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GUTHRIE CENTER, IOWA DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT PLAN

BEFORE BEFORE

AFTER TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction

p.2-3

Existing Conditions p.4-13

Urban Design p.14-17

Master Plan

p.18-21

Implementation

p.22-24

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS CITY COUNCIL Dennis Kunkle (mayor), Dennis Patrick (mayor pro-tem), Roger Underwood, Carolyn Masters, Bob Paterson, & Craig Heckman

PLANNING & ZONING COMMISSION Rick Bu ler, Loyal Dorr, Del Wedemeyer, Keith Davis, Penny Wetzel, & Jason Carroll

CITY STAFF Laura Imerman (city administrator) & Robert Secoy (director of public works)

MSA PROFESSIONAL SERVICES Jim Holz, AICP, Chris Janson, Stephen Tremle , AICP, & Shawn O’Shea

FINAL DRAFT JUNE 2012


INTRODUCTION DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT PLAN

VISION STATEMENT Downtown Guthrie Center is… A vibrant place and the cultural heart and identity of the community. A diverse business mix is thriving and profitable . Arrival to the downtown district is distinctive and appealing, and parking is easy to find . Visitors discover reasons to linger and explore .

GOAL #1 CREATE AN IDENTITY FOR THE DOWNTOWN AND ENHANCE THE EXISTING BUSINESS CLIMATE •

Create and maintain standards and limitations for development within the downtown.

Encourage the rehabilitation of existing structures to be consistent with the downtown character.

Establish a plan for future improvements to the downtown (Master/Concept Plan).

Provide adequate supply of parking that is easy to find (visible from the street or a good wayfinding system) for downtown residents, customers, and employees

GOAL #2 ATTRACT AND RETAIN BUSINESSES THAT STRENGTHEN AND DIVERSIFY THE LOCAL ECONOMY • •

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Seek local and regional businesses that utilize the resident labor force. Develop a long-term strategy to promote sustainable economic growth in the City, especially for the downtown area. Encourage and market development that will make downtown Guthrie Center a destination for the community and the surrounding area.

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he City of Guthrie Center (pop. 1,569) is the county seat of Guthrie County and is approximately 60 miles west of Des Moines, Iowa. The City is intersected by STH 44 (designated as a National Scenic Byway) and STH 25, and is 15 miles north of I-80. Guthrie Center’s downtown central business district is in a period of transition. Historically, the downtown has been the commercial center of the community; however, it has lost some of its economic vitality due to sluggish economic period, retiring small business owners, and more competitive retail market. Many downtown areas have successfully weathered this transitional period by retaining their community’s financial institutions, professional offices, and government buildings. This is the case in Guthrie Center. However, the downtown continues to struggle due to the loss of businesses, conflicting land uses (i.e. industrial, storage, etc.), deteriorating infrastructure, aging or functionally obsolete buildings, and a general lack of a unified theme and pedestrian amenities. This planning document is intended to be a “living” guide for the future overall development of downtown Guthrie Center. It serves to meet the vision for the downtown and the corresponding goals and objectives (as shown on the left).


This Plan was discussed and developed over two Plan Commission meetings between March and June 2012. All meetings were public meetings and traditionally noticed as such. Project Milestones included: March 2012

Public Meeting #1 Issues and Opportunities

May 2012

Public Meeting #2 Plan & Development Concept Review

June 2012

Planning & Zoning Commission Recommendation

July 2012

City Council Adoption

DOWNTOWN PLANNING AREA As defined by this Plan, “Downtown Guthrie Center” is bordered by Prairie Street to the south, 1st Street to the west, Main Street to the north (except between 4th-6th Street its Grand Street) , and 6th Street to the east.

PRINCIPLES, PROCESS, & PLANNING AREA

PLANNING PROCESS

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EXISTING CONDIT DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT PLAN

SWOT ANALYSIS

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On March 16th, 2012, approximately 20 residents and business owners/leasers took part in a SWOT exercise. to gather their opinions of the downtown’s current conditions. The information gathered was divided into four categories: •

Strengths to Reinforce

Weaknesses to Address

Opportunities to Pursue

Threats to Examine

Topics covered facade improvements, public infrastructure, business growth/expansion, business retention, land use types, etc. A complete list is provided below.

Strengths

Opportunities

-Good Conditions of Buildings -Buildings with Character -Variety -Have the Essentials -Existing Businesses -Friendliness -County Seat -Activity Center -Hospital -Pharmacy -Centrally Located -Wide Street -Major Highways -Customer Service

-Leasable Space Available (lower/upper floors) -Vacant Lots to Build On -Job Opportunities (want to pursue adding jobs and expanding job market) -Façade Improvements to Buildings -Grant Opportunities -New Attractions are Needed (movie theater etc.) -New Forms of Entertainment (capitalizing on county fair) -Can Do Attitude -Need for a Laundromat, Ice Cream Shop, Coffee Shop, Bookstore, and Clothing Store -More Restaurants (open Sundays late)

Weaknesses

Threats

-Farmers Market Needs Improvement -One-way Streets -Parking -No Public Restrooms -Vacant Buildings -Construction Costs -Lack of Revenue -Poor Image -Empty Store Fronts -Condition of Existing Buildings -Vacant 2nd Floors of Buildings

-Rise in Taxes -Loss of Families and Graduates -Elderly Population Base -Shrinking population -General Decline of Rural Iowa -Loosing Major Employers -Potential Closing of Courthouse -Mobile Society -Large Metro Retail Threat -Can’t Do Attitude -Potential School Consolidation

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TIONS Many factors can influence how citizens perceive the downtown of their community. These factors combine to create the urban fabric, which can be simplified into three categories: districts, streets, and individual parcels/ buildings. Studying the existing urban context provides insights on what properties are assets to enhance versus those that are strong candidates for redevelopment in order to revitalize the downtown.

DISTRICT A district is a cohesive area with an identifiable character. Building uses, types, and styles establishes this character. Guthrie Center’s downtown district has a good mix of uses (i.e. residential, retail, office, civic and public); however, there are several sites that are vacant, or are have vacant buildings. Disadvantages of this district are the lack of restaurant/bars and the extensive vacant upper-floors. A strength of the downtown is the public and civic buildings, which provides strong anchors to the downtown. See the land uses within the downtown in the map below.

SWOT ANALYSIS & URBAN CONTEXT

URBAN CONTEXT

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EXISTING CONDIT DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT PLAN

STREETS A street is a public thoroughfare, but it is also a public space that evokes a feeling. The streetscape is simply the landscape of the street - it can be barren or inviting. Common streetscape improvements include features that break up the harsh hardscape that exists within a downtown (e.g. trees, shrubs, benches, planters, crosswalks, fountains, and special light fixtures). In the next few months the City is planning updates to the sidewalks along State Street from the east-side of 2nd Street to the west-side of 5th Street (as shown below). This will greatly improve the downtown streetscaping, as they plan to add new street lighting, decorative sidewalk terrace, and decorative sidewalk treatment. No other updates to the streets are planned for the foreseeable future.

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Based on the current street conditions, the following statements can be made: Weaknesses • Missing sidewalk/walkway, or blocked by vehicle parking • No separation between sidewalk and private drive/parking • Most intersections lack ADA compliant ramps • No marked crosswalks • Some curb areas are in poor shape • Light poles are not pedestrian-friendly and some are showing age (i.e. rust) • Street markings are fading • No consistent themed streetscaping (i.e. city banners, decorative lighting, decorative paving) Strengths • Most of the sidewalks in the downtown are sufficiently wider than the standard 5-foot sidewalk • Some banners do exist along the corridor • There are garbage containers and planters (albeit empty during the winter season) within the downtown core section • There are sporadic benches in the downtown core section


TIONS BUILDINGS & PARCELS Individual parcels/buildings can have a lasting impression on a person’s perception of an area, both positively and negatively. For instance, a building could be so well-designed, unique, or historically significant that it is the first thing someone thinks of when someone mentions the City of Guthrie Center. Examples of a parcel/ building that can leave a negative impression would be a poorly designed or dead public space, a rundown/ falling apart building, and a large vacant parcel.

Building Conditions

The map below illustrates the building conditions within downtown. This is not an evaluation of the structural integrity of the building, but rather a subjective opinion of the condition based on the exterior appearance as viewed from the street.

URBAN CONTEXT

In general, buildings within the downtown are in fair to good condition. There are a few sites that are vacant or have dilapidated buildings that would cost more to update than to tear down. One of these sites at the corner of 3rd/State is planned to be removed this year by the City.

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EXISTING CONDIT DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT PLAN

BUILDINGS & PARCELS (CONTINUED) Property Assessment Land and improvement (building) values are assessed annually and provide an objective evaluation of the state of properties within the city; with the exception of tax exempt properties for which no data exists. The map below illustrates the ratio of improvement value to land value within the downtown. In general, strong candidates for redevelopment are properties with land that is more, or almost as, valuable as the improvements (0-1.9 ratio). There are two important trends that are evident: •

Overall there are significant number of parcels contributing significantly to the tax base (5.0 or more—green and blue)

There are a number of parcels that are strong candidates for redevelopment/reinvestment (as they are not contributing significantly to the tax base) with a high concentration along or near 2nd Street.

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TIONS Building/Site Significance The following text and map below illustrate the strengths and weaknesses in the downtown. Historic Buildings provide a sense of history and can have a positive influence on the downtown overall character/image (if the buildings are maintained properly and keep their historic elements visible to the public eye). There are a significant number of properties with historic character on Broadway Avenue between Ellis and Green Streets. They have good bones, but some need significant facelifts.

Public Building/Uses bring residents and activity to the downtown. They also can be catalysts for redevelopment (if built and maintained with quality materials and design).

“Destination” Businesses bring residents and visitors to the downtown (e.g. Hometown Foods, Sinclair Gas Station, Prime Time Restaurant, Dollar General, Guthrie County State Bank, etc.)

Eye Sores are buildings/sites that stand out because they are in disrepair, vacant, or are incompatible with the surrounding neighborhood/district.

URBAN CONTEXT

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EXISTING CONDIT DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT PLAN

RETAIL MARKET The retail analysis is based on three trade areas: 5-, 15-, and 30-minute drive times from downtown Guthrie Center. The 5-minute travel time encompasses the entire Guthrie Center community, while the 15-minute drive time includes the City of Panora. The 30-minute travel time reaches Linden to the east, not quite to Audubon to the west, Bayard and Bagley to north, and Adair to the south.

15 MIN 5 MIN

The table (on the right) summarizes the supply vs. demand for various retail categories. Demand is the expected amount spent by consumers at retail establishments and supply estimates sales to consumers by establishments. The Retail Gap represents the difference between retail potential and retail sales. The Leakage/Surplus Factor presents a snapshot of retail opportunity (supply vs. demand), ranging from +100 (total leakage) to -100 (total surplus). A positive value indicates there is more demand than supply in the area (i.e. consumers are “leaking� outside the trade area to acquire goods and services). A negative value indicates there is a surplus of retail services (i.e. consumers are drawn in from outside the trade area and demand within the trade area is being met). This summary indicates significant food and drink leakage from Guthrie Center (less than a 5-minute drive), as well aswithin the surrounding area (15/30-minute drive times). The graph below indicates mismatches between supply and demand for retail industry subsectors within downtown Guthrie Center (less than 5-minute drive). As shown, there are just a few industry types that are being met. 5-Minute Leakage/Surplus Factor by Industry Subsector

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Source: ESRI Business Analyst


TIONS Below is the leakage/surplus within Guthrie Center’s primary trade area (15-minute drive) for the industry subsector and more detailed industry group. There are substantial growth opportunities, especially those near or at 100+.

RETAIL MARKET ANALYSIS

15-Minute Leakage/Surplus Factor by Industry Subsector

15-Minute Leakage/Surplus Factor by Industry Group

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EXISTING CONDIT DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT PLAN

PARKING STUDY The availability of parking can leave a lasting impression on how people view, or how often they visit a downtown. Convenient parking is considered a sign of welcome. Parking that is difficult to find, inadequate, or inconvenient will frustrate users and can make people reluctant to visit a particular location. In order to understand the existing parking inventory within Downtown Guthrie Center, a parking study was conducted. The purpose of the study was to observe current utilization of existing parking spaces within the downtown and to identify specific issues and opportunities related to existing parking infrastructure.

Methodology The occupancy of parking spaces was documented by observing the number of occupied parking spaces during what is considered the peak period for parking demand within the planning area. This peak period was determined to be on weekdays during normal business hours, and to minimize the impact of weather and seasonal variation, occupancy observations were conducted during fine weather conditions. Although parking occupancy observations were conducted during weekday peak periods, it should be acknowledged that other land uses have different peak parking times (see table below). For example, a block with a popular bar may experience a peak parking period during Friday or Saturday evenings, while the rest of the planning area has relatively low occupancy rates.

Weekday Banks and public services

Auditoriums

Weekend Religious institutions

Professional offices

Bars and meeting halls

Parks

Park and ride facilities

Hotels

Shops and malls

Schools, daycare centers

Restaurants

Factories/distribution centers

Theaters

Source: Victorian Transport Policy Institute 2007: Parking Management Strategies, Evaluation and Planing

Parking occupancy refers to the accumulation of parking over the course of the day. Occupancy during peak periods is the primary measure of parking usage and the need for additional parking. Occupancy rates at or close to 100 percent are generally considered undesirable because motorists must hunt for available parking and/or may be tempted to park illegally or not stop at all. Thus when evaluating parking we look at the “effective” supply instead of the full supply. The effective supply is the maximum number of parking spaces that can realistically be used within a given district. An effective supply “cushion” can help to protect against the inevitable loss of spaces resulting from temporary disturbances such as construction, misparked cars, etc. Parking supply is considered “effective” when approximately 75% of the parking spaces are occupied.

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TIONS Inventory On March 16th, 2012, between 12:30-3:00pm, MSA counted all marked and unmarked parking spaces within the downtown (see p. 3 for planning area). In total, the downtown potentially can park 758 vehicles at one time, excluding garage spaces (410 on-street and 348 off-street). The only public parking lots within the downtown support the public library and county courthouse. There are no hour restrictions on parking in the downtown.

Results

State Street On-Street

Northside Southside Available Spots 1st-2nd 2nd-3rd 3rd-4th 4th-5th 5th-6th

Main Street

Off-Street

46% 34% 40% 39% 135 166 301 14% 50% 53% 25%

50% 43% 20%

65% 34% 35%

On-Street

Off-Street

16% 43% 14% 36% 170 120 290 0% 0% 6% 40% 12% 41% 10% 34% 50% 21%

Prairie Street On-Street

Off-Street

18% 23% 50% 28% 105 62 167 6% 21% 14% 0% 52% 38% 11% 0% 19% 0%

Downtown Total

30% 32% --758 30% 29% 39% 27% 28%

PARKING STUDY

Parking supply is not the issue within downtown Guthrie Center, as only 31% of the spaces were occupied at the time of the study (233 out of 758 spaces). There were several blocks with considerable occupied on-street parking spaces, primarily on State Street between 2nd Street and 4th Street. Based on feedback received on the street during the analysis, the most common complaint was the ability to park right next to, or adjacent to, their destination. Since the downtown has sufficient number of parking spaces for current and future development, strategies should be focused on wayfinding signage (to direct users to available parking) and establishing parking limits (to free up premier parking spaces on a regular basis). For example, State Street could have 2-hr parking limit, while cross streets between Prairie and Main Streets could have 4-hour parking limits (with no parking limits anywhere else in the downtown). Enforcement of these limits will be key to effectively change parking habits within the downtown.

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URBAN DESIGN DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT PLAN

STREETSCAPING - GUIDELINES A major step in revitalizing the downtown is to make public improvements that show residents and businesses owners that the City is taking the initiative in revitalizing the area. These improvements also help to create a district identity for the downtown, which separates it from other areas within Guthrie Center. When planning for road (re)construction, the guidelines and recommendations discussed below should be considered. The design of streets directly affects the quality of life in a community. A well designed streetscape incorporates crosswalks, sidewalks, light fixtures, trees, planters, trash receptacles, banners/flags, benches and green spaces within the public right of way. There is no single component that will meet the preceding goals, but a balanced mix of these components can lead to a successful revitalization of the downtown. Guidelines in this section are intended to assist in the design reconstruction of streets. •

In general, a “friendly” street has features that provide safety, comfort, and mobility. Examples of these features are described and illustrated on the following pages.

SAFETY 1) Good sight distance Limit obstructions at crossings (newspaper/ advertising & electrical boxes, over-grown vegetation, etc.)

4) Adequate height clearance Well maintained landscaping Adequate Awning heights

2) Separation & buffering from other modes of travel Wide sidewalks Parking areas Sidewalk terrace Limit curb-cuts

5) Limit crossing distances Provide bump outs Reduce corner radii Provide refuge medians at ped. crossings

3) Pedestrian visibility Adequate lighting

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MOBILITY

2) Accessible to all citizens ADA-compliant sidewalks and building entrances

1) Clear path No obstructions within areas of travel

3) Clear connections Pedestrian pathways to building entrances

4)

Limit automobile/truck traffic issues Lower vehicle speed limits Provide traffic calming devices

1) At human scale Establish a 1:3-1:2 street width to building height ratio

5) 2)

Add benches, table and chairs, bike racks, etc.

Soften the urban, hardscape Add planters, street trees, landscaped spaces, etc.

3)

Buildings designed w/ pedestrian-friendly features Awnings, large and clear windows on the ground-floor, building entrances, view of products/activities, etc.

Provide pedestrian amenities

STREETSCAPING

COMFORT

6)

Well-maintained infrastructure Well-maintained sidewalks, streets, street fixtures, and street trees

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URBAN DESIGN DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT PLAN

STREETSCAPING - GALLERY The images below illustrate the variety of streetscaping elements that can be incorporated in Downtown Guthrie Center. See the Master Plan and Implementation sections for specific recommendations. B um pouts

P ublic Landscaping

P ar king Landscaping (buffer ing)

Str eet Fur nitur e & Other Str eetscap e Featur es

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DEVELOPMENT GUIDELINES

Relationship to the Street: Design the building such that the primary building façade is orientated towards the street. Provide a public entrance on the primary façade.

Architectural Character: Design the building using architectural elements that provides visual interest and human scale that relates to the surrounding neighborhood context and the City’s overall character.

Building Materials: Use high-quality, long-lasting finish materials such as kiln-fired brick, stucco, and wood. All exposed sides of the building should have similar or complementary materials as used on the front façade.

Building Projections: Canopies and awnings should be provided along facades that give access to the building.

Signage: Use pedestrian-scaled sign types: building-mounted, window, projecting, monument, and awning. Signs should not be excessive in height or square footage.

Parking: Fit the parking below the building or place it on the side/back of the building, wherever feasible. Provide shared parking and access between properties to minimize the number of curb cuts. Provide vegetative buffers between pedestrian circulation routes and vehicular parking/circulation. Access drive lanes should have adequate throat depths to allow for proper vehicle stacking.

Landscaping and Lighting: Provide generous landscaping, with an emphasis on native plant species. Landscaping should be placed along street frontages, between incompatible land uses, along parking areas, and in islands of larger parking lots. Exterior lights should be full-cut-off fixtures that are directed towards the ground to minimize glare and light pollution.

Stormwater: Use rain gardens and bio-retention basins on-site (i.e. in parking islands) in order to filter pollutants and infiltrate runoff, wherever feasible.

Service Areas: Trash and recycling containers/dumpsters, street-level mechanical, rooftop mechanical, outdoor storage, and loading docks should be located or screened so that they are not visible from a public street. Screening should be compatible with building architecture and other site features.

DEVELOPMENT GUIDELINES

Development provides the City with economic stability and provides goods, services and jobs for its residents. However, too often buildings are designed without significant consideration to its neighboring parcels and overall effect on the area. To ensure high-quality and long-lasting projects the following guidelines will provide assistance in guiding future (re)development in the downtown, including major facade improvements:

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MASTER PLAN DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT PLAN

REINVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES Within the downtown area there are several parcels that offer significant opportunities for redevelopment. Parcels that are strong candidates for redevelopment are either vacant or are for sale, have low improvement value (relative to land value), have buildings that are in poor condition, or have uses that are ill-suited for a downtown environment. Figure 4.8 illustrates reinvestment opportunities within the downtown area.

Red/Pink parcels are the most viable for redevelopment, as they do not have structures (bright red) or they are currently for sale (dark red).

Orange parcels are viable for redevelopment due to low values, but they are not for sale and they are not vacant.

Yellow parcels are less viable for redevelopment due to stronger values, but are candidates for reinvestment to improve poor exterior conditions.

This map is for planning purposes only and does not represent the intent of any property owners to sell their land.

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The City’s historic buildings represent an earlier era of economic vibrance, and their preservation is both dependent upon and necessary to continued economic success in the downtown area. The City should preserve this architecture heritage, and help owners protect and restore these buildings over time. There should be a clear policy in place to establish a process by which alternatives to demolition can be sought for buildings that are deemed “historically significant” (see map on p. 9). Below are a sample of recommendations that may help guide restoration/recreation of historical facades: •

Consult the Secretary of Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation and Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings (Revised 1990).

Use firms that specialize in historic preservation when cleaning and repairing the facade (contractors) and for wholesale recreation of historic elements (architects).

If restoration is not feasible, new elements should be designed that replicate or are at least consistent with the character, materials and design of the original building.

Building owners are encouraged to use a “historic“ color for the primary facade color. Many of the major paint manufactures such as Pratt & Lambert, Benjamin Moore, Sherwin Williams publish “historic color” sample charts which are available at paint dealers.

Previously obscured design details should be revealed and restored, whenever feasible.

Architectural details should not be obscured or covered up by siding, awnings or signage.

Chemical or physical treatments, such as sandblasting, to existing painted brick or stone is strongly discourage. If necessary, surface cleaning shall use the gentlest means possible.

MASONRY PIERS/COLUMNS DECORATIVE CORNICE

MASONRY WALL REGULARLY SPACED WINDOWS

UPPER FACADE

STOREFRONT CORNICE (horizontal expression line)

TRANSOM

STOREFRONT

DISPLAY WINDOW BASE PANEL

WINDOW SIGNAGE

TRADITIONAL FACADE COMPONENTS

RESTORATION EXAMPLE (generalized to show 1st floor renovation and stucco removal)

City of Guthrie Center

REINVESTMENT & FACADE IMPROVEMENTS

“HISTORIC” FACADE IMPROVEMENTS

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3RD ST

(or market towards a signature building )

14

13

Top Priority 2 Redevelopment Site (a signature building desired at the corner)

3

4

High Priority

15

3 Redevelopment Site(s)

4

4

12

6

7

Build an Entertainment Park (band shell, covered farmer’s market shelter, plaza space, bathrooms)

7

3

Build a Community Garden (including an entry feature--poten al reuse of torn down bldg bricks)

12

SMALL VEHICLES

12

5

6

1

Reinvestment or Redevelopment Site(s)

4

4

8

3

5 3

13

14

Landscape Street Edges

16 EXTEND STREETSCAPING FEATURES THROUGHOUT

(use of shrubs, flowers, bark, and grass)

17 FACADE & SITE IMPROVEMENTS THROUGHOUT

2

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2ND ST

Expand City Hall 1 to State Street

1ST ST

DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT PLAN

MASTER PLAN

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5


6TH ST

5TH ST

4TH ST 14

Reconstruct Parking (landscaped buffers, monument sign, etc.)

Enhance Street Edge

MAIN ST

9

15

9

Parking & Street Edge Improvements

Enhance Streetscaping 12 Elements (decora ve

12

SMALL VEHICLES

10

9

11

crosswalk borders)

13

15

Add Sidewalk & Landscaping Build Curb

14 Bumpouts

MASTER PLAN

11

STATE ST

(use of shrubs, flowers, half-walls, bark, grass, monument signs, etc.)

Gateway Sign 10 w/ Street Edge Enhancements

2

12

8

(decora ve concrete) 14

Reconstruct Sidewalks allowing 15 Two-Way Traffic

PRAIRIE ST

(8 sidewalks with parking on both sides)

5

9

10

12

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IMPLEMENTATION DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT PLAN

ACTION PLAN This section seeks to provide recommendations for the redevelopment of both private and public properties with the goal of creating a more vibrant and sustainable downtown. This section contains a compilation of the various actions recommended in this Plan to translate this vision to reality. Accompanying each action are recommended timeframes for completion. Since many of the recommendations rely on coordination with the private market it is likely that the full breadth of this Plan’s vision will take many years to achieve.

Ac on #1: Expand City Hall to State Street (or market towards a signature building) This location is quite visible as one drives into town from the west and would be a great location for a signature “gateway” building. If City Hall’s current spaces/building becomes obsolete, expansion to State Street is highly viable (and recommended) . In either case, the building should be built to the corner of 1st and State.

Timeframe: Long Term (2020+)

Ac on #2: Top Priority Redevelopment Site This site has significant marketability for commercial/mixed use development, as it sits along two major roadways. The City should actively market this site, encouraging development of a signature “gateway” building that hugs the corner of 5th and State.

Timeframe: Ongoing

Ac on #3: High Priority Redevelopment Sites These sites currently have high potential for redevelopment, as they are vacant or being used for parking/storage. In some cases a larger project may be possible if adjacent parcels that have low property value ratios and/or poor building conditions (see Action #4) are purchased.

Timeframe: Ongoing

Ac on #4: Reinvestment or Redevelopment Sites These sites have potential for redevelopment (or at least reinvestment), as they have low property value ratios and/ or poor building conditions (see page 18). The City may supplement private financing through use of revolving loan funds, facade/site improvement grants, or developer incentives.

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Timeframe: Ongoing

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Ac on #5: Build an Entertainment Park (w/ a Farmer’s Market Structure) The entertainment park’s proposed band shell (including public bathrooms) could host several types of events from a music festival to weddings to plays. This could draw people from not only the Guthrie Center, but from the surrounding communities. This park may also include a (covered) farmer’s market plaza (shown in the northern portion of the park), replacing the current location for the farmer’s market at 5th/State. A separate, but potentially important, redesign of 3rd Street’s eastern sidewalk could help link this park to State Street and offer additional vendor space for the farmer’s market. The design envisions landscaping planters, benches, decorative lighting, and decorative paving. If this site is unattainable for the entertainment park, another possible location could be at 107 N 2nd Street if the building is deemed unusable or unrepairable.

Timeframe: Long Term (2020+)

Ac on #6: Build a Community Garden The existing building on this site is being torn down in 2012. Instead of leaving the parcel vacant, the City should establish a community garden where individual plots can be rented out to area residents, who can grow their own food. To hold the corner of 3rd and State, a decorative wall feature with an entryway should be built. If possible, the torn down building bricks should be reused to build this entry feature.

Timeframe: Short Term (2012-2014)

Ac on #7: Landscape Street Edges Parking and drive lanes should be separated from the public sidewalk to make it safer for pedestrians using the sidewalk network. This action will also help to beautify the downtown urban landscape.

Timeframe: Short Term (2012-2014)

Ac on #8: Reconstruct Parking Lot Work with the property owner to reconstruct the parking lot with a landscape median between the sidewalk and parking stalls, between the center parking aisles, and between State Street and the parking stalls. This protects the drive lanes, makes it safer for pedestrians, and will help beautify the corridor. Other suggested improvements include replacing their current sign with a monument sign and limiting the parking lot to one-way entrances from State Street (mitigating existing siteline issues when exiting onto State Street).

Timeframe: Mid Term (2015-2019)


Ac on #9: Enhance Street Edges The City should encourage (and help) the property owner(s) improve the aesthetics of this important intersection by creating more defined street edges. Potential design features include brick/stone half-walls, shrubs/plants, monument-style signage, etc. This would also create a buffer between the drive lanes (and parking) from the public sidewalk, making it safer for pedestrians using the sidewalk network.

Timeframe: Short Term (2012-2014)

In addition to incorporating the street edge enhancements suggested in Action #9, the City should work with the property owner to build a “gateway” welcome sign with, or without, the business’ name at the corner of 5th and State. This welcome sign could include a scrolling LED sign that could notify residents and travelers of events going on in the community.

Timeframe: Mid Term (2015-2019)

Ac on #11: Parking Improvements

&

Street

Edge

Work with the property owner to reconstruct their parking lot to define the sidewalk and vehicle entry points. The suggested design involves repositioning the stalls parallel with the State Street and creating one vehicle entry point off of State Street. In order to build this design, the City will need to allow the parking lot to extend within the public right-of-way (via an access easement), or the City should sell the needed land to the property owner. This could be done at the same time as Action #12.

Timeframe: Mid Term (2015-2019)

Ac on #12: Enhance Streetscaping Elements In 2012, State Street from 2nd to 5th Street will be improved with bump-outs, decorative pavement, and decorative lighting. To enhance the streetscaping theme, the City should consider constructing decorative borders (stamped/ colored concrete) around all crosswalks along State Street. Crosswalks should be 7-10 feet wide with 3.5-7 feet decorative borders (5th/State should have wide crosswalks and decorative borders). Funding could potentially be provided by National Scenic Byway Program.

Timeframe: Short Term (2012-2014)

Ac on #14: Build Curb Bumpouts The intersections of 3rd/4th and Prairie (northside) and 3rd/4th and Main (southside) should receive bumpouts, incorporating the same decorative treatments as State Street. The lighting fixtures from State Street may also be incorporated at these intersections.

Timeframe: Long Term (2020+)

Ac on #15: Reconstruct Sidewalks, allowing Two-Way Traffic Guthrie Center residents and business owners mentioned 3rd and 4th Streets should allow vehicle travel in both directions, if possible. In order to allow two-way traffic and keep the existing parking spaces, the sidewalks would have to be reduced to eight feet. If the sidewalks were reconstructed, the City should continue State Street’s streetscaping theme (see Action #16).

Timeframe: Long Term (2020+)

Ac on #16: Extend Streetscaping Features Throughout Downtown In 2012, State Street from 2nd to 5th Street will be improved with bump-outs, decorative pavement, and decorative lighting. Future improvements should continue this design theme throughout the downtown, except for sections that have mature landscaped sidewalk terraces (Main Street 100 Block (southside), Main Street - 200 Block (southside), Prairie Street - 100 Block (northside), and Prairie Street 400 Block (northside)).

Timeframe: Long Term (2020+)

Ac on #17: Facade & Site Improvements

Ac on #13: Add Sidewalk & Landscaping

To proactively encourage property improvements, consider providing façade improvement and/or landscaping (site design) beautification funds for downtown businesses. Design guidelines (or standards) may be needed to guide (regulate) what type of improvements are eligible, as well as provide guidance in establishing a cohesive downtown architectural character. The City may also hire a consultant to provide cost effective facade improvement illustrations for buildings within the downtown to further encourage property owners to make updates to their building(s).

To promote pedestrian movement within the downtown core, sidewalks should be constructed along the 100 Block

Timeframe: Mid to Long Term (2015-2020+)

Timeframe: Short Term (2012-2014)

ACTION PLAN

Ac on #10: Gateway Sign w/ Street Edge Enhancements

of Main and Prairie Streets. ADA-compliant ramps should be provided at street corners to connect the network with the surrounding neighborhoods. The sidewalk edges along the utility facility should be landscaped to hide it from view.

City of Guthrie Center

23 IA


ACTION PLAN ACTION

SHORTTERM

MIDTERM

LONGTERM

2012-2014

2015-2019

2020+

#1

Expand City Hall to State Street (or market towards a signature building)

#2

Top Proirity Redevelopment Site (as a signature building)

--- On Going ---

#3

High Proirity (Re)development Sites

--- On Going ---

#4

Reinvestment or Redevelopment Sites

--- On Going ---

#5

Build Entertainment Park (w/ a Farmer's Market Structure)

#6

Build a Community Garden

#7

Landscape Street Edges

#8

Reconstruct Parking Lot

#9

Enhance Street Edges

#10

Gateway Sign w/ Street Edge Enhancements

#11

Parking & Street Edge Improvements

#12

Enhance Streetscaping Elements

#13

Add Sidewalk & Landscaping

#14

Build Curb Bumpouts

#15

Reconstruct Sidewalk, allowing Two-Way Traffic

#16

Extend Streetscaping Features Throughtout Downtown

#17

Faรงade & Site Improvements

MSA Professional Services, Inc.

COMPLETED v


2012 Guthrie Center Development Plan