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THURSDAY TUESDAY

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THURSDAY SATURDAY

Greek leaders Suing for equality win big at Bensen vs. Chapin brings same-sex regional marriage back into the state spotlight following November elections. conference Leaders with MSU sororities, fraternities won multiple awards at AFLV conference. JENNA SCHLAPKOHL

staff writer

With the pressure to succeed weighing heavy on their minds, representatives from MSU’s Greek community traveled to Indianapolis, IN. on Feb. 7 to attend the Association of Fraternal Leadership and Values (AFLV) Central Region Conference. The pressure was soon lifted at the end of the weekend when a total of five awards were presented to a handful of Maverick Greek leaders. Before attending the conference, the governing bodies for the Greek Community worked tirelessly throughout the 2012 calendar year to compile impeccable applications. Within the two councils, Interfraternity (IFC) and Panhellenic (PHC), each is divided into eight key positions, which correlate with the eight categories open for recognition. Those categories are: Public Relations, Self-Governance & Judicial Affairs, Recruitment, Council Management, Community Service & Philanthropy, Risk Reduction & Management, Academic Achievement and Leadership & Educational Development. MSU’s Panhellenic Council, the governing body for the sororities, was awarded for excellence in the areas

of Public Relations, Risk Reduction & Management, Self-Governance & Judicial Affairs and Community Service & Philanthropy. “Winning the awards proved to myself and the rest of the council that hard work does pay off,” said PHC Council President Trisha Makovsky. In the coming year, Makovsky hopes to take home the Sutherland Award, which means reaching excellence in all eight categories. On the other side, the Interfraternity Council, representing the fraternities at MSU, took home an award for excellence in Risk Reduction and Management. Last year, each council respectively returned with one award, so the jump to four by the Panhellenic Council is an exceptional achievement These five awards were not the only pieces of hardware returning home with representatives. While at the conference, two of MSU’s attendees were chosen to participate in the Oder of Omega Case Study Competition. Twenty-four teams were selected, each given a situation and were then tasked with establishing and implementing a resolution. Bridget Fischer, Vice President of Public Rela-

Greeks / page 5

web photo Gay Marriage returned to the forefront of Minnesota politics recently, as a new lawsuit could bring the battle back into the minds of Minnesotans. CHRIS HOUCK

staff writer

The results of last year’s elections resulted in the right for same-sex couples to legally marry for the residents of such states as New York, Maine, Maryland and Washington. Others that currently uphold a legal marriage for same-sex couples include Connecticut, Iowa, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont, as well as the nation’s capital. Minnesota is currently facing its own battles on the issue because of a recent lawsuit in Hennepin Country that has brought the topic of samesex marriage in the spotlight. Justin Martin, a graduate assistant at the LGBT center here at Minnesota State University, Mankato, spoke about the recent efforts of equal rights activists within

the area. “I feel like the efforts are against it at this point,” said Martin, “against the efforts marriage equality and LGBT efforts are becoming more and more of a minority group of individuals, so I think that’s a really significant shift.” In the 2012 elections, the residents of Minnesota voted to deny an amendment to the state constitution that would ban gay marriage. If passed, the amendment would not have made same-sex marriage in Minnesota any more or less illegal, but only would’ve made it more difficult to overturn it if an opportunity arrived. “It’s an important issue from the standpoint of assuring quality and equity in the state of Minnesota,” said Martin. “I think it’s really a

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benefit for everyone at the end of the day.” The lawsuit revolves around a case in which samesex couples are suing the county for its failure to issue marriage licenses. The case is considered a long-shot to succeed, with the pro-same-sex party arguing that the denial of issuing marriage licenses to gay couples violates the state’s constitution. “I think the issues that have come up recently, have really stirred people to see this as a wave towards equality,” said Martin. “They’re finally seeing a lot of progress on issues that people have been fighting for, for a long time, and I feel like we’re hitting a turning point for people. The courts are starting to line up with the

Gay Marriage / page 5

SPORTS A&E

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INDEX: SPORTS A&E

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CLASSIFIEDS

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Page 2 • Reporter

News

Tuesday, February 19, 2013T

Pope resignation Coast Guard: rocks catholocism cruise ship Benedict to become first former pope fire caused in 600 years. by leak Malfunction left thousands stranded at sea for several days.

yohanes ashenafi • msu reporter Everyday Catholics, including those at MSU, expressed their support of Benedict, as well as his successor. The Vatican will look to install a new pope before the Easter holiday. SAM WILMES chastity until marriage, and increased secularization of

staff writer

For the first time in nearly 600 years, a Pope is resigning. Pope Benedict XVI announced Feb. 13 that he will be stepping down on Feb. 28. A decision on the successor will be made by Easter, although Roman Catholic officials are considering moving the date up. Benedict, who turns 86 in April, based his decision on age and health. “My strengths, due to an advanced age, are no longer suited to an adequate exercise of the Petrine ministry,” he said. Born Joseph Ratzinger on April 16, 1927 in Bavaria, the Pope took a conservative stand on many controversial issues. Benedict focused on the

Western countries, and advocated a return to traditional Catholic teachings to counteract the changing culture. Benedict also took a stand on relativity. He equated the concept, that everyone’s morals are relative, as one of the biggest threats to the faith in the 21st century. He also denounced the commercialism of today’s culture, saying that “Adolescents, youths and even children are easy victims of the corruption of love, deceived by unscrupulous adults who, lying to themselves and to them, draw them into the dead-end streets of consumerism.” Benedict took a conservative stance on the biggest social issues. On the epidemic of AIDS, he suggested practicing

rejected the use of condoms. On homosexuality, Benedict stressed preserving traditional marriage. In a speech given on Christmas Day, Benedict stressed the need to keep traditional gender roles. “People dispute the idea that they have a nature, given to them by their bodily identity, that serves as a defining element of the human being,” he said “They deny their nature and decide that it is not something previously given to them, but that they make it for themselves.” The last Pope to resign was Gregory XII in 1415 and the last one to resign voluntary was Pope Celeste V in 1294. In retirement, Benedict is

Pope / page 6

ATLANTA (AP) — A leak in a fuel oil return line caused the engine-room fire that disabled a Carnival cruise ship at sea, leaving 4,200 people without power or working toilets for five days, a Coast Guard official said Monday. Cmdr. Teresa Hatfield addressed the finding in a conference call with reporters and estimated that the investigation of the disabled ship, the Carnival Triumph, would take six months. Hatfield said the Bahamas —where the ship is registered, or flagged — is leading the investigation, with the Coast Guard and National Transportation Safety Board representing U.S. interests in the probe. The vessel was in international waters at the time of the incident. She said investigators have been with the ship since it arrived Thursday in Mobile. Since then, she said, interviews have been conducted with passengers and crew and forensic analysis has been performed on the ship. She said the crew responded appropriately to the fire. “They did a very good job,” she said. In an email after Monday’s conference call, Coast

Guard spokesman Carlos Diaz described the oil return line that leaked as stretching from the ship’s No. 6 engine to the fuel tank. A Carnival Cruise Lines spokesman said in an email Monday that the company agrees with the Coast Guard’s findings about the fire source. Andrew Coggins, a former Navy commander who was a chief engineer and is now a professor at Pace University in New York and an expert on the cruise industry, said the fire could potentially have been serious. “The problem is the oil’s under pressure,” he said. “What happens in the case of a fuel oil leak where you have a fire like that is it leaks in such a way that it sprays out in a mist. In the engine room you have many hot surfaces, so once the mist hits a hot surface it will flash into flame.” If the crew hadn’t reacted quickly and the fire suppression system hadn’t worked properly, he said, “the fire from the engine room would have eventually burned through to other parts of the ship.” Engine room fires that can’t be suppressed generally result in the loss of the entire

Cruise / page 6

The MSSA will be holding an election for the following positions:

• College of education • cOLLEGE OF ALLIED HEALTH & NURSING • STADIUM HEIGHTS • JULIA SEARS RESIDENCE HALL • GRADUATE STUDIES Elections will be held Wednesday, February 20th in CSU 238

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Tuesday, February 19, 2013

News

Reporter • Page 3

Round three: North Korea tests nuclear bomb

Rogue state continues to ignore United Nations sanctions, despite disaproval from key allies.

web photo North Korea’s lastest test has brought global condemnation upon the rogue state, as it continues to pursue a nuclear program in the face of overwhelming sanctions from the United Nations.

DAN MICHELS

staff writer

Cue the United Nations’ condemnation. Cue the United States’ and South Korea’s disapproving remarks. Then bring in the next round of sanctions and metaphorical slaps on the wrist to bring us back to the beginning of the cycle. Such has been the case for North Korea’s latest foray into nuclear weaponry. In what Pyongyang is describing as a “self-defensive measure,” the rogue nation successfully deto-

nated a nuclear weapon at one of its northeastern test sites. Announced around a month ago, the test is the third major nuclear test conducted by the rogue nation. The test succeeds previous nuclear tests in 2006 and 2009, as well as a December rocket launch. In an ironic twist of fate, the test comes in response to U.N. sanctions and will likely garner more – you guessed it – U.N. sanctions. As is tradition, the U.N. condemnation arrived promptly. U.N. Secretary Ban Ki-Moon

referred to the most recent actions as a “grave violation” of UN Security Council resolutions. In the aftermath of the test, the United Nations Security Council also held an emergency meeting on Tuesday. Meanwhile, individual nations weighed in on the events in their own way. In the United States, North Korea’s self-proclaimed number one enemy, the most recent test drew attention in Tuesday’s State of the Union address. President Barack Obama addressed the actions

briefly in his speech. “The regime in North Korea must know, they will only achieve security and prosperity by meeting their international obligations,” remarked President Obama. “Provocations of the sort we saw last night will only further isolate them.” Neighboring South Korea also chimed in. For some, the event almost seemed routine. UK Guardian’s South Korea correspondent Jonathan Kaiman reported that once news of the test broke out, “young Koreans in its brandname clothing stores and trendy restaurants collectively winced, sighed and went on with their lives.” One South Korean tour guide even expressed more dismay for the financial fallout rather than the potential nuclear fallout. “You know the price of instant noodle stocks used to go way up every time this happened.” The man went on to explain that in previous instances, South Koreans would stockpile food and other essential items in the immediate aftermath of North Korean nuclear threats. The ensuing panic would drive prices for such goods sky-high. Market stability prevailed in the latest affair, suggesting almost a numbing effect. Still, leaders and others remain concerned. In a statement made through her spokeswoman, South Korean president-elect Park Geunhye, the nation’s first female

president, condemned the test. “North Korea’s nuclear test is a grave threat to the Korean peninsula and international peace, hampers inter-Korean trust-building and undermines efforts for peace.” While the initial reaction doesn’t appear to be as profound as those elicited by previous nuclear tests, panic has still set in for many. “I worry about what just happened,” explained Doo Bong, a 27-yearold part-time waiter in a Brazilian barbecue restaurant. “This is a very big problem, and this new Park must be serious about it.” A brief synopsis of the test certainly does warrant some degree of concern. Although the size of the seismic activity caused by the bomb paled in comparison to the 20 kiloton bomb that was dropped on Hiroshima, the estimated 6-7 kiloton explosion is an increase from the nation’s previous two tests, report South Korean officials. More alarming is the belief that the device used this time is reportedly smaller than those used in previous tests. If North Korea was not bluffing and the device is indeed smaller, the test could serve as a stepping-stone to North Korea ultimately developing a warhead small enough to arm a missile. In such a scenario, the routine sanctions and slaps on the wrist may prove insufficient.

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Third place in the WCHA, ninth place in attendance.

web photo The Mavericks sit in ninth place in average attendance this season, beating out only Michigan Tech, Bemidji State and Alaska Anchorage, teams that have won just 13 games this season between them. Huh? RYAN LUND

news editor

Michigan Technological University, better known as Michigan Tech, a little school smack dab in the middle of The Great Lakes State’s stories upper peninsula, is not the most famous school in the region, much less the state. They don’t routinely win

national titles, or produce large numbers of NHL-bound superstars. In fact, Michigan Tech’s biggest claim to fame over the past decade was arguably their famously entertaining pep band’s status as the official pep band of the Final Five, the WCHA’s postseason tournament. The last time that Michigan Tech won a title, Gerald Ford

was in the White House, Wheel of Fortune was the latest and greatest from NBC and Fran Tarkenton had just dueled Terry Bradshaw in Superbowl IX. And while the Mel Pearson era has brought a new spring to the Huskies’ step every now and again, the boys from the U.P. are hardly a force to be reckoned with in the ultracompetitive Western Collegiate

Hockey Association. For all of it’s frosty failures however, Tech has at least one thing going for it. In a show of devotion born of either years of dedication or the bonds of perpetual misery, the Huskies enjoy a particularly devoted fan base. From black and gold clad fans at the Xcel Energy Center in March, to a small yet dedicated contingent of fans populating every arena in the WCHA, Tech fans are consistent, and more than a little inspiring. Simply put; it takes a certain amount fortitude to shell out upwards of $30 a game to watch your team take one thrashing after another against the likes of Minnesota, North Dakota and now Minnesota State several hundred miles from home. As always, Pearson and co. attracted a small contingent of faithful Husky fans for their tilt with the Mavericks last weekend. A dozen, at most, but enough to form a black and gold blob in the upper corner of the Verizon Center, sequestered across from the pep band where they would hopefully go unnoticed by the rest of the arena. And yet despite all of that, despite their status as a large, though not terribly cumber-

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some party at Applebees, and the 500 miles separating Houghton, MI from Mankato, MN a peculiar noise could be heard over the clang of cowbells and the grinding of Mel Pearson’s teeth as his Huskies botched yet another breakout attempt in the neutral zone. “Let’s go Huskies! Let’s go Huskies! Let’s go Huskies!” I paused. I didn’t simply pause in my inner analysis of the game unfolding below, I literally paused. I paused long enough that I missed a few sloppy bits of back-and-forth at center ice, and I paused long enough to examine the make-up of the home crowd. With less than three weeks remaining in the regular season and their team scraping for its first shot at home-ice in years, it seemed to me that the oddly quiet Verizon Center was nearly half-empty. And I was right, the nights final attendance numbers were less than 3,500. A city of 50,000 and a school literally giving tickets away, and the third-best team in the conference, the ninth-best team in the nation, somehow can’t put enough fans in the seats to drown out the

Attendance / page 6

Compiled by Megan Satre

Nathanael rhody, senior

jordyn shaw, freshman

mason johnson, sophomore

victoria kyllo, freshman

casey hovey, freshman

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News

continued from 1

belief that marriage equality is constitutional and also very important. I think also, with the public opinion polls shifting so much, I think that plays a huge role to make people feel more included in society.” The case has been postponed until the end of Minnesota’s legislative session, through an agreement with the county and the attorney for the plaintiffs, and has left the issue up to the state’s legislature until the case is reopened. The decision to postpone the case has left the door open for legislatures and public

more things change, the more they seem to stay the same, which seems all the more true when looking at the history of the United States and the way in which it has dealt with the topic of equality in marriage, and Minnesota’s government is no exception. The topic of marriage in the United States is as old as the country itself. Any citizen can look through the public files of court cases and find several instances where it was illegal for whites to marry any African-Americans, any slaves, as well as retroactively stripping citizenship of es-

marriage, has brought the Hennepin Country case, also known as Benson vs. Chapin, into the spotlight once again. “The conversation about marriage continues here in Minnesota,” said Leva, “as we revisit why government is involved in marriage in the first place. Marriage isn’t about licensing the emotional bond between two people—it’s about recognizing a unique relationship that has the potential to produce a brand-new Minnesotan who deserves to be cared for and to have a mom and a dad if at all possible. We hope our amicus brief,

“I think that the more conversations that allies and the LGBT folk can have in the community is a good thing, because that’s how we change hearts and mind, at the end of the day, about what’s important.” - Justin Martin

debate about the topic, which they readily do. The organization, Minnesota for Marriage, pushes to keep marriage in the state between a man and a woman within the state and have addressed the lawsuit concerning Hennepin County on its website. In a quote from spokeswoman, Autumn Leva, she makes the argument to keep a traditional marriage in the state saying, “our government has three choices when it comes to its citizens’ conduct—it can promote, permit, or prohibit the conduct. Just because government permits sexual conduct does not mean it should promote that conduct by redefining marriage. Our government does, and should, promote authentic marriage because kids are potentially involved—and that affects all Minnesotans.” The old adage is that the

sentially anyone who married Asians due to the 1922 Cable Act. The topic of equal marriage is not an entirely new issue to Americans, with today’s debates and arguments echoing those that strove for equal treatment for a minority group since the early days of the country. “To be honest,” said Martin, “trans-folks and LGBT folks are kind of under a, sometimes, constant concern that they have to be concerned about their safety. A lot of people don’t always don’t walk around necessarily on a day-to-day basis, thinking about their security constantly.” There have always been pro-gay marriage and antigay-marriage arguments on the topic, but the lawsuit in Minnesota, as well as the state’s recent refusal of the amendment to ban same-sex

which uses Minnesota as an example, will illustrate for the Supreme Court why it should allow this conversation about marriage to continue here in Minnesota and elsewhere.” As the Minnesota legislative session continues, the debate continues on, highlighting, more than anything, the need to converse and discuss the issue. “I hope, personally, that the legislature takes up the issue of marriage equality, so that there’s a healthy debate and put the issue on the table. In the next six months, I’d like to see conversations continue. I think that the more conversations that allies and the LGBT folk can have in the community is a good thing, because that’s how we change hearts and minds, at the end of the day, about why it’s important.”

GREEKS “You can make friends with people you never would have met otherwise.” continued from 1 tions & Marketing for PHC and John Bulcock, Assistant Director of Student Activities tackled the mission head on. The duo took second place in the competition. AFLV is the largest conference of its kind. Those attending the conference were given the opportunity to network with more than 3,000 students and advisors. The conference brings in nationally known keynote speakers providing in-depth educational and leadership sessions. Breakout sessions were also offered, leaving attendees with an abundance of knowledge to bring back to their specific organizations. Seven MSU Greek members were fortunate enough to attend the conference, breaking outside of their social circles and connecting with fellow Greek members from around the country. IFC President, Jacob Moe welcomed the chance

to mingle with the large gathering of Greek students, especially with members from his own chapter. “The best part was connecting with 3,000 other Greek students,” explained Moe. “You can make friends with people you never would have met otherwise.” Along with creating new bonds, MSU’s representatives say the learning experience was beyond what they had ever expected. Makovsky described it as a “very invigorating experience,” and hopes to bring back everything she learned to her council in order to reach their goals. MSU’s Maverick Greeks are constantly setting the bar high, striving to reach another level. This acknowledgment on a national scale serves as a stepping stool, allowing the community to embrace their newfound skills and send them soaring over any goal they set.

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GAY MARRIAGE “‘The conversation about marriage continues here in Minnesota,’ said Leva, ‘as we revist why government is involved in marriage in the first place, Marriage isn’t about licensing the emotional bond between two people, it’s about recognizing a special relationship that has the potential to produce a brand new Minnesotan.”

Reporter • Page 5

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Page 6 • Reporter

News

ATTENDANCE “Mike Hastings shouldn’t be wondering whether or not he and his boys will have home ice advantage every weekend.”

CRUISE “What happens in the case of a fuel oil leak where you have a fire like that is it leaks in such a way that it sprays out in a mist. In the engine room you have many hot surfaces, so once the mist hits a hot surface it will flash into flame.”

continued from 4

continued from 3

travel-weary supporters of a team that hasn’t been relevant since MSU joined Division I more than 20 years ago. The Mavericks might not enjoy the biggest market in college hockey, they might not train in the confines of a palatial arena ala UND, or beat their chests quite as loudly as the Gophers do, but for a team on the cusp of it’s first NCAA tournament berth in nearly a decade, the Mavericks have been woefully under supported this season. I get it, Mankato is just about lukewarm as a hockey town, although it has certainly made progress in the last decade. That said, Mike Hastings shouldn’t be wondering whether or not he and his boys will have home ice advantage every weekend, they’ve earned the right to expect it.

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ship, he said. The Triumph left Galveston, Texas, on Feb. 7 for a four-day trip to Mexico. The fire paralyzed the ship early Feb. 10, leaving it adrift in the Gulf of Mexico until tugboats towed it to Mobile. Passengers described harsh conditions on board: overflowing toilets, long lines for food, foul odors and tent cities for sleeping on deck. Hatfield said investigators from the Coast Guard and NTSB would stay with the ship until about the end of the week, then continue work at their respective offices. Last week, a team of six

NTSB investigators were in Mobile trying to determine the cause of the fire. An NTSB spokesman said then that the agency could take information developed from the probe and use it to make recommendations for improving cruise ship safety. Passengers interviewed after the cruise complained about confusion in the immediate aftermath of the fire about whether to evacuate their rooms as well as poor communication about what was happening. Carnival CEO Gerry Cahill apologized to passengers late last week.

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

POPE “Regardless of who is chosen, I look forward to supporting him,” Paukert said. continued from 2 still planning on spending the rest of his life dedicated to Christ. He will move into the Mater Ecclesiae monastery, where he will pray and reflect. The duration of Benedict’s stay at the monastery is unknown. The FOCUS Missionary at Minnesota State University, Mankato’s Ryan Paukert sought to clarify what “secular news sources” had reported about Benedict’s resignation.

“Pope Benedict is stepping down for health reasons. The demands of being the Pope can be extremely taxing. It is sad to see him resign. He has been a wonderful Shepherd for the Catholic Church. I am praying for the College of Cardinals as the Holy Spirit guides them in selecting who God is calling to be the next Vicar of Christ. Regardless of who is chosen, I look forward to supporting him,” Paukert said.

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THIS WEEK IN MAVERICK SPORTS:

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

Sports

FRIDAY

FEBRUARY 22ND SATURDAY

FEBRUARY 23RD SUNDAY

FEBRUARY 24TH

reporter-sports@mnsu.edu | (507) 389-5227

11:00 am SOFTBALL........................................................ vs. Washburn 6:00 pm WOMEN’S BASKETBALL...................................vs. Sioux Falls 8:00 pm MEN’S BASKETBALL.........................................vs. Sioux Falls 2:07 pm WOMEN’S HOCKEY.........................................@ Ohio State 4:00 pm WOMEN’S BASKETBALL.................... vs. SW Minnesota State 6:00 pm MEN’S BASKETBALL.......................... vs. SW Minnesota State 10:00 am SOFTBALL......................................................... vs. Lindwood 10:00 am WRESTLING...................................... NCAA Super Regionals 12:00 pm SOFTBALL........................................... vs. NW Missouri State

FOR MORE COVERAGE OF your favorite Maverick TEAMS VISIT: MSUMavericks.com

MSU’s offensive explosion whips Michigan Tech, now in third place of WCHA The Mavericks men’s hockey team put up a combined 10 goals on the weekend to trounce the Michigan Tech Huskies and put them at a great spot in the Western Collegiate Hockey Association with just four games to play.

shannon rathmanner • msu reporter Freshman Bryce Gervais helped MSU to victory Friday night with an assist, but his highlight reel goal Saturday was the talk of the game as MSU blew past Michigan Tech over the weekend, 4-2 and 6-1. RYAN LUND

news editor

It was a tale of two teams over the weekend, as the now no. 9 ranked Minnesota State Univer-

sity, Mankato men’s hockey team swept the unranked Michigan Tech Huskies 4-2, and 6-1 in a crucial Western Collegiate Hockey Association battle at the Verizon Wireless Civic Center.

From a major gaffe by arena staff during the introductions, to a major penalty less than two minutes into the game, Friday’s victory was hardly pretty, but with just three weeks and eight possible

points remaining on the schedule, head coach Mike Hastings and the Mavericks will take it. After a five-minute boarding penalty to MSU’s Max Gaede left the Mavericks down a man for a full five minutes at 1:55 of the period, Michigan Tech freshman Alex Petan put the Huskies on the board early after a shaky start for Tech’s oft-maligned power play. Edmonton Oilers draft selection Jujhar Khaira’s wraparound chance kicked out to Petan in the slot, who bounced the rebound off the shoulder of freshman goaltender Stephon Williams to give the Huskies an early 1-0 lead. And while MSU’s historically shaky special teams had been the source of Petan’s opening tally, a Michigan Tech penalty midway through the period would provide just the sort of spark that the Mavericks needed. Sophomore Zach Palmquist got the power play going early, feeding freshman Dylan Margonari on what appeared to be a missed play at the left point, before the electric rookie walked in untouched, rifling a shot over the shoulder of Tech goaltender Pheonix Copley

to tie the game at 13:41. While fits of neutral zone action continued throughout the first, the Mavericks would once again turn to leader Eriah Hayes to break the deadlock in the second period. Hayes put his 6-foot-4-inch frame to use before the opening two minutes of the frame were out, muscling a wraparound chance on net, before working his way through the slot and snapping home his own rebound at 1:07 of the second period to make it 2-1. “I think he’s learned to take some of his attributes and use them blocking pucks,” Head coach Mike Hastings said of his star forward, who now leads Division I with 11 power play goals, and 14 overall. Hayes’ two-goal weekend moves the dynamic senior into a tie with North Dakota’s Danny Kristo for fourth in the NCAA scoring race. A pair of penalties to defenseman Nick Buchanan and left wing Chase Grant gave the Huskies a 5-on-3 power play midway through the second, but a huge effort by MSU’s penalty killers kept its onegoal lead alive through the two-

MSU Hockey / page 8

Mavericks defeat Peacocks, fall to rivals Winona State After getting back at Upper Iowa for their early-season upset, the MSU men’s basketball team dropped their saturday match to Winona State, making the two squads tied for the top spot in the NSIC.

JOEY DENTON

staff writer

After obtaining their 10th road victory this season on Friday, the Minnesota State University, Mankato men’s basketball team slipped off the helm of the NSIC on Saturday and is now tied for first in the conference after losing 75-64 at Winona State. In their 67-54 win over the University of Upper Iowa, the team wasn’t clicking offensively in the first half, shooting just 36 percent from the field and failed to make one of their nine attempts behind the three point line. With the help from their defensive play, the Mavericks were able to convert 14 of their 33 first-half points off turnovers. With a five-point lead start-

Upper Iowa No. 8 MSU

54 No. 15 Winona State 75 64 67 No. 8 MSU

ing the second half, the Mavericks put the ball in the paint and kept all the momentum to eventually lead by 16 with just three minutes left in regulation. Junior forward Conner O’Brien was a menace on the boards as he completed his 12th double double of his career with 13 points and 15 rebounds. Sophomore point guard Zach Monaghan finished with a team-high 17 points with six assists. He also was a main reason for the 14 points off turnovers as he stole the ball five times from the Peacocks in the first half. The players have a lot of confidence in their game plan and by following it, they will

be successful. “We did what we were supposed to do, what the coaches have asked us to do, offensive wise and defensive wise. We just did what we were supposed to do,” sophomore forward Assem Marei said after the win. Not only was Saturday’s game a rivalry game with the two-time NCAA champion Winona State Warriors, but both teams were in the race for first place in the NSIC, but the Warriors were prepared. With a March Madness environment, the Warriors took their first lead with 17 minutes to go in the first half and never looked back. The Mavericks

MSU Basketball / page 8

shannon rathmanner • msu reporter Senior Jarvis Williams and the rest of the MSU men’s basketball team attempted a weekend sweep after their win over Upper Iowa, but fell to Winona State 75-64 Saturday.


Page 8 • Reporter

Sports

MSU HOCKEY continued from 7 man advantage, until a wayward shot by Petan found its way behind Williams, bringing Tech to level once again. The awkward tally however would be the last time that the unranked Huskies would come close. Junior forward Johnny McInnes, himself an emerging leader for the Mavericks, put MSU on top again three minutes later, notching his twelfth goal of the season on a flashback highlight from 30 feet out. McInnes gained the Huskies’ blue line on a breakout pass from Zach Palmquist, before winding up and blasting a slapshot home from the top of the right circle, beating a visibly shaken Copley in classic fashion to put the Mavericks up 3-2 entering the third period. A pair of Husky penalties gave MSU its own two-man advantage to start the final period, but an even strength goal by Matt Leitner as the penalties expired would prove to be the difference maker. Sophomore Chase Grant’s rebound found Leitner on the left side; before the Mavericks’ leading scorer patiently worked the puck around Copley to give MSU a messy 4-2 win. “I was surprised when I got the puck and had that much room,” McInnes said of his second-period blast. McInnes’ goal, his 12th of the season, gives the Boston native 20 points on the year, besting his point totals from the previous two seasons combined. And while both teams looked crisper to start Saturday’s series finale, a surgical about-face by the MSU offense provided an announced crowd of 5,363 with its most dominant performance of the season.

Tech put Stephon Williams to work early, appearing to rattle the rookie with a pair of chances in the game’s opening moments, but after 20 minutes of back-and-forth hockey it would be Dylan Margonari, suiting up on the top line opposite Blueger and Hayes, who would open the scoring for MSU once again. Senior defenders Eriah Hayes and Evan Mosey worked the puck along the point, before a snapshot from Mosey kicked out to Margonari to the right of the goal, before the former Youngstown Phantom one-timed the puck past a sprawling Copley to give the Mavericks a 1-0 lead. The real fireworks however, were still to come. Margonari’s penalty midway through the second period put the Huskies on the power play for the first time, after ringing a rare penalty shot off the post earlier in the period, but an aggressive MSU penalty kill swung the momentum firmly back in the home team’s favor. Left wing Brett Knowles forced a turnover at the MSU blue line, setting up a two-on-one rush with junior Zach Lehrke, before the freshman’s expert saucer pass found Lehrke in the slot, who snuck the puck between the legs of Copley to make it 2-0 at 9:33 of the second period. A penalty to Tech’s Riley Sweeney a few minutes later gave the Mavericks a man-advantage of their own, as Leitner found Hayes once again, teeing up the MSU captain in the slot for a 3-0 Mavericks lead at 16:48. “They’re our leaders,” Hastings said of his high-scoring upperclassmen. “And they do it in different ways.”

Leitner continued the offensive assault as the second period began to wind down, grabbing the puck from Max Gaede as the sophomore battled in front of the net, slipping the Huskies defense and snapping home a goal to make it 4-0 and drive Copley from the net. Freshman Jamie Phillips, a 7th round selection of the Winnipeg Jets, did little to stem the bleeding after Max Gaede’s pass from the corner found Brett Knowles in front, whose easy backhand beat Phillips five-hole to make it a fivegoal differential seven minutes into the third periods. A breakaway by Tech freshman C.J. Eick got the Huskies on the board at 14:06, but a spectacular Bryce Gervais power play tally with less than three minutes to play throttled the Huskies comeback aspirations as quickly as they appeared. The 6-1 route ties MSU’s biggest goal differential of the season, following an early-December thrashing of the visiting Bemidji State Beavers. The sweep also moves the Mavericks into seventh in the Pairwise, the ranking system used to simulate the NCAA’s tournament selection process, and well above the bubble considered “safe” by most coaches and pundits, and vaulting the team into third place in the WCHA, just two points behind league-leading St. Cloud State. The Mavericks have another bye this week, before traveling to Colorado Springs to face the reeling Colorado College Tigers. The Tigers currently sit in eighth place in the WCHA following a sweep at the hands of unranked Cornell.

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

MSU BASKETBALL continued from 7 kept it close with a 30-26 deficit going in to halftime, but Winona State went on a 10-3 run to start the second half. The Mavericks couldn’t find a groove behind the three-point line all weekend as they shot 2-for-18 between both games. Junior guard Gage Wooten connected with one in Saturday’s loss to go with his 13 points and eight rebounds on the night. Marei provided 12 points and five rebounds while junior guard Jimmy Whitehead and sophomore guard Lucas Brown brought some offense off the bench with 12 and eight points. Wooten knew they were going in to a rowdy environment, but he feels they weren’t ready to play. “It was a loud environment. We didn’t come out really ready to play. We need to come back next week and get the two wins for the conference championship,” Wooten said. The Mavericks regular season will come to an end

next weekend as the University of Sioux Falls and Southwest Minnesota State come to Mankato. Tip-off is at 8 p.m. Friday and 6 p.m. Saturday. With a 7-13 NSIC record and 11-13 overall, the Sioux Falls Cougars had a weekend split, upsetting Augustana 7058 on Friday then losing 77-56 to a mediocre Wayne State. After defeating Wayne State 87-69 and losing to Augustana 92-82, the Mustangs of Southwest Minnesota State are at a 15-12 overall record and 12-8 in the NSIC. With the team sitting in fifth place in the NSIC South, they are looking for that fourth spot to enter the NSIC tournament. With a regular season NSIC championship on the line, the Mavericks know they need to get these two victories. “We need to be hungry for our last two games,” Wooten said. “We need to come out and play really hard and play good defense.”

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Tuesday, February 19, 2013

A&E

APP OF THE WEEK:

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Kind Country Plays Mean Show

TRISH BJERKE

staff writer

O

n Feb. 14, 15 and 16, Red Sky hosted their third year of Dead Days of Winter. According to www.redskymankato. com, the event is always held the weekend after Valentine’s Day. The three-day event contained two stages and more than 20 bands. Tickets were $12 for one night or $30 for a weekend pass. The vibe was very earthy and translucent. On Thursday, Minnesota bluegrass band Kind Country hit the stage along with Zach Deputy, Shakedown City, Evergreen Grass Band, Venice Gas House Trolley, Loc Da Realist and HC Da Chemist.

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Former Minnesota State University, Mankato student Max Graham is a member of Kind Country, and a previous interview gave some insight into the band and their style. Kind Country consists of six string instruments. In addition to Graham, there is Mitch Johnson, Brandon Johnson, Ed Hou, Rob Higgins and Johnny Kovarik. They’ve only been together since 2012 - but they mesh really well together. Graham describes Kind Country’s sound as “organic; not forced. There’s no real beat, we just feed off of each other.” According to their Facebook page, the group has focused on

“creating live performances with high levels of improvisation and energy,” and their goal is to “create a moment of musical bliss that can be shared by audience members and band alike.” When he was 13, Graham began playing in bands. At the age of 16, he began playing rock music with a Christian band that he was in. He had applied to schools with an emphasis on music, but ended up in Mankato. By the time he had reached college, he lost the passion he used to have for music. After a year of “skipping class and hanging out with his friends,” the music came back to him. But when asked how long he’s loved music, he replies with a genuine answer: forever. Graham plays the harmonica, guitar, euphonium, banjo and mandolin: “I can play a ukulele but I don’t really like play a ukulele. Anything with strings. Anyone can bang a drum with his or her hands. I like to sing, but really I think a songwriter is what I do best, “ Graham said. When asked what he does for fun besides playing music, he has trouble responding. “When I started playing music not just for fun, I guess I just started listening to more music,”

he said. When he was a child, his inspiration was to be an icon. “And then for my first few years of college before I was in a band and I wanted to make music but I just didn’t know how to do it, I was really inspired by like, counter culture in the sixties,” Graham said. “The idea that you could just live your life and exchange services for services… That kind of inspired me for a long time.” Lately, Graham has been listening to a lot of classic rock and The New Riders of the Purple Sage. “I like the stuff that Gram Parsons did back in the 60’s and 70’s,” he said. “Just like psychedelic/country/rock sort of stuff. “ Psychedelic is exactly what Dead Days of Winter was. “Hippy” would be another word to describe the atmosphere. A massive amount of bands doing what they do best: playing. Graham says his favorite music is music made by someone he knows. He finds the music industry a little ridiculous, stating that “the only difference between Taylor Swift and the folks at Good Night, Gold Dust is that when Taylor Swift made her first album, she had like, a million dollars to spend on it.”

“Exposure comes from having money to put into your operation,” he said. Graham just recently returned to Minnesota after spending some time in Nashville, where he played gigs and handed out his demo. “I wanted to see what it was all about,” he said. “Music is an industry there. You do music for a living down there, and here you have to pursue it as a passion.” If you heard the music and like it, Kind Country is coming out with a full-length album this spring. At least pick it up and support your local musicians. On Friday, Roster McCabe, T.U.G.G., Big Zach, Def Gone Graphic, Rellium, Prime, Style Biters, Double Dose, J Mose, Plastic Bag Boys, Joe Dro and Evil Deeds hit the stage. Useful Jenkins, White Iron Band, Cosmic Railroad, Headband Jam, Fat C, Mystery Moth, Good Night Gold Dust, Smokin’ Joe, Whispering Eye and Kali Quotes played on Saturday. Overall it was a great weekend of music for Mankato, and with such a large turnout there’s promises of a fourth year.

February 19 Home Video Release: Argo JAMES SCHUYLER HOUTSMA

web editor

A

lthough it’s currently blazing an unexpected path across this awards season, there’s still a good chance you haven’t seen Argo. That is unless you’re over the age of 40, judging by the audiences that have mainly flocked to see it. How convenient is it then that just five days before it takes home the Oscar for Best Picture you can take Argo home as well? Based off recently declassified documents, Argo is the actual account of six embassy workers who escaped the Iranian embassy at the beginning of the Iranian Hostage Crisis. CIA specialist Tony Mendez is tasked with formulating a plan to rescue the six, who have taken refuge at the Canadian ambassador’s home. Under the ploy of filming a fake sci-fi

movie, Mendez now must swiftly escort the group out of the militant country before everyone’s identity is compromised. There was a time not so long ago when the knowledge of Ben Affleck being in a movie sent shivers down the spines of even the most steadfast individuals. Amazing what a few years off and a career re-evaluation will do. Whatever weaknesses plagued his acting career years ago have now been drastically overshined by his talents as a director. And while it may seem strange, Affleck deserves the vast majority of praise here. Yes, the script is quite good and the colorful performances by Bryan Cranston, John Goodman, and Alan Arkin only elevate the movie, but it’s Affleck’s skilled guidance of the material that makes the picture as thrilling as it ultimately is and his subdued

performance as Mendez that gets the job done while allowing the other players to show off. It doesn’t happen often but when a movie makes you doubt whether the characters will make it out in one piece even though you already know the ending, like Argo does, it’s a sign of investment on the audience’s part and skill on the filmmaker’s. However, one trait Argo has shared with other Best Picture winners to a certain degree is that it doesn’t leave a lot of room for discussion. Described by one critic, perhaps too harshly, as unspectacular entertainment, Argo is undoubtedly great in all its aspects (editing/ pacing being an unsung one before now) yet lacks that one ‘WOW’ factor that plants the film firmly in your mind and sparks discussion long after. Perhaps it is supposed to be that the story is true and has

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happened within the last 45 years; if so, it seems only the 40+ crowd has caught on. Thankfully, while the movie shoots for being more straightforward and solid in its quality rather than daring, Argo doesn’t even approach the milquetoast safety of recent winners The Artist and The King’s Speech. Danger is ever-present and the blend between it and the humor of

the fake movie story works fantastically. Regardless of insignificant degrees of goodness, Argo is most definitely worth a watch, least of all to see what all the fuss is about, most of all to recognize a winner. Argo is now available on Blu-Ray/DVD and VOD, with its Redbox and Netflix debuts arriving in a couple of weeks.


Page 10 • Reporter

An Editor’s Thought:

A&E

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

Bradley Cooper must win.

EMRE K. ERKU

A

a & e editor

ccording to an ancient calendar that was created by a race of people who arguably practiced the grotesque art of cannibalism due to a lack of sufficient protein, 2012 was supposedly the final year of the world’s existence. So Hollywood’s filmmakers, who may or may not have been convinced of this legend, laboriously constructed a league of phenomenal pictures that included an all-star line-up of actors and actresses with the intention of giving the world one last hurrah. Well-known directors such as Django Unchained’s Quentin Tarantino and Lincoln’s Steven Spielberg, once again impressed audiences with films commandeered by the entertaining Jamie Fox and method actor Daniel Day Lewis. And to complement the male leads, actresses such as Sally Field and Jennifer Lawrence shined bright on the silver screen. But the most groundbreaking of all the roles in 2012’s cinematic collection, according to

yours truly, is something that shot right out of left field. Bradley Cooper in David O. Russel’s Silver Lining’s Playbook astonished critics by portraying a convincing semi-psychotic high school substitute teacher from Philadelphia, and the role arrived just in time to be nominated by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for Best Actor. This comes as quite the pleasant surprise since Cooper is known for playing meat-headed scoundrels in comedies like Wedding Crashers and The Hangover. Playbook, on the other hand, exposed the deep artistic side of Cooper’s capabilities, and it exemplified the fact that being a graduate of the Actor’s Studio is something to never be underestimated. Cooper is along side a handpicked collection of prestigious actors and actresses who share the same alma mater. From Marlon Brando to Al Pacino, Robert De Niro to Sidney Poitier, and Faye Dunaway to Sally Field, the Actor’s Studio has produced a vast population of Hollywood’s elite. And now it’s time for Cooper to add his name to the list. We all get it: Lewis is an incredible actor who discon-

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certed us with his glass-eyed Bill the Butcher in Gangs of New York, and he entranced us with the mangy left-footed alcoholic Christy Brown in My Left Foot. Denzel Washington, who is nominated for best actor for his role in Flight, has also done the same by portraying terror-inducing psychopaths in his roles in Training Day and American Gangster. But Cooper, who hasn’t really been put the test until now, has definitely enticed voters to support him winning the nomination, and he certainly has the vote of yours truly. To hell with Lewis, or Washington, or Les Miserables’s Hugh Jackman, Cooper takes the sweet cake with authority. His portrayal of Pat put this writer in a state of revelation and clarity, and not in a state of complete boredom due to listening to a regurgitation of the historical 13th Amendment. During Playbook, it wasn’t Cooper on the screen, it was a grizzly bearded misfit whose life is just about as pathless as an under bridge dwelling junkie. His anger practically uncontrollable, his love life unusual to a T, and his entire demeanor barley tolerated by most. It was as if Cooper siphoned

the characteristics of many of our crazy lives and used it to display just how chaotic things can really get, and how psychotic we all can be. Yet, what Cooper accomplished with Silver Lining’s Playbook is something divine. Through all the bullshit and the madness of being dealt terrible hands in life, he still managed to find a shred of happiness in such

a cruel world. His character proved that the prevalence of insanity in our society is a thing of normalcy. And it was Pat – not Cooper – who did this. That’s why, Mavericks, if Cooper doesn’t win the Oscar for best actor, then the truth is out there: the Academy’s system is flawed and shouldn’t be trusted. Cheers to the world.


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