Page 1


“WCTC students often have considerable technical work

experience that allows them to

apply their practical

knowledge to our

theoretical programs. The majority of

WCTC students

WCTC Engineering Partnerships Start with WCTC’s Engineering programs. Finish at... • Marquette University • Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE) • University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

transfer well into our

engineering programs.” Dr. George Hansen Professor and Chair of Electrical Engineering University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

The WCTC Engineering Advantage • Cutting-edge technology • Hands-on learning

• Small, interactive classes • Affordable tuition

WCTC graduates qualify to enter the engineering field after two years. The WCTC Electrical Engineering Technology program has earned accreditation from the Engineering Technology Accreditation Commission (ETAC) of ABET, the industry’s finest accrediting agency.

Visit www.wctc.edu to find out more or call 262.691.3401.

Pewaukee, Wisconsin


PATHWAYS WI S C O NS I N S T E M

In This Issue

Did You Know?........................................................................................4

Raising Friends and Funds.................................................13

Imagine This!............................................................................................. 5

From Gravel Roads to the International Space Station.........................................................................14

The Unique Partnership Between PLTW & HOSA

The National HOSA Competition............................................................ 6-7

Why Computer Science in K-12?.....................................15

Engineering Lawyers

with Attorney Joe Miotke Partner at DeWitt Ross & Stevens S.C....... 8

Working for You: Meet Your PLTW Statewide Directors........................................................16-17

Student Highlight

2015 Engineering Design Competition..................18-19

Summer Break Working on a Spaceship....................................................... 9

Doing More with Less in Educational Design....................10

On Being A Global Chemist.....................................................11 EUREKA!

Archimedes at Plymouth High School.........................................................12


PATHWAYS

Director’s Note ®

Wisconsin STEM Pathways Project Lead The Way – Wisconsin Magazine Publisher: Joshua Schultz Associate Editors: Marv Bollman Patricia Deibert Chaning Ogden Editor In-Chief: Judith Steininger Contributing Writers: Judy Steininger Dr. Eric Durant Abie Khatchadourian Jennifer Doran Mike Carr Joe Miotke Rachel Welch Brittany Cassel Brittni Peterson Judith Steininger Tammy Moncel Debra Krikourian Shaileen Pokress The Color Ink Production Team: Graphic Designers: Randy Klibowitz Jack Daly Color Ink Creative Print and Distribution Services: Color Ink, Inc. - Sussex, Wis. Permission to reprint, in whole or in part, articles contained in this publication is hereby granted, provided a version of the following credit line be used: Reprinted with permission of Milwaukee School of Engineering. Please direct all correspondence, news, corrections and changes to the address below. In addition to this printed version, Wisconsin STEM Pathways is also available on the PLTW – Wisconsin website, www.pltwwi.org. Use, reproduction or storage of the name, address or other information about any individual identified within this magazine is strictly prohibited and constitutes misappropriation of corporate property.

MSOE – Milwaukee School of Engineering 1025 N. Broadway Milwaukee, WI 53202-3109 Telephone: 414-277-7238 Email: pltwwi@msoe.edu Website: www.pltwwi.org

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Did You Know... Do you think the use of electronics will grow or not in five, ten or fifty years? Do you think the demand for clean water and food will decrease or increase as the population increases? Do you think the need for new forms of energy and transportation will be alleviated or exasperated? In short, do you think the significant challenges facing humanity will solve themselves – or do you think you might have some role in bringing about innovation and improvement to the world we live in? As we face these challenges and are deciding how we can impact our world, I am excited to realize how PLTW is giving you a head start on tackling serious and tangible design challenges that face all of us. The reality, I am sure you will agree, is that the increasing demand for STEM skills is a mark of the “new normal.” The world lacks enough engineers, scientists, entrepreneurs, and STEM teachers to supply current demand. That is the challenge. Likely as not, if you are reading this, you are and will be part of the solution. As a PLTW student, parent, teacher or supporter, you are tangibly improving the future of Wisconsin, the Midwest and the country and even our entire world. Reading the various articles in this issue, you will observe the tremendous impact PLTW is having on STEM education in Wisconsin. Turn to page 6 to read about Brittany Cassel who placed 9th in the National HOSA competition because of PLTW, or check out on page 18 the trio of students from Catholic Memorial who won the WI State Engineering Design Competition. In two different stories you will see how PLTW has served as a springboard to space for Rachel Welch on page 9 and the PLTW classes of the Ojibwe School on page 14. We love to hear from you and want to know what you would like to see in Pathways and our other Wisconsin initiatives (ongoing training, summer camps, additional STEM opportunities etc.). Please send us your comments, questions or submissions and be sure to reach out and talk to us: via Email: pltwwi@msoe.edu via Twitter: #pltw_wi via our website: www.pltwwi.org via Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pltwwi Also, please send stories for considerations to the Editor at steining@msoe.edu. As a reminder: having completed even one PLTW course makes you one of many PLTW Alumni, so please check out our Wisconsin PLTW group and be sure to join: https:// www.pltw.org/alumni I look forward to seeing many of your at the PLTW-WI State Conference November 9-10th in Oshkosh. Take care and study hard! Joshua Schultz, PhD Director, Project Lead The Way – Wisconsin schultzj@msoe.edu


T h e n i i s g ! a m I By Dr. Eric Durant

“Finish reading that article from yesterday.” The

An example of nanotechnology:Timoshenko earphones hear you and the article begins playing micro-beam sensing device for biological applications (Nanotechnology is at the atomic and in your ear in a natural, computer-generated molecular level.) voice. A few blocks from home, you run into a friend, start chatting and the article automatically pauses.When your conversation hits a slow spot, the device in your ear reminds you to ask your friend something you put on your to-do list a few weeks ago.The reminder leads to a great hour long conversation. A ton of technologies went into your future

Courtesy: Dr. Joshua Schultz research team

earphones–tiny, powerful computer chips, batteries that stay charged forever by harvesting the energy of your motion, advanced artificial intelligence, sensors that monitor your pulse and brain activity, and secure wireless communications, to name just some. Many of them haven’t been invented yet. Some of them seem far-fetched A gentle vibration in your ear tells you it’s time to wake up.Your wireless earphones have an alarm clock feature which knows the best time to wake you based on your sleep cycle as well as what’s on your schedule for the day. The alarm never needs setting. As you get out of bed and go to brush your teeth, the earphones play a new song release by one of your favorite artists. And, despite being so small that no one can see you have earphones in, the music sounds as good as anything you’ve ever heard on top-notch headphones. Later that day, walking home for the evening, you want to finish an article you started reading last night, so you say to nobody in particular,

today, but decades of continual advances in computer hardware and software have routinely made the science-fiction of your parents’ childhood today’s reality. Enthusiastically, scientists and engineers continue pushing the limits (assuming there are any) of technology and physics to build smaller, faster, and less power-hungry devices.These faster computer-based systems let other engineers build artificial intelligence in a way they could only conceptualize a few years ago. Being smaller and using less energy will allow these inventions to be worn and stay cool as they seamlessly help you make the most of your day. Maybe you will help invent this future?

Dr. Durant, Program Director of Computer Engineering and Professor of EECS Department MSOE DSP Research Engineer at Starkey Hearing Technologies in MN and CA

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The Unique Partnership Between P The National HOSA Competition

A Teacher’s Perspective . . . By Jennifer Doran Health and Human Services Academy Coordinator HOSA Advisor, HBS Master Teacher Anatomy & Physiology, Biology and Human Body Systems Teacher New London High School; New London, WI PLTW students around the nation make long lasting connections between the curriculum of the Biomedical Science program and the activity club called HOSA. PLTW and HOSA have a seamless fit. The competitive events students can participate in through HOSA have a direct relationship to the PLTW curriculum.  Students take what they learn during the school day, extend and apply that knowledge through completion of a competitive or leadership event in HOSA. When teaching PLTW classes, I think about how students could take what they are learning in the

classroom and tie it into a HOSA event. I encourage my students to think about ways that they can provide service to their peers and the community. For example, the Public Health Event this past year was Second Hand Stress. Two of my students decided to educate their peers by leading a YOGA session and other stress reduction methods.  Students linked this education to an activity in class where they learned how hypertension can be caused by stress.

in class required my students to investigate the underlying causes of heart disease and the anatomical changes occurring because of it.

Two other students did a presentation to 5th grade students on the Damaging Effects of Smoking. They showed students a pig lung model that had been damaged by smoke.They instructed students to run for one minute by only breathing through a straw.That way the students grasped the idea of how smoking can damage the lungs. Students learned about the anatomy of the lung in class and were able to share An example of community outreach was done how the lung should function normally and compare by two students who competed in an event called that with how a smoke damaged lung functions. Health Education.They taught 8th grade health class Teaching PLTW and being a HOSA advisor go hand students what can happen to a person’s body if heart in hand.  We help students make connections and disease develops.  They did a demonstration to show take their learning beyond the classroom. how damage to an artery affects its function.  Activities

I encourage my students to think about ways that they can provide service to their peers and the community.

HOSA-Future Health Professionals Partners with Project Lead the Way . . . By Janice Atkinson Wisconsin State Advisor to HOSA HOSA-Future Health Professionals is a student-led member organization providing opportunities for students to develop, practice and refine their academic, technical, leadership and teamwork skills to achieve a seamless transition from education to health professions. With over 180,000 members in the United States, Puerto Rico, Canada, and Italy; including 1,520 in the state of Wisconsin, HOSA works closely with local and state leaders to build a pipeline to attract qualified young people to healthcare.  The goal of the HOSA and PLTW partnership is to enhance education and opportunities for PLTW Biomedical Science students and HOSA members.  Visit http://www.hosa.org/node/244 to learn more about the partnership, including the HOSA-PLTW Curriculum Crosswalk.

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Membership in HOSA offers many opportunities for  To establish a HOSA chapter in a Wisconsin school, seek interested members and an adult advisor (usually an instructor).  Once the administration approves networking opportunities, and career focused the organization, the advisor contacts Janice Atkinson, activities through attendance at regional, state, or State Advisor, at janice.atkinson@dpi.wi.gov to obtain national leadership conferences. Participation in a chapter number and password.  The advisor must competitive events allows members to showcase affiliate all members through an on-line system on their knowledge and skills in categories of health the national website.  Dues of $15 per person result science knowledge, health professions, emergency in a HOSA membership at the local, state, and preparedness, leadership, teamwork, and recognition.  national levels.  Students are not official members until the affiliation process is complete. Visit the Wisconsin HOSA webpage at http://hosa.

PLTW students. They receive leadership development,

dpi.wi.gov for a complete listing of the 45 events available in Wisconsin. Students compete at State Leadership Conference with the top three in each event qualifying for national competition.  PLTW Biomedical Science students have been very successful HOSA members. 

For more information about Wisconsin HOSA - Future Health Professionals, please explore the National HOSA website at www.hosa.org and the Wisconsin HOSA website at http://hosa.dpi.wi.gov or contact Janice Atkinson atjanice.atkinson@dpi.wi.gov.  


PLTW & HOSA

PATHWAYS

National Top Ten Finish Thanks to POB Course By Brittany Cassel / Grafton High School your time starts; you have 15 minutes”. I started reading immediately but I was so nervous I didn’t comprehend anything. So, I reread the small paragraph which instructed me to change the patient’s gown and sheets since she had spilled

medical (PBS) course helped me answer questions on the written exam. In Fall 2015, Brittany will begin studies at Marquette University to become a Physician’s Assistant. PLTW PBS Teacher at Grafton High School Francis Grant

“Wilmot Union High School PLTW students Rebecca Alter and Deena Griffin competed in the Healthy Lifestyle event at HOSA Nationals, Anaheim, CA in June 2015. HOSA helps PLTW Biomedical students have the opportunity to reinforce skills, enhance and apply content understanding, and make real-world connections within the community.”

Because of PLTW, my interest in the biomedical field expanded and aided me in competing at HOSA nationals this year in Anaheim, California. The critical and analytical thinking skills I developed provided me with the confidence I needed to get through the event. I competed in Nursing Assisting. Nursing assistants work with patients one on one and get to know their patients well.The contest had two parts: first, a written exam with fifty questions and second, the skills portion to execute specific nursing tasks.To eliminate contestants, only the top thirty-five of the written exam continue on to skills.

Lena Joch PLTW Biomedical Science Instructor PBS, MI, & BI PLTW Master Teacher - MI Science Educator, HOSA Advisor

I’m extremely grateful for my PLTW class since it aided me in the first part and I went on to the second part. For the skills part, I waited in a compact computer lab at Anaheim college with thirty-five opponents.Waiting to hear my name, I was anxious. Finally, I was called then led to a separate room and given a briefing.

orange juice on herself. I got through the task finishing with only forty-three seconds left. The pressure was off but I felt like I hadn’t done well until the next day at the award ceremony. When the announcement for top ten in Nursing Assisting was made, I heard my name called and immediately leaped out of my seat and went to the spot where my fellow competitors were also waiting for results.We walked on the stage in front of not only hundreds of people seated before us but also hundreds more watching online. I finished ninth out of over eighty competitors at the national level.

A woman gave me a pink sheet with my task written on it. She said, “When you start reading

I’m extremely proud of the award and grateful for the support I received.The Principles of Bio-

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Engineering Lawyers with Attorney Joe Miotke Partner at DeWitt Ross & Stevens S.C. Joe Miotke, answers our questions about what patent attorneys do and and how STEM education is critical to becoming a patent attorney. Joe is recognized as one of the leading patent attorneys in the United States. He earned his B.S. in Civil Engineering from Marquette University and his J.D., magna cum laude, from Marquette University Law School.

What does a patent attorney do? A patent attorney works at the intersection of technology and law. Patent attorneys play a critical role in launching new products, innovations and cutting edge new technology. Specific examples include helping inventors protect their inventions by obtaining a “patent” from the United States Patent & Trademark Office or representing clients in a trial court when somebody is copying patented technology without permission. Such copying is called “infringing” a patent, and the trials can be very interesting and complicated. One more example is representing inventors and companies when they want to share technology. This “sharing” of technology is called “licensing” or “technology transfer.” Patent attorneys also branch out into other types of “intellectual property” such as trade secrets, trademark and copyright matters.

What is the best part about being a patent attorney? The best part is helping inventors bring new technology into the marketplace and make the world a better place. In addition, it is very rewarding to work with new companies (called “startups”) and help them launch new technologies. Often working with cutting edge technology you get a preview of the direction certain technologies are heading and become an expert in them.

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In addition, patent attorneys are typically the first people to work with startups interested in protecting their technology as they launch a new company. Apple, Facebook, Uber, Google, and Twitter were once small startup companies, and patent attorneys worked with these companies from their very beginnings.

What are your coolest projects? I was involved in a patent infringement lawsuit involving the Invisalign® system that uses clear plastic retainers instead of traditional braces to reposition teeth. In the early 2000s, I worked with inventors developing new uses for “wearable computers,” which are now called smartphones or iPhones®. I also was part of a team selling one of the world’s largest audio/video music concert archives. The archive included performances by many of the world’s most popular performers including Jay-Z, Jerry Garcia, the Black Eyed Peas, and Willie Nelson, to name a few. I negotiated with the artists’ representatives and also with the CEOs of several of the world’s largest media companies.

How do you become a patent attorney? Patent attorneys are both engineers and lawyers. Earn an engineering or other “hard” science degree

such as physics, chemistry, biology, or computer science then attend law school for three years. Besides general law, take courses on patents and other intellectual property areas such as trademarks, trade secrets and copyright. After law school, the general bar exam is required for each state in which you practice. In addition, pass a separate test to become a licensed patent attorney registered to practice before the United States Patent & Trademark Office. The Patent Office Registration Examination is widely regarded as the most difficult bar exam in the United States. Practicing patent law is a rewarding career. It involves many skill sets, including science, technology, engineering, math, writing, and clear communication. The publications Intellectual Asset Management and Managing Intellectual Property have recognized Miotke’s contributions. DeWitt Ross & Stevens S.C. has experts in other related engineering fields: construction, environment, natural resources, mining, energy transportation and logistics.


Summer Break Working on a Spaceship

PATHWAYS

By Rachel Welch

researching and testing cameras that will eventually be placed on Orion. These cameras will observe various components of Orion when it is in flight. I owe this opportunity to the PLTW classes I took at St. Thomas More. I needed to understand the basics of how consumer electronics work, and DE helped me do just that. In addition, my employer hired me for my experience with Autodesk Inventor, a program I learned through PLTW classes. I completed a string of projects for which I had to think through what made a test valid and exercised the camera functions we needed. PLTW’s project based curriculum was instrumental in preparing me.

In 2014, three days after graduating St. Thomas More High School in Milwaukee, WI, I got in my car and drove to Denver, CO to work on a spaceship for a NASA subcontractor.

We kept in touch and I continued sending questions and expressing my excitement for space systems. A few weeks later, I received a frantic email telling me to call her right away. I did. When she answered, she asked several questions about what I did on the team, what my skills were, and what I knew about cameras. After speaking with several other members on her team, I was offered an internship to work on Orion in Denver. Three days later, I was in Colorado.

It all began with a contact I made at a FIRST robotics competition. I met Amber, a rocket scientist, who works on NASA’s Orion, a spaceship intended to one day take humans to Mars. I asked her unending questions and was intrigued by what she did. It was incredible thing to learn that what I was doing on my robotics team Deep Space Systems, a subcontractor of and in my PLTW classes were essentially NASA and Lockheed Martin, employed me. her career. The majority of my internship involved

After successfully completing my freshman year at the Worcester Polytechnic Institute (Massachusetts) studying mechanical engineering, in 2015, I returned to Colorado for another internship with Deep Space Systems. It had a greater focus on different types of tests including radiation, shock, vibration, and thermal vacuum. It has been a wonderful experience exploring what the space systems industry has to offer. And, of course, I had a lot of fun working for NASA- not many new high school graduates can say they worked on a spaceship during their summer break! Rachel’s PLTW Teachers at St. Thomas More Sharon Tomski - PLTW Master Teacher EDD PLTW CSE PLTW CSA Ben Rezutek - Former teacher at St. Thomas More taught POE 9


Doing More with Less in Educational Design

Repurposing Existing Furniture By rearranging current mobile furniture, educators can promote breakout discussions, group interactions and more individualized instruction. Some examples of this include: • Grouping furniture to create mini collaborative environments within a larger classroom. • Repurposing available tables with consideration to their size and what activities they support. Both 3’ x 6’ and 2.5’ x 3.5’ tables allow for easy grouping and support teamwork initiatives during the module training.

Adding New Furniture Budgets may be minimal but some classroom additions won’t break the bank. • Ask about the ability to add caster chairs to your classroom. If they are already available, ask for a trial run. Basic chairs can start in the $40 range, allowing you to outfit a classroom of 20 for less than a $1,000 investment. When possible we recommend spending a little more to find height-adjustable chair options to maximize student comfort. These chairs can easily change the function of an existing space, adding flexibility to the classroom and enhancing the PLTW lab.

By Abie Khatchadourian Eppstein Uhen Architects

• Add mobile marker boards to your classroom; these start around $100. Scattered throughout the room, this piece of furniture can act as a temporary space divider, allowing for private breakout spaces and group work, promoting brainstorming and creativity.

Taking Advantage of Existing Space:

Let’s face it; times aren’t getting easier with respect to education funding. So when our team created the 2015 Project Lead the Way (PLTW) Design Guide, we included design options to address different budget levels from new facility construction, to remodeling options and even furniture solutions. Let’s explore a few quick ways educators can implement classroom design modifications to support PLTW initiatives for little to no cost.

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Most existing classrooms are utilized less than eight periods during the day, which creates space potential for PLTW classes. Available science and art classrooms are the perfect opportunity to expand your PLTW offerings without breaking the bank through renovations. Implementing small changes can help districts incorporate PLTW into their coursework. Illustrations of furniture options within multiple layouts and environments are depicted throughout the 2015 PLTW Guide on the website http://www.pltwwi.org/ DesignGuide2015/?key=DesignGuide2015.


On Being a Global Chemist By Brittni Peterson

PATHWAYS

Product and Materials Specialist Biochemistry and Criminal Justice Bachelor’s Degrees from Lakeshore Technical College If you had told me two years ago I would be a chemist at a company that manufactures machinery for the disposable market, I would have laughed. My name is Brittni; at Curt G. Joa, Inc. I am the Product and Materials Specialist. Curt G. Joa, Inc. (located in Sheboygan Falls,WI) is a global manufacturer of very large, sophisticated machines for makers of baby diapers, adult incontinence products, sanitary napkins, and other disposable products. My job starts by making sure the right coatings go on the machines.This includes paint and metal platings for rust protection, plasma thermal sprays for traction or low coefficient of friction, and rubbers for glue release. Next, I test materials that will be used to actually make the product (the diaper or napkin, for example). I test which glues will stick to which materials, how stretchy and strong the materials are, and how absorbent they are. I also test the final product to determine how well it performs. Being the only chemist in the company can be a challenge at times, but that’s also what makes it great! Creativity is needed for every project and every test run. In order to find the perfect coating or material for an application, I have to think outside of the box.

I get to work with our customers around the world to solve any problems that may occur. I just spent a week in China looking at new diaper products and materials used to make them.We have suppliers from around the world which also keeps the job interesting. New discoveries happen constantly. My day may consist of doing research at my computer, testing new products in the lab, testing new coatings on the plant floor, or traveling. I am always finding new ways to improve the process. During college, I never thought about how a diaper or sanitary napkin was made, let alone the machines that make them. Now, I get to be a part of finding new, better ways to do it.

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EUREKA!

Archimedes at Plymouth High School By Judith Steininger

“Eureka”, said Mr. Paul Krzyzaniak, POE, math and physics teacher in Plymouth,WI.Walking the school hallway, it dawned on him how to work with too many students and not enough equipment. Mr. Krzyzaniak describes it like this.“I was thinking about the marble sorter project and realized I had enough materials to make 5 or 6 sorters but I needed 10; we had 23 students enrolled in two different class periods. I realized I could make groups of four or five students from first and third period then turn them into shift crews. I told the principal, Dr. Jennifer Rauscher, about the idea and got permission to pull students together for an initial 90 minute starting session.After that, the kids took over.” What a valuable experience on many levels. Students learned: • recycling and VEX programming inherent in the experiment’s design

thought that if it turned out I didn’t like teaching, I could always go back to college and study engineering.” Now, thanks to PLTW courses and eager By the end of the three week period, Mr. Krzyzaniak students wanting to go straightaway into engineersays the two shifts “had three working marble sorters, ing, he can have his cake and eat it too. one that was somewhat functioning and one that Krzyzaniak credits the entire geographic area of was not.The benchmark for the experiment is Plymouth High School especially the large industry nine in ninety seconds. One team tweaked till their base and well-informed parents with promoting design got nine in ten seconds. Students showed science and technology. off their work on Parents Night. A Tip from Mr. Krzyzaniak • trust in team members and living up to partners’ expectations can make or break a project, in other words personnel management issues.

Plymouth High School has an active PLTW program including three teachers who are Technical Education certified. Mr. Krzyzaniak with a bachelor’s degree in Physics and Math is certified for POE through the training program at MSOE. Courses are taught in a technology wing built in partnership with Lakeshore Technical College.This makes for economic use of equipment during the day for high school students and during the evening for college students.

• global companies operate using shift workers and Mr. Krzyzaniak became a teacher by being a really across time zones good math and physics college student. Needing • excellent communication and documentation are to earn money for tuition, he became a tutor and found out he enjoyed helping people learn.“I always necessary when face time is limited, and

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How does he create groups within his classes so no hurt feelings occur? “I have a deck of cards the students draw from.” He can set up numbers or suits, but the point is the process and result is objective. Archimedes a Sicilian mathematician supposedly shouted “Eureka” when he discovered how to determine the volume of an irregular shaped object. He made the discovery about 287 B.C.


Raising Friends and Funds By Debra Krikourian • Always follow up community assistance or attendance. • Write them a thank you note for coming; add a student note or two. • Publish the thank you notes in the school newsletter.. • Invite them back and talk to them about the expense of the kits. • Ask for kit donations; show them the materials needed. • Put business name on kit and advertise in local newsletter or paper. Debra Krikourian, PLTW Middle School Gateway Master Teacher from California, wants to make your teaching life easier. Fund and Friend Raising were not part of the curriculum when you were in college. Reality has made them essential. Debra sent Pathways Magazine the following useful list for both state and national resources. During the spring of 2015, Debra served as a Master Teacher for Launch Leader Teacher Training at MSOE. Develop partnerships and relationships with local business and civic groups. Don’t be shy about approaching all kinds of neighbors: insurance agents, dentists, doctors, gas stations, grocery store owners, realtors, pest control applicators.You get the idea.They, too, have a stake in the success of your school.

Wisconsin Specific Grants http://fuelinggood.com/fueling-education/ - $1000 for your classroom (112 classrooms awarded) http://eeinwisconsin.org/core/item/topic.aspx?s=0.0.0.2209&tid=85010 – A collection of Environmental Education grants for Wisconsin http://wisconsin.grantwatch.com/cat/9/elementary-education-grants.html - Wisconsin Grant Watch Page http://www.fairfieldffe.org/Apply_For_Grants/?gclid=Cj0KEQjwz6KtBRDwgq-LsKjMk9kBEiQAuaxWUuwvKR2j5vES_UzaqLvMNmgWddtTOHVgk2uUwY9SiO8aAvip8P8HA – Fairfield Foundation for Education Grants

National Level Grants

Invite individuals into your classroom to help out on a project or showcase students’ work.

www.donorschoose.org

Apply for grants at the state and national levels.

http://help.donorschoose.org/hc/en-us/articles/202377048Chevron-Fuel-Your-School-program

www.limeadesforlearning.com

www.adoptaclassroom.org http://www.adoptaclassroom.org/about/corporate-partners/ farmers/ www.schoolfundingcenter.info http://www.samsung.com/us/solvefortomorrow/home.html

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The Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe School opened its doors on the Chippewa Flowage in 1975. Some walked along gravel roads to get to class. Now, the descendants of those children excel at PLTW courses and video conference with NASA.

Arthur Fleming enjoying the rice harvest in his specially engineered canoe.

From Gravel Roads to the International Space Station By Tammy Moncel Gateway, Science and Engineering Teacher Incorporating PLTW is a challenge in small, rural schools. Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe (LCO) School is an example of how to succeed with dedicated, flexible teachers and a supportive administration. I saw its potential attending a conference in 2009 through the UW Gear Up program. Kern Foundation funding gave the LCO PLTW program a start providing training for the Gateway teachers and core equipment. A three year grant added training and equipment each year resulting in a fully certified engineering program. The school continues financial support. Teachers in a small PLTW school have to be committed to the program. Every day they teach many subjects and must seek out professional development to expand curriculum. I am the only LCO middle school science teacher, Gateway teacher and high school engineering teacher. Athletic Director and Health/PE teacher Dion Doyle covers Medical Detectives in the Gateway track and one in the Biomedical Science program. Wendy Fuller, the high school science teacher for all science subjects, teaches in the Biomedical Science program.

Air Patrol partnership, and travel for the American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) sponsored national conferences and past national science fairs. High school students from LCO took 3rd place in the engineering and robotics division of the National American Indian Science and Engineering Fair in 2013. Middle school students took 2nd place (out of 20 teams) in an Intertribal Science Bowl the same year. High school students took 1st for accuracy at a local community college’s catapult competition this year. LCO high school students have traveled to Anchorage, Alaska and Denver, Colorado to meet fellow students at conferences for AISES.

This past school year, Jason Bisonette, LCO Culture Curriculum Coordinator challenged engineering students to design and build a canoe adaptation that would support a 7th grade, wheel chair bound classmate in a school wide ricing trip. Arthur Fleming had never been in a canoe or participated in the ricing process. Harvesting manoomin (wild rice) is traditional to Ojibwe culture. Bisonette and I supervised the design and building The school extends STEM learning to include process. The adaptation worked and Arthur joined his classmates for the harvest! LEGO league robotics at the middle school level, a science fair, local competitions, Civil Wendy Fuller and I were chosen to attend

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the 2015 Fellows Institute for the Partnership for Environmental Technology Education (PETE) and National Science Foundation in Honolulu, Hawaii. The Institute focused on climate change for indigenous populations. Thirteen other teachers from tribal schools across the country also attended. We learned about STEM in environmental education and presented PLTW success stories to representatives from other tribal schools. Carly Toder, graduate of a neighboring school, is a NASA Biomedical Engineer. Recently, via video-conference she and students discussed her work with the International Space Station astronauts. Some past history includes winning a trip sponsored by the Bureau of Indian Education to NASA’s Goddard Space Center in 2010. I participated in the NASA Endeavor Fellowship Cohort 3 from 2011 - 2013, earning a STEM certificate from Columbia University with Leadership Distinction. We amaze ourselves at the accomplishments in six years. We hope to inspire other small schools considering PLTW. It takes a lot of energy, teamwork but you can do it.


Why Computer Science in K-12? By Shaileen Pokress Shaileen Pokress serves as Director of Instruction – Computer Science for Project Lead The Way. Follow her on Twitter @ ShayPokress. Shaileen Pokress serves as Director of Instruction – Computer Science for Project Lead The Way. Follow her on Twitter @ShayPokress.

“computer science” encompasses a wide range of topics from word processing to computer-aided design and web design. Moreover, statistics show that participation in computing by underrepresented groups, females in particular, is staggeringly low, and has actually been declining over the past two decades.

As a nation, we are shortchanging our students when it comes to computer science. Although much attention has been given to what is happening at the high school level, the problem actually begins in the younger grades. Age-appropriate experiences with computing need to start in elementary school and continue throughout middle school if we are to increase the number and diversity of students electing to take computing in high school and enter computing majors at the undergraduate level. Even for students who do not choose the field of computer science, an understandProjections from the Bureau of Labor ing of computer science and the ability to Statistics show that 3 out of 5 jobs in think computationally will benefit them STEM (science, technology, engineering, regardless of the field they pursue. Stumathematics) will require computing skills dents who are offered their first computer by the year 2022, leaving over one million science elective in high school will opt in unfilled computing positions. Schools must or out based on perceived stereotypes and answer the call to increase computer feelings of self-efficacy. Studies show that science instruction and do so in ways that these effects are diminished when students encourage all students to learn. Students are exposed to early, positive experiences won’t know about this opportunity and as part of their regular classroom schedtheir own aptitude if we don’t give them chances to explore computing all through- ule so that all students receive the same out their K-12 education. Here’s a thought opportunities. experiment: How many students would go The computer science education cominto medical fields if we didn’t teach any life munity has made an emphatic call for sciences until college? computing instruction for primary and The current state of computing education secondary students. It is the area in which the greatest discrepancy exists between in U.S. schools varies widely between states, and even from school to school de- what students need and what schools offer, pending on the availability of resources and yet it is also the most needed for national staff, as well as the priority placed on com- security and prosperity, career readiness, puting education by parents, school boards, and most importantly, equity across our and students themselves.What constitutes classrooms.

Project Lead The Way has answered the call with the development of a K-12 Computer Science Pathway. In addition to the Computer Science and Software Engineering course at the high school level, this year PLTW introduced a new middle school Introduction to Computer Science course. Another high school AP-level course is in development for release to the PLTW network in 2016. At the elementary level, PLTW provides six new PLTW Launch modules, each designed to integrate 10 hours of computer science instruction into the existing curricula of K-5 classrooms.The modules are tied to grade-level standards in science, mathematics, and English language arts, and are accompanied by PLTW’s teacher training and support so that all classroom teachers can learn how to integrate the innovative lessons into their regular classroom instruction. PLTW summarizes digital literacy in one statement: students learn how to collaborate with peers to create solutions through authentic problem-based learning. Everyone is engaged when they have a hand in defining what problems are important to solve. In today’s world, the most effective solutions almost always involve technology because computation has revolutionized every field imaginable. Computational thinking applies to every problem, so learning to apply computational thinking prepares our students for their innovative, technology-rich, ever-changing world. More information is available at https:// www.pltw.org/our-programs/pltw-computer-science/pltw-computer-science-curriculum.

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WORKING FOR YOU

Here’s a quartet you’ll enjoy. They will be very helpful to your classroom efforts and success. The four make great harmony working together as well as relying on their individual strengths in each of the PLTW programs. Here all four share a little personal information about themselves and their contact information. The chorus to everything they do is, “Call me; I’m here to help”. Dr. Joshua Schultz Director of STEM/PLTW-WI PhD, PE, LEED, AP Growing up, I always wanted to be an engineer. My parents, who live in Oconomowoc, WI, my hometown, still store in their garage a 5-foot Tesla coil I made in high school. Do you think I loved math and science? For three years I worked as an engineer at Skidmore Owings and Merrill (SOM) in Chicago on some of the world’s most impressive super-tall buildings including: Burj Khalifa, One World Trade Center, Kunming Junfa Tower, and Pertamina Energy Tower. I realized as much as I love the intellectual challenge of engineering change was necessary; my favorite experiences had always involved sharing my passion for engineering. So, I went on to earn a Ph.D. in civil engineering at Marquette University followed by post-doctoral studies in order to educate young, aspiring engineers. At PLTW, I have returned to the MSOE campus where I earned my bachelor’s degree and am able to combine my soft skills of enthusiasm and passion for educating future engineers with rigorous engineering knowledge that can be applied to tangibly impact the lives of others. Contact: Office: 414.277.7254 Cell: 414.331.1671 Twitter (personal): dr_jschultz Twitter (official): pltw_wi Email (direct): schultzj@msoe.edu Email (office) pltwwi@msoe.edu LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/joshuaschultz Patricia Deibert Associate Affiliate Director PLTW Biomedical Science and Launch Programs Competition Administrator for Statewide Engineering Design Competition. I proudly served the US Army in the Quartermaster Corp as a Mortuary Officer. During part of this time I was based in South Korea, an invaluable international learning experience. After the Army, I worked as a pharmaceutical sales representative and field trainer. That I would find my way to PLTW makes sense with that background. My education includes an undergraduate degree in biology and chemistry education from the University of Edinboro in Edinboro, PA and a master’s degree in educational computing from Cardinal Stritch in Milwaukee. Prior to joining the PLTW staff at MSOE, I was also an adjunct instructor for the University of Wisconsin– Green Bay and Cardinal Stritch University where I taught SMART Board Basics and Beyond the Basics. I’m from Pennsylvania but have lived in Sheboygan Falls, WI for years with my husband and son. I don’t mind the commute because I love my community and PLTW. I taught chemistry and biology at Sheboygan Falls High School and am a Teacher Leader for the American Chemical Society. Contact: Office: (414) 277-7214 deibertp@msoe.edu

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Marvin Bollman Associate Affiliate Director for PLTW Wisconsin Engineering and Gateway programs As a Professor at MSOE for more than thirty years, I taught Engineering Graphics, Computer Graphics, Creative Thinking and Educational Methods courses, and also served as the General Studies Department head for two years. I joined the PLTW team part time in 2006 becoming full time in 2012. I earned undergraduate degrees in Architectural Drafting and Design from Rochester State Junior College in Minnesota and an Industrial Arts in Education from Stout State University. Because I enjoy teaching, I earned a Master of Science in Curriculum and Instruction from UW- Milwaukee. My family is very important to me. I moved to the Milwaukee area from Minnesota in the early 70’s and met my wife Colleen. We have raised three children and are the proud grandparents of three boys and two girls. In my spare time, I’m a frustrated gardener and avid wood turner creating bowls and pens which are sold at a local gallery. Contact: Office: (414) 277-7357 bollman@msoe.edu

Chaning Ogden Associate Affiliate Director for PLTW Computer Science and STEM Director Like Dr. Schultz, I am a proud graduate from the Milwaukee School of Engineering. In 2009, I completed my B.S. in Computer Engineering. Though I went immediately in to industry, looking back, it seems obvious I was bound to return to help other people become engineers. I worked as a software developer for both startups and Fortune 500 companies in the areas of wireless avionic and near field communications, financial account systems, social communities, and automated controls. My passion for education, technology, and community outreach is what attracted me to the impact of PLTW. The one thing I love more than technology itself is learning. The fact that PLTW combines both of those is extremely exciting and has me energized to expand STEM offerings. I am focused on creative means, such as remote learning and dynamic workshops, to allow more schools to be introduced to and explore PLTW offerings. Needless to say, I’m partial to Computer Science. I am an active volunteer in the community, organizing local technology events and judging STEM related competitions. Contact: Office: (414)-277-2223 ogdenc@msoe.edu

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2015 Engineering Design Competition See 2015 winners and be inspired to enter the 2016 competition. Winners of this prestigious, rigorous competition were announced at the Awards Ceremony hosted at Milwaukee School of Engineering on August 12, 2015. Mr. Ronald (Bud) Gayhart from the Wisconsin Innovation Service and Small Business Centers at UW-Whitewater was the guest speaker. Placement

20 18

First Name

Last Name

Portfolio Title

Organization/School

Grade Level

PLTW Teacher

1st

Max

Mutza

CVS…Not the Pharmacy

Catholic Memorial HS

11th

Mary Petrie

1st

Jared

Bluma

CVS…Not the Pharmacy

Catholic Memorial HS

11th

Mary Petrie

1st

Sam

Aspinwall

CVS…Not the Pharmacy

Catholic Memorial HS

11th

Mary Petrie

2nd

Jack

Verstegen

Physical Inactivity

Middleton High School

12th

Brent Siler

3rd

Jackson

Boulanger

Pulaski-Kayak Carrier

Pulaski high school

12th

John Pitzen

3rd

Sawyer

Kobes

Pulaski-Kayak Carrier

Pulaski high school

12th

John Pitzen

3rd

Matt

Link

Pulaski-Kayak Carrier

Pulaski High School

12th

John Pitzen

Honorable Mention

Benjamin

Kalvin

Running Arm Form

Middleton High School

12th

Brent Siler

Honorable Mention

Emily

Walther

Running Arm Form

Middleton High School

12th

Brent Siler

Honorable Mention

Alexander

Peterson

Running Arm Form

Middleton High School

12th

Brent Siler

Honorable Mention

Jordan

Zadra

Computerized Desk Project

Waunakee High School

12th

Jeff Willauer

Honorable Mention

Derek

Urben

Computerized Desk Project

Waunakee High School

12th

Jeff Willauer

Honorable Mention

Christopher

King

Computerized Desk Project

Waunakee High School

12th

Jeff Willauer

Honorable Mention

Jacob

Marek

Computerized Desk Project

Waunakee High School

12th

Jeff Willauer

Honorable Mention

Brandt

Dietry

Screaming Sledgehammer

Waunakee High School

12th

Jeff Willauer

Honorable Mention

Sara

Freimuth

Screaming Sledgehammer

Waunakee High School

12th

Jeff Willauer

Honorable Mention

Devin

McCormick

Screaming Sledgehammer

Waunakee High School

12th

Jeff Willauer


PATHWAYS

Dr. Joshua Schultz, MSOE Director of STEM, and Dr. Matthew Panhans, P.E., MSOE Interim President.

Mr. Ronald (Bud) Gayhart – Director of the Center for Innovation and Business Development at UW-Whitewater.

Sam Aspinwall, Max Mutza, Jared Bluma School: Catholic Memorial Project: CVS…Not the Pharmacy

Derek Urben, Christopher King, Jordan Zadra, Jacob Marek School: Waunakee High School Project: Computerized Desk Project

The Wisconsin Engineering Design Competition is sponsored by Rockwell Automation and administered by Milwaukee School of Engineering for Wisconsin students currently enrolled in a Project Lead The Way capstone course, either “Engineering Design and Development” (EDD), or “Biomedical Innovation” (BI).The competition recognizes and rewards outstanding student projects and highlights the importance of engineering design and problem solving in STEM education. Prizes include $4000, $2000 and $1000. First place wins a vetting by Wisconsin Innovation Service Center housed at UW-Whitewater. Contact Patricia Deibert, Competition Administrator, for 2016 information.deibertp@msoe.edu 19 21


CONTACT INFORMATION FOR PARTNERSHIP AND FUNDING Joshua Schultz • 414-277-7254 • schultzj@msoe.edu FOR ENGINEERING/GATEWAY AND/OR SCHOOL CERTIFICATION Marv Bollman • 414-277-7357 • bollman@msoe.edu FOR BIOMEDICAL SCIENCE AND/OR LAUNCH Patricia Deibert • 414-277-7214 • deibertp@msoe.edu FOR OPERATIONS 414-277-7594

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FOR SCHOOL ENHANCEMENT AND/OR NEW SCHOOL IMPLEMENTATION Greg Quam • 608-778-8521 • gquam@pltw.org

Pathways - Fall 2015  

Pathways is the Wisconsin STEM/PLTW publication published by Milwaukee School of Engineering.

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