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W I N T E R /S P R I N G 2 0 1 7

A PUBLICATION OF THE COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

L O O K I N G B AC K , L O O K I N G F O R WA R D C E L E B R AT I N G 6 0 Y E A R S


DEAR ALUMNI AND FRIENDS:

Welcome to the winter 2017 edition of Vision. For this issue, our theme is Looking Back, Looking Forward as we celebrate our 60th anniversary as an organized college. Inside you will find articles about our founding as a college and some of the history that preceded the birth of the College of Arts and Sciences. In this edition, we have also included a story about the Department of Geosciences celebrating its 100th anniversary. The cover photo is drawn from both the past and present of the geosciences department, with the lower left-hand portion displaying a traditional classroom of years ago. The upper right portion depicts the University today, one where males and females of all races study, learn and grow together intellectually. Led by professors such as Dr. Athena Owen-Nagel, who is pictured on the cover, our faculty is drawn from all over the country and world. They come to Starkville for many of the same reasons you did – a chance to pursue their passions, to equip themselves with the tools to change the world, and be at a campus that is unlike any other. This issue also features a story about three iconic professors, Tom Carskadon, Hank Flick and Bob Wolverton, whom I have had the privilege of calling ‘friend’ for over twenty years. These three professors exemplify one of the best things about the College of Arts and Sciences – a dedication to our students. Three men from different parts of the country quickly came to recognize that Starkville and MSU is indeed a special place. I became the Interim Dean (perhaps appropriately) on April 1, 2016, having spent 23 years at MSU as a faculty member in the Department of Political Science and Public Administration. Being the Dean of the largest, and I believe best, college has been a thrill. Sometimes people ask me what the best part of my job is, and that is always easy to answer; it is getting to know more of the people who make the College a special place. This includes our faculty who are continually making new discoveries and offering insights about our world, our earnest young students whose zeal is always inspiring, and our alumni that we hold up in an aspirational light to encourage these students and whose generosity supports so many faculty and students alike. When I look forward, I know that the next 60 years will bring even greater achievements to the College and part of this will be built on those alumni from our past who enable us to stand on their shoulders as we look toward the future. Thank you for your support of the College of Arts and Sciences and its students and faculty. Please keep in touch and come visit when you can.

Hail State!

Rick Travis Interim Dean


TABLE OF CONTENTS 16 TEACHING AND RESEARCH AWARDS

17 SOCIETY OF SCHOLARS AND DEAN’S ADVISORY BOARD

19 DONOR LIST

22 PROMOTIONS AND RETIREES

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES STAFF

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History of the College of Arts and Sciences

DR. RICK TRAVIS - Interim Dean DR. GISELLE THIBAUDEAU MUNN - Associate Dean for Research DR. NICOLE RADER - Interim Associate Dean for Academic Affairs KARYN BROWN - Director of Communication SARA FREDERIC - Director of Development SHERYL KINARD - Business Manager KATE TEASLER - Assistant to the Dean for Research HANNAH BATEMAN - Admissions Coordinator TRACY BRITT - Academic Coordinator BARBARA STEWART - Academic Coordinator NIKKI ROBINSON - Advancement Coordinator ALISA SEMMES - Administrative Assistant to the Dean GRETCHEN CRAWFORD - Academic Programs Assistant KIMBERLY RAYBORN - Administrative Assistant LATOYA ROGERS - Administrative Assistant

Student Workers:

RICHARD HILL - Student Worker KATE MARTIN - Student Worker MEGAN PECK - Student Worker BECCA SWANN - Student Worker ABIGAIL YANN - Student Worker CLAIRE WINESETT - Student Writer ANNA ZOLLICOFFER - Student Graphic Designer

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Liberal Arts Education

Iconic Professors

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Editors:

KARYN BROWN CLAIRE WINESETT

Writers:

HANNAH BATEMAN CLAIRE WINESETT

#discoveryourand IN THE COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

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10 College of Arts and Sciences Alumni

Celebrating 100 years: Geosciences

12 12

Designers:

ERIC ABBOTT ANNA ZOLLICOFFER (COVER) MEGAN BEAN (COVER PHOTO)

23 Direct comments or questions to: KARYN BROWN | 662.325.7952 kbrown@deanas.msstate.edu P.O. Box AS | Mississippi State, MS 39762

Discover Your And IS PUBLISHED BY THE COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES


LOOKING BACK, LOOKING FORWARD CELEBRATING 60 YEARS

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By Claire Winesett

The College of Arts and Sciences is the largest academic

were required to take classes that now fall under the umbrella

unit at Mississippi State University. With more than 5,000

of “arts and sciences.” These ranged from arithmetic, history

students and 300 full-time faculty members, it singularly could

and rhetoric during the freshman year to meteorology, political

constitute the state’s fifth largest institution of higher learning.

economy, geology and moral philosophy during the senior year.

Currently, the college offers 25 degree programs in 14 different

Formed in 1911, the School of General Science was the

departments: anthropology and Middle Eastern cultures,

inaugural academic unit closest to the general arts and sciences

biological sciences, chemistry, classical and modern languages

concept. During the 1911-12 term, W. H. Magruder—

and literatures, communication, English, geosciences, history,

namesake of Magruder Hall—was director of the new school

mathematics and statistics, philosophy and religion, physics

that had become the fourth on campus after engineering

and astronomy, political science and public administration,

(1902), agriculture (1903) and industrial pedagogy [education]

psychology, and sociology.

(1909).

The Mississippi Agricultural and Mechanical College—

In 1912, W. N. Logan replaced Magruder as director, followed

Mississippi A&M to most—was established by the legislature

in 1916 by W.F. Hand—namesake of the Hand Chemical

in 1878 as a land-grant institution. As the name implies, its

Laboratory—who later was named School of Science dean.

primary missions involved training in agriculture, engineering

In 1917, the school included the departments of bacteriology,

and military science. From the beginning, however, students

botany, chemistry, geology, and zoology. By 1940, it had grown

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to encompass much of the general sciences and pre-professional

He continued, “We often talk about arts and sciences being the heart

sciences that are now a part of the College of Arts and Sciences.

of MSU, not because almost every student will pass through arts and

Courses in the humanities, social sciences and the like did not yet

sciences classes at some point, but because what we teach and what we

have a particular academic home.

do is at the very center of improving humankind.”

In 1954, a survey conducted by John E. Brewton of Peabody

As it has grown dramatically in enrollment and faculty positions over

College in Nashville, Tennessee, recommended the formation

the decades, so has the College’s research productivity, Travis said. “The

of a School of Arts and Sciences from grouping the School of

most important development in the College over the last few years

Science with departments that are typically considered to be the

that will continue in the future is the growth on the research front.

“arts.” Following years of discussion and research, the Board of

Whether one measures our research productivity growth in terms of

Trustees of the State Institutions of Higher Learning approved

published journal articles or award-winning published manuscripts or

the creation of the College of Arts and Sciences on September

competitively-award external funding, the current faculty in Arts and

10, 1956.

Sciences are unprecedented in our history in terms of contributions to expanding the frontiers of knowledge.”

Dr. Rick Travis, the College’s interim dean, says “to many outside observers, the most distinctive thing about arts and

Among major events the College’s recent history are:

sciences is its diversity in terms of subjects and ideas we teach and research.”

• Opening of the A. Randle and Marilyn M. White Pre-Medical Advising Office in Harned Hall to aid students pursuing careers in

Taking as examples the four “P” departments—philosophy, physics, political science and psychology—Travis said “you get

the health-related fields; • Launching of new study-abroad programs to provide students

a sense of the scope of who we are and what we do.” While

with additional opportunities to expand their classroom learning

these academic areas are distinctly different, “what can be easily

experiences;

missed in this is the thing that unites us,” he emphasized.

• Additional undergraduate research opportunities designed to expose top students to cutting-edge scientific discoveries; and

Whatever the major, Travis said the College continues its

• Selections of Donald M. “Field” Brown of Vicksburg as a 2013

dedication “to improving the human condition, whether it is

Rhodes Scholar, and Jamie A. Aron and Natalie M. Jones, both of

through our teaching or research or service. When we do our

Flowood, as, respectively, 2015 and 2016 Harry S. Truman scholars.

jobs well, our students leave MSU equipped both with the desire

Both scholarships are among the nation’s top recognitions for

to engage in this same endeavor and the with the knowledge and

higher education students.

learning skills necessary to navigate the next 40 years of their life.”

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES | VISION WINTER/SPRING 2017

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The Liberal Arts KNOWLEDGE BOTH BROAD & DEEP By Claire Winesett

While nearly every Mississippi State undergraduate will take at least one course in the College of Arts and Sciences, there is a special

and bad behavior, virtues and vices, and the responsibilities of being a good citizen,” said Wolverton.

group of students who can call it their home. According to the classics professor, “The so-called liberal arts today A liberal arts education is too often viewed by the unknowing

are typically composed of three broad divisions: the humanities, the

as impractical, near useless or non-vocational. Yet there are many

social and behavioral sciences, and science and mathematics. Still, in

employers that appreciate how this generalist focus can provide

many cases, other subjects such as the fine arts and music are added.

invaluable skill sets in critical thinking, effective and efficient

We are, one might argue, in the same tradition of the ancient Greeks,

communication, a continuing desire and ability to pursue knowledge

producing that person who is well prepared for living a life, in

while learning about a variety of subjects and, most importantly,

addition to making a living for life.”

learning them well. As Wolverton emphasized, “We all need to know how to think well,

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Dr. Robert E. Wolverton Sr., longtime faculty member in the

how to express ourselves well, how to act well, and how to live well.

Department of Classical and Modern Languages and Literatures,

As I have written elsewhere: ‘The wisdom of the world is on the

said the liberal arts have been rooted in education and humanity for

book-shelf, read by few, understood by few who read, and acted on

centuries. “A liberal arts education is an education for a free person;

by few who read and understand.’ We ignore and de-value the liberal

liberal comes from the Latin word liber, meaning free.

arts at our own peril.”

“Although a Latin word defines it, such an education for a free

Sharing those feelings is Dr. Robert West, who noted that a liberal

citizen goes back to the ancient Greeks, who argued that a free person

arts education is designed to combine a broad education with in-depth

has certain responsibilities as a citizen of the state and as a human

knowledge on a subject of choice and interest. An associate professor

being. Studies were important, therefore, in teaching a person how

in the Department of English, he is a member of Phi Beta Kappa, the

to discern such things as truth and falsehood, right and wrong, good

oldest and largest U.S. honor society in the arts and sciences.

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“Sometimes you hear ‘liberal arts and sciences,’ but it’s all the same,” West explained. “It refers to a curriculum designed to educate students as broadly as possible. Traditionally, that means requiring them to study math, the natural sciences, the social sciences, languages, and the humanities. While students typically choose one subject to major in, they have to take courses in many others, spread out among those broad categories. “In some ways, those non-major studies contribute directly to the profession they envision for themselves,” he said. “For instance, a political science major who’s studied history, sociology and psychology is probably going to understand some aspects of politics better than one who hasn’t.” West said a liberal arts education “can prepare you for life after college in ways that aren’t so directly related to a particular profession. An awareness of many kinds of knowledge and the many ways of learning about the world we all share can make us better citizens of the nation and of the planet. It can make us better spouses, better parents, better readers, better writers. And it can help us to defend ourselves from those who are eager to exploit ignorance.” “We keep hearing that most Americans now entering the working world will have several different jobs in their lifetime; that the single career, working for the same employer for 30-40 years, is less and less likely. The diversity of a liberal arts curriculum requires students to learn adaptability, and that’s going to help them professionally,” West said. Additionally, he observed that students pursuing a liberal arts education “can’t take and pass such diverse college-level coursework semester after semester without learning how to adjust well from one perspective to another, and without learning too how to adjust well from one set of expectations to another.” Echoing Wolverton’s summation, West said those “who dismiss the value of a liberal arts education do so at their and their children’s perils. Liberal arts graduates who have developed the kind of cognitive flexibility such a broad education has required of them will be very well prepared to join this new economy.”

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES | VISION WINTER/SPRING 2017

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Tom Carskadon

Hank Flick

Robert Wolverton

THREE PROFESSORS

L E AV E L E G A C Y O F T E A C H I N G BEYOND THE CLASSROOM By Claire Winesett

Though they came from different personal backgrounds and different

the beginning of each class, Dr. C will ask if any of the students are

academic areas, three College of Arts and Sciences faculty members

celebrating a birthday that day. If they are, he calls the students to the

began their careers at Mississippi State with one point of commonality:

front of the room and sings his unique and funny birthday song while the

None knew what the future would hold.

rest of the class claps along.

Today, Drs. Tom Carskadon, Hank Flick and Robert S. Wolverton Sr. are regarded as university legends after collectively having taught and

When asked what his favorite classroom memory was during his 44 years at MSU, Carskadon bragged about his students.

influenced thousands of students over four decades at the Starkville institution.

“Collectively, it would be my students; my ‘scholars,’ as I call them, somewhere north of 40,000 of them. From day one, I have always loved

Carskadon freely admitted that he “had never even heard of Mississippi

my students. I marvel that I can actually get paid to learn and discover

State until shortly before I came here. I thought I was on my way to teach

all sorts of interesting things about human behavior, find and read

at a college in Illinois, but they unexpectedly lost their funding for the

wonderful books, and then share it with some of the brightest, most

position, and three days later I received an invitation to interview for a

interesting, most enthusiastic people in the country, who have the world

teaching job here.” He came to Starkville after completing a doctorate at

ahead of them,” Carskadon emphasized.

the University of Colorado. Flick, who retired from teaching in the Department of Communication After accepting the Department of Psychology’s offer, Carskadon said he “had no idea what to expect,” but quickly added, “Not only

just prior to the fall 2016 semester, agreed students are the best part of the job.

was I pleasantly surprised by what I found - a modern, comprehensive university that seemed poised for growth in a peaceful, friendly town - but I also thought that maybe I could make a difference here.”

“Teaching was not a job, it was my ministry. It’s how I made a good world better, one student at a time,” the Southern Illinois University doctoral graduate said. “No student ever accused me of not being passionate and

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Originally from New Jersey, “Dr. C,” as he’s dubbed by students, is best

excited about spending time with him or her. I arrived 10 minutes early to

known for the general psychology course taken by many freshmen. At

every class. A wise instructor learns to expect that students are living with

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problems. A smile and an attentive ear doesn’t overcome everything, but it

“These are the best of times,” Carskadon said. “I have always been proud

does help students manage the doubt, pain and suffering of the moment

of Mississippi State, but I have never been prouder of it than right now!

leading to the joy of them knowing I care more about their world than my

Amazing, wonderful things are happening all over this university. This is

own.”

also the friendliest campus I have ever set foot on. When we say we are the MSU family, we really mean it.”

Flick came to MSU after completing a master’s degree at what now is the University of Memphis.

This extends to his personal family, too. All three of Carskadon’s sons graduated from Mississippi State, and two, Bob and James, now work on

“I had never thought about being a teacher. I never took a class in teaching. I was planning on going into the business world, and was waiting for a job

campus in, respectively, the Department of Athletics and Office of Public Affairs.

in Memphis to open up,” he said. “Exactly 40 years after I first came here, my son Bob took a full-time Though he taught a variety of communication courses at MSU, Flick is

position here, and he lived in the exact same house that I did when I first

likely best known for his very popular class on interviewing. Flick proudly

arrived, renting it from the son of the man who rented it to me. I was barely

noted that he “never took a sick day in my 45 years at MSU. There have been

26 years old when I came to State, and my son James just started his career

many days that I could have stayed in bed or should have been in a doctor’s

here at the exact same age,” Carskadon said.

waiting room seeking medicine. Maybe it wasn’t smart, but I wanted to be with my students. There was no better place for me to be than with my students. They are that special.”

Wolverton has also provided a second generation to the campus community. Robert S. Wolverton Jr. is a faculty member and administrator at the Mitchell Memorial Library.

“Teaching was not a job, it was my ministry. It’s how I made a good world better, one student at a time.” -Flick

Looking back on their many years at MSU, these three professors articulate the wisdom they have gained to encourage the faculty, staff and students at Mississippi State. “Embrace this great university of ours. Revel in it,” Carskadon said. “Extend your reach beyond your own department. You have no idea how

Like Carskadon, he too fell in love with MSU, which he described as “a simple place, better than Heaven,” adding, “We Ring True at 39762.”

many fascinating things and amazing people there are here. Make a longterm commitment to Mississippi State University – you will experience immense joy, pride and satisfaction that will only intensify as the years and

Wolverton said he “had no prior experience with MSU” but “from my first interview on, I was attracted to the ‘family atmosphere’ on campus” where

decades roll by. Every time you say, ‘Hail State!’ you will be speaking straight from the heart.”

“people cared for and helped each other.” He now describes MSU as “one of the best-kept secrets in the nation.”

Flick urges the MSU community to “understand, appreciate and value your research. Reach out to the community and share with them the special skills,

A University of North Carolina doctoral graduate, he had taught at the

abilities, aptitudes and talents that MSU helped you develop.”

University of Georgia and served as president of Mount St. Joseph College in Ohio before MSU President James D. McComas named him vice president

“Come here to be a success,” Wolverton adds. “There are so many

for academic affairs in 1977. Upon leaving campus administration in the

resources to help make you successful, so take advantage of them. We do

1980s, he immediately began teaching in the then-Department of Foreign

ring true!”

Languages, including all levels of Latin, Greek and classical mythology. Wolverton said “being VP on the 100th anniversary of the University [in

Dr. Carskadon and Dr. Wolverton continue to teach at MSU. Dr. Flick

1978] and serving as president of the Robert Holland Faculty Senate during the

retired from teaching in fall 2016 to devote time to research and writing

presidency of Dr. [Robert] Foglesong” are among his favorite campus memories.

books. His third book, Good Looks and Meat Both Have an Expiration Date, is in press, and he is currently writing his fourth book, Single Moms are the

Carskadon could well be speaking for his two colleagues when he expressed pride at Mississippi State’s tremendous growth and development over the decades.

Unsung Heroes of Life (2017). When his fourth book goes to press, Flick will begin working on his fifth book, Give God’s Name a Rest, If You Must Curse, Use Your Own Name (2018).

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Arts & Sciences Alumni

By Hannah Bateman and Claire Winesett

MAKING A DIFFERENCE All graduates of Mississippi State University

now-138-year-old campus’ history, the 1975

performing group, he said he most enjoys “the

have personal stories from their time on campus.

general science graduate with a chemistry

way it plays up to the crowd during the pregame,”

In celebration of its 60 years at the university,

emphasis said he was four years old the

along with the Dawg Walk preceding each home

the College of Arts and Sciences recently

night Old Main—believed to be the largest

game at Davis Wade Stadium at Scott Field. “I

contacted a range of alumni from each decade

single campus dormitory in the country—

mean, everything they do is very enjoyable,” he

of its existence to ask their remembrances of the

was destroyed by a massive fire in January of

said.

special place they briefly called home.

1959. As for happy memories, he pointed to the friends he made during his student years,

Like Locke, Dr. Kermit Carraway of Auburn,

Dr. Will Locke’s ties begin with his family. His

among them the daughter of another faculty

California, said one of his best campus

father, legendary professor John Locke, was a

member named Pickett Wilson who one day

memories involves the person he later married.

Mississippi A&M College alumnus who spent a

would become his wife.

After first meeting the former Coralie Carothers

career teaching botany and related courses at his alma mater.

in a humanities class, he then developed a Today, one of the couple’s two sons continues the family tradition of pursuing an education

which they were enrolled.

According to W. Locke, “My parents had lived

in the College of Arts and Sciences as he

on campus since the late 1930s,” the Starkville

works towards a degree in philosophy with a

A 1962 chemistry graduate, Carraway said he

physician said. “When we were little, the train

concentration in religion. Though not a drum

and Coralie so appreciated that chemistry teacher

came through campus and we would go and

major like his father, Wilson Locke is also a

that they gave part of his name to their son Lyell.

watch it come through right down the middle

member of the Famous Maroon Band.

The namesake, Lyell Christian Behr, taught for

of campus.”

many years in the chemistry department before Dr. Will Locke said he made many friends

Recalling one of the saddest events in the

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relationship with her in a chemistry course in

during his time with the band. Of today’s

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concluding his MSU career as dean of the college during the 1970s.


Like Locke, he also shares memories of Old Main, only from a much closer perspective.

it was in Lee Hall as a freshman in a required

and “an adult who experienced [his] first part-

French class that he first laid eyes on the

time and full-time jobs.” Now the MSU Alumni

former Rebecca Rieves.

Association’s assistant director for chapter

“I was a resident in Old Main when it burned to

and volunteer programs, he considers himself

the ground,” Carraway said. “My room was about

especially fortunate because he can “add to

100 feet down the hall from the room where the fire started. A friend woke me, I threw on a jacket and we went downstairs to watch the fire get put out. I never got back to my room, as the fire got

“I experienced a wide range

of people, creating lifelong friends and learning from

those memories as a staff member.” MSU’s family environment is an aspect of the college experience that many alumni still

into a dusty attic with no fire walls and exploded

great people both within

around the building in about a minute.”

and out of my department,”

graduate, came to appreciate the “reassuring”

-Stafford

“Coming from a very small high school (Benton

He continued, “I lost everything. That was

treasure. Stanley Boddy, a 1995 mathematics family environment he found in the college.

during exams. When the new semester started,

High in Yazoo County), it was a whole new

I was in a regular dorm room with three other

world. The professors made me feel part of the

freshmen. You haven’t lived until you have lived in a tiny dorm room with three other guys!”

Michael Richardson, among whose three

family, and they were there to offer help. Believe me,

MSU degrees is a 1992 bachelor’s in chemistry,

I needed it.” Without doubt, he said “MSU prepared

emphasized the value of the relationships he

me for my future” as North American distribution

Meeting a future spouse is another prime

made during his time as a student in the College

services manager for a Swedish company.

memory shared by Dr. Henry C. “Chris”

of Arts and Sciences. He says he “found [his]

Waterer III of Jackson, Mississippi, a 1981

best friends here” and also credits his student

Similarly, Britt Stafford, a 2014 communication/

general science/biology graduate. In his case,

years for helping him become “more outgoing”

public relations and journalism graduate from

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“The professors made me feel part of

Hank Flick’s small group communication class was Westmoreland’s favorite class. He

the family, and they were there to offer

said he used skills learned there throughout

help. Believe me, I needed it.” -Boddy

adjunct assistant professor with Embry-Riddle

his military career in the Army and now as an Aeronautical University-Worldwide. Cindy Robison of Elberta, Alabama, a 1975

Tyler, Texas, also found a family atmosphere.

current resident of Fort Rucker, Alabama. “I

communication/journalism graduate, also lists

“While attending MSU, I experienced a wide

am still friends and speak daily with many of the

Flick her personal favorite professor. “Hank

range of people, creating lifelong friends and

contacts I made while attending State, nearly 20

Flick taught me speech, and I will never forget

learning from great people both within and out

years later. I grew up at State, I became a Bulldog

the class assignments,” Robinson said. “I

of my department,” said Stafford, who is now

and have traveled the world several times over

briefly was a reporter at The Reflector (student

the associate editor for TeaTime magazine with

spreading the good word about State. I get goose

newspaper) and the experience led me to work

Hoffman Media in Birmingham, Alabama.

bumps when I run into people on the street

in the weekly and daily newspaper industry

“Being in the Famous Maroon Band also gave

everywhere I go and we exchange ‘Hail State!’

after graduation.” Recently retired from her

me instant access to more than 300 instant

Going to Mississippi State was life changing and

position as a broadcast journalism teacher in

friends who eventually turned into a family.”

forever made me a part of a family. It is a family

a career center for Jefferson Parish Schools in

tradition and I look forward to my own children

Louisiana, she praised Flick as “a wonderful

ringing their cowbells at a game.”

teacher that gave me great skills with which

Major Patrick Westmoreland, a U.S. Army officer and senior pilot qualified in five different

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to learn to speak before an unending number

airframes with 1,000 flight hours as pilot-in-

While Mississippi State as a whole provided a

of students the rest of my career, as well as

command, agreed that Mississippi State led to

welcoming place to foster relationships, some

editors.” At 44 years, Hank Flick was the

lifelong friendships and loyalty to the land-grant

graduates of the College also considered a

communication department’s longest serving

institution. “I found my experiences at MSU

specific course or faculty member to be a special

faculty member when he retired from teaching

to be some of the best in my life,” said the

favorite.

in August.

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Teresa Busby of Natchez, Mississippi, a 1993

living; how cool is that?” he said, as he explained how

John Cohen is a 1990 English graduate that

history graduate who came back to complete a

the College and geosciences training helped prepare

coached the Bulldog baseball team for nearly a

master’s degree in 1999, said her favorite class was

him. “Spending two weeks chasing tornadoes

decade before recently being promoted to athletic

a German language course taught by professor

across the Great Plains and Midwest with two of

director. “Don’t take your time at Mississippi State

George Buehler, who concluded his long campus

my professors and seven other students was an

for granted and take full advantage of everything

career as an associate dean of the college.

amazing adventure.” He says, “hands-on experience

MSU has to offer,” Cohen advised those now

outside of the classroom allowed me to apply

enrolled.

Copiah-Lincoln

what I had been learning at Mississippi State and

Community College’s Natchez Campus, Busby

Now

vice

president

of

see what the possibilities could be moving forward.

As does Roy Ruby, who holds emeritus rank as vice

recalled how Buehler “would leave notes on my

Furthermore, every arts and sciences teacher I had

president for student affairs and dean of education.

exams that would say, ‘Please minor in German,’ or

invested in me and wanted me to succeed and,

“I’ll say it again, this university gave me more than I

‘You’re a natural, major in German!’ He was just so

because of them, I am living out a dream.”

could ever give it in the 40 years I spent here,” said

encouraging and had such a wonderful story about

the Starkville resident and MSU administrative icon

surviving and escaping Nazi Germany when he was

Then there is Jamie Aron, a political science and

a child. He had a twin brother who did not survive

mathematics double-major who was named a

who completed bachelor’s and master’s degree in

the ordeal and I remember crying in class when he

national Harry S. Truman Scholar prior to her 2016

shared the story. We learned a foreign language and

graduation. Now pursuing a master’s degree in

The people who are a part of the College of Arts

history at the same time.”

medical sciences at Mississippi College to prepare

and Sciences will continue to be the driving force of

for medical school, Aron said she “gained a deeper

the College’s success. We look back in remembrance

political science during the early and mid-1960s.

First Lieutenant William Reed Simmons is a 2011

understanding of my perspective of the world and

of the many influential people that have chosen to

geosciences graduate who went on to complete

how it may differ from others. I can only hope I

be a part of the College of Arts and Sciences, and

U.S. Air Force pilot training. Now based in Biloxi,

will one day be able to give back meaningfully to my

we look forward in excitement towards the many

Mississippi, with 53d Weather Reconnaissance

university as it has given so much to me.”

bright, unique and driven alumni to come.

Squadron, also known as the “Hurricane Hunters,” he commands a Lockeed WC-130J high-wing, medium-range aircraft. “I fly into hurricanes for a

Finally, some alumni of the College choose to make careers at MSU. COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES | VISION WINTER/SPRING 2017

13


DEPARTMENT OF GEOSCIENCES

Celebrates aCentury By Claire Winesett

As the College of Arts and Sciences celebrates its 60th year, one of its departments is celebrating an even longer milestone.

Department Head Dr. Bill Cooke said that whatever the different academic concentrations, all majors are seeking to gain a better understanding of “how the earth works and the processes

Formerly the Department of Geology and Geography, the

that occur on there.”

now-Department of Geosciences is marking its 100th year. From classes and offices in Hilbun Hall, department faculty and

Dr. Kathy Sherman-Morris, an associate professor in the

administrators have long worked to encourage the pursuit of a

department, said she and her colleagues consider “1916-17 as

deeper understanding of the planet we call home.

the year when our modern department was born because it was a combined department of geology and geography for the first

In the department’s geology emphasis, majors study the earth’s surfaces and sub-surfaces; in geography, the study of place and

time. I think what sets us apart is that we have continued to foster this combination of disciplines.”

what happens in places; in meteorology, weather and climate; and

14

in geospatial sciences, the utilization of geographic information

Dr. Renee Clary, an associate professor, directs the department’s

systems and remote sensing to analyze soils, elevation and plant

popular Dunn-Seiler Museum, home to extensive mineral, rock and

cover to produce computerized research models.

fossil collections. She said the department “originally offered 16

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different courses and 13 labs in 1916. This has expanded to more than

While meterology is the most well-known area of study in the

100 different classes and labs. Our focus now includes new disciplines,

Department of Geosciences, Geospatial Studies (GS) might be the

multidisciplinary research and innovative technologies and tools.”

least familiar concentration. GS explores a computerized analysis of information about the earth’s surface and subsurface. This

The department recently added its first endowed faculty position

concentration has played a big role in the department’s success.

made possible by a petroleum geology graduate. The Mark Worthey Endowed Field Studies Fund is supporting hands-on experiences for

“These kinds of computerized modeling of the environment are

students to gain fieldwork experience prior to graduation. Though

being employed in epidemiology, tracking the Zika virus, for instance,

born in Illinois, Worthey was reared in Hamilton, Mississippi. He first

in insect attacks, in crop disease, even in business to determine

enrolled at MSU in 1975 but had to leave for a four-year stint in the

where the best place to put a new mall or recognition of what’s on

U.S. Air Force. Returning to campus on the Montgomery G.I. Bill

the ground to be used as input data in decision-making processes.

and graduating in 1984, he went on to work at Texas-based Denbury

We do pattern analysis of crime, using these geospatial sciences to

Resources. In 2006, Worthey left Denbury Resources and is now the

determine the patterns” to “help effectively deploy law enforcement

Founder and President of McClaren Resources Inc., a private oil and

personnel. We are also using it to track glacial melt, so we can see if

gas company.

climate change is really occurring,” said Cooke.

In expressing appreciation for his support, Cooke said that Worthy’s

The department was recently recognized as a Geospatial Sciences

gift “will provide a base level of funding to be able to attract a

Center of Academic Excellence by the National Geospatial

geologist that we choose.”

Intelligence Agency that handles geographical and geospatial duties for the Central Intelligence Agency and related operations. New

Established in the 1980s, the meteorology program is quite possibly

courses and professional contacts resulting from this prestigious

the discipline for which the department is best known. It currently

recognition should greatly benefit geoscience majors interested in

enrolls more than 100 undergraduate majors on the Starkville campus

intelligence-related careers, Cooke said.

and over 150 in the popular distance-learning program. Cooke said more than one third of U.S. television weather broadcasters now have

As the department continues celebrating its 100th year of

direct ties to MSU meteorology training, and the program boasts a 100

achievement, Sherman-Morris said the department is making plans

percent placement of all broadcast meteorologist graduates. Students

for a major spring-semester event to conclude the anniversary. Alumni

may also pursue a degree in professional meteorology to prepare for

and former students interested in being a part are being asked to

careers with the National Weather Service or private meteorology

visit the website www.geosciences.msstate.edu/articles/home-page-

organizations, as well as for graduate school.

rotator/2016/09/past-present-0/, both to share memories of their time on campus and to nominate individuals they believe should be

“We probably put more people into the broadcast meteorology

included in the department’s “Top 100 Alumni” recognition.

business than anywhere else,” Cooke said. “The number of students who go to work in the television industry or at the National Weather

To help make certain geosciences continues to grow and develop

Service doing weather prediction probably exceeds anything else in

into the 21st century, a crowdfunding campaign also is underway.

our department. It’s a very big program.”

Contributions may be made at: accelerate.msstate.edu/project/2979.

Sherman-Morris noted that the program has grown over the decades

To learn more about the centennial celebration, crowdfunding

“from offering one meteorology class in 1916-17 to a meteorology

effort and other departmental activities during the current school

program that now is nationally known.”

year, visit www.geosciences.msstate.edu or contact Sherman-Morris at kms5@msstate.edu.

Cooke said the training provides “not only the meteorology background, but the communication expertise,” explaining how majors are required “to go through the process of getting on the air and recording their tapes, editing, looking back, making changes, improving their diction, and improving their on-camera presence.”

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES | VISION WINTER/SPRING 2017

15


COLLEGE FACULTY

AWARDS

Dr. David Hoffman Anthropology and Middle Eastern Cultures Wallace Eminent Scholar

Jada Johnson Sociology Oldham Outstanding Mentor Award

DEAN’S STUDENT

ADVISORY COUNCIL As Mississippi State University’s largest and most diverse academic college, the College of Arts and Sciences seeks to faithfully and accurately represent the wide-ranging interests and concerns of its students. The Dean’s Student Advisory Council, comprised of undergraduate representatives from the College’s 14 academic departments, seeks to serve that purpose as a connection between the students in the College and the dean’s administration. This prestigious group of students informs the College’s leadership on the thoughts and concerns of the student population. The Dean’s Student Advisory Council represents the College of Arts and Sciences to current and prospective students. Serving alongside representatives from the dean’s office, members of the Council travel to recruitment events on and off campus to relay how they’ve discovered their path to success through the College of Arts and Sciences. The Dean’s Student Advisory Council selects new members each Spring.

Dr. Jason Morgan Ward History Gulmon Eminent Scholar

Dr. Kathy Sherman-Morris Geosciences Henry Eminent Scholar

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Madelyn Barr Mary Frances Broadhead Chelsea Capleton Kimberly De La Cruz Becca Hawkins Hannah Holetz Ariel Johnson Beth Kowalczyk Hannah Krapac Brooke Laizer Jessie Lewis Katelyn Majors Sabrina Moore Randy Niffenegger

Allison Phillips James Riggins Alivia Roberts Trevor Sanford Nia Sims Bobbie Jo Smith Mary Ann Smith Jake Stockton Kierra Thompson Kayla Thrash Madison Ward Melissa Weitzel Keyonna Wilder


SOCIETY OF SCHOLARS Mary Bailey Katherine Baldwin Allison Bruning John Bryan A. Zachary Buchanan Haily Crawford Emily Damm Lindsey Elmore Austin Fortenberry Alex Hughes Ryan King Reagan Livingston

Fall 2016

Alexis Manson John Miller Sabrina Moore Roxanne Raven Daniel Roberson Ashlee Rogers Jenna Stanford Elizabeth Thomas Kayla Thrash Holly Travis Jamelle Vance Lachelle Vance

DEAN’S EXECUTIVE ADVISORY

BOARD MEMBERS

The mission of the College of Arts and Sciences Dean’s Executive Advisory Board is to provide leadership and support to the Dean. By utilizing skills, financial resources, teamwork and diversity, the board works to strengthen the academic infrastructure, faculty and facilities of the College and University. Laurie Williams (chair)

Llana Smith

Dr. Ralph Alewine

Dr. John Rada

Dr. Fred Corley

Dr. Randy White

Hunter “Ticket” Henry

Dr. David Wigley

Bachelor of Arts in Communication, ‘79

Bachelor of Science in Physics, ‘68 Bachelor of Science in Chemistry, ‘68 Friend of the College

Kitty Henry

Friend of the College

Dr. Karen Hulett

SOCIETY OF SCHOLARS John Bathon Robert Billingsley Madison Buras Logan Chaney Caroline Collins Jenny Cox Ridgeland Dabbs Emily Farrar Lien Geel Cornelia Griesche Sarah Jolly

Spring 2016

Natalie Jones Sarah Kleinwechter Christine Mazzola Adam Niolet Julie Nott Amy Pate Megan Spade Hannah Warren Zachary Warren Terah Winborne

Bachelor of Science in Microbiology, ‘74 Friend of the College Bachelor of Science in Chemistry/Pre-Med, ‘66 Bachelor of Science in Soil Science, ‘77 Bachelor of Science in Chemistry, ‘79

Dr. Thomas Wiley, Jr.

Bachelor of Science in General Science, ‘72

Bachelor of Science in Mathematics, ‘73

Dr. William B. Hulett Friend of the College

COLLEGE REPRESENTATIVES

Hank Johnston

Dr. Rick Travis

Bachelor of Science in Mathematics, ‘65

Malcolm B. Lightsey Bachelor of Science in Mathematics, ‘61 Master of Science in Mathematics, ‘63

Dr. M. Diane Roberts

Bachelor of Science in Zoology, ‘63 Master of Science in Zoology, ‘64

Interim Dean

Sara Frederic

Director of Development

Dr. Giselle T. MunnThibaudeau

Associate Dean for Research

Dr. Nicole Rader

Interim Associate Dean for Academic Affairs

Karyn Brown

Director of Communication

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES | VISION WINTER/SPRING 2017

17


Dear Alumni and Friends, When our family departed Starkville in 2011 for wonderful professional opportunities, our hearts longed for the day we would rejoin Mississippi State University. Five years passed, and we were welcomed home by a new landscape of buildings and a rapidly growing student population. Our homecoming coincided with the 60th anniversary of the College of Arts and Sciences, giving me an incredible opportunity to forge ties with many alumni from the land of maroon and white. Their shared stories revolve around impactful professors and staff that helped them build the firm foundation leading to their successful careers. The transition of our college over 60 years amazes me, but one thing remains constant: our loyal alumni and friends. Because of YOUR support and vision for the future of Mississippi State, we are equipped with the ability to recruit the best faculty and talented students. With a dedicated faculty collectively counseling eager students how to best pursue their passions and interests, our university changes students’ lives daily. As future graduates, these students impact Mississippi and areas well beyond our state and nation as leaders in innovation who are poised to change the world. The College of Arts and Sciences has so much to celebrate. The support of Dr. Donald Hall and his family created our college’s first endowed Distinguished Professorship, bringing Dr. Angus Dawe to the biological sciences department. We mark the continued success of the pre-medical advising office established by Dr. Randle White and Marilyn White and further supported by Oktibbeha County Hospital. We greatly appreciate Dr. Howard Shook, who continues to grow his endowed scholarship in memory of his late wife, Diane Shook, and grant talented mathematics students a chance to study without the financial burden of tuition and fees. Additional generous scholarship donors include Dr. Ralph Alewine and Betty Alewine for their commitment to awarding proven student leaders for their accomplishments and encouraging their strong scientific interest. The opportunities for our College are endless, and these are just a few recent examples of philanthropy and its powerful impact! As we continue the one-billion-dollar Infinite Impact Campaign for Mississippi State, we remind ourselves that 60 years ago our university-wide goal of this magnitude would be unheard of. Now we acknowledge our incredible alumni that change this mindset and provide the potential to make countless opportunities for our distinguished university. Our College will work diligently to fulfill our portion of this goal, and you can be the one contributor to help us progressively move toward this horizon. We are grateful for all of your contributions that provide the College of Arts and Sciences the resources to ensure every faculty, staff and student are successful in their fields. And, with your gifts, comes additional support from corporations and foundations that believe in the strong mission of our University and our College. I look forward to visiting with you soon to learn about how your time as part of the Bulldog Nation helped you become the person you are today.

Hail state, Sara Jurney Frederic ’08, ’10, ’11

Director of Development College of Arts and Sciences

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VISION WINTER/SPRING 2017 | COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES


DONOR LIST

The College of Arts & Sciences proudly recognizes and thanks all of its generous donors who sent gifts of $100 or more for the 2016 fiscal year (July 1, 2015 through June 30, 2016).

AbbVie, Inc.

Dr. and Mrs. Thomas L. Baumann

Mr. and Mrs. Bobby J. Carollo

Mr. Gary F. Adams

Chris and Bette Behr

Dr. Kermit L. Carraway and Dr. Coralie C. Carraway

J. Harry Adams

Ms. Mary E. Benincasa

Dr. F. Perna Carter

Mr. and Mrs. William A. Adams, Jr.

Dr. Mitchell E. Berman

Dr. and Mrs. Richard C. Carter Jr.

Dr. and Mrs. Ralph Alewine III

Ms. Dorothy S. Billingsley and Mr. Robert A. Stephenson

Dr. Gordon M. Castleberry

Mrs. Margaret Allen

Mrs. Anita Bologna

Cengage Learning

Allianz Life

Mr. and Mrs. Morgan F. Bondurant

Mr. Benson B. Chow

American Chemical Society

Dr. and Mrs. Franklin T. Bonner

Dr. and Mrs. Edward J. Clynch

Anadarko Petroleum

Ms. Paula W. Booth

Mr. and Mrs. John A. Cohen

Mr. Donor Anonymous

Dr. Charles D. Borum

Mr. Gus W. Colvin, III

Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration Foundation

Robert B. and Jeanne R. Boykin

Mr. and Mrs. Gus W. Colvin Jr.

Ms. Bettina Avent

Mr. Earl B. Brand, Jr.

Dr. and Mrs. Leon L. Combs

B P. America

Dr. Lewis R. Brown

Mr. and Mrs. Aubrey B. Conrad

Mr. and Mrs. Anthony K. Baca

Bulldog Club, Inc.

Cooper Dentistry

Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Banks

Ms. Shelly L. Gunn

Dr. and Mrs. David D. Cooper

Mr. Frederick Barr

Cambridge Isotope Laboratories, Inc.

Dr. Fred G. Corley Jr.

Ms. Amanda Batey and Mr. Bernard A. Margolis

Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. Camp

Dr. Justin C. Courcelle

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES | VISION WINTER/SPRING 2017

19


Mr. and Mrs. Curt J. Crissey

Dr. and Mrs. Charles L. Guyton

Ms. Carol J. Levy

Dr. and Mrs. W. Lawrence Croft

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel P. Guyton

Dr. and Mrs. Edwin A. Lewis

Mr. Everett T. Culpepper

Dr. and Mrs. Steven R. Gwaltney

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Mr. and Mrs. Perry V. Cupples

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth A. Hackman

Mr. and Mrs. James W. Long

Drs. Joseph and Judith Davenport

Dr. Donald L. Hall

Ms. Rebecca J. Long

Mr. Robert A. De-Metz, Jr.

Mr. and Mrs. Reggie V. Hambrick, Jr.

Dr. Chester C. Lott Jr.

Mr. Hugh B. Devery

Mrs. Barbara J. Hamilton

Mr. and Mrs. Bobby Love

Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd G. Digby

Mr. George C. Hamilton, III

Ms. Sherry Lozowski

Dr. Tracy L. Skipper and Mr. Randall Dong

Ms. Laura Hardin

Ms. Guiyu Lu

Dr. and Mrs. Donald N. Downer

Mr. Jeffrey W. Hardy

MSU Donor-Advised Fund Program

Mrs. Eleanor (Pinks) Dudley

Drs. Guy and Nancy Hargrove

Mr. Ryan O. MacKie

Dr. and Mrs. R. Gregory Dunaway

Mr. and Mrs. Jack M. Harris

Mr. and Mrs. David P. Madison, Jr.

Mr. and Mrs. George K. Dunn

Mr. Joseph W. Harvey

Dr. Charles V. Magee

Mr. and Mrs. R. Wayne Durst

Drs. C. James and Ruth Haug

Mr. and Mrs. Jamie L. Mahne

Edwin C. Roshore Family Trust

Mr. and Mrs. Edward C. Hendley, Jr.

Dr. and Mrs. Alan I. Marcus

Mr. Nathan H. Elmore

Mr. and Mrs. Chris Henning

Mr. and Mrs. George E. Marion

Entergy Corporation

Ewin and Claudia Henson

Mr. James M. Massey

Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Erby

Dr. and Mrs. Barry W. Herring

Dr. and Mrs. Byron C. May

Ergon Refining, Inc.

Miss Lee M. Hilliard

Mr. and Mrs. Cinclair May

Mr. and Mrs. Richard T. Estes, Jr.

Mr. and Mrs. Wesley J. Holland

Dr. and Mrs. David C. May

Mr. and Mrs. C D. Evans

Dr. and Mrs. Jeremiah H. Holleman, Jr.

Mr. Steven L. Mayo

Exxon Education Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth R. Holloway

Dr. and Mrs. Robert T. McAdory, Jr.

Ms. Nancy P. Farmer

Dr. Erin Jaye Holmes

Mr. Anthony B. McCorkle

Mr. William J. Faulkner

Howard Industries Inc.

Dr. Yancy B. McDougal

Dr. Joe L. Ferguson and Mrs. Jean W. Ferguson

Mr. John E. Hughes, III

Mr. and Mrs. Julius F. McIlwain

Mr. Thomas W. Fewel

Drs. Karen and William Hulett

Dr. Keith T. Mead

Ms. Julie S. Fleming

Dr. and Mrs. Donald R. Hunt

Mr. Edward J. Menghi

Flight Attendant Medical Research Center

IBM Matching Grants Program International Foundation

Dr. Jon Rezek and Dr. Meghan Millea

Dr. and Mrs. Jerry W. Fly

International Iguana Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Reilly Miller

Mr. Bobby V. Ford

Dr. and Mrs. William J. Ireland, Jr.

Mr. and Mrs. Paul M. Minor

Drs. John and Connie Forde

Mr. and Mrs. Harold S. Ishee

Mississippi Association of Grantmakers (MAG)

Fountainhead Press Publishing

J and J Fitness, Inc.

Mississippi Humanities

Dr. Emogene Fox

Mr. and Mrs. White G. Jee

Mr. and Mrs. Charles D. Mitchell

Frank Chiles State Farm Insurance

Mr. Michael A. Johnson

Drs. Todd and Debra Mlsna

Mr. and Mrs. William A. Friday

Mr. and Mrs. Henry E. Johnston

Mr. and Mrs. Dennis F. Mobley

Dr. and Mrs. Howell Garner

Ms. Courtney A. Jones

Anonymous

Dr. Jay E. Gee

Dr. and Mrs. Gordon E. Jones

Dr. and Mrs. Harsha N. Mookherjee

Mr. and Mrs. Alan C. Geolot

Mr. and Mrs. Hunter Jones

Dr. Debra A. Moore

Mr. and Mrs. Jason S. Gilbert

Mrs. Rebecca Harbor Jones

Dr. P. J. Moore, III and Mrs. Jane E. Gustavson

Mr. and Mrs. David A. Gillam

Harper and Beth Keeler

Mrs. Wilber J. Moore

Mr. William A. Gillon and Ms. Adrienne M. Pakis-Gillon

Mr. and Mrs. Russell B. Kegley

Carl and Jacqueline Moran

Mr. Elan Goldmann

Dr. James B. Kelley

Ms. Geila Morrill

Mrs. Marjorie M. Goldner

Dr. and Mrs. Samuel W. Keyes, Sr.

Ms. Sara Morris

Goldring Family Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. King

Ms. Martha W. Murphy

Mrs. Cynthia R. Greeley

Mr. Kevin M. Koehler

Mr. R. David Murrell

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Green Jr.

Mr. Robert W. Krueger

Dr. Michael R. Nadorff

Mr. Ray A. Greene

Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Lake

Mr. and Mrs. Steven R. Nash

Mr. and Mrs. Theron V. Griffin

Dr. and Mrs. James D. Land

Mr. John W. Nelson

Ms. Anna Minor Grizzle

Mr. and Mrs. Erik Larson

Mr. and Mrs. Noah New

Mr. and Mrs. James A. Gunter

Ms. Dorothy J. Lenoir

Mr. Gregory J. Nordstrom

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VISION WINTER/SPRING 2017 | COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES


Dr. Justin H. Shows

Drs. David E. Wigley and Dana L. Fox

OCH Regional Medical Center

Silicon Valley Community Foundation

Dr. and Mrs. Thomas L. Wiley Jr.

Mr. Roger H. Ogden

Mr. Adolph Simmons, Jr. and Ms. Brenda D. Gibson

Major and Mrs. Frank J. Wilkerson

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley S. Owen

Mrs. Ann Ardahl Smith

Dr. and Mrs. Clyde V. Williams

Mr. and Mrs. F. R. Owens, Jr.

Mr. C. Douglas Smith

Mr. John C. Williams, III

Mr. and Mrs. Forrest W. Pace, Sr.

Ms. Cailin L. Smith

Mrs. Laurie R. Williams

Mr. Michael C. Pace

Ms. Llana Y. Smith and Dr. John B. Rada

Ms. Wanda T. Williams

Mr. John N. Palmer, Jr.

Ms. Misty A. Smith

Mr. Homer F. Wilson, Jr.

Ms. Susan Palmer

Mr. David Spann

Dr. David O. Wipf

Ms. Sheri A. Pape

Paul and Mimi Speyerer

Dr. and Mrs. Perisco Wofford

Mrs. Valerie Musick Park

Ms. D. Lynn Spruill

Women’s Foundation of Mississippi

Partnership for a Healthy Mississippi

Starkville Urology Clinic

World Health Organization

Pearson Education

Statewide Federal Credit Union

Mr. and Mrs. Mark A. Worthey

Dr. Gary L. Permenter

Ms. Rose M. Stiffin

Mr. Charles M. Wren, II

Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Peterson

Mr. David A. Stockstill

Dr. Jack T. Wynn

Mr. Melvin R. Peterson, Jr.

Drs. Randolph and Gwen Stone

Mr. and Mrs. James A. Yarborough

Dr. and Mrs. Thomas Philip

Mr. Ian S. Stoutenburgh

Mr. Brian S. Young

Dr. and Mrs. Robert L. Phillips Jr.

Mr. Daniel J. Sykes

Mr. and Mrs. Keith L. Young

Dr. Melinda W. Pilkinton

Mr. Chester A. Tapscott, III

Dr. Judy K. Young

Mr. and Mrs. William G. Poindexter IV

Dr. and Mrs. Douglas H. Taylor

nexAir, LLC

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph G. Prichard, IV

The Annie E. Casey Foundation

Mr. Junrui H. Qian

The Brinks Company

Drs. Philip and Deborah Rabinowitz

The Family Health Clinic

Dr. and Mrs. Richard C. Raymond

The G.V. “Sonny” Montgomery Foundation

Richard C. Adkerson Family Foundation

The Greater New Orleans Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. John H. Richards Jr.

The Helis Foundation

Dr. and Mrs. Edward E. Rigdon

The Schwab Charitable Fund

Mr. and Mrs. Charles T. Rivenburgh

Col. and Mrs. Jerry A. Thomas

Hon. and Mrs. James L. Roberts, Jr.

Dr. Katie H. Thomas and Dr. Timothy N. Thomas

Mr. Robert R. Roberts, Jr.

Mr. Nicholas K. Thompson

Ms. Tia N. Roddy

Dr. and Mrs. B. M. Thorne

Mr. Gary Rosenberg

Mr. Jeremy M. Thornton

Mr. and Mrs. James D. Rowe

Mr. John Thornton

Rufford Foundation

Truist

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Rule

Ms. Amy Tuck

Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey B. Rupp

Mr. and Mrs. Joe M. Turner

Mr. and Mrs. Laroy M. Rushing

Mr. Kevin D. Veal

Mr. and Mrs. Chess Rybolt

Ms. Karen W. Vickers

Dr. Harrylyn Sallis and Dr. Charles Sallis

W. K. Kellogg Foundation

Dr. and Mrs. Ben Sanford Jr.

Mr. and Mrs. Harold D. Walker III

Col. and Mrs. Steve C. Schrum

Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Walker

Mr. and Mrs. Wallace H. Scoggins

Dr. Diane E. Wall

Sessions Trust

Mr. and Mrs. William S. Watkins

Dr. Stephen D. Shaffer

Rev. and Mrs. Granville H. Watson, Jr.

Mr. and Mrs. Timothy R. Shann

Dr. and Mrs. Donald Q. Weaver

Mr. and Mrs. James W. Shannon, II

Mr. and Mrs. Tom Webb

Shell Oil Company Foundation

Drs. Richard and Patricia Weddle

Mr. and Mrs. G. Richard Sheridan

Wells Fargo & Company

Dr. Kathleen M. Sherman-Morris and Mr. John A. Morris

Dr. and Mrs. A. Randle White

Dr. Howard E. Shook, Jr.

Dr. and Mrs. Frank J. Whittington

THANK YOU

North American Coal Corporation

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES | VISION WINTER/SPRING 2017

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PROMOTIONS & TENURE NAME.............................. PROMOTION............................................... DEPARTMENT Molly K. Zuckerman .........Assistant to Associate ...... Anthropology and Middle Eastern Cultures Brian A. Counterman.........Assistant to Associate ............................................... Biological Sciences Diane C. Outlaw..................Assistant to Associate ............................................... Biological Sciences Charles Edwin Webster.....Associate to Professor ..............................................................Chemistry Joseph P. Emerson..............Assistant to Associate ...............................................................Chemistry Steven R. Gwaltney.............Associate to Professor ..............................................................Chemistry Lara Dodd..............................Associate to Professor ...................................................................English Thomas P. Anderson..........Associate to Professor ...................................................................English Brenda L. Kirkland.............Associate to Professor ..........................................................Geosciences Julia Osman ..........................Assistant to Associate ....................................................................History Jinwu Ye .................................Associate to Professor ......................................Physics and Astronomy Dipangkar Dutta ................Associate to Professor ......................................Physics and Astronomy Christine L. Rush ...............Assistant to Associate .......Political Science and Pubic Administration Shelley Keith ........................Assistant to Associate ................................................................Sociology

WE WANT YOUR

RETIREES

news! Send an e-mail or letter to:

Lydia Quarles........................Stennis Institute (staff).......................................................... Spring 2016 Keith Mead............................Chemistry (faculty)..............................................................Summer 2016 Harry “Hank” Flick ..........Communication (faculty)........................................................... Fall 2016 Carlene Hatchett.................English (staff)............................................................................... Fall 2016 Judith Goodman .................English (staff)............................................................................... Fall 2016 Patsy Humphrey .................History (staff).......................................................................Summer 2016

Karyn Brown

Director of Communication Mississippi State University College of Arts & Sciences P.O. Box AS Mississippi State, MS 39762 kbrown@deanas.msstate.edu

David Monts ........................Physics (faculty) .......................................................................... Fall 2016 Stephanie Doane ................Psychology (faculty).................................................................... Fall 2016 Joy Smith................................Arts and Sciences (staff) ........................................................... Fall 2016 R. Gregory Dunaway .........Arts and Sciences/Sociology (faculty)................................ Spring 2016

22

VISION WINTER/SPRING 2017 | COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

As the largest college on campus, it is our privilege to showcase all that it has to offer. In order to do that, we need your assistance. Past issues have featured outstanding accomplishments of faculty, students, alumni, and organizations—their accomplishments, awards, and how each is making a difference on campus and in the community. If you have something that should be included, please send it to us!


#DiscoverYourAnd IN THE COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

By Hannah Bateman and Claire Winesett

The College of Arts and Sciences is the largest and most diverse college on campus. With this diversity comes an abundant amount of opportunities for collaboration, discovery and learning. The College’s faculty, staff and students approach these differences with a variety of interests, talents and areas of expertise in numerous fields of study. This leads to fascinating, diverse knowledge being shared among colleagues and students; however, with so many diverse opportunities, it is often difficult to capture a single unifying identity. Discover Your And is a public relations campaign for the College of Arts and Sciences that is designed to promote a sense of unity and collegiality within the College, and to help others understand the mission of this unit. The main element of the campaign is the connecting word “and,” symbolizing the collaboration of individuals from different areas of expertise in hopes of building a better world together. From philosophers to astronomers, historians to chemists, and sociologists to musicians, there is no limit to what students can become. Students in the College of Arts and Sciences may pursue an academic career in one or more of the 25 degree programs offered in the College’s 14 departments. This wide range of opportunities ensures a first-rate experience that will not only educate, but also prepare students for the challenges of today’s dynamic world. The College of Arts and Sciences boasts alumni who are morning meteorologist, successful business owners, military officers, teachers, social workers, baseball coaches, secret service agents, authors, and the list goes on and on. Thousands of the College’s alumni have gone on to positively impact the world and prove that the opportunities that the College of Arts and Sciences can prepare one for are endless. Discover Your And is the celebration of the diversity that brings us together in the College of Arts and Sciences. We strive to learn through discovery, and discover through learning…together.

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES | VISION WINTER/SPRING 2017

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Post Office Box AS Mississippi State, MS 39762

Mailing Address: Post Office Box AS Mississippi State, MS 39762

Physical Address: 175 Presidents Circle Mississippi State, MS 39762

facebook.com/MississippiStateCollegeOfArtsSciences twitter.com/MSUArtsSciences instagram: msuartssciences snapchat: msuartssciences youtube: MSU A&S

Mississippi State University complies with all applicable laws regarding affirmative action and equal opportunity in all its activities and programs and does not discriminate against anyone protected by law because of age, color, disability, national origin, race, religion, sex, handicap, or status as a veteran or disabled veteran.

MSU A&S Vision 17  
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