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City of Solon

Johnson County, Iowa

Comprehensive Plan 2015

Adopted: April 20th, 2016


Acknowledgements Solon City Council

Steve Stange, Mayor Casey Grover, City Council Member Dale Snipes, City Council Member Mark Krall, City Council Member Mark Prentice, City Council Member Steve Duncan, City Council Member Lynn Morris, City Council Member (February 2016)

City Staff

Cami Jo Rasmussen, City Administrator Susie Siddell, City Clerk Scott Kleppe, Director of Public Works Dave Schechinger V&K Engineering, City Engineer

Comprehensive Plan Steering Committee

Cami Jo Rasmussen, City Administrator Mark Pattison - Local business owner Scott Kleppe, Director of Public Works Kristina Bevans - Resident Rich Meehan - Resident Dave Ranard - Planning & Zoning Commission Dale Snipes - City Council Member Casey Grover - City Council Member Barb Smith - Resident Steve Stange - Mayor

MSA Professional Services, Inc.

Chris Janson, Project Planner Shawn O’Shea, Project Manager Jim Holz, Client Services Manager Mat Saur, Project Engineer


Table of Contents Chapter 1: Introduction....................................................1-2

1.1 The Plan as a “Living Guide� 1.2 A Snapshot of Solon, Iowa

2.1 Overview of Planning Process 2.2 Public Visioning Meeting

Chapter 2: Planning Process & Public Participation.....2-2 Chapter 3: Goals, Objectives & Strategies......................3-2 3.1 Vision and Goals 3.2 Transportation 3.3 Housing 3.4 Community Services 3.5 Downtown Solon 3.6 Growth Management 3.7 Economic Development 3.8 Quality of Life

Chapter 4: Land Use..........................................................4-2

4.1 Existing Land Use 4.2 Future Land Use Map 4.3 Future Land Use Categories 4.4 Development Concepts 4.5 Design Guideline Considerations

5.1 Guiding Daily Decisions 5.2 Guiding Annual Decisions 5.3 Action Plan 5.4 Amending the Plan

A.1 Demographics A.2 Housing A.3 Economic Prosperity A.4 Agriculture & Natural Resources A.5 Community Facilities & Services A.6 Community Character A.7 Land Use A.8 Infrastructure A.9 Municipal Finances

Chapter 5: Implementation and Action Plan.................5-2

Appendix A: Community Indicators Report.................A-2

Appendix B: Public Input................................................B-2 B.1 Public Meeting Input B.2 Community Survey Results

Appendix C: Comprehensive Plan Maps.....................C-2


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1 Introduction 2 This Chapter provides the foundation for the Comprehensive Plan, outlining why we plan, the 3 planning process, Smart Planning, and the planning In addition, Chapter 1 also provides community 4 area. background information including key community 5 indicators. Appendix A Page The Plan as a “Living Guide� 1-2 Appendix B 1.1 1.2 A Snapshot of Solon, Iowa 1-4 Appendix C


1.1 The Plan as a “Living Guide” Why Plan? This comprehensive plan serves as a policy document, which establishes general guidelines for the physical, economic, and social development of a municipality. Although the plan itself is not a legal document, it lays a foundation and provides the rationale for decisions concerning legal documents such as zoning and subdivision ordinances. Zoning and subdivision ordinances are the tools that municipalities have in order to manage future growth policies established in this plan. Therefore, it is critical for any community with land use regulations to have an adopted plan from which regulatory decision may be justified. As residents and businesses come and go, and economic trends rise and fall, changes will occur. The purpose of this plan is to establish a shared vision for Solon to guide future actions and decisions.

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Plan Maintenance Local leaders should use this plan to assess and re-evaluate the goals and objectives of the community from year to year. As the community’s needs change, the plan may need to be amended. This planning document is a “living” guide for growth and change in the City of Solon. The plan represents the City’s best effort to address current issues and anticipate future needs. If decisions are being made that are not consistent with this plan, then the plan should be amended. The process of amending the comprehensive plan should not be onerous, but it should trigger a brief pause to consider again the long term vision for the community. This plan’s value is dependent upon frequent use and occasional updates.


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

Plan Organization The organization of the plan is based on the planning process and is divided into five chapters plus several important appendices. Chapter 1: Introduction Chapter 1 discusses the role of the plan, the planning area boundaries and regional context. Chapter 2: Planning Process and Public Participation Chapter 2 outlines the planning process, including a description of public participation methods and feedback. Chapter 3: Vision, Goals, Objectives and Strategies Chapter 3 includes a vision for the future of the City, as desired in 2035, and goals, objectives, strategies, key indicators and action steps for each element of the plan, including: Transportation Housing Community Services Downtown Solon Growth Management Economic Development Quality of Life Chapter 4: Land Use Chapter 4 describes current land use characteristics, defines future land use categories and policies, and presents the future land use map. Detailed planning for several subareas within the City is also addressed. Chapter 5: Implementation & Action Plan Chapter 5 describes the tools and procedures by which the plan will be implemented and provides a detailed timeline of action steps for successful implementation of the plan. Appendix A: Community Indicators Appendix A is a compilation of data that describes the existing conditions, trends, and projections for the City of Solon. This data informs the planning process and should be updated from time to time to track progress and change in the City. Appendix B: Pubic Input Appendix B is a compilation of complete results from the public input process. Appendix C: Comprehensive Plan Maps Appendix C is a compilation of maps that were used in various formats throughout the planning process.

Introduction | 1-3


1.2 A Snapshot of Solon History of Solon In 1839, the United States Government initiated a survey of a military road from Dubuque to “such a point on the northern boundary of the state of Missouri.” The military road ultimately ran from Dubuque to below Keosauqua at the Iowa/Missouri border (Thompson 1989: 2). Hamilton H. Kerr and John West, recognizing the potential for settlement along the road, employed Cyrus Sanders in 1840 to lay out lots on 80 acres along the Road. The developers named the plat “Solon,” in honor of one of the founders’ sons (Des Moines Register “Iowa Close-up”). The town resembled a grid pattern common in the nineteenth century, yet no lots were immediately purchased (Aurner 1912:165). In 1850, H. H. Kerr and P. B. Anders revived the vacated town and laid out lots once more (Anonymous 1973:697). The original town consisted of 56 lots laid out in an irregularly shaped grid pattern with eight streets. North and Main Streets ran east/west, each being four blocks long. Short Street also ran east/west, only one and a half blocks long. West, Iowa, and Dubuque Streets ran north/south, each one and a half blocks long. Market and Cedar Streets also ran north/south, each two and one half blocks long. Dubuque Street and Main Street, each 80 feet wide, served as the two main boulevards for the town. The remaining streets were 55 feet in width. The original town plat provided for a public square, which was 120 feet square and located at the southwest corner of Market and Main Streets. Market Street lay directly east of Dubuque Street and would later become the Iowa Highway 1 (Johnson County Recorder’s Office, Deed Book 10:279).

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City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

Planning Area The study area for this Plan includes all lands in which the City has both a short- and long-term interest in planning and development activity. The Planning Area includes all lands within the current municipal limits and within the City’s potential twomile extraterritorial jurisdiction within Iowa. The City is approximately 837 acres (1.30 square miles). The entire Planning Area is approximately 1660 acres (2.60 square miles).

Solon

Introduction | 1-5 Esri, HERE, DeLorme, MapmyIndia, Š OpenStreetMap contributors, and the GIS user community


1.2 Regional Context The City of Solon is located in Big Grove Township, Johnson County, Iowa. Solon is in close proximity to two larger communities—Iowa City/Coralville and Cedar Rapids. The town provides a good location for residents to live in a smaller community and easily commute to work in the nearby larger towns. TheFayette University of Iowa is alsoClayton located in Iowa City, offering excellent employment and education opportunities to residents in Solon.

MAJOR REGIONAL CITIES City Iowa City, IA Cedar Rapids, IA North Liberty, IA Quad Cities Metro

Distance from Solon 12 Miles

126,561 13,519 383,681

17 Miles 9 Miles 63 Miles

Dubuque

Delaware

Buchanan

Population 67,862

Jackson Jones Linn

Benton

Clinton

Solon Cedar

Iowa

Johnson Scott

Muscatine

Keokuk

Washington

Louisa

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Jefferson

Henry Des Moines


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

Key Community Indicators This section analyzes over arching population and demographic trends for the City of Solon. Examination of these trends provide a foundation for the planning process and implementation of the plan. Population in Solon has been dramatically increasing. Over the past 30 years the City of Solon grew by 210%. The city has grown by 73% from the 2000 to 2010 census.

The number of people per household in Solon has increased from 2.43 in 2000 to 2.60 in 2010, while the County and State have decreased in size. The median age for the City of Solon is 35.4 years of age compared to the State of Iowa with a median age of 38.1.

POPULATION TRENDS 1980-2010 Source: Woods & Poole Economics, Inc. & Census

Solon

Sex & Age 2010

Source: U.S. Census 2010

Age and Sex Male population

984

48.3%

Female population

1,053

51.7%

Under 5 years

159

7.8%

5 to 9 years

196

9.6%

10 to 14 years

200

9.8%

15 to 19 years

121

5.9%

20 to 24 years

71

3.5%

25 to 29 years

106

5.2%

30 to 34 years

153

7.5%

35 to 39 years

175

8.6%

40 to 44 years

157

7.7%

45 to 49 years

124

6.1%

50 to 54 years

135

6.6%

55 to 59 years

97

4.8%

60 to 64 years

69

3.4%

65 to 69 years

45

2.2%

70 to 74 years

54

2.7%

75 to 79 years

59

2.9%

80 to 84 years

51

2.5%

85 years and over

65

3.2%

Total population

969

81,717

2,913,808

1990 Actual

1,050

96,119

2,776,755

1,177

111,006

2,926,324

-

2,951,775

131,244

3,046,355

2005 Proj. Percent

Iowa

1980 Actual 2000 Actual Number

Johnson

2010 Actual

2,037

2,037

Source: 2010 census

Introduction | 1-7


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1 2 Planning Process & Public Participation Chapter provides an overview of the planning and 3 This public participation process. Summaries of public input for 4 the comprehensive planning process are provided. 5 Appendix A Page Appendix B 2.1 Overview of Planning Process 2-2 2.2 Public Visioning Meeting 2-4 Appendix C


2.1 Overview of Planning Process Planning Process

Incorporating Input into the Plan

A transparent public participation process is the foundation to a successful plan. The involvement of residents, business owners, and other stakeholders is essential to the creation and implementation of the plan. Elements of public participation for the 2035 Solon Comprehensive Planning process included:

The goals, objectives and policies of a comprehensive plan support the community’s vision for the future of Solon and address barriers to realizing this vision. Elements of the plan have been crafted from individual participant’s ideas, discussions and debates among Committee members and the past experiences of the community as a whole.

• Comprehensive Plan Steering Committee • Public Visioning Meetings • Public Open House • Community Wide Survey The Comprehensive Plan Steering Committee consisted of members of the City Council, City Staff and local Stakeholders. The Steering Committee acted as the primary sounding board for the planning process. The Committee met four times during the planning process to review draft plan materials. All meetings were open to the public.

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This input allows us to construct underlying themes as a frame for the plan, and provides information on what specific issues and ideas are most important to Solon’s citizens. This foundation ensures that the plan is not just a hollow document, but a guide for future decisions in Solon that are in line with the community’s ideals. From this foundation, the City of Solon will continue to grow and thrive.


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

Planning Process Schedule Kickoff Meeting with Staff (March 18, 2015): Organization and Steering Committee Assignment Committee Meeting #1 (April 14, 2015): Review Existing Conditions and Issues & Opportunities Public Meeting #1 (May 11, 2015): Community Online/Print Survey and Issues & Opportunities Committee Meeting #2 (July 7, 2015): Review Draft Goals, Policies and Existing Conditions Committee Meeting #3 (September 15, 2015): Review Draft Future Land Use and Implementation – Draft Plan Planning and Zoning Commission Meeting (October 27, 2015) –Review Public Meeting #2 (November 9, 2015): Open House to Review Draft Plan Planning and Zoning Commission Meeting (November 11, 2015) –Review Planning and Zoning Commission Meeting (February 29, 2016) –Review and Recommendation City Council Meeting (April 20, 2016) –Review and Adopt Plan

Overview of Planning Process | 2-3


2.2 Public Visioning Meetings Public Visioning Meeting The City desires a clear vision for the future - Solon as we want it to be in 2035. A Public Visioning Meeting was held on May 11th, 2015. The purpose of the meeting was to gather input on the City’s strengths, concerns and opportunities to provide direction to the comprehensive planning process. Many citizens shared their opinions on the future of Solon. The meeting was structured as an open house format, focused on Transportation, Land Use, Infrastructure, Housing, Community Services, Downtown Solon, Growth Management, Economic Development, and Quality of Life. Consultants, City Staff and Plan Steering Committee members were available to discuss topics and answer questions about the plan and planning process. Participants were provided with markers and paper to address Strengths, Weaknesses, Threats and Opportunities in the various categories. The following pages provide a brief summary of the feedback and comments collected from each category. A more detailed list of comments, as well as the responses to the community wide survey are included in Appendix B.

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City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

Transportation

Housing

Through a series of questions, participants were asked to describe the community’s transportation network. Many residence see Highway 1 as both a strength and a weakness. The highway brings people in from outside the community for the local economy and also provides easy access for residents. However, Highway 1 divides the community in half from east to west and is a physical and visual barrier for residents.

The majority of the housing stock in the City of Solon is in fair or better condition. There is housing stock available to existing and future residents in the community, as well as new homes under construction and land available for future development.

Land Use

Community Services

This category is used to identify the effectiveness of current and future land use policies. The majority of responses from the community wide survey felt that the current land use policies are okay (70%) and that the current land use regulations have done an effective job of minimizing land use conflicts (85.9%). There is an opportunity to address design standards and future land use along Main Street to promote commercial growth.

Overall there is a very positive opinion regarding the community services in Solon. The responses in the surveys and also the input meetings highlighted the library, fire department, local schools, recreational services and sheriff presence as some of the biggest strengths in this category. A repeated desire throughout the input process was a need for some sort of indoor recreation/activities especially needed during inclement weather and winter months.

Infrastructure

Downtown Solon

There are a few infrastructure improvement projects in the works for Solon. First is the North trunk sewer project which will add capacity to further growth to north and east. The second major project planned is a 400,000 gallon ground storage reservoir project which will increase capacity for future City growth. Infiltration and inflow is an issue in the wastewater collection system and should be addressed in the near future. There is a street improvements program that addresses issues throughout the community especially in the older parts of the community but many feel that there is an opportunity for these improvements to happen at a faster pace.

Responses from the input meetings and survey indicate the look and feel of the downtown is a strength. Some of the most notable issues that were raised regarding Solon’s downtown is parking is an issue, there is limited space for new/future business, retail options are limited, and there are some facades that need to be revitalized in the downtown.

Public Visioning Meetings | 2-5


Growth Management Most in the community feel that the City of Solon has grown in a well managed way to this point in time. Highway 1 could be a challenge for future growth. The City has projects planned to expand capacity and allow for sustainable future growth in the community.

Economic Redevelopment There is limited space currently available for commercial development and there is a need to attract private developers/investment for commercial development. Highway 1 is a strength for the local economy and existing/ future businesses. There is a general feeling that marketing efforts could be better when marketing the community as a whole and local businesses.

Quality of Life There are many amenities in the vicinity of Solon such as Lake Macbride, a local golf course, and great schools to name a few. There is a need to expand playground opportunities because there is currently only one public park with equipment. There is a requirement to set aside green space for new development and that should continue especially on the east side of Highway 1. The responses to the survey showed overwhelming satisfaction for the quality of life in Solon (97.7% responded with a good to excellent for quality of life in Solon).

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1 2 3 Goals, Objectives & Strategies 4 This chapter presents a vision for the future of Solon and describes goals, objectives, and strategies 5 to achieve that vision. Transportation, Housing, Services, Downtown Solon, Growth Appendix A Community Management, Economic Development and Quality of Appendix B Life are all addressed. Appendix C Page 3.1 Vision and Goals 3-2 3.2 Transportation 3-4 3.3 Housing 3-6 3.4 Community Services 3-8 3.5 Downtown Solon 3-10 3.6 Growth Management 3-12 3.7 Economic Development 3-14 3.8 Quality of Life 3-16


3.1 Vision and Goals Solon as we want it to be in 2035...

We are a welcoming, close-knit community, offering a high quality school system, outstanding recreational opportunities, and a downtown with a unique charm all its own. Come prosper with us and put down roots in Solon!

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City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

Each element of the comprehensive plan contains goals and objectives established during the planning process based on public input and the information contained in Appendix A: Community Indicators. This section defines goals and objectives, as follows: Goal: A goal is a long-term target that states what the community wants to accomplish. Written in general terms, the statement offers a desired condition. Objective: An objective is a statement that identifies a course of action to achieve a goal. They are more specific than goals and are usually attainable through planning and implementation activities.

Solon’s goals for a better future... Downtown Solon DS1: Improve downtown access. DS2: Revitalize as needed and continue to focus on the downtown as the commercial center of the community but also look to areas along Highway 1 for future commercial growth.

Transportation

Growth Management

T1: Ensure that all areas of the community are accessible by a network of sidewalks and trails.

GM1: Continue to support local policies that lead to sustainable growth.

T2: Provide a safe, efficient, multi-modal and well-maintained transportation infrastructure network.

Housing H1: Attract and retain families in Solon by providing a range of housing options. H2: Strengthen community character by encouraging the maintenance and improvement of the existing housing stock and properties throughout the community.

Economic Development ED1: Facilitate strategic economic growth within the City and increase the retail and service options available to residents and visitors.

Community Services

Quality of Life

CS1: Maintain reliable and high quality services, utilities and facilities.

QL1: Support activities that for the youth and young families.

CS2: Protect and enhance park and recreation opportunities for Solon’s residents and visitors.

QL2: Continue to support the strong educational system that attract families and support success and social interaction.

Vision & Goals | 3-3


Complete Street intersection in Charlotte, NC. Source: National Complete Streets Coalition

3.2 Transportation

“Complete streets” are designed and operated to enable safe access for all users. Designs can include bike lanes, accessible transit stops, frequent and/or signaled crosswalks, narrower travel lanes, and traffic calming devices.

Transportation is an essential aspect of life. It is about the ability to readily and safely gain access to work, school, shopping, recreation, medical care and social gatherings. It is also an essential component of most economic activity. The City of Solon’s overarching transportation themes are safety, efficiency and diversity of transportation options.

T1: Mobility & Transportation Goal 1 Ensure that all areas of the community are accessible by a network of sidewalks and trails. Objective: Establish Trail linkages to important community facilities and neighborhoods. • Continue to work with regional and state organizations to create a well connected regional trail system. • Continue to develop a connected network of on-street and offstreet bike routes to make bike transit a viable, safe transportation option. Objective: Develop and implement a phased sidewalk construction program focusing on safe routes to school and sidewalks along arterial and collector roadways. • Create a phased sidewalk plan that determines need to establish priority of the construction. Objective: Enforce sidewalk maintenance ordinance to improve existing sidewalk conditions. • Actively enforce sidewalk maintenance requirements and continue to encourage sidewalk installation where gaps are present. Objective: Ensure installation of sidewalks in new subdivisions and with all lot/building improvements in existing neighborhoods. • Establish and use a Complete Streets Plan, requiring consideration and provision for bike and pedestrian users whenever a street is constructed or reconstructed, including ADA requirements.

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City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

T2: Mobility & Transportation Goal 2 Provide a safe, efficient, multi-modal and well-maintained transportation infrastructure network. Objective: Manage access and design of transportation network in order to effectively maintain the safety and functional integrity of City streets. • Maintain an updated Major Streets Plan • Develop corridor plans before significant development or growth occurs to seek the appropriate balance among competing issues, including efficiency, safety for all users, property access and impacts on adjoining land uses and neighborhoods. • Encourage a connected, flexible street grid. • Consider land acquisition to widen existing collector and arterials only after all other alternatives have been explored, and then with a high level of scrutiny. • Encourage context sensitive design to minimize impacts to historic districts and existing neighborhoods and to preserve natural features.

Mobility & Transportation Action Items

aDevelop a City-wide Bike and Pedestrian Plan to establish a contiguous, safe network of on-street and off-street bike and pedestrian routes.

aPrioritize sections of the City for

sidewalk maintenance and installation and proactively react to needed improvements.

aIncrease enforcement of sidewalk maintenance and safety violations.

aAnalyze future road extensions and

connections for future development areas to maintain proper street connections.

aRequire sidewalks for all new

development and major redevelopment projects, whether sidewalks currently exist adjacent or not. Encourage neighboring properties to install sidewalks.

aAssess need for bike racks throughout the community.

aContinue to develop trail system through the community and across Highway 1.

aIncrease accessibility throughout the

community by increased installation of ADA curb ramps.

Transportation | 3-5


3.3 Housing As a city grows and changes, housing must change to meet the needs of the population. Housing is included in a comprehensive plan to provide guidance for decision-makers and developers when considering additions to and renovations of the City’s housing stock. Diversity, quality, and affordability are overarching themes in Solon’s housing goals.

“Traditional neighborhood design” incorporates a mix of housing types, wellconnected streets, public spaces, and neighborhoodserving amenities.

H1: Housing Goal 1 Attract and retain families in Solon by providing a range of housing options. Objective: Introduce incentives for young families to purchase new/ existing homes in Solon. • The City will promote the development of quality housing options. • The City will continue to support redevelopment of vacant homes by willing developers Objective: Create zoning standards that ensure a variety of housing types. • Neighborhoods should encourage housing for all ages and family types.

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City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

H2: Housing Goal 2 Strengthen community character by encouraging the maintenance and improvement of the existing housing stock and properties throughout the community. Objective: Develop programs and incentives that encourage property owners to improve the appearance and maintain the appearance of their property. • Continue to monitor and encourage property maintenance. • Continue to apply for owner occupied rehabilitation programs. • Actively enforce code violations related to housing standards and property maintenance. • Encourage and support the creation of neighborhood associations and locally led neighborhood planning efforts.

Housing Action Items

aUpdate land development ordinances

to require components of traditional neighborhood design and consideration of existing neighborhood context.

aExplore incentives to promote

rehabilitation of existing housing, beyond current incentives.

aEvaluate other incentives for new

housing and redevelopment of existing housing to ensure they remain effective in promoting residential development.

aEvaluate surrounding communities’ incentive programs for residential development to ensure Solon remains competitive in housing development.

Objective: Apply for housing improvement programs to assist property owners with the rehabilitation of their homes. • The City will consider the development of rebate programs and other financial incentives, in conjunction with public and private partners, for homeowners undertaking energy efficient rehabilitation efforts. • The City will continue to support opportunities for home ownership for low to moderate income families through grant opportunities.

Housing | 3-7


3.4 Community Services Local government is responsible for a broad array of essential services, from sewer and water service to park and recreation facilities, fire protection and public schools. The quality, efficacy and efficiency of these services have a direct relationship to quality of life for residents. While each of these services is individually managed and monitored, they are considered in the comprehensive plan to ensure that investment in these services serves the overall vision for the City.

CS1: Community Services Goal 1 Maintain reliable and high quality services, utilities and facilities. Objective: Ensure that public facilities and services continue to meet the needs of residents and businesses, especially as new development increases demand for those facilities and services. • The City encourages logical, cost-efficient expansion of utilities to serve compact development patterns. • The City generally requires all development that relies on municipal services to be located within the City of Solon’s corporate limits. • Development permits shall not be issued unless there is adequate provision for necessary public facilities to serve such developments. • The City requires that during development planning, and then site construction, natural drainage patterns (i.e. existing drainage corridors, streams, floodplains and wetlands) are preserved and protected whenever possible. • Developers will be responsible for erosion control and stormwater quality and quantity control both during and after site preparation and construction activities in accordance with applicable local, county or state regulations. • The City encourages the use of stormwater management devices that improve the quality and reduce the quantity of runoff (e.g. rain gardens, infiltration basins, vegetated swales) in the design of stormwater management plans and a general effort to reduce the amount of impervious surfaces within new or existing developments. • The City will examine whether the needs of the Fire Department are being met in the current facility.

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City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

CS2: Community Services Goal 2 Protect and enhance park and recreation opportunities for Solon’s residents and visitors.

Community Services Action Items

Objective: The City will work with Public Works and Parks & Recreation to drive maintenance and improvements to community recreation facilities.

aContinue to facilitate and

• As new facilities and programs are developed, the needs of youth and elderly residents will be specifically considered and addressed. • The City will coordinate recreational planning with other public and private entities to maximize resources. • The City encourages the connectivity of local parks and recreational facilities with regional facilities, via bicycle trials or marked routes on existing roads. • The City requires all proposed residential subdivision developments to dedicate land for public parks with play equipment, sirens, recreation and open space acquisition and development (in accordance with most current State Statutes).

aImprove supply of information

Objective: Continue to promote and maintain existing parks and public open spaces.

among governmental agencies as opportunities arise.

• The City will work to provide indoor/outdoor recreational opportunities for all ages and abilities. • The City will continue to develop recreational opportunities. • The City will continue to improve existing park and recreation facilities and services to meet the needs of the community, while improving safety and efficiency of the facilities provided. Objective: Develop a Park, Outdoor Recreation and Open Space Plan to include recommendations for a trail system through town connecting area parks, community facilities, and other locales. • The City will create and maintain a Five-Year Park, Recreation and Open Space Plan to coordinate and prioritize long-term park and recreation improvements, and to maintain eligibility for park acquisition and improvement grant programs. • The City will continue to coordinate with regional and state entities to create an interconnected regional trail system.

improve park and recreation facilities, programs, amenities and special events. (interpretive signage, websites, online forms, maps, etc.) at and for community facilities and key attractions.

aPursue grants to update/

construct community facilities.

aConduct regular review of

sewer/water capacities to serve future growth and development.

aPursue shared services

aEvaluate parks for compliance

with ADA II standards and prepare a transition plan to make necessary changes over time.

aPromote shared usage of public

facilities (e.g. school playgrounds for public use).

aEvaluate if the needs of the Fire Department are being met in the current facility.

aEvaluate the feasibility of local

law enforcement versus the current Johnson County Sheriff Department

Community Services | 3-9


3.5 Downtown Solon The downtown goals and objectives are derived from citizen concerns that were gathered at the beginning of the planning process. Some of these concerns were: limited parking, limited growth area, lack of office space, and a lack of small retail space.

DS1: Downtown Solon Goal 1 Improve downtown access. Objective: Ensure Solon’s downtown is accessible and available to residents and prospective businesses. • Address parking issues that are present in the downtown through expansion and limited time parking to ensure prime spots in front of business in the downtown are rotated on a regular basis throughout the day. • Expansion of available commercial space in the downtown should be addressed through the future land use map and comprehensive plan. • Establish a Main Street Design Committee for recommendations to ensure historical integrity and designs.

DS2: Downtown Solon Goal 2 Revitalize as needed and continue to focus on the downtown as the commercial center of the community but also look to areas along Highway 1 for future commercial growth. Objective: Encourage the rehabilitation of existing structures to be consistent with the downtown character. • The City will explore grant and other financial opportunities to enhance the existing downtown structures.

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City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

Downtown Solon Action Items

aDevelop a plan for the future expansion of the downtown commercial district.

aCreate and maintain standards and limitations for development within the downtown.

aEstablish a plan for future improvements to the downtown (Master/Concept Plan).

aExplore the interest in Main Street property

owners regarding a CDBG application for facade rehabilitation.

aProvide adequate supply of parking that is easy

to find (visible form the street or a good wayfinding system) for downtown residents, customers, and employees.

aDevelop a long-term strategy to promote

sustainable economic growth in the City, especially for the downtown area.

aEncourage and market development that

will make downtown Solon a destination for the community and the surrounding area.

Downtown Solon | 3-11


3.6 Growth Management The City of Solon has grown substantially over the years (73% from 2000 to 2010). This fast paced growth can be a strength and also a weakness for a community like Solon. Although Solon has grown very fast over the years the overall feed back from the community wide survey indicates most residents are satisfied with the policies and community as a whole.

GM1: Growth Management Goal Continue to support local policies that lead to sustainable growth. Objective: Manage development with an integrated land use plan. • The City will use the future land use plan to encourage contiguous land development, maximize infrastructure efficiency, and fit the character of the City of Solon. Objective: As land develops within the city limits the City of Solon should use the future land use map, comprehensive plan and development limitations map to determine future growth areas outside the current city limits. • The City will need to establish new areas for future residential, commercial and other desired uses and look to the most suitable areas for growth and annexation, an annexation study to follow the outlined areas for growth. • The City will guide new urban growth to areas within the areas laid out in the Future Land Use plan. Development in these areas shall be designed so that it can be easily and efficiently served with municipal services.

3-12


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

Growth Management Action Items

a Develop a plan for new areas of growth for commercial, residential and other uses.

a Explore the need to have an annexation study of areas that will be growth areas for the City of Solon.

a Communicate with other jurisdictions whenever

service contracts or major capital improvements are up for consideration, to identify cost savings opportunities through partnerships and shared service arrangements.

Growth Management | 3-13


3.7 Economic Development Economic development requires the collaborative efforts of public and private entities, and the support of the community overall. The City recognizes that economic success requires extensive collaboration with other public and private entities - the City will be an active partner in these efforts and will avoid duplication of services. City “support” for these efforts may include staff time, funding, policies, or simply endorsement.

E1: Economic Development Goal 1 Facilitate strategic economic growth within the City and increase the retail and service options available to residents and visitors. Objective: Maintain strategies to promote sustainable economic development. • The City supports the idea of public-private partnerships and will work proactively with private business and land owners to facilitate investment in the community. • The City will support the needs of growing businesses and will work with local partners to provide programs, space and infrastructure necessary to support an expanding workforce. • Emphasis will be placed on attracting businesses and industries that operate in a sustainable manner, contribute to the sustainability of the community as a whole, and are responsible environmental stewards. • The City will continue to support sustainable business education programs and initiatives. Objective: Avoid land use conflicts between businesses and non-business uses. • The City requires industrial or commercial businesses that generate large volumes of traffic or wastewater, or have a high water demand to locate where a full range of utilities, services, roads, and other infrastructure is available to adequately support such developments. The City will work with businesses that are looking for assistance with expanded City services. • The City supports home occupations and home-based businesses in residential districts as a means to enhance residents’ income opportunities, increase local employment, and foster business creation and entrepreneurship. However, activities that alter the residential character of the neighborhood, such as objectionable changes in traffic, noise, odor, light, or appearance of the home and property, will not be permitted.

3-14


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

Objective: Maintain a local presence on local and regional Economic Development Boards • Solon will be an active participant in the Iowa City Area Development Group and support and promote the Solon Economic Development Group. Objective: Establish and promote a unique identity for the City of Solon to assist in marketing economic growth opportunities. • The City promotes its downtown as a compact, pedestrian-friendly business district that supports employment, shopping, housing, and recreation opportunities. • The City will create and enforce design guidelines for businesses to address landscaping, aesthetics, lighting, noise, parking, and access. • The City will support the creative arts, including live performance, public art installations, art galleries, etc., as an important element of workforce attraction and economic development. • Key locations in downtown will be easy to locate through the appropriate use of wayfinding and signage. • The City will continue to maintain a pedestrian-friendly Downtown through streetscape improvements as needed. • Adaptation and reuse of existing structures that have historic architectural character is strongly encouraged, and the City will review and guide adaptations through the design review process.

Economic Development Action Items

aIdentify and plan for infrastructure

investments required to make priority development/redevelopment sites more competitive for economic development.

aIdentify funding sources and mechanisms for public realm and capital improvements to support economic development.

aDevelop an easy to understand “one-stopshop” for economic development on the City website, with links to partner resources.

aAggressively pursue grants and resources to improve infrastructure.

aEvaluate potential public/private

partnerships for community benefit.

aParticipate in communications with key

stakeholders (e.g. Johnson County, Iowa City and other surrounding communities) to discuss the future of the area and maintain an open dialogue among entities.

aCreate and enhance entry features to

the community and to the downtown (e.g. signage, banners, etc.).

aConstruct and maintain interpretive

signage at key attraction locations to further promote the assets of the community.

aEvaluate and plan for venues and

attractions to further Solon as a year-round destination.

aContinue to evaluate properties for

listing on the National Register of Historic Places to further solidify Solon as a historic community and to enable properties to access historic tax credits.

aComplete periodic review of “business friendliness” as compared to comparable cities, including tax rate, utility rates, and regulatory processes.

Economic Development | 3-15


3.8 Quality of Life Quality of life is the single most important factor to retain current residents and attract future residents. It also key to economic vitality. Every aspect of the community from city services such as waste water treatment to available park space in walking distance for a home owner is a determining factor in the overall perception of the quality of life in Solon. This section defines some overarching themes for quality of life that came out in the meetings and the community wide survey.

QL1: Quality of Life Goal 1 Support activities and amenities for the youth, young families and seniors. Objective: Establish a safe trial/sidewalk connection across Highway 1 for bikes and pedestrians. Highway 1 is a barrier for pedestrians and bicyclists especially those that represent the youth, young families and the elderly. The Highway 1 barrier also divides the community from east to west leaving the east side isolated from the rest of the community. • Support the planning and implementation of a safe connection across Highway 1 for bikes and pedestrians. Objective: The City will work to address the need for an indoor facility for activities during the winter months and inclement weather. • The City will work to determine the need for an indoor facility and available resources both private and public. • Any new facility plans will be addressed in a Five-Year Park and Recreation Plan to coordinate and prioritize this and/or any other long-term park and recreation improvements and to determine any eligible grant and funding opportunities available at the time.

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City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

QL2: Quality of Life Goal 2

Quality of Life Action Items

Continue to support the strong educational system that attract families and support success and social interaction.

aEvaluate potential sites and plans for a safe

Objective: Solon Public School District investments will keep pace with changes to the population it serves.

aCollaborate with Solon Public School

• The City will collaborate with the Solon Public School District to anticipate and plan for changes in the size or makeup of the City’s school-age population. • The City will work with the School District and regional economic development agencies to attract and retain high quality educators and staff. • The City will support the renovation of schools to incorporate innovative and sustainable technology and systems, and will aid the district in seeking funding to do so.

connection across Highway 1.

District on future needs and projects.

aEvaluate the need for an indoor facility for activities.

aContinue to support policies and plans to

improve quality of life for all residents in Solon.

aContinue to support Senior Programs.

Quality of Life | 3-17


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1 2 3 4 Land Use Chapter outlines goals, objectives and policies 5 This specifically for land use, defines categories of land use, the desired future land use for Solon, and Appendix A describes identifies special planning areas. Appendix B Page Existing Land Use 4-2 Appendix C 4.1 4.2 Future Land Use Map 4-6 4.3 Future Land Use Categories 4-8 4.4 Development Concepts 4-22 4.5 Design Guideline Considerations 4-28


4.1 Existing Land Use Existing Land Use There are many unique uses of land across Solon, and many more ways to configure those uses. It is the City’s responsibility to regulate where and how development occurs so that conflicts between incompatible use is minimized, and so that land and infrastructure are used as efficiently as possible As Solon continues to grow, land use is critical to keep the community a pleasant, attractive place to live, work, and play. This chapter features goals, objectives, and policies that apply to land use in general. It also contains strategies and guidelines for specific types of land use and their location within the City and its extraterritorial plat review area. 2015 land use conditions are shown below (city) and to the right (jurisdiction), see Appendix C for a full size version. The Solon planning area extends 2 miles from the current city limits. The City includes approximately 837 acres. The majority of the City is currently comprised of residential (52.1% of the City).Other prominent land uses in the City are Transportation (22.6%), Civic uses (16.9%), and Public Facilities/Utilities (9.1%). Parks and Recreation make up about 4.5% of the City, and approximately 17.5% of land inside the City Limits is currently undeveloped. Commercial only makes up 4.2% of the City. Refer to Appendix C for full size maps of existing and future land uses and development limitations.

IOWA 1

NE

VIKING DR M WINDO

RANDALL DR

DR

2

2

S B ST

W SHORT ST

W 5TH ST

Professional/Office

E 5TH ST

O IN ST

WILLOW

ER CH

N IOWA ST

S IOWA ST

S MARKET ST

S DUBUQUE ST

S WEST ST

CITY OF SOLON JOHNSON COUNTY, IOWA

W SHORT ST

E SHORT ST

E 1ST ST

Downtown Area Printed By: soshea, File: P:\GIS DATABASE\IOWA\JOHNSON COUNTY\Solon\Maps\Existing Land Use Map.mxd

Print Date: 4/10/2015

A1 IOW

DATA SOURCES: JOHNSON COUNTY GIS, NRGIS

JORDAN CREEK RD

Solon City Limits

S CEDAR ST

E MAIN ST

W MAIN ST

Undeveloped

RACINE AVE

N WEST ST

Utility

WINDFLOWER LN

N CEDAR ST

Storage/Warehouse

N MARKET ST

E NORTH ST

W NORTH ST

Light Industrial/Manufacturing

N DUBUQUE ST

ST

Service

4-2

ST

E

Retail

E

PL UM

E 6TH ST

Resturant/Bar

ST

E

S WINDSOR DR

DR

180TH ST

Public

S KINGSTON DR

D

Church

E 4TH ST

T

O O

Parks/Open Space

E 3RD ST

DR

W ST EA

W 3RD ST

ACR ES

Trailer

E 1ST ST E 2ND ST TS RKE S MA

S RACINE AVE

Higher Density Residential

E MAIN ST

EEN S GR

Medium Density Residential

E SHORT ST

S IOWA ST

W SOVERS ST

MARSHEK CT

Low Density Residential

S DUBUQUE ST

W MAIN ST

E ELM ST

E NORTH ST

S CEDAR ST

W ELM ST

38

S STOCHL ST

HI GH W AY

N MARKET ST

E ROCK ST

N IOWA ST

38

S WEST ST

HI GH W AY

N WEST ST

EXISTING LAND USE MAP

SUTLIFF RD

WOOD LILY RD

82

IOWA ST

HW Y3

CT

180TH ST


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

Existing Land Use Map 120TH ST

Y EL

SU

TURNER AVE

TAFT AVE

POLK AVE

RD

IOWA 1

SUTLIFF RD

TAFT AVE

14OTH ST

NE

IOWA ST

160TH ST

VIKING DR

W ELM ST

RD E BR ID G

ER LN

TURNER AVE

RACINE AVE

WINDFLOW

T KET S S MAR

M EH AF FE Y

180TH ST

U

E 5TH ST

W 5TH ST

WOOD LILY RD

E PLUM ST

Raym ond Dr

180TH ST

E MAIN ST

Will Dr

2

S IOWA ST

38

S RACINE AVE

170TH ST

TAFT AVE

HI GH W AY

S B ST

82

OPIE AVE

OAK AVE

Y3 HW

ST

QUINCY RD

200TH ST POPLAR AVE

SU TL IF F

RD

200TH ST

A1 IOW

EXISTING LAND USE PLAN AREA MAP

JO RD AN

CR EE

K

200TH ST

RD

210TH ST

210TH ST

MCBRIDE NRA EXISTING LAND USE

Rural Land Low Density Residential Medium Density Residential

Public Professional/Office

UR RO W DIL LO NS F

Church

RD

Parks/Open Space

CY IN QU

Trailer

RD

Higher Density Residential SUGAR BOTTOM RD

160TH ST

Resturant/Bar COUNTY\Solon\Maps\Land Use Map 2 mi.mxd Printed By: soshea, File: P:\GIS DATABASE\IOWA\JOHNSON UTA HA VE

Retail Service Light Industrial/Manufacturing Storage/Warehouse Utility Undeveloped Stream Body of Water Solon City Limits DATA SOURCES: JOHNSON COUNTY GIS, NRGIS

E

CITY OF SOLON JOHNSON COUNTY, IOWA

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4.1 Johnson County/Solon Fringe Area Agreement

The Johnson County/Solon Area Agreement is an extraterritorial area, known as the fringe area, within two miles of the City boundaries for the purpose of reviewing and approving subdivisions. It should be noted that the current Fringe Area agreement was under review during this planning process with likely revisions to the plan in 2016. Chapter 354 grants the City the authority to require that subdivisions within the fringe area to adhere to the City’s subdivision standards and conditions, unless the City establishes alternative standards and conditions for review and approval of subdivisions via a 28E agreement between the City and the County. Chapter 28E of the Code of Iowa (2008) enables two or more local governments to enter into agreements to cooperate for their mutual advantage. Note: Johnson County and the City of Solon were in the process of updating this agree at the time of this comprehensive planning process. Fringe Area Map Policies (2008): Fringe Area FA1 - Urban Planning Area (Growth Area) • Residential, commercial and industrial land uses are encouraged as recommended and described in the City’s Comprehensive Plan. • Cluster subdivisions contiguous with existing residential development or Solon city limits are preferred. • Subdivisions will be reviewed by the City and the County. • Solon’s city design standards will apply for streets,storm water management and sidewalks (water and sanitary sewers will be constructed and assessed upon annexation). • The County will review all rezoning applications. • Because this area is likely to experience urban growth, there is high potential for annexation by the City of Solon. Annexation should be encouraged and will be voluntary (per state code) in this area • The County building permit process will apply. Fringe Area FA2 - Rural Planning Area Agricultural uses are preferred. Until otherwise changed by amending this agreement,this area shall be restricted to those uses consistent with a Rural/Agricultural area as Indicated in the Johnson County Land Use Plan,and as designated for a Rural/Agricultural area in Chapter 8:1.6 Class A District of the Johnson County Unified Development Ordinance as amended. • Agricultural uses in a rural setting are preferred. • Subdivisions will be reviewed by the City and the County . • The County building permit process will apply. • Farmstead splits and subdivisions of fewer than three lots are exempt from City review • The County will review all rezoning applications. Fringe Area FA3 - North Corridor Planning Area Agricultural and residential uses which preserve the natural resources and character of the area are preferred. Any rezonings in this area will be considered on the basis of conformity with the Johnson County Land Use Plan and other related policies. Applications with a concept plan showing 50% of the property designated as an outlot for open space will receive more favorable review. • Residential and agricultural land uses should comply with land uses proposed in the Johnson County Land Use Plan, as updated. • Cluster subdivisions are preferred. • Subdivisions will be reviewed by the County. • Annexation of this area is highly unlikely. • Johnson County building permit process will apply. • The County will review all rezoning applications.

4-4


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

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4.2 Future Land Use Map Using the Future Land Use Map The Future Land Use Map (opposite) identifies categories of similar use, character and density. These categories are described in the preceding pages, including explanation of the City’s intent and design and development strategies for each. This map, and the corresponding text, are to be consulted whenever development is proposed. Development shall be consistent with the use category shown on the map and the corresponding text. Where uses in this map differ from the current use, it is not the general intent of the City to compel a change in use. Except in rare instances when the City may actively facilitate redevelopment of a priority site, the City’s use of this map will be only reactive, guiding response to proposals submitted by property owners.

Amending the Future Land Use Map It may, from time to time, be appropriate to consider amendments to the Future Land Use Map. The following criteria should be considered before amending the map.

Agricultural The land does not have a history of productive farming activities, does not contain prime soils, or is not viable for long-term agricultural use. The land is too small to be economically used for agricultural purposes, or is inaccessible to the machinery needed to produce and harvest products. Compatibility The proposed development, or map amendment, will not have a substantial adverse effect upon adjacent property or the character of the area, with a particular emphasis on existing residential neighborhoods. A petitioner may indicate approaches that will minimize incompatibilities between uses.

4-6

Natural Resources The land does not include important natural features such as wetlands, floodplains, steep slopes, scenic vistas or significant woodlands, which will be adversely affected by the proposed development. The proposed building envelope is not located within the setback of Floodplain zones (raised above regional flood line). The proposed development will not result in undue water, air, light, or noise pollution. Petitioner may indicate approaches that will preserve or enhance the most important and sensitive natural features of the proposed site. Emergency Vehicle Access The lay of the land will allow for construction of appropriate roads and/or driveways that are suitable for travel or access by emergency vehicles. Ability to Provide Services Provision of public facilities and services will not place an unreasonable financial burden on the City. Petitioners may demonstrate to the City that the current level of services in the City, or region, including but not limited to school capacity, transportation system capacity, emergency services capacity (police, fire, EMS), parks and recreation, storm water, library services, and potentially water and/or sewer services, are adequate to serve the proposed use. Petitioners may also demonstrate how they will assist the City with any shortcomings in public services or facilities. Public Need There is a clear public need for the proposed change or unanticipated circumstances have resulted in a need for the change. The proposed development is likely to have a positive fiscal or social impact on the City. Adherence to Other Portions of this Plan The proposed development is consistent with the general vision for the City, and the other goals, objectives, and policies of this Plan.


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

TAFT AVE

Future Land Use Map

POLK AVE

IOWA 1

SUTLIFF RD

VIKING DR

2

38

2

TAFT AVE

S RACINE AVE

W ELM ST HW AY

ST

HI G

E MAIN ST

W MAIN ST

E SHORT ST W SOVERS ST EA ST W O

180TH ST

O

D

D R

W 5TH ST

E 1ST ST

E PLUM ST Raymond Dr

38

S STOCHL ST

HW AY

N MARKET

HI G

S IOWA ST

NE

S DUBUQUE ST

82

IOWA ST

HW Y3

E 5TH ST

180TH ST

RACINE AVE

200TH ST D

QUINCY RD

POPLAR AVE

Higher Density Residential

DA NC RE EK R

A1 IOW

Rural Lands Medium Density Residential

WOOD LILY RD

ER CH

Future Land Use Low Density Residential

Will Dr

NO

T KET S S MAR ST

I ST

JO R

200TH ST

WINDFLOWER LN

E

FUTURE LAND USE MAP

Commercial Industrial Civic/Religious ST 210TH Open Space/Floodway

210TH ST

Park & Recreation Hwy1 Corridor

Printed By: soshea, File: P:\GIS DATABASE\IOWA\JOHNSON COUNTY\Solon\Maps\Future Land Use Map.mxd

Urban Reserve Area

Development Concept Areas Solon City Limits Stream Body of Water

TURNER AVE

DATA SOURCES: JOHNSON COUNTY GIS, NRGIS

E

CITY OF SOLON JOHNSON COUNTY, IOWA

| 4-7


4.3 Future Land Use Categories Future Land Use Categories The future land use categories identify areas of similar use, character and density. These classifications are not zoning districts - they do not legally set performance criteria for land uses (i.e. setbacks, height restrictions, density, etc.). The strategies listed with each category are provided to help landowners and City officials make design decisions during the development process consistent with the intent of the land use category. Some categories also feature design recommendations. The eleven categories designated on the Future Land Use Map are: • RL - Rural Lands • LDR - Low Density Residential • MDR - Medium Density Residential • HDR - Higher Density Residential • C - Commercial • I - Industrial • CV - Civic/Religious • OS - Open Space/Floodway • Prk - Parks & Recreation • H1 - Highway 1 Corridor • URA - Urban Reserve Area

Rural Lands (RL) The Rural Lands category is intended to preserve land and rural character in areas deemed unlikely or infeasible for urban development prior to 2035. Preferred uses in these areas include open space, farming, farmsteads, agricultural businesses, forestry, quarries, and limited rural residential on well and septic.

Low Density Residential (LDR) Low Density Residential areas are intended for housing with densities that range from one to four units per acre. Neighborhood areas classified as LDR will typically be predominately single-family detached units.

4-8


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

Medium Density Residential (MDR) Medium Density Residential areas are intended for housing at densities between two to four units per acre not to exceed eight living units per acre. Uses in this category include single-family attached duplexes/twinhomes, townhouses, row houses, apartment buildings, and senior housing.

Higher Density Residential (HDR) Higher Density Residential areas are intended for housing at densities exceeding eight living units per acre. Uses in this category include row houses, apartment buildings, and senior housing.

Commercial (C) Commercial areas are intended for retail, service, and office uses that serve neighborhood, community and regional markets. The type and size of use will be determined by location and market forces.

Industrial (I) Industrial areas are intended for light or heavy manufacturing, warehousing, distribution, wholesale trade, accessory offices, and similar uses. Industrial areas are typically larger, individual sites not part of a larger business park.

| 4-9


4.3 Civic/Religious (CV) Public and institutional areas are intended for churches, schools, cemeteries, art and cultural facilities, local government facilities and other parcels that are owned by a public or quasi-public entity. This category does not include parks and recreation areas.

Open Space/Floodway (OS) Open Space areas are intended for preservation of natural drainage and flood prone areas. OS lands can be public or privately owned.

Parks & Recreation (Prk) Parks, Recreation and Open Space areas are intended for active and passive recreation uses or preservation of natural areas. Prk/Rec lands can be public or privately owned.

Highway 1 Corridor (H1) The Highway 1 Corridor is a mix of low to higher density residential, commercial, industrial and civic land uses. The Highway 1 Corridor is the “Gateway� to the community for most that live in or outside of the community and visitors.

Urban Reserve Area (URA) This land use category includes areas that are generally in agricultural or open space use but may be in the path of urban development beyond the planning horizon contained in this plan. These areas present development opportunities for the City that may or may not materialize but were thought to be areas where future land use planning consideration was important to the Plan Steering Committee.

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RL- Rural Lands

notidentifi identified edininthis thissecti sec not disruption of agricultural use and avo RL-2:When Whenhousing housingisisconsidered, considered,the thepreferred preferred Boardwill willhave havethe theflflexib ex RL-2: Board creation of new access points to state hig parcel size size for for any any new new residential residential uses uses isis the andwhen whenthey theycan canbe beshs parcel the and City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035 Small lots (e.g. 2 acres) are preferred, espe smallest possible possible area area that that provides provides adequate adequate creationand/or and/ortax taxbase bas smallest creation the remaining land is in agricultural use. request a business plan space for septic systems and separation from request a business plan space for septic systems and separation from provideevidence evidenceofofthe then drinking water wells, as determined by the provide drinking water wells, as determined by the jobscreated. created. County Health Health Department. Department. Th Thee maximum maximum jobs County housingdensity densityisisone one(1) (1)unit unitper peracre. acre. housing

The Rural Lands category is intended to preserve land and rural character in areas deemed unlikely RL-3: New New homes homes and and other otheruses usesshould shouldbe besited sited RL-3: or infeasible for urban development prior to 2035. on non-productive non-productive soils in in ways ways that that minimize minimize on soils Preferred uses in these areas include open space, disruption of agricultural use and avoid the disruption of agricultural use and avoid the farming, farmsteads, agricultural businesses, forestry, creation ofon new access points toto state state highways. highways. of new access quarries, and limited rural creation residential well and points Small lots lots (e.g. (e.g.22acres) acres)are arepreferred, preferred,especially especiallyifif Small septic.

theremaining remainingland landisisin inagricultural agriculturaluse. use. the Land Use Strategies RL-1: New homes should be sited on non-productive 4-10 soils in ways that minimize disruption of agricultural use and avoid the creation of new access points to state highways. Small lots (e.g. 1.5 acres) are preferred, especially if the remaining land is in agricultural use.

M

RL-2: Rural residential subdivisions containing 5+ homes are discouraged, except in areas where urban development is unlikely to occur, even many years from now. RL-3: Rural residential subdivisions are strongly 4-10 4-10 encouraged to utilize conservation design strategies that minimize the disruption of natural features and rural character.

MSAProfessional ProfessionalServices, Services,Inc. Inc. MSA

Conservation Development

Conservation development usually attempts to hide development from the main road(s) through natural topography, landscape buffers and setbacks in order to preserve rural character.

Image source: www.dem.ri.gov

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4.3 LDR - Low Density Residential The Low Density Residential areas are intended for housing with densities that range from one to four units per acre. Neighborhood areas classified as LDR will typically be predominately single-family detached units.

5. Any additional residential expansion will require voluntary annexation of territory adjacent to the areas mentioned above or rezoning of agricultural land in town.

Land Use Strategies LDR-1: Urban services will be required for all new development, including municipal water, wastewater, and stormwater management systems.

Design Strategies The City encourages residential projects (new construction and remodeling) to incorporate design strategies that will maintain neighborhood property values over time and enhance the social function and LDR-2: Though low density housing is the predominant safety of the neighborhood. use in most neighborhoods, healthy, balanced Relationship to the Street: Buildings and sites should be neighborhoods may also include other uses that support designed to establish visual and physical connections the needs of residents, including: between the public realm of the street and the private • Parks and recreational facilities realm of the home, with layers of increasingly private • Small municipal and institutional facilities (e.g. space in between. learning center, library, fire station, etc.) • Community centers Consider the following techniques (see side bar): • Places of worship A) The front door should face the street and there should be a clear route to the door from the street or LDR-3: Infill development will protect the character of sidewalk. existing residential neighborhoods. Where possible, B) There should be windows on the street facade infill development should be single-family homes and C) Building setbacks will vary according to building should be built within areas that are already zoned and type and lot size. compatible for this type of residential use. Four major D) Incorporate a covered front porch, or at least a areas in the City that have been identified for future raised stoop, preferably covered. development of family residential are as follows: 1. The area located east of Windsor Street and north of 5th Street, extending eastward to the corporate City limits and northward to through Raymond Drive. This is the Prairie Acres subdivision. 2. The area located east of Cedar Street and primarily accessed from Main Street, extending eastward to the corporate City limits. This is the Windmill Estates subdivision. 3. The area located north and west of Randall Park. This is the Old Mill Creek subdivision. 4. The area located east of Highway 1 and Care Center and south of 5th Street. This is the Fox Ridge development. 4-12

Relationship among buildings: Buildings within a neighborhood should be both cohesive and varied. Consider the following techniques: A) Homes along a street should utilize similar setbacks to establish a consistent “street wall”. B) Home sizes may vary along a street, but should utilize design techniques such as similar roof line heights and deeper setbacks for portions of wider houses to minimize apparent size variations.


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

C) The mix of architectural themes or styles should generally be consistent within a neighborhood, but repeated use of identical floorplans or colors is strongly discouraged, especially for adjacent buildings.

Remodeling and Additions: Changes and additions to existing structures should complement the design of the existing structure. Consider the following techniques: A) Select window types and proportions that match the rest of the house. B) New exterior materials should match, or be complementary, to existing materials.

B

D A

C

This graphic illustrates how a single-family homes can use varying techniques to create a relationship with the street (See text for technique descriptions)

Garages: Two stall garages are encouraged in all residential zones. Landscaping: Provide generous landscaping, with an emphasis on native plant species. Lighting: Exterior lights should be full-cut-off fixtures that are directed to the ground to minimize glare, light trespass and light pollution (see side bar). Limited up-lighting is acceptable for architectural accentuation, flag lighting, and to highlight key civic features (e.g. church steeples).

The upper graphic illustrates the different types of lighting techniques from no cutoff to full-cutoff. The lower images provide good examples of full-cutoff building light fixtures.

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4.3 MDR - Medium Density Residential Medium Density Residential areas are intended for housing at densities between two to four units per acre not to exceed eight living units per acre. Uses in this category include single-family attached duplexes/twinhomes, townhouses, row houses, apartment buildings, and senior housing.

Design Strategies The City encourages residential projects (new construction and remodeling) to incorporate design strategies that will maintain neighborhood property values over time and enhance the social function and safety of the neighborhood.

Land Use Strategies MDR-1: MDR could be an alternative for someone that wants to own but needs to meet a lower price point than new detached housing stock.

Relationship to the Street: Buildings and sites should be designed to establish visual and physical connections between the public realm of the street and the private realm of the building, with layers of increasingly private space in between.

MDR-2: MDR uses are an appropriate transition use between commercial areas and Low Density Residential areas.

Consider the following techniques (see side bar):

MDR-3: Multi-family residential units are scattered throughout the City. This type of housing provides an alternative dwelling unit for those who are not interested in purchasing a home in Solon. Multifamily development has occurred throughout the City of Solon with the most recent development of multifamily located south of 6th Street along the west side of Highway 1.

A) The front door should face the street and there should be a clear route to the door from the street or sidewalk. B) There should be windows on the street facade C) Building setbacks will vary according to building type and lot size. Relationship among buildings: Buildings within a neighborhood, or within a single development, should be both cohesive and varied. Consider the following techniques: A) When adjacent to lower density residential buildings, larger buildings should incorporate strategies to minimize the apparent size of the building, including flat roofs instead of pitched roofs, deeper setbacks for upper stories, and/or variation in the depth of setback along the building facade. B) The mix of architectural themes or styles should generally be consistent within a neighborhood or development, but there should be variation in floor plan, facade design, and color choice to avoid monotony. Garages: Two stall garages are encouraged in all residential zones. Landscaping: Provide generous landscaping, with an emphasis on native plant species.

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City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

Lighting: Exterior lights should be full-cut-off fixtures that are directed to the ground to minimize glare, light trespass and light pollution. Limited uplighting is acceptable for architectural accentuation, flag lighting, and to highlight key civic features (e.g. church steeples). Common Open Space: Provide gardens, grass areas, and playgrounds to serve the needs of residents. Service Areas: Trash and recycling containers, street-level mechanical, rooftop mechanical, and outdoor storage, should be located or screened so that they are not visible from a public street. Screening should be compatible with building architecture and other site features. (see side bar)

B A C

This graphic illustrates how a single-family homes can use varying techniques to create a relationship with the street (See text for technique descriptions)

These images provide good examples of screened services areas.

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4.3 HDR - Higher Density Residential Higher Density Residential areas are intended for housing at densities exceeding eight living units per acre. Uses in this category include apartment buildings and senior housing.

Design Strategies The City encourages residential projects (new construction and remodeling) to incorporate design strategies that will maintain neighborhood property values over time and enhance the social function and safety of the neighborhood. The following strategies apply mostly to multi-family formats.

Land Use Strategies HDR-1: HDR uses will generally be located where there is access to bike trails and a pedestrian network.

Relationship to the Street: Buildings and sites should be designed to establish visual and physical connections between the public realm of the street and the private realm of the building, with layers of increasingly private space in between.

HDR-2: HDR uses will generally be located where there is convenient access to restaurants, retail and service businesses. HDR-3: HDR uses are an appropriate transition use between commercial areas and Medium Density Residential areas.

Consider the following techniques (see side bar): A) The front door should face the street and there should be a clear route to the door from the street or sidewalk. B) There should be windows on the street facade C) Building setbacks will vary according to building type and lot size.

Relationship among buildings: Buildings within a neighborhood, or within a single development, should be both cohesive and varied. Consider the following techniques: A) When adjacent to lower density residential buildings, larger buildings should incorporate strategies to minimize the apparent size of the building, including flat roofs instead of pitched roofs, deeper setbacks for upper stories, and/or variation in the depth of setback along the building facade. B) The mix of architectural themes or styles should generally be consistent within a neighborhood or development, but there should be variation in floor plan, facade design, and color choice to avoid monotony.

4-16


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

Landscaping: Provide generous landscaping, with an emphasis on native plant species. Lighting: Exterior lights should be full-cut-off fixtures that are directed to the ground to minimize glare, light trespass and light pollution. Limited uplighting is acceptable for architectural accentuation, flag lighting, and to highlight key civic features (e.g. church steeples). Common Open Space: Provide gardens, grass areas, and playgrounds to serve the needs of residents. Service Areas: Trash and recycling containers, street-level mechanical, rooftop mechanical, and outdoor storage, should be located or screened so that they are not visible from a public street. Screening should be compatible with building architecture and other site features. (see side bar)

This graphic illustrates how a multi-family building can use varying techniques to create a relationship to the street (See text for technique descriptions)

These images provide good examples of screened services areas.

| 4-17


4.3 C- Commercial Commercial areas are intended for retail, service, and office uses that serve neighborhood, community and regional markets. Examples include large retail and service businesses, offices, clinics and health care facilities, hotels, restaurants and entertainment businesses, storage, and automobile sales and services. The type and size of use will be determined by location and market forces.

Land Use Strategies C-1: Commercial areas should generally be served by a contiguous sidewalk network, and safe bike routes. C-2: The City encourages and supports investment in small neighborhood commercial uses and sites in existing neighborhoods. Sites deemed no longer viable for commercial use should be considered for redevelopment with housing. C-3: Older buildings in downtown Solon with architectural character and historical interest are important to the image of the entire community. The City encourages and supports adaptive reuse projects that retain and restore the historic character of the structure. Downtown commercial space typically houses small retail establishments, along with business and social service organizations. This type of business is expected to continue in the downtown district. Any increase in demand for downtown commercial space could be accommodated through existing vacant buildings or lots and possibly an expansion along Main Street west toward the library, east of Market Street and areas adjacent to Main Street. C-4: Way-finding signage to key downtown locations is critical, especially for visitors. The City will develop a signage system from primary downtown entry points to key locations throughout the community. C-5: Highway commercial use is typically characterized by grocery stores, car lots, convenience stores and other commercial uses that require efficient highway infrastructure and adequate space for parking a significant amount of vehicles. Continued commercial development along Highway 1 is anticipated to fulfill this community need. 4-18

Design Strategies The City encourages for all commercial projects the use of design strategies that will maintain property values over time. This section offers different strategies for highway settings and neighborhood settings in some categories. Relationship to the Street: The building should be designed such that the primary building facade is oriented towards the street (toward the larger street on corner lots) and should have a public entrance. Architectural Character: The building should be designed using architectural elements that provide visual interest and a human scale that relates to the surrounding neighborhood context. For commercially zoned districts on Main Street, new infill development shall be compatible with height and scale of surrounding buildings and present a two-story facade appearance. Building Materials: The building should be constructed of high quality, long lasting finish materials, especially along prominent facades with frequent customer traffic. Building Projections: Canopies, awnings, and/or gableroof projections should be provided along facades that give access to the building. (see side bar) Signs: Signs should be not larger or taller than necessary based on the context of the site. Signs are subject to the sign ordinance and all permanent signs require a permit. Highway Commercial: Desired sign types include building-mounted, monument. Signs are subject to the sign ordinance and all permanent signs require a permit. Neighborhood Commercial: desired sign types include building-mounted, window, projecting, monument and awning. Parking: Front yard parking should be limited; side yard, rear yard, or below building alternatives are preferred. Shared parking and access between properties is encouraged to minimize curb cuts and make more efficient use of land and paved surfaces.


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

Landscaping and trees should be incorporated into all surface parking areas to improve aesthetic and environmental performance. Vegetative buffers should be provided between pedestrian circulation routes and vehicular parking/circulation. Access drive lanes should be separated from parking stalls to reduce congestion. (see side bar)

Lighting: Exterior lights should be full-cut-off fixtures that are directed to the ground to minimize glare and light pollution, and especially to avoid light trespass to nearby residential property. Limited uplighting is acceptable for architectural accentuation, flag lighting, and to highlight key civic features (e.g. church steeples).

Development #1 Development #2

Landscaping: Generous landscaping should be provided with an emphasis on native plant species. Landscaping should be places along street frontages, between incompatible land uses, along parking areas, and in islands of larger parking lots. Use trees and low bushes in and around parking areas to partially obscure views of parking while retaining visual connections to maintain personal safety. (see side bar)

Awnings (left) or canopy structures (right) help define the building entrances and provide visual interest along the street frontage.

The above concept illustrates shared parking between two developments connected by an access drive, and includes vegetative buffers along all pedestrian routes.

Stormwater: Rain gardens, bio-retention basins, permeable pavement and other stormwater management technologies should be utilized to filter pollutants and infiltrate runoff. Service Areas: Trash and recycling containers, streetlevel mechanical, rooftop mechanical, outdoor storage, and loading docks should be located or screened so that they are not visible from a public street. Screening should be compatible with building architecture and other site features.

The examples above illustrate ways to landscape parking areas, including along the street frontage, in parking islands and medians, and between incompatible land uses.

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4.3 I- Industrial Industrial areas are intended for light or heavy manufacturing, warehousing, distribution, wholesale trade, accessory offices, and similar uses. Industrial areas are typically larger, individual sites not part of a larger business park.

Land Use Strategies I-1: Industrial areas should be located near regional transportation routes.

P - Public and Institutional Public and institutional areas are intended for churches, schools, cemeteries, art and cultural facilities, local government facilities and other parcels that are owned by a public or quasi-public entity. This category does not include parks and recreation areas.

Land Use Strategies P-1: Decommissioned public properties, such as schools, should be reused or redeveloped in ways compatible with the surrounding neighborhood.

OS - Open Space/Floodway Open Space areas are intended for preservation of natural areas and flood mitigation. OS lands are typically owned by the City, County, or State.

Land Use Strategies OS -1: Existing natural areas identified as Open Space are to be preserved. Limited access should be provided to foster awareness and appreciation for the area.

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City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

Prk - Parks and Recreation Park and Recreation areas are intended for active and passive recreation uses or preservation of natural areas.

Land Use Strategies Prk -1: The development and improvement of future Park areas should be focused on waterfront areas and areas in the flood plain or areas that are susceptible to flood waters.

H1 - Highway 1 Corridor This land use category includes areas in the current City Limits that run along Highway 1. The properties and land uses along this corridor directly affect the look, feel and access of the communities “gateway�.

Land Use Strategies URA-1: The future development and improvement of the Highway 1 corridor should address access, transportation, uses and aesthetics in a comprehensive way.

URA - Urban Reserve Area This land use category includes areas that are generally in agricultural or open space use but may be in the path of urban development beyond the planning horizon contained in this plan.

Land Use Strategies URA-1: These areas should be reserved for long-term urban development.

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4.4 Development Concepts Overview This section identifies specific public and private projects and design guidelines that would enhance the Downtown and other areas of the community, consistent with the more general goals, objectives, and strategies in this plan.

Desired General Characteristics In general, desirable characteristics of future (re)development in Solon include: • High-quality architecture and site design • Walkability • Streetscaping and pedestrian/bicycle amenities • Public open spaces • Preservation of historic character • Focal points and gathering places • Interconnected blocks • On-street parking and “out of view” off-street parking • Mixed-use buildings • Landscaping and street trees Recommended uses could include: • Restaurants and entertainment businesses • Boutiques and specialty stores • Upper story multi-family • Food stores • Public open spaces and plazas • Cafes and bakeries • Service businesses including salons, launderers, tailors, etc. • Cultural centers and art galleries • Community centers and social service agencies • Small business/non-profit incubators • Offices • Live/work spaces • Commercial lodging and meeting space • Music venues • Educational/government/institutional branch offices

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City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

Development Concepts There are several ideal structures that could be erected or revamped for a particular use in Solon. Listed below are suggestions for infill development and new development locations and possible usages based on feedback from public participation focus groups and land use workshops. (See Appendix B for Larger Format Concept Designs and Maps)

FUTURE LAND USE MAP Future Land Use

TAFT AVE

Rural Lands Low Density Residential Medium Density Residential Higher Density Residential IOWA 1

Commercial Industrial Civic/Religious Park & Recreation Hwy1 Corridor

3

Urban Reserve Area Development Concept Areas

SUTLIFF RD

Solon City Limits

4 VIKING DR

2 HI G

S RACINE AVE

1

W ELM ST HW AY

38

2

TAFT AVE

CITY OF SOLON JOHNSON COUNTY, IOWA

Print Date: 4/19/2016

38

ST

E

HW AY

N MARKET

TURNER AVE

HI G

DATA SOURCES: JOHNSON COUNTY GIS, NRGIS

E MAIN ST

W MAIN ST

E SHORT ST

W SOVERS ST

5

EA ST W O

180TH ST

O

D

D R

W 5TH ST

E 1ST ST E PLUM ST Raymond Dr

NE

S STOCHL ST

82

IOWA ST

HW Y3

Body of Water

S IOWA ST

Stream

S DUBUQUE ST

POLK AVE

Open Space/Floodway

E 5TH ST

180TH ST

RACINE AVE

WOOD LILY RD

ER CH

3 A1 IOW

200TH ST D

POPLAR AVE

QUINCY RD

DA NC RE EK R

Will Dr

NO

T KET S S MAR ST

I ST

JO R

200TH ST

WINDFLOWER LN

E

2

210TH ST

210TH ST

| 4-23 Printed By: soshea, File: P:\GIS DATABASE\IOWA\JOHNSON COUNTY\Solon\Maps\Future Land Use Map.mxd


4.4 Development Concepts 1 Downtown Infill and Expansion

2

T

W ELM ST HW AY

38

2

W MAIN ST

E SHORT ST

W SOVERS ST EA ST W O

O

D

D R

W 5TH ST 4-24

E MAIN ST

E 1ST ST E PLUM ST

S STOCHL ST

S RACINE AVE

HI G

S DUBUQUE ST

38

S IOWA ST

HW AY

T ST N MARKE

HI G

IOWA ST

On the page to the right there are two concepts for the expansion and infill of the downtown district. The first is an expansion of the commercial property to the west, with the fire station staying in the current location. The second concept varies in that there is a pedestrian mall concept if the fire station was to move to another location in town and the existing fire station building was turned into a community center in the middle of the pedestrian DR hotel is also illustrated in this mallV concept. A downtown IKING concept as well. In both concepts there is ample off-street parking to the rear, a new downtown park and room for the brewery to expand in it’s current location. A key aspect of these concepts is replacing the trailers near the downtown with mixed use buildings that allow for residential dwellings above the ground level and commercial space on the first floor.

E 5TH ST


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

New Commercial Buildings

New Mixed Use Buildings

Downtown Expansion Concept

North Street

Iowa Street

West Street

Chabal Street

Main Street

B Street Short Street

Contiguous Expansion of Downtown Core

New Downtown Park

Downtown Expansion Pedestrian Mall Concept

Ample Parking in Rear

Brewery Expansion

Pedestrian Mall

Community Center

Downtown Hotel

North Street

Iowa Street

West Street

Chabal Street

Main Street

B Street Short Street

Contiguous Expansion of Downtown Core

New Downtown Park

Brewery Expansion | 4-25


38

2

E MAIN ST

W MAIN ST

E SHORT ST

D

D R

W 5TH ST

E 5TH ST

WOOD LILY RD

RACINE AVE

ER CH

Will Dr

NO

T KET S S MAR ST

I ST

WINDFLOWER LN

E

2 New Commercial District This concept is a potential commercial/business park south of Solon just off of Highway 1. This area is a great development opportunity because of the easy access from both W 5th Street and Highway 1 and the relatively flat dry ground. Services would not have to travel far because it is just outside the current City Limits.

E PLUM ST Raymond Dr

180TH ST

O

E 1ST ST

S STOCHL ST

EA ST W O

S DUBUQUE ST

W SOVERS ST

S IOWA ST

S RACINE AVE

4.4

HW AY

ST

HI G

QUINCY RD

3 Highway 1 Corridor Expansion

T

DA NC RE EK R

A1 IOW

JO R

200TH ST D

Highway 1 is the Gateway to the community. There are some areas that can be infill with new development but the expansion of this corridor would be ideal for new turnkey business sites. A study of the Highway 1 corridor is vital to assess future needs, aesthetics and traffic congestion in a focused comprehensive manner.

N COUNTY\Solon\Maps\Future Land Use Map.mxd

4-26


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

4 New Residential Development North

Future_

Develo

Solon C

82

Stream

VIKING DR

NE VIKING DR

38

2

Rand a

DR

ll Dr RA N

D A LL

D R

OM WIND

HW Y

NE HI G

HW AY

Body o

IOWA ST

SERINITY CT

Y3

FUTU US

IOWA 1

There is an opportunity for growth in housing stock in this area and ideal for single family residential with some mixed use type housing. It is located in a moderately flat area with access points located to HW the east and west of the site.

38

2

HI G

HW AY

E

Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, Earthstar Geographics, CNES/Airbus DS, USDA, USGS, AEX, Getmapping, Aerogrid, IGN, IGP, swisstopo, and the GIS User Community

Printed By: soshea, File: P:\GIS DATABASE\IOWA\JOHNSON COUNTY\Solon\Maps\Future Land Use Map.mxd

38

2

HI G S RACINE AVE

5 New Residential Development West

This proposed development site is ideal for single family primary use because it is just outside the current City Limits and close to city services. It is directly next to the new middle school site, Solon High School and minutes from the Solon Recreation & Nature Area. There is easy access because of the direct access to 180th Street/5th Street.

180TH ST

| 4-27

WS


4.5 Design Guideline Considerations Design Guidelines for Buildings and Sites This plan recommends the adoption of more detailed design guidelines for the downtown area. These pages present the basic categories that should be addressed by any such guidelines and some specific sample guidelines to inform the development of adopted standards. • Street Relationship: Design the building such that the primary building façade is orientated towards the street and built to the front property line. Minor setbacks may be allowed if space created provides an outdoor seating area, a hardscape plaza, or similar pedestrian space. Provide a public entrance on the primary façade.

Portion of the building is set back from the street, allowing extra room for a larger pedestrian zone.

• Lighting: Pick fixtures that complement the character of the building. Illuminate parking lots and pedestrian walkways uniformly and to the minimum level necessary to ensure safety. Lighting should be energy efficient and should render colors as accurately as possible. Preferred light types include: LED, fluorescent, and highpressure sodium.

Examples of full cutoff fixtures that minimize glare and light pollution.

• Landscaping: Provide generous landscaping, with an emphasis on native plant species. Landscaping should be placed along street frontages, between incompatible land uses, along parking areas, and in islands of larger parking lots. • Stormwater: Use rain gardens and bio-retention basins on-site (i.e. in parking islands) in order to filter pollutants and infiltrate runoff, wherever feasible. Consider using permeable surfaces, pervious asphalt, pervious concrete, and/or special paving blocks.

4-28

Building #1 Building #2

• Parking: Place parking on the side or back of the building, wherever feasible. Provide shared parking and access between properties to minimize the number of curb cuts. Provide vegetative buffers between pedestrian circulation routes and vehicular parking/circulation. Access drive lanes should have adequate throat depths to allow for proper vehicle stacking.

An example of parking being shared between two developments with parking limited to the side or rear yards (no front yard parking).

Trees and shrubs within and around parking areas greatly improve the aesthetic appearance and overall pedestrian experience.

Examples of permeable surfaces.


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

• Service Areas: Trash and recycling containers/ dumpsters, street-level mechanical, rooftop mechanical, outdoor storage, and loading docks should be located or screened so that they are not visible from a public street. Screening should be compatible with building architecture and other site features.

• Scale & Articulation: Design the building using architectural elements that provides visual interest and human scale that relates to the surrounding neighborhood context and the downtown’s overall character. • Windows, Doors & Garages: Buildings should activate the street by providing significant visibility through the street-level facade to activities/displays within the building. Clearly define door entryways and design garage doors to be screened from street view (i.e. not on street facade, landscaping, walls), to the greatest extent possible. • Building Projections: Canopies and awnings should be provided along facades that give access to the building. • Signage: Use pedestrian-scaled sign types: buildingmounted, window, projecting, monument, and awning. Signs should not be excessive in height or square footage. • Colors & Materials: Use high-quality, long-lasting finish materials such as kiln-fired brick, stucco, and wood. All exposed sides of the building should have similar or complementary materials and paint colors as used on the front façade.

Example of a building facade screening rooftop mechanical from ground view.

Desired verticallyproportioned buildings.

An example of large windows providing significant visibility into the building.

A good example of mounted awnings placed below the horizontal expression line.

Free-standing and roof signs are not conducive for a downtown, pedestrian-friendly district. Examples of secondary facades continuing the design quality, material palette, and color palette of the primary facade.

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1 2 3 4 5 Implementation & Action Plan Appendix A This chapter outlines how the vision of the Plan is implemented in everyday decisions and annual goalAppendix B setting and budgeting, and how the Plan should be when necessary. The Chapter also provides Appendix C amended a plan for implementing the action items described in Chapter 3, including when it should be completed.

Page 5.1 Guiding Daily Decisions 5-2 5.2 Guiding Annual Decisions 5-4 5.3 Action Plan 5-6 5.4 Amending the Plan 5-12


5.1 Guiding Daily Decisions City Roles & Responsibilities Responsibility for implementing this plan lies primarily with the Planning Commission, City Council and City Staff. City Council City Council sets priorities, controls budgets and tax rates, and often has the final say on key aspects of public and private development projects. The value and legitimacy of this plan is directly related to the degree to which Council members are aware of the plan and expect City actions to be consistent with this plan. Each Council member should have a copy of this plan and should be familiar with the major goals and objectives described herein. City Council should expect and require that staff recommendations and actions both reference and remain consistent with this plan. Planning Commission Land use and development recommendations are a core component of this plan, and the Planning Commission has a major role in guiding those decisions. Planning Commission members shall each have of a copy of this plan and shall be familiar with its content, especially Chapter 4: Land Use. It is generally the responsibility of the Planning Commission to determine whether proposed projects are consistent with this plan, and to make decisions and recommendations that are consistent with this plan. In cases where actions that are inconsistent with this plan are deemed to be in the best interest of the City, the Planning Commission should initiate efforts to amend the plan to better reflect City interests. This will help to reinforce the legitimacy of the plan as an important tool in City functions.

5-2

City Staff City staff have a significant influence on the selection and completion of all kinds of capital and operational projects. It is imperative that individuals in key roles know about, support, and actively work to implement the various strategies and actions in this plan. Specifically, the following people should consult and reference the comprehensive plan during goalsetting and budgeting processes, during planning for major public projects, and in the review of private development projects: • Parks Director • Public Works Director • Finance Director/City Administrator These key staff members are expected to know and track the various goals, objectives, strategies and actions laid out in this plan, and to reference that content as appropriate in communications with residents and elected and appointed officials. All other staff should also be aware of the plan and the connections between the plan and City projects. The purpose of this extra effort is to strengthen staff recommendations and reinforce the plan as a relevant tool integral to City functions.


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

Education and Advocacy

Utilizing Existing Tools

Implementation of this plan also depends, to a great degree, on the actions and decisions of entities other than City government. Some responsible parties that the City of Solon does not control or direct include, but are not limited to: • Solon Community School District • City of North Liberty • City of Iowa City • City of Cedar Rapids • Johnson County • Iowa Department of Transportation • Army Corps of Engineers • Iowa Department of Natural Resources

Many of the strategies identified in this plan presume the use of existing City ordinances and programs. The City’s key implementation tools include:

It is necessary to persuade these entities to be active partners in the implementation of the goals, objectives, and strategies of this plan. The following City activities can support this effort: • Share this plan with each organization, including a memo highlighting sections of the plan that anticipate collaboration between the City and the organization. • Take the lead role in establishing a collaboration • Know and communicate the intent of relevant objectives and strategies - partner organizations need to understand and buy in to the rationale before they will act.

Operational Tools • Annual Goal-Setting Process • Annual Budget Process • Capital Improvement Plan (Recommended) Regulatory Tools • Land Use Regulations (includes landscape and architectural regulations) • Site Design Standards • Historic Preservation Ordinance • Building and Housing Codes Funding tools • Tax Abatement • Tax Incremental Financing (TIF) Districts • State and Federal Grant Programs • Storm Water Utility (Recommended)

| 5-3


5.2 Guiding Annual Decisions Annual Report

Link to Annual Goals and Budget

To provide lasting value and influence, this plan must be used and referenced regularly, especially during budgeting and goal setting processes. To inform these annual processes, City staff will prepare a concise Comprehensive Plan Annual Report with input from the planning commission, including the following information:

The most important opportunity for this plan to influence the growth and improvement of the City is through the annual goal-setting, budgeting and capital planning processes. These existing annual efforts determine what projects will and will not be pursued by the City, so it is very important to integrate this plan into those processes every year.

• Action items in progress or completed during the prior 12 months (celebrate success!)

The compilation of actions in the next section is a resource to support decisions about how and where to invest the City’s limited resources. The Annual Report should draw from these actions.

• Staff recommendations for action items to pursue during the next 12 months. • City actions and decisions during the past 12 months not consistent with the plan (if any). • Staff recommendations for any amendments to the adopted plan.

Plan Commission should make formal recommendations for Council consideration, identifying those choices and commitments most likely to further the goals and objectives identified in this plan. The following recommended:

process

and

schedule

is

July - Staff completes the Comprehensive Plan Annual Report. August - Plan Commission considers Annual Report and makes formal recommendation to Council regarding action items to pursue and comprehensive plan amendments. September - Department Directors consider Annual Report and Plan Commission recommendations, complete goal setting exercises. Council holds a public hearing and considers adoption of any comprehensive plan amendments. November - City Council Goal Setting December to February - Budget preparation process March - Budget Adopted 5-4


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

| 5-5


5.3 Action Plan

Action Plan The Action Plan is designed as a guide to help City officials, community leaders, and private investors prioritize opportunities and address issues within the City of Solon and the surrounding area. The desired vision for Solon cannot be created over night. However, by incrementally implementing the recommendations within this plan, Solon can achieve the desired outcomes set forth in this comprehensive plan.

Potential Funding Sources There are five broad funding sources available to help offset costs to complete the projects listed in this Plan, as described below. ▶▶ General Municipal Funding – It is assumed that some general municipal funds/borrowing will be required to assist with the completion of projects or as a matching source for state or federal grants (e.g. wayfinding, signage, or streetscaping projects). ▶▶ Special Assessments – Particular projects that benefit individual properties (e.g. water, sewer, or sidewalk installations) could be funded through special assessments whereby the City recoups initial design and construction costs through increased real estate taxes on those properties for a set period of time. ▶▶ Private Donations, Developers/Impact Fees – Some of the wayfinding projects (e.g. gateway signs) could be partially or fully funded through private donations or public fund raising. Funding for other infrastructure projects can also be offset by using funds from impact fees the City collects as part of the approval of new development in the corridor. ▶▶ State and Federal Grants – There are many different state or federal grants that may be able to offset the costs of some of the identified projects. Only those programs most likely to award funding to Solon are listed. ▶▶ Tax Increment Financing (TIF) – Tax increment financing (TIF) is a program where the additional taxes generated from development in a TIF district would go towards specified public improvements in a community. This program helps waylay the impacts of new development on a community while improving the attractiveness of the City. Solon has designated areas of the town as an Urban Renewal Area and created a TIF District.

5-6


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

Funding and Other Resources Key CAT - Community Attraction and Tourism Program CDBG - Community Development Block Grant CFJC - Community Foundation of Johnson County City - General Fund, Special Funds, TIF or Assessments C-TEP - County-State Traffic Engineering Program ECICOG - East Central Iowa Council of Governments HC - Hired Consultant IACPG - Iowa Arts Council Project Grant IFMA - Iowa Farmers Market Association ILRTF - Iowa Living Roadways Trust Fund ITAP - Iowa Transportation Alternatives Program JCMPO - Johnson County Metropolitan Planning Organization KIB - Keep Iowa Beautiful Community Beatification Grant Program LWCF - Land and Water Conservation Fund PCRC - Pedestrian Curb Ramp Construction PIB - Paint Iowa Beautiful PO - Property Owner REAP - Resource Enhancement and Protection City Parks and Open Spaces SHPO - State Historical Preservation Office Solon ED - Solon Economic Development Group TAP - Transportation Alternative Program TEAP - Iowa Traffic Engineering Assistance Program TFK - Trees for Kids and Trees for Teens TP! - Trees Please! TSIP - Traffic Safety Improvement Program

This table is for the acronyms in the Action Plan below.

| 5-7


5.3 Action 1.a Assess need for bike racks throughout the community

Transportation

1.b Develop and implement a phased sidewalk construction program 1.c Enforce sidewalk maintenance ordinance to improve existing sidewalk conditions 1.d Establish and use a Complete Streets Ordinance 1.e Maintain an updated Major Streets Plan 1.f Develop a Highway 1 Corridor Plan 1.g Plan & construct a community wide trail system with linkages to important community facilities and neighborhoods

Housing

2.a Evaluate the feasibility of a locally funded housing rehab program to improve older housing stock by the owner 2.b

Establish and enforce an ordinance for design guidelines (including traditional neighborhood design and consideration of existing neighborhood context)

2.c

Evaluate inclusionary housing ordinances that provide incentives to development with certain percentages of affordable and senior housing (including waiving taxes on affordable percentages of development)

2.d

Evaluate surrounding communities’ incentive programs for residential development to ensure Solon remains competitive in housing development

2.e Continue to apply for the CDBG Owner Occupied Housing Rehabilitation Program 2.f Actively enforce code violations related to housing standards and property maintenance 2.g Encourage and support the creation of neighborhood associations and locally led neighborhood planning efforts

Community Services

3.a Establish and maintain a five-year park, recreation and open space plan 3.b Improve supply of information (interpretive signage, maps etc.) at and for community facilities/key attractions 3.c Pursue grants to update/construct community facilities (i.e. a community center) 3.d Evaluate whether the needs of the Fire Department are being met in the current facility 3.e Evaluate the feasibility of local law enforcement versus the current Johnson County Sheriff Department 3.f Conduct regular review of sewer/water capacities to serve future growth and development 3.g Continue to promote shared usage of public facilities (i.e. school playgrounds for public use)

Downtown Solon

4.a Branding of the downtown and other distinct areas of the City as districts 4.b Develop a plan for future expansion of the downtown commercial district (i.e. Downtown Master Plan) 4.c Apply for CDBG Downtown Revitalization Facade Grant 2017 4.d Increase festivals and identify a coordinator/champion for this task (i.e. establish a farmers market) 4.e Encourage existing downtown property owners to explore HOME grant applications for upper story rehab 4.f Establish and enforce off-street parking requirements at plan review for new development in downtown 4.g Design and install graphic wayfinding signage for the downtown and throughout the community

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City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035 Priority

2016-2017 2018-2020

2021+

Action Authority

City

Owner

Other

Potential Funding

Other Resources

TAP, City, PO On Going City

JCPMPO

City, ILRTF

HC

City, REAP, CAT, TAP

HC

City

HC HC

CDBG, City

HC, ECICOG

City

HC

City

HC

City, CDBG, CFJC

HC, ECICOG

On Going On Going

On Going As Needed

On Going On Going

Solon Community Schools City

HC

City, CFJC, ILRTF

HC

CDBG, CFJC

HC, ECICOG

City

IFMA

City, TAP

HC

On Going On Going

| 5-9


5.3

Growth Management

Action 5.a Explore the need to have an annexation study of areas that will be growth areas for the City of Solon 5.b

Communicate with other jurisdictions whenever service contracts or major capital improvements are up for consideration, to identify cost savings opportunities through partnerships and shared service arrangements

5.c Future development shall be designed so that it can be easily and efficiently served with municipal services

Economic Development

6.a Evaluate and plan for venues and attractions to further Solon as a year-round destination 6.b

Identify and plan for infrastructure investments required to make priority development/redevelopment sites more competitive for economic development

6.c Develop an easy to understand “one-stop” for economic development on the City website, with partner resources 6.d Create and enhance entry features to the community and to the downtown (i.e. gateway signage, banners etc. 6.e

Continue to evaluate properties for listing on the National Register of Historic Places to further solidify Solon as a historic community and to enable properties to access historic tax credits

6.f

Complete periodic review of “Business Friendliness” as compared to comparable cities, including tax rate, utility rates and regulatory processes

Quality of Life

7.a Support the planning and implementation of a safe connection across Highway 1 for bikes and pedestrians 7.b Collaborate with Solon Public School District on future needs and projects 7.c Install ADA compliant curb cuts/ramps as needed 7.d Continue to support the Solon Senior Advocate Group 7.e Continue to support policies and plans to improve quality of life for all residents

Land Use

7.f Evaluate the need for an indoor facility for community activities year-round 4.a Evaluate areas where more neighborhood parks can be established (within 1/4 mile of neighborhood) 4.b Explore the need for a requirement to have a percentage of new development designated as green space 4.c Encourage and promote mixed use , especially in and around downtown Solon

5-10


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

Priority

2016-2017 2018-2020

2021+

Action Authority

City

Owner

Other

Potential Funding

Other Resources

HC

CAT, CFJC

City

Solon ED

TAP, City, PCRC On Going

SHPO

On Going

Solon ED

TAP, ILRF, TSIP

HC, JCMPO

On Going PCRC On Going On Going City

HC

LWCF, City, REAP

HC

On Going

| 5-11


5.4 Amending the Plan Plan Monitoring, Amending and Updating Although this Plan is intended to guide decisions and actions by the City over the next 10 to 20 years, it is impossible to accurately predict future conditions in the City. Amendments may be appropriate from time to time, particularly if emerging issues or trends render aspects of the plan irrelevant or inappropriate. The City may be faced with an opportunity, such as a development proposal, that does not fit the plan but is widely viewed to be appropriate for the City. Should the City wish to approve such an opportunity, it should first amend the plan so that the decision is consistent with the plan. Such amendments should be carefully considered and should not become the standard response to proposals that do not fit the plan. Frequent amendments to meet individual development proposals threaten the integrity of the plan and the planning process and should be avoided. Any changes to the plan text or maps constitute amendments to the plan and should follow a standard process as described in the following section. Amendments may be proposed by either the City Council or the Plan Commission, though a land owner or developer may also petition the Plan Commission to introduce an amendment on their behalf. Amendments may be made at any time using this process, however in most cases the City should not amend the plan more than once per year. A common and recommended approach is to establish a consistent annual schedule for consideration of amendments. This process can begin with a joint meeting of the Plan Commission and City Council (January), followed by Plan Commission recommendation (February), then public notice procedures leading to a public hearing and vote on adoption by City Council (March or April). The 20-year planning horizon of this plan defines the time period used to consider potential growth and

5-12

change, but the plan itself should be fully updated well before 2036. Unlike an amendment, the plan update is a major re-write of the plan document and supporting maps. The purpose of the update is to incorporate new data and to ensure, through a process of new data evaluation and new public dialogue, that the plan remains relevant to current conditions and decisions. An update every ten years is recommended, though the availability of new Census or mapping data and/or a series of significant changes in the community may justify an update after less than ten years.


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

Plan Amendment Process In the years between major plan updates it may be necessary or desirable to amend this plan. A straightforward amendment, such as a strategy or future land use map revision for which there is broad support, can be completed in about six to eight weeks through the following process. Step One A change is proposed by City Council, Plan Commission, or staff and is placed on the Plan Commission agenda for preliminary consideration. Private individuals (landowners, developers, others) can request an amendment through the Development & Parks Director, who will forward the request to Plan Commission for consideration. Plan Commission decides if and how to proceed, and may direct staff to prepare or revise the proposed amendment.

Step Four Staff completes the plan amendment as approved, including an entry in the plan’s amendment log. A revised PDF copy of the plan is posted to the City web site and replacement or supplement pages are issued to City staff and officials who hold hard copies of the plan.

Step Two When Plan Commission has formally recommended an amendment, a City Council public hearing is scheduled and at least two weeks public notice is published. Notice of the proposed amendment should also be transmitted as appropriate to other entities that may be affected by or interested in the change, such as the City of Iowa City, the City of North Liberty, the Solon School District or Johnson County. Step Three City Council hears formal comments on the proposed amendment, considers any edits to the amendment, then considers adoption of the amendment.

| 5-13


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5-14


1 2 3 4 5 Appendix A Community Indicators Report Appendix B The Community Indicators Report is a summary of current conditions and recent trends in Solon, Appendix C based on the best available data. The purpose of these indicators is to enable informed choices about the future of the City. This report is included as an appendix to the comprehensive plan so that it may be easily updated from time to time as new data becomes available. Page A.1 Demographics A-2 A.2 Housing A-4 A.3 Economic Prosperity A-6 A.4 Agriculture & Natural Resources A-8 A.5 Community Facilities & Services A-10 A.6 Community Character A-12 A.7 Land Use A-14 A.8 Infrastructure A-16 A.9 Municipal Finances A-18


A.1 Demographics About the Data These indicators utilize a mixture of local, county, state, and federal data sources. The U.S. Census has historically been a key source of data for many community indicators. Much of the information previously collected by the decennial U.S. Census is now collected only by the American Community Survey (ACS). The ACS is an ongoing survey that collects sample data every year and reports estimates of population and housing characteristics. For communities smaller than 20,000 people, the best available estimates are reported as rolling averages over 5-year periods – they indicate average conditions over the reporting period rather than a snapshot of a single point of time. Because the ACS estimates are based on a sample of the population, they include some error. The margin of error is reported for each estimate, and is an indication of how reliable the estimate is. As a general rule, the ACS data is quite reliable at the State level, generally reliable at the County level, and less reliable at the municipal level. The margin of error makes the data much more difficult to interpret. To simplify tables in this plan, the reliability of each value is indicated simply by the formatting of the text. For each ACS estimate, the margin of error is divided by the estimate. If the error is 10% or less than the estimate, the value in the table is bolded and underlined. In graphs, the ACS data exceeding this 10% error threshold will be denoted at the bottom of the graph.

The second important note when using ACS estimates is that they cannot be compared to decennial census data because they are measured in different ways. While some of the tables in this report show both decennial census data and ACS data, caution should be used when trying to draw conclusions about trends by comparing the two sets of numbers.

This report is a summary of current conditions and recent trends in Solon, based on the best available data. The purpose of these indicators is to enable informed choices about the future of the City.

Census data ACS data error exceeds 10%

A-2

error less than 10%


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

Population & Age Trends Population trends for the City of Solon show an explosion in population of 73% increase in population between 2000 and 2010, compared to an 18.2% increase for Johnson County and 4.1% for the State of Iowa during the same period. Over the past 20 years (1990-2010) the population in the City of Solon grew by 94%, in Johnson County by 36.5%, and in the State by 9.7%. Over the next 20+ years (2010-2035) the population in the City of Solon is projected to grow by 80%, Johnson County by 50.5%, and the State by 11.8%. Projections were calculated in 2008 by Woods & Poole Economics, Inc. The City of Solon is relatively balanced in terms of demographics. In 2010, 13.5% of the City population was over the age of 65, and the age group with some of the highest population in the City was those age 10 to 14 years (9.8%). The median age in the City was 35.4 which is slightly lower than the median age for the State of Iowa median age of 38.1.

Population Trends & Projections

Source: US Census Bureau, MSA projections

Solon

Johnson

Iowa

1980 Actual

969

81,717

2,913,808

1990 Actual

1,050

96,119

2,776,755

2000 Actual 2005 Proj.

1,177 -

111,006

2,926,324

-

2,951,775

2010 Actual

2,037

131,244

3,046,355

2015 Proj.

2,261

145,645

3,097,663

2020 Proj.

2,530

158,456

3,172,237

2025 Proj.

2,861

171,417

3,249,751

2030 Proj.

3,263

184,445

3,328,308

2035 Proj.

3,667

197,529

3,407,575

Source: Woods & Poole Economics, Inc., MSA & Census

Age and Sex

Number

Percent

984

48.3%

1,053

51.7%

Under 5 years

159

7.8%

5 to 9 years

196

9.6%

10 to 14 years

200

9.8%

15 to 19 years

121

5.9%

20 to 24 years

71

3.5%

25 to 29 years

106

5.2%

30 to 34 years

153

7.5%

35 to 39 years

175

8.6%

40 to 44 years

157

7.7%

45 to 49 years

124

6.1%

50 to 54 years

135

6.6%

55 to 59 years

97

4.8%

60 to 64 years

69

3.4%

65 to 69 years

45

2.2%

70 to 74 years

54

2.7%

75 to 79 years

59

2.9%

80 to 84 years

51

2.5%

85 years and over

65

3.2%

Male population Female population

Total population

2,037

Source: 2010 census

| A-3


A.2 Housing Household Counts The most recent Census (2010) puts the household population at 1,970 and persons per household at 2.60 to get the household demand of 758 units. In 2010 there were 793 available units to cover the demand with excess units available.

Solon Housing Unit Projections Source: US Census Bureau, MSA projections

Solon Housing Projection 1,400 1,261

1,200

The City’s “persons per household” is projected to remain around 2.60 over the next 20 years. The population is projected to increase over the next 20 years by 60%. This population growth increases the housing demand. The City is projected to see an increase of 446 households between 2010 to 2030. This equates to an addition of 468 housing units (from 793 to 1,261), an increase of 59%.

1,108

1,000 800

982

879

793

600 400 200 0 2010

2015

2020

2025

Household Trends & Projections

Source: US Census Bureau, MSA projections

2010

2020

2025

2030

Population

2,037

2261

2530

2861

3263

Household Population

1,970

2,187

2,447

2,766

3155

People/ Household

2.60

2.61

2.61

2.61

2.62

Household Demand

758

839

937

1,058

1204

4.50%

4.50%

4.50%

4.50%

4.50%

793

879

982

1,108

1261

Base

862

961

1,083

1230

1

1

1

1

861

960

1082

1229

18

21

26

32

3

14

29

57

Vacancy Rate Total Unit Needs Available from Previous Year Lost Units Total Available Units Annual Need Cumulative Need

A-4

2015

793

2030


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

Occupancy & Housing Stock

Existing Unit Type

Source: American Community Survey 2007-2011 avg.

The diversity of Solon’s housing stock is typical of small city in the Midwest, with 84% consisting of Single Family homes. Multi-family housing in the City of 7% and 9% Single Family Attached.

Single Family Attached, 9%

Multi-family, 7%

The most recent ACS (2009-2013) data shows the majority of City residents (79.3%) live in owneroccupied housing. The vacancy rate (2.6%) is low and outside the healthy range vacancy rates, which is considered to be 5-6%. Approximately half of the occupants in Solon (49.5%) moved into their current residence after 1990.

Affordability & Value

Single Family Detached, 84%

Select Monthly Owner Costs as a Percent of Household Income with Percent mortgage Less than 20.0 percent

35.9%

Affordable housing opportunities are often provided through the sale of older housing units. Housing is generally considered “affordable” when the owner or renter’s monthly housing costs do not exceed 30% of their gross monthly income. Roughly 24.2% of City homeowners and approximately 20.6% of renters exceeded the “affordable” threshold during 20092013. While these numbers are important indicators of affordability, it is also important to note that some residents may consciously choose to devote more than 30% of their income to household and lifestyle expenses.

20.0 to 24.9 percent

18.0%

25.0 to 29.9 percent

22.0%

30.0 to 34.9 percent

11.8%

35.0 percent or more

12.4%

The table below shows that income of $75,000 and below have an insufficient amount of affordable units in that range. Solon median home value is $191,700 based on ACS 2013 data.

Housing Affordability Analysis

Not computed

0.0%

Select Monthly Owner Costs as a Percent of Household Income without mortgage Less than 10.0 percent

42.1%

10.0 to 14.9 percent

13.1%

15.0 to 19.9 percent

11.2%

20.0 to 24.9 percent

11.2%

25.0 to 29.9 percent

1.9%

30.0 to 34.9 percent

2.8%

35.0 percent or more

17.8%

Not computed

Source: US Census Bureau, MSA projections

Percent

0.0%

# of Total Households Affordable Range # of Owner Affordable Range Renter Affordable in Range for Owner Units Units of Renter Units Units Units Balance

Income Range

% of Households

$0-25,000

11.6%

88

$0-50,000

0

$0-299

7

7

-81

$25,000-49,999

15.9%

121

$50,000-99,999

36

$300-499

23

59

-61

$50,000-74,999

28.9%

220

$100,000-149,999

137

$500-699

51

188

-32

$75,000-99,999

17.2%

131

$150,000-200,000

149

$700-999

50

199

68

$100,000+

26.4%

200

$200,000+

280

Over $1,000

27

306

106

Totals

100.00%

759

-

602

-

157

759

-

| A-5


A.3 Economic Development Education & Income Education attainment can provide valuable insight into the existing labor force, including availability of skilled and professional workers and demand for training opportunities. The percentage of Solon residents 25 years or older who have at least a high school diploma (97.2%), is higher than the State of Iowa (91.0%, respectively). The percentage of residents who have obtained a bachelor’s degree is higher (20.6%) than the state (17.7%). Educational levels in Solon are higher than the State of Iowa as a whole. Solon’s median and per capita income levels are higher than the State. Median household income in Solon is $65,172, which is substantially higher compared to the State at $51,843. In the City, 2.3% of the population is below the poverty level, compared to 8.1% in Iowa, another example of how Solon’s incomes are higher than those of the State in general.

Educational Attainment

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey

Educational Attainment*, 2009 2013 Avg.

Solon

Iowa

HS Graduate

26.1%

32.9%

Some College

28.6%

21.7%

Associate’s Degree

13.1%

10.6%

Bachelor’s Degree

20.6%

17.7%

Graduate/Prof. Degree HS or Higher

8.8%

8.0%

97.2%

91.0%

Source: ACS, *Population 25 and over

(The Census Bureau uses a set of income thresholds that vary by family size and composition to detect who is poor. If the total income for a family or unrelated individual falls below the relevant poverty threshold, then the family or unrelated individual is classified as being “below the poverty level”.)

Income Trends

Source: American Community Survey

Solon

Avg. 2009-2013 Per Capita

$27,761

Median Family

$76,860

Median Household

$65,172

Iowa

Below Poverty Per Capita

$27,027

Median Family

$65,802

Median Household

$51,843

Below Poverty Souce: ACS, Census Bureau

A-6

2.3%

8.1%


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

Existing Labor Force A community’s labor force includes all people over the age of 16 classified as employed or unemployed, as well as members of the U.S. Armed Forces. Those not included in the labor force statistics include students, homemakers, retired workers, seasonal workers not currently looking for work, institutionalized people, and those doing only incidental unpaid family work. Solon’s labor force overall differs some from that of Iowa. •

Over the last decade, the unemployment rate increased for the City to a more normalized unemployment rate of 5.2% and is currently projected to be similar to that of the State of Iowa at 5.8%. Average unemployment rates typically hover around 5%. Note, in 2010 the United States was in a economic downturn commonly referred to as the “Great Recession”, accounting for the higher unemployment rates.

A majority (65.7%) of workers in Solon earn a private wage and salary, compared to Iowa at 79.0%.

The City of Solon has a much higher rate of Government Workers (26.7%)compared to the State of Iowa (14.0%). This is most likely due to the proximity of the University of Iowa.

Employment Status

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey

Employment Status In Labor Force (2000) Unemployment Rate In Labor Force (ACS 2009-2013) Unemployment Rate

Solon

Iowa

589

1,556,581

1.5%

4.2%

1,182

1,650,140

5.2%

5.8%

Source: Census Data

Class Of Worker

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey

Class of Worker

Solon

Iowa

Private wage and salary workers

65.7%

79.0%

Government workers

26.7%

14.0%

Self-employed in own not incorporated business workers

7.6%

6.8%

Unpaid family workers

0.0%

0.2%

Source: American Community Survey 2009-2013

| A-7


A.4 Agriculture and Natural Resources Natural Resources Physiography

Solon is located east of Lake Macbride. The topography of Solon is mostly flat to gently rolling. Areas to the west and southwest of the City are gently rolling to hilly. Areas of steep slopes within the planning area are shown on the Development Limitations Map (refer to page A-19).

Agricultural Land and Open Space

There is approximately 28 acres of open/park space within the City Limits. This is approximately 4.1% of the land area within the City Limits.

Wetlands

Wetlands generally occur in low-lying areas and near the bottom of slopes, particularly along stream banks and on large areas that are poorly drained. These lands are generally not conducive for intensive development due to erosive character, high compressibility and instability, low bearing capacity, and high shrink-swell potential of wetland soils.

Floodplains

Floods are the nations most common natural disaster and therefore require sound land use plans to minimize their effects. Benefits of floodplain management are the reduction and filtration of sediments into area surface water, storage of floodwaters during regional storms, habitat for fish and wildlife, and reductions in direct and indirect costs due to floods. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) designated 100- and 500-year floodplains within the planning area. The Development Limitations Map (on the next page) displays the 100-year and 500-year floodplain in the planning area.

A-8

Surface Water

Section 303(d) of the Federal Clean Water Act requires states to develop a list of impaired waters, commonly referred to as the “303(d) list.� This list identifies waters that are not meeting water quality standards, including both water quality criteria for specific substances or the designated uses, and is used as the basis for development of Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs). Lake Macbride is the most significant water feature in the area, and is noted on the Section 303(d) list. Solon is in the Middle Iowa Watershed. Ground Water Groundwater is a critical resource, not only because it is used as a source of drinking water, but also because rivers, streams, and other surface water depend on it for recharge. Groundwater contamination is most likely to occur where fractured bedrock is near the ground surface, or where only a thin layer of soil separates the ground surface from the water table. Groundwater can be contaminated through both point and non-point source pollution (NPS). The most common NPS pollutants are sediment (erosion, construction) and nutrients (farming, lawn care). No data was available to note how susceptible the City’s water supply is to contamination.


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

TAFT AVE

Development Limitations Map

POLK AVE

IOWA 1

82

SUTLIFF RD

NE

IOWA ST

WINDOM

VIKING DR

SERINITY CT

HW Y3

W ELM ST 2

W MAIN ST E MAIN ST

O O

D

D R

W 5TH ST

E 1ST ST

E PLUM ST

TAFT AVE

180TH ST

EA ST W

E SHORT ST

E 5TH ST E 6TH ST

ER CH ST

POLK AVE

KET ST S MAR

O IN ST

DEVELOPMENT LIMITATIONS M

SUTLIFF RD

NE

S RACINE AVE

180TH ST

O O

D

14-18%

E SHORT ST

D R W 5TH ST

E PLUM ST

E 5TH ST E 6TH ST

ER CH

180TH ST

ed By: soshea, File: P:\GIS DATABASE\IOWA\JOHNSON COUNTY\Solon\Maps\Development Limitations Map.mxd

QUINCY RD

POPLAR AVE

200TH ST

KR D

25-40%

Lower Elevation A1 IOW

JO RD AN CR EE

18-25%

The data provided in this map is provided for informationalElevation and planning purposes only. The Higherare Elevation City of Solon and MSA not responsible for the misuse or misrepresentation of the data

RACINE AVE

ST

ET ST S MARK

O IN ST

WINDFLOWER LN

E

Printed By: soshea, File: P:\GIS DATABASE\IOWA\JOHNSON COUNTY\Solon\Maps\Development Limitations Map.mxd

9-18% 200TH ST

W MAIN ST E MAIN ST

E 1ST ST

9-14%

KR D

WOOD LIL Y RD

2

W SHORT ST W SOVERS ST EA ST W

RACINE AVE

N IOWA ST

38

S IOWA ST

POPLAR AVE

W ELM ST

Slope

TAFT AVE

HI GH W AY

N MARKET ST

2

JO RD AN CR EE

S DUBUQUE ST

38

QUINCY RD

200TH ST

Flood Zone

A1 IOW

HI GH W AY

IOWA ST

DR WINDOM

VIKING DR

SERINITY CT

82

WINDFLOWER LN

E

IOWA 1

HW Y3

180TH ST

WOOD LIL Y RD

S RACINE AVE

W SHORT ST W SOVERS ST

S IOWA ST

38

TAFT AVE

HI GH W AY

N IOWA ST

2

S DUBUQUE ST

38

N MARKET ST

DR

HI GH W AY

Solon City Limits 200TH ST

The data provided in this map is provided for informational and planning purposes only. The City of Solon and MSA are not responsible for the misuse or misrepresentation of the data.

DATA SOURCES: JOHNSON COUNTY

E

CITY OF SO JOHNSON COUNTY,

| A-9

Print D


A.5 Community Services General Facilities Health Care Facilities The City of Solon is served by multiple nearby medical facilities. Nearest is the Mercy Family Medicine of Solon. University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics in Iowa City is one of the largest in the State with many skilled specialists with a wide variety of services.

PARKLAND NEEDS FORECAST, 2010-2030

Veterans are served by the Iowa City VA Clinic. The clinic offers limited outpatient care in a variety of fields, as well as counseling and wellness classes. Police & Emergency Facilities Johnson County Sheriffs Department provides law enforcement on a contract basis for the City of Solon. The volunteer fire department consists of 35 volunteer Fire Fighters. The Fire Department is located at 131 North Iowa Street. Other Facilities • City Hall located at 101 N. Iowa Street. Public School Facilities The City is served by the Solon Community School District. • Lakeview Elementary School (111 N. Chabal Street Solon, IA) • Solon Middle School (313 South Iowa Street, Solon, IA) • Solon High School (600 W 5th Street Solon, IA) Higher Education Facilities There are several higher education facilities located nearby and this list is not all inclusive. •

University of Iowa

Cornell College

Coe College

Kirkwood Community College

Mount Mercy University

A-10

Source: 2010 Census, MSA Predictions

2010

2020

2030

Population

2037

2530

3263

Low Demand (6 acres/1,000)

12.22

15.18

19.57

High Demand (12 acres/1,000)

24.44

30.36

39.15

Total Supply

31.00

31.00

31.00

Surplus (6 acres/1,000)

18.78

15.82

11.43

The National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA) recommends 6-12 total acres of parks or recreation space per 1,000 people within a community. NRPA also defines park and open space types, including desirable size, service area, and total acres needed to service a community. • • • •

Mini Parks - 2 acres or less in size, servicing 1/8 mile radius (0.250.5 acres / 1,000 residents) Neighborhood Playgrounds - 2-4 acres in size, servicing 1/4 mile radius (0.5-1.5 acres / 1,000) Neighborhood Parks - 2-10 acres in size, servicing 1/4 mile radius (1.0-2.0 acres/ 1,000) Community Play fields/Parks - 5 acres or more, servicing 1.0 mile radius (5-8 acres / 1,000)

The majority of the 31 acres comes in the form of a Community Play field/Parks and there is a need for additional/new neighborhood parks and mini parks throughout the community within a 1/4 miles radius of neighborhoods.


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

Community Facilities Map

IOWA 1

NE VIKING DR R OM D WIND

SUTLIFF RD

R PA K

N WEST ST

E AT ST

S B ST

E SHORT ST

W SOVERS ST S IOWA ST

E 2ND ST

E 3RD ST

O O D DR

180TH ST

W 5TH ST

E

PL UM

T

W 3RD ST

E MAIN ST

TS RKE S MA

S RACINE AVE

E 1ST ST

W ST EA

COMMUNITY FACILITIES & RECREATION AMENITIES MAP

W SHORT ST

MUSHROOM PARK

E 4TH ST

PUBLIC OPEN SPACE

ST

E 5TH ST

SOLON PRAIRIE

E 6TH ST

E O IN ST

WILLOW

WOOD LILY RD

E ID

W MAIN ST

HOOVER NATURE TRAIL

E NORTH ST

LEGION PARK

S CEDAR ST

BR

AREA

E ELM ST

N MARKET ST

AC

W ELM ST HI GH LEG ION P W AY ARK 38 2

S STOCHL ST

M

SOLON OUTD OOR RECREA TION

S DUBUQUE ST

E

LAKE MACBRIDE STATE PARK

E ROCK ST

RK

S WEST ST

R HI GH AN W DA AY LL 38 2 PA

K LA

HOOVER NATURE TRAIL

RANDALL DR

N IOWA ST

82

IOWA ST

HW Y3

180TH ST

CT

ER CH ST

Trails

WINDFLOWER LN

City Hall Fire Station Library Park/Open Space Post Office

School Utility Building Electrical Substation

RACINE AVE

Religious Institution/Cemetery

A1 IOW

JORDAN CREEK RD

Public Works

HOOVER NATURE TRA

Waste Water Treatment Facility

Printed By: soshea, File: P:\GIS DATABASE\IOWA\JOHNSON COUNTY\Solon\Maps\Community Facilities and Recreation Map.mxd

Water Tower Parks Solon City Limits

DATA SOURCES: JOHNSON COUNTY GIS, MSA

| A-11


A.6 Community Character Early City History The first settlers in Big Grove Township have been named as arriving in the years of 1838 to 1840. The sources were the States of Ohio, Indiana, Pennsylvania, New York, while England contributed one in the person of Robert Matthews. War­ren Stiles, whose name is mentioned in the township history at its organization, came in 1839 from New York. He settled on section twenty-six. The year before, Charles Fowler came from New York, W. Fackler from Indiana, and Warner Spurrier from Ohio. Two more, Thomas King and Strawder De­vault, came from Indiana in 1839. In 1839, five more, Jehiel Parks, P. C. Brown, E. M. and Moses Adams, and Abner Arrowsmith, came from Ohio. Harvey Lyman came from the same state in 1840, also W. D. Cannon, and E. T. Pratt in the same year, a state which has furnished so many settlers to the eastern part of Iowa. Two came from Pennsylvanin, J. B. McGrew in 1839, and A. W. Blain in 1840. In October, 1840, Hamilton B. Kerr and John West employed Cyrus Sanders to lay out in lots eighty acres of land in the township of Big Grove as it is today, and they named the plat “Solon.” To the settlers who were then coming very rapidly they offered these lots for sale, but it was not possible to interest them in the lots of a town site when land was so cheap and one could purchase eighty acres for the price of a town lot. After wait­ing for two or three years for the lots to sell, the ground was broken up and put to wheat, which doubtless was more profit­able than dealing in town lots at that time in the history of the county.’” The town plat was recorded in November, 1840, and the record was later transferred by the recorder to the present books in August, 1841. The streets then named were, north and south, Iowa, Dubuque, and Cedar; east and west, Silver, Jefferson, Washington, Adams, and Water. (source: Leading Events in Johnson County, Iowa, History, Volume 1 p. 164-165) A-12


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

Historic Preservation National Register of Historic Places

The National Register is the official national list of historic properties in America worthy of preservation, maintained by the National Park Service. There are currently five sites on the National Register of Historic Places in the vicinity of the City of Solon.

Henyon--Kasper--Duffy Barn 2520 Hwy 1 Solon, Iowa

Buresh Farm R.R., Box 447 Solon, Iowa

Saints Peter and Paul Catholic Church 1165 NE Taft Ave. Solon, Iowa

Cottage at Rock and Dubuque Streets Rte. 4, Box 3 Solon, Iowa

Stone Academy Hwy 1 (2 miles north of Solon)

| A-13


A.7 Land Use Existing & Projected Land Uses As of 2015, the City includes approximately 837.33 acres. The majority of the City is currently comprised of Residential (52%) the majority of that being comprised of Single-Family Residential. Other notable uses include Public Facilities (8.4%), Parks and Recreation (4.1%), Commercial Service (2.3%) and General Industrial (2.2%). Developable land is limited by several natural features including floodplains, slopes greater than 20%, and wetlands. After accounting for these development limitations, the majority of the City is not restricted by development limitations and the majority of the land in the City Limits and the 2 mile jurisdictional boundary are well suited for new development. There are 147 acres inside the City limits that are undeveloped. Most of this undeveloped land is well suited for infill development. Using the projected population and household sizes, it is expected that Solon will need an additional 144.79 acres of residential land, 17.45 acres of commercial land and 17.45 acres of industrial land in the next 20 years. Note: Residential use projections were calculated by multiplying the change in projected households by the average households per acre, as of year 2010. Projections for commercial and industrial acreage assume that these land uses will grow at a similar rate to the current proportion of commercial or industrial land to residential land (i.e. maintaining status quo). Actual land needs may differ based on market conditions and the land use policies of the City.

Solon Existing Land Uses Source: MSA Predictions

Residential

Acres

%

Single-Family

304.00

44.0%

Multi-Family

55.00

8.0%

Mobile Home

0.33

0.0%

3.00

0.4%

Commercial Restaurant General Retail

2.00

0.3%

Service

16.00

2.3%

Professional Services

8.00

1.2%

General Industrial

15.00

2.2%

Warehousing

9.00

1.3%

Utilities

5.00

0.7%

Public Facilities and Utilities

58.00

8.4%

Other Civic Uses

31.00

4.5%

Parks and Rec.

28.00

4.1%

Transportation

156.00

22.6%

Vacant Urban Land

147.00

17.55%

Total

837.33

Industrial

Civic

Undeveloped Land

Projected Land Use Needs 2010-2030 Source: MSA Predictions

A-14

Projected Land Demand

2010

2015

2020

2025

2030

20 Year Change

Population

2037

2261

2530

2861

3263

1226

Housing Size

2.60

2.605

2.61

2.615

2.62

0.02

Housing Units

793

861

960

1082

1229

436

Residential (acres)

359.3

-

419.0

-

504.1

144.79

Commercial (acres)

29.0

-

36.0

-

46.4

17.45

Industrial (acres)

29.0

-

36.0

-

46.4

17.45


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

Existing Land Use Map

E LAN

IOWA 1

NE VIKING DR R OM D WIND

RANDALL DR

SUTLIFF RD

L

2

S B ST

W SHORT ST

E NORTH ST

E SHORT ST

P

E MAIN ST

C

P

DR

T

O O D DR

W 5TH ST

E 4TH ST

PL UM

R ST

R

S WOOD LILY RD

E 3RD ST

P E

S WINDSOR DR

E 2ND ST

S ACR E EEN S GR

S IOWA ST

E 1ST ST

W 3RD ST

W ST EA

180TH ST

T

TS RKE S MA

S RACINE AVE

MARSHEK CT

W SOVERS ST

H

S KINGSTON DR

W MAIN ST

E ELM ST

S STOCHL ST

38

M N MARKET ST

W ELM ST

N WEST ST

HI GH W AY

E ROCK ST

S CEDAR ST

2

S DUBUQUE ST

38

S WEST ST

HI GH W AY

N IOWA ST

82

IOWA ST

HW Y3

E 5TH ST

E 6TH ST E O IN ST

WILLOW

180TH ST

L

S

U

CT

ER CH

U

N MARKET ST

N IOWA ST

RACINE AVE

S DUBUQUE ST

S IOWA ST

S CEDAR ST

S WEST ST

E SHORT ST

E A1 IOW

EXISTING LAND USE MAP W SHORT ST

S MARKET ST

N WEST ST

S

E MAIN ST

W MAIN ST

JORDAN CREEK RD

WINDFLOWER LN

N CEDA R ST

N DUBUQUE ST

ST

E NORTH ST

W NORTH ST

E 1ST ST

Printed By: soshea, File: P:\GIS DATABASE\IOWA\JOHNSON COUNTY\Solon\Maps\Existing Land Use Map.mxd

Low Density Residential Medium Density Residential Higher Density Residential Trailer Parks/Open Space Church Public Professional/Office Resturant/Bar Retail Service 180TH ST

Light Industrial/Manufacturing Storage/Warehouse Utility Undeveloped Solon City Limits

| A-15


A.7 Infrastructure Solon Infrastructure Water System Solon’s community water needs are served by a municipal water system. The source of the water supply is currently from three underground wells, Well #2, Well #3 and Well #4. In 2003 a Water Treatment Plant was constructed to treat water from Well #3 which has high iron content. In 2007, a generator was installed at the Water Treatment Plant to provide for continued water supply during utility outages experienced by the City. The City of Solon conducted a study in 2008 of the water system which provided a model which assisted in determining the future needs of the system. Through this process, it was identified that the City should consider constructing another well which led to the completion of Well #4 and chemical feed building. The study also indicated that when the population reaches approximately 2500, a new water storage facility will be needed. In 2014, with estimates showing the population nearing the 2500 number, research began on water tower storage vs. a ground storage reservoir with council proceeding to purchase property from St. Mary's Church adjacent to Well #4 and the SRNA for a 400,000 gallon ground storage reservoir. To date the project is in the construction design phase. Water lines provide service to all developed areas and proposed developments for the City of Solon. Chlorine and fluoride are added to the water to comply with state safety standards. Sanitary Sewer System The City of Solon has an activated sludge treatment sanitary sewer system. In 2006 the City completed an upgrade/expansion to the Wastewater Treatment

A-16

Plant. After this expansion, the system has a designed capacity of 2,300,000 gallons per day and has experienced peak loads of 500,000 gallons per day. In the future, additional upgrades may be mandated by the Iowa Department of Natural Resources to comply with NPDES requirements. A North Trunk Sewer project is in the preliminary planning stages with expected construction in FY17 to accommodate to remaining phases in Windmill Estates, Prairie Acres, Fox Ridge Subdivisions and for future growth to the areas to the north and to the east of Hwy 1. Storm Sewers Storm sewers assisted by ditches and culverts are located throughout the City. According to an East Central Iowa Council of Governments (ECICOG) Regional Infrastructure Survey, storm sewers serve less than 30% of the City. Solid Waste Collection Solid waste collection in Solon is provided by the City under contract with a private hauler. There is a base monthly rate per household for recycling that is included with the water bill. In addition to this charge, residents must buy garbage stickers for each bag of garbage. These fees may increase as needed to go towards the collection fees to cover closure costs for the landfill used. Current recycling efforts are conducted by the same private hauler. A recycling bins and lids are issued to each household. Recyclables are picked up curbside with the same refuse schedule. Households are provided a list of recyclable items that are eligible for collection.


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

| A-17


A.7 Municipal Finances Municipal Finances • • • •

Tax Base and Rates Debt Analysis Composition of General Fund Revenues Composition of General Fund Expenditures

Tax Base and Rates Taxable valuations have increased since the last Comprehensive Plan update in 2008. The increase is due to several housing developments that complete sections with a phased approached. Tax rates for property owners in the City in 2008 and also for 2015 are listed below. City of Solon Levies for Fiscal Year 2008 TAX LEVY DOLLARS PER THOUSAND Genera l 8.64558 City Special 1.69916 County 6.49453 Community College 0.85526 School District 16.92507 Agricultural Extension 0.06787 State of Iowa 0.00350 Assessor 0.35333 TOTAL 35.04430 City of Solon Levies for Fiscal Year 2015 TAX LEVY DOLLARS PER THOUSAND General 8.64477 City Special 2.32728 County 6.74168 Community College 1.05754 School District 16.35337 Agricultural Extension 0.08119 State of Iowa 0.003300 Assessor 0.30944 TOTAL 35.51857

A-18

The general levy for the City is at the state statutory maximum of $8.10 per $1,000 of valuation. As with many communities, the school district collects the highest property tax levy ($16.15171 per $1,000) Debt Analysis The two primary sources of debt for the City are General Obligation (GO) bonds and revenue bonds. According to the Iowa Code, the GO debt limit for a city is 5% of its actual assessed property valuation. According to the City Clerk files, the current (2015) actual property valuation for Solon is approximately $160,700,227. Five percent of this figure, or $8,035,011, is the GO bonding capacity of Solon. In 2015, Solon was utilizing $3,699,000, or 46.04% of the GO debt capacity. Composition of General Fund Revenues Solon’s general fund revenues are composed primarily of charges for service and property tax revenue. In FY 2015, charges for services comprised approximately 14.7 percent of general fund revenues. Property tax revenue, the first largest component contributed 53% of the 2015 revenues. Intergovernmental revenues, which are revenues that are shared between the state and the City, contributed 10.2 % of the General Fund revenues.


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

Composition of General Fund Expenditures Roads/Streets comprised the largest category of the general fund expenditures in FY 2015 at approximately 24% of the total; followed by Policy and Administration at approximately 19% percent of the total.

The various categories in the expenditures are as follows: • Community Protection (police, fire, street lighting, etc.) • Human Development (health, library, recreation, etc.) • Home and Community Environment (garbage, streets, utilities, etc.) • Policy and Administration (mayor, council, clerk, legal, etc.)

| A-19


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A-20


1 2 3 4 5 Appendix A Appendix B Public Input Appendix C The following summarizes the public and community input process. Appendix B also contains the results of the online community wide survey. Page B.1 Public Meeting Input B-4 B.2 Community Survey Results B-4


B.1 Public Meeting Input On April 14, 2015 the Steering Committee Members took part in a SWOT exercise to determine the area's issues and opportunities. On May 11, 2015 residents, business owners and community leaders took part in a similar SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats) exercise. These two sessions were used to gather opinions on issues and opportunities for the Solon Comprehensive Plan. The information gathered was divided into four categories:

Strengths Characteristics that give Solon an advantage over others. Weaknesses Characteristics that place Solon at a disadvantage relative to others. Opportunities Elements Solon could build upon to advance the area. Threats Elements in the environment or community that have/could hinder revitalization.

B-2


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

Steering Committee #1 April 14, 2015

Transportation

Highway 1, Main Street and Racine (+) Sidewalks (+) Curb & gutter program (+) Stoplight (+) Racine (+) Money is put toward roads every year (+) Main Street has nice aesthetics (+) Sidewalks on Main Street (+) Need to improve chip seal streets (*) Need to address curb & gutter faster and in more volume (*) Stoplight is coming to intersection of Main Street and Highway 1 (*) Opportunities for public transportation (*) Opportunities for better connections (*) Lack of parking (-) Older streets don’t have curb & gutter (-) Crossing Highway 1 (-) Sidewalks east of Highway 1 by post office (-) Chip seal streets (-) Main Street Parking (-) Lack of curb & gutter (-) School event traffic congests areas of town (-) Hard to get across Highway 1 (-) Large traffic volume on Highway 1 (-) Parking issue in downtown (-) Parking issues in multifamily areas (-) No trail connection through town (-) Highway 1 divides the community and impacts growth (-)

Land Use

(+) Strength (*) Opportunity (-) Weakness/Threat

Fox Ridge is good example of buffered and layered zoning (+) Windmill estates is a good example of a premier development (+) City Hall is a good example of a campus concept (+) Good green space by Windflower (+) More parks and recreation (*) Residential homes on Main Street are zoned commercial, future commercial opportunity (*) Opportunity for green space requirement for new developments (*) Opportunity for mixed use i.e. duplexes with single family (*) Mix of land use that is mixed yet connected (*) Opportunity for design standards (*) Main Street growth is limited (-) Highway 1 divides the community (-) Old Mill Creek is separated from town by highway 382 (-) Lack of parks/green space East of Highway 1 (-) Public Meeting Input | B-3


Infrastructure

Well maintenance and inspection program (+) North trunk sewer project is positive for growth to North and East (+) 400,000 gallon ground storage reservoir project is planned (*) North trunk sewer project is planned (*) Storm drainage improvements (*) There is opportunity for street improvements at a faster pace (*) Need to continue Stormwater improvements (*) Need for fire department expansion (*) Ground storage reservoir is planned (*) North trunk sewer line improvement is planned (*) I&I issues in waste collections (-) Sewer and Stormwater drainage in old areas need to be addressed (-) Flooding issues at sewer plant cuts off access to plant (-) What to do with sewer plant? It will be at capacity in 20 years (-)

Housing

Good growth rate (+) Well maintained (+) Two rounds of CDBG owner occupied housing rehab grants (+) Need to look at design standards for multifamily (*) Duchess drive in Apple Valley subdivision is an example of private street setback issues (-)

Community Services

Recreation program (+) Library (+) Indoor recreation center/community center desire (*) Pool/splash pad desire (*) Fire department expansion opportunity (*) Opportunity for recycling on commercial level (*) Law enforcement opportunity for in-house or full-time position, currently Johnson Co. provides community law enforcement on a part time basis (*) Garbage tags for garbage collection is an inconvenience (-)

Downtown Solon

Nice look and feel (+) No vacancies is a positive and negative (+) Mushroom Park could be an opportunity for parking (*) Automotive business on Main Street could be moved to allow for more conducive use for downtown (*) Parking (-) Limited growth area (-) Limited space in the downtown area (-) B-4


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

Growth Management

Growth has been positive to this point (+) Need a vision for housing (*) Future multifamily developments needs to be discussed more (*) Need for more commercial retail space, where can the commercial branch out? (*) Bedroom community is a focus for future growth (*) Multifamily can take away from bedroom feel (-) Property tax could be less for residential but there is two sides of the coin (-)

Economic Development

Attraction of brewery was a recent economic development success (+) Tax abatement program, 3 year 100% tax abatement (+) Need to embrace economic development (*) Start a chamber or look to become a Main Street Iowa (*) Wedding venues is a real opportunity for future economic growth (*) There is a need for turnkey commercial opportunities (*) Opportunity to attract private development for commercial, residential has been good need to look to commercial (*) Limited space/opportunities for new/future businesses (-)

Quality of Life

Many local amenities and other successes to build on (+) Lake Macbride, golf courses, restaurants (+) Need for more opportunities for youth and young families (*) Continue to require green spaces in new developments (*) Crossing Highway 1 is a pedestrian barrier (-) Public Meeting #1 May 11, 2015

Infrastructure

Local programs to educate about soil conservation and other environmental issues (+) Main Street lighting (+) Curb & gutter program (+) New Siren (+) Traffic signal coming to intersection at Highway 1 & Main (+) Well trained staff running City utilities (+) Good water treatment/wells (+) Wastewater treatment facility has capacity (+) Downtown streetscape (+) Building code/inspection process (+) New siren (+) Community support from local organizations (+) Plan for North Trunk Sewer Improvement (+) Public Meeting Input | B-5


Sidewalks at in good condition in most areas (+) Schools are good facilities (+) Good care facility (+) Fire department (+) North Trunk Sewer improvement project is planned (+) Shore erosion control (+) Good school facilities (+) North Trunk Sewer Project coming (*) Opportunity for small businesses, retail, small clean manufacturing (*) Improvement of sidewalks in existing older neighborhoods is needed (*) Need for required off-street parking for future businesses (*) Need for a fire station expansion (*) North trunk sewer project is in the works (*) Water storage project is in the works (*) Faรงade grant CDBG application is desired (*) Faรงade grant CDBG application is desired (*) Shore up erosion control at construction sites, soil has runoff from the middle school construction site and traveled to Lake Macbride (-) Old part of town needs improved sidewalks (-) Streets are not paved and hard to walk on the edge of the road (-) Pedestrian crossing at Highway 1 is a barrier (-) Need connected sidewalk network in south end of town along Highway 1 (-) Lack of parking in the downtown (-) Parts of town with open Stormwater system has flooding/drainage issues (-) Sewer mains in older portion of town north trunk (-) No Curb & Gutter in older portion of town (-) Sidewalk issues (-) Water has 30% loss in water storage (-) Highway 1 traffic (-) Chip seal streets (-) Downtown parking not sufficient (-) Sidewalks (-) Curb and gutter (-) Access to WWTF (-) Downtown landscaping (-) Downtown parking (-) Water capacity (-) WWTF capacity (-) Aging collection/distribution and I&I in collection Water loss (-) Streets and street lighting (-) Siren not herd well enough on community edge (-)

B-6


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

Housing

High interest of developers (+) Zoning plan in place has worked well (+) Quality housing (+) Quality of housing (+) No conflicts with other cities (+) Opportunity for new/better design standard for housing (*) Multiple subdivisions with available lots (*) Extraterritorial land available for annexation (*) Higher cost of housing (-) No affordable housing (-) Higher property taxes than in other surrounding areas (-) Affordability (-) Design Standards and parking requirements for multi-family are not sufficient (-) Cost of housing (-) Lack of affordable housing and starter homes (-)

Quality of Life

Good schools in the community (+) Good school system (+) Recreation Park (+) Lake Macbride (+) Coralville Reservoir (+) Low crime rate (+) Good library (+) Nice trails (+) Good business district (+) Two golf courses in area (+) Community service organization is very involved in the community ie. schools, religious organizations etc. (+) Good fire department (+) Great library (+) Good care facilities for elderly (+) Good trails (+) Nice small town feel (+) Growing community (+) Community support from local organizations (+) Good fire department (+) Library (+) Care center (+) Recreation amenities (+) Staff is well trained and competent (+) Easy access to Lake Macbride (+) Need for better tail connectivity through the community and across Highway 1 (*) Opportunity for Recreation Center/Community Center (*) Public Meeting Input | B-7


Need for more playgrounds and a splash pad (*) Need a recreation center (*) Need/want for a splash pad (*) No bowling alley (-) No aquatic center/pool (-) Connection of trails through town and across Highway 1 (-) Highway 1 splits the community in half (-)

Economic Development

Solon Economic Development Group (+) News Paper (+) TIF District (+) Local Option Sales Tax (+) Highway 1 traffic is good for businesses (+) There is an opportunity for more variety of businesses (*) An opportunity for lodging (*) Opportunity for a hotel (*) Opportunity for a sporting goods store (*) Desire a hotel (*) A lack of workforce rental/affordable housing (-) Lack of a four lane road into the community (-) Lack of parking in downtown (-) Lack of office space (-) Lack of small retail space (-) Downtown parking (-) Not enough employment for teens (-) Not enough office space/retail space (-)

B-8


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

Public Meeting Input | B-9


B.2 Community Survey Results

A community survey was available in hardcopy at City Hall and digitally using SurveyMonkey. Approximately 4% (90) of citizens responded to the survey.

Age of Responder 55-64 10%

65 + 2%

18-24 2%

25-34 23%

45-54 22%

35-44 41%

How long have you lived in Solon?

3% 18% 36% 20%

Less than one year 1-5 years 6-10 years

23%

B-10

11-25 years More than 25 years


Amenities (such as recreation and entertainment) Other (please specify)

6.9%

65 years and older

3.4%

Supportive Business Environment

Quality of Schools

5.7%

50-64 years old

30-49 years old

The Cost of Living

Affordable Housing Options

14.9%

18-29 years old

Great Location

43.7%

13-17 years old

I Like the Community

Family & Friends

Employment Opportunities

11.5%

6-12 years old

5 years and younger

Not Applicable - I was raised in Solon

City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

If you were not raised in Solon, why did you move here? (choose all answers that apply)

52.9%

46.0%

24.1% 12.6% 9.2%

How many people in each of the following age groups live in your household? (Enter the number of persons in each applicable category.)

Community Survey Results | B-11


What occupations are household members employed in? (Select all that apply.) 54.5%

26.1%

20.5% 21.6% 4.5%

9.1%

5.7%

14.8%

3.4%

8.0%

0.0%

Where are your places of employment? (Enter number of persons in each applicable category.) 76.7%

40.7% 31.4%

7.0% Within the City of Solon

B-12

Elsewhere in Johnson County

In another county

In another state


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

What type of dwelling do you live in?

5.6%

2.2% 4.4%

87.8%

Single Family Home

Condo/Townhome

Apartment

Manufactured Home/Mobile Home

Farm/Ranch

Other (please specify)

Do you rent or own your dwelling?

4.5%

95.5%

Overall, how would you rate the quality of life in Solon? 2.3%

Rent

Own

0.0% 47.7%

50.0%

Excellent

Good

Fair

Poor

Community Survey Results | B-13


What are the three (3) most important reasons you and your family choose to live in the City of Solon? 74.4%

69.8%

41.9% 32.6%

31.4% 11.6% 1.2%

2.3%

9.3%

0.0%

In your opinion, has the quality of life in Solon in the last 1-5 years improved, stayed the same, or worsened? 4.7%

51.2%

44.2%

Improved

B-14

Stayed the Same

Worsened

17.4%

2.3%


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

In the next ten years, what types of recreational facilities would you like Solon to invest in (i.e. basketball courts, dog park, Frisbee golf course, etc.)? •pool, dog park •Indoor/outdoor swimming facility as part of school district/community joint venture •walking and biking trails, indoor athletic facility multipurpose •pool •Indoor sports facility for baseball/ softball •A rec center with a pool and hot tub (we need indoor options in winter and bad weather) •Community Center and Pool •Swimming pool would be great! •recreation center similar to North Liberty; indoor/outdoor pool, indoor walking track, basketball, possibly even time for small kids every morning to play and socialize. •Swimming pool indoor and outdoor, recreation center with gym equipment and basketball courts •Parks, Senior and Youth Activities Center, Public Swimming, Frisbee Golf •splash pad, skate park, more neighborhood parks pool •More parks, especially on the east side of town pool •Community use baseball fields, community use basketball indoor courts, community available rec center •Indoor Pool •Rec center, swimming pool •Areas for organized sports •dog park •Pool •Splash Pad! •pool, dogpark, •Dog park, more bike/walking paths •Recreation center, more neighborhood parks, splash pad •Rec center / swimming pool •YMCA •swim pool, rec center •Swimming pool •Community center. •Dog park •swimming pool •Parks to study in •Recreation center •enclosed rec center •indoor recreation facility for cold months

•anything related to the kids future skills •Recreation Center •Recreation Center •Basketball courts and running trails •urban development •Dog park, swimming pool/recreation center, more developed park east of hwy 1 •dog park •Frisbee golf course •baseball fields for youth and a communiity center •Recreation building similar to North Liberty •Recreational center/pool •more parking for businesses to succeed •swimming pool •Children playgrounds/parks, dog park •Pool •Drag strip •Recreation indoor center like North Liberty’s with a poo •Swimming pool, tennis courts •Splash pad, parks & rec areas •More ball parks, parks, rec center and pool with classes •Bike trail to Ely and bike trail to West Branch •Rec center •Take better care of native outdoor spaces, community center, splash pads •race track •Splash pad •More parks •swimming pool. •Recreational center •Public swimming pool •Frisbee Golf •Pool, basketball courts, community center •Recreation Center for the entire community to enjoy. (Not a profit based tournament building that would only benefit the pockets of the owner) •recreation center •outdoor entertainment, amphitheater •A playground in town (closer to main street). •rec center •Community Center •Fitness •Dog park, Community and recreation center Community Survey Results | B-15


Developers should be required to provide neighborhood park or other recreational facilities as part of subdivision approval. 74.1%

27.1%

Agree

Disagree

What are Solon’s strengths regarding transportation infrastructure? •What is there appears to be well-maintained. Newer changes are aesthetically pleasing (recent main street renovations) •bike trails, transportation options •It’s close to bigger cities. •parking on 1 side of the street, must move your vehicle •daily, good snow removal •Main Highway through town bringing people and traffic. •Good roads and easy acess to CR and IC •Solon has nice roads, otherwise I do not think Solon has much for transportation •Not sure yet •main arterials in good shape •Off street parking at the new city building has helped •Main Street up keep is imperative, wide streets •None - its very poor. (The main street improvements have been wonderful. This has really improved the look of main street) •Roads are well maintained (no pot holes) •school bus transportation; sidewalks; trails •Sidewalks Curb and gutter •location on Hwy 1 is nice for getting people to “see” town •Road network allows you to get through town quickly. •Bus in town for kids •Good streets •what transportation infrastrucure B-16

•close to larger towns •the roads are pretty normal/decent overall •Great winter snow removal •not too busy •Curb and gutter program. •Easy to get around by car, bike, or on foot. •easy access to hw 1 •Nice sidewalks, good at clearing roads of snow •Good sidewalks •Fine •Streets are well taken care of •Pretty walkable town •not having them •None highway 1 is a mess •Closeness of business district, able to walk. •roads/streets are in decent shape •winter snow removal, street quality •reasonable speed limits •It’s great that the school runs the buses in town. •timely snow removal, minimal potholes or otherwise •rough roads •Streets are kept clear, clean, and safe •Roads are in good shape •Easy access to major metro areas •New bike trail coming to Solon •adding curb and gutter


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

What are Solon’s weaknesses regarding transportation infrastructure? •No public transit to IC or CR; Post Office is no longer walkable •street parking seems unsafe (e.g., street parking spots too close to intersections reduce line of sight to cross traffic until one is half through the intersection); main street and Hwy 1 intersection is hazardous, particularly as main street business customers who park in the main street lot cross mid-street and not at the intersection; lack of safe pedestrian crossing options on Hwy 1 on the south end of town (e.g., to the Dairy Queen). •Highway 1 traffic flow during rush hour: City needs to require multiple ways to enter developments •New street is so narrow on turns •It’s a very busy drive through town. It needs stoplights on the highway. •We desperately need a traffic light at E 5th St and Hwy 1 •Main Highway through town bringing people and traffic. •Solon has no bike trails, highways are very dangerous •No stop light at the corner of E 5th and Hwy 1. •Congestion on Highway 1 and on Main Street with through traffic. Pedestrian and vehicular traffic is difficult across Highway 1. Most joggers and walkers take to the streets due to sidewalk conditions in the older neighborhoods. Congestion of vehicular traffic is an issue at the south end of town on Highway 1. •high traffic vol. at peak hours are a challenge on Hwy 1 new main street parking has made for more possibly dangerous situations due to lack of visibility •Diagonal parking downtown makes it feel tighter driving through there •need to have HWY1 slower •We have one major road we don’t control (Hwy 1) and then a plethora of side streets. We need more intentional flow to traffic. •Road design--hard to cross hwy 1 •More availability for seniors •Lack of safe accessibilty to different parts of town and developments •being on Hwy 1 creates a few hazardous intersections (Hwy 1 & 5th St) •we need more sidewalks in town for kids walking to •school and runners to keep them off the roads •HWY 1 safety and access, especially during rush hours •No bus to other towns / Cedar Rapids •Stop signs on market st •sidewalks •main street way to narrow

•some low grade roads that shed a lot of gravel, large sections of sidewalks missing on along hwy 1 on the south side of town •need stoplight on Main and Highway 1. Also Main Street driving is VERY dangerous! Very poorly done especially in winter when snow is piled high and can’t see oncoming traffic. •5th St and hwy 1 intersection is terrible •We desperately need a stop light on Hwy 1 and E 5th St •allowing the display and sale of random items along hwy 1 and main thoroughfares. looks trashy and sets a bad impression. backwards small town image to welcome passers by. •lack of stop lights •Reconfiguration of Main Street. It’s horrible. Corner of Main St. and Hwy 1. There needs to be a traffic light. •No stop light on Hwy 1. •Narrowing of main street •Main street is harder to navigate than before the changes Traffic along Hwy 1, hard to turn left onto Hwy 1 during morning and afternoon rushes •trail to Lake could be paved •Sidewalks throughout town; busy intersections •not enough sidewalks •Need more stop signs in neighborhoods with multiple blocks or intersections •Highway 1 and main at intersection •No express bus to Iowa City, need for traffic light at Main and Market •bike trails •Highway 1 is too busy for 2 lanes. •Minimal street lights •lack of bike lanes, no stop light at Main Street and highway 1, congestion around the schools during rush hour •However, the city could support one taxi driver for the seniors of the community We also need to get the stoplights up at Hwy 1/ Main and Hwy1/5th Street. We also need to slow the speed limit down on Hwy 1 coming through town.. •lack of parking, narrow roads along west main, poor stormwater management •Need a plan to deal with increasing traffic on hwy 1, especially at intersection with 5th st. •Hwy 1 accessibility during peak times •Lack of sidewalks in some areas •Need traffic lights at a couple intersections •lack of budget, grants Community Survey Results | B-17


How would you rank the quality of each of the following regarding Solon's transportation infrastructure? Infrastructure maintenance Transportation options Pedestrian options Bike Trails Sidewalks Streets

B-18


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

What are Solon’s weaknesses regarding transportation infrastructure? •More bike/walk/public transit options •stop light at hwy 1 & 180th •More pedestrian options that connect business areas; •safety improvements (see item 15); stop light installed at Hwy 1 and Main street intersection •wider streets •More connecting roads from new developments to the highway and stoplights •Traffic light at East 5th and Hwy 1, especially given the new middle school location, this will increase east/west traffic, we mush control the North/South traffic, it has become quite dangerous •Mass transit to big towns •Would love bike trails! •Based on what I experienced the other day, possibly a portable stop sign at 5th and Market during the time school gets out or 4 way stop there all of the time. •more sidewalks •Bypass Highway 1 around town. Properly designed curb and gutter, stormwater improvements with concrete paved streets and sidewalks. •More sidewalks, trails, curb and gutter and stop lights •COntinued improvement on curb and sidewalk infrastructure •shuttle to IC and CR •There is not a good option for a “business route” for deliveries on main street - possible looking at the street north of main as a parking/delivery option for business. Connection and more sidewalk as on highway 1 ridership to Iowa City & Cedar Rapids •Trails inside town connecting to exterior trails •Hwy 1/5th street considerations of a stoplight. •Responsive traffic lights for HWY 1/5th St and HWY 1/ Main St •Hyw 1 crossing on south side •Crosswalk/ traffic light by Bridge Bank/Stop signs on market st •Road resurface •Sidewalk repairs made. Additional sidewalks added. •A bus route to and from Iowa City/Cedar Rapids •more bike/walking trails that are coherent and connected across town •bike trail paved, stoplight hwy 1, get rid of the bump outs •probably a few full stop lights will be needed on highway one. also regularly see people blow through red light at cross walk by caseys

•repave 5th st •More stop lights or reduce the speed on Highway 1 more strict rental maintenance •Stop light at main at and hwy 1; stop light at intersection of hwy 1 and mehaffey bridge (Median dental) •stop lights •Widening Hwy 1. Continue with curb project until all streets have curb and gutter. •A stop light on Hwy 1 •curb and gutter. drainage •updating streets in old parts of town •Extend the ‘suicide lane’ all the way through town. •Traffic lights along Hwy 1 to better control the flow of traffic. •paved trail •Lake Macbride trail paved instead of gravel •Sidewalks even in older neighborhoods •More side walks •Sidewalk extension on highway 1 o n the south end and better drainage during rain storms •Bike paths and better sidewalks and crossings for school kids •better roads •Paved bike trail connecting to Ely •make highway 1 4 lanes •More street lights, later speed increases on hwy 1 •storm drains on North end. stop light at main & hwy 1. •No more diagonal street parking •fix streets that need it •Sidewalks need to be on every block so kids and adults have a safe place to walk to school. This is especially true with all the schools being on the west side of town. If the kids on the east side of town or near the highway want to walk they have to go through the west side (the old side) of town. There are plenty of places where sidewalks are nonexistent. •Bike trail from Solon to Ely •stormwater conveyance & infiltration •Better walkability throughout the town, better management of traffic on hwy 1. •Hwy 1 accessibility •Bike trails •Continue with bike trails to West Liberty •invest in older parts of town

Community Survey Results | B-19


What are Solon’s strengths regarding its housing stock? • Has a bit of everything, good new housing areas • There’s a lot to choose from • Much better than 2 years ago! There was nothing that met our criteria so we had to build in order to move to Solon • New, quality homes being built all the time. • Great housing • Solon has a lot of single family home neighborhoods • Great • We are developing carefully and not throwing up a bunch of cookie cutter homes. • Single family dwellings • nice size lots, well maintained neighborhoods • diverse • demand is present • It is good • Many high-quality subdivisions are going in with premium quality houses. • Housing value • High quality homes • Minimal low income housing • Plenty of housing • Strong sellers market • good homes • adequate • there are lots of nice houses • booming • excellent and stable

B-20

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Growth in building;varied types of housing Lots of developments new single family development plentiful More homes are now available in Solon. Quality homes Cheap Nice, upkept homes A wide range of options New houses Good Seems to have a good selection Nice newer developments Quality, well kept properties Nice homes high value Holding well Great mix of different housing. Plenty of homes for people interested in our community Good ranges of size, age & price Range of price points, and nice, old homes. Everything isn’t cookie cutter/identical. Newer or well kept homes Quality Some nice high quality homes. at a premium now


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

What are Solon’s weaknesses regarding its housing stock? • building too fast. taking up so much of the beautiful country sids when we could update houses in town. • Not enough single family units in the $200K-$300K range. Increased population density in area behind Dairy Queen will likely lead to squeezing single family units to the lower and upper end of the price scale. • City should limit the number of apartments and push single family housing. • not enough affordable housing for new home buyers • Expensive, high property taxes • Many of the houses being built without buyers seem high in price • Apartment Buildings going up. Yuck! • Do not start affordable housing in town • there are multiple, multi family structures currently being built. • Not enough smaller homes for retirees. All of the new houses are 4-5 bedroom with basement fixed up. Not all empty nesters require or want that kind of room, but still don’t want to live in a condo or duplex either. • Lacking inventory in the $190,000 to $275,000 range • Cost of single family dwellings. Need for lower cost housing that is not multifamily configuration. • cost of single family homes/parking issues with multifamily areas • Need smaller lots for sf homes higher density • Too many multi family • We are focused on building too much transient housing. I don’t think it fits the nature of the town. There is no reason for that kind of housing in a town with the demographics like Solon. • Over priced and not a lot of options for the $250k rang. • getting more expensive; taxes increase to live here compared to other small towns further away from corridor • Crappy planning on the south side of town regarding multi units • City needs to expand limits • more single family homes • $ • Only new homes over 300k available • Solon’s new suburban houses are SO UGLY! • too expensive • too many multiple housing complexes • it is becoming a town that nearly excludes low to moderate income people, the new housing being built is pricing lots of good people out of town • We need factories to help reduce the tax burden

• don’t allow too much building, small town is solons biggest draw. • Lack of variations in housing prices • Lack of single family homes under 200,000.00 • High taxes • too many low end housing units, multiple family buildings. don’t be another north liberty the town will look like shit in ten years. case in point Apple Valley. • expensive • Allowing developers to cut corners and change zoning ordinances. • Need more homes, but not multi dwelling comlexes. • Cheap • too many condos going up. this will attract lower income families that may not contribute to community • Currently being bought up by rental companies. • need rental clauses where the resident can be kicked out if the cops are called multiple times • affordability • too many condos • $’s for new and not a lot of older homes available • It is getting pricey. One of the reasons we moved here is that we knew we could get a good house for a growing family cheaper than IC, that is not as easy as it once was. • no affordable houses • high value • homes sell very quickly • prices • Not enough of it • expensive. Also, I think people in the community would like to be a part of the decision making when it comes to housing. Many of our own citizens aren’t impressed with so many rentable or townhouse options that are going up. I don’t think it’s appropriate to sit back and let developers/realtors make decisions without regard to the people who already call this town home • Concerned about development moving away from town center. All the new building is happening away from town - what will happen to our downtown community and house values? • housing is expensive for middle income families • Keeping quality up • Too many zero lot lines structures that are built cheap. • lack of diversity Community Survey Results | B-21


How would you rank the quality of each of the following? Proximity to needed goods and services

Affordability

Housing options

Housing stock quality

B-22


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

What types of housing options do you believe Solon needs more of in the future? • single family units in $200-$300 range, NOT higher density units • Stay away from the low income housing • Nothing • hard to say, not sure what the appetite is for single family vs. multi family vs. rentals • Single Family Units - High End Housing - NO APARTMENT BUILDINGS • Focus on Retirement folks and single family homes • Single family homes • Smaller, one story homes close to downtown, if possible. • Moderate price range but not cheap quality • Quality homes of a more simple design. • starter type single family/high end single family • attached homes, 55+ active adult options, Live work • Upper entry level, single family homes • Affordable single framily housing • not sure • No more stacked housing to make developers more money • I believe the market will dictate what kind of housing is needed. • Single Family • Single family homes • single family. • lower price family homes • Less crappy section 8 apts • Single family homes • Rental • More homes built in the 200 to 250k range. • Less suburban houses that look all the same. Seriously, most of the new developments are poop-brown houses that are identical to each other. I’m surprised anyone would live, or even buy something like that! • reasonable priced single family homes • mid to upper level single family homes • low to moderate income needs

• Single family • we need a fareway, I don’t shop Sam’s because most things are expired. • Single family homes • More affordable housing • Single family • higher end multi family buildings not along the main thoroughfare • none • Continue with single family housing. • $200,000 or higher homes • single family homes • Castles • new developments with houses rather than condos • Single Family Homes • Single-family homes • Affordable family homes • Moderate single family • Senior independent rental housing • ? • Smaller single family homes in new development areas for $159,000+ • Houses under 225K • Homes 200-280k • affordable • Not as many zero lots or row homes • single family homes • 1-21-2 bedroom homes for less than 150k • Single family • keep it similar to previous 5 year efforts • INVEST IN TOWN. We have so much new construction happening. What about preserving our historic homes and character in downtown? • Quality single family • Continue with the housing developments like Windmill Estates. • good blend of all type

Community Survey Results | B-23


What are Solon’s strengths regarding its economic development/business environment? • A lot of people drive through town everyday. Good, diverse restraints bring people here. • given that Solon is so close to IC and CR and is pass through for many, the community businesses get lot;s of traffic • We need more small business here. • It is starting to come around and business are starting to come. • The new restaurants including the brewery and the New Mexican restaurant are great! Bring more bars/ restaurants downtown will be great as well • Variety of restaurants and a nice grocery store. • developing a great destintation reputation • None. • The school attracts • new business growth • we have a nice variety of businesses in town to stay busy and well-fed! • Restaurants are great for the area • ? • Location. Revitalization efforts downtown. • Good place to live • New businesses coming in on mainstreet • Restaurants • The Big Grove Brewery has helped with fine-dining experence, especially since Red Head closed years ago. Strengthening our mainstreet appeal with places to shop and eat will keep money in Solon. • it’s making an effort to encourage local businesses • Do we really promote businesses to come to Solon? We need more than restaurants and gas stations. • big grove • Business district seems good

B-24

• New business are starting and being supported by the community • Great restaurants • small • Growing community hopfully will bring more businesses. • Not a lot • location, diversity • Good access via Hwy 1 • Proximity to CR/IC • big Grove brewery • New downtown area makes businesses more accessible and beautifies the town • Little to none • Main Street is beginning to boom. Thanks Big Grove! • We seemed to have developed a niche for quality restaurants. • Businesses doing their best to keep as much as they can local. • mainstreet • good variety • Looking better. I’m glad we are driving the downtown and not more strip mall type structures. • New, local businesses like Big Grove and Salt Fork have been great for us. We’re drawing more people in from out of town. • City of Solon’s Committment • Growing community • A lot of eating establishments. • location


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

What are Solon’s weaknesses regarding its economic development/business environment? • Lack of non-restaurant retail business development in the main street/downtown area. The main street area is nicely walkable, but there are limited business needs to walk to downtown. • I have heard it’s too expensive for a small business to lease property here in Solon. • We need good managable assistance for business to come in. Good incentives • Need more shopping available other than a hardware store. • Non existent/ dormant city economic committee • need more space to grow downtown area • lacking affordable options for businesses to be in • We have no big business to help offset the amount of residential. • Upscale restaurant • Need aguire business that employs 30 plus people • less incentives for established businesses • there seem to be a few locations that can’t seem to retain businesses for one reason or another. This is unfortunate. • Not many retail options in town. I usually have to go to IC, CV, or CR to shop. • Need more commercial lots on south side • No chamber of commerce • Limited downtown area • not a lot of location options available for new businesses • We are becoming TOO much like North Liberty, merely a suburban town for Iowa City. More commercial businesses and shops to become more then a town where people go to sleep at. • most everyone lives here to work elsewhere since there are very limited work options (outside of the schools and city positions) • They mayor trying to dissuade business expansion without going through the council. • didn’t need a new million dollar city office complex; giving too many tax breaks to businesses • We need to get large businesses to come to Solon for more jobs and to help with taxes.

• we need a fareway, I don’t shop Sam’s because most things are expired. • Need more business that will draw people in from more than Solon • not enough fast food • new construction business leases are too high and detracts businesses aware of the risk in small town sales and service. • needs more • Need to work harder on bringing industry and jobs to the community. • Not a lot • costs, retention, advertisements • Limited space to expand • parking • Main St. parking • Could use more sit down restaurant • No indoor recreation center • lack of affordable spaces and lack of diversity for types of businesses • need more business down town • Rental spaces appear to be too high • No good paying local jobs, just retail jobs • lack of retail and a coffee shop • N/A • parking • not enough stores • parking • Parking for this development • Main St remains vacant. Why? Why don’t people know about Solon the way that they know about Mt Vernon and North Liberty? • There is no Economic development. Solon needs someone to actively market. We need ready to move into buildings. Parking. • Bedroom community • lack of viable retail options

Community Survey Results | B-25


How would you rank the quality of each of the following regarding Solon's economic development/business environment? Restaurant options Retail options Community marketing Retention of existing businesses Support for business development Having enough family-supporting jobs for workers Having enough workers to fill jobs Workforce with needed skills to fill jobs

B-26


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

What types of retail options do you believe are needed in Solon (i.e. restaurants, weekly farmer’s market, specific retail types, etc.)?

• farmer’s market • farmers market. clothing • better/bigger farmer’s and craft market; boutique retail like Mt. Vernon, outdoor recreational-focused retail to take advantage of nearby recreational opportunities, a good bakery/desert place • More fast food type options, farmers market, • Less expensive home improvement store, nursery, auto parts store, fast food like McDonalds or Hardees • Farmer’s Market - Pharmacy • New grocery store, affordable family dinning • Larger farmers market, shops, bars, restaurants • In order to stay in Solon to do everything, there needs to be a clothing store of some sort. I haven’t tried any of the restaurants but there seems to be a nice variety there. A farmer’s market would be nice as well. Possibly even a consignment/antique store. • farmer’s market, Target • We’re a bedroom community so it would be tough to bring retail to this town. • new or improved grocery store • Copy Works- main street office space- smaller retail space of 1,000 sf • a sandwhich/ burger place • Retail, mid level restaurants, corporate offices • A farmer’s market would be great if it had support. • Farmers market in better location • Farmer’s Market (expanded), coffee shop • Fairway, Kwik star and dollar general • Dollar General / grocery store w/out spoiled food • dollar general • Strengthening our main street and downtown with more food options, a cafe, a clothing shop, craft store, etc. Think mini-mall! Better yet, a ped mall for people to study and enjoy the weather. • we’re pretty saturated with restaurants, I have lots of ideas, but the community couldn’t support them. I’d love to see a real bakery, I don’t think we could sustain a real farmers market • A good coffee shop (not Savvy) • laundry mat • More aggressive Farmers Market would be nice. • we need a fareway, I don’t shop Sam’s because most things are expired. • More restaurants, farmers market, local dance studio/ gymnastics/yoga • Fast food, farmers market

• nice farmers market would be nice. bringing home the farm to table ideals • none • I would like to see a store like Dollar General or similar business come to town. Would also like to get the U of I Credit Union back in town. • None. It’s a bedroom community. If I wanted Walmart close I’d of moved to North Liberty or Coralville. • farmers market, clothing • Pool, coffee shop, recreation supplies shop • I would love to work in Solon - but I don’t think that will eve really be a possibility given how limited the options are. Sam’s is also very problematic. If Solon could support a Fareway it would be a huge benefit to the city. • pizza restaurant, ice cream shop, coffee shop • Flea markets and a boutique • Cafe/bar & grill, dollar store or equivelant • Farmers market, boutique shopping • Shops specialty shops to draw people in grow other towns • All of the above. Less bars • Don’t think Solon could/would support retail other than food and beverage places. Organized Farmers Market would be awesome • Something besides another pizza joint • Farmers market. • a good burger joint • clothing stores • farmers market or flea market • Farmers market, retail, restaurant • What we have is great. The upcoming options are great. We live in a small town and dont want all the hubbub of Coralville or Iowa City. That’s why we don’t live there. We are happy with a couple places to eat, a supported grocery store, a pharmacy and gas station. • We need a coffee shop. Should have an ice cream stand or something in town in the summer. Solon has so many young families, surely more businesses catering to children would be wise. • Farmers Market, Updated Hardware store, And I hate to say it but we need something like a WALMART • Hotel • Coffee shop • Don’t know what would survive given income leakage Community Survey Results | B-27


What are Solon’s strengths regarding its community services? • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

elder services, youth Nice new city building, ample fire protection Never had an issue with ANY service. Very pleased. Good services, Look to expand them in future Has a great library, and EMS service, there is also a lot of sherif presence in the community Don’t know The library programs Fire Department - City Public Works- Library - Rec programs Scott Kleppe Fire Department The churches youth activities; fire dept; food pantry; Legion Fire police fire department Great protective services. School system Great Fire Department this is one of the stronger areas of town all good Good garbage pickup, appreciate all the garbage cans up town. Hope they are being used. Fire department is outstanding, good school, active library services

B-28

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Fire and ambulance, Park and Rec Good workers available General feeling of safety living in Solon Very nice facilities Parks & rec services Music in the park Good deputy presence and good up-keep of grounds and streets We love the library! fire department churches fire dept Park and Rec does a nice job providing programming for all ages. The first responder program is amazing as well. Recreation services is great, the nature areas are awesome. I love the library. Lakeview is a fantastic school (can’t speak to jr/sr high). Recreational, Churches, Senior program Efficient Police and Fire Great when they’re not sniping at each other


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

What are Solon’s weaknesses regarding its community services? • Water/Sewer is very expensive • Garbage and Sewer are pricey, but the services are still excellent. • Infrastructure updates need to be done • Snow removal was not great this past winter • Don’t know • Lack of quality recreation programs and indoor recreation space. The library provides excellent services and programs but it’s not big enough. • regular law enforcement • none • Indoor recreation • Very limited • not sure • fire police • no police department • Garbage collection/recycling issues: offer residents a monthly pickup fee for garbage bins instead of stickers; public library’s limited hours and noise inside. • Storm water • missing a chamber of commerce • You need to go elsewhere for healthcare, I’d like to see the University open up a clinic in town • Unaware of its community services • school system makes taxes way too high • we need a community recreation center for everyone. • more community recreation programs, could have locally based ambulance service, lack of community recreation center/swimming pool

• Plan for improvement and replacement of old water and sewer lines. Enlarge the water mains in residential to 6” minimum, 8” in commercial and multihousing districts, and 12” artirial mains. • none • Would be nice to have a university of Iowa clinic • year round fun • Water and sewer rates are very high • No clothing stores • lack of police presence & law enforcement • Not being thankful for what we have. The expansion of the fire station needs to be haulted in its tracks. Unless you are going to get an ambulance up here, be thankful for what we have. Regarding the rec services, one thing that needs to change is the money flow from Park and Rec. The money that we are paying for our kids to participate in the P&R programs should be invested back into those programs for future improvements. It should NOT be in the city general fund. This is an outdated idea that needs to be remedied and I give my support to Mike Reeve and the Park and Rec Board concerning this. • Options for people who aren’t athletes. Grow the library. Welcome newcomers more warmly. More to preserve/develop green practices and green spaces. • Need a hotel with swimming pool. • Limited municipal budgeting/planning

How would you rank the quality of the following regarding Solon's community services? Healthcare Services Street and Road Maintenance Storm Water Management Snow Removal Sanitary Sewer Service Recycling Program Public School System Public Library Law Enforcement Protection Park and Recreational Facilities Municipal Water System Garbage Collection Fire Protection Ambulance/Quick Response Service

Community Survey Results | B-29


How would you direct the City of Solon civic leaders and planners with regard to land use policies and regulations? 10.0% 20.0%

70.0%

Be less restrictive

Current policies are okay

Be more restrictive

Current land use regulations have done an effective job in minimizing land use conflicts in the City of Solon. 10.9% 1.6%

1.6%

85.9%

Strongly agree

B-30

Agree

Disagree

Strongly disagree


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

From the following list, what type of development would you support and want Solon to focus upon? (Select all that apply) 51.4%

44.6% 35.1%

31.1% 4.1%

Be a full service Focus on becoming a Be a suburban Focus some effort Focus on becoming a community where business based "bedroom" on expanding destination all work, shopping, community. community for the business community with a service, housing, and regional area that is opportunities along unique niche. healthcare needs primarily a major transportation can be met. residential routes. community with few industries and limited commercial services.

From the following list, what types of new housing and neighborhoods should be developed within the city of Solon? (Select all that apply) 77.6%

77.6% 67.1%

48.7%

44.7%

39.5%

With parks within walking distance of residents

With recreational trails and open space

With sidewalks

A mix of residential and small businesses

A mix of single-family and multifamily residential

Only single-family residential

19.7% A mix of lot sizes

19.7%

Large lots (over 15,000 sq. ft.)

Small lots (under 10,000 sq. ft.)

13.2%

Medium lots (10,00015,000 sq. ft.)

30.3%

Community Survey Results | B-31


Related to comprehensive planning and the built environment please list some areas in Solon that you enjoy. • Library, bandstand • parks, library • schools and rec park are tremendous assets, main street looks nice • Wetland trails by Wood Lily Rd, SRNA • Windflower Park Area • I enjoy the community and it is growing well, we have great parks and rec great emergency services and city services • The baseball park with running/walking trail is great. Having the dome lodge for community use is nice as well • I enjoy Lake MacBride, • green space, trails • Library, SRNA and the walking trail on the SE side • SRNA Main Street Randall Park • Main Street, Schools, Trails, Sports facilities • Lake McBride, Solon Rec • Trail and srna • Rec & Nature area; trails; Veteran’s Memorial; ampitheater park downtown • The SNRA is great, downtown has great food options. • Nture area • Randall park, Eastwoods, public library, sam’s, big grove, Fox ridge walking trail • Nice easy-going community • Recreation area • Restaurants/ recreational area • Snra • Trail to mcbride • The walking trails out by the baseball diamonds. The location of the parks in walking distance. • Lake MacBride, Tennis Courts/Rec area • trail around recreation fields • parks and recreation facilities • Solon public library, Randall Park play ground, Nature Center • Nature trail/rec area, Randall Park, library • Recreation area • Park and Rec • parks • Recreation area • Downtown is nice. I live in midtown and enjoy B-32

walking /biking the streets. • The walking trails between Windflower Ln and Wood Lily Rd, Solon Recreation Area trails • restaurants rec areas • big Grove brewery, the trail • love the Recreational Complex • Trails • SRNA • Park and Rec. the library. • The walking trails • McBride Trail, local dining • church and schools • rec area • Library, SRNA, trails, Fox Run trail, crosswalk, • The recreation area is wonderful, and the lake. The bandstand/gazebo are cute, and the redesign of main street looks great. • rec area • Recreation area • Trails, restaurants and schools. • Library, SRNA, Fox Ridge prairie • False-front buildings • the locations of schools and businesses are convenient, the neighborhoods are nicely connected for walk/run/biking • Main Street is looking great • SRNA new housing developments Main Street • nature rec area • Rec & Nature Center area; Vet’s Memorial; downtown park • Short distance to downtown and businesses • Downtown • Plum Street • Horseshoe pits/park • parks and recreation facilities • library, grocery store, hardware store • nature/Rec trail • Trails and parks • most of it • The trail • park and rec • The park • Trail around rec area, bike trail to lake • Nice community.


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

Related to comprehensive planning and the built environment please list some areas in Solon that could use improvement. • parks • more sidewalks, safer and more pedestrian street crossing options, more single family housing units, and reduction in density of multi-family housing units; more niche retail downtown • Lack of an indoor recreation facility to give us year round exercise space and a pool, need a traffic light on East 5th and Hwy 1 for safety, the Lakeview baseball fields are in dis repair • Downtown Residential areas • Developements, Keep lot sizes and planning the same • Don’t know. • sidewalks • Splash pad trails sidewalks • tighter controls on trailers, front yard garbage parking in the front yards • Parks, community events • Older roads • the areas around the grain elevator on stinocher • Safety along HWY 1 • Crosswalk by Bridge bank • East side of town Playground • need a community center and more trails • Need a dog park • some parts of town already have almost no access to a park or green space • expand the width of main street • More opportunities for kids • housing development with multiple access points, street connections between developments, park on east side of HWY 1 could use more play equipment/ shelter/tables/restrooms

• 5 th St. And hwy 1 intersection. • Recruit some light industry and warehousing. Also need a new and larger fire station. • retail • Development behind DQ/new Caseys seems to have been poorly planned. Too much mix of everything in a small space. single fam, multi fam, industry, daycare. • It would be great if the Ely bike trail could be connected to keep bicyclists off the main roads. Randall Park could use expansion. • parking • Could use a pool • pool and rec center indoors • hwy 1 sidewalks south of 5th st • Down town. Rec center needed • Highway 1 residential area • Bike Trail to Ely and West Branch • Everything else • old parts of town get rid of trailer homes • fire station • Sidewalks on all blocks, increase the time at the crosswalk too short) • A park in town. Better sidewalk maintenance in residential areas near downtown. Make the junior high look nice. • High appearance standards for business development • Traffic on highway 1. • streets in older part of town, move Mark’s to industrial lot

Community Survey Results | B-33


Related to comprehensive planning and the built environment please list some areas you would like to see improved in downtown Solon. • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • •

fill all the store fronts Downtown Residential areas Better parking and a new store in town More retail availability; fascade improvement on some of the businesses including the grocery store new or update grocery store more parking cleaner streets, more grass, sams market bricked and traditional arch More stores Store fronts updated Worn out facade none catholic literary society should be put to use, The buildings look more alike and conducive to a neat inviting downtown street scape. The tavern Station or whatever it’s called looks horrible coming down the street. we need a fareway, I don’t shop Sam’s because most things are expired. roads/sidewalks repaired/updated The overall appearance and cohesiveness of businesses and main St. Change the present Main Street confiiguration. beautification Continued facelift. What has been done looks very nice. Sam’s Market could use some work.

B-34

• I would love to see downtown filled. I think it might be beneficial if we started asking proprietors to stick with an aesthetic to make the downtown more attractive to visitors. • Use of vacant downtown buildings. • remove the angle parking on Main Street • more stores • Storefronts of the station and the legion • Fill all tyhe store fronts with business • No comment • the staion bar needs to go, dump • the main st “improvements” need to go. they look nice but make intersections tight and the diagonal parking blocks line of sight. • The gazebo/green space is beautiful and wasteful. We need some picnic tables out there so we can go uptown, get something to eat and sit in the grass or at tables • Take care of the residential areas adjacent to downtown. Could also make downtown more interesting/less conventional. What about community art or something to really put a unique stamp on the town? • Parking • Store front appearance - grocery store • Improve main street beauty.


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

Are there any additional strengths Solon should build upon not covered in this survey? • Lake McBride doesn’t seem to be leveraged as a destination point to which Solon is a gateway. How does Solon cater to Lake McBride users in our retail, service, and restaurant offerings? • the school district did a wonderful job of promoting the new middle school, this feels like a good example of growth/progress • The areas along the highway coming into town could be built up to draw attention and attract visitors. Please aesthetics would go a long way. • Focus on the schools, recreation and keeping the small town feel • None • location in Johnson County and lakes and metro areas • Beef Days is a strength and tourism gathering; Lake McBride is a strength; promote these more in relation to Solon • Community groups • Bike trails! Lots of bike riders • none • It has a lot of skilled workers, between two large population centers, near lots of outdoor recreation, good restaurants

• No • Amount of recreational activities in the area (lake,trails,off-road area) • It’s people. • no • We definatley need to control growth. No more multi family dwellings. No trailer courts. Affordable housing can be a 200,000 home for someone with a job. • rec center activities • On street parking in the older parts of town. • NA • No comment • We have some great leadership in Solon, and we are thankful for it. Some have been here their whole life and see what they do as a direct investment on the community. • Our youth and young families need more presence and say in city development. really would like a woman or younger adult on city council. • Keep quality high, don’t succomb to pressure to be like all other towns

Community Survey Results | B-35


Are there any improvements you would like to see in Solon’s future that were not covered in this survey? • I think there should be more consistent adherence to development and city rules. Examples include: cars/trucks that sit on the street for months, a house on Wood Lily that has not had grass since we moved in 1.5 years ago (pallets of retaining stone sitting around), a stronger police presence would be nice to curb some of vandalism in our neighborhood, a street light on the southern end of Bergamot Ln for safety • New Fire Station, community Center • hotel community center • store fronts • Community rec building pool area • YMCA • Light and crosswalk at Bridge bank • need a centrally located community center • City pool • would like to see a better grocery store to drive some competition, be more flexible with the types of animals residents can keep • try to stay a small town; do not add low value homes; do not need to spend the money for another school • Just the need for a rec center for all ages to use.

B-36

• we need a fareway, I don’t shop Sam’s because most things are expired. • I would like to see city administration and clerk with experience and knowledge to support our town. • I would really like to spend more of my money in town. We need a better grocery store. Not sure what the City can do about that though. • Traffic lights along Hwy 1, at Main and 5th. • parking really sucks! • rec center • Outdoor spaces not including children’s sports • More green space on the East side with playground equipment • No comment • Public swimming pool • The council needs to be more diverse in age/gender. Their ideas are very male dominant, and money focused. They lack creativity, vision or openness. • Expect high standards in all aspects, business, housing, schools, parks • Yes, need more younger active volunteers


City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2035

Community Survey Results | B-37


1 2 3 4 5 Appendix A Appendix B Appendix C Comprehensive Plan Maps The following maps were used in various formats throughout the planning process to examine existing conditions, create goals and define policies for the Solon Comprehensive Plan. Many of these maps are referenced throughout the text and are assembled here in Appendix C for quick reference by plan reviewers. Page C.1 Comprehensive Plan Maps C-2 Regional Context Major Streets Community Facilities Building Conditions Development Limitations Existing Land Use Existing Land Use Plan Area Map Future Land Use


REGIONAL CONTEXT Solon City Limits Iowa Counties

DATA SOURCES: JOHNSON COUNTY GIS, MSA

E Printed By: soshea, File: P:\GIS DATABASE\IOWA\JOHNSON COUNTY\Solon\Maps\Regional Context Map.mxd

CITY OF SOLON JOHNSON COUNTY, IOWA

Print Date: 10/22/2015


IOWA 1

To Ely and Cedar Rapids HW Y3

82

VIKING DR

M

DR

N MA

DO IN W

To Mt. Vernon and Hwy 30 & 151

IOWA ST

NE

MAJOR STREETS

T ST RKE

W ELM ST

Arterial Street Collector Street

Existing Stop Light

W 5TH ST

E 5TH ST

180TH ST

O IN ST ST

WINDFLOWER LN

ER CH

T KET S S MAR

RACINE AVE

E

To Lake McBride and North Liberty

DR

180TH ST

ES ACR

E 3RD ST

EEN S GR

S RACINE AVE

E 1ST ST

IOWA 1

To Iowa City

DATA SOURCES: JOHNSON COUNTY GIS, MSA

E Printed By: soshea, File: P:\GIS DATABASE\IOWA\JOHNSON COUNTY\Solon\Maps\Community Facilities and Recreation Map.mxd

CITY OF SOLON JOHNSON COUNTY, IOWA

Print Date: 10/22/2015


IOWA

COMMUNITY FACILITIES & RECREATION AMENITIES MAP

1

VIKING DR R OM D WIND

SUTLIFF RD

E ID R PA K

N WEST ST

E AT ST

S B ST

MUSHROOM PARK E SHORT ST

W SOVERS ST S IOWA ST

O O D DR

W 5TH ST

Post Office

E 2ND ST

Public Works

E 3RD ST

E

PL UM

T

W ST EA

180TH ST

Park/Open Space

TS RKE S MA

S RACINE AVE

E 1ST ST

W 3RD ST

Library

E MAIN ST

E 4TH ST

PUBLIC OPEN SPACE

E 5TH ST

SOLON PRAIRIE

E 6TH ST

Religious Institution/Cemetery School

ST

E

WOOD LILY RD

BR

HOOVER NATURE TRAIL

W SHORT ST

Fire Station

E NORTH ST

LEGION PARK

W MAIN ST

City Hall

S CEDAR ST

AC

EA

E ELM ST

N MARKET ST

M

SOLON OUTD OOR RECREA TION AR

W ELM ST HI GH LEG ION P W AY ARK 38 2

S STOCHL ST

E

LAKE MACBRIDE STATE PARK

Trails

E ROCK ST

RK

S DUBUQUE ST

R HI GH AN W DA AY LL 38 2 PA

K LA

HOOVER NATURE TRAIL

RANDALL DR

N IOWA ST

NE

S WEST ST

82

IOWA ST

HW Y3

Utility Building

Electrical Substation

180TH ST

Waste Water Treatment Facility Water Tower

O IN ST

WILLOW CT

ER CH ST

Parks

Solon City Limits

WINDFLOWER LN

RACINE AVE

E

CITY OF SOLON JOHNSON COUNTY, IOWA

A1 IOW

JORDAN CREEK RD

DATA SOURCES: JOHNSON COUNTY GIS, MSA

HOOVER NATURE TRAIL Printed By: soshea, File: P:\GIS DATABASE\IOWA\JOHNSON COUNTY\Solon\Maps\Community Facilities and Recreation Map.mxd

Print Date: 4/10/2015


IOWA 1

BUILDING CONDITIONS MAP

NE VIKING DR R OM D WIND

RANDALL DR

SUTLIFF RD

2

Building Conditions

E ROCK ST

S B ST

W SHORT ST

E SHORT ST

Stressed Dilapidated

DR

T

O O D DR

W 5TH ST

E 4TH ST

E 5TH ST

E 6TH ST E O IN ST

N MARKET ST

S CEDAR ST

S DUBUQUE ST

S IOWA ST

DATA SOURCES: JOHNSON COUNTY GIS, MSA

E 1ST ST

Printed By: soshea, File: P:\GIS DATABASE\IOWA\JOHNSON COUNTY\Solon\Maps\Solon Building Conditions Map.mxd

E

CITY OF SOLON JOHNSON COUNTY, IOWA

A1 IOW

T

E 2ND ST

E PLUM ST

RACINE AVE

N IOWA ST

N WEST ST S WEST ST

E SHORT ST

TS RKE S MA

JORDAN CREEK RD

180TH ST

WINDFLOWER LN

N CEDA R ST

S B ST

E NORTH ST

E MAIN ST

W MAIN ST

W SHORT ST

W SOVERS ST

Solon City Limits ST

ST

W NORTH ST

HIGHWAY 382

PL UM

WILLOW CT

ER CH

Downtown Core

E

WOOD LILY RD

E 3RD ST

No Structure S WINDSOR DR

S IOWA ST

E 2ND ST

S ACR E EEN S GR

W 3RD ST

W ST EA

180TH ST

Fair

E MAIN ST

E 1ST ST

TS RKE S MA

S RACINE AVE

MAR SHEK CT

W SOVERS ST

Good

S KINGSTON DR

W MAIN ST

E NORTH ST

S CEDAR ST

2

Excellent/New

S STOCHL ST

38

E ELM ST

N MARKET ST

W ELM ST

N WEST ST

HI GH W AY

S DUBUQUE ST

38

S WEST ST

HI GH W AY

N IOWA ST

82

IOWA ST

HW Y3

Print Date: 4/10/2015


TAFT AVE

DEVELOPMENT LIMITATIONS MAP

POLK AVE

IOWA 1

SUTLIFF RD

NE

9-14% W ELM ST 2

W MAIN ST E MAIN ST

D

D R

W 5TH ST

E 1ST ST

E PLUM ST

Higher Elevation E 5TH ST E 6TH ST

ER CH

180TH ST

RACINE AVE

ST

T KET S S MAR

O IN ST

WINDFLOWER LN

E

Printed By: soshea, File: P:\GIS DATABASE\IOWA\JOHNSON COUNTY\Solon\Maps\Development Limitations Map.mxd

QUINCY RD

POPLAR AVE

200TH ST

Lower Elevation A1 IOW

JO RD AN CR EE

KR D

25-40%

Elevation RD

O O

E SHORT ST

18-25%

WOOD LILY

S RACINE AVE

W SHORT ST W SOVERS ST EA ST W

14-18% TAFT AVE

38

9-18%

N MARKET ST

2

S DUBUQUE ST

38

HI GH W AY

180TH ST

Slope

N IOWA ST

HI GH W AY

Flood Zone

IOWA ST

DR WINDOM

VIKING DR

S IOWA ST

82

SERINITY CT

HW Y3

Solon City Limits 200TH ST

The data provided in this map is provided for informational and planning purposes only. The City of Solon and MSA are not responsible for the misuse or misrepresentation of the data.

DATA SOURCES: JOHNSON COUNTY GIS, NRGIS

E

CITY OF SOLON JOHNSON COUNTY, IOWA

Print Date: 4/10/2015


IOWA

EXISTING LAND USE MAP

1

NE VIKING DR R OM D WIND

RANDALL DR

SUTLIFF RD

Low Density Residential 2

Medium Density Residential

E ROCK ST

S B ST

W SHORT ST

E SHORT ST

Church Public

DR

T

O O D DR

W 5TH ST

E 4TH ST

E O IN ST

N MARKET ST

N DUBUQUE ST

180TH ST

Light Industrial/Manufacturing Storage/Warehouse Utility Undeveloped

ST

N IOWA ST

Retail

WINDFLOWER LN

Solon City Limits

N CEDAR ST

RACINE AVE

S MARKET ST

E SHORT ST

DATA SOURCES: JOHNSON COUNTY GIS, NRGIS

E

CITY OF SOLON JOHNSON COUNTY, IOWA

A1 IOW

S IOWA ST

S DUBUQUE ST

S WEST ST

W SHORT ST

S CEDAR ST

N WEST ST

ST

E MAIN ST

W MAIN ST

JORDAN CREEK RD

Resturant/Bar

WILLOW CT

ER CH

E NORTH ST

W NORTH ST

PL UM

Service E 5TH ST

E 6TH ST

Downtown Core

E

WOOD LILY RD

E 3RD ST

Professional/Office S WINDSOR DR

S IOWA ST

E 2ND ST

S ACR E EEN S GR

W 3RD ST

W ST EA

180TH ST

Parks/Open Space

E MAIN ST

E 1ST ST

TS RKE S MA

S RACINE AVE

MAR SHEK CT

W SOVERS ST

Trailer

S KINGSTON DR

W MAIN ST

E NORTH ST

S CEDAR ST

2

Higher Density Residential

S STOCHL ST

38

E ELM ST

N MARKET ST

W ELM ST

N WEST ST

HI GH W AY

S DUBUQUE ST

38

S WEST ST

HI GH W AY

N IOWA ST

82

IOWA ST

HW Y3

E 1ST ST

Printed By: soshea, File: P:\GIS DATABASE\IOWA\JOHNSON COUNTY\Solon\Maps\Existing Land Use Map.mxd

Print Date: 4/10/2015


120TH ST

Y EL

RD SU TL IF F

TURNER AVE

TAFT AVE

POLK AVE

RD IOWA 1

Low Density Residential 160TH ST

RD E BR ID G

A1 IOW

QUINCY RD

POPLAR AVE

CR EE

K

Retail

TURNER AVE

RACINE AVE

M EH AF FE Y

LN

JO RD AN

200TH ST

Service

Light Industrial/Manufacturing Storage/Warehouse Utility

Undeveloped Stream

RD

210TH ST

210TH ST

MCBRIDE NRA

Resturant/Bar

180TH ST

UTA HA VE

E 5TH ST

W 5TH ST

WER WINDFLO

200TH ST

Public

Professional/Office

WOOD LILY RD

E PLUM ST

T KET S S MAR

200TH ST

Church

E MAIN ST Raym ond Dr

180TH ST

W ELM ST

Will Dr

2

S IOWA ST

38

S RACINE AVE

170TH ST

Parks/Open Space

TAFT AVE

HI GH W AY

Higher Density Residential Trailer

IOWA ST

VIKING DR

S B ST

8

Rural Land

Medium Density Residential

E 2N

OPIE AVE

OAK AVE

Y3 HW

EXISTING LAND USE

SUTLIFF RD

TAFT AVE

14OTH ST

EXISTING LAND USE PLAN AREA MAP

Body of Water

Solon City Limits

RD UR RO W

E

CITY OF SOLON JOHNSON COUNTY, IOWA

DIL LO NS F

RD

Printed By: soshea, File: P:\GIS DATABASE\IOWA\JOHNSON COUNTY\Solon\Maps\Land Use Map 2 mi.mxd

CY IN QU

SUGAR BOTTOM RD

DATA SOURCES: JOHNSON COUNTY GIS, NRGIS

Print Date: 9/4/2015


TAFT AVE

FUTURE LAND USE MAP

POLK AVE

IOWA 1

Future Land Use

SUTLIFF RD

HI G

W ELM ST 38

2

EA ST W O

180TH ST

O

D

E MAIN ST

W MAIN ST

W SOVERS ST

D R

Commercial

E SHORT ST

W 5TH ST

E 1ST ST

Industrial

TAFT AVE

HW AY

Higher Density Residential

E PLUM ST

E 5TH ST

Civic/Religious

Open Space/Floodway

Raymond Dr

2

S IOWA ST

38

S RACINE AVE

HW AY

Medium Density Residential T ST N MARKE

HI G

Low Density Residential

S STOCHL ST

VIKING DR

NE

S DUBUQUE ST

82

Rural Lands

IOWA ST

HW Y3

Park & Recreation

180TH ST

Hwy1 Corridor

WOOD LILY RD

Solon City Limits Stream

Body of Water

RACINE AVE

ER CH

Development Concept Areas Will Dr

NO

T KET S S MAR ST

I ST

WINDFLOWER LN

E

Urban Reserve Area

200TH ST

POPLAR AVE

QUINCY RD

D

TURNER AVE

200TH ST

DA NC RE EK R

A1 IOW

JO R

210TH ST

Printed By: soshea, File: P:\GIS DATABASE\IOWA\JOHNSON COUNTY\Solon\Maps\Future Land Use Map.mxd

DATA SOURCES: JOHNSON COUNTY GIS, NRGIS

E

CITY OF SOLON JOHNSON COUNTY, IOWA

210TH ST

Print Date: 4/19/2016

Profile for MSA Professional Services

City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2015  

The City of Solon is located near Iowa City/Coralville and Cedar Rapids. From the 2000-2010 census, the City grew by 73%. Because of this hi...

City of Solon Comprehensive Plan 2015  

The City of Solon is located near Iowa City/Coralville and Cedar Rapids. From the 2000-2010 census, the City grew by 73%. Because of this hi...

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