Page 1


EDUCATION

WORK EXPERIENCE

2011 – PRESENT

DAVIS PARTNERSHIP, DENVER, CO

PREPARED REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS PRESENTATION AND MARKETING MATERIALS INCLUDING DESIGN DEVELOPMENT DRAWINGS, DETAILS AND CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS INTERACTIVE 3D MODELS FOR CLIENT INTERVIEWS COORDINATED LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS AND SURVEY PERSONAL IN THE CREATION OF SITE AND BUILDING DESIGN PROPOSALS SUMMER 2010

TRYBA ARCHITECTS, DENVER, CO

PARTICIPATED IN CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT PROCESS PREPARED PRESENTATION AND MARKETING MATERIALS INCLUDING DESIGN DEVELOPMENT DRAWINGS, DETAILS AND CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS ORGANIZED AND DEVELOPED REVIT, BIM AND PARAMETRIC MODELS RESEARCHED LOCAL AND NATIONAL ORDINANCE REQUIREMENTS PARTICIPATED IN ON-SITE RECORDING OF DETAILS FOR QUALITY CONTROL SURVEYED AND DOCUMENTED PROJECT PROGRESS ASSISTED IN ARRANGING CLIENT/CONTRACTOR/OWNER MEETINGS SUMMER 2008 UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, TAUBMAN SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE CANDIDATE, 2015 3.75 GPA ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF DESIGN, TEMPE, AZ B.S. ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES, MAY 2012 GRADUATION 3.5 GPA ARCHITECTURE; 3.5 GPA CUMULATIVE REGIS JESUIT HIGH SCHOOL, AURORA, CO GRADUATING CLASS OF 2006 WESTERN STATE COLLEGE, GUNNISON, CO 2007 SPRING SEMESTER, OUTWARD BOUND WILDERNESS LEADERSHIP COURSE, COSTA RICA TO THE KEYS

4

COMMERCIAL SALMON FISHERMAN, SITKA, ALASKA

DECKHAND ON F.V. BYNG AND F.V. E.H. RIGGED, OPERATED AND MAINTAINED FISHING GEAR MAINTAINED AND REPAIRED ENGINE AND HYDRAULIC SYSTEMS LANDED, CLEANED AND ICED ALASKAN KING, SILVER AND DOG SALMON JAN 2007- DEC 2008

RESEARCH ASSISTANT TO ASU’S URBAN PLANNING DEPT., PHOENIX, AZ

ASSISTED IN THE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROCESS FOR URBAN PLANNING PROJECTS FOR PUBLIC PLACES: “PHOENIX FLOWS”, “CANAL CITIES” AND “FLIP-A-STRIP” CREATED POWER POINT PRESENTATIONS, SITE RENDERINGS AND LOGOS FOR BRANDING CONDUCTED RESEARCH ON EXISTING AND PROPOSED PROJECTS CONDUCTED RESEARCH ON SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT PLANS WITH A FOCUS ON URBAN RENEWAL AND REDEVELOPMENT


AWARDS - ORGANIZATIONS

VOLUNTEER EXPERIENCE

HINES 2014 URBAN DESIGN COMPETITION, ENTRY, 2014 REALESTATE DEVELOPMENT COMPREHENSIVE PROJECT, BEST PROJECT AWARD, 2014 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN STUDIO, EXEMPLARARY STUDENT WORK, EXHIBIOTN, 2014 GEORGE DAVIS SCHOLARSHIP, 2011 PAUL H. KLETT MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP, 2011 GEORGE CHRISTENSEN TRAVEL SCHOLARSHIP, 2011 DESIGN EXCELLENCE, ASU SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, 2009, 2011 NOMINATED 2010 DEAN’S LIST HONOR ROLL, ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY, 2007 EAGLE SCOUT, TROOP 72 BOULDER, COLORADO, 2004 AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTURE STUDENTS (AIAS) ALPHA RHO CHI PROFESSIONAL ARCHITECTURE FRATERNITY, SATYROS CHAPTER (ASU) PRESIDENT, 2010-2011 PROFESSIONAL DIRECTOR/FUNDRAISING CHAIR, 2011-2012 SIGMA ALPHA LAMBDA HONOR SOCIETY (SAL) NATIONAL SOCIETY OF COLLEGIATE SCHOLARS (NSCS)

2010, AIA JUDGE, NATIONAL ENGINEERS WEEK FUTURE CITIES DESIGN COMPETITION, PHOENIX, AZ 2010, ALPHA RHO CHI SERVICE PROJECT INFRASTRUCTURE REPAIR AND MAINTENANCE, TUBA, AZ

HOPI

INDIAN

RESERVATION,

2009, VOLUNTEER AMBASSADOR, GREENBUILD CONFERENCE, PHOENIX, AZ 2008, PARK AND TRAIL PARK, LIGNUMVITAE KEY, FL

MAINTENANCE,

LIGNUMVITAE

KEY

BOTANICAL

STATE

2008, SCHOOL MAINTENANCE, PIERNAS BLANCAS, COSTA RICA

5


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

RESUME/C.V.

4-5

PERSONAL WORK

8 -19

UNDERGRADUATE URBAN FARM BARIO COMMUNITY CENTER TREE HOUSE - MULTI FAMILY HOUSING HAYDEN MILL - WELLNESS CENTER PROFESSIONAL WORK CAESAR CHAVES GSA HEAD QUARTERS HEALTHCARE

6

20 - 31 32 - 45 46 - 57 58 - 69 70 - 89 90 - 93


7


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

personal work.

8


9


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

10


11


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

12


13


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

14


15


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

16


17


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

TEMPE URBAN FARM

Fall, 2009. ALA 290. Site Planning and Program Strategy

The project creatively integrates an agriculturally based program into the urban environment of Tempe. The site serves as a functioning farm, education center, public gardens recreational area and Farmers Market. The design is loose; allowing the site to be a dynamic phenomena, constantly changing to accommodate a variety of events and activities. The site was designed using a grid system constructed from historic agricultural geometries. The built elements on the site are characterized by a rectilinear geometry, which contrasts with the organic nature of their immediate context. The primary challenge, with regard to the design, was creating a strategy to unite the six acre site.

18


CONTEXT The site is well connected to its urban surroundings. A number of canals and greenways lie within the immediate surroundings as well as a number of bustling commuter corridors. North of the site there is an animal preserve, and to the south, ASU Tempe main campus. The site is located on the path of a future green belt set to link downtown Tempe with downtown Phoenix four miles to the west. Agriculture has been an important part of Tempe’s history and is still actively practiced on the outskirts of the city.

Hohokuk Expressway

Grand Canal

Loop 202

ASU

Popago Park Preserve

Salt River/ Tempe Lake

Scottsdale Greenway

I-10

19


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

ORGANIC

Rice Terraces, Philippines 2000+ years old

20

INFLUENCED

Rural Farmland, England 700 years old

CONQUERED

Versailles, France 250 years Old

CONTROLLED

Acre Plots, Kansas 80 years old

ENGINEERED

Alfalfa Fields, San Tan, Arizona 30 years old


Vestigial geometries on the site are evident, evidenve of prior uses. An elevated rail bed arcs across the corner, a vague grid system from when the site was used as a temporary parking lot.

21


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

SITE ANALYSIS Methods of Site Discovery & Investigation

Charcoal rubbings were a helpful medium for capturing textures and patterns

22

the site is quiet, a low roar from the freeways bordering the site is audible - the relative silence is broken when an airplane passes overhead. the ground is hard in places and packed as hard as granite in others - pebbles beneath my feet grind as I slide my feet across the flat packed dirt ground - a small dead bush at my feet tells a futile tale of a doomed fight to cling to life in this desolate environment as I reach down to brush my hand over its dry twig-like branches, it crumbles away - there are tire tracks making concentric rings in the hard ground, the free shapes they leave in the earth contradict their rugged surroundings - again the silence is broken as a lightrail train sounds its horn - the stark interior of the site comes to an abrupt end marked by a loose berm of soil, behind it trees and bushes seem to be established along a type of drainage area - the canal, the water is a welcome sight. a cool breeze stirs the stale hot air around me. I am reminded how valuable water is in this climate - behind a thin ribbon of vegetation a road follows the canal’s edge. it is perfectly graded. signs of human activity are scattered in the texture of the rough ground. mountain bike tires, footprints, a dog’s paw prints. - a dense development of condominiums at the site’s eastern edge stand like a great wall of stucco.

night:day, winter:summer

site boundries, vegetation, concrete, canal, asphalt, stucco, buildings, sky


production model PRODUCTION MODEL Community, Grower Co-Op/Food Share

crop donations

produce from the farm

is produced...

work is done by...

food goes...

on-site demontstration farm

employees

community food share system*

orchards and production zones

volunteers

the homes and familiies of plot growers

plot growers

*

Will be the culmination of a cooperative effort amongst all Phoenix area growers. It will operate much like a Farmer’s Market the site functioning as a central point of distribution. The program will provide a marketing and distribution resource to area farmers while providing an educational benefit to the community.

23


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

Existing site geometry

24

Evolving agricultural patterns 2000 BCE - Present

Hohokum Canal Network, Salt River, AZ, 2000 BCE

Hohokum Canal Network Overlay - forming the central axis of the site plan

histroric farming patterns - guided by water source

Abstract sketch, “weaving geometries�

Radial and gridded patterns provide scale

The site is organized by a series of historical and culturally inspired geometries.


SITE DEVELOPMENT Agriculture.

Preserved vegetation

The design of the site is influenced by a series of geometries overlaid and manipulated to produce a grid system that informs the programmatic elements of the design. Each layer of the grid network represents an abstracted pattern that has arisen in man’s approach toward a “controlled” landscape. The final grid pattern represents a historical chronology of landscape geometries. The geometries are extracted form aerial photographs of an array of locations – varying in age, geographic region and cultural contexts, these pattern serve to represent a cross section of man’s affect on his natural landscape.

Community Plots/Gathering Areas

Constructed Forms Based on Developed Geometry

Circulation

25


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

resevoir already being utilized in adjacent areas north of the site. The pond is home to a school of tilapia which play a vital role in the breaking down of organic material generated by the site. The fish in turn produce fertilizer which is used on the site.

26

green belt This swath serves several purposes within the program of the Site. It functions as a pedestrian link between the existing corridors at the north and south ends of the farm. The space created by the implied geometry also functions as a visual anchor, aligning visual anchors on the site in a logical symmetry.

jogging trail Functions as a recreational loop for hikers and joggers. Provides an educational “nature” loop. The trail winds through a collection of preserved and native landscape elements.

date palm grove This area functions as both a Date Palm grove as well as a plaza. The trees are spaced evenly along a grid allowing for free movement within the interrior.

central corridor The central corridor follows the path of the Rio Salado basin.

production zones The farm layout is adapted to the guiding geometry, as a result several distinctly different “zones” that cater to diverse plant needs. Generally, the Production “zones”.

orange groves Offer an aromatic element within the site, grounding it as a “place” and appealing to the olfactory senses of its visitors.

education gardens

community gardens

These gardens are maintained by staff members but serve as public education tools.

The community gardens are leased annualy to individuals and families as a means to generate revenue. The plot owner is then entitled to all of his or her own produce generated during the growing season.


Main site access, vehicle/pedestrian follow the overlaid Rio Salado geometry. -Rio Salado is the primary source of water, sustenence for the Phoenix area. The river is used as a metaphor, guiding visitors through the site.

Landscape is layered and arranged to provide shelter to visitors.

27


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

Corridor Rendering

Built Aesthetic Diagram

SITE DEVELOPMENT The structures gain their forms and aesthetic language from vernacular agricultural implements. Barns, nepa-huts, silos, barn doors, etc. They are distributed along a central mall intended to frame views on the site upon arrival as well as establish a centralized location for accomodating events. As one aproaches from the north, they decend into the the site via a series of stepped terraces. Once at grade, palms in the adjacent groves, flanking the mall, create shade and condition the outdoor spaces. The hardscape features are intentionally human scaled to create feelings of comfort and security, and to contrast the vehicle dominated landscapes that surround the farm. These spaces are intended to be peaceful, flexible and tactile. In some cases the structures themselves should seem to disappear into the landscape as thresholds of inside and outside spaces are dissolved and their programs spill into the outdoors.

1/2. CLASSROOM, STORAGE, TOILET 3. COMMUNITY GATHERING SPACE 4. OFFICE SPACE AND STORAGE 5. OFFICE SPACE 6. EDUCATION GATHERING 7. STORAGE

28


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

Roof Planes at Sunrise

Gathering Space

GATHERING SPACE

Office and Storage

OFFICES ADMIN

Classrooms and Restrooms

CLASSROOMS/TOILET

Gathering Space

29


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

30


31


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

BARRIO CULTURAL CENTER Spring, 2010, Parametric Modeling

The project is focused on a historical and cultural senseitivity of place. The site chosen is a vacant lot in Tuscon’s Bario neighborhood and has played a significant role in the development of the city and the southwest as a whole. The programming centers around community service and cultural celebration. Parametric modeling is used in realizing the architectural aspirations of the design.

`1900

32

Barrio Neighborhood, Tuscon, AZ


CHARACTER

“... It means Free Zone, and in earlier times was allowed to remain without legal restraints or the presence of a policeman. Here, the Mescalian could imbibe his fill, and either male or female could, in peaceful intoxication, sleep on the sidewalk or in the middle of the streets, with all their ancient rights respected. Fandangoes, monte, chicken fights, broils, and all the amusements of the lower class [citizens] were, in this quarter, indulged in without restraint.� -City Directory, 1881

33


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

HISTORY The Bario neighborhood in Tucson was one of the first settlements in the regions. Thoughout history the neighborhood has undergone significant changes as populations moved and Tuscon grew. The area sits in relative disrepair although recent redevolopment interests have sparked redevolopment - mainly remodels of old homes and businesses. During the later part of the 20th c. the neighborhood became neglected and many of

1919

34

1948

the origional structures fell into disrepair. Unfortunately due to the predominant use of adobe most damaged structures were not able to be salvaged. It is our goal to embrace this neighborhood and celebrate its colorful past. We hope to provide a design solution that is thoughtful and considerate while breathing new life into the area.

1971

TUSCON Historical Society, U of A Dept. of Urban Planning


SITE ANALYSIS

Above: Historical Photographs Top: Major Streets, corridors Bottom Right: walking radius Bottom Left: major land uses

Because of the Sites unique location much of my innitial work on the project was research. The City of Tuscon as well as the University of Arizona Dept. of Urban Planning were instrumental in providing the material nessicary to begin understanding the 120 plus year history of the Bario. Fire insurance maps, produced ever five years or so illustrated a gradual decline in the neighborhood residency and later the vanishing of structures due to lack of upkeep. Photos taken at the turn of the century show a dirt road with adobe buildings set just of the street - a unique strategy for maximizing private courtyard space.

35


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

General Massing and Site Planning Historic Practice

T

he project grew from a manipulation of the unique architectural identity of the Barrio. This is a melding of construction techniques and cultural influences that has evolved over the life of the Barrio. A courtyard strategy was deconstructed to reinforce programming relationships and loosely define interior space, while maintaining an open unobstructed courtyard space that provides a venue for a variety of programs. I studied traditional methods of construction and planning in an effort to create an appropriate aesthetic vocabulary for this sensitive site. Centuries old practices of brick and mud, courtyard planning, and solar orientation drove the initial design work.

South Facing Courtyard, Casa Bonita.

Building Massing, Courtyard.

Street Edge Study

EAST WEST 1 Courtyard Space

The goal was to achichieve a dynamic dialogue with the street edge, much like many of the older structures in the area. As you walk down some of the streets in the area, you catch glimpses - through an open door, window, a hole in a fence, of the world beyond the street edge. A shared courtyard.

EAST WEST 2 36

Performance Space


Texture, Form, Light and Rythm

NORTH SOUTH 1 Education - Classrooms, Studios

NORTH SOUTH 2 Administration, Gallery

37


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

Utililizing

a “cross referential” geometry, I was able to maintain calculated view corridors to within the courtyard space from the street. This allows for playful dialogue between the building its users and the passerby - feeling connected was key. This strategy was also useful in organizing the programming on the site and activating the courtyard space. Each programming element shares a direct and intentional connection with each other. Art Studios are across from the gallery, classrooms are oriented toward the Southeast to take advantage on morning light, the library is “transparent” allowing a view of the interior, tempered by the library.

Bottom:Process Sketch, View, Light, perimeter Top: Site configuration

38


39


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

Connecting interior spaces with the street and neighborhood without sacrificing security or privacy.

Throughout this project I was searching for ways to connect the building to it neighbors. I wanted the building to have a dynamic expression, one that would constantly change affect and be affected. The folded structure of the roof allows light to pass freely through the building. During the day the cleats reflect a soft indirect light into the interior, at night light spills out from the building expressing itself geometrically in the buildings elevation. I utilized a number of parametric modeling tools to experiment with various options, ultimately choosing this classic origami form for its ability to diffuse light and its structural characteristics.

40


PROGRAMING AND CIRCULATUION

Site Circulation and Access

Programming

Roof Plan

41


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

Courtyard, looking into the classrooms and studio spaces.

42

Light is used to illuminate the street edge offering security and creating the illusion of a floating mass, resting on the sidewalk


The lowered courtyard provides seating opportunities and mitigates high summer temperatures

43


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

PIONEER MEMORIAL CEMETERY Fall, 2009. ALA 294. Historical Reflection

The Pioneer Memorial Cemetery lies in a neglected area of downtown, however it holds some of the most important pieces of the city’s history. The cemetery itself is over 100 years old and has been largely ignored for the past fifty years. The ground is bare earth punctuated by weathered memorials to the past. The historic significance of this cemetery is paramount. I intend to draw direct and literal connections between the lives of he individuals buried on the site and their contributions to the establishment and development of the Phoenix Valley. The fact that many of the people buried in the cemetery have played significant roles in the development of the original state government and other fraternal and social organizations - constituting the back bone of a developing Phoenix - should be clearly defined within the design of the site. Their contributions should be celebrated within the context of the city of Phoenix and its enduring history.

44

Google Earth imagery


Concept imagery: Phoenix taking root, growing and thriving. A reflection on the lives of those who came before.

45


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

SITE ANALYSIS RIGHT: Site location was analyzed for reasons of access, linkage potential and general oportunities and constraints. BELOW: The site was meticulously surveyed, recording the location and information of every grave marker, site feature, plant and topographic variation. Google Earth imagery

Site Relationship

Grave markers were numbered and coordinated with a spreadsheet containing relevant information, name, date of birth and death, occupation etc.

46


CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT

Reflection Space

Radial Geometry Expressed in Surface Treatments

A variety of scaled spaces care created in the viods of site elements

Site analysis - PLACE

Site analysis - TIME Plotting the number of deaths over timerevealedtrendsillustratingthe cemetery’s use 1877 - 1910.

1. The geometry of the plot was combined and simplified 2. This geometry was mirrired to reveal a for representing the swell and decline of use. 3. Geometric forms were applied to a grid system and distriburted based on month of death. 4. the resulting geometry represents the event of death over time with regard to the cemetery.

Corridors and seating created by hardscape elements

1

Using the country of origin or each of the deceased, discovered during my research, I plotted a tangetial path directly to their respective cities of birth, originating at the cemetery. I created an algorithm that calculated the relative angle of trajectory from the point of origin - a determined point on the site.

2

LEFT: the ten countries of origin BOTTOM RIGHT: the diagramatic geometry produced by the algorithm BOTTOM RIGHT: a screen shot taken of the algorithm showing the various formulas employed.

3

4

47


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

SITE DESIGN Convergence

Site walls distributed along the gridded geometry Hardscape organization is manipulated to establish experiential connections to the past, illuminating the lives of the deceased.

48

Radial geometry is expressed in the ground plane and is carried vertically by a wall at the north of the site. The radial pattern culminates in the reflection space - a dead end corridor framed by concrete walls that frame the sky. The gridded geometry is layed across the interior spaces and projected vertically in the form of solid walls that guide circulation. These walls are penetrated by the radial geometry creating void sight lines that link the reflection space with the north wall.


Reflection Space Lighting Study, examining the interaction of light and the viods in the walls, the floor and ceiling.

49


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

North/South Site Section

East/West Site Section

50


51


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

Street corner, Signage Windows and main entrance

52


Angled north wall from street

Prominade, an experiential link to the past

53


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

Artistic rendering showing the city emerging from beyond the walls of the cemetery, growing up around it

54


View out - Into the garden from the reflection space

55


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

MULTI FAMLY HOUSING Fall, 2010, Tree House

In order to cause the city to “implode� one must begin to consider what is causing its tremendous growth. Upon investigation, it is discovered that a vast majority of new development occurring at the desert edge is to fill a demand for FAMILY housing; families with children, cars and a commute. The goal of TREEHOUSE is to create a desirable community within the city that fosters strong ties to the notions of place (neighborhoods, culture and arts) Homes that breathe with the city and echo the sounds of urban life. These are living spaces that will grow with a family and adapt as their needs change; high quality spaces characterized by flexibility and will develop a distinct identity. These spaces offer a gradient of spatial experiences that change over the course of a day, and throughout the seasons.

56


Weather and Solar Exposure

Residential

Bus lines

Commercial

Light Rail

Parks/Public

Free Shuttle

Adjacent Land Use

Transportation

57


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com Views From Site

TYPICAL UNIT UNIT TYPE 1 1400SF

---

N

58


59


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

level 4

BUILDING SHELL

UNIT TYPES

SHEAR WALLS

CIRCULATION CORES

level 1

60

level 2

level 3


ROOF PATIO PRIVATE/SLEEPING

PASSIVE AIR CIRCULATION

ACTIVE CONDITIONING SYSTEMS

CIRCULATION CORE

GROUND LEVEL

LIVING SPACE

Site Layout

61


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

UNIT TYPE 1

Due to the high density on the site, maintaining privacy within the units was a primary concern when considering unit strategy. The unit types are staggered in plan and section the result is a mass/ void relationship that allows for an offset in spatial functions across the courtyard space. The trees in the courtyard are deciduous – losing their leaves in the winter. This allows for a mitigated privacy barrier between units and manages the southern exposure.

UNIT TYPE 2

UNIT TYPE 3

Units are arranged in a staggered pattern to ensure that the spatial programs of each unit do not align, providing privacy.

62


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

Interior spatial models - used in the design process to determinelivability,lighting,circulationand materiality

63


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

64


65


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

66


67


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

TEMPE MILL WELLNESS CENTER Spring, 2012. ALA 540. Community

The Hayden mill is one of Tempe’s oldest and most prominant landmarks. The city has grown up around the former mill and for decades had relied on it to provide jobs food and goods to the community. The structure stands vacant - a reminder of the agricultural roots of the Phoenix valley and the prosperiety it has brought. The project aims to re establish the iconic structure as a hub of nourishment for the community. Establishing real, experiential connections to the history of place and providing services to it’s community.

68


Standing at the base of the silos Hayden Mill, Tempe AZ

69


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

CONNECTION

BRIDGE

PEDESTRIAN LINK

HIKING TRAILS

70 igor hercegovac christian solorio


CASE STUDIES Escelante Community Center Escelante Community Center The Escalante Community Center serves the community

The Escelante Community the by introducing education andcenter recreationserves programs to community introducing education and toddlers,by youth, teens and seniors recreation programs to toddlers, youth and teens.

Tempe Multi-Generational Center: North North Tempe Multi Generational Center: The center is a unique mix of public, private, and commu-

The center is a unique mix of public, private the nity based organizations. Through these partnerships center provides based neighborhood and community services and community organizations. across the age continuum fromthe preschool to older adult. Through these partnerships center provides neighborhood and community services across the age continuum from preschool to older adult. Westside Multigenerational Center

Westside Multi generational Center:

Offers the City of Tempe's Adapted Recreation Program, Dennis J. Cahill Senior Center, a senior activity center with a

The center that support variety ofprovides activities to facilities choose from. Seven public computers, Anprograms Adult Fitness Center area at withpromoting a 4 stack multi-gym, outreach geared an ab/lower back machine, bikes and treadmills, healthy life styles and serves residents ofFour all classrooms available for public use to non-profit organizaages.tions – facility reservation requests, Three pre-school rooms used by Head Start programs, WellCare Clinic, Boys & Girls Club Ladmo Branch

Westside

Tempe North

Escelante

71


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

PROGRAMMING DEVELOPMENT

Rise

Ride

In order to develop an effective programming strategy, studies were conducted examining the accessibility of the site, services offered on the site, and experiential (intangible) qualities of the area. 72

Prepare

Perform

Reect Reect

Return


SITE EXPLORATION

Morning

Evening Desert textures Characterized by rough organic shapes compiled in an aggregation of varying color and texture.

Color/Light As the day passes through it solar cycles the desert landscape is illuminated and comes alive in dancing color shadow and contrast

Careful attention was paid to the unique, natural qualities of the site context and their interaction with natural processes and human intervention. 73


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

Materials were selected that reflect and reinforce the design intent - driven by scale, tactility and historic relevance.

MATERIAL STUDIES

Tactile Surfaces the interior of the space is finished in rough #2 Douglas fir. This creates a warm, tactile experience, emphasizing the contrast in sensation between the outsode and inside experience.

74

Visually directing surface A course white plaster/cement is used in all exterior surfeces to create a visual barrier or framwork for experiencing the transitions in light quality and meteriological phenomina throughout the day.

Focus The experience of the moment is about the sky. It is creating a space that is bound by the sky; as a ceiling, as bathing coat of color on the structure itself, as an illuminating source of energy and reflection.


Framing exposure from within the site reinforces the connection of sky and earth, enhancing the solar dynamics and overall experience.

EXPOSURE STUDIES

75


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

VISUAL LANGUAGE Structural geometries were inspired by the existing structure and surrounding elements that date to a similar historic period in order to illuminate the visual language of this period and it’s modern influence.

76

wellness

igor hercegovac christian solorio mark knutson

s.12

wellness

igor hercegovac christian solorio mark knutson

s.12


Specific areas of the site were chosen for perscribed interventions, aiming to enhance the experience of the site.

INTERVENTIONS

Hiking/Jogging Trail

Stairs/Entry/Gathrering Space

Community/Education Garden

Shade Structures/Planting

Water Feature/Circulation Spine

77


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

BODY KITCHEN WEIGHT GYM MISC. STUDIO SPACE CAFE SKY COURTYARD OFICE

SPIRIT MIND LIBRARY CLASSROOMS DEMO. KITCHEN OFFICES/MEETING SPACES RESEARCH CENTER COMMUNITY OUTREACH/COUNCILING LOUNGE/OBSERVATION

78

RECEPTION GALLERY SPACE HISTORY CENTER/MUSEUM


Welness: Mind, Body, Spirit

Structural Connections

Material

Environmental Connections

Structure

Community Connections

Mathematical Rythm

Green Belt Connection: Tempe Transit > Tempe Beach Woven Geometries

79


DN

Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

UP

16' - 0"

7

16' - 0"

4

16' - 0"

8 7

9 16' - 0"

9

6

DN

3

16' - 0"

5 UP

2

2

UP

DN

16' - 0"

35' - 11"

1

16' - 0"

6

1

4

1 5

16' - 0"

4

8

16' - 0"

16' - 0"

16' - 0"

16' - 0"

16' - 0"

16' - 0"

16' - 0"

16' - 0"

16' - 0"

n

16' - 0"

16' - 0"

80

STUDIOS COURTYARD STUDIOS WATER RECEPTION CAFE’ KITCHEN OFFICE SPACE EXISTING STRUCTURE

16' - 0"

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

STUDIOS COURTYARD PATIO LOCKER ROOMS RECEPTION GYM STAIR TOWER BRIDGE EXISTING STRUCTURE

n

2


81


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

82


studio space elevator lobby cafe fitness center

83


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

84


85


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

86


87


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com ,

,

Cesar E. Chavez Memorial Building

Design Solar Sculpture Custom shape rack mounted PV panels with integral gutter system along leading edge and spaced to provide access from the garage rooftop

Steel purlins with high performance coating

Steel Pipe Riser sub-structure

Tension cable truss system to hold PV racks

Extension of concrete columns to provide base supporting structure

Steel pipe outriggers to hold tension in truss system

Tension cables return to main garage structure to “close the forces�

Design - 35

Solar access study on June 21

Parametric application in the design of a solar sculpture, constructed 2011, Denver CO. TRYBA Architects, Denver CO

88 Solar access study on December 21


CÉsar E

figured he area nnade. ogical his exany of image buildsecure ed for parate irculaesence n, and ry finurable, als.

greatly hysical n will nce diovided ss and parate ovided nd the

m and e new nd innature nd and nd in-

e floor cycled ources. ded at oustics Coloccents. porate alk-off

Sensitive but unclassified property of the United States Government for official use only. Do not remove this notice. Properly destroy or return documents when no longer needed.

Lobby Renderings constructed 2011, Denver CO. TRYBA Architects, Denver CO

89


Mark Knutson, M.Arch I Applicant - F.13 marksknutson@gmail.com

90


91


MARK KNUTSON M.ARCH I APPLICANT - FALL 2013 MARKSKNUTSON@GMAIL.COM

Mark Knutson  

OVERVIEW OF WORK

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you