow he saw the movement and ran off down to the creek bottom near-by. Just my luck, seeing a bear and scaring it off because I wasn’t ready. I shook off the experience and decided to sit until dark anyway, hoping I might get lucky. About 20 minutes later I heard a huffing noise. This time the bear appeared in the thick brush. He was about 13 yards away on the opposite side of the small creek. Because of the heavy brush, I only had a small hole to shoot through, but I could not tell what part of the bear I was looking at. He was nosing around, and giving me an occasional glimpse of his head. I was watching him, willing him to move 3 yards, just 3 short yards, so that I could see him better. I caught a glimpse of something and peeled my eyes away from the bear to look up. We were no longer alone. There, coming in to the water hole where my tree stand was placed, was a coyote.

f y n

l n h y d t

Now, here is my dilemma. I have a bear in the brush at 13 yards that I can’t see too well, and a coyote in the open at 20 yards with a go ahead from the land owner to “get rid of the coyotes”. What to do? I knew that the coyote would probably spook the bear, so I let him come in and drink his fill without shooting him. To say there were a few tense minutes would be an understatement, as I sat in my tree stand and watched the coyote walk closer to the bear. I was silently willing them to not to notice each other, but I wasn’t that lucky. They spotted one another at about 10 yards away, and I thought this is it, bye bye bear. But to my amazement the bear just watched the coyote as it turned tail and trotted off.

The bear then turned and finally gave me the shot I had been waiting for. I drew back my bow, aimed, and released the arrow fletched by my students, and all hell broke loose. I heard the brush explode as the bear ran off down the creek, breaking y branches along the way. The adrenaline d kicked in and my knees started shaking so badly I thought I was going to fall off y my tree stand. Now, there was nothing to do but wait. t I replayed the scenario over and over in my mind, critiquing every action I d took. I was sure of my shot placement, y but as I searched for my arrow with my

binoculars I couldn’t find my arrow. The brush was just way too thick. I resigned myself to wait. After what seemed like hours, but was only about 30 minutes, I climbed down from the stand.

too big for us to get into the truck. We ended up having to roll the bear onto a tarp and drag it with the truck until we could get to a spot where we could load him.

After searching the area for my arrow, or any blood sign, I felt my heart drop. Nothing. I dreaded what that meant. Was there a wounded bear running around? Is he already dead? Did I miss him completely, though I was sure I had a clean hit? I continued to search until it was too dark to see clearly, and not having much of a choice, called it a night. I called for help that evening, hoping a second set of eyes could give me the hand I needed next morning. I just couldn’t stand the thought of leaving it when I was sure I hit the bear.

After taking him to the meat processing plant to have him skinned and cooled, I had 2 very busy days of work before I could get the hide and head to the taxidermist. Yes, tan the hide, no rug please, and don’t worry about saving the skull, thanks. Not 45 minutes later I got a call from the taxidermist, “We measured your bear at 6 feet plus, and he has green scored 18 3/8, Pope and Young Book entry is 18…” Ok, yes, and take care of the skull!

I knew that one of my bow hunting partners was on an elk hunt, and the other one had his 16 year old daughter on their own hunt, both of which were over 100 miles away. But there was someone else that I knew I could count on, my trusty younger brother Randy. I gave him a call, knowing that he was at home that week working on remodeling his house. He took the call in stride, and was happy to take a break and help me out the next morning. We made it back to my tree stand site at first light, and searched again for any sign. We found plenty of evidence that the bear had been frequenting the area, but still lacked blood or any other sign that I hit him. After a good hour and a half of searching we found ourselves scratching our heads over what to do next. Randy heard some magpies and spotted them congregating in a brush patch about 70 yards away. With nothing to lose, we decided to head over in that direction and found a very large, very dead bear. Success! My heart soared. It was a fantastic feeling, especially after second-guessing myself all night. We took pictures and dressed him out, never finding any other blood other than where he was laying, and that looked to be from the birds being on him. We only had to move him about 100 yards to where we could get the pick-up to him. He was very heavy, and between the two of us we could only move him about 5 yards at a time. When we finally got him to out to the loading point we were exhausted. Randy waited with the bear as I hiked back up to the pick-up and drove over to him. However, he was

I was concerned that my better half of 21 years would not be impressed with the expense, but I figured that this is a once in a lifetime bear and I would take my chances. Luckily she agreed. All said and done, this bear weighed in between 310 and 320 pounds, was over 6 feet and Green Scored 18 3/8! I will eagerly await the final score and then decide if I want to enter him in the Pope and Young Book. In the meantime, my personal “Bear of a Lifetime” experience will stay with me. As well as the thoughts of how blessed I am to be surrounded by family and friends, and my ability to share and give back as a Bowhunter Education Instructor and MBA Member.

“Side Note” The final score on this bear was 18 4/16”. I did enter him in the Pope and Young Record Book after the urging of the scorer. He explained that by entering older trophy animals in the respective record books that groups like the Pope and Young Club, Boone and Crockett Club and the other Conservation Groups are able to show that they having success in growing more older animals.

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MBA CONVENTION

ANNUAL

C ONVENTION April 1-3, 2016

The 2016 MBA Convention will be held in Billings at the Northern Hotel. Book your room, today! The convention will be held in Anaconda at the Fairmont Hot Springs Resort, 1500 Fairmont Rd Anaconda, MT 59711 $119 + tax for single or double occupancy 800.332.3272 www.fairmontmontana.com

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EVENT INFORMATION

38TH ANNUAL

MONTANA BOWHUNTERS ASSOCIATION CONVENTION PRE REGISTER (Before March 15th) Get registered before March 15th save a bunch of cash on a great banquet! $40/person

2016 Convention Fairmont Hot Springs Resort April 1–3, 2016

$75/couple $25/child

GENERAL REGISTRATION (After March 15th) $50/person $85/couple $35/child

Banquet Menu

Send check or Money order to: PO Box 23611 Billings MT. 59104.

Prime Rib (carved to order) with au jus and horseradish Chicken Prosciutto Two Specialty Salads Garlic Mashed Potatoes

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS FRIDAY 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM 9 AM – NOON NOON – 8:30 PM 4:00 PM – 8:00 PM 8:00 PM

MBA Board meeting Manufacturer’s Row setup Registration and Manufacturer’s Row Open Silent Auction Bidding begins Social Time begins

SATURDAY 8:00 AM-10:00 AM 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM 9:00 AM – 7:00 PM 10:30 AM – 11:30 AM

General Membership Meeting Manufacturer’s Row Silent Auction FWP Panel Discussion - developments with shoulder seasons, grizzly delisting plans, Dept. input re: MBA proposal for archery only moose and goat seasons 11:45 AM – 12:45 PM Kids Shoot 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM SEMINAR: UDAP Grizzly Charge Simulator 2:30 PM – 3:30 PM SEMINAR: Filming Your Hunt - Jason Matzinger and Barrett Haugen 4:00 PM – 6:00 PM Pre-banquet Social Time 6:00 PM Banquet begins with Color Guard, Pledge of Allegiance 6:30 PM Dinner served 7:15 PM ProjectElk video with Jason Matzinger 7:30 PM Lee Poole Honorarium 8:00 PM Live Auctions / Raffle and Contest Winners 10:00 PM-11:00 PM Checkout

SUNDAY 8:00 AM – 9:30 AM 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM Noon -

Bowhunter Education Meeting / Breakfast Manufacturer’s Row open Convention Ends

HOTEL INFORMATION We’re very excited to announce the convention will be held at Fairmont this year. We have a 60-room block, and reservations can be made any time between now and the convention. Each room has two queen beds with a group rate of $119 + tax for single or double occupancy. Each additional person is an additional $15 + tax. The room rates include 24-hour access to all four naturally heated mineral pools for each registered guest. Fairmont has two Olympic-sized swimming pools, one indoor and one outdoor. We also have two smaller hot-soaking pools, one indoor and one outdoor. Reservations can be made by calling the reservation line at 800.332.3272 and ask for the MT Bowhunters room block. Reservations can also be made on Fairmont’s website, www. fairmontmontana.com. Click on bookings, then the group tab, and enter our group ID which is 16632 and password which is 37001964. Information will be posted on the website as seminar speakers and donations are confirmed. Mark your calendars and plan tosoak up the camaraderie at Fairmont! TRAVEL INFO Located midway between Yellowstone National Park and Glacier National Park, Fairmont is easy to get to located only three miles off of Interstate 90, Exit 211, eight miles from the I-90 and I-15 interchange. Fairmont’s 500 acres are cradled by the Continental Divide. The Resort sits in a valley at the base of the Pintler Wilderness area, which covers 150,000 acres virtually untouched by man.

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MBA CONVENTION

BOWHUNTER OF THE YEAR

The MBA standardized the process for nominating candidates for the Bowhunter of the Year, Richard Conklin, and Special Achievement Awards. Below you will find the form we will use. Please use this form by cutting it out of the newsletter. You may also attach a separate sheet; just be sure to include all the items that are asked for on the form. The nominations are due to Roger Peffer, regorp77@ msn.com or call 406-452-0911 by March 15, 2016 with all the information. The deadline is important because the nominations will be sent to the members of the awards committee so that they have time before the convention to cast their votes. We then need to get names on the awards. The awards are important to the people receiving them. This form will ensure that the integrity of the award is upheld for future recipients. I am sure many of you know members who are worthy of one or more of the four prestigious awards. However, these people will never receive the awards unless someone makes the effort to nominate them.

This award is given annually at the MBA banquet. It is confined to members who have been in good standing with the MBA during the 12 month period prior to the issuance of the award. The Bowhunter of the Year Award is basically an award recognizing “success” and may, but does not have to be, in the form of a kill. This “success” may be the taking of one outstanding animal, or the aggregate of various species taken, or “success” in the form of a particularly difficult achievement relating to the bowhunting experience. When an individual is to be considered as a candidate for the Bowhunter of the Year Award, all aspects of this success should be considered. Fair chase must play a large part in considering this “success”. The totality of the circumstances should also be considered, meaning the individual’s experience, handicaps, advantages, the difficulty of the hunt and the overall attitude of the candidate. Any member of the MBA may nominate someone else or himself/ herself as a candidate, though the respective reps are encouraged to locate candidates within their area. The nomination should be submitted on the form (found below) or on a reasonable facsimile. The form should include a detailed account of why this individual is deserving of this award, and any verification of the success that is available. The “success” need not have occurred during the past 12 month period. It could have occurred at any time in the candidate’s bowhunting career. The candidate may be nominated year after year for the same success, though actual issuance of the Bowhunter of the Year Award can only be given once for any one success. All nominations will be brought before the Awards Committee. The secret vote will be taken within this body. The majority of

the same as the Bowhunter of the Year Award, with the exception that the vote will not be taken. The awards committee, along with the First Vice President, will through mutual agreement, by the majority of this body in attendance, decide if a candidate is to be the recipient of the award. Nominations should be submitted on the form belo

SPECIAL ACHIEVEMENT AWARD Over the years it has become apparent that various individuals have been due recognition that does not necessarily fall within the realm of the two prior awards. This award or commendation is dictated depending on the circumstances and though, more often than not, does not have to be given to an MBA member. When an individual is due such recognition, his or her name and action should be forwarded to the award committee chairman in the same manner as the Bowhunter of the Year Award and the Conklin Award nominations. The committee will discuss these nominations at the same time as the other awards. This issuance of this award is on the approval of the majority of the awards committee.

PAUL SCHAFER AWARD This award is similar to the Bowhunter of the Year Award, but is only awarded to persons seventeen years old and younger. Ethics will play a large role in this award, as this is how Paul Schafer would have wanted it. So if you know of a young person deserving of this award, please send the information in.

the committee determines the Award.

MBA LITERATURE AWARD

RICHARD CONKLIN AWARD

This award goes to the MBA member whose story in the Montana Bowhunter Magazine is chosen as the best of the year. The MBA magazine committee, in conjunction with the Awards committee, will choose the winner, but will consider all input and nominations from all MBA members. This is an annual award.

This award was established as a “service” award. This award, which is not necessarily an annual award, is given only when an MBA member is due the recognition for outstanding work or accomplishment in the field of service to the MBA and the sport of bowhunting. The procedure for giving this award is

NOMINATIONS FOR BOWHUNTER OF THE YEAR AWARD RICHARD CONKLIN AWARD SPECIAL ACHIEVEMENT AWARD PAUL SCHAFER AWARD & MBA LITERATURE AWARD Name: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Address: __________________________________________________________________________________________________________ City:__________________________________________________ State of Candidate:___________Zip: ____________________________ Award:

Bowhunter of the Year Award Richard Conklin Award Special Achievement Paul Schafer Award

Specifics: (Please describe in as great a detail as possible, on a separate sheet of paper, the reason this candidate should receive the above checked award. Please type or print legibly.) Name of Nominator: _______________________________________________________________________________________________ Address of Nominator: ______________________________________________________________________________________________ regorp77@msn.com

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Forms must be received no later than March 15, 2016


GUEST SPEAKERS

FILMING YOUR HUNT ProjectELK VIDEO

Jason Matzinger SEMINAR SATURDAY 2:30PM – 3:30PM SATURDAY 7:30PM

GRIZZLY CHARGE SIMULATOR

Mark Matheny UDAP SEMINAR SATURDAY 1:00PM – 2:00PM

Ever since an early age Jason has possessed an uncommon passion for hunting, a passion that is as alive today as it was all those years ago. At an early age Jason was exposed to the great sport of hunting by his father Tim and his hunting partner George in his home state of Montana. Soon after graduating from High School, Jason started guiding big game hunters in Southwestern, Montana and soon realized what he was seeing on a day to day basis would rival anything that was currently being produced in the hunting industry. After his outfitter moved away Jason had a decision to make. That’s when he decided to start filming more seriously. Jason soon had filmed animal behavior that no one else had ever captured and major companies in the outdoor industry started to recognize that. Now 36, Jason has followed his passion and travelled the globe into some of the most highly sought after hunting in the world and is the hunter, filmmaker behind the series “Into High Country” that is now going into it’s sixth season on national television. In just a couple of years Jason has been nominated for such awards as “Best New Series”, “Shot of the Year”, and recently “Best Overall Production” by the Sportsmans Channels, Sportsmans Choice Awards. Now with his latest film “LIFE on the High Plains”, Jason is pioneering a new path in hunting production that you are not going to want to miss...

Mr. Matheny, an outdoorsman and resident of Bozeman, Montana, has become something of a Western legend as a result of a near-fatal 1992 attack he suffered while hunting and inadvertently encountering a female grizzly protecting her cubs. His survival is attributed to the fact that his friend was carrying pepper spray. In the years following the attack, Mr. Matheny became a tireless advocate of safety in the wild, lecturing, presenting seminars and distributing literature about the realities, causes, and prevention of bear attacks. He was a sponsor and presenter of Wyoming Game and Fish Department’s “Living in Bear/ Lion Country” workshop and he regularly speaks to children in schools around Southwest Montana on preventing animal attacks. Mr. Matheny also has made safety in bear country a vocation as well as his avocation. The company he founded in 1994, UDAP Industries, manufactures a variety of safety products that include pepper spray for bear deterrent and personal defense under the trademarked name PepperPower®, bear resistant canisters, and bear electric fences , all of which are widely used by state and federal wildlife agencies and avid outdoorsmen.

BOWHUNTERS!

CONVENTION CONTESTS

Bring your trophies, shed antlers and hunting/bragging snapshots to be displayed at the Convention! Contact Brian Koelzer with questions regarding mounts at 406-570-7997 or rocknrollbowhunter3@yahoo.com.

50/50 Poop counting contest – winner gets 50% of pot and a Susan Barrett hat

MANUFACTURERS! Please email Brian Koelzer at rocknrollbowhunter3@ yahoo.com if you are interested in booth space. Each space is $300, or is complementary to manufacturers who donate an equivalent amount.

Stone Glacier pack weight contest – winner gets the pack and a Susan Barrett hat Deer/elk horn inches contest - $5/chance – winner gets 50% and Susan Barrett hat Trophy scoring contest – winner gets Susan Barrett hat and another FABULOUS prize Genesis bow poker hand contest Regional games

Spring 2016

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AUCTIONS AND RAFFLES

AUCTION AND RAFFLE ITEMS LIVE AUCTION HUNTS Matlabas Game Hunters – Africa – One blue wildebeest or zebra Plus one warthog or steenbok or impala or bush duiker Plus daily rates for the first four days, for each of two hunters during a minimum ten day safari for plains game in the malaria-free Matlabas Bushveldt, Limpopo province, South Africa – day of arrival and departure included. Additional hunters and non-hunters are welcome to join the safari in which event standard rates will apply to them. Full hunt details on the website at mtba.org

Alberta Black Bear Hunt Northern Edge Outfitting. 1 hunter, 2 bear hunt for spring of 2017. $4000 value

HUNT RAFFLES

MOOSE HUNT RAFFLE Ticket Prices –$20 each or 6 for $100 Silver Fox Outfitters 6-day archery moose hunt Ticket Prices: $20 each or 6 for $100 – Tickets can also be purchased online at mtba.org Two-man 6-day archery moose hunt list price $4,500 Full hunt details on the website at mtba.org Dates: Sept 17 – Sept 22, 2016 2 hunters – 1 guide Hunt area near Edson, Alberta Not included: Bow hunting Lic ($25) Moose License ($800) Federal Tax on package (5%) and Gratuities www.silverfoxoutfitters.com

2016 DONATION HUNT: MONTANA BOWHUNTERS Ten days plains game hunt for two hunters in the malaria-free Matlabas Bushveldt, Limpopo Province, South Africa (day of arrival and departure included). This hunt is available in 2016 on a mutually agreed date between 1 April and 30 October. This is a minimum ten day hunt of which the daily rates for the first five days are included in the donation. In addition, the following animals are included for each of the hunters: one Blue Wildebeest plus any two of the following: Warthog or Impala or Bush duiker or Steenbok. The hunt includes accommodation, meals, laundry service, the services of a professional hunter and trackers and skinners, field preparation of trophies and delivery to a taxidermist or ‘shipper & dipper’ in Limpopo. Transport from and to Johannesburg International Airport is excluded – cost $250 per hunter each way. All Value Added Taxes are included in the rates, except Value Added Tax (14%) to be charged on wounded animals that are not recovered and thus not exported. This is a compound or traditional bow hunt and may be upgraded or extended (for extra days or additional hunters or nonhunters) as per the current price list. Accompanying non-hunters are welcome. Members who have previously been on this hunt include Jeff Nicholls, dr. Amy & Stephen LePage, and Roger & Pat Allick. Additional species that may be hunted include Limpopo bushbuck, bush duiker, Cape eland, gemsbok, kudu, nyala, red hartebeest, plains zebra, waterbuck, giraffe, caracal, black-backed jackal, vervet monkey and chacma baboon. The conservation authorities in South Africa allow the export of only one monkey and one baboon per hunter as a hunting trophy. The hunters on this hunt may however shoot additional unlimited monkeys and baboons, for free, provided not more than one of each are to be exported. Sable, tsessebe, roan and buffalo may also be available on other concessions. Prices are listed on the website www.matlabas.co.za/ hunting. This is a ‘bow hunting only’ concession, although rifles are occasionally allowed as an exception. There are no licenses or permits required for plains game, but permits for small cats, monkeys and baboons need to be obtained prior to the hunt. A Conservation Levy of US $ 10 per animal taken will be charged and will go to the Conservation Fund of the Professional Hunters Association of South Africa. Accommodation is provided at Matlabas Game Lodge. The scrumptious meals are mostly traditional South African Bushveldt cuisine and venison is regularly served. The lodge consists of 4 thatched rooms and 2 en suite Meru type safari tents. The lodge has 220 Volt electricity, and other features include a lounge with satellite TV, a wildlife and natural history video library, a swimming pool, a ‘lapa’ where there will be a camp fire every evening, and a curio shop. A daily cleaning service is included in the hunt. Basic toiletries and towels are provided. Excursions and other activities for non-hunters as well as tours and/or photographic safaris at the end of the hunting safari are also available (a safari to the Kruger National Park is very popular with visitors from abroad and can be recommended). Fishing, scuba diving and/or wing shooting is also available prior to or after the hunting safari. Details will be provided on request. This is one of South Africa’s prime bow hunting destinations, but this hunt cannot be exchanged for other goods or services or alternative hunts. Nor can the free animals be exchanged for other species. This hunt is ideal for two hunting friends, or a hunting couple, who would like to experience authentic African bow hunting. Should only one hunter be able to make the trip, the donation value for the second hunter will be forfeited. This is a 100% donation to Montana Bowhunters. Donation Value: US $5890 (per 2016 price list) Willem or Flippie Frost E-mail: info@matlabas.co.za

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Web: www.matlabas.co.za/hunting Telephone: (27) 147790969 or (27) 147790602 WWW.MTBA.ORG


AUCTIONS & RAFFLES

TENT RAFFLE

LIVE AUCTION Deer head study bronze Sean Dunn began donating this art to the MBA four years ago in honor of his father-in-law, Bill Davis (the artist) who passed away unexpectedly. Bill was a driving force behind Sean starting in traditional archery, which Sean now works to pass on to many others via social and youth programs. It’s a nice way to remember Bill to promote the sport he loved and passed on to his family. Value $800.

Greg Scheibel custom oil painting Scheibel Fine Art - Value: $1,200

MBA engraved knife - Skyblade Knives, Todd Orr Madison 4 - Redwood Burl handle - 4” blade - CPM S35VN Stainless steel blade and a custom sheath by Madison Saddlery. Comes with a Lifetime Warranty value at $330.

Montana Canvas Relite Spike III tent and a Riley Stoves Little Amigo stove

Custom barnwood coffee table -

Ticket Prices: 5$ each or 6 for $25

Jeff and Elisha Kennedy - Value: $500

Tickets can also be purchased online at mtba.org

A round of golf for four and a one-night stay at Moonlight Basin – Big Sky Value $1000

MBA Longcurve Bow Auction – win the chance to shoot an MBA legacy bow! John Demott giclee bison painting “Fury on the Plains” Scheibel Fine Art - Value: $3,300

To experience a John DeMott painting is to truly experience a part of the great American frontier. And outdoorsman and storyteller of the American west, DeMott transcends the cliché of the western artist. Born in 1954 and raised on Southern California horse ranches, he has worked and lived the life of his artistic subjects and can speak the language of his experience. The ability to recreate a sense of place and time doesn’t come easily. Most collectors do not realize that DeMott spends hours researching and studying tools, wardrobe, accoutrements and the history of his subjects to recreate the detail that is a trademark of a Demott painting. The Plains Indians, the trapper, cowboys, a grizzly bear in the wilderness or simply the beautiful southwestern landscape, it is DeMott’s gift that can make the viewer keenly aware of sense of time and place. “As a storyteller of the American frontier, western art has been an important part of my life and I am proud to be involved in the preservation of our great heritage!” John’s work has been published in the following art publications: Art of the West, Southwest Art, Art Talk, Civil War Art, Sporting Classics, and Western Horseman.

Spring 2016

21


AUCTIONS AND RAFFLES

Prizes are still rolling in! Raffle tickets including all prizes will be mailed and can be purchased online at mtba.org.

DEFENSE RAFFLE

BOW RAFFLE

$2 ea / 6 for $10 (each item won separately”

$5 ea / 6 for $20 (each item won separately”)

M.R. James signed book and T.J. Conrads donation

Schafer Silvertip Recurve – Dave Windauer $1000 towards a custom bow

2 free Oil cChanges at SpeedyLube - Bozeman

Trails End Recurve – Dale Dye $300 towards a custom bow

LEGISLATIVE RAFFLE $5ea / 6 for $25 (each item won separately”l) Siberian Cooler Sitka Gear set – coat, pants, and shirt 1-day Snowmobile Rental + Trailer – Big Boy Toys

CONSERVATION RAFFLE $5ea / 6 for $25 each item won separately”)

Yellowstone Custom Bows – Rich Wormington - $400 towards a custom bow Bears Paw Custom Bows – Neil Jacobson $500 towards a custom bow Toelke Custom Bows – Dan and Jared Toelke 58” Chinook recurve 51” @ 28” classic myrtle riser and bamboo limbs RER Custom bow – Chester & Ike Floyd – custom bow valued at $750 Pronghorn Custom Bows – Herb Meland – gift certificate towards a bow

10x42 Vortex Razorback binos - Shedhorn Sports $175 Gift Certificate - Berger Taxidermy

LADIES RAFFLE

Rooster Pheasant Wire Art - Bryan Mackie Antler Creek Wildlife Creations

$5 each / 6 for $25 (each item won separately”)

Mystery Ranch Pack

45# Prime Bow w/sights and quiver - Prime

HAT RAFFLE Ticket Information at Convention SIG Sauer 223 Caliber Rifle – Talus Architects

UnderArmour camo set pants, long-sleeved ¼ zip shirt, ColdGear ¼ zip shirt, polar fleece lined exterior top, and a short-brimmed hat – Billings Scheels Two 90-minute hot stone massages - Alisha Miller 406 Massage Beaded necklace and matching bracelet Montana Silversmiths earrings and necklace - Kristy Titu

YOUTH RAFFLE $2 each / 6 for $10 (each item won separately”)

SILENT AUCTION ITEMS Information available at the convention.

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WWW.MTBA.ORG

Hoyt “Ruckus” bow, peep sight, nock loop, release, Easton ACC Pro hunter arrows and McKenzie TuffBlock target - Billings Scheels PSE Miniburner with accessories – Judy Adams, Buffalo Jump Archery


2016 CONVENTION DONORS

2016 DONORS

Spring 2016

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BOARD NOMINEE BIOS

Board Nominee Bios President - Marlon Clapham I’m going to throw my name into the ring to run for the President position. Here is a little about myself: I started bowhunting in 1970, riding my bicycle out to the woods from home after school. We were hunting whitetail deer anywhere we could find them. Bowhunting has become my passion. I became an MBA member in the mid 80’s and a life member shortly thereafter. I have been teaching the BowEd program for the last 25 years, and am currently the Ravalli Co. chief for the last six years. I’ve served on the MBA board for four years in Region 2. I truly believe that bowhunting in Montana depends on the MBA to survive. Communication is key to that survival. Keeping the members informed and involved makes us the successful and strong organization that we are. I hope to keep that going forward. I love working with the youth, starting them on the path to bowhunting and shooting bows and arrows. Watching first-time shooters get their smile on after breaking a balloon is special to me. I never get tired of it. I’m asking for your support and to vote for me in the upcoming election. I’ll do my very best to keep the MBA in top form and carry on the tradition we worked for all these years. Thank you, Marlon Clapham Stevensville, MT

2nd Vice President - Mark Schwomeyer I would like to be vice president because I care about the future of bowhunting. I want to stay informed on upcoming changes and inform fellow bowhunters of what they can do to help keep what we have for future generations! Thank you, Mark Schwomeyer

Region 2 - Neil Maier Dear MBA MembersI am Neil A Maier and I would like to run as a candidate for the MBA Region 2 Representative. I believe I have a lot that I can contribute to the MBA as a whole. I have called Montana home most of my life, except for working in Washington state for four years. I started bow hunting in 1973 when I bought my first recurve bow, a Bear Kodiak Hunter 55# with green fiberglass. I used fiberglass arrows until aluminum arrows came out. I sold that Kodiak when I bought my first compound bow and now realize I never should have sold it. I have hunted with compound, recurve and to a lesser degree, longbows. I have taken a few deer over the years and am still trying to get my first elk. I have been within 5 steps of bulls but could never get that shot. I have been teaching Montana Hunter Education for 27 years and Montana Bow Hunter Education for 21 years. I also hunt with rifles and shotguns. I love hunting Chucker in the Hells Canyon area along Brownley Reservoir, east of Richland Oregon and the Halfway area. I enjoy riding Paso Fino horses with my wife, and also enjoy Rock hounding around Montana, Idaho, Oregon and Washington. Sincerely, Neil Maier Frenchtown, MT

Region 5 - John Grimstad I have been bow hunting Montana since 1980. I served on the board of the MBA for 2 terms prior. My greatest accomplishments are my 2 kids and their love for the outdoors. I could tell you I have shot several bull elk and a big horn sheep with my bow, but I don’t think that is what makes a good bow hunter. A bow hunter is someone who loves the outdoors and who respects the animals they pursue. Size is not important, but having a passion and trying to make sure the next generations have the same (if not more) opportunities to bow hunt is what makes a respected bow hunter, in my opinion. Please feel free to contact me with any questions or concerns: twingrim@bresnan.net | (406) 252-3620 Sincerely, John W. Grimstad Billings, Montana

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WWW.MTBA.ORG

Region 6 - David Moon I will continue to represent the members of Region 6 with their views on bowhunting in Montana. I will act as the liaison between Montana Bowhunters Association and the members of Region 6. I will stay informed on the latest issues with Montana bowhunting and relay that information to the Region 6 members. I will promote the Montana Bowhunters Association to other bowhunters, other hunters, non-hunters, and local land owners to build relationships in Region 6. I would appreciate your vote.

Region 8 - Jerry Davis I am the third generation of my family to live in Montana. I was born in Havre, Montana in the early 50’s and was raised in Ft Peck, Montana. I graduated from Glasgow High School in 1970, served in the US Army from 1971 until 1973, and graduated from Flathead Valley Community College with an AS specializing in Forestry Technology. I then graduated from Montana State University in 1985 with a BS in Civil Engineering. I retired from USDOT Office of Pipeline Safety in 2012 and now work as a Senior Utility Engineer for Utility Mapping Services in Clancy, MT. I have hunted and fished my entire life. I began shooting a bow when I was very young but I only pursued carp. It was not until my children were grown that I began hunting antelope, deer and elk with a bow, in 2007 or so. I love shooting a bow all that archery only season offers. Please consider me for another term as Region 8 Rep. Jerry Davis

Director at Large - Cliff Goudelock Dear MBA Members, I began my archery hunting career by harvesting a whitetail doe at the age of 14, 52 years ago. I shot my last buck with a bow in September of 2014. In between, I have shot one real nice 4X4 whitetail buck, numerous mule deer in Montana, and one spot and stalk black bear. Although I have had many memorable gun hunts, bowhunting has always been my number one sport. I also attended and completed John Schulz’s Master Bowmaker School in Cortez, Colorado in 1983. Howard Hill taught John Schulz how to make longbows. I still have the bow I made at Bow School and a Howard Hill Commemorative Prototype bow created by John Schulz. I enjoy deer, elk, bear, mountain lion and wild hog hunting the best, but I also enjoy bowfishing and fishing with a spinning outfit on the Yellowstone River. I would like to contribute my time and energy to the promotion of bowhunting in Montana, for residents and non-residents. Whether it is teaching others how to shoot the bow, or how to hunt, or whether it is lobbying politically for the goals of the MBA, I will devote my time and energy to achieve these goals. I would like to share my enjoyment of the sport and help others become better bowhunters by utilizing my extensive 50+ years of bowhunting experience. Sincerely, Clifford P. Goudelock Reed Point, MT

Director at Large - Roger Peffer My name is Roger Peffer and I have served as a Director At Large for MBA for about the last 8+ or years or so ... I work as a Biology professor in Great Falls, MT. I am willing to step forward and serve another term. I have been involved in supporting bowhunting for over 25 years in both WA and MT. I have hunted both traditional and compound and endorse use of both weapons. I’ve been very outspoken about the importance of membership and have participated in many events to sign up new members. I currently serve as the Chair of the Awards Committee for the Convention and also on the editorial committee. MBA is the voice of bowhunting in Montana and the Board works tirelessly to fight for opportunity and seasons. Please consider me for another term. Thanks! Roger Peffer


DRAFT BALLOT 2016 ELECTIONS

OFFICIAL BALLOT 2016 MBA ELECTION THIS BALLOT IS UNIQUE TO: MEMBER NAME: Member ID: (Note: Your membership status must be active to vote. Official ballots will be mailed.)

Candidates Seeking Election President Marlon Clapham Write-in__________________

1st Vice President Steve Schindler Write-in__________________

2nd Vice President Mark Schwomeyer Write-in__________________

Secretary Write-in__________________

Region 2 Representative

(Region 2 members only – vote for candidate and/or write-in)

Neil Maier Write-in__________________

Region 4 Representative

(Region 4 members only – write-in candidates welcome)

Write-in__________________ Write-in__________________

Region 5 Representative

(Region 5 members only – vote for candidate and/or write-in)

John Grimstad Write-in__________________

Region 6 Representative

(Region 6 members only – vote for candidate and/or write-in)

David Moon Write-in__________________

Region 8 Representative

(Region 8 members only – vote for candidate and/or write-in)

Jerry Davis Write-in__________________

Directors-At-Large – Even Year (All members vote for candidates and/or write-in – total of 7 DAL positions)

Roger Peffer Seth Rogers Cliff Goudelock Write-in_________________ Write-in_________________ Write-in_________________ Write-in_________________

Spring 2015

25


www.pronghornbows.com 307-234-1824 evenings 2491 West 42nd Street Casper, WY 82604

MARK SEACAT, SITKA ATHLETE LOCATION: UTAH SHAUN MATHEWSON

TURNING CLOTHING INTO GEAR BASE | INSULATION | SOF T SHELL | HARD SHELL | HEADWEAR | HANDWEAR | PACKS

SITKAGEAR.COM | 877.SITKA.GR

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Montana

BOWHUNTER

WWW.MTBA.ORG


2016 MBA CONVENTION DRAFT ORDER FORM

OFFICIAL ORDER FORM WILL BE MAILED 38th ANNUAL MBA CONVENTION APRIL 1-3, 2016 FAIRMONT HOT SPRINGS RESORT ORDER FORM Return order for to MBA P.O. Box 23611 Billings, MT 59401 Orders can also be placed online at www.shop.mtba.org Hunt details online at www.mtba.org Banquet Tickets Pre-registration before March 15

Price $40/person or $75/couple

General Registration after March 15 or at the convention Raffle Type MOOSE HUNT RAFFLE Silver Fox Outfitters two-man, 6-day archery hunt near Edson, Alberta, Sept. 17-22, 2016 List price $4,500

$50/person or $85/couple Price $20 each / 6 for $100

BEAR HUNT RAFFLE

$20 each / 6 for $100

TENT RAFFLE Montana Canvas Relite Spike III tent and a Riley Stoves Little Amigo stove

$5 each / 6 for $25

LEGISLATIVE RAFFLE  Siberian cooler  Sitka Gear set: coat, pants, and shirt  1-day snowmobile rental + trailer – Big Boy Toys _________________

$5 each / 6 for $25

Quantity

Total

Quantity

Total

T F A R D

CONSERVATION RAFFLE  10x42 Vortex Razorback binos - Shedhorn Sports  $175 gift certificate - Berger Taxidermy  Rooster Pheasant Barbed Wire Art - Brian Mackie Antler Creek Designs gns  Mystery Ranch pack

$5 each / 6 for $25

LADIES RAFFLE

$5 each / 6 for $25

 45## Prime Bow w/sights and quiver quive  UnderArmour derArmour camo set - pants, ts, long-sleeved long eved ¼ zip shirt, t, Cold ColdGear ¼ zip shirt, polar fleece lined top, and a short-brimmed -brimmed hat – Billings Scheels Scheel  Two 90-minute 90-minute hot stone sto massages - Alisha Miller 406 Massage ge  Beaded necklace and matching bracelet  Montana Silversmiths earrings, necklace - Kristy Titus

DEFENSE RAFFLE  M.R. James and T.J. Conrads signed books  2 free oil changes at SpeedyLube - Bozeman _________________ _________________

$2 each / 6 for $10

YOUTH RAFFLE  Hoyt “Ruckus” bow, peep sight, nock loop, release, Easton ACC Pro hunter arrows and McKenzie TuffBlock target - Billings Scheels  PSE Miniburner with accessories – Judy Adams, Buffalo Jump Archery _________________ _________________

$2 each / 6 for $10

BOW RAFFLE Enter quantity of chances next to each bow Schafer Silvertip Recurve – Dave Windauer $1000 towards a custom bow Trails End Recurve – Dale Dye $300 towards a custom bow Yellowstone Custom Bows – Rich Wormington $400 towards a custom bow Bears Paw Custom Bows – Neil Jacobson $500 towards a custom bow Toelke Custom Bows – Dan and Jared Toelke 58" Chinook recurve 51# @ 28" classic myrtle riser and bamboo limbs RER Custom bow – Chester & Ike Floyd Custom bow valued at $750 Pronghorn Custom Bows – Herb Meland Gift certificate towards a bow

$5 each / 6 for $25

HAT RAFFLE SIG Sauer 223 caliber rifle – Talus Architects

Payment Info Name:

$40/hat

Phone:

Email:

Address: Credit card info or check enclosed: Name on card:

Card type:

Card number:

Exp. Date:

CSV:



Spring 2016

27


MEMBER STORY

Kara’s Mule Deer Adventure T

hirty thousand feet in the air on my way to the 2015 Pope and Young Convention in Phoenix, AZ, I’m in my seat thinking about my hunting adventures and the tags I have drawn. I’ve never thought of myself as a lucky person. Growing up my name was never pulled from a bucket to win a prize, until I moved to Montana in 2011 and began a new chapter in my life. I grew up in a small town south of Fargo, ND where I was very active with sports and outdoor activities including snow and water skiing, swimming in the lakes and camping. Never did it cross my mind that I would pick up hunting. Sure, we had lots of deer that loved to run in front of your car on the roads and mom and her two fawns that lived near the farm, but I wasn’t exposed to hunting as it wasn’t something my father or grandfathers did. I meet this guy in February of 2011 who sparked my interest. He had many stories of life in the outdoors hunting, picking up sheds and chasing mountain lions with hound dogs. April came and he told me about his travels to Rochester, MN for a Pope and Young Convention, which I had never heard about. Soon it was November and I couldn’t stand to be 800 miles away from him, so I packed up the U-Haul and traveled west on Thanksgiving day. That Christmas I received a Hoyt bow from Brian and began practicing every Friday night at Big Sky Archery’s techno league. Brian was by my side with all my “real” hunts there after. He shared so much of his hunting knowledge with me and began to let me make my own decisions when it came to my hunts. He watched my confidence grow and he helped nourish it through the first few seasons of my hunting career, during which time I have been blessed to harvest a couple whitetail deer and antelope, an elk, mountain lion, mountain goat, turkey and black bear. I drew special tags for the mountain goat and turkey, which didn’t make some of Brian’s uncles and friends happy as they had been putting in unsuccessfully for their whole lives for the opportunity to draw such tags! After getting off the plane in the airport of Phoenix, AZ, I turned my phone on and next thing I knew my good luck had struck again. I had drawn a Bridgers’ mule deer tag! Immediately Brian and I started planning our adventure that lay ahead of us. With a busy summer in our future as Brian and I both had trips planned and our late August wedding quickly approaching, we didn’t have much time for pre-season scouting. After saying our “I do’s”, we quickly switched into hunting mode. I began to obtain permission on several key properties where we had noticed significant buck activity. One of these properties, I gladly shared hunting rights with a very good buddy who drew the same tag. September found us perspiring in the ground blind with not much action from the bucks, but multiple does hanging nearby. After multiple days spent in a ground blind, we decided to put our efforts towards the elk and allow the weather to cool down a bit for better deer movement. With several close but not quite encounters with elk, October found me switching back to mule deer

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mode. With Brian spending most of his weekends hunting whitetails out of town, I was left completely on my own for the first time in my hunting career. Over the course of the fall there were 3 bucks that sparked my interest. One was a beautiful 5x5 with one wing cheater, the other was a tall-wide 3x4 and the last was a big heavy mature 3x3 we nick named the “Whitetail Buck”. One ambush found me face to face with the 5x5 only 7 yards away, bow in hand but unfortunately facing me head on. I didn’t know my heart could race this fast! During the last week of October, I began to catch on to their travel pattern, which consisted of them heading out of the hills and hanging out in some long grass near and old fence line before heading down to feed for the night. Since Brian was gone whitetail hunting Halloween day, I made my way out to the spot I had been hunting. I spotted the “Whitetail Buck”, so I had to make a plan. I quickly got dressed, grabbed the pop-up blind, my bow and snuck out to the fence line. In my hurry to get set up, I completely forgot to bring my chair. The afternoon was spent sitting/squatting in the blind for three and a half hours watching the occasional doe in the distance and trying to prevent my legs from falling asleep. Brian and I conversed through texts about my current hunting situation which kept me entertained. He was just getting to Bozeman when I noticed several does coming out of the hills and heading my direction. Next thing I know I am surrounded by the does and notice 3 bucks making their way down the fence line right towards my blind. Two of the smaller bucks passed directly in front of my blind but the “Whitetail Buck” held up and crawled under the fence. One particular doe became irresistible to Mr. Whitetail and he started escorting her my direction, but unfortunately to the rear of my blind. Having to very quietly and cautiously do a 180 without being detected all while squatting, they were now within five yards of my blind. I drew back my Hoyt Carbon Spyder, settled my pin and released my VPA tipped arrow. I felt confident in my shot, within fifty yards and less than 10 seconds the “Whitetail Buck” was mine! I began violently shaking and attempted to text Brian, but quickly gave up and had to call instead. Having just pulled up to the property, he saw me crawling out of the blind to retrieve my arrow from the complete pass through shot. We then walked over and had a quiet moment honoring this amazing buck. I was a mess, full of so many emotions. I had worked so hard and for this scenario to play out so perfectly, it was a dream come true. Coming from the flat lands of eastern North Dakota four short years ago to successfully hunting the mountains of Montana on my own has been a truly amazing experience. We are so fortunate to live in a place that affords us with so much bow hunting opportunity. Thank you to the MBA for all you’ve done over the past 40 years to “promote and preserve” bow hunting in our great state!


Spring 2016

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CANYON FERRY CARP SAFARI

Montana Bowhunters Association presents:

Have You Been “Carpified ?” C A N YO N F E R RY C A R P S A F A R I JUNE 11, 2016 C A N YO N F E R RY L A K E , H E L E N A M T x

Bowhunting only - everyone welcome!!

x

Help Carp Management in Canyon Ferry Lake

x

Never been Carpified? -Help available from semi-professional Carp Ninjas

x

Send in Registration form by June 6

x

Evening meal included in pre-registration

Good Things to Know : - All sh oo ter s n e ed a vali d fi shi ng l i cens e - Boa ts m us t b e re gis ter e d wi th corr e ct numb er of li f eja ck e ts - Boa ts m us t b e cl ean up on arri val and cl ean e d pr io r to e n ter ing an o th er b o d y of wa ter - Bo whun ting on l y. Brin g l o ts o f arr ows - Carp Safa ri will run Sa tur da y f rom sun ris e un ti l 5 p .m.

Individual shooter - preregistered Individual shooter - day of shoot 2-person team - preregistered 2-person team –day of shoot Shooter - under 15 - preregistered Non - shooter meal ticket - prereg.

$20.00, meal included $20.00, meal not included $40.00, meal included $40.00, meal not included $ 10.00, meal included $ 6.00, fee for meal

Camping available at our private camping area—details and map posted at http://mtba.org

price (don’t worry, it’s not carp) How to g e t pr er eg is ter ed: x

3D Targets available for those of us who can’t even hit thousands of spawning carp

x  Mail att ach ed form b y J u n e 6 , 2 0 1 6 x  Mail p ayme nt t o: J o e l l e S e l k 6963 York Road Helena, MT 59602 (Make checks out to MBA) x  Ne e d mor e f or ms o r i n f o?

jselkm t@gmail.c om P h one #: 4 0 6 - 4 2 2 -67 98

P R E R E G I S T R A T IO N FO RM C a n y o n Fe r r y C a r p S a f a r i J u n e 1 1 , 2 0 1 6 I n d i v i d u a l Sh o o t e r s $20.00 x ______ = Shooters under 15 $10.00 x ______ = M e a l t i c k e t -n o n - s h o o t e r $6.00 x _______ = 2-person team $40.00 x _______ = Total>> $_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Make checks out to MBA and mail to: Joelle Selk– MBA 3470 Kase Road Helena MT 59602

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Montana

BOWHUNTER

WWW.MTBA.ORG

C a n y o n F e r r y La k e , H e l e n a $__________ $__________ $__________ $__________

List names of shooters:__________________________________ ____________________________________________________

(


CONTACT NUMBERS

FWP Commissioner Contacts fwpwld@mt.gov

District 1

District 3

District 5

Gary Wolfe, Commissioner

Richard Stuker, Vice-Chairman

Matthew Tourtlotte, Commissioner

P.O. Box 7323

1155 Boldt Road

940 Blonco Circle

Missoula, MT 59807

Chinook, MT 59523

Billings, MT 59105

Phone: (406) 240-7323

Phone: (406) 357-3495

Phone: (406) 698-9696

gwolfe207@bresnan.net

rstuker@mtintouch.net

mtourtlotte@gmail.com

District 2

District 4

Dan Vermillion, Chairman

Richard Kerstein, Commissioner

PO Box 668

Box 685

Livingston, MT 59047

Scobey, MT 59263

Phone: (406) 222-0624

Phone: (406) 783-8564

dan@sweetwatertravel.com

fw4buttes@gmail.com

BUSINESS & CLUB MEMBERS

Active as of January 2016

CROWN PHOTOGRAPHY DR. CAMO EAGLE RESTORATION ELK CREEK FAMILY OUTFITTERS GREAT FALLS ARCHERY CLUB K DESIGN MARKETING, INC LIBBY ARCHERY CLUB MATABLAS GAME HUNTERS MIKE PRESCOTT STATE FARM PRONGHORN CUSTOM BOWS ROCKY MOUNTAIN ELK FOUNDATION S3 ARCHERY TECH TRAILS END CUSTOM RECURVE BOW TROY ARCHERY CLUB, INC. UDAP INDUSTRIES WESTERN TRAILER & MARINE SALES YELLOWSTONE COUNTRY BEAR HUNTERS ASSOCIATION

Become a Business Member of the MBA and be listed on this page every issue! For membership visit www.mtba.org.

Mike & Lucinda Layne Don Stein Michael Henry David Hein Rick Maynard Kimberly Kinsinger Wendy Drake Willem Frost Mike Prescott Herb Meland David Allen David Lofts Dale Dye Patrick Hanley Mark Matheny Clyde Thomas, Jr. Joe Kondelis

PO Box 9936 Kalispell 1625 Northern Heights Dr Havre 15853 Queen Annes Lane Florence 1021 Toole Circle Billings PO Box 3653 Great Falls 1613 South Ave W. Missoula PO Box 755 Libby PO Box 1559, Lephalale, 0555, South Africa 1501 S. Russell St. MIssoula 2491 W 42nd St Casper 5705 Grant Creek Road Missoula 6350 Delarka Dr Lolo 276 Grantsdale Rd Hamilton 185 Forest Rd Troy 1703 Waterline Rd Butte 1865 Hwy 2 E. Havre 255 Upland Ct Cody

MT MT MT MT MT MT MT

59904 59501 59833 59105 59403 59801 59923

MT WY MT MT MT MT MT MT WY

59801 82604 59808 59840 59935 59701 59501 82414

406-752-6116 406-265-8099 406-549-1221 406-670-4366 406-453-1158 406-273-6193 406-291-4801 27116794664 406-541-9800 307-234-1824 406-523-4500 406-239-3726 406-363-2983 406-295-9048 406-581-4856 406-265-4572 307-899-0461

James Brown

PO Box 96

MT

59259

406-773-5509

Richey

Spring 2016

31


HEADER

Do you enjoy bowhunting and our bowhunting seasons in Montana? Join the MBA to preserve, promote and protect bowhunting! What the MBA offers you: Expanded hunting opportunities through working with FWP and commissioners to preserve and expand bowhunting seasons Unified voice during legislative sessions to protect seasons and access programs while opposing efforts which seek to limit the role of FWP in managing wildlife Fellowship with others who are interested in shaping the future of bowhunting Quarterly magazine keeping you informed on local, state, and national bowhunting issues, bowhunter education, events, and great hunting stories

INDIVIDUAL MEMBERSHIP One Year $25.00 Three Years $67.00 Life $500.00

FAMILY MEMBERSHIP One Year $30.00 Three Years $81.00 Life $750.00

JUNIOR MEMBERSHIP (Under 18) One Year

$5.00

CLUB MEMBERSHIP One Year $45.00 Three Years $120.00

BUSINESS MEMBERSHIP One Year $45.00 Three Years $120.00

OVERSEAS MEMBERSHIP Add $10.00 a year to membership choice for added mailing costs

Join Today! Visit the MBA website at: www.mtba.org

32

Montana

BOWHUNTER

WWW.MTBA.ORG

Memberships run January 1 to December 31 each year.


1

MERRI CLAPHAM 4x4 wt. buck number 5 in a row

4

7

JEFF YERKS first bow harvest bull

MIKE BARRETT - 56# Predator Bow with full metal jacket arrows and aboyer broadhead - Elk in Montana on Oct 1 at 20 yards

10

DYRK EDDIE with 2015 deer

2

5

8

11

JOEY NELSON

3

MIKE BARRETT - 56# Predator Bow with full metal jacket arrows and aboyer broadhead - Mule deer d in Idaho on Nov 21 at 16 yards

DYRK EDDIE lifetime member with 2015 moose

6

DICK SOLUM turkey harvest

Thanksgiving day buck for SCOTT KOELZER! Schafer silver tip zwickey head 15 yd shot

CHRIS BLASKOWSKI 2015 buck

9

SUSAN BARRETT - 50# XI bow with full metal jacket arrows and 2 blade stainless steel broadhead Whitetail deer on Nov 17 in Wyoming W at 18 yards from a treestandt.

12

BRANDEN VANDYKEN 2015 speedgoat 900 archery 2 only tag. Not a beast, but very tasty

Spring 2016

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WHY EVERY MONTANA BOWHUNTER SHOULD CONSIDER JOINING THE MONTANA BOWHUNTERS ASSOCIATION • The MBA is the organization the Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks consults on bowhunting issues that affect Montana bowhunters. • Montana has the best bowhunting seasons of any of the western states. We are continually working to keep these. • The MBA is active in the Legislature to protect and fight for our hunting and bowhunting seasons and rights. • The MBA produces a quarterly magazine informing you of local, state, and national bowhunting issues and events, and publishing great stories and pictures. • THE MBA NEEDS MEMBER NUMBERS AND YOUR YEARLY DUES TO CONTINUE TO PROTECT WHAT YOU ENJOY EVERY YEAR. ISN’T WHAT YOU ENJOY EVERY FALL WORTH $25 A YEAR TO PROTECT?

What the MBA has done for you? • • • •

Worked to get the first archery season started in Montana. Along the way, we’ve increased the seasons to what you enjoy today. Worked to establish archery bear, lion and sheep seasons. Worked to establish archery antelope 900 tag and August 15th opener. Worked to establish archery only areas and hunting districts. Proposed a special archery wolf season and endorsed the highest quota of wolf harvest possible. Actively protects hunting & bowhunting seasons in the Legislature year after year. Defended our archery seasons against the “Crossbows & Muzzleloaders” threats throughout the years. Created the Modified Archer’s permit that now allows those with handicaps to use modified archery equipment to hunt; which kept any need for crossbows out of Montana and defended our archery seasons against other crossbow threats throughout the years. Re-established the archery season after it was left off the regulations one year. Actively works with FWP to protect archery seasons, our resources, and expand archery opportunity in Montana year after year.

Photos by Denver Bryan / Images on the Wildside

What can you do for bowhunting in Montana? Join the MBA at www.mtba.org to preserve, promote and protect bowhunting.

Spring 2015

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