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VOL. 44 #1 Fall 2016

MBA Member Spotlight – PAGE 16

The Jinks is Broken – PAGE 16

Return service requested Montana Bowhunters Association PO Box 23611 Billings, MT 59104

2016 Canyon Ferry Carp Safari – PAGE 16

Legislative Reports – PAGE 12 MBA Bowhunter Education – PAGE 17 Letter from a Longtime Member – PAGE 20

Non-Profit Org. U.S. POSTAGE PAID Permit # 120 Bozeman, MT 59718


MBA

Regional Representatives Region 1 Region 2

www.mtba.org

MBA offi cers PRESIDENT

Al Kelly

PO Box 219, Libby, MT 59923 ............................................ 406-293-29000 alman@frontiernet.net

Neil Maier

16200 Roman Creek Rd Frenchtown, MT 59834 .............. 406-546-60133

Marlon Clapham 4455 Hoover Lane • Stevensville, MT 59870 mbaregion2@gmail.com • 406-777-2408

nam56@yahoo.com 1ST VICE PRESIDENT

Region 3

Brian Koelzer

80 Jansma Lane Manhattan, MT 59741............................. 406-570-79977 rocknrollbowhunter3@yahoo.com

Barrett Haugan

560 Clovehitch Road Belgrade, MT 59714 ........................ 406-539-06022

Steve Schindler 134 Sawney Drive • Glasgow, MT 59203 sas@nemont.net • 406-228-9024

btreasurestate@aol.com

Region 4

2ND VICE PRESIDENT

Stephen LePage

2574 Divide Rd. Lewistown, MT ...................................... 406-535-5636

Roger Licht

PO Box 189 Stanford MT 59479 ....................................... 406-566-26933 Licht@Roger@yahoo.com

Region 5

John Grimstad

Region 6

David Moon

Region 7 Region 8

2031 Poly Drive Billings, MT 59102 ................................. 406-252-36200 twingrim@bresnan.net

P.O. Box 1995 Colstrip, MT 59323 ..................................... 406-749-07066 robertredface@gmail.com

Jerry Davis

markschwo@gmail.com • 406-350-0173

TREASURER

Jenn Schneider PO Box 23611 • Billings, MT 59104

djmoon9876@gmail.com

Bob Morgan

60 Hruska Ln • Lewistown, MT 59457

97 Aberdeen, Glasgow, MT 59230 ..................................... 406-942-06599 mtba@mtba.org • 406-697-7668

SECRETARY Vacant

725 Middlemas Road, Helena, MT 59602.......................... 406-475-22266 pipelinejerry@gmail.com

AT LARGE DIRECTORS

PAST PRESIDENT

Joelle Selk 6963 York Road • Helena, MT 59602

EVEN YEARS

Roger Peffer 2517 9th Ave So., Great Falls, MT 59405 – regorp77@msn.com .........................................406-452-09111 Seth Rogers 1425 Prickley Pear, Billings, MT 59105 – srogers@lamar.com ............................................406-670-54355 Tim Roberts 2410 Chouteau St, Fort Benton, MT 59442 – timr59442@gmail.com .................................406-220-20511 Michael Shepard 351 7th Ave East N., Columbia Falls, MT 59912 – michaelshepard7@gmail.com ............406-250-98066

jselkmt@gmail.com • 406-422-6798

MAGAZINE CO-EDITORS

Teri and Al Kelly

ODD YEARS

Paul Martin Ray Gross Dan Moore

Mark Schwomeyer

mbaregion4@yahoo.com

110 Sage Lane, Kalispell, MT 59901 - paulhmartin99@gmail.com .......................... 406-261-4456 6 355 Antelope Drive Dillon, MT 59725 – raygross0144@gmail.com ........................ 406-660-1019 9

PO Box 219 • Libby, MT 59923 teray1979@yahoo.com

75 Haywire Trail, Kalispell Mt 59901 - bigdanmt@yahoo.com .................................. 406-756-7395 5

EDITORIAL COMMENTS The MBA Magazine is a quarterly publication of the MBA and is intended to inform, entertain and educate its members on happenings within the organization and to bowhunting in general.

PUBLICATION DATES AND DEADLINES

FALL ISSUE, DEADLINE, July 15 WINTER ISSUE, DEADLINE, October 15 SPRING ISSUE, DEADLINE, January 15 SUMMER ISSUE, DEADLINE, April 15 Stories, photos, or cartoons should be sent to Al

or Teri Kelly at PO Box 23611, Billings, MT 59104 or email teray1979@yahoo.com. All materials are the opinion of the author unless otherwise stated, and are subject to being edited. All photos will be placed in the MBA Photo Ablum and can be viewed at the annual conventions. Any questions as to policies of MBA please write the President.

WEB DESIGNER

Lyle Hebel www.pixelelk.com

Liberty Brown Branding Iron Marketing

MEMBERSHIP INQURIES

Please send new memberships or renewal memberships to MBA Tresurer, PO Box 23611, Billings, MT 59104 or call 406-697-7668, register online at www.mtba.org or ask a member.

MAGAZINE DESIGN

K Design Marketing, Inc. 1613 South Ave. W. • Missoula, MT 59801 kim@kdesignmarketing.com 406-273-6193


TABLE OF CONTENTS VOL. 44 #1 Fall 2016

PAGE

PAGE

PAGE

PAGE

On the Cover

2

EDITOR’S NOTE

4

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

Teri Kelly Marlon Clapham TREASURER’S MESSAGE

Jenn Schneider

5 6 12

15

MBA MEMBER SPOTLIGHT BLAST FROM THE PAST

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THE JINKS IS BROKENNT

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MONTANA YOUTH

Brian Koelzer

CONSERVATION EDUCATION EXPO 2016

1ST VICE RESIDENT’S MESSAGE

SteveSchindler

LETTER FROM A LONGTIME MEMBER

Dennis Price

REGIONAL REPORTS LEGISLATIVE REPORT

19

BUSINESS & CLUB MEMBERS FWP COMMISIONER CONTACTS

BOWHUNTER EDUCATION

Here is Ed Evans, at the age of 70, with his 320-inch bull from last fall.

13 14

VOTE NO ON 1-177 2016 CANYON FERRY CARP SAFARI

20 21

MBA MEMBERSHIP FORM MEMBER GALLERY

Fall 2016

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EDITOR’S NOTE

Teri Kelly

Teri Kelly

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Montana

BOWHUNTER

WWW.MTBA.ORG


For all those who purchase the plate, the MBEF would like to invite you to send us a photo of your plate on your vehicle. Be creative, include yourself, pets, family, trophies of all sorts, etc.

Photos will be posted on the website. www.mtbowhuntermuseum.org

Fall 2016

3


OFFICER’S REPORTS

President’s

MBA Committees

Message

Legislative:

T

he summer is sure flying by. It seems it was just last week we at Fairmont for the convention. The Carp Safari had a great turnout, the weather didn’t cooperate, so the fish were tough to see, but we all had a great time. I think we even made a few bucks.

Jerry Davis, Chair Steve Schindler • Ray Gross Marlon Clapham • Dan Moore

Tentatives:

By now most everyone has heard the FWP asked us to drop the deadline Marlon Claphman of July 31 for Bow-Ed. After a lengthy discussion we felt it would be in our best interest to drop the deadline. Other states offer on-line classes with no field. So we will try to keep the quality of our classes and have some input on the agenda to keep Mt. folks from jumping to another state. Things are already starting to heat up on the legislation front. There is a group of antis trying to get public lands banned from trapping and next on their agenda are bowhunting and all hunting. I will attend a with a group of all outdoor sportsmen and women to help formulate a plan to defeat I-177. The Trappers Association will be taking the lead on this as they are first to lose their place on public lands. I will have updates as these meeting go forward and we have more information. I also have been in contact with the Blackfoot Clearwater Stewardship Project as they move forward. This group has been a key factor in keeping those public lands in that region open for all kinds of uses, hunting fishing logging just to name a few activates. It seems the US Gov. is trying to intervene and get their hands on a twenty year management program that has been very successful handled by the locals. There will be major changes for the 2017 Convention. All the regions will be working together this time to take the pressure off one spot. Your Rep. will be keeping everyone up on the details. Joelle will be the chair and keep us all on our toes. Well I think it’s time to start planning an elk hunt over in the Breaks, Merri hasn’t got to hunt anything for a couple of weeks now so she’s chomping at the bit. She did harvest a fine red-brown Black Bear over in Idaho, so that calms her a little. Keep-Em Sharp and Shoot-Em Straight

Marlon Clapham

PS The last is me hard at work. Retirement is tough.

Ray Gross, Chair Paul Martin • Mark Schwomeyer Marlon Clapham Steve Schindler • Dan Moore

Steve Schindler

Financial:

Jerry Davis, Chair Jenn Schneider • Seth Rogers Ray Gross • Neil Maier

Landowner/Sportsman: Mark Schwomeyer, Chair Dan Moore • David Moon Neil Maier • Bob Morgan

Nominations:

Steve Schindler, Chair Al Kelly • Paul Martin

Awards:

Roger Peffer, Chair Al Kelly • Steve Schindler Marlon Clapham

Membership:

Chair, vacant Joelle Selk, Membership assistant Jenn Schneider Seth Rogers • Ray Gross

Convention 2016/2017: Brian Koelzer, Chair Jenn Schneider • Sean Dunn Joelle Selk • Barrett Haugan

Treasurer’s Message

I

’ve now been doing this job for 6 years and just thought I had it figured out... I guess it’s a lot more like parenting than I anticipated. As we grow and change as an organization, our needs and processes have to change too. We have decided to have next year’s convention at the same location and ask the chairperson to move regions as the entire state helps gather donations and such. I feel and hear lots of tension between the “what we used to do’s” and the “well, we need to start’s.” The main point being that we all want the same thing for this organization, its survival and essential influence on the seasons of bow hunting that we know and love. The way we get there might not be how you saw it going, or even how I saw it going, but throwing your hands in the air and walking away from it certainly won’t get you anywhere...much like my toddler. So I’ll take my own advice and maybe it can do you some good too. Stop whining, use your big person boy voice, let’s find a solution, and it will all work out. Looking forward to hunting season this year, hope you get out, get a shot at something and at least kill a predator (or two).

Jenn Schneider

Magazine:

Al & Teri Kelly, Co-Chairs Steve Schindler Roger Peffer • Joelle Selk Brian Koelzer • Jerry Davis

Website:

Webmasters Lyle Hebel Jenn Schneider • Liberty Brown

Carp Shoot: Joelle Selk, Chair

Bow-Ed:

Al Kelly, Chair Marlon Clapham • Brian Koelzer Bob Morgan • Mark Schwomeyer David Moon • Ray Gross

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Montana

BOWHUNTER

WWW.MTBA.ORG


OFFICER REPORTS

Steve Schindler

First Vice

President’s

Report

S

ummer is in full swing and so far it has been pretty good weather wise. A few big thunder boomers passing thru, we have had good rains and the crops and the horns should be looking good. As most of you know this fall is an election fall, I pretty much stick to sportsmen related issues and the transfer of Federal Lands to State control is a hot topic. Most all the sportsmen’s groups I know of are dead set against the transfer, and I guess I am too. I don’t see how the state could afford to manage these lands and not go broke. I’m guessing the first big fire will bankrupt us. I certainly do not like some of the decisions handed down from Washington DC, but I’m not sure the alternative is any better. If you get a chance to speak to any of the politicians on a state or national level please ask them their position and tell them yours. Make sure your local politician knows you are a Bowhunter, a Sportsmen and that you do not like them screwing around with your public lands. You might also tell them any fish and game issues should NOT be decided in the state legislature, we have a Fish & Game Commission that does that job. It’s very scary to sit in on a Fish & Game hearing in either the House or the Senate and have somebody introduce a bill that is counter to good sound biology. What makes it scary, is that you will have 10 to 15 legislators in the Fish & Game committee who, at best, have a very casual interest in actual Fishing and Hunting issues and they will listen to testimony for 30 minutes and then make a decision. These issues need to be vetted, with the State Fish & Game commission at least the issue gets its time and are looked at pretty closely, and even then we sometimes get the short end of the stick. Make a special attempt to find out who your friends are and give them your vote.

Steve Schindler

Fall 2016

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REGIONAL REPORTS

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AL KELLY

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BRIAN KOELZER BARRETT HAUGAN

We’re coming into a hot year legislatively with elections and all the bills that we will see popping up headed for Helena. I-177 has gathered enough votes to qualify for the November ballot. For all of you that don’t know what I-177 is about, it would ban trapping on public lands in Montana. Bad news. First trapping, then bowhunting, as we are as hot on the radar of the anti’s.

W

ell here it is mid-July already as I write this and bow season is just around the corner. I have been out scouting and found a couple of new wallows so we shall see what the future brings. The carp safari was a kick. I did shoot a couple of carp and had a great time. There were a lot of shooters there but the wind and clouds made the carp hard to see. The camping was a fun break from work even though it was short. I will definitely plan more time for this next year.

There is little doubt that a crossbow bill will be thrown out there, but in the meantime the MBA will be keeping everyone posted as the bills pop up. Our rights are being chipped away at from every angle right now and the only way to keep what we have is to be vocal. Enough doom and gloom. Antelope are just around the corner!!! Here is to a fun, safe, and successful hunting season. Keep’em sharp, Brian

Brian Koelzer

The political season is in full swing and the candidates have been narrowed down. Have you contacted the candidates and see where they stand on hunting issues, and public lands access? Remember now is the time to make a decision because the election will happen not long after you read this. Two of our forests have made travel plan choices and they are very disappointing. Instead of a balanced plan, more roads and trails will be closed for access. We all need to get involved to be heard at these sessions. Private lands are being bought up and closing access to large public lands behind them such as the Wilkes brothers in eastern Montana. As most Bow Ed instructors have been informed the July 30th date as the last date to have your Bow Ed classes complete has been removed. Classes can now be taught year round. This does not mean you have to teach past the July 30th date but you can if you wish to. I am still looking for a second region 2 rep to help with the area. If you are interested please contact me.

Al Kelly

I hope your summer has gone well and you are ready for bow season to begin.

Neil Maier 6

Montana

BOWHUNTER

WWW.MTBA.ORG

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H

Al Kelly

REGION REGION

ell by the time you all read this summer will be slipping away and the sacred month of September will be upon us. I’m not one to wish away the warm weather but seeing the bucks in full velvet is starting to get me excited!

ere we are another bow season set to start. I hope you drew that tag you were after and your broadheads are sharp. This is always a busy time of year. There are all the honey do’s to get done for one’s family, all those projects at work you want to put to bed before the season starts and all that gear to get ready before you hit the woods. Like I said, it is a busy time of the year.

Keep em sharp

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Neil Maier

I so look forward to this time of year. I am thankful for those who came before and worked hard to make sure that we could have this special time of year. If it means as much to you please give some thought to how you can participate. It really is an organization where one person cannot do everything, we need many people to all do a little-a piece, that together with others, adds up to the business that is the Montana Bowhunters Association keeping our opportunities that we so treasure. Let us work together so our kids and grandkids will experience the joy that is bowhunting.

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NEIL MAIER

Friends,

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Brian Koelzer


REGIONAL REPORTS

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all is almost here and I hope everyone has been shooting bows and sharpening broadheads in preparation for the upcoming season. This fall will be exceptionally exciting for me in that my son will be eligible to hunt this year through the apprentice hunter program. His nervous anticipation is infectious and our archery practice sessions have been fun and fruitful. I can tell that with or without success, we will have a terrific season. I am very curious to see the effects of the shoulder seasons here in Region 4. The general consensus from other bowhunters that I have talked to is negative and I have mixed emotions. On one hand, I am happy to bring my daughter elk bowhunting a week before school starts, but on the other I am nervous to have a rifle season immediately before the archery season. I guess we will just wait and see how the chips fall. Please make time this fall to take a kid out in the field…it will renew you.

Stephen LePage mbaregion4@yahoo.com

T

his is all new to me so bear with me. Hi Roger Licht from Stanford area and new region 4 rep. I am 53 years old and my wife Jodie and I have 3 kids and 4 grandkids. I have been in the Stanford area for 16 yrs. I grew up hunting, fishing and trapping in the Dodson area. I joined the MBA a few years back and have enjoyed the newsletter and stories. I have enjoyed the banquets and the people there. Because I have more time now I thought I would start giving back to the MBA. Things are changing fast, we just need to slow down a bit and enjoy the great outdoors Montana has to offer.

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JOHN GRIMSTAD

STEPHEN LEPAGE ROGER LICHT

Best Regards,

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s I sit on my patio drinking a cold one I can’t believe that hunting season is fast approaching. Over the past month I have reached out to all the past and present region 5 members we had emails for. I heard back from 6 or so. Some of the ones who are not members said one reason they stopped being a member is because of the lighted nocks issue. Several said they didn’t feel the MBA was listening to them and was doing what the board members decided. So now I think we (region 5) members and non-members should have a get together. We should meet one another and discuss all concerns and how to move forward. I am going to ask for help on this and see if I can spread out the names and we call each and every one inviting them to join our get together. I was hoping to accomplish this by August, but I don’t see that happening then it will be hunting season. So I am thinking this will have to be in January. I attended the “Forum for protecting Montana’s Public land” when it was here in Billings, and it was good. All 3 Montana politicians either had a video or had a representative read their stance on public lands. Jon Tester stated repeatedly he strongly supports public land and will not support any transfer or sale of these lands. Steve Daines stated he supports public lands but with timber reforms, balance management. Ryan Zinke supports the LWCF (land water conservation funds) and would never give/sell public lands.

is the American Lands Counsel. Randy Newberg is a passionate advocate for public land and a very knowledgeable individual on this matter. Of course most of you know this. Yes, I might have a man crush on him! First Lite was also there and knows where their bread is buttered when it comes to hunters and their clothing. Without public land they wouldn’t exist. This forum was put on by “The Center for Western Priorities” if you want to look them up. Please get involved when it comes to public land staying in federal control. Montana cannot afford to manage all the federal land within its borders so it will have to be sold and we the people will be left out. I really want to hear from any and all region 5 members! And if you are willing to help out let me know so when it comes time to make a few phone calls I can count on you. Good luck this fall and may your freezer be filled and you enjoy what God and this great state has to offer!

John W. Grimstad John W. Grimstad

The big group behind the push for selling or giving the states the public land (knowing the states cannot afford to keep the land)

My email is Licht@Roger@yahoo.com if you have anything you want to talk about. I Hope everybody had a great summer, hunting season is just around the corner.

Roger Licht

Fall 2016

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REGIONAL REPORTS

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It is the time of year to get all your gear ready. I was busy making arrows and a bow this summer. It seems like you can never have enough arrows ready to go as they do get broken during practice. Most of the stuff I made was kid’s archery equipment. If they want to shoot I sure do not want them to be short of equipment. I still need to make my daughters new bow as my wife wants hers back. I have talked to a lot of people who drew some good tags. They are excited to get out there this year. I have not even gotten in much fishing yet this year and it will soon be the start of antelope season.

David Moon

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JERRY DAVIS

BOB MORGAN

ith the wet spring and summer there should be plenty of food for the wildlife. The grass is still green around here. Hopefully the animal numbers are on the rise. I know that when we went spring bear hunting I saw lots of elk. I know a lot will move onto private land come hunting season, but still, I do not ever remember seeing that many on a spring bear hunt. We also saw a total of four other people out hunting. In the past I have seen very few other hunters out after bear in the spring. We saw a good number of deer and a few moose also. Seemed to see everything, but what I was hunting for.

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DAVE MOON

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n the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. He gave man dominion over the beast of field. He said love and help your neighbor, and pray for your enemies. In the Bible Isaac tells Esau taken your bow and quiver and get some venison. I thank God for the land and the creatures that he has created that we can enjoy and hunt. And the blessing of our hunting partners, neighbors and friends. Thank you Lord for the invention of the bow and arrow, and man’s creativity. We should all thank God for the beautiful sun rises and sunsets, the mountain, the valleys and streams. So let’s enjoy the hunting season this year with our friends and family. And remember CBS close broadside and standing still. The first sentence of the above is the Bible verse my 4 1/2-year-old granddaughter recited at our family reunion at Flathead Lake. Genesis 1.1 It all starts when we are young.

Bob Morgan 749-0706

Dave Moon

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ossibly by the time you read this I will be on a goat hunt. After a lifetime of applying for a goat permit I have drawn one. I was getting to the point of considering not putting in because I am at the age I must also signup for Medicare. Well I drew one this year and now I have to develop some strategy. It is in an area that I somewhat knew as a younger man when I used to backcountry ski and backpack But I am considerably older now and I have a much better understanding of my limits. Also I neither own horses nor do I have friends crazy enough to go with me. For those reasons I hired an outfitter/guide service. I have never used either of those services in Montana, though I have used guide and outfitting services in Nepal, Ecuador, and the Galapagos for other than hunting pursuits. During the legislative sessions many would think I may be adverse to outfitters and guides, but the opposite is true. My aversion to outfitters is for those that wish to obtain private land leases for the express intent of blocking public access to public lands.

Truly qualified and licensed outfitters and guides provide a valuable service to the recreating public. They allow people unfamiliar with wild country to safely access wild places for fishing, hunting and sightseeing activities. Quality outdoor experiences by novice and experienced outdoor persons alike lead to greater support for the protection of our public lands. Though I may or may not take a goat I hope to once again enjoy the high country and to recharge my batteries for the upcoming Legislative Session.

Bob Morgan

Dave Moon

Speaking of Legislative Sessions I might just talk about that. In June I sat in on the initial meeting of Montana Sporting Organizations coalition. Representatives were there from the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, Ducks Unlimited, Montana Wildlife Federation, Pheasants Forever, National Wild Sheep Foundation, Montana Wild Sheep Foundation, Trout Unlimited, Mule Deer Foundation, Montana Sportsmen’s Alliance, and Montana Bowhunters Association. There was also talk of asking Backcountry Hunters and Anglers, National Wild Turkey Foundation, Boone and Crocket Club, and Safari Club International to also join this group. During our discussion several possible issues that may become bills during this Legislative session were identified. One issue may be archery equipment. During a Commission meeting earlier this year MBA submitted a tentative rule change to address the use of lighted nocks during Archery-Only season.

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BOWHUNTER

WWW.MTBA.ORG


REGIONAL REPORTS

In all probability there will also be a bill sponsored by MWF to increase the funding for Block Management, something I think we all can get behind. The FWP budget also needs to be adjusted to allow more FTEs, full time employees. More FTEs are needed for management of Block Management Areas and Shoulder seasons as well as other programs including enforcement.

Jerry Davis At that same meeting another individual presented a proposal to also allow the use of crossbows for handicapped hunters during Archery-Only season. After some discussion the Commission determined that they could not promulgate a rule change allowing lighted nocks without also addressing crossbows. For that reason the Commission tabled both the MBA tentative and the crossbow proposal. In lieu of acting the Commission has convened an Archery Technology group made up of several MBA and TBA members to develop a policy to address these and future requests for equipment allowances. If these efforts are not successful in all likelihood we will be seeing bills specifically addressing the use of lighted nocks and cross bows during the ArcheryOnly seasons. Even if efforts are successful there may be bills for crossbows.

There may be a bill removing the performance criteria that is now used to evaluate whether or not a shoulder season is effective and if it should be continued. Without these criteria shoulder seasons will simply become an extension of hunting seasons, and will have a potential to cause irreparable harm to elk populations. If we are to continue to have shoulder seasons the evaluation criteria must remain. Shoulder seasons’ primary function is to manage elk populations that are at or above objectives and not to simply allow for additional opportunity. Probably more important is that shoulder seasons are hunting regulations and as such they are the responsibility of the FWP Commission and not the Legislature. There was discussion about getting FWP to focus on giving greater weight to carrying capacity when setting shoulder seasons. At this time it appears that landowner tolerance is more heavily weighted than the capacity of the lands elk inhabit when elk objectives are set. But I feel this issue should be presented to the Commission and not handled legislatively. Most likely we will see some bills proposing the transfer of Federal Lands to the State of Montana. Even if one of these bills were passed it is doubtful

that it would hold up legally. Montana’s Federal lands belong to all citizens of the United States not just Montana citizens. In my opinion I think sponsoring such bills is a waste of our very limited Legislative session time. If such a transfer were to occur it could have some significant negative impacts to the Montana State Budget during a bad fire year. This in turn could lead to the sale of public lands to private hands to pay for fire suppression efforts. During the last session a bill was passed that put a moratorium on FWP purchases of fee title to lands under the Habitat Montana program. That bill sunsets next year and there may be bills both to extend the moratorium as well as bills to end the moratorium. FWP must have the ability to purchase lands critical to wildlife. Having the ability to purchase fee title is simply another tool to be used in the management and conservation of our wildlife so the moratorium must be ended. There will be a bill drafted by RMEF to provide an exception to the state’ credit gaming statutes that address raffle tickets sold by nonprofits. As the session gets nearer I hope to get a clearer picture of what battles we will have to fight during the 2017 Legislative Session. But for now I am focusing on a goat hunt and regardless of my ability to harvest a goat, the hunt will be a success because I will once again be wandering that country so close to the heavens. Happy Trails

Jerry Davis

Fall 2016

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Paul Martin

REGIONAL REPORTS

DirectorsAt Large

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ith this issue of the MBA magazine, we are now rapidly approaching the fall hunting seasons. I wish you all great success. At this time I have drawn no special tags while friends of mine have drawn ewe, ram and even a bison tag! My success for special tags is about as good as the drawing for bows at banquet! Maybe I’ll get drawn next year?

So get out and do your preseason scouting... loose those arrows and tune that equipment. Shoot straight and have a wonderful season. Be safe. But now on to a serious note... in November there will be a very important election. In particular sportsmen and women MUST pay close attention to issues related to hunting access, streamside access, funding for FWP, block management funding, and whether or not ownership and management of public lands (including our coveted National Parks) are going to stay in the hands of the public or be sold off to the highest bidder. PLEASE... educate yourself about these issues. Talk to the candidates and pay attention to any debates and public forums. Check the sportsmen’s alliance conservation voting records. Which candidates want to cut or freeze wildlife funding? Who wants to stop funds for block management? Who voted against the corner crossing bill? Who tried to throw out our stream side access law? The people that do not support funding our Fish Wildlife and Parks, access to public lands and wildlife habitat need to be sent packing or not allowed into office in the first place. Some crazy extremists entered into the MT legislature over the last several years that wanted to privatize wildlife, defund FWP, and block or hinder public access to public lands. And don’t forget to pay attention to our state Supreme Court election. Why are out of state dark money groups pouring huge amounts of money into Montana’s Supreme Court race? What do they expect for their investment? They are endorsing the candidate with minimal experience and the candidate would vote to overturn streamside access law. If you support the wrong candidate that votes against your self-interests as a sportsman/outdoor recreationist you have simply shot yourself in the foot. Once our public lands have been sold off we will never get them back. I do not want to live in a state like Texas where there are no public lands and hunting is only for those that can afford the fees to hunt the privately owned lands. Don’t let this happen to Montana. Montanans cherish our public lands for recreation. Let’s keep these public lands public. Get involved. Get educated. Get registered. Go VOTE! I am a sportsman and I VOTE!

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his is my report on the Spring Bear hunting season here in Region 1. In 2016 343 bears were harvested in comparison to 2015’s 367 and 2014’s 340 bears. This tells us that we have a very stable population of black bears here in Region 1. Due to being overly busy with the MBEF obligations, I limited myself to just the last day of Spring bear, which is one of my favorite hunts, and possibly kill a bear with my Cocobolo bow. Six miles in on one of my old favorite gated roads, with only a few more minutes of legal light I got a shot at a nice chocolate black bear. For those of you who may not know FWP no longer tests the meat for trichinella, they just recommend that you cook it to 160 degrees. Those bear burgers are just delicious, but best of all I now get to call the Cocobolo bow the Cocobolo killer. At the time of writing this report we will have officially started construction of the pavilion/barn at the MBEF property that will be used for club and group meetings, all youth groups, and future archery/bow hunting seminars, and storage for the field targets. We want to thank all the supporters of the MBEF through the purchase of the Bowhunter license plate, this is a big step towards building the museum/education center. The MBEF hosted the 2nd annual PRE-SEASON COUNT DOWN SHOOT put on by the Flathead Valley Archers. This is a 40 target 3D shoot with awards and the introduction of a new class of competition. The new class was shooting a compound bow one day and a traditional bow the next day for a combined total score. This shoot took place on July 23 & 24; this is an annual event so if you missed this year we hope to see you there in 2017. We will be out hunting, shoot straight, help one another, put some meat in the freezer and enjoy our bowhunting heritage.

Paul Martin

Roger Peffer Ray Gross

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ow hunting season is right around the corner. Archery antelope opens August 15, archery elk for deer and bear open September 3, and if you were lucky enough to draw a special permit for big horn sheep, mountain goat, or moose, September 3 or September 15. Drawing a limited archery elk permit is also icing on the cake. I put in for HD 410 and am looking forward to a great hunt in new country. A Montana resident has great odds of drawing a limited archery elk permit every year. Being a bowhunter in Montana is exciting.

Ray Gross 10

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REGIONAL REPORTS

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I

have been a bowhunter for about 30 years. During that time I have served in various positions, committees, and have always been an advocate for bowhunting’s traditional values.

Tim Roberts My first step into bowhunting politics, involved trying to get a bowhunter education class. I knew it was just a matter of time until I would find my way to Montana to hunt. Even though having a previous years bowhunting license would allow me to bowhunt in Montana, I always felt that was a cop out, and if I was going to get up there, I needed to do it right with a bowhunter education certificate. At that time the hunter education department in Utah hadn’t agreed with other states, and didn’t have reciprocity with any other states. My commitment to bowhunter education later landed me in a position to serve as the Utah state chairman for the NBEF/IBEP. At a Regional Advisory Committee meeting, Utah’s way for public input to upcoming seasons, policies, etc. a man by the name of Jerry Mason, stood up and proposed that there be a Ad-Hoc Committee set up to discuss and make recommendations as to what could be used in Utah’s “primitive weapon” seasons, muzzleloader, and the bowhunt. Jerry’s, primary concern was the ability of the inline muzzleloaders and their ability to shoot further more accurately. At that time there was only one state archery organization, the Utah Bowmen Association, myself and a few others were concerned that their attitude towards anything goes would open up Utah’s bowhunting season to anything that comes along is good in bowhunting. So myself, and another guy, set up a “grass roots” state Bowhunter Organization, Bowhunters of Utah. We didn’t have many members, but we had recognition in all of Utah’s 5 Regions, and it was enough to get us a seat on the committee. Following what Montana, and Idaho, had for restrictions we were able to keep most technology out of Utah’s bowhunting season. Other accomplishments have been, serving as committee chairman as the PBS anti-crossbow committee, now called the bowhunting preservation committee. During that time, I was instrumental in bringing about a definition that P&Y, Compton’s Traditional Bowhunters, and the PBS, all signed on to and agreed to, this later brought about the Journey of Challenge video. This was later dropped by all three organizations due to petty egos, and poor attitudes. I also served as a Councilman for the PBS, and because I always believed that bowhunting, not an organization, came first, I later stepped down from that position. Through sion that ty to be al values,

the course of all this, I have come to the concluit is on a state level, that we have the opportunileaders, and set the course for preserving the traditionknowledge, and passing of skills to future bowhunters.

Thank you for your time and consideration, Respectfully,

ornings have been cool in Columbia Falls as of late, and it makes me want to hit the hills. I saw a huge grizzly just 1/2 mile from the house 2 weeks ago. It is my hope, that before I get too old, I can legally have a tag to go after it. Those of us on the FWP CAC in Region 1 are working for this to happen. It is my expressed wish that you all have a great bow season. Remember to be safe at all times; no walking with a nocked arrow on your bow like the TV idiots. They all get an “F” in my Bow Ed class. Try to keep things on a simple basis, rely more on your skills and less on all the technology that you think you need. Only take hi-percentage shots into the vital area, and limit the length of your shot. Simple words, but it may mean the future of our sport and 6 week season. Technology and success have reached a point, along with more and more pressure on the public lands, that in the near future, it may mean huge changes. Having been blessed to bowhunt since 1961, I want our seasons and sport to continue well after I pass. Even the brothers in the Boone and Crockett Club are printing more and more articles on slowing and/or halting technology into the world of rifle hunting. 1000 yard shots are now being called “killing”, and have nothing to do with hunting. Our sport has made me a better and more skilled hunter, as I love to work close into the prey animal. If something blows the stalk, you keep after it. I challenge myself, not technology, to get me into those positions to be able to get a close shot. There is nothing greater on an excitement level than to be within that danger zone with a bear, and having a shot that later is measured at 8 feet. We owe it to our game animals to take them with one shot, and a quick kill. So please keep it safe at all times, no sound shots, ID your target at all times, get in shape, and have fun. Last thought. Our Bow Ed program was founded on all classes being done by 1 August. This has always given all those students the minimum of then 1 month to get all ready to hunt. We do not need “instant” bowhunters out there. We have always been the only group that has walked the walk and talked the talk about self-policing, hunter responsibilities, bowhunter ethics, and trained bowhunters and ask those who want to be new and into our sport to be responsible enough to make classes as scheduled, which is a personal choice based on all the things they can opt to do, if they need that card. As the Father of that concept, I will not change. It is a privilege to serve my fellow bowbenders, and wish you the success you desire...

Mike Shepard Columbia Falls

Our apologies to Mike. In the last newsletter one sentence of his article ended up on the cutting room floor....”My son and daughter-inlaw Joyce are both PHD’s. I am not going into the amount of work they have done to get there, but they are both outdoor users, living in Bozeman. Ask my daughter-in-law about her time bowhunting with her soon-to-be husband, and a certain kind of bear. I chuckle, but that is me. Eric has taken a bull elk with my handmade arrows shooting his Toelke longbow. Good kids.”

Tim Roberts Seth Rogers

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his summer has been a blur, and I can’t believe it’s already time to start looking for antelope! As hot and dry as it’s been, the waterhole hunting should be outstanding. Best of luck to everyone, and look forward to hearing all about it!

Seth Rogers

Fall 2016

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BOWHUNTER EDUCATION

Bowhunter Education To quote the Father of modern Bowhunter Education;

“If bowhunting as we know and enjoy it is to survive, we must be hunters who appreciate and respect the environment in which we hunt, as well as maintain a strong desire to uphold the highest standards for our sport.” — Bill Wadsworth

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his is where Bowhunter Education came from. Pure and simple it began as an effort by early bowhunters who recognized the need to educate and police our own ranks. The MBA was instrumental in bringing this to Montana, and leading the charge was our friend Michael Shepard or as he is known to his friends “Shep”. Those of you who know “Shep” know he doesn’t have a shy bone in his body. He was instrumental in organizing the program across Montana. In the late 70’s and early eighties the bowhunting community recognized the need for a formalized introductory to bowhunting. With the advancements in technology and the large numbers of new bowhunters this was attracting to the sport things were changing fast. Wounding rates were fast becoming a concern of bowhunters and rifle hunters alike. Pictures were

starting to show up in the galleries and articles of eighty, ninety and even one hundred yard shots to harvest antelope. The early bow hunters that recognized the danger to our seasons if this was to go unchecked were the core of the creation of the mandatory Bowhunter Education in Montana and all across the land. In the beginning there were some very well thought out restrictions on what would be taught and when. Things like the importance of ethics and how they reflect on the sport. Part of these ethics involved what are reasonable shot distances and angles. Another aspect was teaching no classes after the 1st of August. It is quite obvious that this is so that students new to the sport have ample time to practice and prepare for the season. Even at that, you need to have been preparing for the season long before August 1st. Preparedness is such a big part of bowhunting that having the class finished a month prior to the general bow season should not be a burden to anyone who wants to bowhunt. One does not walk into a Bowhunter Education class a novice and emerge a fullfledged bowhunter ready to hit the woods. What we can hope to teach in the limited time we get the students is to introduce them to the skills they need to hone to be proficient in the field. Notice I said introduce, it will take time and much effort to become a bowhunter. I guess my point is I don’t see the need to change this. If you want to get into a sport that takes little time and no commitment take up Pokémon Go.

Al Kelly

Bowhunter Education Instructor Region 1

Legislative

Report

Update on MBA Proposal for Archery Equipment Policy The MBA met with the FWP Commission during its work session on May 11. We had a very productive discussion regarding equipment trends and MBA historical positions, as well as the recently expressed desire by members to relax the electronics restrictions. We are currently developing an equipment review policy and evaluation tool. The policy would establish a more detailed review process for the Department and Commission to evaluate archery equipment requests. The evaluation tool will utilize a set of questions to measure the relative merits and risks of allowing additional devices for use on archery equipment. Our goal is to enhance the Department’s and Commission’s ability to objectively review

equipment proposals in order to recommend or decline them for advancement to the Tentatives public comment period. Adoption of this policy will also assist us in defending our positions regarding archery regulations during the upcoming legislative session. We are working to finalize the policy and evaluation tool by the end of summer so it can be sent out for public comment this fall. It is expected the final policy will be adopted by the Commission in late fall/early winter. Our primary objective with this proposal is to continue promoting Montana’s high-quality hunting experience by preserving the essence of bowhunting as a challenging, close-range endeavor. The policy and evaluation tool will ensure our equipment regulations promote this ideal rather than sacrificing it.

MARK SEACAT, SITKA ATHLETE LOCATION: UTAH SHAUN MATHEWSON

TURNING CLOTHING INTO GEAR BASE | INSUL ATION | SOF T SHELL | HARD SHELL | HEADWEAR | HANDWEAR | PACKS

SITKAGEAR.COM | 877.SITKA.GR

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www.pronghornbows.com 307-234-1824 evenings 2491 West 42nd Street Casper, WY 82604


VOTE NO ON 1-177

Fall 2016

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CANYON FERRY CARP SAFARI

2016 Canyon Ferry Carp Safari

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his year’s Safari. This year’s Safari challenged archers with cooler temps and cloud cover, producing choppy, murky conditions. Carp cruised deeper under the surface, and bowfishers were forced to raise their game.

Following are the winners:

Team Most Fish Cody Gullett & Phil Churchill — 47 fish Adult Most Fish Mike Prescott — 31 fish Adult Big Fish Phil Churchill — 14 lbs. 1 oz. Adult Small Fish Sarah Allegrucci — 2 lbs. 3 oz. Youth Big Fish – (retriever reel) Jason Key — 10 lbs. 4 oz. Youth Small Fish Colter Zink — 4 lbs. 1 oz.

Youth Small Fish - Cody Zink

Adult Big Fish - Phil Churchhill

Youth Big Fish - Jason Key

Adult Small Fish - Sarah Allegrucci

We crowned a new carp princess, Calbria Briggs, who carried out her duties with exceptional royal bearing. June LePage, this year’s Bowhunter of the Year, mentored our youth participants in awarding the plaques and prizes to the winners. A carpacious amount of thanks goes out to local MBA members who faithfully helped schlep fish at the weigh-in and burgers during the awards ceremony. Joelle extends a hearty thank you to Gali Delp, Jerry and Claudia Davis, Craig Marr, Terry and Al Kelly, and the LePage Family, who donated the t-shirts and assisted with the carp princess coronation. Thanks again to Scott Reed for the plaque construction and to AMS Bowfishing, who donated the Retriever reel for the lucky youth recipient.

Carp Princess - Calbria Riggs

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Team Most Fish - Phil Chruchhill & Cody Gullett

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Adult Most Fish - Mike Prescott


COVER STORY

MBA Member Spotlight How many bows do you own? Ed: Probably about nine.

Ed Evans is a retired pharmacist and lives in Lewistown with his wife, Phyllis.

What one piece of advice would you like to pass on to a new bowhunter? Ed: Don’t expect to kill anything for several years.

When did you start bowhunting? Ed: You mean with a license? Seriously, I was 18 years old, so 52 years ago.

Who is your bowhunting mentor or idol? Ed: Howard Hill

Tell me about your first bowkill. Ed: It was a big deer drive with Don and Bruce Davidson on the Sun River. A 4-point whitetail ran by me and I made a splendid shot at 6 feet and got the deer. That was back in ’65.

Tell me about your favorite bowhunting memory? Ed: When I got my goat hunting with Rosey Roseland on the Eastern Front. It was a long, hard hunt but ultimately successful.

Follow up question: Was that 1865 or 1965?

Who are your favorite bowhunting partners?

Ed: Shut up and get on with it.

Ed: Rosey Roseland, Don Davidson, Steve Rogers, John Fleaharty, Bruce Davidson and Steve LePage …he’s not my favorite, I just have to put up with him.

Describe your dream hunt. Ed: A leopard, a snow leopard would be the ultimate hunt.

Do you have any secret bowhunting tricks that you are willing to share?

Why do you support the MBA?

Ed: Patience, patience is everything.

Ed: It’s the voice of the bowhunter in the legislature and Fish Wildlife and Parks.

If you have a MBA member you would like to be featured in “Member Spotlight”, please contact Steve LePage at mbaregion4@yahoo.com.

Blast from the Past What was happening in the MBA in past years? Here is a blast from the past, From the January-February 1981 newsletter. Lee Poole was our president and the MBA was fighting for the early Elk Bugling season in September. Lee writes, “at this time the FWP has received more letters to save the Bugle season then to oppose it”. He adds these suggestions to members; A- Write a letter to Gov. Ted Schwinden (or send a mail-o-gram) B- Send copies to the FWP Commissioners. C- Sign the petition that you’re Area Rep. has. D- Spread the word to the land owners. E- Meet with me in Helena where we will organize for the FWP meeting. Lee Continues with, “The gloves are off! This is a fight that we all must take part in, if we are to win. Everything that we have worked for is at stake. I’m very concerned, and I need your help.” The Third Annual Banquet was held in Bozeman, And Ray Torrey, P&Y Records Chairman and guide and lion hunter, was the guest speaker from Salmon, Idaho.

Fall 2016

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Theis Jinx

MEMBER STORY

Broken By Brian Koelzer

Brian Koelzer Saskatchewan #61 bears paw bow vpa broadhead

“So the bears up there have never seen people and only view you as competition for food!” said my good friend Mike Connett as he was describing to me his spring 2014 black bear hunt to the far north of Saskatchewan. Being no stranger to black bears myself I was amazed by his story of aggressive bears that don’t care about smelling you or seeing you. On the third day of his hunt (after two days of bad weather), Mike took a 20” brute that literally chased him up his tree then circled him like a guard dog. Before Above: Mike Connett bear Below: John McDonnell with huge first day bear

hanging up the phone I told him I would be interested if he ever thought about going back…… Having hunted black bears in Montana and Saskatchewan for many years I have become quite familiar with the species and the different ways to hunt them. I’ve been fortunate to connect on a handful of nice bears but that 18” has eluded me for more reasons than I can count on both hands. I was starting to consider a trophy black bear my jinx animal. In January 2015 Mike called me to invite me on another adventure to the same camp he took his bear the spring before, in less than two seconds; I said to count me in!!! Having not hunted Saskatchewan myself in several years I was excited, but had plenty of time to prepare as our hunt was not until the spring of 2016. Fast forward a year and change; I was as excited as I have ever been for any hunt in my life as the days ticked down towards our departure. Two of Mikes friends from the east coast had to beg out of the hunt so I put the word out and John McDonall, a friend of mine from Three Forks, took one of the spots. John had never hunted Canada before so it made it even more exciting for me as we talked weekly and planned our big adventure. On May 20, 2016 we were northbound beginning our 1000 mile one way drive to parts unknown. The plan was to meet Mike and a friend of his in a small town just west of Saskatoon where we’d get some food and sleep then make the final 12 hours the next day. Two spare tires were recommended as the last 5 ½ hours to camp is on a gravel road that we were advised to drive less than 50 mph. During the last hour of our drive the road turned into little more than a cut in the bush and we saw three different bears that wandered across the road in front of us. Game time... Camp was a cluster of small log cabins on the shore of a beautiful lake teeming with pike, lake trout and walleye. Our guides, Brian and Shelly McDonald along with their son Jeremy, welcomed us and after a great backwoods supper we hit the sack with visions of giant bruins dancing in our heads. Day one dawned and it was beautiful, after coffee and breakfast we put together bows, sharpened arrows and got our gear in order. I’ve always been used to hunting bears in the evening as that is when they become the most active. It was about 10:30am or so when Jeremy asked me if I wanted to go

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MEMBER STORY hunting. I replied that yes I was looking forward to this evening and took a sip of coffee. He said that we should go hunting now and not wait for evening. Since the sun didn’t set until about 10:30 pm up there I told him I wasn’t so mad at the bears that 12 hours in a tree sounded like a good idea. His reply was that he’d come get me by 7 pm. Very strange I thought to myself. Why would we hunt the heat of the day rather than get out at prime time? I’ve found over the years that it’s best not to guide the guide, so I agreed and after getting things together we all headed off in different directions to climb into a tree. John was taken to a bait about 20 minutes from camp and literally as the quad was pulling away he saw a bear coming towards him. Being fairly green to bear hunting he didn’t want to be the guy that got all excited and shot a “huge” bear the first day only to have it be a toilet seat cover. He spent over an hour taking pictures and video of his bear before deciding that maybe it was a pretty good one and he should take it. One perfect arrow and thirty yards later he had his first archery bear. 400 pounds and 20 10/16 is a pretty good way to start the first two hours of a hunt!!! It was a good thing that fishing season opened up mid week for us and we had all bought licenses because less than two hours after John shot his bear Mike had an 18 14/16 bear on the ground and the skinning began. My bait was accessed by boat, and as we pulled up to the shore we could see three different bears around the bait. The stand was less than twenty yards from the lake and it took a little work to scare the bears far enough away so I could dart to the tree and climb the 8 feet up into my stand. Jeremy’s parting words were “they should be here soon”. Funny guy as two bears had already come back to the bait and I didn’t have an arrow on the string yet. That day was amazing as I had bears coming and going virtually all the time. One good boar who was in the low 18’s was tempting but with the action I was seeing I couldn’t talk myself into it. Bears came and went with the exception of a couple hours’ mid day when the temps got a little warm. I even had one small bear who couldn’t figure out what I was, so he climbed my tree and I had to swat him on the end of his nose, and then smack him on the head with my bow to get him to leave me alone. Day one ended with me seeing 12-14 different bears. Not too shabby! Day two ended up being warmer than the previous so it was decided that I wouldn’t go out until two or so and sit till dark. Things started pretty slow but about 6 when the shadows were starting to lengthen the action began. The same good boar that I passed the day before came in and spent a half hour or so with me. Again tempting but I was holding out for a big one. 6:30ish my resident bruin looked over his shoulder, grabbed a piece of fish and ran about 30 yards before turning and facing the bait. A reaction like that usually means somebody bigger is coming. I got ready and before I could see the new comer I could hear him panting and groaning. As he materialized out of the thick foliage I could see it was a very good bear and that he was limping badly. He approached the bait with no hesitation and I could see he had a freshly split ear, scarred face and could not put any pressure on his right front leg. For a split second I wondered what kind of beast put the “whoopin” on him but quickly brushed that thought aside as the bear in front of me was far larger than anything I’d ever taken. He paced around the bait, never offering a good shot and when he finally settled down was facing me from behind the barrel. While simultaneously waiting for a shot and trying to not turn into a slobbering sack of goo, I saw the boar I had passed on was still thirty yards behind me watching the new guy with suspicion. At about the same time the bigger boar decided he was going to walk directly underneath me and bother the little guy. As he passed barely five feet right below me I tried to turn 180 degrees as quietly as I could but he caught my movement and turned broadside at about 12 yards to stare me down and try to figure out what I was. That was all I needed and a VPA tipped arrow was on its way. The arrow passed through so quickly that his only reaction was to turn and look at the arrow sticking out of the ground then start to slowly walk away. Arrow two was on its way seconds later and after a short 60 yard run the woods were silent. The silence lasted about 15 seconds until bear #1 that I’d totally forgot about started choking on the same piece of rotten fish that he’d been chewing on the whole time. My knees were Jello and as I slumped to my seat, he walked up to where I’d shot his adversary and sniffed the arrow in the dirt. I think I saw him shrug his shoulders, then he sauntered back over to the bait and stayed with me for another hour until Jeremy made a pass on the lake and saw me waving the red bandana that meant I got one. After pictures and wrestling the beast to the lake shore we headed back to camp. The boat ride back seemed surreal as I thought back on all the years of trying for a truly big bear and finally having it all come together. After cleaning up the head and hide the next morning while having coffee I put the calipers on him and came up with 19 6/16. My guide Brian nodded and with a grin and twinkle in his eye told me maybe I could come back and try for a big one next time. I’m gonna take him up on that. Fishing season opened to next day and after two hours throwing some big spoons out we had caught three lake trout and 40 pike up to 25lbs. All in all, it was a great adventure and I’d like to thank my good friend Mike Connett for inviting me along and helping me break my jinx. Camp View Camp Mike Connett with a huge pike

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MEMBER ARTICLES

Letter From a Longtime Member Dennis Price

Montana Youth Conservation Education Expo 2016

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nce again we survived the youth of the Bitterroot Valley. We had fewer attendees this year, probably because of the weather, but there was still a steady stream of shooters. These kids love to shoot arrows and bust a few balloons. I would like to thank our sponsors with their generous donations of funds that allow us to provide the opportunity for these kids to attend conservation camps. The bowhunters across the state stepped up once again; The Montana Bowhunters the Traditional Bowhunters of Montana both stepped up their donations, and Paul Martin and Montana Bowhunting Education Foundation donated another youth bowhunting package to Briana McCartney as it was her 13th birthday making this a very special day for her and her family. A little information on the camps we send the lucky winners to. We lost several spots to camps we had sent kids to in the past. Because we didn’t want kids to lose this opportunity we got together and started our own camp. The USFS gave us the use of an old camp site with several buildings along with a small kitchen. Our camp took place up Magruder and named the camp The River of No Return. We hired a cook and gathered up a group of volunteers to put together an agenda for a weeks’ worth of activities. We were ready for our camp. The camp was held the week of July 17th and the MBA handled all of the archery activities for the week. The Five Valley Archery Club supplied the camp with ten 3D targets. Other MBA members handled other activities, such as Toby Walrath taught trapping and survival, the Doyle family assisted with the archery and Back Country Horseman provided activities. As I write this the camp has not been held et so I’ll have a full update in the next newsletter as to how the camp went. Once again a big ThankYou for all the donations and help. Marlon

I recently saw a sentence that read “What has the Montana Bowhunters Association done for me?” I started thinking, well, quite a bit for me actually. This fall of 2016 will be my 40th year to enjoy bowhunting in Montana. Being one of the older longtime members of the MBA, I can tell you with no uncertainty that our bowhunting seasons were not just given to us. It was earned by a lot of hard work, endless hours of time, and a huge commitment by many dedicated officers and board members. As I write this I can see the faces and remember the names of the many people who gave so much so the rest of us can have the seasons we enjoy today. From 1979 on I went to nearly all the MBA Conventions. I participated and stayed involved as much as I could. Through MBA I bet a lot of great people and made lifetime friends. Those people gave me a lot of inspiration and motivation to keep on reaching in my bowhunting goals in spite of a few injuries I received a couple of years before I joined. I guess you could say bowhunting and the Montana bowhunters Association became a focal point in my life. Then, just like a lot of the old time members, I began to go to less and less of the conventions, I got behind on my dues and I became less involved and I can’t even give you a reason why. I still bowhunted but I had let myself get disconnected. Fortunately my grandson Jacob woke me up. The excitement in his voice and the spark in his eye when he talked about his bowhunting adventures said it all. He was hooked. It took me back to all the great times I had bowhunting with his father when he was young. Now my son is taking his son hunting and I have three generations of bowhunters in my family; all current MBA members. I attended the convention in Fairmont this year. It was good to be at a convention again, especially since I was able to share it with several members of my family. One highlight for us was to have my grandson Jacob be called up front to receive the Paul Schafer award. He was so surprised! When he showed me his plaque with his name next to Paul’s, it really hit me. Then a young woman received the Bowhunter of the Year award, which was so great to see. It has come full circle. The young people around us are taking bowhunter education and enjoying Montana’s archery season. All the dedicated people I saw working for the MBA throughout the years make this all possible. But as Scott Koelzer said when he spoke at the convention, do not take our seasons for granted. There are other groups who would like to have all, or part of our season. I know that for over 30 years crossbows have tried to be included in our season and muzzle loaders have wanted to take weeks from our season to create their own. I know Marlan Clapham is a very dedicated and hard working person and will make a great president. With the help of the hard working young people like Brian and the crew I met at Fairmont, I feel the future of the MBA looks good. We just need everyone to sign up more members. A higher number of members provides the MBA more leverage to help maintain the seasons we have. Most of the people who are bowhunting in Montana take it for granted and have never heard of the Montana Bowhunters Association, much less what it has done and continues to do for the bowhunters of Montana. So spread the work and sign up your friends, co-workers and family. Keep the MBA alive and strong. Well, I just felt like I had to tell my story so thank you for listening and thank you Montana Bowhunters Association for all that you do.

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CONTACT NUMBERS

FWP Commissioner Contacts fwpwld@mt.gov

District 1

District 3

District 5

Gary Wolfe, Commissioner

Richard Stuker, Vice-Chairman

Matthew Tourtlotte, Commissioner

P.O. Box 7323

1155 Boldt Road

940 Blonco Circle

Missoula, MT 59807

Chinook, MT 59523

Billings, MT 59105

Phone: (406) 240-7323

Phone: (406) 357-3495

Phone: (406) 698-9696

gwolfe207@bresnan.net

rstuker@mtintouch.net

mtourtlotte@gmail.com

District 2

District 4

Dan Vermillion, Chairman

Richard Kerstein, Commissioner

PO Box 668

Box 685

Livingston, MT 59047

Scobey, MT 59263

Phone: (406) 222-0624

Phone: (406) 783-8564

dan@sweetwatertravel.com

fw4buttes@gmail.com

BUSINESS & CLUB MEMBERS

Active as of August 2016

BUFFALO JUMP ARCHERY CROWN PHOTOGRAPHY DR. CAMO EAGLE RESTORATION ELK CREEK FAMILY OUTFITTERS ELKRIDGE GOLDENS FIRST CLASS OUTDOORS, LLC LIBBY ARCHERY CLUB MATABLAS GAME HUNTERS MIKE PRESCOTT STATE FARM PRONGHORN CUSTOM BOWS ROCKY MOUNTAIN ELK FOUNDATION SILVERTIP PLUMBING & HEATING SPIRIT QUEST ARCHERY TRAILS END CUSTOM RECURVE BOW TROY ARCHERY CLUB, INC. UDAP INDUSTRIES WESTERN TRAILER & MARINE SALES YELLOWSTONE COUNTRY BEAR HUNTERS ASSOCIATION

Become a Business Member of the MBA and be listed on this page every issue! For membership visit www.mtba.org.

Judy Adams

P.O. Box 5581

MT

59604

406-449-3111

Mike & Lucinda Layne Don Stein Michael Henry David Hein LeeAnn Curtis

MT MT MT MT MT MT MT

59904 59501 59833 59105 59713 59072 59923

406-752-6116 406-265-8099 406-549-1221 406-670-4366 406-475-4536

Wendy Drake Willem Frost Mike Prescott Herb Meland David Allen Scott Rice Kevin & Kim Friedman Dale Dye Patrick Hanley Mark Matheny Clyde Thomas, Jr. Joe Kondelis

PO Box 9936 Kalispell 1625 Northern Heights Dr Havre 15853 Queen Annes Lane Florence 1021 Toole Circle Billings PO Box 273 Avon 10 Grassy Flat Rd Roundup PO Box 755 Libby PO Box 1559, Lephalale, 0555, South Africa 1501 S. Russell St. MIssoula 2491 W 42nd St Casper 5705 Grant Creek Road Missoula PO Box 1103 Plains 115 Rocky Cliff Rd Kalispell 276 Grantsdale Rd Hamilton 185 Forest Rd Troy 1703 Waterline Rd Butte 1865 Hwy 2 E. Havre 255 Upland Ct Cody

Helena

MT WY MT MT MT MT MT MT MT WY

59801 82604 59808 59859 59904 59840 59935 59701 59501 82414

James Brown

PO Box 96

MT

59259

Richey

406-291-4801 27116794664 406-541-9800 307-234-1824 406-523-4500 406-756-5455 406-363-2983 406-295-9048 406-581-4856 406-265-4572 307-899-0461 406-773-5509

Fall 2016

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Do you enjoy bowhunting and our bowhunting seasons in Montana? Join the MBA to preserve, promote and protect bowhunting! What the MBA offers you: Expanded hunting opportunities through working with FWP and commissioners to preserve and expand bowhunting seasons Unified voice during legislative sessions to protect seasons and access programs while opposing efforts which seek to limit the role of FWP in managing wildlife Fellowship with others who are interested in shaping the future of bowhunting Quarterly magazine keeping you informed on local, state, and national bowhunting issues, bowhunter education, events, and great hunting stories

INDIVIDUAL MEMBERSHIP One Year $25.00 Three Years $67.00 Life $500.00

FAMILY MEMBERSHIP One Year $30.00 Three Years $81.00 Life $750.00

JUNIOR MEMBERSHIP (Under 18) One Year

$5.00

CLUB MEMBERSHIP One Year $45.00 Three Years $120.00

BUSINESS MEMBERSHIP One Year $45.00 Three Years $120.00

OVERSEAS MEMBERSHIP Add $10.00 a year to membership choice for added mailing costs

Join Today! Visit the MBA website at: www.mtba.org

20

M ontana

BOWHUNTER

WWW.MTBA.ORG

Memberships run January 1 to December 31 each year.


1

4

7

TED NESMITH of Great Falls with his first Bow antelope

2

MERRI CLAPHAM with a nice Idaho chocolate bear

5

KIM BLASKOWSKI 2015 doe antelope

8

SETH ROGERS antelope

3

MIKE SHEPARD

MARK SCHWOMEYER antelope

6

KARA JENSON Gallatin valley Tom. April 2015

LUCAS ZEMLIKA 2013 MT bull

9

JEFF KENNEDY

Your photo could be here!

10

BRIAN ASHE - 2015

11

CHRIS BLASKOWSKi with his very well deserved 2015 6x6. When it was all said and done, 425 pounds of elk carried off the mountain

12 Fall 2016

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WHY EVERY MONTANA BOWHUNTER SHOULD CONSIDER JOINING THE MONTANA BOWHUNTERS ASSOCIATION • The MBA is the organization the Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks consults on bowhunting issues that affect Montana bowhunters. • Montana has the best bowhunting seasons of any of the western states. We are continually working to keep these. • The MBA is active in the Legislature to protect and fight for our hunting and bowhunting seasons and rights. • The MBA produces a quarterly magazine informing you of local, state, and national bowhunting issues and events, and publishing great stories and pictures. • THE MBA NEEDS MEMBER NUMBERS AND YOUR YEARLY DUES TO CONTINUE TO PROTECT WHAT YOU ENJOY EVERY YEAR. ISN’T WHAT YOU ENJOY EVERY FALL WORTH $25 A YEAR TO PROTECT?

What the MBA has done for you? • • • • • • •

• •

Worked to get the first archery season started in Montana. Along the way, we’ve increased the seasons to what you enjoy today. Worked to establish archery bear, lion and sheep seasons. Worked to establish archery antelope 900 tag and August 15th opener. Worked to establish archery only areas and hunting districts. Proposed a special archery wolf season and endorsed the highest quota of wolf harvest possible. Actively protects hunting & bowhunting seasons in the Legislature year after year. Defended our archery seasons against the “Crossbows & Muzzleloaders” threats throughout the years. Created the Modified Archer’s permit that now allows those with handicaps to use modified archery equipment to hunt; which kept any need for crossbows out of Montana and defended our archery seasons against other crossbow threats throughout the years. Re-established the archery season after it was left off the regulations one year. Actively works with FWP to protect archery seasons, our resources, and expand archery opportunity in Montana year after year.

Photos by Denver Bryan / Images on the Wildside

What can you do for bowhunting in Montana? Join the MBA at www.mtba.org to preserve, promote and protect bowhunting.

Spring 2015

22


Mba fall 2016 issue