Page 1


In 2009, the MSU Foundation launched a special initiative to garner support for scholarships and faculty awards. StatePride: An Initiative for Student and Faculty Support is a strategic fundraising plan that seeks to raise $100 million by December 31, 2012. The major focus of StatePride will be to help MSU attract exceptional students from the state and the region, and create opportunities for top performing faculty members. For more information on StatePride, contact the MSU Foundation at 662-325-7000 or visit our website at www.msufoundation.com.

PROFILE:

Melissa Moore, Ph.D.

C O L L E G E : Business E M P H A S I S : Marketing,Quantitative

Analysis and Business Law A W A R D : Notable Scholar

“True passion for your work guarantees that you are going to excel, regardless. However, when alumni recognize your efforts and validate that what you do is important, you now have a directed passion with a purpose —one that pushes even the best to maximize student performance.”

L O YA LT Y. P R I D E . PA S S I O N .


Summer/Fall 2010 | Vol. 86 | No. 2 USPS 354-520

features

2

The People’s University

Beyond the buzz | page

President Mark E. Keenum (’83, ’84, ’88)

Mississippi State’s focus on sustainability is university-wide, encompassing academics, athletics, curriculum, research, physical plant and quality of life. And the large-scale efforts are also making their way into the local community and around the world.

Vice President for Development and Alumni

CHARM unites past with present | page

John P. Rush (’94, ’02)

Alumni Association Executive Director and Associate Vice President, Development and Alumni Jimmy W. Abraham (’75, ’77)

Mississippi State Alumnus is published three times a year by the Office of University Relations and the Mississippi State University Alumni Association at Mississippi State, Miss. Send address changes to Alumni Director, P.O. Box AA, Mississippi State, MS 397625526; telephone 662-325-7000; or e-mail fcarr@ advservices.msstate.edu.

Editorial offices: 102 George Hall, P.O. Box 5325, Mississippi State, MS 39762-5325 Telephone, 662-325-3442 Fax, 662-325-7455 E-mail, snowa@ur.msstate.edu www.msstate.edu

10

Through the Consortium for the History of Agricultural and Rural Mississippi, or CHARM, materials related to the role played by agriculture, forestry and rural life in Mississippi are preserved and made available for teaching, learning and research.

Stricklin takes deliberate approach to athletics | page

14

Athletic director Scott Stricklin says his time working in various capacities around the SEC and the NCAA, often competing against MSU, gave him a unique perspective as to how the university and its athletic program are viewed from the outside.

MSU track finishes outstanding year | page

22

The Mississippi State track team finished the 2010 season with a top 20 overall ranking in the NCAA, while junior O’Neal Wilder, freshman Tavaris Tate and sophomore Jody-Ann Muir claimed four gold medals, collectively, in international competition.

Soball phenom completes stellar career | page

24

After four years as a member of Coach Jay Miller’s squad, it would be safe to say that four-time All-American catcher Chelsea Bramlett has far exceeded her own expectations, becoming one of the premier players in the nation and the most decorated softball player in MSU history.

Advertising: Contact Libba Andrews at 662-325-3479 or landrews@alumni.msstate.edu.

Editor Allen Snow (’76)

Associate Editor Harriet Laird

Designers Matt Watson (’05)

Photographers Russ Houston (’85) Megan Bean Kenny Billings Beth Newman

Mississippi State University Alumni Association National Officers Karen Dugard Lawler, ’82, ’94, national president Jerry L. Toney, ’96, national first vice president Camille Scales Young, ’94, ’96, national second vice president Jodi White Turner, ’97, ’99, national treasurer Charles A. Cascio, ’79, immediate past president

Campus news ........... 17 Alumni news ............. 25 Foundation news..... 35 Class news ................ 39 In memoriam ............ 42

On the cover: MSU’s award-winning EcoCAR is just one example of the university’s commitment to sustainability. The focus is university-wide, encompassing academics, athletics, curriculum, research, physical plant, and quality of life. Photo by Roy Feldman


STATEOFSUSTAINABILITY

BEYOND THE BUZZ University takes lead on eco-friendly initiatives packing an economic punch By Jim Laird Photos By Roy Feldman

S

keynote address this past April,

buzzword with

Keenum said, “Your university is

and highly visible projects at the

staying power

stepping up its efforts to help ensure

university is driven by bright

at Mississippi

an environmentally sound and sus-

minds and cutting-edge research:

State University.

tainable future, and many students,

the MSU EcoCAR.

From research

faculty, and staff are working hard to

labs to classrooms, to buildings

make that happen. Embracing new

and grounds and beyond, the

technology to meet the challenges of

campus is going greener for the

a changing world is an integral part

DRIVINGAWAY FROMTHE COMPETITION

environment, as well as seeing a

of our land-grant heritage.�

In the 2010 EcoCAR: The NeXt

positive return on investment -- a

Mississippi State’s focus on

Challenge’s second round in May,

win-win that can make a differ-

sustainability is university-wide,

the EcoCAR lapped its competi-

ence during tight budget times.

encompassing academics, athlet-

      

President Mark E. Keenum’s

2 Alumnus Summer | Fall 2010

One of the most successful

ustainability is a

ics, curriculum, research, physical

MSU was among 16 institu-

signing of the American College

plant and quality of life. And the

tions represented at the San

and University Presidents’ Climate

large-scale efforts are also making

     

Commitment in 2009 expanded the

their way into the local commu-

three-year competition spon-

environment for nascent eco-friendly

nity and around the world. That

sored by the U.S. Department of

        

outreach is central to MSU’s long-

Energy, General Motors and the

institution. During his Earth Day

held commitment to service.

Canadian government, among


GM-donated vehicle to minimize

CHOICES PEDALPOWER ORSHUTTLE SIMPLICITY?

fuel consumption and emissions,

The EcoCAR isn’t the only ef-

for university departments and

while maintaining its utility,

    

organizations to rent, he added.

safety and performance.

get around campus. Since 1996,

others. The competition challenges North American engineering majors to “re-engineer� a

tions. “We’ve built a solid team over the years with a great staff and great drivers.� The shuttles are also available

In addition to convenience,

Mississippi State’s shuttle system

 

     

Molen said he was pleased with the

has provided riders a quick and

congestion on campus, free park-

hard work, effort and ingenuity stu-

    

ing spaces and enhance air quality,

dents dedicated to the competition.

or making that next meeting. The

  !

The home team designed a plug-in

program’s growth is a testament

grow as biofuel sources become

hybrid vehicle with an electric

to the success of the state’s only

more readily available. Currently,

range of 60 miles. During testing

university-owned and -operated

Parking Services has a 250-gallon

in California, the vehicle achieved

shuttle service.

tank for biodiesel -- a three-day

MSU faculty adviser Marshall

a 118 miles-per-gallon equivalent

“We started with four buses

supply for one bus. Harris envi-

of combined city and highway

running two routes, and this fall

       

mileage.

we will have 20 buses rolling

every bus is running on biofuel.

“I’ve never been so proud,�

      

“We’re an ag school -- it makes perfect sense for us,� he said.

Molen said. “These are some of

routes, as well as the Night Route

   

and Saturday Shuttle,� said Mike

Such a scenario would be an-

you’ll ever encounter.�

Harris, director of parking opera-

other contribution toward creating

Harris envisions a future for the eet where every bus is running on biofuel.

a comprehensive transportation management solution for the university, integrating bikes, shuttles, parking and pedestrians into a holistic system. Bicycles are an increasingly common sight on campus, and the university has been at the forefront of this development by providing riders with maroon and white Bully Bikes. The popular bike-share program started in January 2009, and provides students, faculty, and staff twoParking operations director and MSU alumnus Mike Harris shows off the

wheeled cruisers at convenient

university’s Bully Bikes, which are stored in the basement of the Roberts

locations around the university’s

Building when not in use on campus. The space also houses a repair

rolling 832-acre landscape.

and maintenance area for the fleet of maroon and white bicycles.

“People want choices,� Har-

Alumnus Summer | Fall 2010 3


Procurement and contracts director Don Buffum recognizes the costsavings potential

ris said. “Our bikes and buses,

of smart and

parking lot and sidewalk improve-

sustainable buy-

ments, and focus on customer

ing, but cautions

service are all part of our plan to

that the univer-

provide a positive experience for

sity can’t afford

everyone who is part of the Mis-

to pursue green

sissippi State community.�

waste management program.� As the recycling program helps reduce waste on campus, the uni %      -

purchasing for mental aspects

MAKING CONNECTIONS

alone: “As a

“There are many aspects to sustain-

with green options by providing

public purchas-

ability at Mississippi State and the

guidance, as well as an online envi-

er, my goal is to

common thread is their link to the

ronmental purchasing guide.

get more value

university’s mission of teach-

for the tax dollar.

ing, research and service,� said

goal is to get more value for the

When we buy

Jeremiah Dumas, who coordinates

tax dollar,� said Don Buffum,

energy-efficient

many of the eco efforts on campus.

  &' -

equipment, we

"# $    

save money by

signed an agreement with Colum-

  * $

spending less on

bus-based Triangle Maintenance

save money by spending less on

Jeremiah Dumas announces

energy. This is

Service, LLC, for the company’s

energy. This is good for taxpay-

Mississippi State’s ECO Paw pro-

good for the tax-

BluBox Recycling division to

ers. When we use less energy, it is

gram during the Earth Day Fair

payers. When

service the Starkville campus.

good for the environment. When

in April. ECO Paw is designed to

we use less

Students, faculty, staff and visitors

we buy items that can be recycled

enhance environmental stew-

energy, it is good

may now dispose of paper of all

and those items go to recycling,

ardship, maximize resources

for the environ-

types, plastics (Nos. 1-7), alumi-

we spend less money on waste dis-

and contribute to a healthier

ment. Satisfying

num, metal, glass and cardboard

   # $ 

campus community by giving

both sides of

into the blue boxes and bins.

is good for taxpayers, and, reduces

every MSU employee an op-

     $ 

portunity to make a difference

good for the environment.�

and help the university achieve

the environ-

that equation

“The recycling response has

is the only way

exceeded expectations,� Dumas

that green pur-

said. “Comprehensive, single-

chasing will grow on campus.�

4 Alumnus Summer | Fall 2010

ing departments in meeting their service, supply and product needs

“As a public purchaser, my

ment and Contracts. “When we

The complementary relationship

the goals of the American Col-

stream recycling provides an

between the economic and environ-

lege and Universities Presidents’

easy-to-use and cost-effective

mental is essential if green buying is

Climate Commitment.

complement to MSU’s existing

going to grow, Buffum said.


ENERGIZEDFOR ABRIGHT—AND SUSTAINABLE— FUTURE #   $     State created an energy team. The goal? Develop a resource ef    +  results have been impressive. MSU energy monitor J.D. Hardy develops reports for the university’s energy committee, and is part of

and pumps in each of the con-

general-purpose system and the

that team charged with developing

nected buildings.�

    

ways to improve energy systems      “We look constantly for ways to

New buildings added to the

based on the number of calcula-

central loop also require less

tions performed for every watt of

mechanical equipment, which

power consumed.

reduce consumption and imple-

lowers capital costs, boosts over-

“If you took a pen and paper,

  

all economy and reduces ongoing

and did one long division problem

now and in the longer term,� Hardy

maintenance expenses. The loop

per second, working 24 hours a

said. “Our goal is to continue to

also leverages the university Cen-

day, this computer could calculate

      

tral Plant’s large-scale capacity to

in one second what it would take

the academic and research goals of

heat and chill water that provides

you one million years to do by

Mississippi State.�

more reliability, Nobles said.

hand,� said Trey Breckenridge,

In addition to cutting energy

As the university landscape

      

costs through monitoring, technol-

shifts to accommodate ever more

the university’s High Performance

ogy and awareness campaigns,

     

Computing Collaboratory where

large-scale projects are also

an earth-friendlier footprint, Mis-

Talon is housed.

making an impact on how much

sissippi State researchers are also

energy is used. One of the most

on the leading edge with projects

the university’s previous fastest

important of these projects is

holding the potential to protect the

system, while consuming less than

hidden from view and easily

environment and maximize natural

one-half the electricity.

overlooked.

resources in creative and cost-ef-

+     

“We’re fortunate because in

fective ways. In labs, lecture halls

many instances the right thing to

of pipes buried around the center

and experimental plots, faculty and

do for the environment is also the

of campus, conveying hot water

students are unlocking the secrets

smart thing to do economically.

and chilled water to 34 buildings

that will help grow the green

That hasn’t always been the case,�

for use in controlling the tem-

economy and foster sustainable –

Dumas said.

perature in each building,� Ralph

 /

“The central loop is a system

Nobles, Facilities Management

Moreover, Mississippi State is

Land-grant institutions make a difference on their campuses and

associate director for utilities,

home to one of the world’s green-

in the communities they serve,

explained. “The central loop pro-

est supercomputers. The newly

and sustainability at Missis-

vides greater operational economy

released Green500 list ranks Mis-

sippi State illustrates the positive

and lower overall energy usage

sissippi State’s “Talon� supercom-

impact made at the intersection of

than individual boilers, chillers

   % 

research, teaching and service.

Alumnus Summer | Fall 2010 5


MSU’s

Charm

6 Alumnus Summer | Fall 2010


m

unites past with present

I

n the 1950s, Jeff Wilker-

script librarian for MSU Librar-

appreciate the important part he

son and his wife Ida were

ies. “Before his death in 1997,

and others like him have played in

busy raising a family and

;    

Mississippi’s history,� she said.

farming more than 1,000

photographs used on the program

acres near Winterville in

to the university and the collection

president of the Mississippi

the Mississippi Delta . A glimpse

is now part of the Consortium for

Historical Society, added that the

of what their lives and the lives

the History of Agricultural and

CHARM project is exciting for

of hundreds of other Mississippi

Nowell, who is the current

Rural Mississippi, or CHARM.�

her and others who share an inter-

farm families were like a half

Through CHARM, Abraham

est in preserving history for future

century ago is preserved in the

added, materials related to the role

CHARM collection at Missis-

played by agriculture, forestry

sippi State University’s Mitchell

and rural life in Mississippi are

Memorial Library.

preserved and made available for

â&#x20AC;&#x153;From 1955 until 1961, How ;   < 

generations.

teaching, learning and research. For Princella Wilkerson Now-

Family of the Weekâ&#x20AC;? segment

ell of Winterville, the CHARM

for WLBT-TV in Jackson and

project has helped preserve a part

each week the program featured

of her family history.

a family that met standards for

By Bob RatliďŹ&#x20AC; Photos courtesy of MSU Libraries

â&#x20AC;&#x153;My dad was a good farmer

  !; 

and having the photos and other

and county Extension agents,â&#x20AC;?

material from the Farm Family of

said Mattie Abraham, manu-

the Week segment has helped me

Alumnus Summer | Fall 2010 7


â&#x20AC;&#x153;

Helping individuals and family groups preserve and share items of historical value with others is an important part of CHARM.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;

8 Alumnus Summer | Fall 2010


“Helping individuals and family groups preserve and share items of historical value with others is an

diverse rural past is an important part of the CHARM project. “When materials are donated

important part of CHARM,” MSU’s

they are inventoried, described and

Abraham said. “Donating these ma-

placed in environmentally sound

terials to an archive ensures that they

storage,” Abraham said. “Reproduc-

are not scattered or lost and ensures

tions of the items are also made

open access to all who are interested.”

and stored in the CHARM digital

CHARM was established in 2002 and has brought together an impres-

database.” In 2005, the CHARM project

sive array of documents and artifacts

was designated a site for Southern

that include the Lenoir Family Planta-

regional agricultural history and

tion Records, the Fernwood Lumber

rural life by the Agriculture Network

Collection and the Frank Gates Archi-

Information Center, a section of the

tectural Records, among others.

U.S. Department of Agriculture’s

Users of the archive include stu-

National Agricultural Library.

dents from MSU and other schools

There are currently more than

doing academic research, individu-

10,000 digital items from 39 col-

als preparing family histories and

lections in the CHARM database,

writers searching for information and

which is available on the web at

photographs for their publications.

library.msstate.edu/charm.

Among recent users has been Ted

Individuals may also have access

Ownby, director of the Center for

to CHARM materials under secure

the Study of Southern Culture at the

conditions in the library and items

University of Mississippi. Ownby

from the CHARM collections are

is selecting photographs from the

periodically used in exhibits at the

CHARM collection for use in the

MSU library. “While collecting and

upcoming Mississippi Encyclopedia,

preserving materials related to the

an interdisciplinary work that will

state’s rural past is an important part

cover virtually all aspects of past and

of CHARM, it’s just as important to

present life in Mississippi, including

have them available for both research

literature, art and architecture, music,

and enjoyment by anyone interested

folk life, religion, and other themes.

in this aspect of our history,” said

“CHARM is particularly useful

Frances Coleman, dean of MSU

because so many of the photos and

libraries. “By providing access to the

other materials are online so I can

CHARM collections we help Mis-

see what they look like,” he said.

sissippians make a direct connection

“The collection is a unique re-

with their history.”

source for information on agricul-

For additional information on

ture and rural life in Mississippi.”

CHARM, contact Abraham at

Providing access to the materi-

662-325-3848, or by e-mail at

als related to Mississippi’s rich and

mabraham@library.msstate.edu.

Alumnus Summer | Fall 2010 9


Stricklin

10 Alumnus Summer | Fall 2010


takes deliberate approach in steering MSU athletics

By Kenny Billings Photos courtesy of MSU Athletics

W

hen Scott Stricklin left Mississippi State in 1993 to join the media relations staff at Auburn, it was a reluctant yet necessary move for a young

professional seeking to gain experience and grow professionally in the world of college athletics. Two years ago, the 40-year-old Jackson native had the opportunity to end a 15-year journey around the NCAA, which included stints at Tulane, Baylor and Kentucky, and accepted an invitation from then-Athletic Director Greg Byrne to return to his alma mater as senior associate athletic director for external affairs. For Stricklin, his wife Anne, the youngest daughter of Basketball Hall of Fame member Bailey Howell, and daughters Abby (9) and Sophie (6), it was the culmination of a career come full circle and a chance to return to the place they all considered home. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is just something that makes sense about working at your alma mater,â&#x20AC;? Stricklin said of his return. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I remember walking out onto Scott     >       play â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Hail Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; with the scattered cowbells in the background. I remember feeling this swell of emotion because there are certain sights, sounds and smells that make Davis Wade Stadium just come alive on game day. It was good to be home after 15 years.â&#x20AC;? It would also turn out to be a move that would catapult Stricklin to a position that had long been in the back of his mind, yet he rarely dreamed he might one day achieve it. On May 7, before a gathering of fans, friends and family, he was of        %QZ     director, 22 years after beginning his career in athletics as a student assistant. Stricklin said his time working in various

Alumnus Summer | Fall 2010 11


Photo by Kristen Baker

capacities around the SEC and the

Noble or any of our other facilities,

NCAA, often competing against

they know they are going to be in

MSU, gave him a unique perspec-

     [

tive as to how the university and Photo by Kristen Baker Photo by Russ Houston

its athletic program are perceived

department will be creating an

from the outside. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a perspec-

overall experience for internal

tive, he said, that is invaluable as

and external stakeholders that

he prepares the athletic depart-

will generate a sense of pride and

ment for the future.

ownership for everyone connected

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I know what it is like to sit     $"

12 Alumnus Summer | Fall 2010

He said a primary focus of his

to Mississippi State. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of the biggest traps we

have the advantage of being able to

could fall into is thinking that the

see the university from both sides.

university exists because of the

Mississippians are known for

athletic department. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the other

their work ethic and being tough,

way around. We are not on an is-

resilient people. I want us to build

land,â&#x20AC;? Stricklin said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our business

a program that is representative of

is not to sell tickets; it is to provide

our people. I want us to create a

an experience for everyone our de-

brand of toughness so that when a

partment touches. For the student-

team comes to Davis Wade, Dudy

athlete, it is about providing them


a quality educational experience

Mark Keenum during the inter-

and a quality playing experience.

view process for the position.

For our external stakeholders, it is

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Because of our budget,

about providing them a sense of

maximizing our resources to put

pride and love of institution that

us in a position to win is one of

engages them with the university. I

the toughest jobs in the country,

want to be able to give State people

  %  

a reason to hold their heads high

who we are. Our athletic programs

and wear their shirts with pride.â&#x20AC;?

     

A great source of that pride,

of intensity and competitiveness

he says, comes from athletic

and truly embody what a Bulldog

programs that consistently win

isâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a tough, tenacious, unrelent-

and compete for championships.

ing opponent that will not give up.

With a program that has an annual

That does not happen by acci-

      

dent. It has to be a very deliber-

many of the schools it competes

ate process, where we seek out

against, building such a program

those kinds of coaches and staff

has its challengesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a fact, Strick-

members and recruit those kinds

lin said, that was brought up more

of athletes. My hope is that across

than once by university President

the board, that will be our brand.â&#x20AC;?

I know what it is like to sit on the other side of the ďŹ eld, so I have the advantage of being able to see the university from both sides.

Alumnus Summer | Fall 2010 13


MSU track

By Kenny Billings Photos courtesy of MSU Athletics

finishes with a strong showing

T

    ]  >    the 2010 season with a top 20 overall

The 4x100 team of Justin Christian, Kenny

ranking in the NCAA, while junior

May, Mullings and Tate made their contributions

Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neal Wilder, freshman Tavaris Tate

] %       ]`{  

and sophomore Jody-Ann Muir claimed four gold

39:09, the second fastest in school history, and a

medals, collectively, in international competition.

       |{##%

On the legs of the 4x100 and 4x400 relay

At the NACAC Under 23 Championships in

teams, led by three-time All American Dwight

Miramar, Fla., featuring athletes from 32 coun-

Mullings, MSU claimed a national rank of 17

tries, freshman All American Tate claimed the

following the 2010 NCAA Outdoor Track &

gold medal in the 400-meter dash with a time of

Field Championships.

45.36 before teaming with fellow Bulldog, Wilder,

Mullings, along with teammates Emanuel

Southern Calâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Joey Hughes and LeJerald Betters

 $_  + $   

} $  ~!~   Â&#x20AC;Â Â&#x201A;Â&#x192;Â&#x192;Â&#x2020;$ 

the 4x400 behind Texas A&M with a time of

fastest time recorded in the world this year.

3:01.66, the second fastest in school history. Prior to the national championships, the 4x400

14 Alumnus Summer | Fall 2010

     ]`{{   

Running for her native country of Jamaica, Muir ran an opening leg of 52.20 in the 4x400 to

team had collected an impressive resume that

lead her team to the gold with a world junior lead-

included wins at the Penn Relays and NCAA East

ing time of 3:34.41 at the CAC Junior Champion-

Regionals in Greensboro, N.C., and a second-

ships in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic.


Chelsea Bramlett: Softball phenom Completes stellar MSU career By Kenny Billings | Photos courtesy of MSU Athletics

W

hen Chelsea Bramlett chose

players in the nation, including being

school at First Assembly Christian School

to continue her softball

named to the United States Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

in her hometown. During her summers,

career at Mississippi State

National Team the past two years. She

she would play with summer leagues and

and made the 200-mile

     

attend the MSU softball camp, where

move from her home in Cordova, Tenn.,

prestigious Honda Award, considered the

she developed a relationship with Miller.

she set her sights on reaching her fullest

Heisman Trophy of college softball.

Miller also coaches Bramlett on the

potential and being the best player she could be.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;When you come from a small school to a university, you hope to earn a starting

Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s National Team. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She was an outstanding athlete and

spot and to continue to succeed and get

immediately caught our attention,â&#x20AC;? said

Jay Millerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s squad, it would be safe to say

better,â&#x20AC;? Bramlett said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is humbling to

Miller. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She could run well, had a lot of

the four-time All American catcher has far

look back on my career and know my

athletic ability and a really strong arm, so

exceeded her own expectations, becoming

>      -

we decided to start recruiting her early.â&#x20AC;?

one of the premier players in the nation

lowed me to excel, and to know Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done

and the most decorated softball player in

something few others have done.â&#x20AC;?

After four years as a member of Coach

MSU history.

The path that led her to the pinnacle

â&#x20AC;&#x153;You see a lot of kids with talent, but unfortunately, they all donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t reach their potential. Chelseaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s accomplishments as a

of college softball actually began on a

Bulldog are a tribute to her hard work and

Bramlett has tallied an impressive list of

baseball diamond, where a 12-year-old

effort. It has been pretty special to watch

accomplishments and accolades on her

Chelsea played hardball with the boys be-

her get better every year.â&#x20AC;?

way to becoming one of the best college

fore beginning fast-pitch softball in high

During her tenure with the Bulldogs,

Miller said that while much of Bram-

Alumnus Summer | Fall 2010 15


lettโ€™s success can be attributed

of conference and NCAA honors.

was going to be representing the

to natural ability, the key to her

This summer, her list of accom-

entire nation when I step out on the

success has been her dedication

plishments continued to grow, with

$[}  <" > 

to working hard and remaining

the USA Womenโ€™s team riding an

of breathtaking, because it is such

committed to being the best she

undefeated streak to a Gold Medal

a huge responsibility and tremen-

could be.

in the ISF World Championships in

dous honor to be playing for your

Caracas, Venezuela.

country.โ€

โ€œChelsea is always working to improve. A lot of players will

In 2009, Miller and the USA

Though her college career has

sometimes take it easy and coast

Team claimed gold in the Canada

come to a close, the teaching and

here or coast there, but Chelsea

Cup, World Cup of Softball and

coaching major continued to rep-

is not like that. She never takes

Japan Cup.

resent the USA at international

time off and is always focused on

Of all her accomplishments

tournaments through the summer

getting better. That is what it takes

and recognitions, Bramlett said her

      

to compete at the international

membership on the USA team is

2010 semester. She also plans to

level.โ€

one of her proudest.

pass her love of the game on to

}     career this spring with a long list

โ€œWhen I put on that jersey,      "

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16 Alumnus Summer | Fall 2010

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  o 

Alumnus A Alum Al lum umnu n s Summer | Fall 2010 17


Campus

NEWS

10

summer ALUMNUS

Service DAWGS volunteer in community More than 250 Mississippi State volunteers participated in the

ly kicked off the dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s activities. Teams fanned out to more than

incoming freshmen, returning students, and university faculty

universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s campus-wide day of

20 sites to complete their volun-

and staff the opportunity to begin

service in August.

teer work and enjoyed a barbecue

the school year on a positive note

lunch immediately following.

through volunteerism.

The annual event is sponsored

Work sites for the 2010 Service

by Service DAWGS, an acronym

April Heiselt, an assistant pro-

for Donating A Wonderful Gift of

fessor of counselor education and

DAWGS Day included Maroon

Service.

educational psychology who leads

Edition Habitat for Humanity, Ai-

Megan Mullen, wife of head

the student organization, also is

ken Village Preschool, Boy Scout

football coach Dan Mullen, and

service learning coordinator for

Camp Seminole, the Salvation

Miss Mississippi and university

MSUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Leadership Programs.

Army, and Starkville Parks and

  ]  } Â&#x2021;  -

Heiselt said the day provides

Recreation, among others.

INSPIRE connects teachers with student researchers Teachers from around the Golden Triangle are

and math) disciplines. For each year of the program,

partnering with graduate students at MSU to enhance

        ]Â&#x2C6;

earth and space science education in seventh through

fellows, and together they design and implement

12th grade classrooms.

hands-on activities for the upcoming school year.

The innovative INSPIRE program, an acronym for Initiating New Science Partnerships in Rural Educa-

teachers gain valuable knowledge and new instruc-

tion, focuses on technology-supported, inquiry-based

tional tools, and our research fellows have the op-

learning.

portunity to incorporate their research in engineering,

According to MSU geosciences department project coordinator Sarah Radencic, INSPIRE takes an

18 Alumnus Summer | Fall 2010

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a win-win relationship,â&#x20AC;? Radencic said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The

geosciences and physics into real-world settings,â&#x20AC;? she explained.

interdisciplinary approach, connecting teachers with

+      

Mississippi State graduate student research fellows

multimillion dollar National Science Foundation

from three STEM (science, technology, engineering

Â&#x2030;  Â&#x160;QÂ&#x20AC;     


Maroon Edition reaches to Afghanistan As one service component of

Afghan Foundation, based in

YMCA building on East

the 2010 Maroon Edition common

Nashville, Tenn., the Maroon

Lee Boulevard.

reading program, the university is

Edition committee sponsored a

   

campus drive to collect backpacks

Mississippi State are re

foundation that provides supplies

   

sent to Afghanistan on

for school-aged children in war-

them, Crudden said.

Air Force transportss

torn Afghanistan. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s freshman common

Items collected by

on a space-availablee

Mortensonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Central Asia

basis.

Institute raises funds to sup-

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Both the Student nt

book is Greg Mortensonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Three

port the school-building efforts,

Cups of Tea,â&#x20AC;? a New York Times

added Maroon Edition chair Linda

Association and thee

best-seller that describes his com-

Morse, director of the Center for

Starkville com-

mitment to reducing poverty and

Teaching and Learning.

munity are activelyy

educating young girls in Pakistan

engaged in our

â&#x20AC;&#x153;We encourage those who wish to contribute that way to consider

efforts,â&#x20AC;? said Crud-

doing so,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We decided we

den, adding that

could support the goals of Morten-

could best engage others and build

Starkville Reads

sonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book and involve our campus,

cultural awareness by collecting

has adopted

community and alumni while

items that school children need.â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Three Cups of

and Afghanistan. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We looked for a way that we

raising awareness,â&#x20AC;? said Adele

A major campus drive was held

Teaâ&#x20AC;? and the Student nt Association

Crudden, co-chair of the Maroon

the weekend of the MSU-Georgia

will support a variety of outreach

Edition outreach efforts and director

football game on campus. A collec-

efforts.

of MSUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s social work program.

tion pod will be located between

Working through the Lamia

Colvard Student Union and the

ment technology-supported, inquiry-based instructional materials that infuse fellowsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; STEM research; increase K-12 science teachersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; content knowledge and technological skills; build partnerships between K-12 school districts and STEM-related careers; and provide international research experiences for fellows and teachers through which they receive training across geographic borders. Geosciences assistant professor Karen McNeal is principal investigator for the INSPIRE grant. to: enhance MSU research fellowsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; communication, teaching and team-building skills; develop and imple-

For additional information about INSPIRE, visit http://www.gk12.msstate.edu

Alumnus Summer | Fall 2010 19


Campus

NEWS

10

summer ALUMNUS

Keenum heads discussion of land-grant roles in food aid At an August gathering of international representatives in

noted. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We want to broaden the

Kansas City, Mo., Mississippi

reach of the university and its

State President Mark E. Keenum

research impact to serve not only

moderated a broad-ranging

our citizens here in Mississippi

discussion of the role land-grant

      

universities play in food aid and

the world.â&#x20AC;?

capacity development. His invited participation at

At the Kansas City meeting, Keenum headed a panel

the 2010 International Food Aid

that included administrators at

and Development Conference

Michigan State University, Lin-

came approximately a month

coln University of Missouri, and

after he addressed similar issues

Tuskegee University.

in discussions with several inter-

â&#x20AC;&#x153;With disasters such as the

national food agencies based in

 Â&#x2039;   ' >  $

Rome, Italy, including the World

or events closer to home such

Food Program and the Food and

as Hurricane Katrina, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a

Agriculture Organization. Both

need for food that can be quickly

are specialized agencies of the

deployed in emergencies, for

United Nations.

instance,â&#x20AC;? Keenum noted. He said

Sponsored by USDA and the

representatives of the World Food

United States Agency for Interna-

Program and Costco Corporation,

tional Development, the Kansas

one of the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest retail

City gathering brought together

chains, came to the Mississippi

participants from more than 20

State campus recently to discuss

countries with representatives from

development of a cashew-based

the food and agriculture industries,

food product that could be pro-

private voluntary and non-govern-

vided to disaster victims.

mental organizations, and U.S. and foreign governments. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mississippi State is becoming

20 Alumnus Summer | Fall 2010

ment and water supply,â&#x20AC;? Keenum

Land-grant universities, in particular, are well positioned to be in the forefront of developments that

internationally known as a leader

can reduce hunger and help other

in issues that range from food

nations improve the capacity to

product development and food

respond to needs within their own

safety to weather risk assess-

borders, Keenum said.


Keenum seeks to enhance research alliances Having concluded an invited meeting in Italy with

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll soon start discussions on our

three international agencies, MSU President Mark E.

campus with faculty members about an

Keenum is moving to tap capabilities of the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

m more me more international center or other ways to become

        

engaged with organizations such as the U.S. S. State Sttat S tate

â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are some exciting opportunities to match

Departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Agency for International Developveelo l o p-

research strengths and expertise at Mississippi State

ment, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and and

with projects that literally stretch around the globe,â&#x20AC;?

non-governmental agencies and foundations,â&#x20AC;? ns, s,,â&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;? he he

said the former U.S. under-secretary of agriculture.

explained.

The privately funded travel took Keenum in June

Such collaborations should open new opportuopppoort r u-

to Rome, headquarters of the Food and Agriculture

nities for MSU research, as well as travel-abroad -abbr broa o d oa

Organization and World Food Program, specialized

   !       

agencies of the United Nations, as well as the Inter-

technical assistance avenues for faculty and ndd staff, staaff ff,,

national Fund for Agricultural Development. He had

the chief executive said.

been invited by the FAO to explore possible connec-

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The United States is the largest single contributor onttributor

tions with MSU, which ranks seventh nationally in

to U.N. world food assistance efforts,â&#x20AC;? he noted. otedd. â&#x20AC;&#x153;By

agricultural research and expenditures.

exploring these opportunities, we not only serve ervve that

â&#x20AC;&#x153;As a result of these meetings, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great interest

cause, but we build the strength of our research pro-

in further dialog about possible memoranda of under-

            

standing with the FAO in particular,â&#x20AC;? Keenum said.

] %         [

Alumnus Summer | Fall 2010 21


Campus

NEWS

10

summer ALUMNUS

MSU supercomputer among worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;greenestâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Mississippi State

currently be used for many of the things that we do,â&#x20AC;?

is now home to one

 +}> $      -

of o the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s green-

tor for the universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s High Performance Computing

est e supercomputers,

Collaboratory, often referred to as HPC2. +         % -

aaccording to the rrecently released

ous fastest system, while consuming less than one-half

Green500 list. G

the electricity, and performs nearly 420 million calcula-

The list ranks the

tions for every watt of electricity it uses. The supercomputer is an IBM iDataPlex cluster

MSU supercomM pputer, named Talon,

and has 3,072 processor cores, using six-core Intel

aas the most energy

Xeon processors, and more than six terabytes of

  

Â&#x152;#"    *    " } 

purpose super-

network provided by Voltaire Inc., and has a peak

world, and the ni ninth most energy computer in the world

performance of more than 34 trillion calculations per

  Â&#x2030;Â&#x201A;  %

second. Talon is located at the HPC2 facility in the Thad

most powerful supercomputers by the number of calculations performed for every watt of power that

Cochran Research, Technology and Economic

they consume.

Development Park adjacent to the MSU campus in

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The top eight systems all use very specialized

Starkville. The supercomputer will support research

IBM Cell processors or hybrid GPU approaches to

for the Center for Advanced Vehicular Systems,

    $    

Center for Computational Sciences, Geosystems

excellent for a limited set of applications, they canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t

Research Institute, and the Northern Gulf Institute.

Research VP named to Gulf recovery commission Mississippi Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chief research

on the broad-based, 34-member

vided a multi-front response to the

     -

board of scientists and business

oil spill. In June, BP gave a $10

sippi Gulf of Mexico Commission

leaders with representatives of state

million grant to the Mississippi

by Gov. Haley Barbour in August.

and local governments acting as ex

State-led Northern Gulf Institute

 

to meet immediate research needs

David Shaw, the universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vice president for research and economic development, will serve

22 Alumnus Summer | Fall 2010

Since the Deepwater Horizon explosion in April, MSU has pro-

related to the incident. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mississippi Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s research, service


Administrative changes announced Mississippi State President Mark E. Keenum

dean of the

announced in June plans to combine administrative

College of For-

functions of two research units and the colleges of

est Resources

Forest Resources and Agriculture and Life Sciences.

and director of

Consolidation of administrative units for two col-

the Forest and

           

Wildlife Researchh

while maintaining the separate identities of the col-

Center. He also

leges, he said.

will assume duties es

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The university faces unprecedented budget

as interim dean

reductions in the next two years as the state under-

of the College of

goes challenging economic times,â&#x20AC;? Keenum noted.

Agriculture and

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Combining administrative resources will reduce

Life Sciences

costs while ensuring the quality of the two programs

and interim director of the Mississippi

remains intact.â&#x20AC;?

Agricultural and Forestry Experiment

The land-grant institution has been proactive in

Station. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Forestry and agriculture are the

dealing with current and future budget challenges. Last fall, the president developed a faculty-led Select

largest and most important industries

{ `   "  

in our stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economy, accounting for

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The committee recommended merging the two col-

28.8 percent of all jobs in the state and

leges to save administrative costs,â&#x20AC;? Keenum said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;After

23.5 percent of all income,â&#x20AC;? said Vice

visiting with friends and supporters of the two colleges,

President Greg Bohach of the Division

as well as faculty and staff, it was apparent the best way

of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine.

to accomplish the needed savings is to merge the admin-

â&#x20AC;&#x153;MSU is ranked seventh among all U.S. institutions

istrative roles of each unit.â&#x20AC;?

in research expenditures for the agricultural sciences

The merger could save up to $1 million annually.

and forestry. <+          -

The university must cut approximately $47 million

tive functions will allow us to maintain our nationally

over the next two years. MSU alumnus George M. Hopper will remain

prominent programs and faculty,â&#x20AC;? Bohach added.

and outreach are making a difference

development of an ongoing vision

now, and we will continue to provide

to enhance the Gulf of Mexico for

long-term leadership,â&#x20AC;? Shaw said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I

the Mississippi Gulf Coast.

am honored to serve on the commission

The commission will work with

on behalf of the MSU faculty and staff

the Gulf of Mexico Alliance and

working to restore the Gulf and mini-

various state agencies to develop a

mize the spillâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s impact on the regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

plan to submit to Navy Secretary

economy and environment.â&#x20AC;?

Ray Mabus, the former Missis-

According to the Governorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

sippi governor tapped by President

&$    

Barack Obama to lead the restora-

impact of the oil spill and aid in the

tion of the Gulf region.

Alumnus Summer | Fall 2010 23


Campus

NEWS

10

summer ALUMNUS

EcoCAR team wins big others. The competition challenges North American engineering majors to â&#x20AC;&#x153;re-engineerâ&#x20AC;? a GM-donated vehicle to minimize fuel consumption and emissions, while maintaining its utility, safety and performance. In separate, but similar, vehicle redesign competitions several years ago, MSU was the overall international winner. Many of the students involved in that challenge went on to work with automotive and other related companies after graduation. EcoCAR team leader Matthew C. Doude, a mechanical engineering graduate student from McCool, said preparing the vehicle for inspections made this year the most rigorous in the competition. The team designed and built a biodiesel extended-range electric vehicle, he added. <+     >             mates,â&#x20AC;? Doude said, adding that, of 1,000 possible Mississippi State is on its way for a possible

points, MSU scored 844. Virginia Tech University was second with 691, he added.

repeat. A university student team of some 20 members took

Upon learning of the achievement, MSU President

        

Mark E. Keenum said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We congratulate each student,

2010 EcoCAR: The NeXt Challenge.

the faculty advisers, and all those involved in this

MSU was among 16 institutions represented at the ]        -

tremendous win. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We know that Mississippi State students are

tition sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy,

among some of the brightest and best, and this team

General Motors and the Canadian government, among

has made the university and our entire state proud

Library dean honored for Grant Collection role The dean of libraries at Mississippi State is one of two being

Now based at MSU, the asso-

general that help make possible evaluations of his life and career. Given at the organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

honored with the Ulysses S. Grant

ciation was established in 1962 by

#  %Â&#x2021; Â&#x2019;] 

the Civil War Centennial Com-

recent annual meeting on campus,

Award of Merit.

missions of Illinois, New York

the Simon Awards are a memorial

and Ohio. Its goal is the collection

to the late USGA executive direc-

recognition with Frank J. Wil-

      

tor and managing editor who led

liams, retired Rhode Island Su-

evidence related to the 18th U.S.

in publishing the 31-volume â&#x20AC;&#x153;The

preme Court chief justice and the

president and top Union Civil War

Papers of Ulysses S. Grant.â&#x20AC;?

Frances N. Coleman shares the

24 Alumnus Summer | Fall 2010

associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s longtime president.


Bulldog Embroidered with their accomplishments,â&#x20AC;? Keenum said. Overall, MSUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s team brought home 20 trophies from California. "       $      Â&#x2039;     MSU faculty adviser Marshall Molen said he was pleased with the hard work, effort and ingenuity students dedicated to the competition. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never been so proud,â&#x20AC;? Molen said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These are some of the    % [ MSUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s EcoCAR team designed a plug-in hybrid vehicle with an electric range of 60 miles. During competitionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s testing, the vehicle achieved a 118 miles-per-gallon equivalent of combined city and highway mileage.

Grant boosts training project

0RQGD\6DWXUGD\ &ROOHJH3DUNÂ&#x2021;5XVVHOO6WUHHW 

Focused on making professional development more accessible for rural and low-income childcare providers in Mississippi, a new university project will develop multimedia tools to demonstrate best practices in early care and education. With a $750,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Education, the

standing childcare practitioners,â&#x20AC;? Grace explained. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These will be put in an

universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Early Childhood Institute will create an online library that shows

online library for access by instructors, trainers and coaches who work with

best practices by demonstrating practitioners at work, said Cathy Grace, ECIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

childcare centers.â&#x20AC;?

founding director and a professor in the College of Education. The institute will use nearly 10 years of data about strengths and weaknesses of Mississippi

Elizabeth F. Shores, the instituteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s associate director for research,

childcare facilities as the basis for the project. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We will work with Mississippi Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Television Cen         -

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The association is fortunate

To expand access to professional development, resources also will be made available with training notebooks and accompanying DVDs. communications and national initiatives, will direct the project with assistance from Melina Vaughan and other ECI staff members.

tinguished Professor Emeritus of

been housed since 1964. With

to have the talents and dedica-

History, succeeded Simon as the

the relocation to MSUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mitchell

tion of Dean Coleman and Justice

associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s executive director

Memorial Library, she became a

Williams,â&#x20AC;? said John F. Marsza-

and managing editor.

member of the USGA board of

lek. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These presentations are but

Coleman played a major role

directors.

a small token of gratitude for all

in the successful 2008 transfer

they have done and continue to do

of the Grant Collection from

the Grant Association and the

for our important historical work.â&#x20AC;?

the Morris Library at Southern

presidential collection, visit http://

Illinois University, where it had

library.msstate.edu/USGrant/.

Marszalek, an MSU Giles Dis-

For complete information on

Alumnus Summer | Fall 2010 25


Alumni

NEWS

10

summer ALUMNUS

Spirit of

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Forever Maroon and Whiteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 102 year old, H. Stanley â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dutchâ&#x20AC;? Amsler, recalls his time as a student at Mississippi Agricultural and Mechanical College By Sheri Pape

In 1929, Leakesville na-

ries high, and had a stairri

Photos by Russ Houston

tive H. Stanley â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dutchâ&#x20AC;?

way at each end of the w

Amsler came to Missis-

hhall,â&#x20AC;? Amsler described.

sippi Agricultural and

â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;&#x153;The sophomores would

Mechanical College as

pput somebody at each

a freshman. It was a

eend of the hall to keep

time of instability for the

tthe freshmen from leav-

state and nation, as the

iing and they would pick

country faced the Great

aat us.â&#x20AC;?

Depression. Enrollment

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Do you know, when

at Mississippi A&M was

I got to be a sophomore,â&#x20AC;?

in decline, and, at times,

he added, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t practice any of that.â&#x20AC;?

professors were unable to receive compensation. Times were hard in the South, but at Mississippi A&M, the Bulldog spirit was still alive. As students

Among the many changes

those who werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t playing were

during Amslerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time was a new

required to attend the games.

name for the state institution. On

Sophomores were relentless to

Feb. 3, 1932, the state Legisla-

dealt with the effects of the Depres-

freshmen during those days, and

tor acknowledged a petition for

sion, they continued their education

initiated underclassmen in a vari-

a name change, and Mississippi

and extracurricular activities on

 &  

A&M became Mississippi State

campus. Life went on despite the

of the year, freshmen were thrown

College. The academic units

struggles felt across the nation.

into Eckieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pond, a landmark still

comprising the newly renamed

there today in the southeast corner

institution included the Agricul-

still remembers much about his

of campus. Though Amsler never

tural Experiment Station, Divi-

time as a student. When he entered

was thrown in, rumors of the

sion of Continuing Education, the

A&M, there were rules enforced

icy plunge were enough to keep

Mississippi Agricultural Extension

by upperclassmen that all of the

underclassmen inside.

Service, as well as the Colleges

Amsler, who graduated in 1933,

â&#x20AC;&#x153;froshâ&#x20AC;? had to follow. Freshmen

  %

of Engineering, Agriculture and

were not allowed to walk on the

relief in the halls of Old Main,

Business and Industry, and the

grass and had to stick to the paths.

their home away from home.

Schools of General Science and

They had their own football and

26 Alumnus Summer | Fall 2010

baseball team, the Bullpups, and

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The old dormitory was four sto-

Industrial Pedagogy.


The name change didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t inter-

His friends then decided

rupt life on campus, and clubs and

to nominate him for Student

organizations continued on with

Association president anyway, ay ay, y,

business as usual. Amsler was

and he was elected to serve

involved with several organizations

his senior year.

as a student. He served as a sports

While serving as the SA

   + Â&#x152;    

president, Amsler frequently

  Â&#x2019;{# Â&#x201C;

had business with Mitchell

was also member of the Greene

Robinson, the new college

County Club and Kappa Gamma, a

secretary. One afternoon he

local fraternity which later merged

walked into Mr. Robinsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

with Alpha Tau Omega.

$       

there ther th eree

named Una Brewer, who wass Mr. Mr

for for

activities, Amsler played baseball

Mitchellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s private secretary.

sev-

for four years at Mississippi State.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I went to the door and

eral

Among his many campus

At the time, the team didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have

knocked on it,â&#x20AC;? he recalled.

years

money for uniforms or equipment.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;There was this young woman sit-

before

However, under the leadership

ting in there by herself, monitor-

serving

of legendary coach and athletic

ing the telephone.â&#x20AC;?

in activee

director C.R. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dudyâ&#x20AC;? Noble, the team practiced every day.

She invited him in and offered to help with his questions. He

military duty in d i the Army.

One rainy afternoon during

came back on several occasions,

As World War II passed by,

Amslerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s junior year, Coach No-

and always dealt with Una, never

Amsler continued to serve in the

ble had the team practice sliding

with Mr. Robinson.

Army in the anti-aircraft division.

into second base. Amsler recalls

Amsler eventually asked her

Years later, Amsler returned to

the ground being very hard. On

to accompany him to a school

his beloved alma mater to accept

one of his sliding attempts, he

dance. The two hit it off and

a position with student affairs as a

hung his spikes on second base,

began dating. Upon graduation,

supervisor of a student apartment

and sprained his ankle.

Amsler proposed to and married

complex on campus. When he

the young lady in Mr. Robinsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

retired from the position, he moved

me out of baseball for a little

+    

to his wifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hometown of Canton.

while,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s when

for over 70 years, until her death.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;That was just enough to take

Dutch Amsler turned 102 years

the boys of my home county of

With the Depression still

old on October 17. To this day, he

Greene jumped in and said we

affecting the economy, students

recalls many fond memories of his

   [

from Mississippi State College

time at Mississippi State. Though

   -

itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been nearly 80 years since he

tion and did not take his friends

ment after graduation. However,

graduated, this Bulldog remains

seriously.

Amslerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s brother helped him get

passionate about his alma mater,

a job at a Civilian Conservation

and truly embodies the spirit of

Corp camp in Arkansas. He stayed

â&#x20AC;&#x153;forever maroon and white.â&#x20AC;?

Amsler chucked at the sugges-

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t win a job as a dog catcher,â&#x20AC;? he joked.

Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll sing i you a song s of colleges. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll tell you where to go. Columbia for her knowledge, Cornell to learn to row, Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ole Miss for her sloppy dues, For learning go to Penn, Nebraska for her confound luck, But to A&M for men! Alumnus Summer | Fall 2010 27


Alumni

NEWS

10

summer ALUMNUS

JANETDOWNEY

2010 Road Dawgs tour a success

The 2010 BancorpSouth Road Dawgs Tour

successfully came to an end on April 30. This was the fourth year for the annual trip, which is co-sponsored by the Alumni Association and Bulldog Club. Head football coach Dan Mullen headlined the trip, accompanied by several university ril representatives. The tour, which took place April 26-30, visited 12 cities across Mississippi, Alabama and Tennessee. More than 1,700 loyal Bulldog fans attended these events. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Road Dawgs tour is an exciting way to bring Mississippi State to our alumni and friends around the country,â&#x20AC;? said Jimmy Abraham, associate vice president for development and alumni and executive director of the MSU Alumni Association. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our fans showed their enthusiasm and support of MSU at every stop, and it was a great way to get ready for the 2010 football season.â&#x20AC;? Photos from the Road Dawgs event can be found at www.facebook.com/msstatealumni.

Top: Head football coach Dan Mullen speaks to the Panola County Alumni Chapter. Bottom: Bulldog faithful from the Harrison-Stone Chapter gather at the Biloxi Yacht Club for the ďŹ nal night of the Road Dawgs Tour.

Dunne honored with teaching award Dr. James

28 Alumnus Summer | Fall 2010

is to facilitate problem solving

since 1998, received a bachelor

and critical thinking skills which

professor of p

of science in physics from the

       

physics in p

American University in Wash-

study they choose to pursue.

tthe College

ington, D.C., in 1987, followed

oof Arts and

up with a doctorate from the

cessible and available to all of

Sciences,

same university in 1995.

his students, serving not only

was honored

Jimmy Abraham, left, presents Dr. James Dunne, right, with an award on behalf of the MSU Alumni Association.

Dunne, who has been at MSU

Dunne, a D

As a teacher, Dunne has

Dunne makes himself ac-

as a mentor, but as a friend

as the 2010 recipient of the

   +  

and support system during the

Excellence in Undergraduate

to provide insight for students

learning process. His involve-

Teaching Award presented by the

into the central concepts of the

ment continues outside of the

MSU Alumni Association.

study of physics. The second

classroom with other student


Alumni reunite during Super Bulldog Weekend More than 90 Bulldog faithful from the classes of 1950, 1955 and 1960 came together for a time of fellowship and celebration the weekend of April 16-17. During Super Bulldog Weekend, class members reunited for campus tours, a special lunch and a program, individual college gatherings and plenty of Bulldog fun. If you are a member of the classes of 1941, 1946, 1951, 1956 or 1961, make plans to attend next year.

Class of 1950: From left, seated: Tommy Everett, Rayburn Smith, Robert â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bobâ&#x20AC;? McElroy, Martha Swain, Robert â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bobâ&#x20AC;? Bryan, W.W. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Docâ&#x20AC;? Martin and Dero Ramsey From left, back row: Gil Foresman, Marvin â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ratâ&#x20AC;? RatcliďŹ&#x20AC;, John Lee, Jimmy Dick Carter, Charles Hardin, John Herring and Tom Worthington

Class of 1955: From left, seated: Stanley Gray, Robert â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bobâ&#x20AC;? Smallwood, David Spell, Calvin â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sonnyâ&#x20AC;? Hull, George McIntosh, Jesse Quinn, Roy Grafe and C.T. Carley From left, back row: George Mullendore, Gary Rees, W.A. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Billâ&#x20AC;? Sims, Robert Boyd, Charles Sappington, Garner Shannon, Ken Kennedy and Harry Boschert

Class of 1960: From left, front row: Jimmy Covington, W.T. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tommyâ&#x20AC;? West, William Turner, Hubert Christopher, James Henley, Dick Hall, Jerry Mitchell and Marion Cockrell From left, back row: Joe Clements, Jim Puryear, Walter Miller, William â&#x20AC;&#x153;Billâ&#x20AC;? Phillips, Frank Carter, Barney Smith, J. Don Trotter, Lawrence Hill, Robert Cato and Rodney Henderson

related activities. Since joining

Alumni Association. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He is an

American Association of Physics

MSUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s faculty, he has served as a

excellent teacher and mentor,

Teachers Committee on Physics

mentor for the football team and

and will continue to serve as a

in Pre-High School Education,

as faculty adviser for the Society

great asset to the students of this

and has helped develop numer-

of Physics Students.

university.â&#x20AC;?

ous workshops and courses to

â&#x20AC;&#x153;During Dr. Dunneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time at

His dedication to education

better train secondary educators

MSU, he has shown tremendous

extends far beyond the campus

concentrating in science. He also

service to his students, depart-

of Mississippi State. Dunne has

volunteers in area schools by giv-

ment and college,â&#x20AC;? said Jimmy

positively impacted K-12 educa-

ing physics demonstrations and

Abraham, associate vice president

 $      

speaking on other science related

for development and alumni and

science, throughout Mississippi

topics.

executive director of the MSU

and the region. He serves on the

Alumnus Summer | Fall 2010 29


Alumni

NEWS

10

summer ALUMNUS

Alumni Association to sponsor 2010-11 athletic radio broadcasts the Athletic Department in this en-

of the university throughout the

will be sponsoring the radio broad-

deavor, but this will also allow us to

year,â&#x20AC;? continued Abraham. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There

casts at all football, baseball and

promote our Association numerous

will be a total of 126 games with

menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball games

times to thousands of listeners.â&#x20AC;?

more than 1,000 on-air mentions.â&#x20AC;?

The MSU Alumni Association

during the 2010-11 athletic season.

The sponsorship includes at least

The Alumni Association radio

six live radio mentions during each

sponsorship began with the open-

portunity to let all Bulldog fans

broadcast, two 15-20 second live

ing football game against Mem-

know of the Alumni Associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

reads per broadcast, opening radio

phis on Sept. 4. It will continue

support of MSU Athletics,â&#x20AC;? said

billboard prior to each broadcast,

throughout the entire 2010-11

Jimmy Abraham, associate vice

and a public address announcement

athletic year. Radio broadcasts can

president for development and

with the associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s logo on the

be heard on more than 25 statewide

alumni and executive director of the

video board at each game.

networks, online at Maroon to the

â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are very proud of the op-

MSU Alumni Association. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Not

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The radio sponsorship will allow

only are we excited to partner with

us to reach more alumni and friends

Max, and on some Sirius and XM satellite stations.

Alumni Association honors new alumni, provides resources online On April 22, the Alumni Association welcomed

The DVD included informative videos introducing the

the 2010 graduating class

newest alumni to the association, chapters and other

as the newest members to

important aspects.

the Bulldog alumni fam-

A new section has been created on the website for

ily. Adding to the nearly

recent graduates as well. Young alumni can visit www.

118,000 living alumni, over

alumni.msstate.edu/newgrads for links to all of the

700 students attended the

featured videos, important information to help with their

event held at the Hunter

transition from college life to the workplace, as well as

Henry Center courtyard.

important alumni and university links.

The annual Senior Cel-

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our desire is for our newest alumni to make a smooth

ebration was cosponsored

transition from college to the real world. We are here

by the Division of Student

to help in any way, and hope our alumni will utilize our

Affairs and the Student Association. The festivities in-

staff, volunteers and resources as they embark on their

   $]Â&#x2C6;  $  $  

careers,â&#x20AC;? said Jimmy Abraham, associate vice president for

In addition to the Senior Celebration, all new graduates received a special DVD from the MSU

30 Alumnus Summer | Fall 2010

Alumni Association in honor of their May graduation.

development and alumni and executive director of the MSU Alumni Association.


New national alumni oďŹ&#x192;cers elected The 2010-11 Mississippi State University Alumni Association National OďŹ&#x192;cers (left to right), are Charles A. Cascio, immediate former president; Camille Scales Young, national second vice president; Karen Dugard Lawler, national president; Jerry L. Toney, national ďŹ rst vice president and Jodi White Turner; national treasurer. and vice president of Cadence

Montgomery chapter. She is the

ference in February, the Alumni

Bank in Starkville. He has served

   ' -

Association elected new national

as president of the Oktibbeha

South Bank in Tallassee.

   QQÂ&#x192;$

County chapter and national sec-

During the annual winter con-

Mississippi State University alumni worldwide.

ond vice president. Camille Scales Young, a

Charles A. Cascio of Cleveland, Miss., assumed the role of immediate former national president at

1994 communication manage-

the end of his term. He served as

Madison, Ala., assumed the role

ment graduate who also earned a

national president for the 2009-

of national president on July 1,

masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in agriculture and

Â&#x20AC;Q  {    

2010. Lawler earned a Bachelor

extension education in 1996, has

in 1979 with a degree in industrial

of Business Administration in

been elected national second vice

engineering. He is the business

1982 and a Master of Business

president. Young, of Madison, is a

development manager for Baxter

Administration in 1994, both from

government affairs representative

Healthcare Corp., Cleveland loca-

Mississippi State. She is the team

with Watkins Ludlam Winter and

tion. Cascio has also been in the

lead for the budget integration and

Stennis, P.A. in Jackson. She is a

     $

     &

member of the Central Mississippi

national second vice president and

 {    & 

chapter board of directors, and

an at-large director.

NASAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Marshall Space Flight

has served on various committees

â&#x20AC;&#x153;For 125 years, the leaders

Center in Huntsville, Ala. With the

including the Evening in Maroon,

of our Alumni Association have

Huntsville-Decatur chapter, she has

Young Alumni and Central Missis-

worked tirelessly to promote and

served as treasurer, vice president

sippi Tennis Tournament.

help Mississippi State University

Karen Dugard Lawler, of

Jodi White Turner of Mont-

in whatever way possible,â&#x20AC;? said

;      

gomery, Ala., continues her role as

Jimmy Abraham, associate vice

vice president.

and president. Most recently,

national treasurer. Turner received

president for development and

Others elected are:

a bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in accounting

alumni and executive director of

Jerry L. Toney of Starkville

in 1997 and a masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in

the MSU Alumni Association.

      -

business administration in 1999,

<+  

dent. He is a 1996 business gradu-

both from Mississippi State. She

continue that tradition and will

ate with a degree in real estate,

has served as treasurer of the

do an outstanding job leading our

    

Birmingham, Ala., chapter and is

association and representing our

Â&#x201C;  {    ' 

now actively involved with the

nearly 118,000 alumni worldwide.â&#x20AC;?

Alumnus Summer | Fall 2010 31


Alumni

NEWS

10

summer ALUMNUS

Kentucky Derby, Masters Golf Tournament added to 2011 destinations Each year, theAlumni Association sponsors several travel opportunities enriched with informative educational programs, the services of a professional tour director and expert local guides. In 2011, the Traveling Bulldogs will embark to destinations across Africa, Asia, Europe, Australia and North America. Led by world-renowned travel agencies, each of the sponsored adventures ensures that travel-

trips to the Kentucky Derby and

more. Travelers will be able to

ers will have a unique, exciting

Masters Golf Tournament. Both

discover history and tradition

and worry-free experience. All

viewed as a â&#x20AC;&#x153;must haveâ&#x20AC;? lifetime

while exploring new lands.

details and itineraries are carefully

experience, these trips are sure to

planned and executed allowing

please travelers of all ages. In addition, MSU alumni will

guests to sit back and enjoy the vacation. In 2011, the Traveling Bulldogs are offering two special

For more information on the 2011 Traveling Bulldogs trips, visit www.alumni.msstate.edu/

visit destinations such as the Great

travel, or contact Libba Andrews

Barrier Reef, the Holy Lands, the

at 662-325-3479 or landrews@

Mediterranean isles and much

alumni.msstate.edu.

MSU thanks staďŹ&#x20AC; for service to the university In May, Mississippi State celebrated the hard work of its

day we can come together as a family and just enjoy

staff members by holding the annual Staff Appreciation sta

the day. PSSAC would like to thank all of our volun-

Day. Held at The Junction on a beautiful and sunny afDa

teers, sponsors and especially our MSU staff, faculty

ternoon, the special luncheon featured free food, games ter

and alumni.â&#x20AC;?

and an prizes for all university staff members. The Hollywood-themed event was sponsored by Hollywo  & ' $    

vice vi presidents, the Alumni Association and an the Professional and Support Staff Advisory Council. A â&#x20AC;&#x153;This event is very special to our staff,â&#x20AC;? said Sam Manning, 2009-2010 sta chair cha of the council. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is the one

Al SSummer | FFallll 2010 32 Alumnus


Alumni Association revamps, launches new website This June, the Alumni Association

and executive director of the MSU

unveiled a new look to their website. In an

Alumni Association. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our goal is to be

effort to improve access and provide more

able to provide our alumni and friends

information to its nearly 118,000 alumni,

with up-to-date technology and informa-

the project took nearly a year of research,

tion in order to keep them connected to

mark in the heart of campus

planning and implementation.

and informed of events related to Mississippii

d i the h 1950s 1950 andd 1960s. 1960 All graduates d during

State and the Alumni Association.â&#x20AC;?

can join â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Bull Ringâ&#x20AC;? by visiting our

The new site offers easy to view drop-

   > < [<

down navigation organized under nine cat-

The Alumni Association website joins

egories. Another new feature on the home-

newly redesigned sites for the vice president

page is a news hub for alumni, university

for development and alumni and the Hunter

and athletic department press releases.

Henry Center, all a part of the Division of

site, look for updates and improvements

Alumni and friends can visit the new asso-

Development and Alumni.

in the coming months. For information or

time login.â&#x20AC;? As the association transitions to the new

Other features include the association

to provide feedback, please contact Sheri

online community called â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Bull Ring.â&#x20AC;?

Pape, marketing and communication coor-

Named for a spot where students gathered

dinator at spape@advservices.msstate.edu.

website,â&#x20AC;? said Jimmy Abraham, associate

to meet friends, catch up on news, and â&#x20AC;&#x153;be

View the newly redesigned website at

vice president for development and alumni

in the know,â&#x20AC;? the Bull Ring was a land-

ciation site and gather important information from every area of the university. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are very excited to launch our new

www.alumni.msstate.edu.

Your Clients Expect You To Know Everything.

JAMES A. KOERBER

BRIAN SCHMITTLING

EDWARD T. SIMMONS

CPA/ABV, CVA, CFE, CFF

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â&#x20AC;˘ Business Valuation Services â&#x20AC;˘ Calculation of Damages â&#x20AC;˘ Forensic Accounting

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103 Madison Plaza â&#x20AC;˘ Hattiesburg, MS 39402 â&#x20AC;˘ Toll Free 888.655.8282 â&#x20AC;˘ www.koerbercompany.com Alumnus Summer | Fall 2010 33


Alumni

NEWS

10

summer ALUMNUS

Alumni celebrate Mississippi State at summer picnics Five out-of-state chapters celebrated the maroon and white spirit by participating in family picnics for alumni and friends this summer. Three picnics to â&#x20AC;&#x153;celebrate Mississippiâ&#x20AC;? were held in Atlanta, New York City and Washington, D.C. Each event featured musical entertainment, Mississippi Delta     $# %  < homeâ&#x20AC;? Southern hospitality. The 31st Annual Mississippi in the Park was held in New York Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Central Park on Saturday, June 5. The

Alumni in Atlanta come together for a picnic in the park.

picnic included several activities such as contests for the best amateur art, best dessert and best picnic spread. There was also a scavenger hunt for the children and a Mississippi blues band providing live entertainment. The MSU Washington, D.C. Chapter participated in the 20th Annual Mississippi on the Mall on Saturday, June 19. Begun by the Mississippi Society of Washington D.C., the annual picnic takes place each summer on the National Mall â&#x20AC;&#x201C;surrounded by the Washington Monument and the United States Capitol. The newly organized Mississippi Society of Georgia

New York City Alumni Chapter at Mississippi in the Park.

hosted Atlantaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s second annual Mississippi Picnic at Chastain Park on June 26. The day was wrapped in maroon and white thanks to the overwhelming attendance of Bulldogs, as well as the Atlanta Alumni Chapterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s involvement with the picnic committee. Rounding out the summer, two chapters participated in events to celebrate the friendly competition of our fellow Southeastern Conference. The Rocky Mountain Alumni Chapter in Denver, Colo. participated in Denver SEC Picnic on August 28. Over 40 MSU alumni and friends joined supporters from

Washington, D.C. Chapter at Mississippi on the Mall.

other schools for a picnic at Eisenhower Park in Denver. Over 400 individuals attended that event. In addition, the South Texas Chapter participated in

34 Alumnus Summer | Fall 2010

Mississippi State has 90 alumni chapters nation-wide,

the 13th Annual Austin SEC Picnic and Tailgate Party at

      ]  Â&#x160; +

Zilker Park on August 28. MSU was well represented

out more about chapter events, please visit www.alumni.

with over 30 alumni and friends.

msstate.edu/chapters.


Continue ZPVS QBUI .BLFB statement. P0#PYt.JTTJTTJQQJ4UBUF .4 e.edu T: 662-325-2224 t F: 662-325-1MSU t E-mail: admitmsstate.edu .46JTBOFRVBMPQQPSUVOJUZJOTUJUVUJPO

admissions.msstate.edu


Foundation

NEWS

10

summer ALUMNUS

Johnson advances engineering education with scholarships the major specialty engineering

son Endowed Scholarship will

companies in the state, and was

    

cited as one of the 500 fastest-

abilities in advancing the interests

growing private companies in the

of African-Americans. The schol-

nation by the trade publication

arship memoralizes Johnsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Inc. magazine.

parents who died in 2004.

<]       to take charge of my life, exercise personal creativity, and support

out of respect for their memory,â&#x20AC;?

   $[  

Johnson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They were in their

MSU civil engineering graduate.

90s and were married nearly 70

Throughout his success, Johnson continues to hold the

years before they passed away just eight weeks apart,â&#x20AC;? he recalled.

importance of family close to his

Johnson grew up in Mississippi,

heart. He resides in Houston with

where his dad was a farmer and his

his son, Herbert II, who is follow-

mom was a homemaker in Panola

ing in his footsteps. The younger

County. Coming from an agri-

Johnson is currently a civil engi-

culture background, Johnson was

neering major at the University of

involved with the Future Farmers

Houston.

of America during high school.

Johnson understands what it

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was active with the FFA and

 >    

would attend events at Mississippi

of engineering and wants to do his

State. Since I was familiar with

part to encourage young profes-

the campus and looked forward to

The core values of education, fam-

sionals with similar aspirations.

visiting Starkville, it was a natural

ily and purpose are important to

Bringing engineering education to

progression for me to later enroll

Herb Johnson. After structuring a

the forefront for students in Mis-

as a student,â&#x20AC;? Johnson explained.

career in the engineering industry,

        

Johnson has reached a point in his

to him.

life where he is taking conscious

Recently, Johnson created an

Although agriculture was a large part of his background, Johnson decided to forge a differ-

endowment for scholarships in

ent path and pursue engineering

the James Worth Bagley College

at Mississippi State. He earned

owned HVJ Associates Inc., based

of Engineering at Mississippi

a bachelor of science in civil

Â&#x201C; $+! $   

State. The scholarship will assist

engineering in 1978, followed by

Austin, Dallas, El Paso, and San

students with their engineering

a master of science in the same

Antonio. The company Johnson

studies.

 QÂ&#x2022;Â&#x192;Q

steps to ensure his legacy. Since 1985, Johnson has

founded has evolved into one of

36 Alumnus Summer | Fall 2010

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I created the scholarship endowment in honor of my parents

The Jessie and Sarah L. John-

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The opportunity to attend


board of directors.

Mississippi State was the single

considering following the same

greatest opportunity Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had in

course. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I would say a commitment

my life. If I could lower every-

to learning is an excellent pathâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;

ences at Mississippi State, going

thing Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done in life to a single

learning about yourself, who you

back to the days of high school

common denominator, it would be

are and your purpose in life. This is

and visiting the campus for spe-

the difference that MSU and my

where the energy for accomplish-

cial programs,â&#x20AC;? Johnson recalled.

education made,â&#x20AC;? Johnson said.

ment resides,â&#x20AC;? he shared.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;While I was attending college,

After receiving his bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

HVJ Associates is widely

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had many positive experi-

several of the professors and staff

degree, Johnson was employed

known for providing quality

there had a profound impact on

with the U.S. Army Corps of

   +  

meâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Oswald Rendon, Victor Zitta

Engineers, Waterways Experiment

provided geotechnical services for

and Walter Croft were among

Station in Vicksburg, where MSU

many of the landmark projects in

them,â&#x20AC;? he added.

offers a graduate program of study.

Texas, and is recognized for its

Johnson worked full time as a

vast knowledge of Texas subsur-

longtime faculty members of the

research civil and design engineer

   +   

engineering college during John-

while pursuing a masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree.

heavily involved in construction

sonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s days as an MSU student.

Rendon, Zitta and Croft were

I could lower everything Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done in life to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ifa single common denominator, it would be the

â&#x20AC;?

diďŹ&#x20AC;erence that MSU and my education made. Â&#x201C;   > `-

quality control and infrastructure

The three helped steer countless

vironmental Protection Agency.

asset management services.

students, including Johnson,

The government jobs provided

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s accomplish-

toward an engineering career. As Johnson looks to the future,

him the foundation and the cour-

ments can be directly attributed

age to later strike out on his own.

to the culture of HVJ Associates.

his past will not be forgotten. In

From there, starting a company,

Our ability to meaningfully ad-

fact, his heritage and belief in

according to Johnson, was a fairly

dress the cares and concerns of all

education will be honored in per-

manageable process.

our stakeholders has set us apart,â&#x20AC;?

petuity through the endowment he

Johnson noted.

created at Mississippi State.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of resources are in existence and are readily available.

Johnson strives to maintain a

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mississippi State has helped

+        

connection with his alma mater,

immeasurably in my development,

was in mastering the know-how

despite a busy career. Through the

and I am deeply appreciative of

of management and leadership to

years, Johnson has been a mem-

that,â&#x20AC;? Johnson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Years from

make valuable offers to clients,

ber of the James Worth Bagley

now, I want people to remember

employees and business associates,

College of Engineering Deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

me as someone who placed value

that as an organization, we could

Advisory Council and the Civil

on education and someone who

  $[ ! 

and Environmental Engineer-

made the most of his academic

ing Advisory Board. He also is a

background,â&#x20AC;? he concluded.

Â&#x2021;    this advice to others who are

member of the MSU Foundation

Alumnus Summer | Fall 2010 37


Foundation

NEWS

10

summer ALUMNUS

Private giving TOPS $65 MILLION and the value they attach to the leadership role Mississippi State is playing in our state and nation.â&#x20AC;? Keenum continued, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We      investments in scholarships and endowed faculty positions that are helping ensure a quality education for an expanding population of deserving students.â&#x20AC;? #  !     the on-going StatePride initiative fueled the year. Mississippi State is in the second year of the fouryear effort to secure student scholarships and awards for meritorious faculty members in recognition of their teaching, research or service activities. A surge in athletic giving also rienced consecutive $60 million

Foundation has reached a new

plus years,â&#x20AC;? Rush said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We were

milestone with its fundraising

pleased to exceed $61.5 million

who understand the importance of

efforts. For a second consecutive

in FY 09, and we are extremely

contributing to the university as a

year, university giving has topped

pleased to surpass $65 million for

whole, with a passion for athletics

the $60 million mark, with more

FY 10.â&#x20AC;?

and academics. These individuals

than $65 million contributed during FY 10.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are energized by donors

Of the total funds raised for

are utilizing available matching

FY 10, new gifts accounted for

funds to assist the university as

       

more than $25.9 million, and new

it prepares for more students,â&#x20AC;?

was through the specialized initia-

pledges totaled in excess of $30.9

said MSU Athletic Director Scott

tive StatePride, said John P. Rush,

million. Deferred gifts made up

Stricklin.

vice president for development

the remaining $8.2 million plus.

Funds immediately available

MSU President Mark E. Kee-

from StatePride will provide $1

and alumni and CEO of the MSU

num said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Alumni and friends

million in faculty awards and an

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The generosity of donors

continue to provide strong support

additional $1 million in scholar-

has sparked the third highest

       

ships for the current fall semes-

giving year in university history

economic times. These efforts

ter. This amount is a result of

 >    

represent a powerful testament to

matching funds provided annually

fundraising history weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve expe-

the generosity of those who give

through a special partnership with

Foundation.

38 Alumnus Summer | Fall 2010

    

The Mississippi State University


MSU Athletics over the course of

support several areas. The gift will

per & Gold Inc. in Phoenix, Ariz.

the initiative.

establish an endowed scholarship

A former MSU baseball standout,

and an endowed professorship,

Clark enjoyed a 15-year career in

Pride has raised over $42 million

both in the College of Business,

Major League Baseball.

toward its $100 million goal. Mis-

and a multi-disciplinary classroom

sissippi State will continue to place

for campus.

Since its launch in 2009, State-

an emphasis on StatePride priorities through calendar year 2012. A few highlights from FY 10 include: A $4 million lead gift from

Jackson resident Richard Rula,

tact Bo Hemphill, executive director

president of Hemphill Construc-

of development, at 662-325-7000.

 {$       gift toward campus construction. A $500,000 portion of the gift will

Foundation set in motion the

support the basketball practice

construction of a new basketball

facility, while $1 million will sup-

practice facility. Heralded as one

port a planned Civil and Environ-

of the largest in the SEC, the facil-

mental Engineering Complex.

January 2011. Gifts in excess of $6.7 million

Jimmy Sanders Inc., one of the leading farm supply distribution businesses in the Mid-South, has

gift from the Meridian-based

committed $1 million for Mis-

Riley Foundation will expand the

sissippi State University scholar-

Mississippi State University pres-

ships. These scholarships honor

ence in downtown Meridian. The

the late Jimmy Sanders, a Tippo

funds include a challenge grant

native who founded the company.

for the Riley Next Step scholar-

Individual lead gifts of

ships to MSU-Meridian and the

$100,000 from James Worth

donation of the historic Newberry

Bagley of Trophy Club, Texas,

Building adjacent to the MSU

Richard C. Adkerson of Phoe-

Riley Center for Education and

nix, Ariz., and Will Clark of

Performing Arts. Also part of the

Prairieville, La., sparked addi-

foundationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s generous commit-

tional gifts for faculty awards and

ment are funds to renovate the

enabled the MSU Foundation to

Kress building, which will house

secure $500,000 in athletic match-

the MSU-Meridian Division of

ing funds for the academic year.

Business.

Bagley is executive chairman of

A $2.95 million gift of land

www.msufoundation.com or con-

a civil engineering alumnus and

the Tupelo-based Henry Mize

ity is scheduled for completion in

For information on StatePride, visit the MSU Foundation online at

the board of directors of Califor-

from Turner Wingo, a business

nia-based Lam Research Corp.,

alumnus and retired retailer who

and Adkerson is president and

resides in Collierville, Tenn., will

CEO of Freeport McMoRan Cop-

Alumnus Summer | Fall 2010 39


Class

NEWS

10

summer ALUMNUS

â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 

â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 

Board of Directors and as a mem-

JAMES E. COFER SR.

ber of the National Advisory Board

has posthumously been awarded

(M.B.A. â&#x20AC;&#x2122;75) has been named

of the U.S. Department of Energy.

the Distinguished American

president of Missouri State

He also is former mayor of Tupelo.

Award by the National Football

University. He previously served

Foundation and College Hall of

for eight years as president of the

â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 

Fame, the highest honor annually

University of Louisiana at Mon-

bestowed by the organization. He

roe. He also is a tenured professor

Rock, Ark., has been named

was a teacher, coach and admin-

in Missouri Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s College of

vice president of gas operations

istrator at Treadwell High School

Business Administration.

for Mississippi and Louisiana,

â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 

in addition to his current duties

LLOYD C. MCDOUGAL JR.

in Memphis and later coached at Central High School.

â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

BIG JOE SHELTON of Columbus, a blues musician

WALTER BRYANT of Little

over Arkansas and Oklahoma, for CenterPoint Energy.

MORRIS K. THOMPSON has

whose 2008 release â&#x20AC;&#x153;Black Prairie

been elected to serve as the 11th

West Point, retired as an Air Force

Bluesâ&#x20AC;? was a ďŹ nalist in the 2009

bishop of the Episcopal Diocese

lieutenant colonel and as execu-

International Blues Challenge for

of Louisiana. He previously has

tive director of Golden Triangle

the best self-produced CD award,

served as dean of Christ Church

Regional Airport, has been hon-

has received a $4,400 fellowship

Cathedral in Lexington, Ky.

ored with the naming of the Smith

grant from the Mississippi Arts

Ceremonial Plaza at Columbus

Commission to complete his cur-

â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 

Air Force Base. The plaza honors

rent record project.

RICHARD E. SMITH JR. of

all those killed or missing in action in the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wars, as well as POWs. Smith was a prisoner

â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

 SHARION AYCOCK, Missis-

NANCY DORMAN-HICKSON of Hoover, Ala., a freelance writer and editor, is Alabama Media Professionalsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ďŹ rst-place winner in

of war for ďŹ ve and a half years

sippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ rst female United States

its 12th annual Communications

during the Vietnam War.

District Court Judge, has been

Contest. She was honored for her

â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 

named the 2010 Lawyer of the

writing for the web feature article,

Year by the Mississippi College

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Child of Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s: Brandon

School of Law.

Hicks,â&#x20AC;? the story of a teenagerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

LEND C. MCCASLIN of Trussville, Ala., former command

GLENN L. MCCULLOUGH

stroke and treatment at Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

security manager for all U.S.

JR. of Tupelo has been named

Hospital in Birmingham. Dor-

Army forces in Europe, has just

chairman of biomass businesses in

man-Hickson also placed second

published a book, Secrets of the

the United States for British ďŹ rm

and third for several other articles.

Cold War, detailing and offering

Meridian Power, which develops

She is a former staff member of

a new perspective on counterin-

renewable and clean conventional

Southern Living and Progressive

telligence efforts in U.S.-Soviet

power projects. The companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Farmer magazines.

relations.

ďŹ rst biomass power plant will be built in Mississippi. McCullough

40 Alumnus Summer | Fall 2010

has served as chairman of TVAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

JOHN SCOTT of Ridgeland, a certiďŹ ed public accountant and


tax partner and director of tax ser-

the country. He recently received

vices for HORNE LLP, has been

the honor for outstanding perfor-

re-elected to the ďŹ rmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s board of

mance as the senior aerospace

directors for a three-year term.

science instructor at Lexington

promoted to associate professor

â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 

(Tenn.) High School.

of exercise and sport science and

â&#x20AC;&#x2122;



also was granted tenure at Cedar-

LYNEE LEWIS GAILLET (M.A. â&#x20AC;&#x2122;86) has co-edited a book,

JAY GEE of Atlanta, Ga., re-

â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  APRIL CROMMETT has been

ville University (Ohio).

TONYA KUSER of Madison

The Present State of Scholar-

cently returned from Haiti, where

has been promoted to chief ďŹ nan-

ship in the History of Rhetoric:

he served on a rapid response

cial ofďŹ cer at Mississippi Technol-

A Twenty-First Century Guide,

team of the U.S. Centers for

ogy Alliance.

published by the University of

Disease Control and Prevention

Missouri Press. She is associate

that assisted the Haitian Ministry

â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 

professor of rhetoric and composi-

of Health in the aftermath of the

tion at Georgia State University.

January earthquake.

ROB WITTHAUER of Doylestown, Pa., has been ap-

GLENN Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ROURKE of San

pointed national legal counsel for

of Jackson has been named chief

Jose, Calif., has been promoted to

the United States Junior Chamber

executive ofďŹ cer of the Missis-

vice president of technology and

(Jaycees), the largest civic group for

sippi Association of Realtors, the

quality for Xilinx, a world leader

young professionals in the country.

stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s business advocate for real

in programmable logic devices.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 

BETH H. HANSEN (M.S. â&#x20AC;&#x2122;86)

estate professionals.

DAVE WELSH has been named commercial, planning and

DORSEY R. CARSON JR. of

business development supervisor

Jackson recently spent a day un-

of North Sea production for Mobil

derway aboard the Virginia-class

bany, Ga., a licensed professional

North Sea LLC, ExxonMobil

submarine USS New Mexico with

counselor, recently received the

Production Company. He will

Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus

2009-10 Counselor of the Year

be headquartered in Aberdeen,

and Vice Admiral Jay Donnelly,

award from the American Mental

Scotland.

Commander of the U.S. Subma-

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;

rine Forces.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;  JOHN C. BURNS III of Al-

Health Counselors Association, the national organization that represents the mental health

CHRISTOPHER B. CLIFFORD

â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 

profession.

has been named associate vice

TIM S. DUNCAN, senior vice

â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 

president for business services

president of Phoenix Exploration

for the University of Alabama at

in Houston, Texas, recently ap-

Birmingham. He previously was

peared on CNBC as one of two oil

Air Force lieutenant colonel, has

chief ďŹ nancial ofďŹ cer for West

and gas experts to discuss the Gulf

received recognition from the De-

Virginia University at Parkersburg

of Mexico oil spill.

partment of the Air Force as being

and, before that, director of budget

among the top 5 percent of Air

and ďŹ nance at Mississippi State.

MIKE GOOLSBY, a retired

Force Junior ROTC instructors in

CHRIS GRIFFIN of Ripley, a dentist, has received the Mississippi Dental Associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2010

Alumnus Summer | Fall 2010 41


Class

NEWS

10

summer ALUMNUS

Humanitarian of the Year award. He is the ďŹ rst Mississippi State graduate ever to receive the honor.

â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 

JEREMY SEBENS is one of

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;

DEREK T. WINSTEAD

80 new Woodrow Wilson Indiana

received a doctorate in physical

Teaching Fellows, receiving a

therapy in May from the Univer-

HEATH GIBSON of Law-

$30,000 stipend and enrollment

sity of South Alabama.

renceville, Ga., a teacher at South

in a masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree program at

Gwinnett High School, has written

Indiana University to prepare for

â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 

Gigged, a novel for young adults.

the teaching of math and science

CARMAN HENLEY MULLINS has been named opera-

in urban and rural schools.

a software engineer for Dynamic

â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 

Concepts Inc., which contracts

tions technical manager, surface, Imperial Oil Resources for Exxon-

TRAVIS GRIFFIN has been ap-

Mobil Production Co.

pointed director of engineering di-

â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 

versity programs for the University

R. DAVID CROWDER JR. of

of Tennessee, Knoxville, College of Engineering. He previously was

RUSSELL N. WINSTEAD is

with Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala.

Birth

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Louisville is director of strategic

coordinator of the multi-cultural

plans and ďŹ&#x201A;eet integration for U.S.

engineering program at Oklahoma

9, 2010, to DORSEY R. CARSON

Fleet Forces Command within

State University.

the Department of the Navy in

â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 

JR. (â&#x20AC;&#x2122;93) and SUSAN HAYS CARSON (â&#x20AC;&#x2122;94) of Jackson.

Norfolk, Va.

â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 

TIFFANY CHANTE HENDERSON MULLINS of

Hays Elizabeth Carson, June

Callie Katherine Nickels, May 3, 2010, to LEE NICKELS (â&#x20AC;&#x2122;05) and wife MARY of Horn Lake.

KIMBERLY C. CROWDER of

Hoover, Ala., received in May a

Timothy Clayton Russo,

Starkville is a banking ofďŹ cer for

doctor of medicine degree from

June 14, 2010, to RICHARD D.

TowneBank in Norfolk, Va.

the University of South Alabama

RUSSO, II (â&#x20AC;&#x2122;00) and SARA

â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 

College of Medicine and has

BAILEY RUSSO (â&#x20AC;&#x2122;00).

TIMOTHY B. SMITH, who

accepted a residency in pathology at Baptist Health System in

Wolf Torbert, Nov. 5, 2009, to

teaches history at the University

Birmingham. During Honors

R. SHAY HUDSON (â&#x20AC;&#x2122;06) and BENJAMIN TORBERT (former

of Tennessee at Martin is the

Convocation, she received the

faculty).

author of Mississippi in the Civil

Community Service Award from

War: The Home Front. The book

the Mobile (Ala.) Medical Society

May 28, 2010, to CHAD

examines the social aspects of the

and the Student National Medical

war for the people of the state.

Association Award for leadership.

WALCE (â&#x20AC;&#x2122;02) and AMBER WALCE (â&#x20AC;&#x2122;03, ( , M.S. â&#x20AC;&#x2122;05). )

Smith also has written The Untold Story of Shiloh: The Battle and BattleďŹ eld and Champion Hill: Decisive Battle for Vicksburg.

42 Alumnus Summer | Fall 2010

â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 

Morgan Elizabeth Wallace,


In

MEMORIAM

10

summer ALUMNUS

JOSEPH L. MAY SR. (’35)—Maumelle,

PAU KEITH SCOTT MANGUM

EARL GIFFORD ALLEY (former em-

Ark.; retired FHA county supervisor, Dec.

(’58)—74, Memphis, Tenn.; retired ac-

ployee)—75, Starkville; professor emeritus

11, 2009.

counting and business education teacher,

of chemistry at Mississippi State and former

June 22, 2010.

state chemist and director of the State

BENJAMIN S. BEALL III (’36)—94, Easton, Md.; electrical engineer and retired

THOMAS MAR RIVERS (’58)—75,

president of Lindberg Corp., June 9, 2010.

Tupelo; retired technical writer at Red-

JACK RICE (’41)—90, Elk Grove,

stone Arsenal for the U.S. Army Missile

Chemical Laboratory research division, May 26, 2010. DOMINIC J. CUNETTO (former em-

Calif.; retired real estate broker/devel-

Command and Korean War veteran, Sept.

ployee)—78, Starkville; professor emeritus

oper and World War II veteran, May 7,

20, 2009.

of communication at Mississippi State and

2010.

BOBBY C. MOORE (’59)—73, St.

one of the founders of both the Starkville

Augustine, Fla.; retired employee of Betz

Community Theatre and the Starkville Area

pendence; retired farmer, rural mail carrier

Labs Inc. and Betz PaperChem in Jackson-

Arts Council, June 19, 2010.

and horseman, May 7, 2010.

ville, Fla., June 13, 2010.

HARLEY D. SMITH (’44)—90, Inde-

CRK WESLEY COLEMAN

ROY SIMMONS ESTESS (’60)—71,

VIRGINIA BARLOW ESTESS (former employee)—88, Clinton; retired employee

(’47)—87, Yazoo City; retired ASCS office

Carriere; retired director of the John C.

of the Mississippi Cooperative Extension

manager for Yazoo County, June 6, 2009.

Stennis Space Center and former director

Service in Hinds County, June 15, 2010.

HENRY HARRISON UCHLEY

of the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in

JR. (’48)—86, Houston, Texas; retired

Houston, Texas, June 25, 2010.

licensed mechanical engineer for Brown

JOHN ED AINSWORTH (’65)—66,

and Root, and World War II and Korean

Madison; managing director of Phoenix

War veteran, April 6, 2010.

Gaming Group and former state public

JED T. PEPPER (’48)—84, Pickens; retired Mississippi Chemical Corp. employee and farmer, May 23, 2010. WALTER ELLIS PHILLIPS SR. (’48)—89, Tupelo; co-owner of Mutual Insurance Agency in Starkville and World War II veteran, March 5, 2010. WILLIAM J. GAMBLE JR. (’49)—88, Morganton, N.C.; retired assistant director of Broughton General Hospital and World War II veteran, April 22, 2010. DANIEL LUTHER WILLIAMS JR. (’50)—82, Wiggins; former forester for the Mississippi Forestry Commission and

land commissioner, May 10, 2010. ADRIAN PERRY GAITHER III (’72)— 72, Macon; retired English professor at East Mississippi Community College’s

at Mississippi State. FRANCES PATTON SCOTT RYAN (former employee)—91, Starkville; former English and continuing education teacher at Mississippi State. RRY JAN WEBBER (former em-

CECIL LYNN ELLISON (’75)—63,

instructor at Mississippi State, April 30, 2010.

Houston; retired forester for the National

MAX MILLER (student)—21, West

Resource Conservation Service, March

Point; sophomore biological engineering

24, 2010.

major at Mississippi State, March 30, 2010.

JAMES R. LOPRESTI (’80)—55, Vero Beach, Fla.; engineer and co-owner of LoPresti Aviation and Speed Merchants, July 3, 2010. MARY L. DAVIDSON (’88)—59, West

Woodco Inc., June 16, 2010.

School for Mathematics and Science in

practice in Vidalia, La., July 25, 2010.

and director of graduate studies in English

ployee)—76, Port Charlotte, Fla.; former art

Point; biology teacher at the Mississippi

Gilbert, Ark.; retired from 45-year law

ee)—63, Starkville; professor of English

Golden Triangle Campus, April 12, 2010.

Crown Zellerbach Corp., and owner of

WILLIAM LEO KOERBER (’55)—76,

RICHARD F. PATTESON (employ-

Columbus, June 17, 2010.

Please send obituaries to Allen Snow, P.O. Box 5325, Mississippi State, MS 39762-5325 or e-mail to snowa@ur.msstate.edu.

O. BRET HOWARD (’91)—40, Clarksdale; crop consultant, Jan. 22, 2010.

Alumnus Summer | Fall 2010 43


SUMMER / FALL 2010




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& Surveillance Driving Directions: Go East on Hwy 12 past the Wal-Mart on the right. Bare to the right at the Shell onto Old Hwy 12. Stay straight, The Links will be on the right and WELLINGTON PLACE is on the left.

Model Home Open Daily Noon–6pm Sunday 1-5pm एझनडयࣜࣾवࣜऎडझनरवࣜएफऱमटडࣨࣜईईࣿ࣪ࣜ ࣾमफधडमयࣜओडनटफऩडࣜ

662-769-4600 or 662-769-4601 5432 Any Street West, Townsville, State 54321

wellingtonplace-starkville.com

Phone (555) 543-5432 Fax (555) 543-5433

and High Speed Internet

Starkville & MSU


NON-PROFIT U.S. POSTAGE PAID BIRMINGHAM, AL PERMIT NO. 159

Post Office Box AA One Hunter Henry Boulevard Mississippi State, MS 39762-5526 www.alumni.msstate.edu CHANGE SERVICE REQUESTED

Made with recycled paper. Discrimination based upon race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, or veteran’s status is a violation of federal and state law and MSU policy and will not be tolerated. Discrimination based upon sexual orientation or group affiliation is a violation of MSU policy and will not be tolerated.

Mississippi State Alumnus Summer 2010  

Mississippi State Alumnus Vol. 86, No. 2

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