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Comprehensive Plan City of Casey, Illinois

Adopted by Casey City Council May 21, 2014

Prepared by the City of Casey with assistance from MSA Professional Services, Inc.


Acknowledgements Casey City Council

Everett E. Bolin, Mayor Robin McClellan, City Clerk Aldermen: Jason Wimbley, Ward I David Sauer, Ward I Steve Jenkins, Ward II Sharon Carlen, Ward II Lori Wilson, Wards III & IV Bob Dane, Wards III & IV

Comprehensive Plan Committee Shannon Ashley Jim Bolin Sharon Durham Mary Gard Dave Hensiek Carla Honselman Jeanette Huisinga Jeff Lakins Bernie Morgan Dee Scott Nick Sherwood Sandy Staszak Maggie Williams Jason Wimbley

City Staff

Shelby Biggs, Superintendent of Utilities Nicole Weigand, Economic Development Director

MSA Professional Services Stephanie Brown, Project Planner Greg Crowe, Client Services Manager Todd Halvorson, GIS Specialist Eric Thompson, Engineer


Table of Contents Chapter 1: Introduction 1.1 2008 “Ike” Disaster 1.2 The Plan as a “Living” Guide 1.2 A Snapshot of Casey

Chapter 2: Planning Process & Public Participation 2.1 Overview of Planning Process 2.2 Citizen Survey 2.3 Public Visioning Meeting

Chapter 3: Issues & Opportunities 3.1 Issues & Opportunities

Chapter 4: Goals, Objectives & Strategies 4.1 Vision & Goals 4.2 Housing 4.3 Public Infrastructure & Utilities 4.4 Transportation & Mobility 4.5 Economic Prosperity

4.6 Downtown Revitalization 4.7 Agriculture & Natural Resources 4.8 Hazards 4.9 Collaboration & Partnerships

Chapter 5: Land Use 5.1 Existing Land Use 5.2 Future Land Use 5.3 Future Land Use Categories

5.4 City-Wide Bike Routes and Trails & Regional Context 5.5 Neighborhood / Planning Areas 5.6 Special Planning Area: Downtown

Chapter 6: Implementation & Action Plan 6.1 Guiding Daily Decisions 6.2 Guiding Annual Decisions 6.3 Action Plan 6.4 Amending the Plan

Appendix A: Community Indicators Report A.1 Demographics A.2 Housing A.3 Transportation & Mobility A.4 Economic Prosperity A.5 Agriculture & Natural Resources

A.6 Community Facilities & Services A.7 Community Character A.8 Collaboration & Partnerships A.9 Land Use

Appendix B: Public Input B.1 Citizen Survey B.2 Public Visioning Meeting

Appendix C: Maps

C.1 Existing Land Use C.2 Future Land Use C.3 City-Wide Bike Routes and Trails C.4 Transportation C.5 Regional Context

C.6 Community Facilities C.7 Parkland Needs C.8 Prime Agriculture C.9 Neighborhood Planning Areas C.10 Downtown Planning Area


Studies & Reports Sanitary Sewer Inflow & Infiltration Improvement Plan Economic Development Plan Downtown Revitalization Plan Capital Improvement Plan Street & Sidewalk Evaluation & Improvement Plan Annexation Study GIS Asset Management Housing Needs Assessment


1 Introduction 2 This Chapter provides the foundation for the Comprehensive Plan, outlining why we plan, the 3 planning process, and the planning area. In addition, 1 provides community background 4 Chapter information including key community indicators 5 and existing plans and studies. Page 6 1.1 2008 “Ike” Disaster 1-2 1.2 The Plan as a “Living” Guide Appendix A 1.3 A Snapshot of Casey 1-4 1-8 Appendix B Appendix C


1.2

THE PLAN AS A “LIVING” GUIDE

Ike Planning Grant

Storms Affect on the City

Funding for this Plan comes from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). This grant funding was allocated to the State of Illinois by Presidential Declaration in response to the flooding in 2008 – known as the “Ike” disaster. “Ike disaster” funds were provided to communities to recover from the 2008 floods, as well as plan for and reduce the damage from future floods.

The 2008 flood event from Hurricane Ike severely impacted the City of Casey and highlighted the need to address the sanitary sewer system.

Based on the Ike Planning Program requirements, the Plan must at a minimum directly address the project area’s disaster recovery needs. Specifically, the plan must: • Analyze the impact of the floods of 2008 on the area, paying special attention to the areas and groups that were most adversely affected, and the kinds of unmet “needs” that were created by the storm either directly or indirectly (e.g. infrastructure, housing, economic development etc.). • Put forth principles/policies designed to best serve the affected populations and address the identified needs created by the disaster. • Outline strategies designed to mitigate or minimize future disaster damage.

For instance, if the city experiences an inch of rain, which it experienced several inches in 2008, the sanitary sewer system will need to bypass the plant (plant capacity is 1 MGD, ADF is 0.2 MGD, Max wet weather flows are 2.0 MGD). The plant was bypassed 144 times in 2012 alone, not counting surcharges/overflows at manholes (MH’s) in the upper system. Anecdotally it was determined that during a ‘25-year storm’ and larger there are backups into basements. This is what happened during the 2008 flood event. The City has no comprehensive flow data for the system, although there is a parshall flume at the inlet to the plant (after the high flow bypass) and on the bypass prior to joining with plant discharges. A primary goal of this Plan (namely the associated studies) is to predict and better prevent flooding, and thus, reduce the damage caused to both private and public property by future floods.

Additionally, this Plan must promote the Sustainable Planning Principles listed below: • • • • • •

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Provide more transportation choices Promote equitable, affordable housing Enhance economic competitiveness Support existing communities Coordinate policies and leverage investment Value communities and neighborhoods

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CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION

Casey, Illinois

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1.2

THE PLAN AS A “LIVING” GUIDE

Why Plan It is difficult to know what the future may bring for Casey, or for any community. As residents and businesses come and go, and economic trends rise and fall, changes will occur. The purpose of this plan is to establish a shared vision for Casey to guide future actions and decisions. This guidance provides predictability and consistency over time, which encourages investment. We plan so that we can act and react in a changing world with a confident understanding of our common values and goals.

Plan Maintenance This planning document is a “living” guide for growth and change in the City of Casey. The plan represents the City’s best effort to address current issues and anticipate future needs; however, it can and should be amended from time to time if conditions warrant reconsideration of policies in this plan. If decisions are being made that are not consistent with this plan, then the plan has lost its relevance and should be amended. The process of amending the comprehensive plan should not be onerous, but it should trigger a brief pause to consider again the long term vision for the community. This plan’s value is dependent upon frequent use and occasional updates.

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CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION

Illinois Comprehensive Planning Law Comprehensive plans are defined in the Illinois Local Planning Technical Assistance Act (Public Act 920768, Sec. 5). The common elements addressed in a comprehensive plan are: 1. Land Use 2. Natural Resources 3. Historic Preservation 4. Transportation 5. Economic Development 6. Housing 7. Utilities & Community Facilities 8. Urban Design / Community Character 9. Agricultural & Forestry 10. Intergovernmental Cooperation All comprehensive plans include: • A statement of authority to prepare and adopt the plan • Background data and analysis – including area history, a description of existing social, economic and physical (natural and manmade) conditions and trends, and economic and demographic projections. • Documentation of stakeholder’s interests and involvement – these include interests of residents, public officials, the business community, and developers. • Vision statement (or statement of desired goals and objectives) – desired Village outlook, generally 20 years from now. • Future plan map or maps – these maps depict various components, including land use, transportation, community facilities, and housing areas. • Plan Implementation – framework or schedule that describes specific measures to carry out the plan, the time frame to execution, and potentially cost ranges.

Casey, Illinois

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1.2 THE PLAN AS A “LIVING” GUIDE Plan Organization The organization of the plan is based both on the planning process and the guidance provided by the Illinois IKE Disaster Recovery Program. The plan is divided into six chapters plus three important appendices. Additionally, eight (8) specific studies were organized to address issues specific to Casey. Chapter 1: Introduction Chapter 1 discusses the role of the plan, the Illinois Comprehensive Planning Law, the planning area boundaries and regional context, and Casey’s previous planning efforts. Chapter 2: Planning Process and Public Participation Chapter 2 outlines the planning process, including a description of public participation methods and feedback. Chapter 3: Issues & Opportunities Chapter 3 explores issues and opportunities, discovered through the planning process, for the future of Casey. Chapter 4: Vision, Goals, Objectives and Strategies Chapter 4 includes a vision for the future of the City, as desired in 2033, and goals, objectives, strategies, key indicators and action steps for each element of the plan, including: Housing Downtown Revitalization Public Infrastructure Agricultural & Natural Resources Transportation Hazards Economic Prosperity Collaboration & Partnerships Chapter 5: Land Use Chapter 5 describes current land use characteristics, defines future land use categories and policies, and presents the future land use map. Detailed planning for several subareas within the City is also addressed. Chapter 6: Implementation & Action Plan Chapter 6 describes the tools and procedures by which the plan will be implemented and provides a time line of action steps for successful implementation of the plan. Appendix A: Community Indicators Appendix A is a compilation of data that describes the existing conditions, trends, and projections for the City of Casey. This data informs the planning process and should be updated from time to time to track progress and change in the City. Appendix B: Public Input Appendix B is a compilation of complete results from the public input process. Appendix C: Plan Area Maps

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CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION

STUDIES: The studies are supporting documents that function on their own, but are not necessary for the daily function of the Comprehensive Plan. Sanitary Sewer Inflow & Infiltration Improvement Plan This Study contains system maps, a manhole inspection program, a sewershed map and repair action plan, and a standardized plan for repair specifications for the manholes. Economic Development Plan This study has developed recommendations for the City, including a Tax Increment Financing Analysis for the Downtown to assist in economic recovery. Downtown Enhancement Plan The City of Casey Downtown Enhancement Plan evaluated opportunities, strategies and infrastructure in the study area. This study includes a building inventory and recommendations for streetscape enhancements and improvements. Capital Improvement Plan This plan is a financial strategy to be used for effective management of finite financial resources. It has identified findings which mitigate risk from future disasters by 1) analyzing community facility needs, 2) preparing project descriptions, 3) analyzing fiscal capacity, and 4) setting project priorities. Street & Sidewalk Evaluation & Improvement Plan This study contains an inventory of the streets and sidewalks within Casey with a PASER (Pavement Surface Evaluation and Rating) style evaluation to establish a baseline for the City’s pavement infrastructure assets. This will help prioritize future upgrades. Annexation Study This study identifies potential areas for annexation and growth around Casey. These areas can be most efficiently served with sewer, water and emergency services. GIS Asset Management This plan integrates all of the data collected and developed throughout the planning process into a webbased Asset Manager (mapping) program. Housing Needs Assessment This study includes a windshield housing survey which identified dwelling types, condition, and general trends within Casey. This, combined with Census Data, was used to create and analyze maps as well as create housing initiatives for the City.

Casey, Illinois

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1.3

A SNAPSHOT OF CASEY

History of Casey

Planning Area

Casey was first settled as the result of the completion of the National Trail and a new north/south road (later to become Route 49) through Clark County. In the 1853, the post office and the community were named after the Honorable Zadoc Casey, who at the time was serving part of five consecutive terms as an Illinois U.S. Senator.

The study area for this Plan includes all lands in which the City has both a short- and long-term interest in planning and development activity. As shown on the map on the opposite page, the Planning Area includes all lands within the current municipal limits and within the City’s potential 1.5 mile extraterritorial jurisdiction. The City is approximately 1,382.4 acres (2.16 square miles). The entire Planning Area is approximately 16,000 acres (25 square miles).

At the turn of the 20th century, the discovery of oil made Casey a boomtown and the instant prosperity affected every part of local life. Shortly after the first oil well was drilled in Pennsylvania in 1857, Clark County began its experiments with oil drilling. However, it wasn’t until techniques and tools improved by the early 1900s that the boom was fully realized. By 1907, two-thousand wells had been drilled in a 9,000 acre area between Casey and Westfield filling twenty-four million barrels in a single year. The oil boom brought much wealth to the community of Casey and whether it is in the fields or in the architecture; its lasting effects can still be seen as you make your way around town.

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CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION

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CITY OF CASEY CLARK AND CUMBERLAND COUNTIES, IL

BASE MAP

DATA SOURCES: MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY AND PARCELS PROVIDED BY CLARK COUNTY. ROADS, TOWNSHIPS AND COUNTIES PROVIDED BY US CENSUS (2013). LAND USE IN CLARK COUNTY DERIVED FROM PARCEL DATASET. LAND USE IN CUMBERLAND COUNTY DERIVED FROM AERIAL INTERPRETATION. OPEN WATER AND RIVERS/STREAMS PROVIDED BY USGS (NHD). FORESTED AREA DERIVED FROM USDA-NRCS CROPLAND DATA LAYER (2012).

CASEY COUNTY PARCEL FORESTED AREA OPEN WATER

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Casey, Illinois

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1.3

A SNAP SHOT OF CASEY

Regional Context The majority of the City of Casey, Illinois is located in Clark County while a finger of the municipality reaches into the eastern boundary of Cumberland County. You will find Casey at the intersection of State Routes 40 and 49, just south of Interstate 70 in southeastern Illinois. Casey is 100 miles southwest of Indianapolis, Indiana; 130 miles northeast of St. Louis, Missouri; and 60 miles south of Champaign, Illinois.

The map below shows the major regional cities within 150 miles of Casey. These cities have a large impact on employment and goods for Casey.

Casey’s economy is based largely on agricultural, educational, health, and social services. These are served by the local school district as well as surrounding higher educational facilities. There are also two local clinics and several regional hospitals within commuting distance. There is also a large portion which relies on manufacturing and transportation/warehouse industries. These are served by U.S. Interstate 70 which runs across the northern boundary of Casey and by the CSX Railroad.

MAJOR REGIONAL CITIES

Source: U.S. Census, 2010

Champaign-Urbana 122,305

Danville 32,649

Decatur 75,407

Mattoon-Charleston 40,275

Indianapolis 834,852

Paris 8,664 Terre Haute 61,112

Effingham 12,554

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CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION

Key Community Indicators This section analyzes over-arching population and demographic trends for the City of Casey. Examination of these trends provide a foundation for the planning process and implementation of the plan. Population in Casey has been steadily decreasing since 1980, losing over 8% of the City’s population in the last 30 years. This is double the County’s population loss and significant in a State which is showing population growth. The number of people per household in Casey showed a slight increase in the last decade, but is still below the regional and national averages. Casey’s also has an older population with 40% over the age of 50. The young professional age group is rather small representing less than 16% of Casey’s population.

Existing Plans Casey currently does not have existing plans and studies related to planning or the future of the community. This plans represents their first efforts to guide the future of the community as a whole.

POPULATION TRENDS 1980 - 2010 Source: U.S. Census, 2010

City of Casey

Illinois

1980

3,026

16,913

11,426,518

1990 2000 2010

2,914

15,921

11,430,602

2,942 2,769

17,008 16,335

12,419,293 12,830,632

HOUSEHOLD COUNTS 1980 - 2010 Source: U.S. Census, 2010

Casey Persons Per 1980 1990 2000 2010

Clark County

Number

n/a n/a 2.22 2.27

Persons Per

na/ n/a 1,266 1,163

2.57 2.45 2.40 2.38

Number

Illinois Persons Per

16,654 15,672 16,761 16,114

Number

2.76 2.65 2.63

4,045,374 4,202,240 4,591,779

2.59

4,836,972

AGE OF POPULATION 2010 Source: U.S. Census, 2010

City of Casey Number Under 18 18 & over 20 - 24 25 - 34 35 - 49 50 - 64 65 & over Totals

Casey, Illinois

Clark County

635 2134 163 309 493 479 613

2,769

Percent 22.93% 77.07% 5.89% 11.16% 17.80% 17.30% 22.14%

Clark County Number 3,718 12,617 866 1,750 3,362 3,303 2,946

Percent 22.76% 77.24% 5.30% 10.71% 20.58% 20.22% 18.03%

16,335

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1 2 Planning Process & Public Participation 3 This Chapter provides an overview of the planning and public participation process. Summaries of 4 public input for the citizen survey, public visioning focus groups and growth and development 5 meeting, workshops are provided. 6 Page Appendix A 2.1 Overview of Planning Process 2-2 2.2 Citizen Survey 2-4 Appendix B 2.3 Public Visioning Meeting 2-10 Appendix C


2.1

OVERVIEW OF PLANNING PROCESS

Planning Process A transparent public participation process is the foundation to a successful plan. The involvement of residents, business owners, and other stakeholders is essential to the creation and implementation of the plan. Elements of public participation for the Casey Comprehensive Planning process included: • • • • •

Comprehensive Plan Advisory Committee Planning process on City Website Citizen Survey Public Visioning Meeting Stakeholder meetings

The Comprehensive Plan Advisory Committee consisted of members representing a wide range of public and private interests and acted as the primary sounding board for the planning process. The Committee met bimonthly from June 2013 to April 2014 to review draft plan materials. All meetings were open to the public.

Incorporating Input into the Plan The goals, objectives and strategies of a comprehensive plan support the community’s vision for the future of Casey and address barriers and opportunities to realizing this vision. Elements of the plan have been crafted from individual participants’ ideas, common themes identified in focus groups, discussions and debates among Committee members, anonymous concerns identified in surveys, and the past experiences of the community as a whole. This input allows us to construct underlying themes as a frame for the plan, and provides information on what specific issues and ideas are most important to Casey’s citizens. This foundation ensures that the plan is not just a hollow document, but a guide for future decisions in Casey that are in line with the community’s ideals. From this foundation, a better Casey can and will be built.

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CHAPTER 2 PLANNING PROCESS & PUBLIC PARTICIPATION

Planning Process Schedule This Plan was discussed and developed through a series of working session meetings between May 2013 and March 2014 (See side bar for the project milestones). All meetings were public meetings and noticed as such.

Advisory Committee Meeting #1 May 14, 2013 Public Open House June 20, 2013 Advisory Committee Meeting #2 July 18, 2013 Advisory Committee Meeting #3 September 17, 2013 Downtown Advisory Committee Meeting October 29, 2013 Advisory Committee Meeting #4 November 19, 2013 Advisory Committee Meeting #5 January 30, 2014 Advisory Committee Meeting #6 March 25, 2014 Public Review of Draft Plan April-May 2014 Public Open House May 6, 2014 Council Meeting to Adopt Plan May 2, 2014

Casey, Illinois

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2.2 CITIZEN SURVEY Online Survey

Survey was available online via www.surveymonkey.com

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CHAPTER 2 PLANNING PROCESS & PUBLIC PARTICIPATION

Methods

Profile of Respondents

The survey was distributed via hard copies available at the public open house and thereafter at City Hall. It was also published on the City’s website (www. cityofcaseyil.org) and the Comprehensive Plan’s website (www.picturecasey.com).

Approximately 1.81% (equalling 50) of citizens responded to the survey. No one under the age of 25 responded, while 45% of the respondents were over the age of 45. The 25 to 34 age range is overrepresented in this survey. In addition, those who live in single family homes (97%) and were homeowners (88%) were overrepresented almost exclusively. Age of Respondent (Q3) 30.0% 25.0% 20.0% 15.0% 10.0% 5.0% 0.0% <18

18 to 24 25 to 34 35 to 44 45 to 54 55 to 64 Survey Respondents

65 or older

Census Data (2010)

The majority of respondents (77.6%) currently live in Casey, while the other live in surrounding communities, including some outside of Illinois (12.2%). City of Residence (Q4) Outside of Illinois 11%

Other 9%

Elsewhere in Illinois 8% City of Effingham 0%

City of Casey 70%

City of Charleston/Mattoon 2%

Casey, Illinois

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2.2

CITIZEN SURVEY

Imagine Casey

Quality of Life

When asked if they could imagine changing or fixing something in the community that would have a long-lasting impact, the majority of the open ended responses fell into four major categories: 1) Catering to youth with activities and events; 2) Increasing the number of available jobs; 3) Providing incentives for business; and 4) Ensuring good property maintenance for both commercial and residential. The latter comment was the most prevalent.

When asked to identify the three most important reasons the respondent and their family live in Casey, the majority of respondents (60%) indicated it was to be “near family and friends” and “near job/work”. A significant respondents also indicated that the “low crime rate” was a determining factor. Other factors included “owning a business in the City” (20%) and “quality schools” (12%).

Q1 Q2

When asked to imagine brining something to the community that would have a long-lasting impact, the most desired element focused on bringing employment and/or employment opportunities to the community (e.g. a factory, small businesses, tourism, telecommunications, etc.). The other major response was for family and/or youth oriented activities aiding in the overall health and wellness of the city.

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Q5 Q6 Q7

Overall, respondents felt that the quality of life in Casey was “good” (50%), while 33.3% felt the quality of life was “fair”, and with only 8.3% feeling that the quality of life was “excellent”. Many commented on how the quality has deteriorated over the years and felt the future looked bleak, specifically identifying deteriorating properties and employment availability. Respondents were also asked to indicate up to four changes that would improve the quality of life in Casey. An overwhelming majority (95.9%) of respondents indicated “Increase employment opportunities” as a needed change. Other highly ranked responses included “Decrease taxes and fee” (61.2%) and “expand retail shopping options” (40.8%).

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CHAPTER 2 PLANNING PROCESS & PUBLIC PARTICIPATION

City Facilities and Services

Economic Development

The survey respondents were asked to prioritize maintenance and construction investments for City Facilities and infrastructure. Respondents felt that more money was needed for the maintenance and improvement of “sidewalks” (47.8%), “bike routes and trails (42.2%), and “stormwater management systems (sewers, ponds, etc)” (51.1%). There were no categories where the majority of respondents indicated that less money should be spent. Other facilities and infrastructure that were prioritized included the airport, major and neighborhood streets, city hall, parks, the library, sanitary sewers, and the public water supply.

The distance a person commutes to work can be a strong indicator of the quality of life in a community as well as the employment availability. The range of distances traveled by the respondents varied greatly. A large portion (33.3%) of respondents travel more than ten (10) miles to work, while a similarly sized group (28.9%) only travel one to three (1-3) miles to work. Surprisingly, 15.6% work from home thus eliminating a commute.

Q8 Q9 Q10

When asked to prioritize public services spending preferences, respondents indicated that more money should be spent on “Economic development” (83.0%), “Programs for youth” (68.8%), “General City-wide clean-up, etc.” (66.7%),“Inspection (building code enforcement)” (58.7%), and “Recreational programs” (51.1%). There were no categories where the majority of respondents indicated that less money should be spent. Respondents were also asked to indicate up to four types of recreation amenities either expanded or improved upon in Casey. Highest ranked responses included “Walking Trails” (46.9%), “Swimming pools or splash parks” (44.9%), “Playgrounds and playground equipment” (40.8%), and “Weight lifting and fitness centers” (36.7%).

Casey, Illinois

Q11 Q12 Q13 Q14

Less than half (42.2%) of the respondents work within the City of Casey. Several (11.1%) travel to the Charleston/Mattoon area for work while a few respondents travel to Effingham, Paris, Martinsville, and even outside of Illinois (Terre Haute). With unemployment recently hitting historically high rates throughout the country, job security has been an important issue facing communities both large and small. When asked how secure respondents felt their employment to be, approximately 56% indicated “Secure” (37.8%) and “Somewhat secure” (17.8%) over the next 3-5 years. Only 11.1% believed their employment to be “Insecure”, and 4.4% of respondents indicated that they were currently “Unemployed”. A majority of respondents (67.4%) believe the City of Casey should commit tax dollars to attract, retain, and replace lost jobs in the private sector in Casey while 23.9% were “Not sure” at this time if they would support or oppose such action.

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2.2 CITIZEN SURVEY

Q15 Q16 Q17

Economic Development Cont.

Housing

In addition to employment, respondents were asked about their spending habits. Approximately 64% shop downtown once per month or less, with 31.8% monthly and the same percentage less weekly. The most common response for not shopping downtown was that the stores were too “niche” and not something that interested the respondent.

When asked about the supply of various housing types in the City of Casey, respondents indicated that more “Affordable housing” (64.3%) and “Assisted living facilities for seniors” (59.5%) are needed. They also indicated the need for more studio/efficiency apartments, condominiums and apartments for seniors, and starter homes. Comments including cleaning up the existing housing stock and retrofitting where necessary.

Results indicate that 60% of respondents leave Casey on a weekly basis to shop with 28.6% leaving on a monthly basis. The most common reason for leaving the City was for the lower cost of items. In-line with the findings of previous questions in this section, most respondents indicated that there is a lack of “Apparel and shoe stores” (81.0%), a lack of “Downtown retail shopping/services” (77.8%), and a lack of “Department and general merchandise stores” (69.8%). Other areas where respondents felt Casey fell short on providing were fast-food restaurants, sit-down restaurants, and grocery stores. There were very few respondents who felt that too many services were provided.

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Q20 Q21

“Housing quality” (60.0%) was sited as the most important housing aspect to improve upon in Casey. The cost of housing was a somewhat smaller concern with 28.9%. Many sited “slum” houses or neighborhoods as a major concern while other commented on the cost of homes as being disproportionately high when compared to the quality of home for the area.

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CHAPTER 2 PLANNING PROCESS & PUBLIC PARTICIPATION

Land Use & Development

Q22 Q23 Q24

Respondents rated most aspect of the City of Casey as “Good” including “Noise control”, “Signage control (size and location of signs)”, “Lighting control”, and “Number of street trees”. “Aesthetic design of new development” was split between respondents as being Good and Poor. “Access to parks” was rated as excellent by a majority (70%) of respondents while “Property upkeep/cleanliness” was rated as poor (55.8%) and fair (34.9%). The respondents were asked if the City should offer financial incentives to encourage development and investment in Casey. A majority of respondents indicated that they would be in favor of the City offering financial incentives to encourage development and investment within the City for “Residential” (62.5%), Retail Business (83.7%), and Non-Retail Business (70.7%). Respondents also felt that development would best be served in the “Downtown” (92.9%), then in “Vacant infill sites outside of the downtown area” (72.2%) then in the “Undeveloped land (e.g. farmland)” (42.9%). This was supported in the comments which encouraged investment in existing building and vacant lots.

Casey, Illinois

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2.3

PUBLIC VISIONING MEETING

Public Visioning The City desires a clear vision for the future-Casey as we want it to be in 20 years. The recent Picture Casey process resulted in the following Vision Statement:

all sm t n ra ib v a is y se a C f o y it C â&#x20AC;&#x153;The s on town ideally located to focu ses, es n si u b l ca lo r u o g in rt o p p su d attracting new businesses an . appealing to regional tourism y se a C in ve li to se o o ch le p eo P ds, for the friendly neighborhoo unity m m co d an , n w to n w o d g in it inv y se a C it is v to se o o ch le p eo P . spirit cal for the unique attractions, lo onal ti ea cr re d an , g in in d , ry st ti ar opportunities.â&#x20AC;?

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CHAPTER 2 PLANNING PROCESS & PUBLIC PARTICIPATION

Public Open House The Public Open House was held on June 20, 2013 at Casey City Hall. The purpose of the meeting was to gather input on the Casey’s strengths, concerns and opportunities which would in turn provide direction to the comprehensive planning process. Over twenty (20) participants shared their options on the future of Casey. The meeting was structured as an Open House format and divided into two sections. The first was a S.W.O.T. (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, & Threats) Analysis where participants’ input was discussed and a consultant recorded for all to review. The discussion covered all topics from economic development and land use to historic preservation and youth programs. The second portion was a community identity and visioning exercise which asked participants to envision Casey Yesterday and Casey Tomorrow. Both positive and negative aspects were discussed. Participants anonymous posted their visions and discussion on several ensued. The following pages provide a brief summary of the feedback and comments collected throughout the evening. A more detailed list of comments, as well as images of the final boards from the meeting, are included in Appendix B.

INTERESTED OR CONCERNED ABOUT DIFFERENT ELEMENTS OF OUR COMMUNITY — TRANSPORTATION, HOUSING, DOWNTOWN?

JUNE 20, 2013 5—8 P.M.

PUBLIC OPEN HOUSE

CASEY CITY HALL

Residents of Casey are invited to give input on the direction of the Comprehensive Plan—the long-term goals of our community. Come share your thoughts & listen to others as we discuss our strengths & weaknesses as a community, and decide where we should focus our efforts in the future.

Join us for as long—or short— as you like to be a part of the planning process. Your vision for your community matters! Contact Nicole Weigand for more information: 217-932-4074 or nweigand@mchsi.com Stop by anytime to join in the conversation and provide vision for the future of Casey.

Open House SW OT Analysis June 2013

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2.3

PUBLIC VISIONING MEETING

S.W.O.T. Analysis

Land Use & (Re)Development

By working through the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of and around Casey, the participants were able to clearly identify where they were, where they are, and where they would like to be. Helpful

External origin

(attributes of the environment)

Internal origin

(attributes of the organization)

to achieving the objective

Harmful

to achieving the objective

S W O T Strengths

Opportunities

Weaknesses

Threats

Several common themes emerged from this analysis which included: • • • • • • •

Land Use & (Re)Development Transportation Economic Development & Employment Parks & Recreation Housing Tourism & Activities Volunteerism

Each theme has been summarized herein.

Land development and redevelopment is guided by plans, ordinances, market conditions, developer efforts, community feedback, and decisions by elected officials. A key purpose of the comprehensive plan is to make land development and investment as predictable as possible by identifying types and locations of development that are both market feasible and, at minimum, acceptable to the community. Participants discussed many types of development they have seen or would like to see in Casey. Some of the strengths are the Enterprize Zone and the Casey Industries group, both which focus on expanding and/or bringing quality businesses to Casey. Discussion was focused on the redevelopment of the downtown and the (re)development of vacant or derelict structures. Much concern was given toward the number of vacant and dilapidated structures throughout the city. Both commercial and residential structures were cited as being a weakness for the community and a threat to attracting new development. The participants also saw opportunities for reinvestment in the historic downtown through upper story residential units and ground floor retail.

Transportation Casey has an excellent transportation network within and surrounding the city. It is served by Interstate, Highway, Air, and Rail. The participants felt this strength was also an under-utilized opportunity for the community. Interstate 70 runs along the northern edge of Casey lending to good container access. The airport is located just off of Interstate 70 for convenient land to air transport. And the railroad runs parallel to the interstate although located in the heart of Casey. The participants also saw an opportunity for tourism growth though the Historic National Road, also known as the “Road That Built the Nation”, “The Cumberland Road”, and “The Old Pike”.

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CHAPTER 2 PLANNING PROCESS & PUBLIC PARTICIPATION Economic Development & Employment Residents pointed to several threats to achieving a thriving economic development and employment scene in Casey. First, there is a lack of money within the community for investment and reinvestment. Locals do not currently have the resources to financially help themselves. Second, the mobility of residents makes it easy to go outside of the community to shop, work, and recreate. The participants also pointed to a lack of skilled and/ or educated work force available in the community for potential employers to utilize. On the flip side, for the highly educated employees, there are very few jobs to be found in the area for which they are not over qualified. Residents also see a need for jobs to help retain the recently graduated citizens to keep them in the community. Many youth must leave after graduation to find employment. Participants saw opportunities for economic growth through a coordinated marketing plan. One that made the most of what Casey had to offer (i.e. location, festivals, workforce, etc.). In regards to location, the participants felt they could support a distribution center easily. They would like to see better incentives for employers to locate in Casey and thought that the idea of a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pop Up Storeâ&#x20AC;? may work well in Casey as long as it did not compete with other local businesses. On the whole, the participants felt as a community lacked enough purchasing power to support existing local businesses, let alone new, desired retail.

Illinois be more competitive with Indiana. On the upside, the participants cited a few economic drivers which are present and should be enforced and strengthened. The current Enterprise Zone provides a good incentive for businesses wanting to locate in Casey. The community has been very successful in pursuing and being awarded grants for a multitude of projects. There are several thriving local businesses which contribute greatly to the community. Major employers include health clinics, nursing homes, and assisted living facilities; all growing industries in Illinois. Lastly there are four (4) lending institutions in the community which contribute to the financial vitality of Casey.

Parks & Recreation The community takes great pride in its large and well maintained Fairview Park. This park contains an outdoor pool, picnic area, playground, and outdoor theatre, baseball/softball diamonds, lake, trails, and stables. This is where major festivals occur and tournaments are held and where the community see the possibility for more events. It is a pillar of the community and participants see it continuing to be into the future. However, the pool needs some attention. The community also has a wonderful golf course which also is home to the Worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Largest Golf Tee. They have two camp grounds, a Motor Cross course, and a private community center. The community center was seen as being under utilized due to its high rent costs.

The participants also cited as a weakness and a threat that Clark County had higher property taxes than surrounding communities in Cumberland County with very little to offer for the difference. There was a consensus that these would need to be lowered in order to compete with nearby communities. To that same sentiment, the participants sited competition with Indiana for employers as a major factor in unemployment and would like to see the State of

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2.3

PUBLIC VISIONING MEETING

Housing

Volunteerism

Much discussion focused around the need for stricter enforcement of codes and ordinances for residential structures. Participants felt the public nuisance ordinance especially needed enforced to ensure neighborhoods were kept up and made desirable for residents. Abandoned homes are of also concern for participants: how to maintain, how to fill, and/or how to demolish these units were all discussed.

The participants took great pride in amount of volunteering spirit within the community. They stated that there are many charitable residents who give for a multitude of reasons. The local churches have a huge community presence and there are strong clubs (Lions, Rotary, CIA, Alumni, Historic, etc.). Unfortunately, the group feared burn out and are looking for other ways to achieve more community involvement.

Casey currently provides senior and low income units for residents, but participants felt that much of the existing stock was of a low quality for the low income units.

Tourism & Activities Casey has worked hard to position themselves as a tourism center and are well on their way by labeling themselves with “Big Things in a Small Town”. Casey currently holds four (4) Guinness World Records-Largest Wind Chime, Largest Knitting Needles, Largest Crochet Needles, and Largest Golf Tee-and are working on more. The idea of bringing in a Trolley to connect these sites was discussed. These tourist attractions lend to the opportunity of putting “heads in beds” and fill the Days Inn to expand the local tax base. The participants also see an opportunity to showcase local artists. Casey annually hosts the Popcorn Festival and sees opportunities to grow this and others through marketing, social media, and a community calendar. However, the participants see a lack of activities for residents and would like to see that expanded in Casey (e.g. bowling alley, movie theatre, etc.)

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1 2 3 Issues & Opportunities 4 This Chapter highlights the opportunities, assets, issues and liabilities identified through the public 5 participation process, and in previous plans and that are relevant to the communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s growth 6 studies, and prosperity. Appendix A Page Appendix B 3.1 Issues & Opportunities 3-2 Appendix C


3.1

ISSUES & OPPORTUNITIES

Introduction

Issues & Liabilities

This plan is grounded in a set of issues about which the community is concerned, and opportunities the community sees for positive change. The plan seeks to address perceived deficiencies and capitalize on opportunities. This section is a compilation of key issues and opportunities, identified in recent plans and studies and throughout the development of this plan in 2013. Items on these lists come from focus group conversations, the community survey, Advisory Committee input, and public meetings.

• Nostalgia for heavy manufacturing and limited white-collar employment. • Aging workforce and inability to attract/retain young professionals. • Loss of jobs and population in Clark County over the last 50 years. • Regional shopping centers pose a threat to viability of downtown and other local businesses. • Attracting environmentally sustainable businesses and industries while providing adequate employment opportunities for Casey’s workforce. • Costs associated with extension and expansion of infrastructure and services. • Deterioration of older housing stock and lack of diversity in new housing stock. • Property maintenance and code violation issues. • Decrease in community pride and increase in negative attitudes. • Vacant buildings and storefronts, especially downtown. • Disconnected or non-existent pedestrian/bicycle infrastructure and pedestrian/bicycle safety. • Flooding is becoming more frequent and more extreme. • Limited resources for hazard mitigation and response. • Limited encouragement and support of the arts and lack of promotion of art/cultural events.

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CHAPTER 3 ISSUES & OPPORTUNITIES

Opportunities & Assets • Mid-continent location and a comprehensive transportation system (including major railway system, four lane interstate grade highway access, and regional airport facility) minimizes transportation costs. • Midwest work ethic, low absenteeism, and a strong industrial background. • Economic development Enterprize Zone.

tools

including

• Major regional tourist and destination attractions and events including Four Guinness World Records, the Popcorn Festival, the Amateur Softball Hall of Fame, and a Golf Course. • Adequate supply of land for development and growth. • Significant opportunities for redevelopment including historic properties and warehouses, vacant commercial buildings, and downtown store fronts. • Quality educational system. • State-of-the-art medical facilities and services, including Sarah Bush. • Quality amenities including Fairview Park. • Established and committed civic groups.

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1 2 3 4 Goals, Objectives & Strategies 5 This Chapter presents a vision for the future of Casey and describes goals, objectives, and 6 strategies to achieve that vision. Housing, Public Transportation & Mobility, Economic Appendix A Infrastructure, Prosperity, Downtown Revitalization, Agriculture & Appendix B Natural Resources, Hazards, and Collaboration & Partnerships are all addressed. Appendix C Page 4.1 Vision & Goals 4-2 4.2 Housing 4-4 4.3 Public Infrastructure & Utilities 4-8 4.4 Transportation & Mobility 4-10 4.5 Economic Prosperity 4-14 4.6 Downtown Revitalization 4-20 4.7 Agriculture & Natural Resources 4-24 4.8 Hazards 4-28 4.9 Collaboration & Partnerships 4-32


4.1

VISION & GOALS

Chapters 1-3 assessed where Casey is now; the values, strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats. This Chapter seeks to find where Casey is going--the vision--and how the City is going to get there--the goals, objectives and action steps as defined as follows: Goal: A goal is a long-term target that states what the community wants to accomplish. Written in general terms, the statement offers a desired condition. Objective: An objective is a statement that identifies a course of action to achieve a goal. They are more specific than goals and are usually attainable through planning and implementation activities. Action Steps: These are the small series of steps taken to achieve the objectives and goals. Individually, these usually do not realize big change, however, achieving many action steps can result in noticeable changes toward the goal. Policy: A policy is a specific rule of conduct or course of action intended to help the City achieve the goals and objectives of the plan. Policies using the words “shall” or “will” are firm commitments by the City – all future actions and decisions made by the City should be consistent with these policies. Policies using the words “should,” “encourage,” “discourage,” or “may” are intended to serve as a guide for City decisions and actions.

The City of Casey as we want it to be in 2035... “The City of Casey is a vibrant small town ideally located to focus on supporting our local businesses, attracting new businesses and appealing to regional tourism. People choose to live in Casey for the friendly neighborhoods, inviting downtown, and community spirit. People choose to visit Casey for the unique attractions, local artistr y, dining, and recreational opportunities.”

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CHAPTER 4 GOALS, OBJECTIVES & STRATEGIES

Caseyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goals for a better future... Housing H1: All residents will have access to quality housing, regardless of ability or socioeconomic status.

E6: Downtown Casey will be preserved and enhanced as a hub of economic, social, and cultural affairs.

H2: Plan for safe, attractive and affordable housing to meet existing and forecasted housing demands.

Downtown Revitalization

H3: Casey will reinvest in vacant lots and existing housing stock. H4: Casey homes will be resource efficient.

Public Infrastructure & Utilities P1: Sewer and water service will effectively meet the needs of current and future residents and businesses. P2: The City will be well connected by pedestrian pathways.

Transportation & Mobility T1: Provide a safe, efficient, reliable, multi-modal, and well-maintained transportation network. T2: Single occupancy vehicle trips will decline as a percentage of all transportation within the City. T3: Biking and walking in Casey will be safe, enjoyable and efficient. T4: Local transportation systems will be wellcoordinated with regional systems and investments.

DT1: Ensure high quality site and building redevelopment to uphold property values and reinforce the character of the City. DT2: Address the needs of Downtown Infrastructure and parking. DT3: Make improvements to public spaces and incorporate park facilities. DT4: Casey will ensure historic preservation is recognized and celebrated.

Agriculture & Natural Resources AG1: Maintain, enhance and reinforce the aesthetic quality of life consistent with the character of the city and surrounding landscape by preserving agricultural lands and activities, rural vistas, and natural areas of south eastern Illinois. AG2: Improve the quality of water resources for both recreation and consumption. AG3: Provide locally grown products for local consumption.

Hazards

Economic Prosperity E1: Attract, retain, create and expand businesses that strengthen and diversify the local economy, grow the tax base, and enhance the downtown area. E2: Strengthen and promote tourism as an economic force in Casey. E3: Employment will grow in Casey through the creation, expansion and further development of existing and new business. E4: Caseyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economic base will be diverse and resilient.

HZ1: Ensure the Casey is adequately prepared to mitigate the effects of a natural or manmade disaster. HZ2: Residents and assets will be protected during a disaster.

Collaboration & Partnerships CP1: Foster and/or maintain mutually beneficial relationships and partnerships with neighboring municipalities, Clark and Cumberland Counties, State and Federal agencies, and the schools, colleges and universities which serve Casey residents.

E5: Costs and benefits of economic development efforts will be shared within the regional economy.

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4.2

HOUSING

As a city grows and changes, housing must change to meet the needs of the population. Housing is included in a comprehensive plan to provide guidance for decision-makers and developers when considering additions to and renovations of the City’s housing stock. Diversity, quality and affordability are over arching themes in Casey’s housing goals. For the full assessment, see the study, Housing Needs Assessment.

H1: Housing Goal 1

SHARED CITIZEN CONCERNS • Need to clean up/keep up existing housing stock • Low quality, low-income housing • Lack of enforcement of nuisance ordinances

All residents will have access to quality housing, regardless of ability or socioeconomic status. Objective H1.1: Lower-income earners in the local workforce will have access to affordable housing options within the City. Strategies • The City will promote the development of quality housing options that meet the needs of lower-income residents, including both marketrate and subsidized or price-controlled products. • The City will promote the geographical dispersal of affordable housing throughout the community, and encourage development of affordable housing on transit routes and corridors. • The City will continue to support opportunities for homeownership for low to moderate income families through grant opportunities.

Objective H1.2: The City will continue to play an active role in providing accessible housing to all populations. Strategies • The City will encourage non-profits in providing transitional and emergency housing for low-income and homeless individuals and families. • The City will support redevelopment of vacant homes by willing residential developers.

Objective H1.3: Accessible housing units will be seamlessly integrated into both existing neighborhoods and new developments. Strategies • The City encourages the use of universal design and development of life-cycle housing to facilitate the ability of residents to age in place, either in the same home or the same neighborhood. • The City should periodically analyze the housing needs of the special needs and elderly populations and promote appropriate programs, regulations, or incentives to meet these needs.

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“Universal design” refers to a broad spectrum of design construction techniques meant to create housing that is accessible and comfortable for people with or without disabilities. “Life-cycle housing” aims to create housing options that meet people’s needs and circumstances at all of life’s stages, from family to old age

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CHAPTER 4 GOALS, OBJECTIVES & STRATEGIES Objective H4.2: All residential development, and particularly multiple-family and senior living developments, should be located in areas where safe pedestrian access to parks, retail, and community facilities is possible. However this policy should not result in the concentration of multiple-family housing in any one area -- such housing should be located in many parts of the city, consistent with Objective H1.1. Strategies • The City will review the subdivision code and enforce compliance with (re)development projects.

H2: Housing Goal 2 Plan for safe, attractive and affordable housing to meet existing and forecasted housing demands. Objective H2.1: Develop land use plans that guide the location, use and density of existing and future housing developments. Strategies • The city encourages the integration of varied housing types and lot sizes throughout the community to meet the needs of residents of varied income, age and health status. This may include single-family, two-family, multiple family or senior housing choices within the same development area. • New residential development should be connected to an existing or planned neighborhood area that incorporates traditional neighborhood design. Unplanned or unconnected residential development is strongly discouraged.

Current and Existing Housing Conditions in Casey Household trends for the City of Casey show an 8.14% drop in households between 2000 and 2010, compared to a 3.86% drop for Clark County and a 5.34% increase for the State during the same period. Over the past 20 years (1990-2010) the number of households in the County grew by 2.82%, and in the State by 15.1%. Over the next 20 years (2010-2030) the number of households in the City of Casey is projected to grow by 1.7%, in Clark County by 7.66%, and in the State by 15.2%. In all three cases, the projected percentage growth in the number of households is less than the projected growth in population which reflects the continued trend in the decline of the number of persons per household. The diversity of Casey’s housing stock is typical of small towns in the Midwest, with 81% consisting of single family homes. Multi-family housing in the City is limited in number of units per dwelling with 6% having two to four units, and only 4% having dwellings with greater than four units. Casey is atypical in the fact that there is also a large percentage (9%) of dwellings classified as a Mobile Home or Trailer. The vacancy rate (14%) is outside the healthy range vacancy rates, which is considered to be 5-6%. Casey has seen a relatively consistent decrease in new housing stock since 1950 when nearly 50% of the stock had been built. Since 2005, a mere 5% of the current housing stock has been built and will only be slower as the population trends continue.

“Traditional neighborhood design” incorporates a mix of housing types, wellconnected streets, public spaces, and neighborhoodserving amenities.

Casey, Illinois

Casey residents that participated in the public participation process indicated that quality of housing, diversity of housing, and preservation of historic homes are all important issues when planning for housing development and growth.

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4.2

HOUSING • Neighborhoods should include housing for all ages and family types.

Objective H2.2: Ensure that residential developments are built and maintained according to levels deemed safe by industry standards. Strategies • The City maintains a comprehensive building code that requires inspection of new structures and repair of unsafe and unsanitary housing conditions. • The City supports programs that maintain or rehabilitate the local housing stock. They City discourages the use of properties for the accumulation of “junk” materials, and will enforce property maintenance/public nuisance ordinances as needed.

SURVEY RESULTS HIGHLIGHTS • • • •

Objective H2.3: Casey will offer safe, attractive and diverse housing options. Strategies • The City encourages a mixture of housing unit sizes, types, and market-rate price points in all neighborhoods. • The City will be aware of market demand for various housing types and will encourage development of units that respond to market demand.

Objective H2.4: Existing neighborhoods will be maintained, enhanced and celebrated. Strategies • The City encourages and supports the creation of neighborhood associations and locally-led neighborhood planning efforts. • Redevelopment should be compatible with the character of the surrounding neighborhood. • The City will work to improve walkability, lighting, streets, and sidewalks in existing neighborhoods.

H3: Housing Goal 3 Casey will reinvest in vacant lots and existing housing stock. Objective H4.1: The City supports infill and redevelopment practices to reinvigorate older portions of the community. In the downtown area, the City will consider creative development or redevelopment that includes a mix of residential units, small businesses and/or civic spaces. Strategies • The City will support incentive programs for residential redevelopment in declining neighborhoods.

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More affordable housing and assisted living facilities are desired. A variety of units (apartments, condos, studios, etc..) is desired. The clean up of existing housing stock was a concern for residents. Cost of housing was not a concern, while quality of housing stock was a concern.


CHAPTER 4 GOALS, OBJECTIVES & STRATEGIES H3: Housing Goal 4 Casey homes will be resource efficient. Objective H4.1: The energy efficiency of Casey’s housing stock will continue to improve. Strategies • The City will ensure that all applicable construction or rehabilitation projects meet the International Energy Conservation Code.

Housing Action Items

aUpdate

land development ordinances to require components of traditional neighborhood design and consideration of existing neighborhood context.

aEvaluate

aDevelop

and maintain affordable homeownership

aContinue to evaluate promote housing improvements

a sustainable funding source to address the residential tear-down and acquisition of abandoned properties (e.g. a percentage of code violation fees).

aExplore the development of a housing rehabilitation

aExplore

promote the care of vacant lots.

programs.

aDevelop

incentives to promote rehabilitation of existing housing.

Casey, Illinois

surrounding communities’ incentive programs for residential development to ensure Casey remains competitive in housing development. in the southeast target area.

revolving loan funding program.

aExplore the development of a sideyard program to aSecure grants for an abandoned property program. 4-7


4.3

PUBLIC INFRASTRUCTURE & UTILITIES

Local government is responsible for a broad array of essential services, such as sanitary sewer service, stormwater management, water supply, solid waste disposal, wastewater treatment technologies, recycling facilities and telecommunications facilities. The quality, efficacy and efficiency of these services have a direct relationship to quality of life for residents. While each of these services is individually managed and monitored, they are considered in the comprehensive plan to ensure that investment in these services serves the overall vision for the City. The over arching themes of the plan for these services are quality, efficiency and equity. For more detailed analyses on specific systems, see Study A: Sanitary Sewer Inflow & Infiltration Improvement Plan, Study D: Capital Improvement Plan, and Study E: Street & Sidewalk Evaluation & Improvement Plan.

SHARED CITIZEN CONCERNS • Need to prevent future flooding during rain events. • • No high speed internet

P1: Public Infrastructure & Utilities Goal 1 Sewer and water service will effectively meet the needs of current and future residents and businesses. Objective P1.1: Sewer and water service will be safe. Strategies • Water quality standards will be strictly adhered to, including both drinking water standards and standards for quality of treated wastewater returned to waterways.

Objective P1.2: Sewer and water service capacity will not be a constraint on economic growth. Strategies • The City and its economic development partners will have regular communication with large commercial users of water or wastewater services, and will ensure that their needs are being met as efficiently as possible.

Objective P1.3: Development will support the efficiency and fiscal sustainability of sewer and water systems. Strategies • The City will encourage infill development and other practices that efficiently and cost effectively utilize existing infrastructure. • The City will void lift stations and extra pumps whenever possible to control the long-term cost burden of the water and sewer systems. • The City will continue to make investments that allow for longterm cost control, such as the separation of sanitary sewer and storm sewer pipes to reduce the amount of stormwater that is mixed with wastewater and treated.

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CHAPTER 4 GOALS, OBJECTIVES & STRATEGIES P2: Public Infrastructure & Utilities Goal 2 The City will be well connected by pedestrian pathways. Objective P2.1: The City will invest in installing sidewalks where none currently exist. Strategies â&#x20AC;˘ The City will identify where sidewalks are not present and ensure they are installed on a priority basis.

Objective P2.2: The City will invest in maintaining existing sidewalks. Strategies â&#x20AC;˘ The City will identify the condition of existing sidewalks and repair as needed.

Public Infrastructure & Utilities Action Items

aConduct regular review of sewer/water capacities to serve future growth and development.

aPursue shared services among governmental agencies

aAdopt a Stormwater Management Plan. aAdopt the Inflow and Infiltration Plan.

as opportunities arise.

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4.4

TRANSPORTATION & MOBILITY

SHARED CITIZEN CONCERNS • Limited transportation options. • High volume of heavy truck traffic through City. • Lack of a pedestrian/bicycle trail system (regional or local) • City roads in need of repair • Lack of coherent/uniform streetscape.

Transportation is an essential aspect of life. It is about the ability to readily and safely gain access to work, school, shopping, recreation, medical care and social gatherings. It is also an essential component of most economic activity. The City of Casey’s overarching transportation themes are safety, efficiency and diversity of transportation options.

T1: Transportation Goal 1 Provide a safe, efficient, reliable, multi-modal, and wellmaintained transportation network. Objective T1.1: Ensure roads and paths meet the needs of multiple users. Strategies • New roads shall be built according to City standards and inspected before accepted for dedication. The City maintains requirements for new roads and driveways that aim to ensure safety for all users. Roadway design will account for snow removal needs, including adequate terrace width between the street and the sidewalk. The City may utilize its official mapping powers to coordinate long-term facility planning in its extraterritorial area. • The City encourages the development of neighborhoods that are oriented towards pedestrians and well-served by sidewalks, bicycle routes, and other non-motorized transportation facilities. Bicycle and pedestrian ways, including sidewalks within developments shall be designed to connect to adjacent developments, schools, parks, shopping areas, and existing or planned pedestrian or bicycle facilities. • The City collaborates with and refers residents to Cumberland and Clark Counties and private vendors in the region to make available transportation services for disabled and elderly residents. • When considering new development proposals the City may require intergovernmental agreements that define the responsibilities of the City, the developer and neighboring jurisdictions regarding any required improvements to City streets and funding of such improvements. The City may also require that the property owner, or their agent, fund the preparation of a traffic impact analysis by an independent professional prior to approving new development. Where appropriate, the City may designate weight restrictions and truck routes to protect local streets. • The City will work with representatives from the IDOT and Cumberland and Clark Counties to raise awareness of local concerns when State and County highways in the area are slated for improvement. The City will coordinate improvements to adjacent local roads, when appropriate. • The City will actively participate in any discussions and planning

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CHAPTER 4 GOALS, OBJECTIVES & STRATEGIES for any form of public transit or passenger rail should these transportation alternatives become feasible in the City in the future. • Maintain airport safety standards in accordance with Federal Airport Administration and Department of Transportation regulations. • Participate in the review for public transportation with ongoing regional efforts.

Objective T1.2: Develop and maintain a road plan to address long-term needs for road upgrades and new roads, including where possible parallel pathways for alternative forms of transportation, e.g. bicycle, pedestrian, slow moving vehicles and transportation for the disabled. Strategies • Reserve adequate right-of-way for future road linkage. • Access and integrate local, state, and regional road or transportation plans. • Maintain the City’s transportation network at a level of service desired by City residents and businesses.

T2: Transportation Goal 2 Single occupancy vehicle trips will decline as a percentage of all transportation within the City. Objective T2.1: The City will actively promote and encourage alternative transportation options.

Transportation in Casey Nearly 90% of all commuting trips in Casey are in a single occupant vehicle. Many factors contribute to a lack of diversity in transportation modes including sprawling, segregated land uses, absence of transit service, lack of employment within City Limits, and limited biking infrastructure. These are interconnected issues that can only be resolved through coordination of land use and development, transportation systems and programs, and community education. This plan attempts to address these issues and offer guidance on creating a more diversified and accessible system. An environmentally sustainable and socially equitable transportation system is necessary to maintain a high quality of life. Transportation Issues and Opportunities The Casey community has identified several opportunities for improving the transportation system, including: • • •

Capitalizing on the existing network which includes Interstate 70, the Airport, and Railroad. Enrich the history of transportation with the Historic National Road. Creating a connected system of off-road bicycle/pedestrian trails. Providing more bicycle infrastructure (e.g. bike racks) Improving pedestrian safety at Downtown intersections

Strategies • • The City will develop and maintain programs to incentivize use of alternative transportation modes. • • In collaboration with local and regional organizations, the City will host events that encourage and celebrate alternative transportation. hat’s wrong with single occupancy vehicles? Single • The City will lead by example occupancy vehicles are inefficient. They waste 75-80% of through employee ridership programs, available passenger capacity. If the percentage of single occupancy accessible public facilities, and vehicles on Casey roadways can be reduced, increases in transportation commuter encouragement. demand due to population and employment growth will be offset by • The City will encourage the use of increased efficiency, and the space and spending that would otherwise go to additional lanes and traffic control devices can instead be used rideshare programs. to further enhance bike paths, bus service, and other modes of travel. This then enhances mobility for residents unable to drive and improves quality of life. As an added benefit, a more efficient transportation system will result in lesser CO2 emissions per person.

W

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4.4

TRANSPORTATION & MOBILITY

T3: Transportation Goal 3 Biking and walking in Casey will be safe, enjoyable and efficient. Objective T3.1: Bike and pedestrian infrastructure will be safe and well-connected.

“Complete streets” are designed and operated to enable safe access for all users. Designs can include bike lanes, accessible transit stops, frequent and/or signaled crosswalks, narrower travel lanes, and traffic calming devices.

T4: Transportation Goal 4 Local transportation systems will be well-coordinated with regional systems and investments. Objective T4.1: The City will maximize the cost-effectiveness of the regional transportation system by coordinating planning, design and funding with regional and state agencies, as well as neighboring jurisdictions. Strategies • The City will work with neighboring jurisdictions and Rides Mass Transit District to coordinate mobility goals and a vision for the future. • The City will inform the community about regional and state transportation projects, and will encourage public involvement. • The City will work with the Illinois DOT to improve access to and efficiency of major transportation routes through joint planning and policy initiatives. • Coordinate major transportation projects with property owners, neighboring communities, Clark and Cumberland Counties, and the Illinois Department of Transportation.

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Complete Street intersection in Charlotte, NC. Source: National Complete Streets Coalition

Strategies • The City will begin to develop a connected network of onstreet and off-street bike routes to make bike transit a viable, safe transportation option. • The City will begin to work with regional and state organizations to create a well-connected regional trail system. • The City will encourage the Complete Streets design requirements for bike and pedestrian users whenever a street is constructed or reconstructed, including meeting ADA requirements. • The City will actively enforce sidewalk maintenance requirements and will continue to encourage sidewalk installation where gaps are present.


CHAPTER 4 GOALS, OBJECTIVES & STRATEGIES

Transportation & Mobility Action Items

aActively participate in state-led highway improvement

aRequire sidewalks for all new development and

aDevelop

a City-wide Bike and Pedestrian Plan to establish a contiguous, safe network of on-street and offstreet bike and pedestrian routes.

aWork with DOT to ensure safe and proper

aPrioritize

community.

projects within the City to advocate for context sensitive design - streetscaping improvements should be designed with local input and should be unique to Casey.

sections of the City for sidewalk maintenance and installation and proactively react to needed improvements (See Study E: Street & Sidewalk Evaluation & Improvement Plan).

aIncrease enforcement of sidewalk maintenance and safety violations.

aAnalyze

future road extensions and connections for future development areas to maintain proper street connections.

Casey, Illinois

major redevelopment projects, whether sidewalks currently exist adjacent or not. Encourage neighboring properties to install sidewalks. crossings at Central Ave and adjacent streets.

aAssess need for bike racks throughout the aInitiate a trail system and interconnectivity of parks and open space.

aIncrease

accessibility throughout the community by increased installation of ADA curb ramps.

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4.5

ECONOMIC PROSPERITY

SHARED CITIZEN CONCERNS • Lack of employment opportunities. • Loss of industry. • Limited tax base. • Limited growth prospects. • Strong competition from neighboring communities. • Failure to attract/retain young professionals. • Attract but do not retain tourists.

Economic prosperity is realized through the growth and retention of jobs, a diversity of businesses types, an increase in buying power, investment in the built environment, and a general improvement in the community’s quality of life. Creating economic prosperity requires the collaborative efforts of public and private entities, and the support of the community overall. Casey’s prosperity themes are education, diversity and growth from within. The City recognizes that economic success requires extensive collaboration with other public and private entities - the City will be an active partner in these efforts and will avoid duplication of services. City “support” for these efforts may include staff time, funding, policies, or simply endorsement.

E1: Economic Prosperity Goal 1 Attract, retain, create and expand businesses that strengthen and diversify the local economy, grow the tax base, and enhance the downtown area. Objective E1.1: Maintain strategies to promote sustainable economic development.

A Cottage Industry is generally defined as a small business located entirely within a dwelling, or an accessory structure located on the same lot or tract as a dwelling, which complies with the requirements of local code. The use is clearly incidental and secondary to the use of the property and is compatible with adjacent land uses. Cottage industries generally employ less than five full time employees, generate low traffic volumes, and have little or no noise, smoke, odor, dust, glare, or vibration detectable at any property line. Brownfield development refers to the redevelopment of blighted or contaminated commercial or industrial parcels. Infill development refers to developing or redeveloping vacant sites within built up areas.

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Strategies • The City supports the expansion of existing businesses, and also supports the attraction and development of new businesses that complement existing establishments for the employment of Casey citizens. • The City supports the idea of public-private partnerships and will work proactively with private business and land owners Reliance on manufacturing, to facilitate investment in the retention of young professionals, community. and lack of diversity in job • The City will collaborate with opportunities were all identified as neighboring municipalities, Clark issues that Casey must overcome to and Cumberland Counties, and ensure economic prosperity. local and regional economic development organizations to promote economic prosperity for the region. • The City may consider the use of public land acquisition to expand the industrial and commercial tax base of Casey. • The City encourages brownfield or infill (re)development and development of existing business and industry parks in the region before considering creating new business or industry parks in Casey. • The City will work with private landowners and State agencies to clean up contaminated or blighted sites that threaten the public health, safety and welfare and to redevelop these sites to productive

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CHAPTER 4 GOALS, OBJECTIVES & STRATEGIES uses. • The City promotes its downtown as a compact, pedestrianoriented business district that supports employment, shopping, housing, and recreation opportunities. • The City requires industrial or commercial businesses that generate large volumes of traffic or wastewater, or have a high water demand to locate where a full range of utilities, services, roads, and other infrastructure is available to adequately support such development. • The City will collaborate with economic development organizations such as Casey Industries, and other applicable agencies and organizations to promote economic prosperity for the City and Region. • The City will maintain the Enterprize Zone as an incentive for business and industry.

Objective E1.2: Use the City’s transportation strengths and assets as economic drivers. Strategies • The City actively promotes the development of the I-70 corridor where suitable infrastructure exists. • The City actively promotes the airport as an economic resource for future development. • The City actively promotes the existing railroad spurs to potential industries.

Objective E1.3: Use the City’s agricultural strengths and assets as economic drivers.

Casey’s Workforce Like communities across the nation, Casey is struggling to rebound from the recession. Over the last decade, the unemployment rate has doubled in Clark County (from 5.0%% in 2000 to 12.6% in 2010). Casey will need to implement a multi-faceted approach to ensure future economic prosperity including educational programming, diversification of business and industry, and retention of workers and businesses. Casey’s Economy Casey’s economy relies heavily on Management, business, science, and arts occupations with nearly 30% of Casey’s workforce in these industries. Other industries have taken root in Casey in recent years including the medical and human services fields (27.7%). Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting, and mining account for nearly ten (10%) percent of the local economy. According to Illinois Workforce Development, the fastest growing occupations in the region are Network Systems and Data Communication Analysts, Medical Assistants, Skin Care Specialists, and Substance Abuse/ Behavioral Disorder Counselors.

Strategies • The City promotes business growth connected Casey sees great opportunity within to the agricultural economy, including local food its transportation strengths to help production, value-added products (e.g. certified grow the local economy and move organic products), and specialty shops. Casey forward. • The City supports the development of farmbased businesses and cottage industries within its boundaries and extraterritorial area to support farm Tourism as Industry families and enhance the agricultural economy and identity of Casey has a rich cultural and historical the area. heritage providing an abundance of sites and events to attract tourists. The most Objective E1.4: Explore possibilities to increase the service sector notable attractions include Historic and related areas to increase job opportunities for newer generations. Downtown Casey, the Guinness Record Holders (Wind Chime, Golf Tee, Strategies Crochet Hook, and Knitting Needles) • The City should consider the creation of a small business and the Softball Hall of Fame. incubator to help further the development of small business

Casey, Illinois

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4.5

ECONOMIC PROSPERITY within Casey.

Objective E1.5: Create and maintain an attractive and aesthetically pleasing business environment. Strategies • The City maintains design guidelines for businesses to address landscaping, aesthetics, lighting, noise, parking and access.

Objective E1.6: Avoid land use conflicts between business and non-business use. Strategies • Explore alternatives to traditional zoning such as design guidelines or form based codes. • Implement Annexation Plan (Study F: Annexation Study) to help increase City tax base. • The City will continue to conduct a cluster analysis and fully utilize the findings.

E2: Economic Prosperity Goal 2 Strengthen and promote tourism as an economic force in Casey. Objective E2.1: The City should create a tourism committee focused on promoting tourism in Casey. Strategies • The City will support current activities geared toward promoting tourism in Casey. • The City will work to create a marketing campaign to promote local attractions. • The City will work to create a mobile application to promote local attractions. • Install informational kiosks along the Historic National Route. • The City will explore the opportunity to hire a Tourism Staff Person. • The City will continue to work with the Cumberland and Clark County’s Tourism offices.

E3: Economic Prosperity Goal 3 Employment will grow in Casey through the creation, expansion and further development of existing and new business. Objective E3.1: Existing Casey businesses will retain and expand employment Strategies • The City will support the needs of growing businesses and will work with local partners to provide programs, space and infrastructure necessary to support an expanding workforce.

Objective E3.2: The City will have both space and incentive tools to support business creation, growth, and expansion. Strategies • The City will ensure an adequate supply of land for commercial and industrial development through land use controls. • The City will continue to use development tools such as tax incremental financing districts and enterprise zones to offer incentives that support employment growth.

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CHAPTER 4 GOALS, OBJECTIVES & STRATEGIES Objective E3.3: Entrepreneurial spririt and small business growth will be enthusiastically and continuously supported in Casey. Strategies • The City will support collaboration among its partners to provide local entrepreneurship training and encouragement. • The City supports the cottage industries which include home occupations and home-based businesses in residential districts as a means to enhance residents’ income opportunities, increase local employment, and foster business creation and entrepreneurship. However, activities that alter the residential character of the neighborhood, such as objectionable changes in traffic, noise, odor, light, or appearance of the home and property, will not be tolerated. • The City will support and promote minority- and women-owned businesses.

E4: Economic Prosperity Goal 4 Casey’s economic base will be diverse and resilient. Objective E4.1: Attract new jobs to the community in varied sectors. Strategies • The city will encourage and support efforts to recruit businesses and growth industries no currently prevalent in the City, including information technology, energy technology, and health-related products and services. • The City will work with key stakeholders to establish a base of creative industries (e.g. arts, sciences, research, architecture) to enhance quality of life and expand the professional workforce. Objective E4.2: Explore possibilities to increase the service sector and related areas to increase job opportunities for newer generations. Strategies • The City should consider the creation of a small business incubator to help further the development of small business within Casey.

Objective E4.3: Encourage and promote the development of environmentally sustainable industries. Strategies • The Emphasis will be placed on attracting businesses and industries that operate in a sustainable manner, contribute to the sustainability of the community as a whole, and are responsible environmental stewards.

Casey, Illinois

Education & Income Education attainment can provide valuable insight into the existing labor force, including availability of skilled and professional workers and demand for training opportunities. The percentage of Casey residents 25 years or older who have at least a high school diploma (88.2%) is lower than Clark County (89.0%) and slightly higher than Illinois (86.6%). The percentage of residents who have obtained a bachelor’s degree (9.2 %)is lower than both the County and State (11.9% and 19.1% respectively). This may indicate the need for additional vocational and adult learning programs. Casey’s median and per capita income levels are lower than the county and state. Median household income in Casey is $36,944 compared to Clark County’s $47,933, and Illinois’ $56,576. These lower averages are likely due to the relatively high percentage of individuals living below the poverty level. In the City, 16.4% of the population is below the poverty level, compared to 10.2% in the County, and 13.1% in Illinois. (The Census Bureau uses a set of income thresholds that vary by family size and composition to detect who is poor. If the total income for a family or unrelated individual falls below the relevant poverty threshold, then the family or unrelated individual is classified as being “below the poverty level”.)

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4.5

ECONOMIC PROSPERITY

E5: Economic Prosperity Goal 5 Costs and benefits of economic development efforts will be shared within the regional economy. Objective E5.1: Most economic development activities will be collaborative efforts with multiple public and private partners across the region. Strategies • The City will create partnerships within the region to support economic development in the region. These partnerships may include pooled funding for incentive programs and revenue sharing agreements to reduce local competition for business expansion investments.

aAdopt a Vacant Building Ordinance to better manage

and maintain the City’s vacant building stock through a mandatory annual license and fee. The program should support the costs of inspections and maintenance enforcement, and it should both prevent and help pay for emergency actions to protect public safety, including demolition.

aIdentify

and plan for infrastructure investments required to make priority development/redevelopment sites more competitive for economic development.

aIdentify funding sources and mechanisms for public

realm and capital improvements to support economic development.

aIdentify

target industries/business types and offer tax incentives to businesses in those sectors to locate or expand in Casey.

aWork

with Casey area schools, Eastern Illinois University, and local businesses to develop and implement an internship and summer job programs.

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aCoordinate with Casey Industries, Lakeland College

Eastern Region Center, and local educational institutions to plan for workforce transitions from manufacturing to knowledge-based and creative industries.

aTarget downtown locations for major public cultural investments.

aCoordinate

with Clark and Cumberland Counties to develop a rural and eco-tourism plan that promotes recreation and tourism outside the City as well as hotel stays inside the City.

aContinuously update the City website to emphasize the assets of Casey as a vibrant, modern community with a rich history and an exceptional quality of life.

aDevelop an easy to understand “one-stop-shop” for economic development on the City website, with links to partner resources.

aAggressively pursue grants and resources to improve infrastructure.

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CHAPTER 4 GOALS, OBJECTIVES & STRATEGIES E6: Economic Prosperity Goal 6 Downtown Casey will be preserved and enhanced as a hub of economic, social and cultural affairs. Objective E6.1: Downtown Casey will be economically robust. Strategies • The city will utilize economic development tools, existing and new, to attract more retail and professional employers to Downtown. • The City will work with Downtown partners to actively market Downtown as an ideal business site. Objective E6.2: Downtown Casey will be a unique and attractive place that invites pedestrian exploration. Strategies • The city will work to develop a cohesive and attractive “feel” to the Downtown through streetscaping, signage, and other public infrastructure. • The Downtown will be pedestrian-oriented through streetscape improvements. • The City will work to create attractive, memorable and safe public spaces where citizens and visitors can gather.

Economic Prosperity Action Items

aEvaluate

potential public/private partnerships for community benefit.

National Register of Historic Places to further solidify Casey as a historic community and to enable properties to access historic tax credits.

aParticipate

aUpdate

aAdopt

aPromote growth of tax base in all areas of the community,

in monthly communications with key stakeholders (e.g. Casey Industries, City of Casey, and Clark County) to discuss the future of the area and maintain an open dialogue among entities. a design overlay area in Downtown Casey to promote and protect the character of the area.

aPromote vocational education/training to fill the needs of local employers.

aCreate and enhance entry features to the community and to the downtown (e.g. landscaping, signage, banners, etc.).

website to improve view of community, and evaluate other social media to improve distribution of information. including infill, redevelopment and improvements in existing developed areas and continued growth in planned new development areas.

aThe City will evaluate its property tax levels/rates to be competitive with other communities in Illinois and region and to support infrastructure/services in the community.

aConstruct

and maintain interpretive signage at key attraction locations to further promote the assets of the community.

aEvaluate

and plan for tourism attractions to further Casey as a year-round destination.

aContinue

to evaluate properties for listing on the

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4.6

DOWNTOWN REVITALIZATION

SHARED CITIZEN CONCERNS • Declining/dilapidated building stock. • High volume of heavy truck traffic through downtown. • Lack of bicycle facilities. • Lack of coherent/uniform streetscape. • On-street angle parking is dangerous. • Downtown lacks activity.

Downtown Casey still maintains some of the charm and character from years gone by. However, signs of neglect and abandonment threaten the vitality of a strong central business district. For a more detailed plan, see Study C: Downtown Revitalization Plan.

D1: Downtown Revitalization Goal 1 Ensure high quality site and building redevelopment to uphold property values and reinforce the character of the City. Objective D1.1: Enforce property maintenance for occupied and unoccupied structures. Strategies • The City will work with building and lot owners to enforce strict property maintenance to enhance the outward appearance of the downtown.

Objective D1.2: Guide the design of redevelopment and rehabilitation within the Downtown so that existing historic structures can maintain their integrity and function in today’s modern world. Strategies • Develop Design Guidelines to assist the City and business owners in establishing architectural and design criteria for redevelopment of downtown properties. • Consider creating a Facade Improvements program to offer incentives to private property owners to improve their buildings, especially for historic buildings. • Consider showcasing and publicizing property owners who do make investments in downtown buildings. • Evaluate the possibility of utilizing Tax Incremental Financing (TIF) to assist downtown building improvements (See Study B). • The City encourages maintenance and rehabilitation of older and historic buildings and will support community events and programs that celebrate the history and culture of Casey.

Objective D1.3: Maintain site and building design guidelines for new development, especially commercial development, which establish a small-town, “pedestrian-oriented” environment and coexist with existing historic structures. Strategies • Develop Design Guidelines to assist the City and business owners in establishing architectural and design criteria for infill development within the Downtown.

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CHAPTER 4 GOALS, OBJECTIVES & STRATEGIES Objective D1.4: Enhance the aesthetic appearance of the Downtown, especially along Main Street and Central Avenue. Strategies • Adopt the Streetscape Enhancements from the IDOT grant to further the Streetscape along Central Avenue and Main Street. • Include standards for landscaping, signage, building materials, and sidewalk elements.

D2: Downtown Revitalization Goal 2 Address the needs of Downtown Infrastructure and parking. Objective D2.1: Determine the supply and demand for parking in the downtown prior to making any long-term decisions. Strategies • Undergo a parking study each time a new tourist attraction is added to the downtown. • Observe current utilization of existing parking spaces and determine peak times. • Work to get IDOT to include a second phase of the ITEP grant to the downtown.

Downtown’s Economy

Approximately 64% of survey respondents shop downtown once per month or less, with 31.8% monthly and the same percentage less weekly. The most common response for not shopping downtown was that the stores were too “niche” and not something that interested the respondent. Most respondents indicated that there are a lack of “Downtown retail shopping/services” (77.8%) and the new development would best be served in the “Downtown” (92.9%). This was supported in the comments which encouraged “investment in existing building and vacant lots”.

Objective D2.2: Study traffic patterns prior to making route changes or street layouts. Strategies • Observe effects of heavy truck traffic through the downtown. • Consult with IDOT on feasibility of alternative truck routes. • Study the insertion of turn lanes on Central Avenue at Main Street.

Objective D2.3: Maintain and enhance all existing infrastructure including storm water, sanitary sewer, sidewalks, roads, lighting, and traffic signals.

Reference Study C for a detailed plan on potential enhancements for Downtown Casey.

Strategies • Paint traffic signals, stop sign poles, and other right of way elements black to blend into the streetscape. • Replace broken infrastructure as soon as damage occurs.

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4.6

DOWNTOWN REVITALIZATION

D3: Downtown Revitalization Goal 3 Make improvements to public spaces and incorporate park facilities. Objective D3.1: Create and enforce and overall plan for the Downtown to ensure a functional and aesthetically pleasing environment. Strategies • Develop a Casey Park Plan. • Develop a streetscape plan to be carried throughout the downtown, including keeping the existing lighting, and considering crosswalk, pedestrian and bicycling safety improvements. • Develop a landscape maintenance Plan for the City’s properties that includes a list of improvements and established maintenance standards.

Objective D3.2: Public art and cultural activities and events be supported and will enhance a unique local identity. Strategies • Public art will enhance a unique local identity. • The City will identify and remove unnecessary barriers to public art installations. • The City will encourage and facilitate the installation of art in public spaces, including art integrated with public infrastructure. • The City encourages the use of public art in private (re)development. • The City will support neighborhood initiatives to enhance neighborhood identity through public art. • The City will seek innovative and sustainable ways of supporting cultural facilities, local cultural events, and local artists. • The City will engage artists in the planning and development process to integrate culture and art into the fabric of the community. • The City will work with artists and community organizations to identify appropriate sites and venues for cultural events, including nontraditional venues.

D4: Downtown Revitalization Goal 4 Casey will ensure historic preservation is recognized and celebrated. Objective D4.1: Casey will safeguard the City’s architectural, historic, aesthetic and cultural heritage. Strategies • The City will continue to support the Casey Historical Society and the local designation of historic landmarks and districts. • The City will develop and maintain design guidelines for (re)development in historic districts. • The City will promote and safeguard the historical landscape in addition to structures and districts. • The City will apply criteria for Capital Projects that require evaluation and mitigation of negative impacts to historic assets. • The City encourages (adaptive) reuse and rehabilitation of historic structures.

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CHAPTER 4 GOALS, OBJECTIVES & STRATEGIES

Objective D4.2: Casey will foster pride in the legacy of beauty and achievements of the past. Strategies • The City will collaborate with the School District and other educational institutions to facilitate local history tours, projects and lesson plans. • The City will support and recognize private historic rehabilitation. • The City will continue to incorporate historical heritage considerations in the development of neighborhood plans.

Downtown Revitalization Action Items

aCreate a streetscape plan which guides and enhances future changes to the right-of-way spaces within the downtown.

aAdopt design guidelines for building setback, height, articulation of the cornice, & awnings over building entrances in downtown.

aImplement awards program for good design. aCoordinate with local artists on display throughout the downtown.

aContinue to support the Historical Society and aid in the development of a Historic Preservation Action Plan.

aDevelop cohesive historic wayfinding signage. aLead the drive for encouraging positive outcomes and attitudes.

aEncourage use of public spaces/streets for outside space

aSeek potential donors for installation of permanent public art.

aWork with downtown businesses and building owners

festivals and events.

aConsider adding National Register properties to Local Historic Register.

aEvaluate public activities and services that are friendly or attractive to the young professionals and families.

for potential banners or wall murals.

aInclude

a public arts component in development requests for Proposal for City-owned sites.

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4.6

AGRICULTURE & NATURAL RESOURCES

SHARED CITIZEN CONCERNS • Lack of availability of locally grown food and made products. • No farmers market within the City.

The abundance and health of our agricultural and natural resources are vital to the well being of our community, the prosperity of our economy and the health of our regional ecological systems. This section outlines the objectives and strategies for preserving, protecting, and restoring our natural and agricultural resources.

AG1: Agriculture & Natural Resources Goal 1 Maintain, enhance and reinforce the aesthetic quality of life consistent with the character of the city and surrounding landscape by preserving agricultural lands and activities, rural vistas, and natural areas of southeastern Illinois. Objective AG1.1: Preserve productive agricultural lands or those lands that have severe limitations due to grades, soils, not suitable for building, or sensitive environmental areas such as wetlands, floodplains, and streams in order to protect these areas from degradation for continued agricultural use whenever possible. Strategies • The City supports programs to restrict development in areas of agricultural production. • The City discourages new development that is not contiguous with existing development. • The City will restrict development in areas that have documented threatened and endangered species, or have severe limitations due to steep slopes, soils not suitable for building, or sensitive environmental areas such as wetlands, floodplains, and streams in order to protect these areas from degradation. The City shall require these natural resources features to be depicted on all site plans, preliminary plats, and certified survey maps in order to facilitate preservation of natural resources.

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CHAPTER 4 GOALS, OBJECTIVES & STRATEGIES AG2: Agriculture & Natural Resources Goal 2 Improve the quality of water resources for both recreation and consumption. Objective AG2.1: Protect waterways and ground water from harmful agricultural practices. Strategies • The City will use all available powers to protect sensitive environmental areas within the City’s extraterritorial area. • Implement waterway protective measures such as riparian buffers. • The City will ensure that stormwater runoff is contained as much as possible to prevent contaminated infiltration into the groundwater and running into the streams.

Objective AG2.2: Improve stormwater system to prevent overflow during rain events. Strategies • Ensure the Sanitary Sewer Inflow and Infiltration Study is implemented and kept up-to-date.

Objective AG2.3: Practice techniques which both curb and prevent stormwater runoff.

Casey’s Agricultural and Natural Resources Casey has rich and varied natural and agricultural resources. This land is a mix of farms (mostly corn and soybeans), woodlands, wetlands, floodplains, streams, and streambanks. Casey’s Water Resources The City of Casey lies within the Embarras/ Middle Wabash River Basins Watershed. Groundwater is a critical resource for Casey, not only because it is used as a source of drinking water, but also because rivers, streams, and other surface water depend on it for recharge. Groundwater contamination is most likely to occur where fractured bedrock is near the ground surface, or where only a thin layer of soil separates the ground surface from the water table. “Green infrastructure” is a network of open spaces and natural features woven into the built environment that provides natural stormwater management and essential ecosystem connections.

Strategies • The City will encourage the use of Rain Barrels and Rain Gardens for both residential and commercial uses.

Objective AG2.4: Encourage the use of green infrastructure in new development and redevelopment projects. Strategies • The City will encourage permeable paving for surface parking lots.

Casey, Illinois

“Permeable paving” utilizes porous materials and laying techniques to allow water to percolate and infiltrate the soil beneath the paving, instead of running off as with impervious paving.

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4.6

AGRICULTURE & NATURAL RESOURCES

AG3: Agriculture & Natural Resources Goal 3 Provide locally grown products for local consumption. Objective AG3.1: Encourage farmers to grow products for purchase and consumption by Casey residents. Strategies • The City will allow and support urban farming practices within City limits.

Objective AG3.2: Set up a farmers market to showcase and sell locally grown produce and products. Strategies • The City will provide a place for the operation of a Farmers Market.

Agriculture & Natural Resources Action Items

a

Develop a “GreenPrint” for creating an interconnected greenway system of parks and open spaces.

aConsider the adoption of

best management practices (BMPs) for stormwater management and low-impact development.

a

Consider the adoption of regulations for conservation and restoration of natural features during development.

a

Consider the adoption of stormwater and low-impact BMP requirements for City facilities and operations.

aUpdate

enforcement.

a

erosion control regulations and increase

Work to identify local point and non-point source pollution and implement steps for remediation.

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aDevelop a stormwater education program to inform citizens of BMPs including the use of rain barrels, rain gardens, green roofs, permeable paving, etc.

aIdentify and remove barriers to local food production. aConsider the adoption of local food procurement policies for City events and facilities.

aDevelop procedures for increasing the ability to use

electronic and government assistance forms of payment at local farmers markets.

aEnsure FSA office guidelines for agricultural practices

for Clark County are followed for operations within Casey’s jurisdiction and encourage responsible agriculture region-wide.

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4.7

HAZARDS The Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000, which conditions eligibility for hazard mitigation grants from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) upon a state’s or local jurisdiction’s official participation in an approved local hazard mitigation plan under the act, has moved many communities forward in thinking about such plans and Casey is no exception. The City of Casey is committed to protecting people and property from natural and man-made disasters. A community must first identify potential hazards and mitigate the risk of impacts pre-disaster, then respond efficiently during a disaster, and plan for a comprehensive recovery post-disaster. This section defines the City’s over arching goals and strategies for all phases of a disaster.

HZ1: Hazards Goal 1 Ensure that Casey is adequately prepared to mitigate the effects before a natural or manmade disaster. Objective HZ1.1: Increase investment in infrastructure which reduces effects of flood events. Strategies • The City will pass and implement the Sanitary Sewer Inflow and Infiltration Study (See Study A). • The City will pass and implement the Capital Improvement Plan (See Study D).

Objective HZ1.2: Casey residents and businesses will be prepared for potential disasters. Strategies • When forewarning is possible, as with rising water levels, the City will strive to keep citizens accurately apprised of the situation and possible outcomes. • The City will collaborate with local agencies and organizations to inform the community about disaster preparedness, especially including evacuation procedures in flood-prone areas and the location of public shelters. • The City encourages private disaster preparedness, including resilient building practices and materials, establishment of disaster response and recovery plans by families and businesses, and maintenance of emergency kits and supplies as recommended by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). • The City encourages and will implement programs to support participation in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) and hazard proofing of residences and businesses. • Organize and distribute public announcements, or implement other means to provide information and consult with members of the public regarding preparation for disasters.

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CHAPTER 4 GOALS, OBJECTIVES & STRATEGIES Objective HZ1.3: The City’s use of smart development practices will effectively limit disaster impacts to new development due to flooding. Strategies • The City discourages private development in flood-prone areas and will work to restore the natural floodplain areas and associated tributaries. • The City will commit to the safe development of public facilities, and will evaluate the feasibility of re-siting and upgrading facilities to mitigate potential hazards.

Objective HZ1.4: The City will be prepared for the worst case scenario. Strategies • The City will plan for the effective delivery of emergency services and basic human needs in the event of a worst case scenario, such as catastrophic flooding. • The City recognizes the potential for a disaster causing impacts beyond the City’s capacity to respond, and will develop procedures to request timely assistance from neighboring communities, and County and State governments.

HZ2: Hazards Goal 2 Residents and assets will be protected during a disaster. Objective HZ2.1: Residents’ basic human needs will be met during a disaster. Strategies • The City will work with non-profits, human services agencies, and emergency management agencies to plan for efficient disaster response that meets the needs of all in the community. • The City will call upon partners if unable to handle immediate needs in the event of a disaster and will respond in-kind when asked. • The City will collaborate will all engaged entities, including other government agencies and non-profit organizations, to meet residents’ immediate needs. Objective HZ2.2: Assets and infrastructure will be protected during a disaster.

SHARED CITIZEN CONCERNS • Lack of water capacity for medium and large rain events. • Lack of funding to improve stormwater system.

Strategies • The City will develop and maintain a plan for protecting community facilities, including emergency supplies acquisition, volunteer management, and prioritization of municipal sites to be protected.

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HAZARDS

4.7

• Protection emphasis will be placed on public and private utility infrastructure, including water, sewer, roads, gas, and electricity. • The City will recruit and safely utilize volunteers to protect public assets when necessary.

Objective HZ2.3: The City will be able to communicate and manage its available resources during a disaster. Strategies • The City will work with Clark (and Cumberland when applicable) County Emergency Management.

Objective HZ2.4: Disaster victims will have prompt access to recovery resources throughout the recovery process. Strategies • The City will advocate for quick and equitable disbursement of individual and business assistance funds. • The City will partner with non-profits and regional, state and federal agencies to provide for the long-term needs of disaster victims by forming a Long Term Recovery Committee (LTRC). • The City will work with recovery partners to create a “one-stop shop” for individual and business recover assistance.

Long Term Recovery Committees (LTRCs) coordinate recovery resources for volunteer case management agencies and offer guidance and referral for disaster victims.

Objective HZ2.5: Reconstruction and recovery will be quick, safe, and collaborative. Strategies • The City will work with Clark (and Cumberland when applicable) A Disaster Recovery Plan outlines the County to implement the Disaster Recovery Plan: this includes responsibilities of partners and actions to be taken after a disaster. Disaster Recovery lines of authority, interagency coordination, processes for expedited Plans supplement Pre-Hazard Mitigation review, and inspection/repair/reconstruction of structures and Plans and recognize that recovery is longinfrastructure. term. • The City will develop and adopt an appropriate Recovery and Reconstruction Ordinance. • The City will implement temporary regulations when necessary to facilitate safe and expedited recovery. A Recovery and Reconstruction Ordinance establishes a recovery organization and authorizes a variety of preand post-disaster planning and regulatory powers. Model sections include: • Recovery Organization Formation and Duties • Implementation of Disaster Recovery Plan • Temporary Regulations • Temporary and Permanent Housing • Recovery and Reconstruction Strategy

4-30

MSA Professional Services, Inc.


CHAPTER 4 GOALS, OBJECTIVES & STRATEGIES

Hazards Action Items

aDevelop a Disaster Recovery Plan. aDevelop and adopt a Recovery and Reconstruction Ordinance.

aConduct Disaster Recovery Plan table-top exercises. aImplement NFIP Community Rating System (CRS)

electric, gas and other utility systems to reduce or eliminate outages in the event of a disaster.

aBury power lines when feasible. aIdentify areas to be protected (existing development) versus areas to be preserved (natural/open space opportunities).

credited activities and explore application to CRS designation.

aExamine alternative back-up strategies for necessary

aDevelop interagency agreements for aid during and

aEncourage local businesses and residents to implement

after a disaster.

systems, if there are none already in place. their own Action Plans.

aCoordinate

with County Emergency Manager to develop a sustainable Community Organization Active in Disaster (COAD) to build a framework for meeting disaster victimsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; needs.

aIdentify a Disaster Victim Assistance Officer (as part of

the recovery organization established by the Recovery and Reconstruction Ordinance) to partner with the County EMA in advocating for quick disbursement of Other Needs Assistance and Disaster Case Management Funds.

aActively participate in Flood Awareness Month, and National Preparedness Month.

aConduct a public facilities audit for potential disaster impacts and implement mitigation strategies.

aWhen feasible, purchase easements to preserve the natural floodway.

aEvaluate

redundant capabilities of water, sewer,

Casey, Illinois

4-31


4.8

COLLABORATION & PARTNERSHIPS

SHARED CITIZEN CONCERNS • Need to utilize University services more. • Unstable and unreliable State government. • Potential school consolidation increases distances traveled.

Successful and vibrant communities rely upon collaborative efforts among city businesses and organizations and benefit from partnerships with regional organizations and state and federal agencies. The City of Casey has a strong history of intergovernmental collaboration and multi-partner projects. This section defines the City’s strategies on collaboration and provides guidance on reaching out to new partners and maintaining existing relationships.

CP1: Collaboration & Partnerships Goal 1 Foster and/or maintain mutually beneficial relationships and partnerships with neighboring municipalities, Clark and Cumberland Counties, State and Federal agencies, and the schools, colleges and universities which serve Casey residents. Objective CP1.1: Casey will think regionally while acting locally. Strategies • The City will meet with surrounding municipalities, jurisdictions and counties to ensure a cohesive message while always keeping the best interest of Casey at the forefront.

Objective CP1.2: Reduce costs and improve quality of municipal services through partnerships with neighboring towns and municipalities. Strategies • The City will actively participate, review, monitor, and comment on pending plans from neighboring municipalities, Clark and Cumberland Counties, and State or Federal agencies on land use or planning activities that would affect Casey. • The City will continue to work with neighboring municipalities to identify opportunities for shared services or other cooperative planning efforts.

Objective CP1.3 Communicate clearly with Clark and Cumberland Counties to establish mutually agreeable development goals and objectives in the City’s extraterritorial area. Strategies • To the extent possible, the City will coordinate its Comprehensive Plan with Clark and Cumberland Counties’ Comprehensive Plans. • The City will continue to work with Clark and Cumberland Counties to identify opportunities for shared services or other cooperative planning efforts.

4-32

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CHAPTER 4 GOALS, OBJECTIVES & STRATEGIES

Objective CP1.4: Leverage university and university extension resources to help the City further it’s planning and development interests. Strategies • Lakeland College Eastern Region Center will continue to be a partner to the City.

Objective CP1.5: Ensure adequate school facilities by coordinating and communicating growth and consolidation plans with the Casey-Westfield Community Unit School District. Strategies • The City will meet regularly with the School District to ensure open communication.

Collaboration & Partnerships Action Items

aWork with Mass Transit and neighboring communities to study the feasibility of an expanded regional bus system.

a Explore options for obtaining four-year programs/

degrees through existing facilities or satellites with regional universities/colleges in Casey.

a

Assemble a joint task force with neighboring communities to explore the concept of shared economic development investments coupled with shared tax revenues.

Casey, Illinois

a Host monthly meetings with regional partners to

explore ways in which collaboration on programs or services can improve quality, access, and efficiency.

a

Communicate with other jurisdictions whenever service contracts or major capital improvements are up for consideration, to identify cost savings opportunities through partnerships and shared service arrangements.

4-33


1 2 3 4 5 Land Use 6 This Chapter outlines goals, objectives and polices specifically for land use, defines categories of land Appendix A use, describes the desired future land use for Casey, Appendix B and identifies special planning areas. Appendix C Page 5.1 Existing Land Use 5-2 5.2 Future Land Use Map 5-4 5.3 Future Land Use Categories 5-12 5.4 City-Wide Bike Routes and Trails & Regional Context 5-28 5-30 5.5 Neighborhood / Planning Areas 5.6 Special Planning Area: Downtown 5-32


5.1

EXISTING LAND USE

There are many unique uses of land across Casey, and many more ways to configure those uses. It is the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s responsibility to regulate where and how development occurs so that conflict between incompatible uses is minimized, land and infrastructure are used as efficiently as possible, and Casey continues to grow as a pleasant, attractive place to live, work, shop, play and stay. This chapter features goals, objectives, and policies that apply to land use in general, and also strategies and guidelines for specific types of land use and their location within the City and its extraterritorial plat review area.

Existing Land Use 2010 existing land use conditions are shown opposite (see Appendix C for a full size version). The Casey planning area extends 1.5 miles from the current city limits.

5-2

MSA Professional Services, Inc.


CHAPTER 5 LAND USE 49

\ [

N 370TH ST

PA PARKER RKER TO TOWN WNSHI SHIP P

2480E

± ³

20TH ST

7

\ [ 1150N

2480 E

± ³

23 50E

70 ¦ ¨ §

E 1300TH RD

\ [ 330E

E

12

D 50TH R

1180

40 £ ¤

N COLES ST

75E

EC

UM

BE

RL

AN

D DR

D

R

2

2

N 430TH ST

\ [ E 1180TH RD

975N

2325E

TRAIL RD

2450E

2350E

975N

AK E

1300N

100TH ST

\ [

1000N

\ [[ \

SN

\ [

WESTFIELD RD

25

1050N

E

FR RD

E 1300TH RD

1300 RD

[ \ \[ [ \

400E

CA CASEY SEY TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP

N 300TH ST

2300E

N 320TH ST

\ [

N 180TH ST N 25TH ST

2400E

180TH ST

\ [

\ [

E 1400TH RD

N 100TH ST

1200N

2480E

\ [

N 400TH ST

V U

UN UNIIO ON N TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP

N M ILAM LN

DUPONT RD

N 230TH ST

2480E

\ [

E 1000T H RD

N 450TH ST

N 400TH ST

SW 4TH ST SW 2ND ST SW 1ST ST

ORY LN HIC K

E 1050TH RD

E WASHINGTO N RD

E WASHINGTO N ST

1070N

230E

E 950TH RD

£ ¤

\ [

\ [

\ [

70 ¦ ¨ § 40

NE 25TH

ST

W TYLER AVE

D DR

NE 1 5TH

AN

E WASHI NGTON AVE E ADAM S AVE E JEFFERSON AVE AVE ON E MADIS E MONRO E AVE

SE 8TH ST

RL

ST

BE

ST

E AV MA BA ST LA AIN EM

SE 4TH ST

M CU

AIN

EA

H N 10 T

WM

E EDGAR AVE

SE 1ST ST S CENTRA L AVE

850N

NW 1ST ST NW 2ND ST NW 3RD S T NW 4TH ST NW 5TH ST

\ [

0E

875N

2 40

\ [

COLES ST

900N

T NE 13T H S

\ [ 1100N

\ [

E 1120TH

E 930TH RD

220E

[ \ \ [ \ [ 710N

COUNTY

LAND USE

CITY OF CASEY CLARK AND CUMBERLAND COUNTIES, IL INDUSTRIAL

COMMERCIAL

INSTITUTIONAL

OPEN SPACE

RESIDENTIAL

OPEN WATER

PARK

VACANT

RIVER/STREAM

AGRICULTURAL

PARCEL FORESTED AREA

N 330TH ST

EXISTING LAND USE CASEY

OAK LEAF RD

2400E

E 830TH RD

E 800TH RD

N 250TH ST

CR CRO OOK OKED ED C CR REEK EEK TOW TOWNS NSH HIIP P

2300E

N 240TH ST

\ [

JOH JOHN NS SON ON TOW TOWNS NSH HIP IP

N IL 49

600N

N COLES ST

\[ [ \

E 870TH RD

N 150TH ST

2275E

N 100TH ST

\ [

2480 E ST

2425E

49

CL K ARK CLAR

\ [

AND ERLLAND CUM BER CUMB

2350E

600N

V U

2480 E CO RD

700N

DATA SOURCES: MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY AND PARCELS PROVIDED BY CLARK COUNTY. ROADS, TOWNSHIPS AND COUNTIES PROVIDED BY US CENSUS (2013). LAND USE IN CLARK COUNTY DERIVED FROM PARCEL DATASET. LAND USE IN CUMBERLAND COUNTY DERIVED FROM AERIAL INTERPRETATION. OPEN WATER AND RIVERS/STREAMS PROVIDED BY USGS (NHD). FORESTED AREA DERIVED FROM USDA-NRCS CROPLAND DATA LAYER (2012).

0

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Casey, Illinois

0.25

0.5

Miles 1

E Print Date: 4/2/2014

5-3


5.2

FUTURE LAND USE MAP

Using the Future Land Use Map The Future Land Use Map (opposite) identifies categories of similar use, character and density. These categories are described in the preceding pages, including explanation of the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s intent and design and development strategies for each. This map and the corresponding text are to be consulted whenever development is proposed, especially when a land division is requested. Development shall be consistent with the use category shown on the map and the corresponding text. Where uses in this map differ from the current use, it is not the general intent of the City to compel a change in use. Except in rare instances when the City may actively facilitate redevelopment of a priority site, the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s use of this map will be only reactive, guiding response to proposals submitted by property owners.

Amending the Future Land Use Map It may from time to time be appropriate to consider amendments to the Future Land Use Map. See Chapter 6 for a description of the procedural steps for amending any aspect of this plan. The following criteria should be considered before amending the map.

Agricultural The land does not have a history of productive farming activities, does not contain prime soils, or is not viable for long-term agricultural use. The land is too small to be economically used for agricultural purposes, or is inaccessible to the machinery needed to produce and harvest products. Compatibility The proposed development, or map amendment, will not have a substantial adverse effect upon adjacent property or the character of the area, with a particular emphasis on existing residential neighborhoods. A petitioner may indicate approaches that will minimize incompatibilities between uses.

5-4

Natural Resources The land does not include important natural features such as wetlands, floodplains, steep slopes, scenic vistas or significant woodlands, which will be adversely affected by the proposed development. The proposed building envelope is not located within the setback of Shoreland and Floodplain zones (raised above regional flood line). The proposed development will not result in undue water, air, light, or noise pollution. Petitioner may indicate approaches that will preserve or enhance the most important and sensitive natural features of the proposed site. Emergency Vehicle Access The lay of the land will allow for construction of appropriate roads and/or driveways that are suitable for travel or access by emergency vehicles. Ability to Provide Services Provision of public facilities and services will not place an unreasonable financial burden on the City. Petitioners may demonstrate to the City that the current level of services in the City, or region, including but not limited to school capacity, transportation system capacity, emergency services capacity (police, fire, EMS), parks and recreation, library services, and potentially water and/or sewer services, are adequate to serve the proposed use. Petitioners may also demonstrate how they will assist the City with any shortcomings in public services or facilities. Public Need There is a clear public need for the proposed change or unanticipated circumstances have resulted in a need for the change. The proposed development is likely to have a positive fiscal or social impact on the City. The City may require that the property owner, or their agent, fund the preparation of a fiscal impact analysis by an independent professional. Adherence to Other Portions of this Plan The proposed development is consistent with the general vision for the City, and the other goals, objectives, and policies of this Plan.

MSA Professional Services, Inc.


CHAPTER 5 LAND USE

2480E

E

2400E

LD RD N 180TH ST N 25TH ST WESTFIE

2300E

T 20T H S

\ [

N 320TH ST

180TH ST

1200N

SN AK E

E 1400TH RD

2480E

[ \ \ [ \ [

470E

400E

49

1150N

2480 E E 1300TH RD

1300 RD

100TH ST

N 470TH ST

\ [

UN UNIIO ON N TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP

\ [

\ [

V U

N 100TH ST

PA PARKER RKER TO TOWN WNSHI SHIP P

TR

\ [ 1400N

AIL RD

CA CASEY SEY TOW TOWNS NSH HIP IP

\ [

FR RD

1300N

70 ¦ ¨ §

\ [ 330E

± ³ 25

1050N

\ [

1000N

1180

75E

E 1180TH RD

± ³

2450E

7

40 £ ¤

H RD

T

2

2

N 430TH ST

\ [

975N

2325E

N COLES ST

\ \[ [ 975N

N 300TH ST

\ [

2350E

E 1250TH RD

\ [

SW 4TH ST

N M ILAM LN

1070N

E 10 50TH RD

E WASHINGTO N RD

DUPONT RD

SW 1ST ST

N 400TH ST

E 1000T H RD

N 450TH ST

W TYLER AVE

D DR

\ [

N 230TH ST

LA N

ORY LN

ER

E WASHINGTO N ST

SE 8TH ST

MB

T

SE 4TH ST

CU

IN S

VE AA

E WASHI NGTON AVE E ADAM S AVE E JEFFERSON AVE E MADISON AVE E MONRO E AVE

SE 1ST ST

800N

A WM

E 1120

D DR

HI CK

850N

M BA LA E A ST AIN EM

NE 25TH

70

\ [

NW 1ST ST NW 2ND ST NW 3RD S T NW 4TH ST NW 5TH ST

\ [

0E

875N

K CL ARK CLAR

COLES ST

AND ERLLAND CUM BER CUMB

240

\§ [ ¦ ¨

E EDGAR AVE

UM

LA N

ST

\ [ 1100N

900N

NE 1 5TH

NE 13TH S T

\ [

EC

R BE

[ \ \ [ 230E

£ ¤ 40

E 950TH RD

2425E

710N

E 800TH RD

\ [ 2480E

FUTURE LAND USE CASEY COUNTY

Future Land Use

Business Park Public/Institutional

Residential

Industrial

OPEN WATER

Mixed Use

Parks, Recreation & Open Space

RIVER/STREAM

Commercial

FORESTED AREA

E 750TH RD

CITY OF CASEY CLARK AND CUMBERLAND COUNTIES, IL

Rural Lands

PARCEL

N 330TH ST

2400E

N 250TH ST

\ [

CR CRO OOK OKED ED C CR REEK EEK TOW TOWNS NSH HIIP P

JOH JOHN NS SON ON TOW TOWNS NSH HIP IP

N COLES ST

\ [ 2300E

E 830TH RD

OAK LEAF RD

600N

N 240TH ST

\ [

2480 E ST

600N

E 870TH RD

N 150TH ST

2275E

49

N IL 49

\ [

V U

2480 E CO RD

700N

2350E

700N

N 100TH ST

[ \ \ [

[ \ \ [

E 930TH RD

220E

DATA SOURCES: MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY AND PARCELS PROVIDED BY CLARK COUNTY. ROADS, TOWNSHIPS AND COUNTIES PROVIDED BY US CENSUS (2013). LAND USE IN CLARK COUNTY DERIVED FROM PARCEL DATASET. LAND USE IN CUMBERLAND COUNTY DERIVED FROM AERIAL INTERPRETATION. OPEN WATER AND RIVERS/STREAMS PROVIDED BY USGS (NHD). FORESTED AREA DERIVED FROM USDA-NRCS CROPLAND DATA LAYER (2012).

0

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Casey, Illinois

0.25

0.5

Miles 1

E Print Date: 3/24/2014

5-5


5.2

FUTURE LAND USE MAP 2480E

E

2400E

LD RD N 180TH ST N 25TH ST WESTFIE

2300E

T 20T H S

\ [

N 320TH ST

180TH ST

1200N

SN AK E

E 1400TH RD

2480E

[ \ \ [ \ [

470E

400E

49

1150N

2480 E E 1300TH RD

1300 RD

100TH ST

N 470TH ST

\ [

UN UNIIO ON N TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP

\ [

\ [

V U

N 100TH ST

PA PARKER RKER TO TOWN WNSHI SHIP P

TR

\ [ 1400N

AIL RD

CA CASEY SEY TOW TOWNS NSH HIP IP

\ [

FR RD

1300N

70 § ¦ ¨

\ [ 330E

\ [

1000N

AN

E 1120

D DR

H RD

4

\ [ 1070N

E 10 50TH RD

E WASHINGTO N RD

DUPONT RD

± ³

SW 4TH ST

RL

N 400TH ST

U

E MB

E 1000T H RD

N 450TH ST

N 230TH ST

D DR

ORY LN

LA N

HI CK

ER

W TYLER AVE

NE 25TH

MB

AREA

E WASHINGTO N ST

SE 8TH ST

CU

ST

SE 4TH ST

800N

IN

VE AA

E WASHI NGTON AVE E ADAM S AVE E JEFFERSON AVE AVE ON MADIS E E MONRO E AVE

SE 1ST ST

\ [

A WM

M BA LA E A ST AIN EM

3 AREA

EA 2

AR

850N

E EDGAR AVE

EC

5

ST

70

NW 1ST ST NW 2ND ST NW 3RD S T NW 4TH ST NW 5TH ST

\ [

0E

875N

K CL ARK CLAR

COLES ST

AND ERLLAND CUM BER CUMB

240

\§ [ ¦ ¨

40 £ ¤

NE 1 5TH

\ [ 1100N

900N

AREA

7

NE 13TH S T

\ [

E 1180TH RD

SW 1ST ST

2450E

75E

2

2

1

N 430TH ST

\ [

975N

2325E

N COLES ST

\ \[ [ 975N

AREA 1180

T

\ [

N M ILAM LN

± ³

1050N

N 300TH ST

\ [

2350E

E 1250TH RD

25

[ \ \ [ 230E

40 £ ¤

E 950TH RD

2425E

710N

2400E

\ [ 2480E

FUTURE LAND USE - AREAS CASEY COUNTY

Future Land Use

Business Park Public/Institutional

Residential

Industrial

OPEN WATER

Mixed Use

Parks, Recreation & Open Space

RIVER/STREAM

Commercial

FORESTED AREA

E 750TH RD

CITY OF CASEY CLARK AND CUMBERLAND COUNTIES, IL

Rural Lands

PARCEL

N 330TH ST

\ [

CR CRO OOK OKED ED C CR REEK EEK TOW TOWNS NSH HIIP P

N 250TH ST

2300E

E 800TH RD

JOH JOHN NS SON ON TOW TOWNS NSH HIP IP

N COLES ST

\ [

DATA SOURCES: MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY AND PARCELS PROVIDED BY CLARK COUNTY. ROADS, TOWNSHIPS AND COUNTIES PROVIDED BY US CENSUS (2013). LAND USE IN CLARK COUNTY DERIVED FROM PARCEL DATASET. LAND USE IN CUMBERLAND COUNTY DERIVED FROM AERIAL INTERPRETATION. OPEN WATER AND RIVERS/STREAMS PROVIDED BY USGS (NHD). FORESTED AREA DERIVED FROM USDA-NRCS CROPLAND DATA LAYER (2012).

0

0.25

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5-6

E 830TH RD

OAK LEAF RD

600N

N 240TH ST

\ [

2480 E ST

600N

E 870TH RD

N 150TH ST

2275E

49

N IL 49

\ [

V U

2480 E CO RD

700N

2350E

00N

N 100TH ST

[ \ \ [

[ \ \ [

E 930TH RD

220E

MSA Professional Services, Inc.

0.5

Miles 1

E Print Date: 3/24/2014


CHAPTER 5 LAND USE 180TH ST

± ³

E 1250TH RD

7

V U N 100TH ST

49

70 § ¦ ¨

N 25TH ST

\ [ 1180

CA CASEY SEY TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP

70 § ¦ ¨

± ³

WESTFI ELD RD

± ³

N 180TH ST

25

E 1180TH RD

7

NE 16TH ST

TH D NOR

1ST ST

E GRANT AVE

LN

HORSE SHOE

NE 14TH ST

NE 13TH ST

R

N CENTRA L AVE

V U 49

E KEACH AVE

DEER RUN LN

E AV

ST

NT

NE 4TH ST

RA WG

1100N

NE 3RD ST

\ [

NE 1 5 T H

40 £ ¤

E GEORGI A AVE

W GEORGIA AVE

ED

E LA

R WA

VE EA

NE 1ST ST

FUTURE LAND USE - AREA 1 CASEY COUNTY

Future Land Use

Business Park

Rural Lands

Public/Institutional

Residential

Industrial

OPEN WATER

Mixed Use

Parks, Recreation & Open Space

RIVER/STREAM

Commercial

PARCEL FORESTED AREA

CITY OF CASEY CLARK AND CUMBERLAND COUNTIES, IL DATA SOURCES: MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY AND PARCELS PROVIDED BY CLARK COUNTY. ROADS, TOWNSHIPS AND COUNTIES PROVIDED BY US CENSUS (2013). LAND USE IN CLARK COUNTY DERIVED FROM PARCEL DATASET. LAND USE IN CUMBERLAND COUNTY DERIVED FROM AERIAL INTERPRETATION. OPEN WATER AND RIVERS/STREAMS PROVIDED BY USGS (NHD). FORESTED AREA DERIVED FROM USDA-NRCS CROPLAND DATA LAYER (2012).

0

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Casey, Illinois

500

1,000

Feet 2,000

E Print Date: 3/24/2014

5-7


5.2

FUTURE LAND USE MAP CA CASEY SEY TOW TOWNS NSH HIP IP

\ [ 1100N

N COLES ST

40 £ ¤

70 § ¦ ¨

L W F

ID OR

VE AA

\ [ 2480E

ST

W DELAWARE AVE

NW 4

NW 3RD ST

TH

W COLORADO AVE

W BENTON ST

NW 5TH ST W ALABAMA AVE

\ [ 850N

40 £ ¤

K CL ARK CLAR

AND ERLLAND CUM BER CUMB

COLES ST

UN UNIIO ON N TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP

T W M A IN S

SW 4TH ST

\ [ 2480E

CU

MB

ER

D LA N

RD

W TYLER AVE

N COLES ST

40 £ ¤

FUTURE LAND USE - AREA 2 CASEY COUNTY

Future Land Use

Public/Institutional

Residential

Industrial

OPEN WATER

Mixed Use

Parks, Recreation & Open Space

RIVER/STREAM

Commercial

FORESTED AREA

DATA SOURCES: MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY AND PARCELS PROVIDED BY CLARK COUNTY. ROADS, TOWNSHIPS AND COUNTIES PROVIDED BY US CENSUS (2013). LAND USE IN CLARK COUNTY DERIVED FROM PARCEL DATASET. LAND USE IN CUMBERLAND COUNTY DERIVED FROM AERIAL INTERPRETATION. OPEN WATER AND RIVERS/STREAMS PROVIDED BY USGS (NHD). FORESTED AREA DERIVED FROM USDA-NRCS CROPLAND DATA LAYER (2012).

Business Park

Rural Lands

PARCEL

CITY OF CASEY CLARK AND CUMBERLAND COUNTIES, IL

0

500

1,000

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5-8

MSA Professional Services, Inc.

Feet 2,000

E Print Date: 3/24/2014


CHAPTER 5 LAND USE E GEORGI A AVE

V U

W GEORGIA AVE

49

NE 1

ST S

T

NE 2ND ST

W FLORIDA AVE

E EDGAR AVE

NE ST

40 £ ¤

9 TH

NE 3RD ST

W EDGAR AVE

T OPA LS

NE 4TH ST

W DELAWARE AVE

NE 5TH ST

NW 1ST ST

E DELAWARE AVE

EA

LA

BA

MA

E AV

E COLORA DO AVE

N CENTRAL AVE

T

NW 4T

HS

W COLORADO AVE

NE

E BUCKEYE AVE

31 /2 S

EM

AIN

ST

T SE

UC

KE

YE

E AV

V U

NW

49

3R NW

T DS

2N

EG

T DS

W ALABAMA AVE

L WA

BA

NY

E AV

W

GE

NE

R

R AL

OB

EY

E EG

NE

RA

LR

OB

EY

EN

ER

AL

RO

B

DR EY

EA

LB

AN

ST

LA

N RL

VE YA

E WASHINGTON RD

E WASHI NGTON AVE

SE 3RD ST

E JEFFERSON AVE

SO N

AV E

SE 7TH ST

E ADAM S AVE

ST

SE 2ND ST

AIN

IBE

T HS

NW 5TH ST

WB

WM

CR

4T

W BENTON ST

W JEFFE R

SW 4TH ST

E MADISON AVE

SE 5TH ST

CA CASEY SEY TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP

W MADISO N AVE

E MONROE AVE

ST

SE 1ST ST

SW 3RD ST

SE 8TH ST

6T H SE

W MONROE AVE

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N IL 49

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FUTURE LAND USE - AREA 3 CASEY COUNTY

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Business Park

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Residential

Industrial

OPEN WATER

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RIVER/STREAM

Commercial

PARCEL FORESTED AREA

CITY OF CASEY CLARK AND CUMBERLAND COUNTIES, IL DATA SOURCES: MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY AND PARCELS PROVIDED BY CLARK COUNTY. ROADS, TOWNSHIPS AND COUNTIES PROVIDED BY US CENSUS (2013). LAND USE IN CLARK COUNTY DERIVED FROM PARCEL DATASET. LAND USE IN CUMBERLAND COUNTY DERIVED FROM AERIAL INTERPRETATION. OPEN WATER AND RIVERS/STREAMS PROVIDED BY USGS (NHD). FORESTED AREA DERIVED FROM USDA-NRCS CROPLAND DATA LAYER (2012).

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FUTURE LAND USE - AREA 4 CASEY COUNTY

Future Land Use

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Rural Lands

Public/Institutional

Residential

Industrial

OPEN WATER

Mixed Use

Parks, Recreation & Open Space

RIVER/STREAM

Commercial

PARCEL FORESTED AREA

CITY OF CASEY CLARK AND CUMBERLAND COUNTIES, IL DATA SOURCES: MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY AND PARCELS PROVIDED BY CLARK COUNTY. ROADS, TOWNSHIPS AND COUNTIES PROVIDED BY US CENSUS (2013). LAND USE IN CLARK COUNTY DERIVED FROM PARCEL DATASET. LAND USE IN CUMBERLAND COUNTY DERIVED FROM AERIAL INTERPRETATION. OPEN WATER AND RIVERS/STREAMS PROVIDED BY USGS (NHD). FORESTED AREA DERIVED FROM USDA-NRCS CROPLAND DATA LAYER (2012).

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FUTURE LAND USE - AREA 5 CASEY COUNTY

Future Land Use

Business Park

Rural Lands

Public/Institutional

Residential

Industrial

OPEN WATER

Mixed Use

Parks, Recreation & Open Space

RIVER/STREAM

Commercial

PARCEL FORESTED AREA

CITY OF CASEY CLARK AND CUMBERLAND COUNTIES, IL DATA SOURCES: MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY AND PARCELS PROVIDED BY CLARK COUNTY. ROADS, TOWNSHIPS AND COUNTIES PROVIDED BY US CENSUS (2013). LAND USE IN CLARK COUNTY DERIVED FROM PARCEL DATASET. LAND USE IN CUMBERLAND COUNTY DERIVED FROM AERIAL INTERPRETATION. OPEN WATER AND RIVERS/STREAMS PROVIDED BY USGS (NHD). FORESTED AREA DERIVED FROM USDA-NRCS CROPLAND DATA LAYER (2012).

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5.3

FUTURE LAND USE CATEGORIES

Future Land Use Categories The future land use categories identify areas of similar use, character and density. These classifications are not zoning districts - they do not legally set performance criteria for land uses (i.e. setbacks, height restrictions, density, etc.). The strategies listed with each category are provided to help landowners and City officials make design decisions during the development process consistent with the intent of the land use category. Some categories also feature design recommendations. The ten categories designated on the Future Land Use Map are: • RL - Rural Lands • R - Residential • MU - Mixed Use • C - Commercial/Office • BP - Business Park • I - Industrial • P - Public and Institutional • P/OS - Parks, Recreation & Open Space

Rural Lands (RL) The Rural Lands category is intended to preserve land and rural character in areas deemed unlikely or infeasible for urban development prior to 2032. Preferred uses in these areas include open space, farming, farmsteads, agricultural businesses, forestry, quarries, and limited rural residential on well and septic. Residential (R) This land use category is intended for existing and planned neighborhoods that feature a mix of housing types with the majority of homes consisting of single-family and duplex units. These neighborhoods will be served by municipal sanitary sewer and water systems. Municipal and institutional land sues (parks, schools, churches, and stormwater facilities) may be built within this district area. The preferred density range is 2-8 units per acre.

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CHAPTER 5 LAND USE Mixed Use (MU) Mixed-Use areas are intended to provide a mix of smallerscale commercial, residential, public and related uses in a pedestrian-friendly environment. They may include a mix of retail and service commercial, office, institutional, higher density residential, public uses and/or park and recreation uses. Uses can be integrated either vertically or horizontally. Commercial (C) Commercial areas are intended for retail, service, and office uses that serve neighborhood, community and regional markets. The type and size of use will be determined by location and market forces. Business Park (BP) Business park areas are intended for showrooms, warehousing, storage, and light industrial uses with associated office functions. Business park developments are usually designed in a unified manner and feature public and private landscaping, directory signage and/or entry features. Industrial (I) Industrial areas are intended for light or heavy manufacturing, warehousing, distribution, wholesale trade, accessory offices, and similar uses. Industrial areas are typically larger, individual sites not part of a larger business park.

Public and Institutional (P) Public and institutional areas are intended for churches, schools, cemeteries, art and cultural facilities, local government facilities and other parcels that are owned by a public or quasi-public entity. This category does not include parks and recreation areas. Parks, Recreation & Open Space (P/OS) Parks, Recreation and Open Space areas are intended for active and passive recreation uses or preservation of natural areas. P/OS lands can be public or privately owned.

Casey, Illinois

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5.3

FUTURE LAND USE CATEGORIES

RL- Rural Lands The Rural Lands category is intended to preserve land and rural character in areas deemed unlikely or infeasible for urban development prior to 2034. Preferred uses in these areas include open space, trails, farming, farmsteads, agricultural businesses, forestry, quarries, and limited rural residential on well and septic.

Land Use Strategies RL-1: New homes should be sited on non-productive soils in ways that minimize disruption of agricultural use and avoid the creation of new access points to state highways. Small lots (e.g. 1.5 acres) are preferred, especially if the remaining land is in agricultural use. RL-2: Rural residential subdivisions containing 5+ homes are discouraged, except in areas where urban development is unlikely to occur, even many years from now. RL-3: Rural residential subdivisions are strongly encouraged to utilize conservation design strategies that minimize the disruption of natural features and rural character.

Conservation development usually attempts to hide development from the main road(s) through natural topography, landscape buffers and setbacks in order to preserve rural character.

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5.3

FUTURE LAND USE CATEGORIES

R - Residential The Residential areas are intended for housing with densities that range from two to eight units per acre. Neighborhood areas classified as R will typically be predominately function as residential areas with singlefamily detached units, doubles and other lower density attached housing products, townhouses, row houses, apartment buildings, and senior housing.

Land Use Strategies R-1: Urban services will be required for all new development, including municipal water, wastewater, and stormwater management systems. R-2: Healthy, balanced neighborhoods may also include other uses that support the needs of residents, including: • Parks and recreational facilities • Access to bike and pedestrian network • Small municipal and institutional facilities (e.g. learning center, library, fire station, etc.) • Community centers • Places of worship • Day care centers • Small pockets of higher-density residential (see HDR) • Small commercial that serves neighborhood needs R-3: The City will encourage and support the creation of neighborhood plans for growth areas and for existing neighborhoods experiencing redevelopment pressure, to proactively determine how varied housing types and uses can be appropriately integrated into the neighborhood, and to establish a unique identity for each neighborhood. R-4: Infill development will protect the character of existing residential neighborhoods. Design Strategies The City encourages residential projects (new construction and remodeling) to incorporate design strategies that will maintain neighborhood property values over time and enhance the social function and safety of the neighborhood.

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Relationship to the Street: Buildings and sites should be designed to establish visual and physical connections between the public realm of the street and the private realm of the home, with layers of increasingly private space in between. Consider the following techniques (see side bar): A) The front door should face the street and there should be a clear route to the door from the street or sidewalk. B) There should be windows on the street facade C) Building setbacks will vary according to building type and lot size, but should generally not exceed 30 feet. D) Incorporate a covered front porch, or at least a raised stoop, preferably covered. E) Utilize low fences, hedges, or other landscaping to establish a layer of privacy behind the sidewalk. Relationship among buildings: Buildings within a neighborhood should be both cohesive and varied. Consider the following techniques: A) Homes along a street should utilize similar setbacks to establish a consistent “street wall”. B) Home sizes may vary along a street, but should utilize design techniques such as similar roof line heights and deeper setbacks for portions of wider houses to minimize apparent size variations. C) The mix of architectural themes or styles should generally be consistent within a neighborhood, but repeated use of identical floor plans or colors is strongly discouraged, especially for adjacent buildings. D) When adjacent to lower density residential buildings, larger buildings should incorporate strategies to minimize the apparent size of the building, including flat roofs instead of pitched roofs, deeper setbacks for upper stories, and/or variation in the depth of setback along the building facade.

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CHAPTER 5 LAND USE Remodeling and Additions: Changes and additions to existing structures should complement the design of the existing structure. Consider the following techniques: A) Select window types and proportions that match the rest of the house. B) New exterior materials should match, or be complementary, to existing materials. C) Avoid enclosing covered porches, when possible. If enclosing a covered porch, maintain the appearance of a porch, rather than attempting to blend the porch seamlessly with the rest of the house.

This graphic illustrates how a single-family homes can use varying techniques to create a relationship with the street (see text for technique descriptions)

Garages: Consider garage location and scale to avoid a “garage-scape” street appearance. When necessary, street-facing garages should be set back at least 10 feet behind the front façade of the building. Landscaping: Provide generous landscaping, with an emphasis on native plant species, especially along street frontages. Use trees and low bushes in and around parking areas to partially obscure views of parking while retaining visual connections to maintain personal safety. Lighting: Exterior lights should be full-cut-off fixtures that are directed to the ground to minimize glare, light trespass and light pollution (see side bar). Limited up-lighting is acceptable for architectural accentuation, flag lighting, and to highlight key civic features (e.g. church steeples).

The upper graphic illustrates the different types of lighting techniques from no cutoff to full-cutoff. The lower images provide good examples of full-cutoff building light fixtures.

Common Open Space: Provide gardens, grass areas, and playgrounds to serve the needs of residents. Service Areas: Trash and recycling containers, streetlevel mechanical, rooftop mechanical, and outdoor storage, should be located or screened so that they are not visible from a public street. Screening should be compatible with building architecture and other site features. (see side bar)

Casey, Illinois

These images provide good examples of screened services areas.

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5.3

FUTURE LAND USE CATEGORIES

MU - Mixed Use Mixed-Use areas are intended to provide a mix of smaller-scale commercial, residential, public and related uses in a pedestrian-friendly environment. They may include a mix of retail and service commercial, office, institutional, higher density residential, public uses and/or park and recreation uses. Uses can be integrated either vertically or horizontally.

Land Use Strategies MU-1: Commercial uses in MU areas will be smallerscale establishments serving the local market and/ or niche markets, rather than large users serving regional demand and generating significant traffic and parking needs. Businesses encouraged in these areas include restaurants, small grocery or specialty food shops, laundromats, salons, hardware stores, small professional offices, and boutiques. MU-2: Upper-floor residential units are strongly encouraged over ground-floor retail. MU-3: High density residential uses will generally be located where there is convenient access to restaurants, retail and service businesses. MU-4: Older buildings with architectural character and historical interest are important to the image of the entire community. The City encourages and supports adaptive reuse projects that retain and restore the historic character of the structure.

Consider the following techniques: A) The surrounding context, especially adjacent buildings, should always be documented and considered before design begins. City reviewers should require photos of this context during the review process. B) Buildings should incorporate architectural elements that provide visual interest and human scale, such as differentiation of the ground floor level, awnings or canopies over entrances, etc. C) It is not necessary to replicate historic architectural styles with new buildings, but there should be some consistency of the scale and rhythm of design features, such as windows and floor heights, that help fit a new building within a block of older buildings D) Building materials should be consistent with other nearby buildings. Brick and stone are strongly encouraged in most parts of downtown, but other quality, long-lasting materials may be appropriate in some places. Building Height: Multi-story buildings (2-3 floors) are strongly encouraged on all downtown sites. Relationship to the Street: Buildings and sites should be designed to establish visual and physical connections between the public realm of the street and the private realm of the building.

MU-5: Wayfinding signage to key downtown locations is critical, especially for visitors. The City will develop a signage system from primary downtown entry points to key locations, including City Hall, the public library, and the tourist attractions (Wind Chime, Golf Tee, Rocking Chair, Knitting Needles and Softball Hall of Fame).

Consider the following techniques (see side bar):

Design Strategies The City encourages all new development in the downtown area to maintain the urban fabric and character.

C) There should be clear vision windows on the street facade. Retail and service spaces should have large, clear windows that provide good visual connection between the building interior and the sidewalk.

Design Context and Architectural Character: New buildings should fit their context.

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A) In most cases there should be no setback from the sidewalk, though occasional partial setbacks to create usable space, as for an outdoor seating area, are acceptable. B) The front door should face the primary street.

Garages: Street-facing garages doors should be

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CHAPTER 5 LAND USE avoided whenever possible. Parking: Front yard parking is strongly discouraged. Side yard parking should be separated from the sidewalk by a low fence or landscape buffer to partially obscure views of parking while retaining visual connections to maintain personal safety. Landscaping: In places where the building is not building at the front property line, hardscape improvements and native plants should be used to provide visual interest and a comfortable pedestrian environment. Lighting: Exterior lights should be full-cut-off fixtures that are directed to the ground to minimize glare and light pollution, and especially to avoid light trespass to residential uses. Limited up-lighting is acceptable for architectural accentuation, flag lighting, and to highlight key civic features (e.g. church steeples).

Above are examples of landscaped street edges where the building is set back from the street. In some instances, the set back area includes outdoor seating areas.

Signage: Signs should be pedestrian-scaled. Desired sign types include building-mounted, window, projecting, monument and awning. Signs should not be excessive in height or square footage. (see side bar) Service Areas: Trash and recycling containers, streetlevel mechanical, rooftop mechanical, outdoor storage, and loading docks should be located or screened so that they are not visible from a public street. Screening should be compatible with building architecture and other site features. Stormwater: Green roofs, permeable pavement and other stormwater management technologies should be utilized as feasible to filter pollutants and infiltrate or delay runoff.

Preferred pedestrian-scaled sign alternatives

Stormwater management techniques (from left to right): rain garden, bioswale, pervious pavers, & porous pavement.

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FUTURE LAND USE CATEGORIES

Examples upper floors being setback, reducing the buildings overall impact on the street and neighboring buildings. An example of a low-density, surburban mixed use building with minimal setback, large first-floor windows, and walkways to street-side entrances.

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CHAPTER 5 LAND USE

The examples above illustrate how landscaping can provide visual interest along a public street, and partially obscure views of parking areas while retaining views between 3-6 ft.

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5.3

FUTURE LAND USE CATEGORIES

C- Commercial Commercial areas are intended for retail, service, and office uses that serve neighborhood, community and regional markets. Examples include large retail and service businesses, offices, clinics and health care facilities, hotels, restaurants and entertainment businesses, storage, and automobile sales and services. The type and size of use will be determined by location and market forces.

Land Use Strategies C-1: Commercial areas should generally be served by public transit, a contiguous sidewalk network, and safe bike routes. C-2: The City encourages and supports investment in small neighborhood commercial uses and sites in existing neighborhoods. Sites deemed no longer viable for commercial use should be considered for redevelopment with housing. Design Strategies The City encourages for all commercial projects the use of design strategies that will maintain property values over time. This section offers different strategies for highway settings and neighborhood settings in some categories. Relationship to the Street: The building should be designed such that the primary building facade is oriented towards the street (toward the larger street on corner lots) and should have a public entrance. Architectural Character: The building should be designed using architectural elements that provide visual interest and a human scale that relates to the surrounding neighborhood context. Building Materials: The building should be constructed of high quality, long lasting finish materials, especially along prominent facades with frequent customer traffic. Building Projections: Canopies, awnings, and/or gable-roof projections should be provided along facades that give access to the building. (see side bar)

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Signage: Signs should be not larger or taller than necessary based on the context of the site, and within the limits established by the zoning ordinance. Highway commercial: Desired sign types include building-mounted, monument. Neighborhood commercial: Desired sign types include building-mounted, window, projecting, monument and awning. Parking: Front yard parking should be limited; side yard, rear yard, or below building alternatives are preferred. Shared parking and access between properties is encouraged to minimize curb cuts and make more efficient use of land and paved surfaces. Landscaping and trees should be incorporated into all surface parking areas to improve aesthetic and environmental performance. Vegetative buffers should be provided between pedestrian circulation routes and vehicular parking/circulation. Access drive lanes should be separated from parking stalls to reduce congestion. (see side bar) Landscaping: Generous landscaping should be provided with an emphasis on native plant species. Landscaping should be places along street frontages, between incompatible land uses, along parking areas, and in islands of larger parking lots. Use trees and low bushes in and around parking areas to partially obscure views of parking while retaining visual connections to maintain personal safety. (see side bar) Lighting: Exterior lights should be full-cut-off fixtures that are directed to the ground to minimize glare and light pollution, and especially to avoid light trespass to nearby residential property. Limited uplighting is acceptable for architectural accentuation, flag lighting, and to highlight key civic features (e.g. church steeples). Stormwater: Rain gardens, bio-retention basins, permeable pavement and other stormwater management technologies should be utilized to filter pollutants and infiltrate runoff.

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CHAPTER 5 LAND USE Service Areas: Trash and recycling containers, street-level mechanical, rooftop mechanical, outdoor storage, and loading docks should be located or screened so that they are not visible from a public street. Screening should be compatible with building architecture and other site features. Awnings (left) or canopy structures (right) help define the building entrances and provide visual interest along the street frontage.

Development #1 Development #2

The above concept illustrates shared parking between two developments connected by an access drive, and includes vegetative buffers along all pedestrian routes.

The examples above illustrate ways to landscape parking areas, including along the street frontage, in parking islands and medians, and between incompatible land uses.

Casey, Illinois

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5.3

FUTURE LAND USE CATEGORIES

BP - Business Park Business park areas are intended for offices, showrooms, warehousing, storage, and light industrial uses with associated office functions. Business park developments are usually designed in a unified manner and feature both public and private landscaping, and common directory signage and/or entry features.

Land Use Strategies BP-1: Business parks should be served by public transit, a contiguous sidewalk network, and safe bike routes. BP-2: Any new business parks will utilize design standards to establish and maintain a consistent and quality appearance. Design Strategies The City encourages the use of design strategies that will maintain property values over time in business park areas. Relationship to the Street: Buildings should be designed such that the primary building facade and entrance are oriented towards the street (toward the larger street on corner lots). Architectural Character: Buildings should be designed using architectural elements that provide visual interest. A consistent design theme or style among different sites is not necessary. Building Materials: Buildings should be constructed of high quality, long lasting finish materials. Building Entrances: Building entrances should utilize architectural features that make them easy to find and which provide some measure of protection from the elements immediately in front of the door. (see side bar) Signs: Signs should be not larger or taller than necessary based on the context of the site, and within the limits established by the zoning ordinance. Common directory signs at business park entrances and a common style or format for all sites are

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encouraged. (see side bar) Parking: Parking should be in the side yard or rear yard wherever feasible. Front yard parking should be limited to one double-loaded aisle. Shared parking among neighboring sites is encouraged to make more efficient use of land and paved surfaces. Vegetative buffers should be provided in parking lots between pedestrian circulation routes and vehicular parking/circulation. The use of on-street parking is encouraged. Access drive lanes should have adequate throat depths to allow for proper vehicle stacking. Landscaping: Generous landscaping should be provided with an emphasis on native plant species. Landscaping should be places along street frontages, between incompatible land uses, along parking areas, and in islands of larger parking lots. Use trees and low bushes in and around parking areas to partially obscure views of parking while retaining visual connections to maintain personal safety. Lighting: Exterior lights should be full-cut-off fixtures that are directed to the ground to minimize glare and light pollution, and especially to avoid light trespass to any nearby residential property. Limited up-lighting is acceptable for architectural accentuation, flag lighting, and to highlight key civic features (e.g. church steeples). Stormwater: Rain gardens, bio-retention basins, permeable pavement and other stormwater management technologies should be utilized to filter pollutants and infiltrate runoff. Service Areas: Trash and recycling containers, streetlevel mechanical, rooftop mechanical, outdoor storage, and loading docks should be located or screened so that they are not visible from a public street. Screening should be compatible with building architecture and other site features.

MSA Professional Services, Inc.


CHAPTER 5 LAND USE I- Industrial Industrial areas are intended for light or heavy manufacturing, warehousing, distribution, wholesale trade, accessory offices, and similar uses. Industrial areas are typically larger, individual sites not part of a larger business park.

Land Use Strategies I-1: Industrial areas should be located near regional transportation routes. Uses with a large workforce should also be served by public transit.

There are many ways to architecturally define building entrances on office/industrial buildings. Above are a few examples with a varying degrees of protection provided.

Examples of common directory signs at business/industrial park entrances.

Casey, Illinois

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FUTURE LAND USE CATEGORIES

P - Public and Institutional Public and institutional areas are intended for churches, schools, cemeteries, art and cultural facilities, local government facilities and other parcels that are owned by a public or quasi-public entity. This category does not include parks and recreation areas.

Land Use Strategies P-1: Decommissioned public properties, such as schools, should be reused or redeveloped in ways that are compatible with the surrounding neighborhood. The City will partner with the School District to consider reuse options and neighborhood concerns before a sale occurs. Design Strategies Many public and institutional uses are located in or next to residential areas. The following strategies are intended to mitigate negative impacts on surrounding uses. Traffic and Parking: Parking and driveway access should be designed to minimize the impacts of vehicle headlights, congestion, and aesthetic appearance on the surrounding neighborhood. Parking lots should be buffered from adjacent residential uses by

a landscaping buffer that blocks headlights and the view of parked cars. Landscaping: Buildings that are much larger than surrounding residential uses should utilize landscaping to mitigate the apparent size of the building. This can include a combination of planting beds, foundation plantings, ornamental shrubs and trees, and shade trees that will help the larger structures blend into the neighborhood. Lighting: Exterior lights should be full-cut-off fixtures that are directed to the ground to minimize glare and prevent all light trespass to adjacent residential uses.

P/OS - Parks, Recreation & Open Space Park and Open Space areas are intended for active and passive recreation uses or preservation of natural areas. P/OS lands are owned by the City, County, or State.

Land Use Strategies P/OS -1: Existing natural areas identified as Parks and Open Space are to be preserved, though limited access should be provided to foster awareness and appreciation for the area. P/OS -2: The development and improvement of future Parks and Open Space areas should be focused on the development of trails and bike pathways.

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DATA SOURCES: MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY AND PARCELS PROVIDED BY CLARK COUNTY. ROADS, TOWNSHIPS AND COUNTIES PROVIDED BY US CENSUS (2013). LAND USE IN CLARK COUNTY DERIVED FROM PARCEL DATASET. LAND USE IN CUMBERLAND COUNTY DERIVED FROM AERIAL INTERPRETATION. OPEN WATER AND RIVERS/STREAMS PROVIDED BY USGS (NHD). FORESTED AREA DERIVED FROM USDA-NRCS CROPLAND DATA LAYER (2012).

FORESTED AREA OPEN WATER RIVER/STREAM

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REGIONAL CONTEXT MAP PARKER RKER V TO U 8PA TOWN WNSHI SHIP P

UN UNIIO ON N

E 1300TH RD

N 100TH ST

E 1250TH RD

\[ [ \ 2350E

RD

H

± ³

E 1120T

D DR

O RY

LN

1070N

E 10 50TH RD

E WASHINGTO N RD

E WASHINGTO N ST

\ [ DUPONT RD

SW 4TH ST

UM

LA N

N 400TH ST

EC

R BE

H IC K

3

E 1000T H RD

N 230TH ST

5

SE 8TH ST

SE 4TH ST

W TYLER AVE

D DR

VE AA

NE 25TH

ST

M BA LA E A ST AIN EM

E WASHI NGTON AVE E ADAM S AVE E JEFFERSON AVE E MADISON AVE E MONR OE AV E

SE 1ST ST

IN

NW 1ST ST NW 2ND ST NW 3RD S T NW 4TH ST NW 5TH ST

K CL ARK CLAR

0E

A W M

3 4 2 1

E EDGAR AVE

ST NE 1 5TH

2

1100N

70 ¦ ¨ § AN

NE 13TH S T

\ [

COLES ST

24 0

850N

RL

N

40 £ ¤ 7

AND ERLLAND CUM BER CUMB

900N

BE

40

N M I LAM LN

2

2325E

M CU

330E

E 1180TH RD

2400E

800N

\ [

N 430TH ST

975N

2450E

2 7 5E

\ [

¦ ¨ §

N COLES ST

\ [ \ [ 1. New Conference Center 2. New Bed & Breakfast \ [ 3. Development of Local Trail System \ [ \ [ \ [ \ [ 875N

1300N

1180

IMPROVEMENT OPPORTUNITIES 975N

\ [

72 70

1

\ [

1000N

SW 1ST ST

2350E

± ³

\ [

CA CASEY SEY TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP

FR RD

N 300TH ST

25

100TH ST

SN AK ET RAIL RD

N 450TH ST

2480 E

49

1300 RD

N 320TH ST

T 20T H S

\ [

N 180TH ST WESTFIELD RD 180TH ST

\ [

E 1400TH RD

N 25TH ST

1200N

2480E

\ [

1. World’s Largest Wind Chime 2. World’s Largest Golf Tee 2300E 1150N 3. World’s Largest Knitting Needles & Crochet Hook 4. World’s Largest Rocking Chair 5. Illinois Amateur Softball Association Hall of Fame & Honor Museum 6. Lincoln Trail Motosports 1050N 7. Moonshine 8. Oilfield

E

49

TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP EXISTING REGIONAL AMENITIES

4 70T H ST

CHAPTER 5 LAND USE

[ \ \ [ 230E

[ \ \ [

\ [

6

V U

2275E

E 870TH RD

JOH JOHN NS SON ON TOW TOWNS NSH HIP IP

11

± ³

500N

2480E

± ³

\ [

\ [ 15

7

E 700TH RD

CITY OF CASEY CLARK AND CUMBERLAND COUNTIES, IL

REGIONAL CONTEXT

DATA SOURCES: MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY AND PARCELS PROVIDED BY CLARK COUNTY. ROADS, TOWNSHIPS AND COUNTIES PROVIDED BY US CENSUS (2013). LAND USE IN CLARK COUNTY DERIVED FROM PARCEL DATASET. LAND USE IN CUMBERLAND COUNTY DERIVED FROM AERIAL INTERPRETATION. OPEN WATER AND RIVERS/STREAMS PROVIDED BY USGS (NHD). FORESTED AREA DERIVED FROM USDA-NRCS CROPLAND DATA LAYER (2012).

CASEY COUNTY

E 750TH RD

OAK LEAF RD

2400E

N 250TH ST

\ [

N 100TH ST

2300E

CR CRO OOK OKED ED C CR REEK EEK TOW TOWNS NSH HIIP P

E 800TH RD

N COLES ST

\ [

2350E

E 830TH RD

N 450TH ST

600N

2480 E ST

[ \ \ [

N 150TH ST

600N

N 240TH ST

\ [

2480 E CO RD

700N

700N

N IL 49

710N

E 930TH RD

220E

49

2425E

N 330TH ST

£ ¤

E 950TH RD

40

MAJOR HIGHWAYS

PARCEL FORESTED AREA OPEN WATER

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5.5

NEIGHBORHOOD / PLANNING AREAS

Neighborhoods and Planning Areas Neighborhoods come in all shapes and sizes. They can be just a few blocks or a large portion of a city. While often defined more by resident perception and preference than any other criteria, neighborhoods generally feature a common size, character and age of homes. Healthy, vibrant neighborhoods often have multiple residential types to accommodate residents in all stages of life, are safe and pleasant to explore on foot, and offer convenient pedestrian access to retail and restaurant uses. There are, at present, no officially designated neighborhoods in Casey. The Planning Areas map at right unofficially designates parts of the City as planning areas. The purpose of this designation, is to consider possible neighborhood areas and allow for easier discussion of various parts of the City during planning discussions. Should there be interest in forming neighborhood associations in Casey, the City will support that effort and this map can be used as a starting point for discussion about neighborhood boundaries. This following section also offers location-specific planning and improvement strategies for one key planning area: the Downtown.

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CHAPTER 5 LAND USE

180TH ST

CA CASEY SEY TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP

\ [

± ³

1050N

1180

40 £ ¤

± ³

2450E

N 300TH ST

\ [

N 230TH ST

N 25TH ST

N 100TH ST

7

\ [

70 § ¦ ¨

WESTFIELD RD N 180TH ST

E 1250TH RD

25

E 1180TH RD

N COLES ST

975N

70 § ¦ ¨

2480E

V U

NE 16TH ST

\ [

49

HO

E LN

L ST

D DR

NE 25TH

O PA

AN

LN

H ST 1 3T

1 0T

ST

T HS

N 13 TH

SE

E WASHINGTO N RD

E WASHINGTO N ST

E WASHINGTON AVE

E ADAM S AVE

E HI L LCRE E MONROE AV E

SE 8TH ST

SE 5TH ST

E MADISON AVE

ST RD

SW 4TH ST

RL

ORY

SE

ST

BE

HICK

E AV

T HS

AIN

T 5TH S NE 1

MA

UM

E VAN BUREN AVE

N 230TH ST

E HARRISON AVE

E TYLER AVE

N 150TH ST

N IL 49

N COLES ST

\ [ 230E

E 950TH RD E 930TH RD

\ [

N 100TH ST

2480 E ST

\ [

2425E

BA

E JEFFERSON AVE

W TYLER AVE

\ [

LA

0T

W VAN BUREN AVE W HARRISON AVE

EA

N1

D

T NE 9T H S

DR

EM

SE 6TH ST

N LA

VE YA

SE 3RD ST

ER

AN

SE 1ST ST

MB

LB

SE 2ND ST

W MONROE AVE

CU

NE 5TH ST

EA

4TH ST

AVE

S CENTRA L AVE

ST

E COLORA DO AVE

SE

MA

N CENTRAL AVE

W ALA B A

NW 2ND ST

NW 5TH ST

NW 4TH ST

COLES ST W

IN MA

NW 3RD ST

W DELAWARE AVE

E EDGAR AVE

NE 4TH ST

IDA AVE OR FL W EDGAR AVE

NW 1ST ST

K CL ARK CLAR

850N

NE 2ND ST

W

AND ERLLAND CUM BER CUMB

\ [

NE 13TH ST

E GEORGI A AVE

1100N

UN UNIIO ON N TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP

RSE S DEER RUN LN

NE 14TH ST

\ [

HO

40 £ ¤

EC

220E

2480E

NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNING AREAS CASEY

NORTHWEST

COUNTY

SOUTHWEST

PARCEL

DOWNTOWN

FORESTED AREA

NORTHEAST

OPEN WATER

FAIRVIEW

RIVER/STREAM

EAST

CITY OF CASEY CLARK AND CUMBERLAND COUNTIES, IL DATA SOURCES: MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY AND PARCELS PROVIDED BY CLARK COUNTY. ROADS, TOWNSHIPS AND COUNTIES PROVIDED BY US CENSUS (2013). LAND USE IN CLARK COUNTY DERIVED FROM PARCEL DATASET. LAND USE IN CUMBERLAND COUNTY DERIVED FROM AERIAL INTERPRETATION. OPEN WATER AND RIVERS/STREAMS PROVIDED BY USGS (NHD). FORESTED AREA DERIVED FROM USDA-NRCS CROPLAND DATA LAYER (2012).

GOLF COURSE

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5.6

SPECIAL PLANNING AREA: DOWNTOWN

Overview

Desired General Characteristics

This section identifies an overview of design guidelines that would enhance the Downtown, consistent with the more general goals, objectives, and strategies in this plan. For a more detailed plan, see Study C: Downtown Revitalization Plan.

In general, desirable characteristics of (re)development in the Downtown include:

future

• High-quality architecture and site design • Compact and walkable • Streetscaping and pedestrian/bicycle amenities • Public open spaces and plazas • Preservation of historic character • Focal points and gathering places • Compact, interconnected blocks • Serviceable by bike/pedestrian infrastructure • On-street and structured parking (minimal use of surface lots) • Mixed-use buildings • Landscaping and street trees Recommended uses include: • Restaurants and entertainment businesses • Boutiques and specialty stores • Upper story multi-family • Specialty food stores • Public open spaces and plazas • Cafes and bakeries • Service businesses including salons, launderers, tailors, etc. • Cultural centers and art galleries • Community centers and social service agencies • Small business/non-profit incubators • Offices • Live/work spaces • Commercial lodging and meeting space • Music venues • Educational/government/institutional branch offices

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CHAPTER 5 LAND USE W COLORADO AVE

E BUCKEYE AVE

E ALA

BAM A

AV E

NE 3R DS T

DS T

CA CASEY SEY TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP

VE EA

2N

EY

NE

CK

N CENTRAL AVE

SE

U WB

3R

TS T

2N

49

T

1S

DS

NE

NW

V U

T DS

EM

TS

VE AA AM

1S

LA B

ST

NW T

WA

AIN

SE 1S TS T

NW

E EG

3R T DS

EA

AIN

ST

W

WA

NE

RA

LR

OB

EY

AN

NE

RA

LR

OB

RA

LR

OB

EY

LR

OB

EY

ST

VE YA

DR

E WASHINGTON RD

E WASHI NGTON AVE

VE YA

ST

E ADAM S AVE

SE 2ND ST

SW 1ST ST

SW 3RD ST

E EG

LB

GE

NE

AN

RA

S CENTRAL AVE

WM

E EG

EY

LB

NE

E JEFFERSON AVE

V U 49

SW 2ND ST

W JEFFERSON AVE

SW 4TH ST

E MADISON AVE

W MADISO N AVE

DOWNTOWN PLANNING AREA CASEY COUNTY PARCEL

Future Land Use

Business Park

Rural Lands

Public/Institutional

Residential

Industrial

Mixed Use

Parks, Recreation & Open Space

CITY OF CASEY CLARK AND CUMBERLAND COUNTIES, IL DATA SOURCES: MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY AND PARCELS PROVIDED BY CLARK COUNTY. ROADS, TOWNSHIPS AND COUNTIES PROVIDED BY US CENSUS (2013). LAND USE IN CLARK COUNTY DERIVED FROM PARCEL DATASET. LAND USE IN CUMBERLAND COUNTY DERIVED FROM AERIAL INTERPRETATION. OPEN WATER AND RIVERS/STREAMS PROVIDED BY USGS (NHD). FORESTED AREA DERIVED FROM USDA-NRCS CROPLAND DATA LAYER (2012).

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Casey, Illinois

125

250

Feet 500

E Print Date: 3/24/2014

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5.6

SPECIAL PLANNING AREA: DOWNTOWN

Streetscaping Improvements The downtown area needs some streetscaping improvements, especially to enhance consistency and provide an attractive and enjoyable experience. These pages identify important design considerations when making changes and/or improvements to the Downtown Planning Area. There are many aspects of the public street to be considered when designing Caseyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s streetscape.

General Streetscaping Improvements

Signage and Lighting Lighting and signage can be integrated in several ways. There are thousands of lighting and signage options to chose from in determining the character of the streetscape. Casey already has a standard lighting design implemented, adding uniform signage will enhance the experience.

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CHAPTER 5 LAND USE

Cohesive Character Streetscape design can incorporate many different features and amenities, and, if used consistently, create a sense of continuity throughout a district or corridor. Above, light poles with banners and decorative pavers carry the character throughout the street or district, while the intersections are anchored with wayfinding signage and other elements that create a unique, memorable place identity.

Branding Custom branding can help define the elements of a streetscape even with multiple scales and materials. In these images, the Main Street corridor is adorn with emblems signifying the common thread through branding, whether itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a light pole base or banner to seating and signage.

Unique, Contextual Materials The materials used can often influence the visual character. For instance, to the left, large powder-coated I-beams serve as seats and hint to this districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s industrial history. This sort of contextual, historical nod gives a place character while providing a practical function.

Outdoor Seating Outdoor seating for restaurants and cafes enlivens the street with activity. Where sidewalks are too narrow to allow this, space can be created by the strategic reclaiming of on-street parking spaces. This illustration shows how these seating areas can also incorporate additional trees and landscaping, stormwater mitigation techniques, public art and signage.

Casey, Illinois

5-35


5.6 SPECIAL PLANNING AREA: DOWNTOWN Streetscaping Improvements (cont.) Unique Paving Pavers, whether clay or concrete or natural stone, can provide a heightened sense of character, used either for larger areas or as accents. In some cases permeable pavers may be viable, reducing stormwater runoff. Accents may also be achieved through colored concrete.

Landscaping Trees, shrubs and other softscaping provide many benefits to a community, including highlighting and protecting pedestrian routes, beautifying (breaking up) the harsh urban hardscape and reducing heat gain. Below illustrates the potential transformation of the downtown corridor by painting the poles black, adding bump-outs, and installing trees, planters and benches.

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CHAPTER 5 LAND USE Unique Features Unique features are often the highlight that a user or visitor will remember and talk about. There is a large variety of special elements that can be incorporated. Sculptures are often used to highlight a local artist or provide a level of sophistication through fine art. To the left, large wall boards provide historical information and wayfinding tips, while on the right, large print images built into the sign gives visitors a sense of the historical character of the building facades.

BEFORE

AFTER

BEFORE

AFTER

Casey, Illinois

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5.6

SPECIAL PLANNING AREA: DOWNTOWN

Design Guidelines for Buildings and Sites This plan recommends the adoption of more detailed design guidelines for the downtown area. These pages present the basic categories that should be addressed by any such guidelines and some specific sample guidelines to inform the development of adopted standards. • Street Relationship: Design the building such that the primary building façade is orientated towards the street and built to the front property line. Minor setbacks may be allowed if space created provides an outdoor seating area, a hardscape plaza, or similar pedestrian space. Provide a public entrance on the primary façade.

Portion of the building is set back from the street, allowing extra room for a larger pedestrian zone.

• Lighting: Pick fixtures that complement the character of the building. Illuminate parking lots and pedestrian walkways uniformly and to the minimum level necessary to ensure safety. Lighting should be energy efficient and should render colors as accurately as possible. Preferred light types include: LED, fluorescent, and highpressure sodium.

Examples of full cutoff fixtures that minimize glare and light pollution.

Building #1

• Landscaping: Provide generous landscaping, with an emphasis on native plant species. Landscaping should be placed along street frontages, between incompatible land uses, along parking areas, and in islands of larger parking lots. • Stormwater: Use rain gardens and bio-retention basins on-site (i.e. in parking islands) in order to filter pollutants and infiltrate runoff, wherever feasible. Consider using permeable surfaces, pervious asphalt, pervious concrete, and/or special paving blocks.

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Building #2

• Parking: Fit the parking below the building or place it on the side/back of the building, wherever feasible. Provide shared parking and access between properties to minimize the number of curb cuts. Provide vegetative buffers between pedestrian circulation routes and vehicular parking/circulation. Access drive lanes should have adequate throat depths to allow for proper vehicle stacking.

An example of parking being shared between two developments with parking limited to the side or rear yards (no front yard parking).

Trees and shrubs within and around parking areas greatly improve the aesthetic appearance and overall pedestrian experience.

Examples of permeable surfaces.


CHAPTER 5 LAND USE

• Service Areas: Trash and recycling containers/ dumpsters, street-level mechanical, rooftop mechanical, outdoor storage, and loading docks should be located or screened so that they are not visible from a public street. Screening should be compatible with building architecture and other site features.

• Scale & Articulation: Design the building using architectural elements that provides visual interest and human scale that relates to the surrounding neighborhood context and the downtown’s overall character.

• Windows, Doors & Garages: Buildings should activate the street by providing significant visibility through the street-level facade to activities/displays within the building. Clearly define door entry ways and design garage doors to be screened from street view (i.e. not on street facade, landscaping, walls), to the greatest extent possible.

• Building Projections: Canopies and awnings should be provided along facades that give access to the building.

• Signage: Use pedestrian-scaled sign types: buildingmounted, window, projecting, monument, and awning. Signs should not be excessive in height or square footage.

• Colors & Materials: Use high-quality, long-lasting finish materials such as kiln-fired brick, stucco, and wood. All exposed sides of the building should have similar or complementary materials and paint colors as used on the front façade.

Casey, Illinois

Example of a building facade screening rooftop mechanical from ground view.

Desired verticallyproportioned buildings.

An example of large windows providing significant visibility into the building.

A good example of mounted awnings placed below the horizontal expression line.

Free-standing and roof signs are not conducive for a downtown, pedestrian-friendly district. Examples of secondary facades continuing the design quality, material palette, and color palette of the primary facade.

5-39


1 2 3 4 5 6 Implementation & Action Plan Appendix A This chapter outlines how the vision of the Plan is implemented in everyday decisions and annual goalAppendix B setting and budgeting, and how the Plan should be when necessary. The Chapter also provides Appendix C amended a plan for implementing the action items described

in Chapter 4, including who is responsible for each action and by approximately when it should be completed. Page 6.1 Guiding Daily Decisions 6-2 6.2 Guiding Annual Decisions 6-4 6.3 Action Plan 6-6 6.4 Amending the Plan 6-14


GUIDING DAILY DECISIONS

6.1

City Roles & Responsibilities Responsibility for implementing this plan lies primarily with City Council, City Planning and Zoning Commission, and City Staff. City Council City Council sets priorities, controls budgets and tax rates, and often has the final say on key aspects of public and private development projects. The value and legitimacy of this plan is directly related to the degree to which Aldermen are aware of the plan and expect City actions to be consistent with this plan. Each Alderman should have a copy of this plan and should be familiar with the major goals and objectives described herein. City Council should expect and require that staff recommendations and actions both reference and remain consistent with this plan. Standing Committees Land use and development recommendations are a core component of this plan, and certain standing Committees in Casey play a major role in guiding those decisions. • Public Utility Committee • Street & Alley Committee • Downtown Improvement Development Committee

&

Economic

Committee members must each have of a copy of this plan and must be familiar with its content, especially Chapter 5: Land Use. It is generally the responsibility of these committees to determine whether proposed projects are consistent with this plan, and to make decisions and recommendations that are consistent with this plan. In cases where actions that are inconsistent with this plan are deemed to be in the best interest of the City, the Committees should initiate efforts to amend the plan to better reflect City interests. This will help to reinforce the legitimacy of the plan as an important tool in City functions.

Key City staff have a significant influence on the selection and completion of all kinds of capital and operational projects. It is imperative that individuals in key roles know about, support, and actively work to implement the various strategies and actions in this plan. Specifically, the following people should consult and reference the comprehensive plan during goalsetting and budgeting processes, during planning for major public projects, and in the review of private development projects: • Mayor • Superintendent of Utilities • Economic Development Director These key staff members are expected to know and track the various goals, objectives, strategies and actions laid out in this plan, and to reference that content as appropriate in communications with residents and elected and appointed officials. All other department directors should also be aware of the plan and the connections between the plan and City projects. The purpose of this extra effort is to strengthen staff recommendations and reinforce the plan as a relevant tool integral to City functions. The Mayor, as lead administrative official of the City, is responsible to ensure that other key staff members are actively working to implement this Comprehensive Plan.

City Staff

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CHAPTER 6 IMPLEMENTATION & ACTION PLAN

Education and Advocacy

Utilizing Existing Tools

Implementation of this plan also depends, to a great degree, on the actions and decisions of entities other than City government. The Action Plan (see Section 6.4) indicates responsible parties that the City of Casey does not control or direct. These include, and are not limited to:

Many of the strategies identified in this plan presume the use of existing City ordinances and programs. The City’s key implementation tools include:

• Casey-Westfield Community Unit School District #C-4 • Clark and Cumberland Counties • Casey Industries, Inc. • Illinois Department of Transportation It is necessary to persuade these entities to be active partners in the implementation of the goals, objectives, and strategies of this plan. The following City activities can support this effort: • Share this plan with each organization, including a memo highlighting sections of the plan that anticipate collaboration between the City and the organization. • Take the lead role in establishing a collaboration • Know and communicate the intent of relevant objectives and strategies - partner organizations need to understand and buy in to the rationale before they will act.

Casey, Illinois

Operational Tools • Annual Goal-Setting Process • Annual Budget Process • Capital Improvement Program Regulatory Tools • Land Use Regulations (includes landscape and architectural regulations) • Site Design Standards • Historic Preservation Ordinance • Building and Housing Codes Funding tools • Tax Abatement • Tax Incremental Financing (TIF) Districts • Enterprise Zones • State and Federal Grant Programs • Storm Water Utility

6-3


6.2

GUIDING ANNUAL DECISIONS

Annual Report

Link to Annual Goals and Budget

To provide lasting value and influence, this plan must be used and referenced regularly, especially during budgeting and goal setting processes. To inform these annual processes, City planning staff will prepare, with input from other departments and the Mayor, a concise Comprehensive Plan Annual Report with the following information:

The most important opportunity for this plan to influence the growth and improvement of the City is through the annual goal-setting, budgeting and capital planning processes. These existing annual efforts determine what projects will and will not be pursued by the City, and so it is very important to integrate this plan into those processes every year.

• Action items in progress or completed during the prior 12 months (celebrate success!) • Staff recommendations for action items to pursue during the next 12 months. • City actions and decisions during the past 12 months not consistent with the plan (if any). • Staff recommendations for any amendments to the adopted plan.

The compilation of actions in the next section is a resource to support decisions about how and where to invest the City’s limited resources. The Annual Report should draw from these actions. Standing Committees should make formal recommendations for Council consideration, identifying those choices and commitments most likely to further the goals and objectives identified in this plan. The following process and schedule is recommended: November - Staff completes the Comprehensive Plan Annual Report. December - Appropriate Standing Committees consider Annual Report and make formal recommendation to Council regarding action items to pursue and comprehensive plan amendments. January - Department Heads consider Annual Report and Committees’ recommendations, complete goal setting exercises. Council holds a public hearing and considers adoption of any comprehensive plan amendments. February - City Council Goal Setting March to June - Budget preparation process May 1 - Fiscal Year Begins July - Budget Adopted

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Casey, Illinois

6-5


6.3

ACTION PLAN

About the Action Plan The following pages feature a compilation of actions identified in Chapter 4 to help the City achieve its various goals and objectives. Deadlines The “deadlines” identified to achieve these actions are not firm - rather they are indications of when the City may choose to pursue an action based on its importance or difficulty. Where multiple deadlines are noted, this indicates an ongoing or repetitive activity. Responsible Parties Most of these actions require leadership and effort by multiple people and organizations. These tables indicate those parties considered necessary to implementation. Funding Sources Most of these actions come with some cost. It is presumed that most could be supported by tax revenue from the City’s general fund. Where other sources of potential funding may exist, such as grant programs, these are noted.

Housing Actions 1 Update land development ordinances to require components of traditional neighborhood design and consideration of existing neighborhood context. 2 Develop and maintain affordable homeownership programs. 3 Develop a sustainable funding source to address the residential tear-down and acquisition of abandoned properties (e.g. a percentage of code violation fees). 4 Explore incentives to promote rehabilitation of existing housing. 5 Evaluate surrounding communities’ incentive programs for residential development to ensure Casey remains competitive in housing development. 6 Continue to evaluate promote housing improvements in the southeast target area. 7 Explore the development of a housing rehabilitation revolving loan funding program.

Target Completion 2014- 2016- 20212016 2021 2034

Potential Funding Sources

City Staff, Standing Committies, City Council

X

City Staff, Standing Committies, City Council

X X

Responsible Parties

X

X

City Staff

DCEO

X

City Staff

DCEO - Housing Rehab Program

X

City Staff

X

X

X

X

City Staff City Staff

8 Explore the development of a sideyard program to promote the care of vacant lots. 9 Secure grants for an abandoned property program.

X

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X X

City Staff

X

City Staff

DCEO - Housing Rehab Program


CHAPTER 6 IMPLEMENTATION & ACTION PLAN Target Completion 2014- 2016- 20212016 2021 2034

Transportation & Mobility Actions 1

2

3

Actively participate in state-led highway improvement projects within the City to advocate for context sensitive design streetscaping improvements should be designed with local input and should be unique to Casey. Develop a City-wide Bike and Pedestrian Plan to establish a contiguous, safe network of on-street and off-street bike and pedestrian routes. Prioritize sections of the City for sidewalk maintenance and installation and proactively react to needed improvements (See Study E Sidewalk Study).

4 Increase enforcement of sidewalk maintenance and safety violations. 5 Analyze future road extensions and connections for future development areas to maintain proper street connections. 6

X

X

X

X X X

Responsible Parties

Potential Funding Sources

City Staff, IDOT, Standing Committies, City Council

Federal Transportation Enhancement Program, IDOT

City Staff, IDOT, Standing Committies, City Council

Federal Transportation Enhancement Program, IDOT; Safe Routes to School

City Staff, City Council

X

X

City Staff, Standing Committees

X

X

City Staff, IDOT, Standing Committies, City Council

Require sidewalks for all new development and major redevelopment projects, whether sidewalks currently exist adjacent or not. Encourage neighboring properties to install sidewalks.

X

X

X

City Staff, Standing Committees, City Council

Work with DOT to ensure safe and proper crossings at Central Ave and adjacent streets.

X

X

X

City Staff, Standing Committees, City Council

8 Assess need for bike racks throughout the community. 9 Initiate a trail system and interconnectivity of parks and open space.

X

X

X

City Staff

X

X

City Staff

X

X

City Staff, Standing Committees, City Council

7

10

Increase accessibility throughout the community by increased installation of ADA curb ramps.

X

Casey, Illinois

Federal Transportation Enhancement Program, IDOT

Safe Routes to School

Safe Routes to School

6-7


6.3

ACTION PLAN Economic Prosperity Actions

1 Adopt a Vacant Building Ordinance to better manage and maintain the City’s vacant building stock through a mandatory annual license and fee. The program should support the costs of inspections and maintenance enforcement, and it should both prevent and help pay for emergency actions to protect public safety, including demolition. 2 Identify and plan for infrastructure investments required to make priority development/redevelopment sites more competitive for economic development. 3 Identify funding sources and mechanisms for public realm and capital improvements to support economic development 4 Identify target industries/business types and offer tax incentives to businesses in those sectors to locate or expand in Casey. 5 Work with Casey area schools, Eastern Illinois University, and local businesses to develop and implement an internship and summer job programs. 6 Coordinate with Casey Industries, Lakeland College Eastern Region Center, and local educational institutions to plan for workforce transitions from manufacturing to knowledgebased and creative industries. 7 Target downtown locations for major public cultural investments. 8 Coordinate with Clark and Cumberland Counties to develop a rural and eco-tourism plan that promotes recreation and tourism outside the City as well as hotel stays inside the City. 9 Continuously update the City website to emphasize the assets of Casey as a vibrant, modern community with a rich history and an exceptional quality of life. 10 Develop an easy to understand “one-stop-shop” for economic development on the City website, with links to partner resources. 11 Aggressively pursue grants and resources to improve infrastructure.

6-8

Target Completion 2014- 2016- 20212016 2021 2034

Responsible Parties

Potential Funding Sources

X

City Staff, City Council

HUD

X

City Staff, City Council, Casey Industries

CDAP - Economic Development Program

City Staff, City Council, Casey Industries

CDAP - Economic Development Program

Casey Industries, City Council

USDA, Rural Business Enterprise Grants

X X

X

X

X

X

Casey in Action

X

Casey in Action, City Countil, Eastern Illlinois, Lakland College Eastern Region Center

X

Casey Industries, City Staff City Council

X

County Boards, City Council, Casey in Action

X X

X

X

City Staff, City Council

X

X

X

City Staff, City Council

X

X

X

City Staff, Casey in Action

MSA Professional Services, Inc.


CHAPTER 6 IMPLEMENTATION & ACTION PLAN 12 Evaluate potential public/private partnerships for community benefit.

X

13 Participate in monthly communications with key stakeholders (e.g. Casey Industries, City of Casey, and Clark County) to discuss the future of the area and maintain an open dialogue among entities. 14 Adopt a design overlay area in Downtown Casey to promote and protect the character of the area. 15 Promote vocational education/training to fill the needs of local employers.

X

X

Casey Industries, City Council, County Boards, Regional/Public/Private School Boards

X X

Casey in Action, Casey Industries, County Boards, Regional/Public/Private School Boards

X

X

City Staff, Standing Committees, Casey Historical Society, City Council, Casey in Action

X

City Staff, Casey in Action, City Council

X

18 Evaluate and plan for tourism attractions to further Casey as a year-round destination. 19 Continue to evaluate properties for listing on the National Register of Historic Places to further solidify Casey as a historic community and to enable properties to access historic tax credits. 20 Update website to improve view of community, and evaluate other social media to improve distribution of information. 21 Promote growth of tax base in all areas of the community, including infill, redevelopment and improvements in existing developed areas and continued growth in planned new development areas. 22 The City will evaluate its property tax levels/rates to be competitive with other communities in Illinois and region and to support infrastructure/services in the community. The City will evaluate its property tax levels/rates to be competitive with other 23 communities in Illinois and region and to support infrastructure/services in the community.

X

X

City Staff, Standing Committees, Casey Historical Society, City Council

16 Create and enhance entry features to the community and to the downtown (e.g. landscaping, signage, banners, etc.). 17 Construct and maintain interpretive signage at key attraction locations to further promote the assets of the community.

X

City Staff, City Council, Casey in Action, County Boards

X

X

City Staff, Casey in Action, County Toursim

X

City Staff, Standing Committees, Casey Historical Society, Casey in Action, City Council

X

X

City Staff, City Council

X

X

X

City Staff, Standing Committees, City Council, Casey Industries

X

X

City Staff, City Council, County Assessor

X

X

City Staff, City Council, County Assessor

Casey, Illinois

IDOT, ITEP

6-9


6.3

ACTION PLAN Downtown Revitalization Actions

1 Create a streetscape plan which guides and enhances future changes to the right-of-way spaces within the downtown. 2 Adopt design guidelines for building setback, height, articulation of the cornice, & awnings over buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s entrances in downtown. 3 Implement awards program for good design. 4 Coordinate with local artists on display space throughout the downtown. 5 Seek potential donors for installation of permanent public art. 6 Work with downtown businesses and building owners for potential banners or wall murals. 7 Include a public arts component in development requests for Proposal for City-owned sites. 8 Continue to support the Historical Society and aid in the development of a Historic Preservation Action Plan. 9 Develop cohesive historic wayfinding signage. 10 Lead the drive for encouraging positive outcomes and attitudes 11 Encourage use of public spaces/streets for outside festivals and events. 12 Consider adding National Register properties to Local Historic Register. 13 Evaluate public activities and services that are friendly or attractive to the young professionals and families.

6-10

Target Completion 2014- 2016- 20212016 2021 2034

Responsible Parties

Potential Funding Sources

X

City Staff, Casey in Action, Downtown Partners

ITEP

X

City Staff, Casey in Action, Downtown Partners

X X X

X X X

X X X

X

City Staff, Casey in Action City Staff, Casey in Action City Staff, Casey in Action City Staff, Casey in Action

x

x

x

City Staff

X

X

X

City Staff, City Council City Staff, Casey in Action, Casey Historical Society

X X X

X X

X X

X

City Staff, Casey in Action, City Council City Staff, City Council City Staff, Casey Historical Society, City Council

X X

Private Donations

X

City Staff, Casey in Action, City Council

MSA Professional Services, Inc.

IHPA


CHAPTER 6 IMPLEMENTATION & ACTION PLAN Agriculture & Natural Resources Actions 1 Develop a “GreenPrint” for creating an interconnected greenway system of parks and open spaces. 2 Consider the adoption of best management practices (BMPs) for stormwater management and low-impact development. 3 Consider the adoption of regulations for conservation and restoration of natural features during development. 4 Consider the adoption of stormwater and lowimpact BMP requirements for City facilities and operations. 5 Update erosion control regulations and increase enforcement. 6 Work to identify local point and non-point source pollution and implement steps for remediation. 7 Develop a stormwater education program to inform citizens of BMPs including the use of rain barrels, rain gardens, green roofs, permeable paving, etc. 8 Identify and remove barriers to local food production. 9 Consider the adoption of local food procurement policies for City events and facilities. 10 Develop procedures for increasing the ability to use electronic and government assistance forms of payment at local farmers markets. 11 Ensure FSA office guidelines for agricultural practices for Clark County are followed for operations within Casey’s jurisdiction and encourage responsible agriculture region-wide.

Public Infrastructure & Utilities Actions 1 Conduct regular review of sewer/water capacities to serve future growth and development. 2 Pursue shared services among governmental agencies as opportunities arise. 3 Adopt Stormwater Management Plan. 4 Adopt Inflow and Infiltration Plan.

Target Completion 2014- 2016- 20212016 2021 2034

Responsible Parties

X

City Staff

Potential Funding Sources

X

City Staff, City Council, County Boards

CDAP

X

City Staff, City Council, County Boards

CDAP

City Staff, City Council, County Boards

CDAP

X X

City Staff, City Council, County Boards

X

City Staff, City Council, County Boards

X

City Staff, City Council, County Boards

CDAP

City Staff, City Council, County Boards, Illinois Department of Agriculture City Staff, City Council, County Boards, Illinois Department of Agriculture

X X X

City Staff, City Council, County Boards, Illinois Department of Agriculture

X

City Staff, City Council, County Boards, Illinois Department of Agriculture

Target Completion 2014- 2016- 20212016 2021 2034

Responsible Parties

Potential Funding Sources

X

X

X

City Staff

Local, State, Federal Grants

X

X

X

City Staff, City Council, County Boards, State Agencies

Local, State, Federal Grants

X X Casey, Illinois

City Council City Council

6-11


6.3

ACTION PLAN Hazards Actions

1 Develop a Disaster Recovery Plan. 2 Develop and adopt a Recovery and Reconstruction Ordinance. 3 Conduct Disaster Recovery Plan table-top exercises. 4 Implement NFIP Community Rating System (CRS) credited activities and explore application to CRS designation. 5 Develop interagency agreements for aid during and after a disaster 6 Coordinate with Clark and Cumberland County Emergency Manager to develop a sustainable Community Organization Active in Disaster (COAD) to build a framework for meeting disaster victimsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; needs. 7 Identify a Disaster Victim Assistance Officer (as part of the recovery organization established by the Recovery and Reconstruction Ordinance) to partner with the County EMA in advocating for quick disbursement of Other Needs Assistance and Disaster Case Management Funds.

Target Completion 2014- 2016- 20212016 2021 2034

X X

Responsible Parties

Potential Funding Sources

City Staff, County Boards, City Council, FEMA

FEMA

City Staff, City Council City Staff, County Boards, City Council

X X

City Staff, City Council

X

City Staff, County Boards, City Council, FEMA

X

City Staff, County Boards, City Council, FEMA

City Staff, County Boards, City Council

X

8 Actively participate in Flood Awareness Month, and National Preparedness Month 9 Conduct a public facilities audit for potential disaster impacts and implement mitigation strategies. 10 When feasible, purchase easements to preserve the natural floodway. 11 Evaluate redundant capabilities of water, sewer, electric, gas and other utility systems to reduce or eliminate outages in the event of a disaster.

X

X

X

City Staff, County Boards, City Council, FEMA

FEMA

X

X

X

City Staff

FEMA

X

X

X

City Staff

12 Bury power lines when feasible.

X X

X

X

City Staff, AmerenIP

13 Examine alternative back-up strategies for necessary systems, if there are none already in place. Examine alternative back-up strategies for 14 necessary systems, if there are none already in place. Encourage local businesses and residents to 15 implement their own Action Plans.

6-12

X

City Staff, City Council

City Staff

X X

City Staff

X

X

City Staff, Local Businesses

MSA Professional Services, Inc.


CHAPTER 6 IMPLEMENTATION & ACTION PLAN Collaborations and Partnerships Actions

Target Completion 2014- 2016- 20212016 2021 2034

Responsible Parties

X

City Staff, City Council, Mass Transit

X

Casey in Action, Eastern Illinois University, University of Illinois, Lakeland College, Regional School Board, School Board

Work with Mass Transit and neighboring 1 communities to study the feasibility of an expanded regional bus system. Explore options for obtaining four-year programs/degrees through existing facilities or 2 satellites with regional universities/colleges in Casey. Assemble a joint task force with neighboring communities to explore the concept of shared 3 economic development investments coupled with shared tax revenues. Host monthly meetings with regional partners to explore ways in which collaboration on 4 programs or services can improve quality, access, and efficiency. Communicate with other jurisdictions whenever service contracts or major capital improvements 5 are up for consideration, to identify cost savings opportunities through partnerships and shared service arrangements.

Potential Funding Sources

City Staff, City Council, Neighboring Municipalities

X X

X

X

City Staff, City Council, Casey in Action

X

X

X

City Staff, City Council

Casey, Illinois

6-13


6.4

AMENDING THE PLAN

Monitoring, Amending & Updating Although this Plan is intended to guide decisions and actions by the City over the next 10 to 20 years, it is impossible to accurately predict future conditions in the City. Amendments may be appropriate from time to time, particularly if emerging issues or trends render aspects of the plan irrelevant or inappropriate. The City may be faced with an opportunity, such as a development proposal, that does not fit the plan but is widely viewed to be appropriate for the City. Should the City wish to approve such an opportunity, it should first amend the plan so that the decision is consistent with the plan. Such amendments should be carefully considered and should not become the standard response to proposals that do not fit the plan. Frequent amendments to meet individual development proposals threaten the integrity of the plan and the planning process and should be avoided.

update is a major re-write of the plan document and supporting maps. The purpose of the update is to incorporate new data and to ensure, through a process of new data evaluation and new public dialogue, that the plan remains relevant to current conditions and decisions. An update every ten years is recommended, though the availability of new Census or mapping data and/or a series of significant changes in the community may justify an update after less than ten years.

Any changes to the plan text or maps constitute amendments to the plan and should follow a standard process as described in the following section. Amendments may be proposed by either the City Council or the Committees, though a land owner or developer may also petition the Committees to introduce an amendment on their behalf. Amendments may be made at any time using this process, however in most cases the City should not amend the plan more than once per year. A common and recommended approach is to establish a consistent annual schedule for consideration of amendments. This process can begin with a joint meeting of the Standing Committees and City Council (January), followed by Standing Committee recommendation (February), then public notice procedures leading to a public hearing and vote on adoption by City Council (March or April). The 20-year planning horizon of this plan defines the time period used to consider potential growth and change, but the plan itself should be fully updated well before 2034. Unlike an amendment, the plan

6-14

MSA Professional Services, Inc.


CHAPTER 6 IMPLEMENTATION & ACTION PLAN

Plan Amendment Process In the years between major plan updates it may be necessary or desirable to amend this plan. A straightforward amendment, such as a strategy or future land use map revision for which there is broad support, can be completed in about six to eight weeks through the following process. Step One A change is proposed by City Council, Standing Committees, or staff and is placed on the appropriate Committee(s)â&#x20AC;&#x2122; agenda for preliminary consideration. Private individuals (landowners, developers, others) can request an amendment through the Mayor, who will forward the request to the appropriate Committee for consideration. The Committee decides if and how to proceed, and may direct staff to prepare or revise the proposed amendment. Step Two When the Standing Committee has formally recommended an amendment, a City Council public hearing is scheduled and at least two weeks public notice is published. Notice of the proposed amendment should also be transmitted as appropriate to other entities that may be affected by or interested in the change, such as Clark or Cumberland County. Step Three City Council hears formal comments on the proposed amendment, considers any edits to the amendment, then considers adoption of the amendment. Step Four Staff completes the plan amendment as approved, including an entry in the planâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s amendment log. A revised PDF copy of the plan is posted to the City web site and replacement or supplement pages are issued to City staff and officials who hold hard copies of the plan.

Casey, Illinois

6-15


1 2 3 4 5 6 Appendix A Community Indicators Report Appendix B The Community Indicators Report is a summary of current conditions and recent trends in Casey, Appendix C based on the best available data. The purpose of these indicators is to enable informed choices about the future of the City. This report is included as an appendix to the comprehensive plan so that it may be easily updated from time to time as new data becomes available. Page A.1 Demographics A-2 A.2 Housing A-4 A.3 Transportation & Mobility A-8 A.4 Economic Prosperity A-12 A.5 Agriculture & Natural Resources A-18 A.6 Community Facilities & Services A-22 A.7 Community Character A-28 A.8 Collaboration & Partnerships A-30 A.9 Land Use A-32


A.1

DEMOGRAPHICS

About the Data These indicators utilize a mixture of local, county, state, and federal data sources. The U.S. Census has historically been a key source of data for many community indicators. Much of the information previously collected by the decennial U.S. Census is now collected only by the American Community Survey (ACS). The ACS is an ongoing survey that collects sample data every year and reports estimates of population and housing characteristics. For communities smaller than 20,000 people, the best available estimates are reported as rolling averages over 5-year periods â&#x20AC;&#x201C; they indicate average conditions over the reporting period rather than a snapshot of a single point of time. Because the ACS estimates are based on a sample of the population, they include some error. The margin of error is reported for each estimate, and is an indication of how reliable the estimate is. As a general rule, the ACS data is quite reliable at the State level, generally reliable at the County level, and less reliable at the municipal level. The margin of error makes the data much more difficult to interpret. To simplify tables in this plan, the reliability of each value is indicated simply by the formatting of the text. For each ACS estimate, the margin of error is divided by the estimate. If the error is 10% or less than the estimate, the value in the table is bolded and underlined. In graphs, the ACS data exceeding this 10% error threshold will be denoted at the bottom of the graph.

This report is a summary of current conditions and recent trends in Casey, based on the best available data. The purpose of these indicators is to enable informed choices about the future of the City.

The second important note when using ACS estimates is that they cannot be compared to decennial census data because they are measured in different ways. While some of the tables in this report show both decennial census data and ACS data, caution should be used when trying to draw conclusions about trends by comparing the two sets of numbers. City 1990 2000 2010 Avg. 2007-2011

Number 124 138 143

County Percent 2.2% 3.4% 10.0%

378

error exceeds 10%

A-2

Number 79,364 100,601 145,452

Percent 5.0% 6.0% 7.0%

253,053

error less than 10%

MSA Professional Services, Inc.

Census data ACS data


APPENDIX A COMMUNITY INDICATORS

Population & Age Trends Population trends for the City of Casey show a 5.88% decrease in population between 2000 and 2010, compared to 3.96% decrease for Clark County and 3.3% increase for the State during the same period.

POPULATION TRENDS & PROJECTIONS

1980

3,026

16,913

11,426,518

Over the past 20 years (1990-2010) the population in the City of Casey decreased by 0.05%, increased in Clark County by 0.03%, and increased in the State by 12.2%. Over the next 20 years (2010-2030) the population in the City of Casey is projected to grow by 0.02%, in Clark County by 0.2%, and in the State by 18.0%. County and State projections were calculated by the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity. MSA extrapolated those growth projections to estimate the growth of City.

1990 2000 2010

2,914

15,921

11,430,602

2,942 2,769

17,008 16,335

12,419,293 12,830,632

2,741 2,769 2,802 2,816

16,852 17,164 17,336 17,587

13,748,695 14,316,487 14,784,968 15,138,849

Casey is a relatively balanced City in terms of demographics. In 2010, 22.14% of the City population was over the age of 65, and the age group with the highest population in the City was those aged under 18 years (22.93%). The age group with the lowest population were those aged 20-24 with 5.89% which may be due to this age group pursuing higher education opportunities.

SEX & AGE, 2010

Source: 2010 Census; MSA Projections

City of Casey

2015 2020 2025 2030

Illinois

Source: 2010 Census

City of Casey Male Female Under 18 18 & over 20 - 24 25 - 34 35 - 49 50 - 64 65 & over Totals

Casey, Illinois

Clark County

Number 1277 1492 635 2134 163 309 493 479 613

2,769

Percent 46.12% 53.88% 0.00% 22.93% 77.07% 5.89% 11.16% 17.80% 17.30% 22.14%

Clark County Number 7,962 8,373 3,718 12,617 866 1,750 3,362 3,303 2,946

Percent 48.74% 51.26% 0.00% 22.76% 77.24% 5.30% 10.71% 20.58% 20.22% 18.03%

16,335

A-3


A.2

HOUSING

Household Counts Household trends for the City of Casey show an 8.14% drop in households between 2000 and 2010, compared to a 3.86% drop for Clark County and a 5.34% increase for the State during the same period. Over the past 20 years (1990-2010) the number of households in the County grew by 2.82%, and in the State by 15.1%. Over the next 20 years (2010-2030) the number of households in the City of Casey is projected to grow by 1.7%, in Clark County by 7.66%, and in the State by 15.2%. In all three cases, the projected percentage growth in the number of households is less than the projected growth in population. This reflects the continued trend in the decline of the number of persons per household. In 1980, the average number of people per household in the State was 2.76. By 2010, that number shrunk to 2.59, and is projected to continuing declining to 2.25 by year 2030. This trend is consistent with national trends attributed to smaller family sizes, increases in life expectancy, and increases in the number of single parent households.

A-4

HOUSEHOLD COUNTS Source: U.S. Census Bureau Casey Persons Per 1980 1990 2000 2010

Clark County

Number

n/a n/a 2.22 2.27

Persons Per

na/ n/a 1,266 1,163

2.57 2.45 2.40 2.38

Illinois

Number

Persons Per

16,654 15,672 16,761 16,114

Number

2.76 2.65 2.63

4,045,374 4,202,240 4,591,779

2.59

4,836,972

HOUSEHOLD PROJECTIONS, 2000-2030 Source: US Census Bureau, MSA projections Casey Households n/a n/a 1,266 1,163

1980 1990 2000 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030

1,151 1,163 1,177 1,183

Clark County

Percent Households Change n/a 16,654 n/a 15,672 n/a 16,761 -8.14% 16,114 -1.00% 16,623 1.00% 16,931 1.20% 17,100 0.50% 17,348

MSA Professional Services, Inc.

Illinois

Percent Change

Households

Percent Change

-3.86%

4,045,374 4,202,240 4,591,779 4,836,972

5.34%

3.16% 1.85% 1.00% 1.45%

5,183,299 5,397,369 5,573,863 5,707,079

7.16% 4.13% 3.27% 2.39%

-5.90% 6.95%

3.88% 9.27%


APPENDIX A COMMUNITY INDICATORS

Occupancy & Housing Stock The diversity of Caseyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s housing stock is typical of small towns in the Midwest, with 81% consisting of single family homes. Multi-family housing in the City is limited in number of units per dwelling with 6% having two to four units, and only 4% having dwellings with greater than four units. Casey is atypical in the fact that there is also a large percentage (9%) of dwellings classified as a Mobile Home or Trailer. Surprisingly, just over half of the City residents (57%) live in owner-occupied housing. This percentage has been declining over the past three decades due in part to the increase in multi-family using units, a more mobile workforce, and the 2008 housing market crisis. The vacancy rate (14%) is outside the healthy range vacancy rates, which is considered to be 5-6%. Casey has seen a relatively consistent decrease in new housing stock since 1950 when nearly 50% of the stock had been built. Since 2005, a mere 5% of the current housing stock has been built and will only be slower as the population trends continue.

UNIT TYPE, 2007-2011 AVG Source: American Community Survey

Single Family 2 to 4 Units 5 to 9 Units 10 or more Mobile Home or Trailer Other

OCCUPANCY

Source: U.S. Census Bureau 1990 Owner Occupied Renter Occupied Vacant Homeowner Vacancy Rate

Number Percent n/a n/a n/a n/a

Rental Vacancy Rate

n/a

2000

Number Percent Number Percent 898 62% 770 57% 368 25% 393 29% 13% 14% 192 188 6% 129 10% 93 2%

23 1,454

TOTAL

2010

63 1,355

5%

Source: US Census Bureau

YEAR STRUCTURE BUILT, 2007-2011 AVG Source: American Community Survey 2005 or later 2000 to 2004 1990 to 1999 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1940 to 1949 1939 or Earlier 0%

5%

*error exceeds 10% for all estimates

Casey, Illinois

10%

15%

20%

25%

30%

A-5


A.2

HOUSING

Affordability & Value Affordable housing opportunities are often provided through the sale of older housing units. Housing is generally considered “affordable” when the owner or renter’s monthly housing costs do not exceed 30% of their gross monthly income. Roughly 22% of City homeowners and nearly half (47%) of renters exceeded the “affordable” threshold during 2007-2011. While these numbers are important indicators of affordability, it is also important to note that some residents may consciously choose to devote more than 30% of their income to household and lifestyle expenses. Despite the fact that more renters do not have “affordable” housing, the median rent in the City ($318) is more than half of the state median ($735). The median value of a home in the City ($72,300) has increased steadily since 2000, but is significantly below the State’s ($198,500). The County’s median home value ($84,700) is only slightly higher than the City’s.

VALUE (FOR HOMES WITH MORTGAGES) Source: U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey Average 2000 2007 - 2011

Less than $50,000

46%

18%

$50,000 to $99,999 $100,000 to $149,999 $150,000 to $199,999

49% 4% 1%

54% 17% 4%

$200,000 to $299,000

0%

0%

0% 0% $52,700

0% 6% $72,300

$300,000 to $499,99 $500,000 or more Median Value

SELECTED MONTHLY OWNER COSTS Source: American Community Survey

Percent Less than 20%

58%

20% to 24.9% 25% to 29.9% 30% to 34.9%

15% 6% 2%

35% or more

20%

Not computed

0%

GROSS RENT AS PERCENTAGE OF INCOME Source: American Community Survey

Percent

A-6

Less than 15%

19%

15% to 19.9% 20% to 24.9% 25% to 29.9%

11%

30% to 34.9%

14%

35% or more Not computed

33% 17%

MSA Professional Services, Inc.

6% 0%


APPENDIX A COMMUNITY INDICATORS

Housing Programs Housing Rehabilitation Grant

In 2012, a Housing Rehabilitation Grant was awarded to the City through Illinoisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Community Development Assistance Program. This grant is administered by Coles County Regional Planning & Development Commissions for housing improvements in the southeast target area of the City.

Low Income Housing

Currently, there is only one low income housing provider in the City. Quality Housing out of Robinson, Illinois supplies housing for individuals and families which meet the standards for subsidized housing.

Casey, Illinois

A-7


A.3

TRANSPORTATION & MOBILITY

Commuting Approximately 45% of the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commuters age 16 or older work within 14 minutes of their place of employment. Nearly 60% of the workers are employed within Clark County. The percentage of Clark County residents who work out of state is relatively high (16.8%) and is most likely due to the geographic proximity of Indiana. These commuters, on average, have a travel time to work of 15.7 minutes, which is slightly less than the County (20.4 minutes) and State as a whole (21.5 minutes). A large percentage of Casey workers have a commute that is less than 25 minutes. These times suggest most residents work in the City or in nearby areas. Commuting in Casey is mostly done by car, with 87.3% of commuters traveling in a single occupant vehicle. This number is slightly higher for Clark County (91.5%) and slightly lower for Illinois (82.5%). Only 9.7% of commuters in Casey carpooled to work, 1.3% walked, and a surprising 6.3% worked from home.

COMMUTING TIME TO WORK, 2007-2011 AVG Source: American Community Survey 40.0% 35.0% 30.0% 25.0% 20.0% 15.0%

City of Casey

10.0%

Clark County

5.0%

Illinois

0.0%

COMMUTING METHODS TO WORK, 2007-2011 AVG Source: American Community Survey Worked at Home Other Means Bicycle Illinois

Walked

Clark County City of Casey

Public Transportation Carpooled Single Occupancy 0.0% 10.0% 20.0% 30.0% 40.0% 50.0% 60.0% 70.0% 80.0% 90.0%

PERCENTAGE OF RESIDENTS COMMUTING Source: American Community Survey

58.3% 97.7% 58.3% 39.4%

Clark County 57.4% 83.2% 57.4% 25.9%

2.3%

16.8%

City of Casey Within Clark County Outside of County, Within State Outside of State Outside of County, Within State Outside of State

A-8

MSA Professional Services, Inc.


APPENDIX A COMMUNITY INDICATORS

Major Modes of Travel Aviation Service

Truck Routes

The Casey Municipal Airport, Kermit B. Patchett Field, is owned by the City of Casey and leased to the Casey Airport Boosters, Inc. The airport is managed by volunteers at the direction of the Boosters and is open to the public 24 hours each day and offers the following facilities:

Interstate 70, which runs north of Casey, is designated as a Class I Roadway. Illinois Route 49 and US Route 40 are Class II Roadways which dissect the City.

• • • • • •

Roadway Improvement Projects Illinois’ Six Year Highway Improvement Program identifies projects by county and project limits. This list provides projects to be completed during 2012 and 2017. The City of Casey will be impacted by only one project over this time frame which is not listed as a major improvement project.

Runway 22 & 4 - 4,000 feet Bituminous, lighted - Pilot activated on 122.8 Runway 18 & 36 - 2,000 feet Sod Radio - Unicom 122.8 NDB on field frequency 359 Identifier CZB Fuel - 100 octane Scope: Agricultural applications, Flight Instruction, Aircraft repairs - major and minor.

The airport is classified as a Small General Aviation Airport by the Illinois Bureau of Aeronautics. Small General Aviation airports primarily support single-engine general aviation aircraft, but may also accommodate small twin-engine general aviation aircraft and occasionally business aircraft activity.

Road Classifications All federal, state, county, and local roads are classified into categories under the “Roadway Functional Classification System” based upon the type of service they provide (see map on the next page for road classifications in the Plan Area). In general, roadways with a higher functional classification should be designed with limited access and higher speed traffic. See Transportation Map on following page for Average Daily Traffic Counts through Casey.

HIGHWAY IMPROVEMENTS MATRIX Source: Illinois Department of Transportation

Hwy ILL 49

County Clark

Project Title/Limits

Miles

0.5 MI N OF US 40 TO TYLER AVE

Casey, Illinois

Year 2

2013-2017

Project Description RESURFACING

A-9


E 1300TH RD 100TH ST

\ [

E 1250TH RD

2350E

COUNTY PARCEL FORESTED AREA OPEN WATER RIVER/STREAM

N

N 450TH ST

± ³ SW 4TH ST

SW 1ST ST

0 195

\ [ 11

E 700TH RD

± ³

± ³

2480E

15

Daily Traffic Counts T R A N S P O R T A T I O N Average Illinois Department of Transportation - 2013 CASEY

Principal Arterial Minor Arterial Collector

CITY OF CASEY CLARK AND CUMBERLAND COUNTIES, IL

DATA SOURCES: MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY AND PARCELS PROVIDED BY CLARK COUNTY. ROADS, TOWNSHIPS AND COUNTIES PROVIDED BY US CENSUS (2013). LAND USE IN CLARK COUNTY DERIVED FROM PARCEL DATASET. LAND USE IN CUMBERLAND COUNTY DERIVED FROM AERIAL INTERPRETATION. OPEN WATER AND RIVERS/STREAMS PROVIDED BY USGS (NHD). FORESTED AREA DERIVED FROM USDA-NRCS CROPLAND DATA LAYER (2012).

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0.5

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A-10

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A.3

Miles 1

E Print Date: 4/2/2014

MSA Professional Services, Inc.


APPENDIX A COMMUNITY INDICATORS

Bike, Pedestrian & Transit Travel At present, the City of Casey does not maintain a citywide transit system, nor are there any plans for the implementation of one.

Sidewalks, Trails, & Routes Pedestrians and bicyclists use a combination of roadways, sidewalks, and off-street trails. While many of the City’s residential neighborhoods include sidewalks there are some neighborhoods throughout the City that do not have sidewalks. The City’s Subdivision Code does not mandate the installation of sidewalks within new subdivisions; however, Section 2.50.050 gives the City Plan Commission the power “To provide for the health, safety, comfort and convenience of the city and contiguous territory, the plan or plans shall establish reasonable standards of design for subdivisions and for re-subdivisions of unimproved land and of areas subject to redevelopment including reasonable requirements for public streets, alleys, ways for public service facilities, parks, playgrounds, school grounds, and other public grounds”.

Transit Service The City of Casey and surrounding area currently have limited options for the elderly and disabled individuals. The East Central Illinois Mass Transit District (ECIMTD) is a federally funded public transportation system which provides curb to curb non-emergence service for all ages. There is also the Bi-County Bus System which will provide service between Clark and Cumberland Counties. Additionally, many local churches provide transportation services to seniors and those with disabilities.

Railroad Service CSX is the only railroad that goes through the City and is frequently utilized by the company.

Casey, Illinois

A-11


A.4

ECONOMIC PROSPERITY

Education & Income Avg. 2006-2010

34.10% 22.10% 16.20% 9.20% 6.60% 88.20%

HS Grad Some College

39.2% 21.4%

38.4% 21.7%

Associate Degree Bachelor's Degree Graduate/Prof. Degree High School Grad or Higher

11.0% 11.0% 5.4% 88.0%

11.4%

HS Grad Some College Associate Degree Bachelor's Degree

27.9% 20.8% 7.3%

27.6% 21.1% 7.3%

18.9%

19.1%

Graduate/Prof. Degree

11.4%

11.6%

86.2%

86.6%

Casey

Some College Associate Degree Bachelor's Degree Graduate/Prof. Degree High School Grad or Higher

High School Grad or Higher

11.9% 5.5% 89.0%

INCOME TRENDS

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey

2000

Clark County Illinois

A-12

Avg. 2007-2011

31.30% 23.40% 16.80% 6.70% 6.20% 84.40%

HS Grad

Casey

Casey’s median and per capita income levels are lower than the county and state. Median household income in Casey is $36,944 compared to Clark County’s $47,933, and Illinois’ $56,576. These lower averages are likely due to the relatively high percentage of individuals living below the poverty level. In the City, 16.4% of the population is below the poverty level, compared to 10.2% in the County, and 13.1% in Illinois. (The Census Bureau uses a set of income thresholds that vary by family size and composition to detect who is poor. If the total income for a family or unrelated individual falls below the relevant poverty threshold, then the family or unrelated individual is classified as being “below the poverty level”.)

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey

Clark County

The percentage of residents who have obtained a bachelor’s degree (9.2 %)is lower than both the County and State (11.9% and 19.1% respectively). This may indicate the need for additional vocational and adult learning programs.

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT

Illinois

Education attainment can provide valuable insight into the existing labor force, including availability of skilled and professional workers and demand for training opportunities. The percentage of Casey residents 25 years or older who have at least a high school diploma (88.2%) is lower than Clark County (89.0%) and slightly higher than Illinois (86.6%).

Avg. 2007-2011

Per Capita

$16,266

$22,234

Median Family

$36,941

$48,094

Median Household Below Poverty

$30,089

$36,944

15.4%

16.4%

Per Capita Median Family

$17,655 $43,213

$24,338 $54,981

Median Household Below Poverty

$35,967

$47,933

9.2%

10.2%

Per Capita Median Family Median Household Below Poverty

$23,104 $55,545

$29,376 $69,658

$46,590

$56,576

10.7%

13.1%

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APPENDIX A COMMUNITY INDICATORS

Existing Labor Force A community’s labor force includes all people over the age of 16 classified as employed or unemployed as well as members of the U.S. Armed Forces. Those not included in the labor force statistics include students, homemakers, retired workers, seasonal workers not currently looking for work, institutionalized people, and those doing only incidental unpaid family work. Casey’s labor force overall is similar to that of Clark County and Illinois. •

Over the last decade the unemployment rate increased for the City and doubled for both the State and County. Note, in 2010 the United States was in a economic downturn commonly referred to as the “Great Recession”, accounting for the higher unemployment rates. A majority (71.5%) of workers in Casey earn a private wage and salary, similar to Clark County at 66.4% and Illinois at 73.3%. A majority of occupations in Casey are split between “Management, Professional & Related” and “Sales & Office”; “Service” and “Production, Transportation and Materials Moving” come in second. The largest industries in the City include Educational, Health & Social Services (26.5%), Manufacturing (10.2%), and Arts, Entertainment, Recreation and Accommodations and Food Services (9.6%) which is consistent with the City’s largest employers.

INDUSTRY, 2007-2011 AVG

EMPLOYMENT STATUS

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey City of Casey

Clark County

In Labor Force (2000) Unemployment Rate

-----

8,716 5.0%

In Labor Force (2010) Unemployment Rate

-----

8,184 12.6%

Illinois 6,467,700 4.5% 6,616,300 10.4%

CLASS OF WORKER

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey

Private Wage & Salary

City of Casey 71.5%

Clark County 66.4%

13.7%

14.8%

12.9%

7.6% 7.3%

7.5% 11.3%

8.7% 5.1%

Government Worker Private Not-for-Profit Worker Self Employed & Unpaid Family Worker

Illinois 73.3%

OCCUPATIONS, 2007-2011 AVG Source: American Community Survey 40.0% 35.0% 30.0% 25.0% 20.0% City of Casey

15.0%

Clark County

10.0%

Illinois

5.0% 0.0% Management, business, science, and arts occupations

Service Sales and office occupations occupations

Natural Production, resources, transportation, construction, and material and moving maintenance occupations occupations

Source: American Community Survey Public administration Other services, except public administration Arts, entertainment, and recreation, and accommodation and food services Educational services, and health care and social assistance Professional, scientific, and management, and administrative and waste management services Finance and insurance, and real estate and rental and leasing

Illinois

Information

Clark County City of Casey

Transportation and warehousing, and utilities Retail trade Wholesale trade Manufacturing Construction Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting, and mining 0.0%

5.0%

10.0%

15.0%

20.0%

25.0%

30.0%

Casey, Illinois

A-13


A.4

ECONOMIC PROSPERITY

Business & Industry Industrial Sites At present, the City of Casey does not have any Business or Industrial Parks. However, there is land available for development/redevelopment to create such a park if the opportunity arose. Major Employers The largest employer in the City is the Casey-Westfield School System, with just under 200 employees. Other major employers include several large manufacturing operations including Bolin Enterprises and Charles Industries. Health Services also serve as major employers with Heartland Nursing and Casey Health Care.

A-14

MAJOR EMPLOYERS & MANUFACTURERS, 2012 Source: Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity

Employer

Product/Service

Approximate Employment

Casey - Westfield School Bolin Enterprises, Inc. Heartland Nursing Center Charles Industries

Education Tank & Pipeline Service

185 179

Nursing Home Equip/Marine Product

87 70

Casey Health Care Martin's IGA City of Casey J & K Mitchell TGB

Nursing Home Grocery City Government Automotive Sales Agri-Business

64 50 32 31 25

Schilling Brothers

Farm Machinery

25

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APPENDIX A COMMUNITY INDICATORS

Labor Projections Illinois Workforce Development develops occupation projections. Statewide, the fastest growing occupation is Home Health Aides. Healthcare jobs in general are also growing rapidly, both regionally and statewide due in part to the aging population. Workforce Development also breaks Illinois down into regions where Casey is located in the East Central Economic Development Region. Here, the fastest growing sector is Network Systems and Data Communication Analysts. However, similar to the State, healthcare jobs are still on the rise and are projected to continue to rise into the near future.

FASTEST GROWING OCCUPATIONS: East Central Economic Development Region Source: Illinois Workforce Development Title

Base Year (2006)

Projection Year (2016)

Percent Change

Change

Network Systems & Data Comm Analysts

183

258

74

40%

Medical Assistants Skin Care Specialists Substance Abuse/Bhvrl Dsrdr Counslrs

507 48 105

689 65 142

182 17 37

36% 36% 35%

Physician Assistants Home Health Aides Manicurists and Pedicurists Mental Hlth/Substnce Abuse Soc Wkrs Massage Therapists Social and Human Service Assistants

58 533 92 91 104 245

78 692 119 116 132 312

19 159 27 25 29 67

33% 30% 30% 28% 28% 27%

Casey, Illinois

A-15


A.4

ECONOMIC PROSPERITY

Development Tools The City of Casey employs several tools to support economic development within the City. Clark County Enterprise Zone The Clark County Enterprise Zone was established on July 1, 1990. An enterprise zone is a specific area designated by the State of Illinois in cooperation with a local government to receive various tax incentives and other benefits to stimulate economic activity. Casey Industries, Inc. Casey Industries was formed in 1960. Its charter mandates the development and promotion of Casey, Illinois, and the financial structure and by-laws make possible the mechanics whereby land and buildings may be bought, held and sold for the purpose of improving the business and industrial climate of the area. Since its formation, Casey Industries has been the source of funds and support for both new and expansion business and industrial projects in the area. Casey Industries works to assist existing and new businesses with expansion and development opportunities including tax abatements for real estate purchases through the Clark County Enterprise Zone, business planning and resources, and potential gap financing. Casey Industries works with the best interests and desires of both the community and the prospective company in mind. Past activities have included donation of land, lease-purchase arrangements, labor surveys and longterm finance arrangements. Funding for the activities of Casey Industries is made possible through the sale of membership certificates. Casey In Action Casey in Action is a group of people who are dedicated in making Casey a better place to live through philanthropy.

spirit and togetherness is vital for a thriving business atmosphere, and supports community events and local entities, including businesses, community groups and our schools. The Chamber depends on the participation and support of local businesses and individuals to continue efforts to grow, improve and support the community of Casey. The Chamber implements a variety of strategies aimed at growing the local business community, including building and providing a resource network for business owners, spotlighting local businesses, promoting businesses through advertising, and awarding Chamber dollars at events which may be redeemed at Chamber businesses. The Chamber serves on behalf of the city as a welcoming agency for new businesses, as well as providing new Chamber members with all of the resources, promotions and networking opportunities that the business community has to offer. The Chamber of Commerce promotes the City of Casey and businesses though its advertising campaigns, showcasing the unique qualities our community has to offer. Illinois Economic Development Corporation As the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lead economic development organization, the Illinois Economic Development Corporation (IEDC) nurtures business growth and job creation in Illinois by providing resources, technical support, and financial assistance to companies, partners and the communities they serve. The IEDC administers a variety of economic and community development programs for private businesses and municipalities. Visit www.inIllinois.com to learn more.

Casey Chamber of Commerce Casey Chamber of Commerce with the support from local businesses and individuals continues its efforts to grow, improve and support the community of Casey. Established in 1936, the Chamber has been a networking tool for local businesses and a catalyst for economic growth since its inception. It understands that community

A-16

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APPENDIX A COMMUNITY INDICATORS

Casey, Illinois

A-17


A.5

AGRICULTURE & NATURAL RESOURCES

Physiography & Open Space Physiography Clark County is in the Central Lowland Province of the Till Plains Section and lies mostly within the Springfield Plan physiographic division. This Plain include the level portion of the Illinois drift sheet in central and southern Illinois which is characterized mainly by its flatness and by relatively shallow entrenchment of drainage. Elevation ranges from 735 feet above sea level to 430 above sea level. Areas of relatively steep slopes within the planning area are shown on the Development Limitations Map (refer to page C-23).

Roxana Silt is composed of mixed silty and loamy sediment from loess and drift material.

Alluvium is material which was deposited by floodwater from modern streams and mostly consist of silty sediments.

Mineral & Natural Resources Extracted natural resources in Clark County include oil and gas, sand and gravel, and limestone. Soil also is a very valuable natural resource; it provides a growing medium for plants, a surface to build upon, a filter for waste products, a sink for carbon, and storage for excess rainwater. In addition, forests and woodlots, impounded surface water as lakes and ponds, sand and gravel aquifers, and bedrock aquifers are among the natural resources in Clark County.

Agricultural Land and Open Space Of the 15,949 acres in the planning area, approximately 9,168 acres are either agricultural land or open space. This equates to approximately 57.5% of the land. The majority of this land is located outside of the City of Casey but within the planning area.

Soils The parent soils in Clark County include: till, outwash, loess, mixed loess and drift, and alluvium. •

Till is material laid down directly by glaciers and consists of a blend of clay, silt, sand, gravel, and boulders.

Outwash is a stratified material deposited by flowing glacial meltwaters and is dominated by material that is fine sand or coarser.

Peoria Silt, or loess, is material which was deposited by the wind and are uniform silt-sized particles that were calcareous before being acted upon by leaching.

A-18

MSA Professional Services, Inc.


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CITY OF CASEY CLARK AND CUMBERLAND COUNTIES, IL

PRIME AGRICULTURE CASEY COUNTY

COMMERCIAL OPEN SPACE PARK

FORESTED AREA

INDUSTRIAL

OPEN WATER RIVER/STREAM

DATA SOURCES: MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY AND PARCELS PROVIDED BY CLARK COUNTY. ROADS, TOWNSHIPS AND COUNTIES PROVIDED BY US CENSUS (2013). LAND USE IN CLARK COUNTY DERIVED FROM PARCEL DATASET. LAND USE IN CUMBERLAND COUNTY DERIVED FROM AERIAL INTERPRETATION. OPEN WATER AND RIVERS/STREAMS PROVIDED BY USGS (NHD). FORESTED AREA DERIVED FROM USDA-NRCS CROPLAND DATA LAYER (2012).

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E Print Date: 4/2/2014

Casey, Illinois

A-19


A.5

AGRICULTURE & NATURAL RESOURCES

Water Resources Watersheds The City of Casey lies within the Embarras/Middle Wabash River River Basins Watershed.

Surface Water Section 303(d) of the federal Clean Water Act requires states to develop a list of impaired waters, commonly referred to as the â&#x20AC;&#x153;303(d) list.â&#x20AC;? This list identifies waters that are not meeting water quality standards, including both water quality criteria for specific substances or the designated uses, and is used as the basis for development of Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs). Ground Water Groundwater is a critical resource, not only because it is used as a source of drinking water, but also because rivers, streams, and other surface water depend on it for recharge. Groundwater contamination is most likely to occur where fractured bedrock is near the ground surface, or where only a thin layer of soil separates the ground surface from the water table.

Floodplains Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) designated 100- and 500-year floodplains are not found within the planning area.

A-20

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APPENDIX A COMMUNITY INDICATORS

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Casey, Illinois

A-21


A.6

COMMUNITY FACILITIES & SERVICES

General Facilities Health Care Facilities The nearest hospital, Sarah Bush Lincoln, is located 35 miles away in Mattoon, Illinois. While Casey does not have a hospital, it does have the Casey Clinic with is affiliated with the Sarah Bush Lincoln Health System. There is also the Casey Family Medical Center. There are several assisted living facilities in the Casey Area: Casey Health Care Center, Heartland Nursing Center, and Simple Blessings Assisted Living Center. Other health care facilities include: the Casey Crisis Pregnancy Center, Champion Fitness Physical Therapy, Dr. Patrick Niebrugge, Optometrist, Dr. Tony Butcher, Chiropractor, Casey Family Dental, and the Pharmacie Shoppe.

Casey is served by the Casey Township Library, located at 307 East Main Street. The building is in good condition although an expansion may be necessary in the future. School & College Facilities The City is served by the Casey-Westfield Community Unit School District #C-4 which is a K-12 public school system with 3 schools. The district operates one elementary school, one junior high school, and one high school. • Monroe Elementary School (K-6), located at 306 East Monroe Street • Casey-Westfield Jr.-Sr. High School (7-12), located at 306 East Edgar Street Other Government Facilities

Police & Emergency Facilities

• City Hall, located at 108 East Main Street

Law enforcement in the City is provided by the Casey Police Department, located within City Hall. The facility in inadequate for the department as there is not enough room or privacy and is outdated for any new or future equipment.

• U.S. Postal Office, located at 100 West Alabama Avenue

Fire protection is provided by the Casey Fire Department and it serves all of Casey Township and runs mutual aid on MABAS 26 District. The fire station facility is next door to City Hall and is in decidedly poor condition. Updates, additions or an entirely new facility are desired although no plans are set. A small fund has been set up for future improvements, and recent equipment acquisitions were made possible through grants.

• City of Casey Gas Barn, located at 402 S.E. 8th Street • City of Casey Generation Building, located at 910 North Central • City of Casey ground storage, located at 1802 East Washington • City of Casey South Substation, located at 201 South Central • City Waterworks, located at 10821 North 600th, Martinsville, IL

The emergency medical system is run through Clark County.

Nearby Higher Education Facilities

Cemeteries

There are seven higher education facilities located within sixty miles. Additionally, there is a U of I - Extension Agent available in the region.

There are two cemeteries located within the City of Casey. • Washington Street Cemetery - East Washington Street • Casey Cumberland Cemetery - East Alabama Avenue

• Eastern Illinois University (about 17 miles; Charleston, IL; Full-time enrollment: 9,940) • Lake Land College (about 24 miles; Mattoon, IL; FT enrollment: 3,606) • Ivy Tech Community College-Wabash Valley (about

Library Facilities

A-22

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N COLES ST

\ [

2350E

E 830TH RD

N 450TH ST

600N

2480 E ST

[ \ \ [

N 150TH ST

600N

N 240TH ST

\ [

2480 E CO RD

700N

700N

N IL 49

710N

E 930TH RD

220E

49

N 330TH ST

40 £ ¤

15

CITY OF CASEY CLARK AND CUMBERLAND COUNTIES, IL

COMMUNITY FACILITIES

DATA SOURCES: MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY AND PARCELS PROVIDED BY CLARK COUNTY. ROADS, TOWNSHIPS AND COUNTIES PROVIDED BY US CENSUS (2013). LAND USE IN CLARK COUNTY DERIVED FROM PARCEL DATASET. LAND USE IN CUMBERLAND COUNTY DERIVED FROM AERIAL INTERPRETATION. OPEN WATER AND RIVERS/STREAMS PROVIDED BY USGS (NHD). FORESTED AREA DERIVED FROM USDA-NRCS CROPLAND DATA LAYER (2012).

CASEY COUNTY PARCEL FORESTED AREA OPEN WATER

0

RIVER/STREAM Printed By: sbrown, File: P:\12700s\12790s\12793\12793000\GIS\BaseMap.mxd

0.25

0.5

Miles 1

E Print Date: 3/19/2014

Casey, Illinois

A-23


A.6

COMMUNITY FACILITIES & SERVICES

General Facilities Continued 33 miles; Terre Haute, IN; FT enrollment: 2,860) • Indiana State University (about 34 miles; Terre Haute, IN; FT enrollment: 8,125) • Vincennes University (about 50 miles; Vincennes, IN; FT enrollment: 6,470) • University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (about 58 miles; Champaign, IL; FT enrollment: 39,877) • Parkland College (about 60 miles; Champaign, IL; FT enrollment: 4,831)

While there is no definitive time line, the Water Plant will need to be replaced in the near future.

Solid Waste & Recycling Facilities Solid Waste services are contracted out to a private company, United Republic. The City does not provide any Solid Waste or Recycling services directly. Solid waste is disposed of at the Effingham Landfill and the City of Casey Landfill. However, the City of Casey Landfill is currently in the process of closing.

Utilities & Services

Telecommunications Facilities

Stormwater Management

There are two telecommunication providers for the Casey area. Telephone service for the City is provided by Mediacom and Frontier. Mediacom also provides the cable service.

Stormwater management typically includes the collection and controlled release of storm runoff to natural receiving systems, typically through detention and/or retention facilities. The City is responsible for approximately XX miles of storm sewer which is part of a combined system with Sewers. There are currently no utility fees associated with Stormwater or Sewer management. The City addresses stormwater in several ordinances including: •

Code of Ordinances Title 13 - Public Utilities

Power Plant & Transmission Lines

Power is provided by Illinois Public Energy Agency and the Illinois Municipal Electric Agency. There are 2 substations for power located on both the north and south sides of Casey.

Waste Water & Sanitary Sewer System All sanitary wastewater generated in the City is treated by the City of Casey Wastewater Treatment Facility. The Wastewater Treatment Facility is an activated sludge facility located at 1802 East Washington Street. The treatment facility has an average flow of 400,000 gallons per day with a max flow of 1 MGD. The facility was built in 1978. Effluent water is discharged into Quarry Branch Creek where the City is currently in compliance with all State and Federal standards. The City of Casey received a grant and has obtained a loan in order to replace the sewer plant within the next 1-3 years.

Water Supply The City of Casey maintains a 500,000 gallon water tower and has 1MG in storage. Annually, 122,000,000 gallons of water are used averaging 350,00 daily with a peak usage of 650,000 gallons.

A-24

MSA Professional Services, Inc.


APPENDIX A COMMUNITY INDICATORS

Casey, Illinois

A-25


A.6

COMMUNITY FACILITIES & SERVICES

Parks & Recreation In total, the City has approximately 40 acres of public parkland. Based on the National Recreation and Park Association’s (NRPA) recommendations, the City currently has a surplus of 6.77 acres using a policy of six acres per 1,000 people. Assuming the population projections hold true and the City doesn’t add additional parkland, the City will have a surplus of 6.21 acres by year 2030. Although the total acreage is an easy indicator that a community has met its recreation and parkland needs, it is not the only indicator. Access to parkland is also an important indicator. Generally speaking, any park is accessible by vehicle; however, walkability is even more important, especially for children and young adults. Therefore, neighborhood parks should be within a 1/4 mile in order to service that neighborhood. As the Parkland Service Map on the next page illustrates, there are several neighborhoods lacking easy walkable access to parkland due to the one park location. Community parks and play fields provide a wider variety of recreational activities and, therefore, can justifiably service a larger area (one mile as shown). At present, Casey does not have a community park and recreation plan. •

PARKLAND NEEDS FORECAST, 2010-2030 Source: 2010 Census, MSA Predictions

Needs and Demand Population Demand (6 acres/1000) Demand (12 acres/1000) Total Supply Surplus/Deficit (6 acres/1000) Surplus/Deficit (12 acres/1000)

2020 5,581

2030 6,008

31.77 63.54

33.49 66.97

36.05 72.10

276.00 244

276.00 243

276.00 240

212

209

204

The National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA) recommends 6-12 total acres of parks or recreation space per 1,000 people within a community. NRPA also defines park and open space types, including desirable size, service area, and total acres needed to service a community. • • • •

Mini Parks - 2 acres or less in size, servicing 1/8 mile radius (0.25-0.5 acres / 1,000 residents) Neighborhood Playgrounds - 2-4 acres in size, servicing 1/4 mile radius (0.5-1.5 acres / 1,000) Neighborhood Parks - 2-10 acres in size, servicing 1/4 mile radius (1.0-2.0 acres/ 1,000) Community Play fields/Parks - 5 acres or more, servicing 1.0 mile radius (5-8 acres / 1,000)

Casey Township Park (Fairview Park) - this park includes: • 2 Baseball and 2 Softball diamonds • Skate Park • Playground • Swimming Pool • 4 Picnic Shelters • Campground • Bandstand • 2 Ponds • 4 Free Standing Restroom Facilities • Horseshoe Arena • Horse Area • Tractor Pull Area

A-26

2010 5,295

MSA Professional Services, Inc.


100TH ST

\ [

E 1250TH RD

2350E

N

\ [ 330E

40 £ ¤ H

± ³ D DR

SW 4TH ST

SW 1ST ST

RD

N M I LAM LN

1070N

E 10 50TH RD

E WASHINGTO N RD

E WASHINGTO N ST

\ [ DUPONT RD

LA N

E 1120T

D DR

E 1000T H RD

N 230TH ST

ER

LA N

LN

MB

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O RY

CU

W TYLER AVE

EC

B UM

H IC K

800N

ST

SE 8TH ST

70 § ¦ ¨

IN

E WASHI NGTON AVE E ADAM S AVE E JEFFERSON AVE E MADISON AVE E MONR OE AV E

SE 4TH ST

A W M

VE AA

ST NE 1 5TH

850N

M BA LA E A ST AIN EM

SE 1ST ST

\ [

NE 13TH S T

0E

875N

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NW 1ST ST NW 2ND ST NW 3RD S T NW 4TH ST NW 5TH ST

24 0

\ [

COLES ST

900N

AND ERLLAND CUM BER CUMB

2325E

1100N

K CL ARK CLAR

[ \ \ [

\ [

NE 25TH

7

2400E

N 400TH ST

\ [

N 430TH ST

2

2450E

E 1180TH RD

N COLES ST

\ [

2 7 5E

\ [

70 ¦ ¨ §

1180

975N

975N

1300N

\ [

1000N

\ [

\ [

FR RD

N 100TH ST

2350E

\[ [ \

CA CASEY SEY TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP

N 300TH ST

± ³

1050N

SN AK ET RAIL RD

N 450TH ST

2480 E E 1300TH RD

1300 RD

25

E E 1400TH RD

N 320TH ST

1150N

ST N 180TH ST WESTFIELD RD 180TH

T 20T H S

\ [

2300E

PA PARKER RKER TO TOWN WNSHI SHIP P

2480E

1200N

49

N 25TH ST

\ [ \ [

V U

UN UNIIO ON N TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP

4 70T H ST

APPENDIX A COMMUNITY INDICATORS

[ \ \ [ 230E

E 950TH RD

[ \ \ [

\ [

V U

2425E

2275E

E 870TH RD

JOH JOHN NS SON ON TOW TOWNS NSH HIP IP

500N

\ [ 2480E

11

E 700TH RD

± ³

\ [

15

CITY OF CASEY CLARK AND CUMBERLAND COUNTIES, IL

COMMUNITY FACILITIES CASEY COUNTY PARCEL FORESTED AREA

E 750TH RD

OAK LEAF RD

2400E

N 250TH ST

\ [

± ³

2350E

N 100TH ST

2300E

E 800TH RD

N COLES ST

\ [

CR CRO OOK OKED ED C CR REEK EEK TOW TOWNS NSH HIIP P

E 830TH RD

N 450TH ST

600N

2480 E ST

[ \ \ [

N 150TH ST

600N

N 240TH ST

\ [

2480 E CO RD

700N

700N

N IL 49

710N

E 930TH RD

220E

49

N 330TH ST

40 £ ¤

COMMUNITY PLAYFIELD SERVICE AREA (1 MI) CITY PARKS - WALKABLE SERIVE AREA (1/4 MI) SCHOOL PROPERTY - WALKABLE SERVICE AREA (1/4 MI)

DATA SOURCES: MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY AND PARCELS PROVIDED BY CLARK COUNTY. ROADS, TOWNSHIPS AND COUNTIES PROVIDED BY US CENSUS (2013). LAND USE IN CLARK COUNTY DERIVED FROM PARCEL DATASET. LAND USE IN CUMBERLAND COUNTY DERIVED FROM AERIAL INTERPRETATION. OPEN WATER AND RIVERS/STREAMS PROVIDED BY USGS (NHD). FORESTED AREA DERIVED FROM USDA-NRCS CROPLAND DATA LAYER (2012).

OPEN WATER

0

RIVER/STREAM Printed By: sbrown, File: P:\12700s\12790s\12793\12793000\GIS\BaseMap.mxd

0.25

0.5

Miles 1

E Print Date: 3/19/2014

Casey, Illinois

A-27


A.7

COMMUNITY CHARACTER

Historic Preservation Historic Preservation The City of Casey has several historically and culturally significant features that contribute greatly to the villages identity. While the City does have a Historical Society, nothing is formalized with the City and there are presently no ordinances or land use plans for the preservation or protection of the these historically significant sites. Several buildings are on both the Illinois and National Register of Historic Places. A list of Nationally recognized sites is provided below.

HISTORICALLY AND CULTURALLY SIGNIFICANT FEATURES

Source: Illinois Historic Preservation Agency; Historic and Architectural Resources Geographic Information System

Significant Name

Discription

Bridge over DRAINAGE DITCH carrying GOLF CART PATH

Location

National Register Evaluation

CASEY GOLF COURSE

Determined eligible for the NR

3 Story, brick commercial building

17 S. Central Ave.

Undetermined

3 Story, brick commercial building

19 S. Central Ave.

Undetermined

2 Story, brick commercial building

105 S. Central Ave.

Undetermined

2 Story, brick commercial building

115 S. Central Ave.

Undetermined

2 Story Italianate, residential structure

221 S. Central Ave.

Undetermined

2 Story, residential structure

309 S. Central Ave.

Undetermined

2.5 Story, residential structure

800 S. Central Ave.

Undetermined

1.5 Story, residential structure

903 S. Central Ave.

Undetermined

2.5 Story, residential structure

300 E. Colorado Ave.

Undetermined

2.5 Story, residential structure

211 E. Edgar Ave.

Undetermined

3 story, brick school

400 E. Edgar Ave.

Undetermined

2.5 Story, residential structure

300 W. Main St.

Undetermined

2 Story, residential structure

210 W. Main St.

Undetermined

2 Story, residential structure

206 W. Main St.

Undetermined

2 Story, residential structure

201 W. Main St.

Undetermined

2.5 Story, residential structure

106 W. Main St.

Undetermined

2 Story, brick commercial building

17 E. Main St.

Undetermined

2 Story, brick commercial building

21 E. Main St.

Undetermined

2 Story, residential structure

110 E. Main St.

Undetermined

First Methodist Church

1 Story, brick church, gothic influence

115 E. Main St.

Undetermined

Fuquay Home

2.5 Story, residential structure

200 E. Main St.

Undetermined

2.5 Story, residential structure

202 E. Main St.

Undetermined

2.5 Story, residential structure

206 E. Main St.

Undetermined

2 Story, residential structure

300 E. Main St.

Undetermined

Casey Opera House

High School

A-28

Schimel, Charles Home

MSA Professional Services, Inc. 310 E. Main St.

2.5 Story, residential structure

1.5 Story, residential structure

413 E. Main St.

Undetermined Undetermined


2 Story, residential structure

206 W. Main St.

Undetermined

2 Story, residential structure

201 W. Main St.

Undetermined

2.5 Story, residential structure

106 W. Main St.

2 Story, brick commercial building 2 Story, brick commercial building 2 Story, residential structure Historic Preservation

Undetermined APPENDIX A 17 E. Main St. Undetermined COMMUNITY INDICATORS 21 E. Main St.

Undetermined

110 E. Main St.

Undetermined

First Methodist Church

1 Story, brick church, gothic influence

115 E. Main St.

Undetermined

FuquaySignificant Home Name

2.5 Story, residential structure Discription

200 E. MainLocation St.

2.5 Story, residential structure

202 E. Main St.

National Register Undetermined Evaluation Undetermined

Bridge over DRAINAGE DITCH carrying GOLF CART PATH

2.5 Story, residential structure 2 Story, residential structure

206 E. Main St. CASEY GOLF COURSE 300 E. Main St.

Undetermined Determined Undetermined eligible for the NR

Schimel, Charles Home

2.5 Story, residential structure 3 Story, brick commercial building 1.5 Story, residential structure 3 Story, brick commercial building 2.5 Story, residential structure 2 Story, brick commercial building 2.5 Story, residential structure 2 Story, brick commercial building 1.5 Story, residential structure 2 Story Italianate, residential structure 1 Story, residential structure

310 E. Main St. 17 S. Central Ave. 413 E. Main St. 19 S. Central Ave. 415 E. Main St. 105 S. Central Ave. 501 E. Main St. 115 S. Central Ave. 510 E. Main St. 221 S. Central Ave. 512 E. Main St.

Undetermined Undetermined Undetermined Undetermined Undetermined Undetermined Undetermined Undetermined Undetermined Undetermined Undetermined

2 Story, 2.5 Story,residential residentialstructure structure

309 E. S. Main Central 521 St.Ave.

Undetermined

2.5 Story, residential structure

800 E. S. Washington Central Ave. Ave. 206

Undetermined

1.5 Story, residential structure 2.5

903 E. S. Washington Central Ave. Ave. 307

Undetermined

Story, residential structure 32.5 Story, brick commercial building

300S.E.Central Colorado 16 Ave.Ave.

Undetermined

2.5 Story, residential structure 2 Story, glazed brick commercial building 3 story, brick school 2 Story, brick commercial building 2.5 Story, residential structure 2 Story, brick commercial building 2 Story, residential structure 2 Story, brick commercial building 2 Story, residential structure 2 Story, brick commercial building 2 Story, residential structure 3.5 Story, brick church 2.5 Story, residential structure

211 E. Edgar Ave. 13 S. Central Ave. 400 E. Edgar Ave. 11 S. Central Ave. 300 W. Main St. 8 S. Central Ave. 210 W. Main St. 4 S. Central Ave. 206 W. Main St. 2 S. Central Ave. 201 W. Main St. 20 N. Central Ave. 106 W. Main St.

Undetermined Undetermined Undetermined Undetermined Undetermined Undetermined Undetermined Undetermined Undetermined Undetermined Undetermined Undetermined Undetermined

2 Story, brick commercial building

17 E. Main St.

Undetermined

2 Story, brick commercial building

21 E. Main St.

Undetermined

2 Story, residential structure

110 E. Main St.

Undetermined

First Methodist Church

1 Story, brick church, gothic influence

115 E. Main St.

Undetermined

Fuquay Home

2.5 Story, residential structure

200 E. Main St.

Undetermined

2.5 Story, residential structure

202 E. Main St.

Undetermined

2.5 Story, residential structure

206 E. Main St.

Undetermined

2 Story, residential structure

300 E. Main St.

Undetermined

2.5 Story, residential structure

310 E. Main St.

Undetermined

1.5 Story, residential structure

413 E. Main St.

Undetermined

2.5 Story, residential structure

415 E. Main St.

Undetermined

2.5 Story, residential structure

501 E. Main St.

Undetermined

1.5 Story, residential structure

510 E. Main St.

Undetermined

1 Story, residential structure

512 E. Main St.

Undetermined

2.5 Story, residential structure

521 E. Main St.

Undetermined

2.5 Story, residential structure

206 E. Washington Ave.

Undetermined

2.5 Story, residential structure

307 E. Washington Ave.

Undetermined

A. F. & A. M. of K. P.

3 Story, brick commercial building

16 S. Central Ave.

Undetermined

Casey National Bank

2 Story, glazed brick commercial building 13 S. Central Ave.

Undetermined

2 Story, brick commercial building

11 S. Central Ave.

Undetermined

2 Story, brick commercial building

8 S. Central Ave.

Undetermined

4 S. Central Ave.

Undetermined

2 S. Central Ave.

Undetermined

Casey Opera House

A. F. & A. M. of K. P. Casey National Bank High School

United Brethren Church

Schimel, Charles Home

Casey,building Illinois 2 Story, brick commercial 2 Story, brick commercial building

A-29


A.8

COLLABORATION & PARTNERSHIPS

Existing Areas of Collaboration Organization/Entity

Existing Collaboration Efforts Collaboration on snow plowing  Shared E911 Communication Center  Grants 

Clark County Illinois

Collaboration on property acquisition Works with Enterprise Zone  Financing for businesses/industries  

Casey Industries

A-30

MSA Professional Services, Inc.


APPENDIX A COMMUNITY INDICATORS

Potential Areas of Collaboration Please see Chapter 6, Action and Implementation.

Casey, Illinois

A-31


A.9

LAND USE

Existing & Projected Land Uses The City of Casey is surrounded by prime agricultural land. This may be the only encumbrance to development as there are no significant wetlands or steep slopes in the area. Approximately 31% of the land is currently dedicated to residential purposes. Another 22% is used for agricultural production while 17% is used as commercial and 14% for public or institutional uses. The “planning area” identified on the existing land use map is the City limits plus a buffer of one-and-a-half from those limits, corresponding the City’s extraterritorial land use and subdivision review jurisdiction. The planning area features a significant amount of agricultural or open space use (81.35%). With very little of the land developed, opportunities for expansion are possible for the City of Casey. Using the projected population and household sizes, it is not expected that Casey will need many additional acres of residential land. There are approximately 17.76 acres of vacant properties within the City Limits which could be redeveloped for residential use. If more acres for residential development are needed, they should occur west/southwest of town. See Chapter 5, Land Use for more information.

A-32

EXISTING LAND USE - CITY LIMITS Source: MSA Mapping

Land Use Agricultural Residential Commercial Industrial Public/Institutional Park Open Space Vacant Road ROW TOTAL

Acres

Percentage

276.85 394.22 215.54 25.43 178.97 85.08 26.56 49.52 17.96

21.80% 31.04% 16.97% 2.00% 14.09% 6.70% 2.09% 3.90% 1.41%

1,270.14

100.00%

EXISTING LAND USE - PLANNING AREA Source: MSA Mapping

Land Use

Acres

Percentage

Agricultural Residential Commercial Industrial Public/Institutional Park Open Space Vacant Road ROW

12,544.49 1,047.21 238.29 257.44 253.00 98.46 703.62 120.09 158.57

81.35% 6.79% 1.55% 1.67% 1.64% 0.64% 4.56% 0.78% 1.03%

TOTAL

15,421.16

100.00%

MSA Professional Services, Inc.


APPENDIX A COMMUNITY INDICATORS 49

\ [

N 370TH ST

PA PARKER RKER TO TOWN WNSHI SHIP P

2480E

± ³

20TH ST

7

\ [ 1150N

2480 E

± ³

23 50E

70 ¦ ¨ §

E 1300TH RD

\ [ 330E

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12

D 50TH R

1180

40 £ ¤

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975N

2325E

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2450E

2350E

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\ [[ \

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25

1050N

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1300 RD

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N 300TH ST

2300E

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2400E

180TH ST

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\ [

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N 100TH ST

1200N

2480E

\ [

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V U

UN UNIIO ON N TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP

N M ILAM LN

DUPONT RD

N 230TH ST

2480E

\ [

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N 450TH ST

N 400TH ST

SW 4TH ST SW 2ND ST SW 1ST ST

ORY LN HIC K

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1070N

230E

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£ ¤

\ [

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70 ¦ ¨ § 40

NE 25TH

ST

W TYLER AVE

D DR

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BE

ST

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SE 4TH ST

M CU

AIN

EA

ST

WM

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SE 1ST ST S CENTRA L AVE

850N

NW 1ST ST NW 2ND ST NW 3RD S T NW 4TH ST NW 5TH ST

\ [

0E

875N

2 40

\ [

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900N

H N 10 T

\ [ 1100N

\ [

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220E

[ \ \ [ \ [ 710N

COUNTY

LAND USE

CITY OF CASEY CLARK AND CUMBERLAND COUNTIES, IL INDUSTRIAL

COMMERCIAL

INSTITUTIONAL

OPEN SPACE

RESIDENTIAL

OPEN WATER

PARK

VACANT

RIVER/STREAM

AGRICULTURAL

PARCEL FORESTED AREA

N 330TH ST

EXISTING LAND USE CASEY

OAK LEAF RD

2400E

E 830TH RD

E 800TH RD

N 250TH ST

CR CRO OOK OKED ED C CR REEK EEK TOW TOWNS NSH HIIP P

2300E

N 240TH ST

\ [

JOH JOHN NS SON ON TOW TOWNS NSH HIP IP

N IL 49

600N

N COLES ST

\[ [ \

E 870TH RD

N 150TH ST

2275E

N 100TH ST

\ [

2480 E ST

2425E

49

CL K ARK CLAR

\ [

AND ERLLAND CUM BER CUMB

2350E

600N

V U

2480 E CO RD

700N

DATA SOURCES: MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY AND PARCELS PROVIDED BY CLARK COUNTY. ROADS, TOWNSHIPS AND COUNTIES PROVIDED BY US CENSUS (2013). LAND USE IN CLARK COUNTY DERIVED FROM PARCEL DATASET. LAND USE IN CUMBERLAND COUNTY DERIVED FROM AERIAL INTERPRETATION. OPEN WATER AND RIVERS/STREAMS PROVIDED BY USGS (NHD). FORESTED AREA DERIVED FROM USDA-NRCS CROPLAND DATA LAYER (2012).

0

Printed By: sbrown, File: P:\12700s\12790s\12793\12793000\GIS\ExistingLandUse\12793000_ExistingLandUse_8x11_PlanningArea.mxd

Casey, Illinois

0.25

0.5

Miles 1

E Print Date: 4/2/2014

A-33


A.9

LAND USE 180TH ST

V U 49

N 180TH ST

[ \ \ [

CA CASEY SEY TOW TOWNS NSH HIP IP 5 E 12

0T

H RD

N 230TH ST

2480E

70 ¦ ¨ §

1050N

\ [ ± ³

1180

7

E 1180TH R D

975N

40 £ ¤

N 25TH ST

± ³

25

N 300TH ST

N 100TH ST

\ [

WESTFI ELD RD

2450E

70 ¦ ¨ §

NE 16TH ST

N COLES ST

OE

LN

SE 5TH ST

230E

O PA

L ST

E HARRISON AVE

N 100TH ST

N 230TH ST

E TYLER AVE

V U 49

N COLES ST

E 950TH RD

N 150TH ST

220E

N IL 49

2480 E ST

LAND USE

DATA SOURCES: MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY AND PARCELS PROVIDED BY CLARK COUNTY. ROADS, TOWNSHIPS AND COUNTIES PROVIDED BY US CENSUS (2013). LAND USE IN CLARK COUNTY DERIVED FROM PARCEL DATASET. LAND USE IN CUMBERLAND COUNTY DERIVED FROM AERIAL INTERPRETATION. OPEN WATER AND RIVERS/STREAMS PROVIDED BY USGS (NHD). FORESTED AREA DERIVED FROM USDA-NRCS CROPLAND DATA LAYER (2012).

INDUSTRIAL

OPEN SPACE

RESIDENTIAL

OPEN WATER

PARK

VACANT

RIVER/STREAM

AGRICULTURAL

0

0.25

0.5

Printed By: sbrown, File: P:\12700s\12790s\12793\12793000\GIS\ExistingLandUse\12793000_ExistingLandUse_8x11_PlanningArea.mxd

A-34

E 930TH RD

\ [

CITY OF CASEY CLARK AND CUMBERLAND COUNTIES, IL

INSTITUTIONAL

FORESTED AREA

E HI LLCRE

E VAN BUREN AVE

W TYLER AVE

COMMERCIAL

PARCEL

ST RD

ST

SE 8TH ST

SE 6TH S T

SE 7TH ST

\ [ E MONRO E AV E

EXISTING LAND USE - INSET COUNTY

E WASHINGTO N ST

E WASHINGTO N RD

E ADAM S AVE

SE 4TH ST

SE 3RD ST

SW 4TH ST

HICKORY LN

N 13 TH

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2425E

CASEY

D DR

NE 25TH

ST

1 0T

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SE

EM

RL

SE

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BE

ST

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MA

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TH

ST

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2480E

BA

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W HARRISON AVE

K CL ARK CLAR

\ [

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UN UNIIO ON N TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP

S CENTRA L AVE

R

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LB

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CU

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RD

LA EA

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D LA N

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EA

ST

NE 9

LA B

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NW 2ND ST

AIN

NW 4TH S T

WM

NW 3RD ST

NW 5TH ST

COLES ST

850N

WA

NW 1ST ST

W DELAWARE AVE

E EDGAR AVE

N 10 TH

W EDGAR AVE

NE 4TH ST

NE 2ND ST

W

IDA AVE OR FL

UM

TH 13

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APPENDIX A COMMUNITY INDICATORS

Casey, Illinois

A-35


1 2 3 4 5 6 Appendix A Appendix B Public Input Appendix C This Appendix is

a compilation of stakeholder input collected during the comprehensive planning process. The goals, objectives and policies of this comprehensive plan were created in response to the issues and ideas collected here. Page B.1 Citizen Survey B-2 B.2 Public Visioning Meeting B-20


B.1

CITIZEN SURVEY

About the Data Between June and September, 2013, the City of Casey conducted a citizen survey. The Citizen Survey was designed to gather stakeholder and resident opinions on a range of topics relevant to preparing a plan to guide growth and change in Casey over the next 20 years. The survey covered quality of life, city facilities and services, economic development, housing, and land use and development. The survey also collected respondent information to analyze how well the survey responses represent the overall population of the community. The survey was available in several locations: digitally using SurveyMonkey, a downloadable version on the Comprehensive Plan website (www.picturecasey. com), the City website (www.cityofcaseyil.org), and as paper copies through the City found at City Hall. Approximately 1.81% (equalling 50) of citizens responded to the survey. No one under the age of 25 responded, while 45% of the respondents were over the age of 45. The 25 to 34 age range is overrepresented in this survey. This section provides comparative data on the profile of respondents, results from the survey, and selected respondent comments for each survey question. Complete survey data was provided to the City of Casey.

B-2

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APPENDIX B PUBLIC INPUT

Profile of Respondents Age

Place of Residence

25.00% Elsewhere in Illinois, 8.2%

20.00% 15.00% Census Data (2010) 10.00%

Survey

Outside of Illinois, 12.2%

City of Effingham, 0.0% City of Charleston/Mattoon, 2.0% City of Casey, 77.6%

5.00% 0.00% Under 18 - 24 25 - 34 35 - 49 50 - 64 18

65 & over

Distance to Work

Place of Employment

none unemployed, 4.4%

45.0% 40.0%

none retired, 8.9%

35.0% 30.0% 25.0%

1-3 miles, 28.9%

none - work at home, 15.6%

20.0% 15.0% 10.0%

3-5 miles, 4.4% >10 miles, 33.3%

5.0% 0.0%

5-10 miles, 4.4%

Type of Housing Unit

120% 100% 80% 60%

American Community Survey (2007-2011)

40%

Survey

SELECTED COMMENTS • Hair salon in my home • Terre Haute, Indiana • live in Indiana...na question • Self-employed in St. Louis • stay at home mom • Outside Casey • Paris, IL • Martinsville • Toledo, IL. looking to move, house for sale

20% 0% Single 2 to 4 Family Units

5 to 9 Units

10 or Mobile Other more Home or Trailer

Casey, Illinois

B-3


B.1

CITIZEN SURVEY

Responses & Selected Comments Imagine if you could change/fix something in the community that would have a long-lasting impact, what would that change/fix be? (limit one response) Answer Options Response Count 50

answered question skipped question

SELECTED COMMENTS

50 1

• Have some more constructive things for the kids to do in the summer when school is out. • More thing for the kids in town, there is nothing in town • More affordable options for the young people. Kids will stay out of trouble with things to do and they need to be affordable with all the unemployment. • Entice new businesses to come here with lower utilities, etc for the first year • Diversity of job options • The old businesses uptown do something with them • Condemn unsafe/unsightly houses and tear them down! • Would love for the old buildings and homes to have been maintained throughout the years, rather than neglected. • Lower utilities • Bring jobs here • Fix the buildings that are falling down. The old bakery has looked like crime scene for at least three years with the caution tape around it. • Revitalize the downtown. • You know when you make the comment, “If I win the lottery I would...?” I’ve always said I would give every homeowner and business owner in town an allotment of funds to put towards the improvement of the outside of their house or business. The funds would go directly to construction companies to provide the work. Therefor the town would be beautified and jobs would be created. :) • Fix the flooding problem. I am worried about water getting under my house and causing damage. • Clean up the abandoned properties and bring more business to the community. • The economic development program needs to adjust focus on being competitive in today’s “digital age”. The workforce needs to being skilled accordingly and connectivity needs to be fast and generally available at a low cost. • Residents attitude toward the town. • Clean up all the dilapidated and trashy properties • The look of the downtown buildings. • I would like to see the up town buildings refurbished so that no small business could come in. • Clean up of unsightly properties. • Care like the first founders did, work with and for each other. • More family activities little the migdet car races, big shiner 4th of July party in park,etc. • Have something like a movie theater or bowling alley or something for a family, or people to do, young and old • Downtown needs to be improved. All of the beautiful old buildings need refurbished and niche shops put in place. The community has a great opportunity to utilize the attractions that have recently been added, but there must be a reasonable and affordable plan to do it. • More businesses other than resale shops in the downtown area. • Casey needs to beautify the whole town (not just downtown) by tearing down old abandoned houses/buildings, cleaning up lots, planting trees/flowers. Even the people who live here feel horrible about their plight, how do you think someone looking to move here or start a business would feel? And I would do something to lower the outrageous utilities. Sorry that’s two responses. • The downtown area. Getting the buildings looking better and some businesses downtown. • I would like to see the downtown buildings brought up to quality standards. There are many buildings sitting in a bad state of disrepair. The building that sits beside the old bells jewelers is starting to crumble near the top. I figure it will be the next to start falling down. • The condition of the city is in terrible shape. Buildings need to be torn down or repaired. • Abandoned buildings ... Tear down ... Create new buildings.. By offering bidding on new lots with a set requirement .. We build a new downtown for the future. • Raise more money for the athletic dept that way we can make sure all sports stay around for future generation • Crumbling buildings. In all honesty, the picture to this survey link made Casey look beautiful. We have several old buildings that are empty and falling apart. Maybe some incentives for people to fix the buildings or for business to move into them. I once heard that in Paris, they had some kind of deal where empty buildings were offered at cheaper rent in order to attract businesses. What does the owner of the building have to lose if they are just sitting empty anyways? Or at least give businesses a break (rent, utilities, etc) for the 1st year while they are trying to get a business going. • Increase job opportunities in the area, not just lower income jobs. • Fix the septic/drainage problem in the Southwest area. • Have a 4 days Market at Park ..People vending would pay then food gas groceries motel camping.. etc money would be spent here and maybe bring people that wanted to move here and generate more money..Then with all ready having the space and camping to do so generate money to help fix pool and other issues.. • Revamp the infrastructure. It is collapsing. roads, sewage, water, the lines

B-4

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APPENDIX B PUBLIC INPUT

Imagine if you could bring something to the community that would have a long-lasting impact, what would you bring? (limit one response) Answer Options Response Count 48 answered question 48 skipped question 3 SELECTED COMMENTS

• a skating rink/bowling alley. or possibly even a cheap movie theater. • more jobs • JOBS!! Not just tourism jobs but jobs that will pay people’s bills in the long run. • The City needs a large manufacturing plant with large employment. • A community college • something for us all to do instead if running everyone out if town! • One industry which would employ +/- 300 people paying above minimum wage. • Better paying jobs to keep young families here and give others a better quality of life. • Factory • mfg factory • Tax cuts to encourage new businesses to come in. • I would like to see a Uniform Shop for medical staff, none around here. • Since Casey is being the “World’s Largest” community. Maybe bring Brown County Indiana type businesses to the town and a tourist shop to feature items available for the “World’s Largest” features in the community. Brown County is just booming with tourists and residents spending money on anything type of gadget you can think of. The town seems to benefit a lot from it. There are plenty of building available in the downtown area to create some really cute shops to draw people in. • Gigabit internet! • Employment • A business that would employ many people • Bring Jobs in manufacturing or any kind of jobs • More activities (bowling alley, mini golf, movie theater) • A factory that would employ many people would be nice! • Manufacturing • A telecommunication/help center to help with unemployment. It could be placed in one of many empty buildings or in a completely new facility on current city-owned property. • Family activiteis go car races, water park,laser tag,mini golf course etc. • Something like Bogey’s • The area NEEDS decent job opportunities for residents now and for the young people who come through our school system. Right now there is not much of a future here. • Wal-mart • Well-paying jobs such as manufacturing or tech jobs. • A youth center • I would like to see something in town to provide a fun family atmosphere. Maybe a family fun center that would offer bowling, mini golf or other activities of that nature. • Bring some jobs/factories to town! The key word would be some! Not a worlds biggest to help your self. • I am not sure • Some kind of business/industrial work to create more jobs. • Jobs. Easier said than done but we need to draw people in. I feel like no one wants to bring businesses to Casey when we don’t have things like good internet speeds and phone service. We have MediaCom which is hit and miss most of the time. No competition for Mediacom here so they have no reason to better their service. Many people, like myself, have to commute 30+ minutes a day for work. This commute takes time away from my family. • A plan for program development that addresses the needs of the citizens in a way that includes health and wellness issues in addition to economic concerns. • A community center with things like bowling, arcade games, jump houses, a movie theater possibly? Things that have a small fee for kids to get in. Other parents volunteer their time once a month or so and this way the kids that are running the streets have some place to go. Even teens that are just starting to date would have a fun place to go. Unless all you want to do is eat, there isnt anything to do around here for the younger generation. • A place for kids and adults to do things from all walks of life to keep them off the streets and out of trouble..And get back some family values along the way..That’s affordable for all.

Casey, Illinois

B-5


B.1

CITIZEN SURVEY What are the three most important reasons you and your family choose to live in the Casey area? (Please check up to three) 70.0% 60.0% 50.0% 40.0% 30.0% 20.0% 10.0% 0.0%

SELECTED COMMENTS

• Own farm near city • Grew up here and stayed • These are why my parents lived here, and thus, why I lived here. • Grew up here. • I grew up in Casey and moved in 1993. I return several times a year to visit my relatives. The town has changed so much since I was young. Used to be low crime rate, quality neighborhoods, and a downtown area full of businesses. Now the crime rates seems to be higher, not many downtown businesses or if the are there, not open. Most neighborhoods have houses that should be condemned and torn down. • My family left Casey in 1977 to pursue economic opportunities elsewhere. • My hometown and I chose to retire here. • Founders so we stayed to keep a good life going. • I would have stayed in Casey had there been more jobs and family activities for my children. • I am a lifer, born here and still here! • I grew up here; Casey is familiar and comfortable to me. I wanted my kids to have the benefit of a small town upbringing. • Born and raised here but looking to relocate to Charleston where I work. • Casey is home...Home is where your heart is. • We are looking at other areas to relocate to but just haven’t made the decision yet. • Because my property hasn’t sold.. • I lived in Casey approx. 25 years.

B-6

MSA Professional Services, Inc.


APPENDIX B PUBLIC INPUT

Overall, how would you rate the quality of life here in the Casey area? (Check one) 8%

8%

Excellent Good

34%

Fair 50%

Poor

SELECTED COMMENTS

• In order to do family nights out we have to drive over 30 minutes. • Lack of business • Life is what you make of it; our family will be happy anywhere, but it saddens me to see our hometown with downtown buildings empty and literally caving in as well as residential areas that look unkept • It is, of course, what you make of it. • Concerned about the future of our schools. • Needs some new thoughts and old values • Not much to offer for me to rate it any higher. • I think our school system needs a lot of work. • Pushing poor • I see lots of parents participate with their children.. A town that rallies around sporting events, churches, and family. That is good life. However there is other sectors that have a very negative opinion, and too many of them in a barrel spoils the picture. The aging population is a concern, due to our youth having to seek jobs elsewhere. • It was a good, busy town when I lived there.

Casey, Illinois

B-7


B.1

CITIZEN SURVEY Please indicate changes you think would improve the quality of life in the Casey area. (please check up to four)

120.0% 100.0% 80.0% 60.0% 40.0% 20.0% 0.0%

SELECTED COMMENTS

• Utility costs to be specific. I hear too often of people having 400, 500, 600 dollar utility bills and families simply can’t afford that on one income or even with two working adults if they are low income. • Decrease diversity of housing types. • Improvement in connectivity and education are the key ingredients for improving the local economy. Casey has everything else you could ask for. • Schools would be my top priority. Second would be job opportunities. Third is providing something for our youth to do. • Bring new jobs and the rest will follow.

B-8

MSA Professional Services, Inc.


APPENDIX B PUBLIC INPUT The City maintains a wide array of public facilities and infrastructure with a limited budget. How would you like the City to prioritize maintenance and construction investments? Please indicate your investment preferences based on your satisfaction wit

50 45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0

More 4 Same Less $

Public Water Supply

Stormwater Management…

Sanitary Sewers and Treatment System

SELECTED COMMENTS

Public Library

City Hall

Parks

Bike Routes and Trails

Sidewalks

Neighborhood Streets

Major Streets

Airport

No Opinion

• Since I do not live in Casey, it is hard to judge, but outward appearance seem comparable to other communities of a similar size. • Casey needs trees! • Its all going down hill • I think the sidewalks are going through very well but in some areas there still arent any sidewalks. I think for safety issues this should be taken care of.

Casey, Illinois

B-9


B.1

CITIZEN SURVEY The City supports many public services with a limited budget. How would you like the City to prioritize spending on these services? Please indicate your spending preferences based on your satisfaction with these public services.

60 50 40 30 20 10 0

More $ Same Less $

SELECTED COMMENTS

• We have a leaf sweeper that we don’t use much and City workers that cant even stop by to pickup sticks.

B-10

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Yard waste/ City composting

Economic development

Programs for youth

Programs for the elderly

Historic preservation

Affordable housing

Recreational programs

Arts/Cultural program funding

General City-wide clean-up, etc

Inspections (building code…

Emergency medical/ambulanc…

Police protection

No Opinion


APPENDIX B PUBLIC INPUT

Picnic areas

Ice Skating/Hockey rink

Fishing areas

Dog park

Skate parks

Disc (Frisbee) golf courses

Golf courses

Walking trails

Bike trails

Ice Skating/Hockey rink

Swimming pools or splash…

Weightlifting and fitness…

Tennis courts

Swimming pools

Basketball courts

Tennis courts

Soccer/football fields

Basketball courts

Baseball/softball diamonds

Soccer

Playgrounds and playground…

50.0% 45.0% 40.0% 35.0% 30.0% 25.0% 20.0% 15.0% 10.0% 5.0% 0.0%

Please indicate up to four types of recreation amenities that you would like to see expanded or improved in Casey, either by the City or by the private sector.

SELECTED COMMENTS

• I’m not convinced recreation should be increased when money could be better spent in other areas of need first. • Baseball • Some towns have YMCAs. My friend goes all the time...when she goes to Zumba, he son plays open court basketball or karate. They always have events or programs going on there. • Any activity that falls in this category that can be done with reasonable expense should be considered in order to meet the needs of the greatest number of people. • Miniature Golf.

Casey, Illinois

B-11


B.1

CITIZEN SURVEY How secure do you believe your employment to be over the next 3-5 years? 0%

11% 4%

Secure 38%

Somewhat secure Insecure

18%

Do not know Unemployed Retired Other (please specify)

11% 18%

Do you believe the City of Casey should commit tax dollars to attract, retain, and replace lost jobs in the private sector in Casey? 24% Yes No

2%

No Opinion 7%

Not Sure 67%

B-12

MSA Professional Services, Inc.


APPENDIX B PUBLIC INPUT

How often do you shop downtown? 2% 14%

16% Never

4%

Daily Weekly Monthly Quarterly 32%

32%

At least once per year

SELECTED COMMENTS

• Only when I am in the area. • Not applicable since I do not live in Casey. • I am not a crafty person and don’t knit. • There just isnt much I am looking for in this area. If there was a craft supply store or an organic food store I would do all my shopping here. The hardware stores is about all I visit downtown.

How often do you leave the Casey area to shop? 0% 2% 2%

7%

Never 29%

Daily Weekly Monthly Quarterly At least once per year 60%

SELECTED COMMENTS

• buying food is cheaper to go out of town for larger purchases. • I go to Aldi’s, Walmart and other stores due to cheaper prices. • i am a firm believer in buying local. I am glad that I can stay in town and buy alot of the necessary things for my household. • I go to WalMart. I wish we had a Target or something here. • Almost always

Casey, Illinois

B-13


B.1

CITIZEN SURVEY Please share your opinions about the supply of various retail and service businesses in the Casey area?

50 45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0

Need More Have Enough Have Too Much

Grocery Stores

Sit-down restaurants

Fast-food restaurants

Hardware and building supply stores

Apparel and shoe stores

Boutique and specialty retail stores

Department and general merchandise stores

Convenience retail/services outside of Downtown

Downtown retail shopping/services

Not Sure

SELECTED COMMENTS

• Supply is not so much the issue as quality and variety of what they carry and high prices (IGA vs Wal-Mart, Aldi, Sam’s Club, etc.) • As a part of the comprehensive planning process, Casey needs to re-establish its commercial core within the context of today’s market realities. Liveable communities of the future will reduce dependence auto transportation and provide housing, food, pharmacy, clinical and other essential services within easy walking distance or access to public transportation. Sheltered pedestrian ways will also be important. Big box strip centers are being replaced by neighborhood stores and overnight ry by UPS and FedEx. Downtown should probably be rebuilt around a roundabout, but there needs to be some architectural themes that create an attractive result. Facades can be saved with the associated structures rebuilt. Making the numbers work is the big challenge without major improvements in the economic development program to drive capital formation and property values - not an overnight process. • Population is not big enough to support the inventory needed for dept and clothing stores. • I wish we had a rural king in town. • I would love to see little stores around here. • Casey can’t support what it has now. Adding more, isn’t gonna work. The lumber place we have needs be competitive with big box stores. They are so high out there, one can leave the town make their purchase and still come out money ahead.

B-14

MSA Professional Services, Inc.


APPENDIX B PUBLIC INPUT

Do you rent or own your dwelling? 12%

I own my home I rent or lease my home

88%

Casey, Illinois

B-15


B.1

CITIZEN SURVEY Please share your opinions about the supply of various housing types in the Casey area.

50 45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0

Need More Have Enough

SELECTED COMMENTS

Downtown upper-story living

Executive (high-end) homes

Starter (first time buyer) homes

Assisted living facilities for seniors

Senior condominiums and apartments

Affordable housing

Townhomes and condominiums

Apartments (3+ bedrooms)

Apartments (1-2 bedrooms)

Apartments (studio/efficiency)

Duplexes (2 units)

Mobile home parks

Single-family housing

Have Too Much Not Sure

• Need to clean up the trashy rental homes • The housing is there, just not the qualified buyers which pushes us to need more studios, apartments, and 3 bedroom rentals for low income families. • Slum lords of rentals and down town buildings need held accountable. • Senior housing is an antiquated concept. Universal design is the new standard. • There are more homes for sale in Casey then there ever has been because people are leaving, because no jobs and high cost of travel to the jobs. • Affordable housing covers a lot of areas... Low income housing that doesn’t look like slums... More federal housing for those that qualify... With disabilities and handicapped accessible prioritize for the aging population. • there are plenty of houses in casey. No one has money to purchase the single family units because there are no jobs. The town needs cleaned up to begin with, get jobs in here, then add onto the housing, shopping, etc.

B-16

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APPENDIX B PUBLIC INPUT

Which one of the following aspects of housing is most important to improve in the Casey area? (check one) 4%

7%

29%

Housing supply Housing cost Housing quality No opinion

60%

SELECTED COMMENTS

• Too many “slum” houses effecting neighborhood property values and keeping people from moving into town. When they drive in from the South... embarrassing. • QUALITY!!!! • The price of a quality home in Casey is compared to Indianapolis or other large cities. Its awful! • I think the cost for the quality is the problem. People should be made to take care of the outside of their homes. It doesnt take money to pick up your own trash or pick up your dogs feces. If I am looking at a nice house to buy but see awful neighbors that arent taking care of their place, I wont buy the house because who wants crappy neighbors. • there is an over supply of homes for sale, mine being one of them. No one has money to look at or buy a starter home. This town needs jobs in order to put people in a financial position to buy homes.

Casey, Illinois

B-17


B.1

CITIZEN SURVEY How do you rate the following aspects of the City of Casey? 50 45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0

Excellent Good Fair Poor

SELECTED COMMENTS

Property upkeep/cleanliness

Aesthetic design of new development

Lighting control

Noise control

Signage control (size and location of signs)

Number of street trees

Access to parks

No Opinion

• I noticed with the recent storms the street lamps on the north side of main on the 300 block blink on and off with the lightening. • There are too many home with trash laying around. Many need to be mowed more often • Tearing down homes for gravel car lots not aesthetically appealing. Downtown corner buildings are embarrassing..ie..old pool hall, Bairds law office row. • Unkept property should not be tolerated. • Some places grass does not get cut regularly, I would get a notice by police if my grass was over 3 inches when my mower broke. I see some that is over my knees, on property that I am unsure who owns. • Do something to owners of abandoned house and tear them down • People shouldn’t be allowed to build giant polebarns downtown. • Make the slum lords clean up there property’s. • We have a landlords in town that don’t like to take care of there properties that are abandoned and that are getting foreclosed on. They feel that it is the banks or the cities responsibility to upkeep it. • Would love to see sidewalks all the way around the park. If not sidewalks, parking spaces would be great! • it all depends on where you live in this town and who you are. This applies to the noise/pollution, upkeep.

B-18

MSA Professional Services, Inc.


APPENDIX B PUBLIC INPUT Should the City offer financial incentives to encourage development and investment? 50 45 40 35 30

Yes

25

No

20

It depends

15 10 5 0

Residential

Retail business

Non-retail business

Where should development and investment occur in Casey? 45 40 35 30

Yes

25

No

20

It depends

15 10 5 0

SELECTED COMMENTS

Downtown

Vacant infill sites Undeveloped land (e.g. outside of the downtown farmland) area

• Communities that reduce or eliminate the reliance on auto transportation can keep older adults independent, can increase disposable income for the average family by 20% and offer businesses the benefits of having easy access to related services and employees. Downtowns, if appropriately designed and maintained, can be a tremendous economic asset. • Money to help tear down and or refurbish the buildings that are falling down • Start to rebuild then branch out away from town • More industry is needed in order to get people to work. Money will start being spent, once there are jobs in this town.

Casey, Illinois

B-19


B.2

PUBLIC VISIONING MEETING

S.W.O.T. Analysis By working through the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of and around Casey, the participants were able to clearly identify where they were, where they are, and where they would like to be. Helpful

External origin

(attributes of the environment)

Internal origin

(attributes of the organization)

to achieving the objective

Harmful

to achieving the objective

S W O T Strengths

Opportunities

Weaknesses

Threats

Several common themes emerged from this analysis which included: • • • • • • •

Land Use & (Re)Development Transportation Economic Development & Employment Parks & Recreation Housing Tourism & Activities Volunteerism

Each theme has been summarized herein.

B-20

Strengths Transportation - Airport, rail, hwy, and historic hwy The Town of Big - 3 Guinness world records Fairview Park (pool, festivals, picnic areas, etc.) Churches 0 active community presence Schools Top Notch Sports Golf Course Volunteerism "Unique" Restaurants - Local 2 Weekly Newspapers Charitable Residents Library Nursing Home Facilities (3) Clinics (2) Senior Housing Low Income Housing Senior Center Tote-A-Meal Program Community Center Emergency Services (All volunteer based) Strong Lions, Rotary, CIA, Alumni, Historic, etc. Clubs Popcorn Festival Days Inn Motor Cross Camp Grounds (2) Multiple Colleges in area Richard's Farm Enterprise Zone Economic Development Grant Writing Local talent Softball Hall of Fame Tractor Pull Low Crime Rate - Violent Crimes Multiple lending institutions (4) Dentist and Vet Clinic Implement Dealer

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APPENDIX B PUBLIC INPUT

Opportunities

Weaknesses Low Quality, Low Income Housing Lack of entertainment - Youth and Adults (bowling, theatre, etc.) Employment Opportunities Lack of Retail and Lack of purchasing power Lack of Local Support for Local Retail No Cleaning Establishment (Dry Cleaners) Downtown Buildings in need of repair - vacant Abandoned Homes Roads in town 1)Need repair 2)Need visual streetscape improvements Real Estate Taxes are higher than surrounding area

More potential to utilize Community Center (needs to be marketed and cost lowered) Intergovernmental Cooperation @ boarders (unsightly areas) Stricter enforcement of existing codes & ordinances Areas could be annexed to add to tax base Road from Rt. 49--need stores--motel, strip mall, etc. (don't compete with downtown) Distribution Center Reinvent Downtown - Blocks Removed & New Built vacant/Dilapidated Properties - Reinvestment Story to Tell: "Ghost Town" Marketing of Casey - Make most of what Casey has to offer

Visual Limitation w/ Angled Parking Downtown Guy with Trolley - Tour Opportunity Lack of Communication with Aldermen - need way to connect Fairview Park - Events Opportunity Lack of Enforcement of existing ordinances Public Nuisance Ordinance needs enforced or vamped

Theatre - New movies Market to surrounding Communities during their festivals

Vacant Homes/Lots High rent for Community Center Empty School Building (Roosevelt) Empty Factory Buildings Volunteerism - same 8-10 people Need a marketed draw to Casey

Incentives for employers to locate Showcase local talent Market local talent Community Calendar Social Media Pop Up Store (e.g. Bikes) - Not compete with local businesses.

Petty Crime Rate is high

Casey, Illinois

B-21


B.2

PUBLIC VISIONING MEETING Picture Casey

Threats Lack of money for investment Mobility - People can easily leave for goods or opportunities

The participants were asked to think of the Casey they remember, both positives and negatives, and write down their thoughts.

Lack of jobs for youth State of Illinois Competition from Indiana for employers

They were then asked to envision what they would like Casey to become. The full results on are on the following pages.

Low Income Base - Employers rely on out of towners Lack of Skilled/Educated Work Force Need employer for educated work force Swimming Pool Needs Attention - $ Community Communication lacking Social Media - No fact checking and no accountability Big Box Store (i.e. Walmart)

B-22

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APPENDIX B PUBLIC INPUT

Yesterday Positive Negative Businesses/Buildings open & operating normal hours --> Business owners/Council member that kept competing Consistant business out of Casey Friday nights downtown - 1950s 1) businesses stayed open late, 2) all the parking spaces full, 3) People walking around visiting Friendliness of Police Department Economics made eaier for families to stay in town Vibrant Downtown Teen Hangout Local Shopping Successful old businesses Movie Theatre Bowling Alley Radio Station Shoe Store Bakery Casey Industries, Inc. (LDC) Cops Being your friends People helping people Shopped Locally Places for Kids to go Being able to have sales

Casey, Illinois

B-23


B.2

PUBLIC VISIONING MEETING Tomorrow

Positive Busy, interesting & different

Negative Need to do something about trees on Main Street and bird mess. This is definitely a health hazard. Council Members that choose to be in office for Casey, not for t heir own advantage.

Shops Things for Teens Downtown Casey

Casey losing the small town feel. Economics now cost too high to change our downtown

Basketball Court

Costing more for low-mid income to sign youth to play sports, music or other organizations

Every building filled Opportunities that keep people in Casey (more jobs) Senior Housing for disabilities Park used for markets Minature golf for kids and adults Police Depart That are Friends Friday Nite Drawing: -Fee Ham and Beans feed - Give Away Money (has to be present) - Money Raises if not there - Keeps people in town People Attractive Streets Develop 1-70 area Repurpose downtown - residential Clean up! School sports - lots of support during seasons Market all posities to broader area - but also to oursleves Coordinate efforts Buildings in good repair - attractive for people to enter I see a small park on the southwest corner of Central and Main. Every that showed up tonight to help Casey Grow! To see the West end orad repaired on old Rte 40 where is come off 40. Down by Hutson Wedding etc.

B-24

MSA Professional Services, Inc.


APPENDIX B PUBLIC INPUT

Casey, Illinois

B-25


1 2 3 4 5 6 Appendix A Appendix B Appendix C Maps This Appendix is a compilation of all the maps found within the Comprehensive Plan. Page C.1 Existing Land Use Maps C-2 C.2 Future Land Use Maps C-4 C.3 City-Wide Bike Routes and Trails Map C-11 C.4 Transportation Map C-12 C.5 Regional Context Map C-13 C.6 Community Facilities Map C-14 C.7 Parkland Needs Map C-15 C.8 Prime Agriculture Map C-16 C.9 Neighborhood Planning Areas Map C-17 C.10 Downtown Planning Area map C-18


C.1

EXISTING LAND USE MAPS 49

\ [

N 370TH ST

PA PARKER RKER TO TOWN WNSHI SHIP P

2480E

± ³

20TH ST

7

\ [ 1150N

2480 E

± ³

23 50E

70 ¦ ¨ §

\ [ 330E

E

12

D 50TH R

1180

40 £ ¤

N COLES ST

75E

EC

UM

BE

RL

AN

D DR

D

R

2

2

N 430TH ST

\ [ E 1180TH RD

975N

2325E

TRAIL RD

2450E

2350E

975N

AK E

1300N E 1300TH RD

100TH ST

\ [

1000N

\ [[ \

SN

\ [

WESTFIELD RD

25

1050N

E

FR RD

E 1300TH RD

1300 RD

[ \ \[ [ \

400E

CA CASEY SEY TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP

N 300TH ST

2300E

N 320TH ST

\ [

N 180TH ST N 25TH ST

2400E

180TH ST

\ [

\ [

E 1400TH RD

N 100TH ST

1200N

2480E

\ [

N 400TH ST

V U

UN UNIIO ON N TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP

N M ILAM LN

DUPONT RD

N 230TH ST

2480E

\ [

E 1000T H RD

N 450TH ST

N 400TH ST

SW 4TH ST SW 2ND ST SW 1ST ST

ORY LN HIC K

E 1050TH RD

E WASHINGTO N RD

E WASHINGTO N ST

1070N

230E

E 950TH RD

£ ¤

\ [

\ [

\ [

70 ¦ ¨ § 40

NE 25TH

ST

W TYLER AVE

D DR

NE 1 5TH

LA N

ST NE 13T H

ER

SE 8TH ST

MB

ST

E WASHI NGTON AVE E ADAM S AVE E JEFFERSON AVE E MADISON AVE E MONRO E AVE

SE 4TH ST

CU

AIN

E AV MA BA ST LA AIN EA EM

ST

WM

E EDGAR AVE

SE 1ST ST S CENTRA L AVE

850N

NW 1ST ST NW 2ND ST NW 3RD S T NW 4TH ST NW 5TH ST

\ [

0E

875N

2 40

\ [

COLES ST

900N

H N 10 T

\ [ 1100N

\ [

E 1120TH

E 930TH RD

220E

[ \ \ [ \ [ 710N

COUNTY

LAND USE

CITY OF CASEY CLARK AND CUMBERLAND COUNTIES, IL INDUSTRIAL

COMMERCIAL

INSTITUTIONAL

OPEN SPACE

RESIDENTIAL

OPEN WATER

PARK

VACANT

RIVER/STREAM

AGRICULTURAL

PARCEL FORESTED AREA

N 330TH ST

EXISTING LAND USE CASEY

OAK LEAF RD

2400E

DATA SOURCES: MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY AND PARCELS PROVIDED BY CLARK COUNTY. ROADS, TOWNSHIPS AND COUNTIES PROVIDED BY US CENSUS (2013). LAND USE IN CLARK COUNTY DERIVED FROM PARCEL DATASET. LAND USE IN CUMBERLAND COUNTY DERIVED FROM AERIAL INTERPRETATION. OPEN WATER AND RIVERS/STREAMS PROVIDED BY USGS (NHD). FORESTED AREA DERIVED FROM USDA-NRCS CROPLAND DATA LAYER (2012).

0

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C-2

E 830TH RD

E 800TH RD

N 250TH ST

CR CRO OOK OKED ED C CR REEK EEK TOW TOWNS NSH HIIP P

2300E

N 240TH ST

\ [

JOH JOHN NS SON ON TOW TOWNS NSH HIP IP

N IL 49

600N

N COLES ST

\[ [ \

E 870TH RD

N 150TH ST

2275E

N 100TH ST

\ [

2480 E ST

2425E

49

CL K ARK CLAR

\ [

AND ERLLAND CUM BER CUMB

2350E

600N

V U

2480 E CO RD

700N

MSA Professional Services, Inc.

0.5

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APPENDIX C MAPS 180TH ST

V U 49

N 180TH ST

[ \ \ [

CA CASEY SEY TOW TOWNS NSH HIP IP 5 E 12

0T

D HR

N 230TH ST

2480E

70 ¦ ¨ §

1050N

\ [ ± ³

1180

7

E 1180TH R D

975N

40 £ ¤

N 25TH ST

± ³

25

N 300TH ST

N 100TH ST

\ [

WESTFI ELD RD

2450E

70 ¦ ¨ §

NE 16TH ST

N COLES ST

HICKORY LN

OE

LN

SE 5TH ST

230E

O PA

L ST

E HARRISON AVE

N 100TH ST

N 230TH ST

E TYLER AVE

V U 49

N COLES ST

E 950TH RD

E 930TH RD

\ [

N 150TH ST

220E

N IL 49

2480 E ST

LAND USE

CITY OF CASEY CLARK AND CUMBERLAND COUNTIES, IL DATA SOURCES: MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY AND PARCELS PROVIDED BY CLARK COUNTY. ROADS, TOWNSHIPS AND COUNTIES PROVIDED BY US CENSUS (2013). LAND USE IN CLARK COUNTY DERIVED FROM PARCEL DATASET. LAND USE IN CUMBERLAND COUNTY DERIVED FROM AERIAL INTERPRETATION. OPEN WATER AND RIVERS/STREAMS PROVIDED BY USGS (NHD). FORESTED AREA DERIVED FROM USDA-NRCS CROPLAND DATA LAYER (2012).

INDUSTRIAL INSTITUTIONAL

OPEN SPACE

RESIDENTIAL

OPEN WATER

PARK

VACANT

RIVER/STREAM

AGRICULTURAL

FORESTED AREA

E HI LLCRE

E VAN BUREN AVE

W TYLER AVE

COMMERCIAL

PARCEL

ST RD

ST

SE 8TH ST

SE 6TH S T

SE 7TH ST

\ [ E MONRO E AV E

EXISTING LAND USE - INSET COUNTY

E WASHINGTO N ST

E WASHINGTO N RD

E ADAM S AVE

SE 4TH ST

SE 3RD ST

SW 4TH ST

NE 25TH

N 13 TH

T HS

E WASHI NGTON AVE

2425E

CASEY

D DR

T

ST

1 0T

VE YA

AN

H ST 1 3T

AIN

SE

EM

RL

SE

E AV

BE

ST

ST

MA

5TH S NE 1

NE 14TH ST

TH

BA

ST

AN

SE 2ND ST

2480E

A AL

E MADISON AVE

W HARRISON AVE

K CL ARK CLAR

\ [

\ [ AND ERLLAND CUM BER CUMB

UN UNIIO ON N TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP

S CENTRA L AVE

R

W VAN BUREN AVE

LB

SE 1ST ST

CU

E MB

RD

E

VE AA AM

W MONROE AVE

D LA N

E COLORA DO AVE

EA

ST

NE 9

LA B

N CENTRAL AVE

NW 2ND ST

AIN

NW 4TH S T

WM

NW 3RD ST

NW 5TH ST

COLES ST

850N

WA

NW 1ST ST

W DELAWARE AVE

E EDGAR AVE

N 10 TH

W EDGAR AVE

NE 4TH ST

NE 2ND ST

W

IDA AVE OR FL

UM

TH 13

E GEORGI A AVE

1100N

\ [

SES H DEER RUN LN

NE

\ [

HOR

40 £ ¤

EC

0

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Casey, Illinois

0.25

0.5

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E Print Date: 4/2/2014

C-3


C.2

FUTURE LAND USE MAPS 2480E

E

2400E

LD RD N 180TH ST N 25TH ST WESTFIE

2300E

T 20T H S

\ [

N 320TH ST

180TH ST

1200N

SN AK E

E 1400TH RD

2480E

[ \ \ [ \ [

470E

400E

49

1150N

2480 E E 1300TH RD

1300 RD

100TH ST

N 470TH ST

\ [

UN UNIIO ON N TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP

\ [

\ [

V U

N 100TH ST

PA PARKER RKER TO TOWN WNSHI SHIP P

TR

\ [ 1400N

AIL RD

CA CASEY SEY TOW TOWNS NSH HIP IP

\ [

FR RD

1300N

70 § ¦ ¨

\ [ 330E

± ³

1050N

\ [

\ [

1000N

1180

E 1180TH RD

± ³

2450E

75E

7

40 £ ¤

H RD

T

2

2

N 430TH ST

\ [

975N

2325E

N COLES ST

\ \[ [ 975N

N 300TH ST

\ [

2350E

E 1250TH RD

25

N M ILAM LN

1070N

E 10 50TH RD

E WASHINGTO N RD

DUPONT RD

SW 1ST ST

SW 4TH ST

N 400TH ST

E 1000T H RD

N 450TH ST

W TYLER AVE

D DR

\ [

N 230TH ST

LA N

ORY LN

ER

E WASHINGTO N ST

SE 8TH ST

MB

T

VE AA

E WASHI NGTON AVE

SE 4TH ST

CU

IN S

E 1120

D DR

E ADAM S AVE E JEFFERSON AVE E MADISON AVE E MONRO E AVE

SE 1ST ST

800N

A WM

AN

HI CK

850N

M BA LA E A ST AIN EM

NE 25TH

70

\ [

NW 1ST ST NW 2ND ST NW 3RD S T NW 4TH ST NW 5TH ST

\ [

0E

875N

K CL ARK CLAR

COLES ST

AND ERLLAND CUM BER CUMB

240

\§ [ ¦ ¨

E EDGAR AVE

U

RL

ST

\ [ 1100N

900N

NE 1 5TH

NE 13TH S T

\ [

EC

E MB

[ \ \ [ 230E

40 £ ¤

E 950TH RD

2425E

710N

E 800TH RD

\ [ 2480E

FUTURE LAND USE CASEY COUNTY

Future Land Use

Business Park Public/Institutional

Residential

Industrial

OPEN WATER

Mixed Use

Parks, Recreation & Open Space

RIVER/STREAM

Commercial

FORESTED AREA

E 750TH RD

CITY OF CASEY CLARK AND CUMBERLAND COUNTIES, IL

Rural Lands

PARCEL

N 330TH ST

2400E

N 250TH ST

\ [

CR CRO OOK OKED ED C CR REEK EEK TOW TOWNS NSH HIIP P

JOH JOHN NS SON ON TOW TOWNS NSH HIP IP

N COLES ST

\ [ 2300E

DATA SOURCES: MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY AND PARCELS PROVIDED BY CLARK COUNTY. ROADS, TOWNSHIPS AND COUNTIES PROVIDED BY US CENSUS (2013). LAND USE IN CLARK COUNTY DERIVED FROM PARCEL DATASET. LAND USE IN CUMBERLAND COUNTY DERIVED FROM AERIAL INTERPRETATION. OPEN WATER AND RIVERS/STREAMS PROVIDED BY USGS (NHD). FORESTED AREA DERIVED FROM USDA-NRCS CROPLAND DATA LAYER (2012).

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C-4

E 830TH RD

OAK LEAF RD

600N

N 240TH ST

\ [

2480 E ST

600N

E 870TH RD

N 150TH ST

2275E

49

N IL 49

\ [

V U

2480 E CO RD

700N

2350E

700N

N 100TH ST

[ \ \ [

[ \ \ [

E 930TH RD

220E

MSA Professional Services, Inc.

0.5

Miles 1

E Print Date: 3/24/2014


APPENDIX C MAPS

2480E

E

2400E

LD RD N 180TH ST N 25TH ST WESTFIE

2300E

T 20T H S

\ [

N 320TH ST

180TH ST

1200N

SN AK E

E 1400TH RD

2480E

[ \ \ [ \ [

470E

400E

49

1150N

2480 E E 1300TH RD

1300 RD

100TH ST

N 470TH ST

\ [

UN UNIIO ON N TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP

\ [

\ [

V U

N 100TH ST

PA PARKER RKER TO TOWN WNSHI SHIP P

TR

\ [ 1400N

AIL RD

CA CASEY SEY TOW TOWNS NSH HIP IP

\ [

FR RD

1300N

70 ¦ ¨ §

\ [ 330E

\ [

1000N

75E

AN

E 1120

D DR

H RD

4

\ [ 1070N

E 10 50TH RD

E WASHINGTO N RD

DUPONT RD

SW 4TH ST

RL

N 400TH ST

U

E MB

E 1000T H RD

N 450TH ST

N 230TH ST

W TYLER AVE

D DR

ORY LN

LA N

HI CK

ER

NE 25TH

MB

AREA

E WASHINGTO N ST

SE 8TH ST

CU

ST

SE 4TH ST

800N

IN

VE AA

E WASHI NGTON AVE E ADAM S AVE E JEFFERSON AVE E MADISON AVE E MONRO E AVE

SE 1ST ST

\ [

A WM

M BA LA E A ST AIN EM

3 A E R A

EA 2

AR

850N

E EDGAR AVE

EC

5

ST

70

NW 1ST ST NW 2ND ST NW 3RD S T NW 4TH ST NW 5TH ST

\ [

0E

875N

K CL ARK CLAR

COLES ST

AND ERLLAND CUM BER CUMB

240

\§ [ ¦ ¨

40

NE 1 5TH

\ [ 1100N

900N

£ AREA ¤

7

NE 13TH S T

\ [

1

± ³

2450E

2

2

SW 1ST ST

2325E

E 1180TH RD

N 430TH ST

\ [

975N

N COLES ST

\ \[ [ 975N

AREA 1180

T

\ [

N M ILAM LN

± ³

1050N

N 300TH ST

\ [

2350E

E 1250TH RD

25

[ \ \ [ 230E

40 £ ¤

E 950TH RD

2425E

710N

E 800TH RD

\ [ 2480E

FUTURE LAND USE - AREAS CASEY COUNTY

Future Land Use

Business Park

Rural Lands

Public/Institutional

Residential

Industrial

OPEN WATER

Mixed Use

Parks, Recreation & Open Space

RIVER/STREAM

Commercial

PARCEL FORESTED AREA

E 750TH RD

CITY OF CASEY CLARK AND CUMBERLAND COUNTIES, IL DATA SOURCES: MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY AND PARCELS PROVIDED BY CLARK COUNTY. ROADS, TOWNSHIPS AND COUNTIES PROVIDED BY US CENSUS (2013). LAND USE IN CLARK COUNTY DERIVED FROM PARCEL DATASET. LAND USE IN CUMBERLAND COUNTY DERIVED FROM AERIAL INTERPRETATION. OPEN WATER AND RIVERS/STREAMS PROVIDED BY USGS (NHD). FORESTED AREA DERIVED FROM USDA-NRCS CROPLAND DATA LAYER (2012).

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Casey, Illinois

N 330TH ST

2400E

N 250TH ST

\ [

CR CRO OOK OKED ED C CR REEK EEK TOW TOWNS NSH HIIP P

JOH JOHN NS SON ON TOW TOWNS NSH HIP IP

N COLES ST

\ [ 2300E

E 830TH RD

OAK LEAF RD

600N

N 240TH ST

\ [

2480 E ST

600N

E 870TH RD

N 150TH ST

2275E

49

N IL 49

\ [

V U

2480 E CO RD

700N

2350E

00N

N 100TH ST

[ \ \ [

[ \ \ [

E 930TH RD

220E

0.25

0.5

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C-5


C.2

FUTURE LAND USE MAPS 180TH ST

± ³

E 1250TH RD

7

V U N 100TH ST

49

70 ¦ ¨ §

N 25TH ST

\ [ 1180

CA CASEY SEY TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP

70 § ¦ ¨

± ³

WESTFI ELD RD

± ³

N 180TH ST

25

E 1180TH RD

7

NE 16TH ST

TH D NOR

1ST ST

E GRANT AVE

LN

HORSE SHOE

NE 14TH ST

NE 13TH ST

R

N CENTRA L AVE

V U 49

E KEACH AVE

DEER RUN LN

E AV

ST

NT

NE 4TH ST

RA WG

1100N

NE 3RD ST

\ [

H NE 1 5 T

40 £ ¤

E GEORGI A AVE

W GEORGIA AVE

ED

E LA

R WA

VE EA

NE 1ST ST

FUTURE LAND USE - AREA 1 CASEY COUNTY

Future Land Use

CITY OF CASEY CLARK AND CUMBERLAND COUNTIES, IL

Business Park

Rural Lands

Public/Institutional

Residential

Industrial

OPEN WATER

Mixed Use

Parks, Recreation & Open Space

RIVER/STREAM

Commercial

PARCEL FORESTED AREA

DATA SOURCES: MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY AND PARCELS PROVIDED BY CLARK COUNTY. ROADS, TOWNSHIPS AND COUNTIES PROVIDED BY US CENSUS (2013). LAND USE IN CLARK COUNTY DERIVED FROM PARCEL DATASET. LAND USE IN CUMBERLAND COUNTY DERIVED FROM AERIAL INTERPRETATION. OPEN WATER AND RIVERS/STREAMS PROVIDED BY USGS (NHD). FORESTED AREA DERIVED FROM USDA-NRCS CROPLAND DATA LAYER (2012).

0

500

1,000

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Feet 2,000

E Print Date: 3/24/2014


APPENDIX C MAPS CA CASEY SEY TOW TOWNS NSH HIP IP

\ [ 1100N

N COLES ST

40 £ ¤

70 § ¦ ¨

L W F

ID OR

VE AA

\ [ 2480E

ST

W DELAWARE AVE

NW 4

NW 3RD ST

TH

W COLORADO AVE

W BENTON ST

NW 5TH ST W ALABAMA AVE

\ [ 850N

40 £ ¤

K CL ARK CLAR

AND ERLLAND CUM BER CUMB

COLES ST

UN UNIIO ON N TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP

T W M A IN S

SW 4TH ST

\ [ 2480E

CU

MB

ER

D LA N

RD

W TYLER AVE

N COLES ST

40 £ ¤

FUTURE LAND USE - AREA 2 CASEY COUNTY

Future Land Use

Public/Institutional

Residential

Industrial

OPEN WATER

Mixed Use

Parks, Recreation & Open Space

RIVER/STREAM

Commercial

FORESTED AREA

DATA SOURCES: MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY AND PARCELS PROVIDED BY CLARK COUNTY. ROADS, TOWNSHIPS AND COUNTIES PROVIDED BY US CENSUS (2013). LAND USE IN CLARK COUNTY DERIVED FROM PARCEL DATASET. LAND USE IN CUMBERLAND COUNTY DERIVED FROM AERIAL INTERPRETATION. OPEN WATER AND RIVERS/STREAMS PROVIDED BY USGS (NHD). FORESTED AREA DERIVED FROM USDA-NRCS CROPLAND DATA LAYER (2012).

Business Park

Rural Lands

PARCEL

CITY OF CASEY CLARK AND CUMBERLAND COUNTIES, IL

0

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Casey, Illinois

500

1,000

Feet 2,000

E Print Date: 3/24/2014

C-7


C.2

FUTURE LAND USE MAPS E GEORGI A AVE

V U

W GEORGIA AVE

49

NE 1

ST S

T

NE 2ND ST

W FLORIDA AVE

E EDGAR AVE

NE ST

40 £ ¤

9 TH

NE 3RD ST

W EDGAR AVE

T OPA LS

NE 4TH ST

W DELAWARE AVE

NE 5TH ST

NW 1ST ST

E DELAWARE AVE

EA

LA

BA

MA

E AV

E COLORA DO AVE

N CENTRAL AVE

T

NW 4T

HS

W COLORADO AVE

NE

E BUCKEYE AVE

31 /2 S

EM

AIN

ST

T SE

UC

KE

YE

E AV

V U

NW

49

3R NW

T DS

2N

EG

T DS

W ALABAMA AVE

L WA

BA

NY

E AV

W

GE

NE

R

R AL

OB

EY

EG

EN

ER

AL

RO

BE

EN

ER

AL

RO

B

DR EY

EA

LB

AN

T YS

LA

N RL

VE YA

E WASHINGTON RD

E WASHI NGTON AVE

SE 3RD ST

E JEFFERSON AVE

SO N

AV E

SE 7TH ST

E ADAM S AVE

ST

SE 2ND ST

AIN

IBE

T HS

NW 5TH ST

WB

WM

CR

4T

W BENTON ST

W JEFFE R

SW 4TH ST

E MADISON AVE

SE 5TH ST

CA CASEY SEY TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP

W MADISO N AVE

E MONROE AVE

ST

SE 1ST ST

SW 3RD ST

SE 8TH ST

6T H SE

W MONROE AVE

W JACKSON AVE

E VAN BUREN AVE

SW 1ST ST

SW 2ND ST

W VAN BUREN AVE

W HARRISON AVE

S CENTRAL AVE

E HARRISON AVE

E TYLER AVE

N IL 49

W TYL ER AVE

FUTURE LAND USE - AREA 3 CASEY COUNTY

Future Land Use

CITY OF CASEY CLARK AND CUMBERLAND COUNTIES, IL

Business Park

Rural Lands

Public/Institutional

Residential

Industrial

OPEN WATER

Mixed Use

Parks, Recreation & Open Space

RIVER/STREAM

Commercial

PARCEL FORESTED AREA

DATA SOURCES: MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY AND PARCELS PROVIDED BY CLARK COUNTY. ROADS, TOWNSHIPS AND COUNTIES PROVIDED BY US CENSUS (2013). LAND USE IN CLARK COUNTY DERIVED FROM PARCEL DATASET. LAND USE IN CUMBERLAND COUNTY DERIVED FROM AERIAL INTERPRETATION. OPEN WATER AND RIVERS/STREAMS PROVIDED BY USGS (NHD). FORESTED AREA DERIVED FROM USDA-NRCS CROPLAND DATA LAYER (2012).

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250

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C-8

MSA Professional Services, Inc.

Feet 1,000

E Print Date: 3/24/2014


APPENDIX C MAPS N 25TH ST N 230TH ST

R WA

D DR

CA CASEY SEY TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP

1 5T T HS

T HS

MA

AN

NE

1 3T

BA

RL

E AV

EM

AIN

ST

1 2T

LA

NE T HS

EA

BE

VE EA

NE

E LA

UM

NE 25TH

NE 14TH ST

ED

EC

ORY

ST

T HS

H 13 T

0T

HICK

SE

N1

LN

NE 1 0T T HS T HS

ST

1 0T

N 13 TH

SE

E WASHINGTO N ST

E WASHINGTO N RD

E WASHI NGTON AVE

N 230TH ST E HILLCREST RD

E MONROE AVE

\ [ 230E

FUTURE LAND USE - AREA 4 CASEY COUNTY

Future Land Use

Business Park

Rural Lands

Public/Institutional

Residential

Industrial

OPEN WATER

Mixed Use

Parks, Recreation & Open Space

RIVER/STREAM

Commercial

PARCEL FORESTED AREA

CITY OF CASEY CLARK AND CUMBERLAND COUNTIES, IL DATA SOURCES: MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY AND PARCELS PROVIDED BY CLARK COUNTY. ROADS, TOWNSHIPS AND COUNTIES PROVIDED BY US CENSUS (2013). LAND USE IN CLARK COUNTY DERIVED FROM PARCEL DATASET. LAND USE IN CUMBERLAND COUNTY DERIVED FROM AERIAL INTERPRETATION. OPEN WATER AND RIVERS/STREAMS PROVIDED BY USGS (NHD). FORESTED AREA DERIVED FROM USDA-NRCS CROPLAND DATA LAYER (2012).

0

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Casey, Illinois

250

500

Feet 1,000

E Print Date: 3/24/2014

C-9


C.2

FUTURE LAND USE MAPS

CA CASEY SEY TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP

¦ ¨ § 70

N 300TH ST

N 25TH ST N 230TH ST

N 180TH ST

40 £ ¤

WESTFI ELD RD

40 £ ¤

NE 25TH

NE 16TH ST

JESSICA AVE

NE 13TH ST

E GRANT AVE

EC

UM

BE

RL

AN

D DR

N 25TH ST

NE 14TH ST

T NE 15

T HS

VE AA

VE EA

EM

AIN

ST

HICK LN

NE 1 0T

T HS 13T

ORY

SE

T HS

T HS

AM

R WA

1 2T

0T E

B A LA

E LA

NE

N1

NE 9TH ST

ED

T HS

FUTURE LAND USE - AREA 5 CASEY COUNTY

Future Land Use

CITY OF CASEY CLARK AND CUMBERLAND COUNTIES, IL

Business Park

Rural Lands

Public/Institutional

Residential

Industrial

OPEN WATER

Mixed Use

Parks, Recreation & Open Space

RIVER/STREAM

Commercial

PARCEL FORESTED AREA

DATA SOURCES: MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY AND PARCELS PROVIDED BY CLARK COUNTY. ROADS, TOWNSHIPS AND COUNTIES PROVIDED BY US CENSUS (2013). LAND USE IN CLARK COUNTY DERIVED FROM PARCEL DATASET. LAND USE IN CUMBERLAND COUNTY DERIVED FROM AERIAL INTERPRETATION. OPEN WATER AND RIVERS/STREAMS PROVIDED BY USGS (NHD). FORESTED AREA DERIVED FROM USDA-NRCS CROPLAND DATA LAYER (2012).

0

250 500

Printed By: sbrown, File: P:\12700s\12790s\12793\12793000\GIS\FutureLandUse\12793000_FutureLandUse_8x11_PlanningArea.mxd

C-10

MSA Professional Services, Inc.

Feet 1,000

E Print Date: 3/24/2014


100TH ST

\ [

E 1250TH RD

2350E

N

\ [ 330E

40 £ ¤ H

± ³ D DR

SW 4TH ST

SW 1ST ST

RD

N M I LAM LN

1070N

E 10 50TH RD

E WASHINGTO N RD

E WASHINGTO N ST

\ [ DUPONT RD

LA N

E 1120T

D DR

E 1000T H RD

N 230TH ST

ER

LA N

LN

MB

ER

O RY

CU

W TYLER AVE

EC

B UM

H IC K

800N

ST

SE 8TH ST

70 § ¦ ¨

IN

E WASHI NGTON AVE E ADAM S AVE E JEFFERSON AVE E MADISON AVE E MONR OE AV E

SE 4TH ST

A W M

VE AA

ST NE 1 5TH

850N

M BA LA E A ST AIN EM

SE 1ST ST

\ [

NE 13TH S T

0E

875N

E EDGAR AVE

NW 1ST ST NW 2ND ST NW 3RD S T NW 4TH ST NW 5TH ST

24 0

\ [

COLES ST

900N

AND ERLLAND CUM BER CUMB

2325E

1100N

K CL ARK CLAR

[ \ \ [

\ [

NE 25TH

7

2400E

N 400TH ST

\ [

N 430TH ST

2

2450E

E 1180TH RD

N COLES ST

\ [

2 7 5E

\ [

70 ¦ ¨ §

1180

975N

975N

1300N

\ [

1000N

\ [

\ [

FR RD

N 100TH ST

2350E

\[ [ \

CA CASEY SEY TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP

N 300TH ST

± ³

1050N

SN AK ET RAIL RD

N 450TH ST

2480 E E 1300TH RD

1300 RD

25

E E 1400TH RD

N 320TH ST

1150N

ST N 180TH ST WESTFIELD RD 180TH

T 20T H S

\ [

2300E

PA PARKER RKER TO TOWN WNSHI SHIP P

2480E

1200N

49

N 25TH ST

\ [ \ [

V U

UN UNIIO ON N TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP

4 70T H ST

C C.3 CITY-WIDE BIKE ROUTES AND TRAILS APPENDIX MAPS

[ \ \ [ 230E

E 950TH RD

[ \ \ [

\ [

V U

2425E

2275E

E 870TH RD

JOH JOHN NS SON ON TOW TOWNS NSH HIP IP

500N

\ [ 2480E

11

E 700TH RD

± ³

\ [

15

CITY OF CASEY CLARK AND CUMBERLAND COUNTIES, IL

POTENTIAL TRAIL DEVELOPMENT CASEY COUNTY

E 750TH RD

OAK LEAF RD

2400E

N 250TH ST

\ [

± ³

2350E

N 100TH ST

2300E

E 800TH RD

N COLES ST

\ [

CR CRO OOK OKED ED C CR REEK EEK TOW TOWNS NSH HIIP P

E 830TH RD

N 450TH ST

600N

2480 E ST

[ \ \ [

N 150TH ST

600N

N 240TH ST

\ [

2480 E CO RD

700N

700N

N IL 49

710N

E 930TH RD

220E

49

N 330TH ST

40 £ ¤

FUTURE LOCAL TRAIL SYSTEM

PARCEL

DATA SOURCES: MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY AND PARCELS PROVIDED BY CLARK COUNTY. ROADS, TOWNSHIPS AND COUNTIES PROVIDED BY US CENSUS (2013). LAND USE IN CLARK COUNTY DERIVED FROM PARCEL DATASET. LAND USE IN CUMBERLAND COUNTY DERIVED FROM AERIAL INTERPRETATION. OPEN WATER AND RIVERS/STREAMS PROVIDED BY USGS (NHD). FORESTED AREA DERIVED FROM USDA-NRCS CROPLAND DATA LAYER (2012).

FORESTED AREA OPEN WATER

0

RIVER/STREAM Printed By: sbrown, File: P:\12700s\12790s\12793\12793000\GIS\BaseMap.mxd

0.25

0.5

Miles 1

E Print Date: 3/19/2014

Casey, Illinois

C-11


C.4

E 1300TH RD 100TH ST

\ [

E 1250TH RD

2350E

N

± ³ SW 4TH ST

SW 1ST ST

0 195

N M I LAM LN

\ [ 2480E

11

E 700TH RD

± ³

± ³

500N

15

Daily Traffic Counts T R A N S P O R T A T I O N Average Illinois Department of Transportation - 2013 CASEY COUNTY PARCEL FORESTED AREA OPEN WATER RIVER/STREAM

Principal Arterial Minor Arterial Collector

CITY OF CASEY CLARK AND CUMBERLAND COUNTIES, IL

DATA SOURCES: MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY AND PARCELS PROVIDED BY CLARK COUNTY. ROADS, TOWNSHIPS AND COUNTIES PROVIDED BY US CENSUS (2013). LAND USE IN CLARK COUNTY DERIVED FROM PARCEL DATASET. LAND USE IN CUMBERLAND COUNTY DERIVED FROM AERIAL INTERPRETATION. OPEN WATER AND RIVERS/STREAMS PROVIDED BY USGS (NHD). FORESTED AREA DERIVED FROM USDA-NRCS CROPLAND DATA LAYER (2012).

Local Roads 0

0.25

0.5

Printed By: sbrown, File:

C-12

E 750TH RD

OAK LEAF RD

\ [

N 250TH ST

JOH JOHN NS SON ON TOW TOWNS NSH HIP IP N COLES ST

2400E

N 450TH ST

N 150TH ST

\ [

E 830TH RD

E 800TH RD

N 100TH ST

CR CRO OOK OKED ED C CR REEK EEK TOW TOWNS NSH HIIP P

N 240TH ST

2300

2480 E ST

2350E

DUPONT RD

N IL 49

2480 E CO RD

E 870TH RD

600N

600N

E 930TH RD

N 330TH ST

V U

2275E

[ \ \ [

E 10 50TH RD

E 1000T H RD

220E

49

700N

\ [

500

1070N

N 230TH ST

[ \ \ [

700N

E WASHINGTO N RD

\ [

230E

2425E

710N

1250

E WASHINGTO N ST

[ \ \ [

E 950TH RD

\ [

B

E 1120T

D DR

LN

D DR

UM

AN

O RY

LA N

EC

L ER

H IC K

40 £ ¤

MB

W TYLER AVE

NE 25TH

CU

5700

ST

ST

ER

2050

800N

1250

IN

E WASHI NGTON AVE E ADAM S AVE E JEFFERSON AVE E MADISON AVE E MONROE AV E

SE 8TH ST

70 § ¦ ¨

2650 600 SE 4TH ST

A WM

VE AA

NE 1 5TH

850N

M BA LA E A ST AIN

EM

SE 1ST ST

\ [

NE 13TH S T

0E

875N

E EDGAR AVE

NW 1ST ST NW 2ND ST NW 3RD S T NW 4TH ST NW 5TH ST

240

\ [

6500 0 6400 190

1100N

RD

H

4400 3350

\ [

COLES ST

900N

AND ERLLAND CUM BER CUMB

2325E

1150

40 £ ¤

7

K CL ARK CLAR

[ \ \ [

2300E

40

N 400TH ST

\ [

275

2400E

\ [

2100 N 430TH ST

2

2450E

E 1180TH RD

N COLES ST

\ [

2 7 5E

\ [

330E

1180

975N

975N

72 70 § ¦ ¨ \ [

N 100TH ST

2350E

1000N

\ [ 1300N

2300 600 00 196 \91004400 [ 1 400

\[ [ \ \ [

175

CA CASEY SEY TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP

FR RD

N 300TH ST

± ³

1050N

SN AK ET RAIL RD

N 450TH ST

2480 E

49

1300 RD

25

E E 1400TH RD

N 320TH ST

1150N

N 180TH ST WESTFIELD RD 180TH ST

T 20T H S

\ [

2300E

PA PARKER RKER TO TOWN WNSHI SHIP P

2480E

1200N

49

N 25TH ST

\ [ \ [

V U

UN UNIIO ON N TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP

4 70T H ST

TRANSPORTATION MAP

Miles 1

E Print Date: 4/2/2014

MSA Professional Services, Inc.


APPENDIX C MAPS

REGIONAL CONTEXT MAP PARKER RKER V TO U 8PA TOWN WNSHI SHIP P

UN UNIIO ON N

E 1300TH RD

N 100TH ST

E 1250TH RD

\[ [ \ 2350E

N RD

± ³

H

N M I LAM LN

B

E 1120T

D DR

O RY

LN

1070N

E 10 50TH RD

E WASHINGTO N RD

E WASHINGTO N ST

\ [ DUPONT RD

SW 4TH ST

UM

AN

N 400TH ST

EC

L ER

H IC K

3

E 1000T H RD

N 230TH ST

D DR

VE AA

E WASHI NGTON AVE E ADAM S AVE E JEFFERSON AVE E MADISON AVE E MONR OE AV E

5

ST NE 1 5TH

W TYLER AVE

M BA LA E A ST AIN EM

SE 8TH ST

LA N

ST

3 4 2 1

E EDGAR AVE

SE 4TH ST

ER

IN

NW 1ST ST NW 2ND ST NW 3RD S T NW 4TH ST NW 5TH ST

K CL ARK CLAR

0E

A W M

70 § ¦ ¨ MB

NE 13TH S T

1100N

COLES ST

24 0

850N

\ [

2

NE 25TH

7

AND ERLLAND CUM BER CUMB

900N

CU

40 N 430TH ST

2

2325E

800N

330E

40 £ ¤

2400E

\ [

\ [

E 1180TH RD

SE 1ST ST

\ [ 1. New Conference Center 2. New Bed & Breakfast \ [ 3. Development of Local Trail System \ [ \ [ \ [ \ [

975N

2450E

875N

¦ ¨ §

N COLES ST

\ [

2 7 5E

1300N

1180

IMPROVEMENT OPPORTUNITIES 975N

\ [

72 70

1

\ [

1000N

SW 1ST ST

2350E

± ³

\ [

CA CASEY SEY TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP

FR RD

N 300TH ST

25

100TH ST

SN AK ET RAIL RD

N 450TH ST

2480 E

49

1300 RD

N 320TH ST

T 20T H S

\ [

N 180TH ST WESTFIELD RD 180TH ST

\ [

E 1400TH RD

N 25TH ST

1200N

2480E

\ [

1. World’s Largest Wind Chime 2. World’s Largest Golf Tee 2300E 1150N 3. World’s Largest Knitting Needles & Crochet Hook 4. World’s Largest Rocking Chair 5. Illinois Amateur Softball Association Hall of Fame & Honor Museum 6. Lincoln Trail Motosports 1050N 7. Moonshine 8. Oilfield

E

49

TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP EXISTING REGIONAL AMENITIES

4 70T H ST

C.5

[ \ \ [ 230E

E 950TH RD

[ \ \ [

\ [

6

V U

2275E

E 870TH RD

JOH JOHN NS SON ON TOW TOWNS NSH HIP IP

11

± ³

500N

2480E

± ³

\ [

\ [ 15

7

E 700TH RD

CITY OF CASEY CLARK AND CUMBERLAND COUNTIES, IL

REGIONAL CONTEXT

DATA SOURCES: MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY AND PARCELS PROVIDED BY CLARK COUNTY. ROADS, TOWNSHIPS AND COUNTIES PROVIDED BY US CENSUS (2013). LAND USE IN CLARK COUNTY DERIVED FROM PARCEL DATASET. LAND USE IN CUMBERLAND COUNTY DERIVED FROM AERIAL INTERPRETATION. OPEN WATER AND RIVERS/STREAMS PROVIDED BY USGS (NHD). FORESTED AREA DERIVED FROM USDA-NRCS CROPLAND DATA LAYER (2012).

CASEY COUNTY

E 750TH RD

OAK LEAF RD

2400E

N 250TH ST

\ [

N 100TH ST

2300E

CR CRO OOK OKED ED C CR REEK EEK TOW TOWNS NSH HIIP P

E 800TH RD

N COLES ST

\ [

2350E

E 830TH RD

N 450TH ST

600N

2480 E ST

[ \ \ [

N 150TH ST

600N

N 240TH ST

\ [

2480 E CO RD

700N

700N

N IL 49

710N

E 930TH RD

220E

49

2425E

N 330TH ST

40 £ ¤

MAJOR HIGHWAYS

PARCEL FORESTED AREA OPEN WATER

0

RIVER/STREAM Printed By: sbrown, File: P:\12700s\12790s\12793\12793000\GIS\BaseMap.mxd

0.25

0.5

Miles 1

E Print Date: 3/19/2014

Casey, Illinois

C-13


C.6

100TH ST

\ [

E 1250TH RD

2350E

N

\ [ 330E

40 £ ¤

SW 4TH ST

SW 1ST ST

N M I LAM LN

DUPONT RD

D DR

1070N

E 10 50TH RD

E WASHINGTO N RD

E WASHINGTO N ST

\ [ E 1000T H RD

N 230TH ST

LA N

SE 8TH ST

ER

W TYLER AVE

RD

H

± ³

LN

ST

SE 4TH ST

IN

Fairview Park

MB

Casey-Cumberland Cemetery

E WASHI NGTON AVE E ADAM S AVE E JEFFERSON AVE E MADISON AVE E MONR OE AV E

SE 1ST ST

A W M

70 § ¦ ¨ CU

B

O RY

850N

800N

VE AA

UM

AN

H IC K

M BA LA E A ST AIN EM

ST NE 1 5TH

NW 1ST ST NW 2ND ST NW 3RD S T NW 4TH ST NW 5TH ST

E EDGAR AVE

EC

L ER

Casey City Hall Casey Township Library Casey Fire & Police Departments Casey Ground Storage Washington Street Cemetery Casey Gas Barn

0E

875N

\ [

NE 13TH S T

Casey-Westfield Jr-Sr High School 24 0

\ [

1100N

E 1120T

D DR

Casey Generation Building Casey Healthcare Center Casey Country Club

\ [

COLES ST

900N

AND ERLLAND CUM BER CUMB

2325E

K CL ARK CLAR

[ \ \ [

NE 25TH

7

2400E

N 400TH ST

\ [

N 430TH ST

2

2450E

E 1180TH RD

N COLES ST

\ [

2 7 5E

\ [

70 ¦ ¨ §

1180

975N

975N

1300N

\ [

1000N

\ [

\ [

FR RD

N 100TH ST

2350E

\[ [ \

CA CASEY SEY TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP

N 300TH ST

± ³

1050N

SN AK ET RAIL RD

N 450TH ST

2480 E E 1300TH RD

1300 RD

25

E E 1400TH RD

N 320TH ST

1150N

N 180TH ST WESTFIELD RD 180TH ST

T 20T H S

\ [

2300E

PA PARKER RKER TO TOWN WNSHI SHIP P

2480E

1200N

49

N 25TH ST

\ [ \ [

V U

UN UNIIO ON N TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP

4 70T H ST

COMMUNITY FACILITIES MAP

[ \ \ [ 230E

E 950TH RD

[ \ \ [

\ [

V U

2275E

E 870TH RD

JOH JOHN NS SON ON TOW TOWNS NSH HIP IP

2480E

11

E 700TH RD

± ³

500N

\ [ ± ³

\ [

E 750TH RD

OAK LEAF RD

2400E

N 250TH ST

\ [

N 100TH ST

2300E

CR CRO OOK OKED ED C CR REEK EEK TOW TOWNS NSH HIIP P

E 800TH RD

N COLES ST

\ [

2350E

E 830TH RD

N 450TH ST

600N

2480 E ST

[ \ \ [

N 150TH ST

600N

N 240TH ST

\ [

2480 E CO RD

700N

700N

N IL 49

710N

E 930TH RD

220E

49

2425E

N 330TH ST

40 £ ¤

15

CITY OF CASEY CLARK AND CUMBERLAND COUNTIES, IL

COMMUNITY FACILITIES CASEY COUNTY PARCEL

DATA SOURCES: MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY AND PARCELS PROVIDED BY CLARK COUNTY. ROADS, TOWNSHIPS AND COUNTIES PROVIDED BY US CENSUS (2013). LAND USE IN CLARK COUNTY DERIVED FROM PARCEL DATASET. LAND USE IN CUMBERLAND COUNTY DERIVED FROM AERIAL INTERPRETATION. OPEN WATER AND RIVERS/STREAMS PROVIDED BY USGS (NHD). FORESTED AREA DERIVED FROM USDA-NRCS CROPLAND DATA LAYER (2012).

FORESTED AREA OPEN WATER RIVER/STREAM

0

0.25

Printed By: sbrown, File: P:\12700s\12790s\12793\12793000\GIS\BaseMap.mxd

C-14

0.5

Miles 1

E Print Date: 3/19/2014

MSA Professional Services, Inc.


APPENDIX C MAPS

PARKLAND NEEDS MAP

100TH ST

\ [

E 1250TH RD

2350E

N

\ [ 330E

40 £ ¤ H

± ³ D DR

SW 4TH ST

SW 1ST ST

N M I LAM LN

E 10 50TH RD

E WASHINGTO N RD

E WASHINGTO N ST

1070N

DUPONT RD

LA N

RD

\ [ E 1000T H RD

N 230TH ST

ER

B

E 1120T

D DR

LN

MB

UM

AN

O RY

CU

W TYLER AVE

EC

L ER

H IC K

800N

ST

SE 8TH ST

70 § ¦ ¨

IN

VE AA

E WASHI NGTON AVE E ADAM S AVE E JEFFERSON AVE E MADISON AVE E MONR OE AV E

SE 4TH ST

A W M

M BA LA E A ST AIN EM

ST NE 1 5TH

850N

E EDGAR AVE

SE 1ST ST

\ [

NE 13TH S T

0E

875N

1100N

NW 1ST ST NW 2ND ST NW 3RD S T NW 4TH ST NW 5TH ST

24 0

\ [

\ [

COLES ST

900N

AND ERLLAND CUM BER CUMB

2325E

K CL ARK CLAR

[ \ \ [

NE 25TH

7

2400E

N 400TH ST

\ [

N 430TH ST

2

2450E

E 1180TH RD

N COLES ST

\ [

2 7 5E

\ [

70 ¦ ¨ §

1180

975N

975N

1300N

\ [

1000N

\ [

\ [

FR RD

N 100TH ST

2350E

\[ [ \

CA CASEY SEY TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP

N 300TH ST

± ³

1050N

SN AK ET RAIL RD

N 450TH ST

2480 E E 1300TH RD

1300 RD

25

E E 1400TH RD

N 320TH ST

1150N

N 180TH ST WESTFIELD RD 180TH ST

T 20T H S

\ [

2300E

PA PARKER RKER TO TOWN WNSHI SHIP P

2480E

1200N

49

N 25TH ST

\ [ \ [

V U

UN UNIIO ON N TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP

4 70T H ST

C.7

[ \ \ [ 230E

E 950TH RD

[ \ \ [

\ [

V U

2275E

E 870TH RD

JOH JOHN NS SON ON TOW TOWNS NSH HIP IP

2480E

11

E 700TH RD

± ³

500N

\ [ ± ³

\ [

15

CITY OF CASEY CLARK AND CUMBERLAND COUNTIES, IL

COMMUNITY FACILITIES CASEY COUNTY PARCEL FORESTED AREA

E 750TH RD

OAK LEAF RD

2400E

N 250TH ST

\ [

N 100TH ST

2300E

CR CRO OOK OKED ED C CR REEK EEK TOW TOWNS NSH HIIP P

E 800TH RD

N COLES ST

\ [

2350E

E 830TH RD

N 450TH ST

600N

2480 E ST

[ \ \ [

N 150TH ST

600N

N 240TH ST

\ [

2480 E CO RD

700N

700N

N IL 49

710N

E 930TH RD

220E

49

2425E

N 330TH ST

40 £ ¤

COMMUNITY PLAYFIELD SERVICE AREA (1 MI) CITY PARKS - WALKABLE SERIVE AREA (1/4 MI) SCHOOL PROPERTY - WALKABLE SERVICE AREA (1/4 MI)

DATA SOURCES: MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY AND PARCELS PROVIDED BY CLARK COUNTY. ROADS, TOWNSHIPS AND COUNTIES PROVIDED BY US CENSUS (2013). LAND USE IN CLARK COUNTY DERIVED FROM PARCEL DATASET. LAND USE IN CUMBERLAND COUNTY DERIVED FROM AERIAL INTERPRETATION. OPEN WATER AND RIVERS/STREAMS PROVIDED BY USGS (NHD). FORESTED AREA DERIVED FROM USDA-NRCS CROPLAND DATA LAYER (2012).

OPEN WATER

0

RIVER/STREAM Printed By: sbrown, File: P:\12700s\12790s\12793\12793000\GIS\BaseMap.mxd

0.25

0.5

Miles 1

E Print Date: 3/19/2014

Casey, Illinois

C-15


C.8

SN AK E

T RAIL RD

N N 320TH ST

20TH ST

E E 1400TH RD

CA CASEY SEY TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP N 450TH ST

180TH ST N 180TH ST

1150N

K CL ARK CLAR

\ [

PA PARKER RKER TO TOWN WNSHI SHIP P

N 100TH ST

2480E

1200N

2300E

49

\ [

FR RD

2480 E

RD N 25TH ST WESTFIELD

AND ERLLAND CUM BER CUMB

\ [ \ [

V U

UN UNIIO ON N TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP

E 1300TH RD

1300 RD

100TH ST

[ \ \ [

4 70T H ST

PRIME AGRICULTURE

1300N

\ [

40 £ ¤

330E

E1

25

D 0TH R

2350E

\[ [ \

2400E

2

75E

EC

7

UM

BE

RL

AN

D DR

D

R

2

975N

E 1180TH RD

N 430TH ST

975N

2325E

70

1180

2450E

N COLES ST

\ [[ \

\§ [ ¦ ¨

\ [

2350E

N 300TH ST

1000N

± ³

± ³

1050N

25

D DR

SW 4TH ST

SW 1ST ST

N M I LAM LN

DUPONT RD

LA N

E 10 50TH RD

E WASHINGTO N RD

E WASHINGTO N ST

\ [

N 400TH ST

ER

230E

70 § ¦ ¨

E 930TH RD

220E

E 1000T H RD

N 330TH ST

\ [

E 950TH RD

[ \ \ [

1070N

N 230TH ST

MB

W TYLER AVE

\ [

LN

CU

ST

SE 8TH ST

800N

AIN

E WASHI NGTON AVE E ADAM S AVE E JEFFERSON AVE E MADISON AVE E MONROE AV E

SE 4TH ST

\ [

WM

O RY

850N

E AV

EM

SE 1ST ST

COLES ST

\ [

MA BA LA E A ST AIN

H IC K

0E

875N

E EDGAR AVE

NE 25TH

240

\ [

NW 1ST ST NW 2ND ST NW 3RD S T NW 4TH ST NW 5TH ST

40 £ ¤

ST

1100N

900N

NE 1 5TH

ST NE 13T H

\ [

\ [

E 1120TH

710N

2275E

JOH JOHN NS SON ON TOW TOWNS NSH HIP IP N COLES ST

2400E

11

E 700TH RD

± ³

± ³

500N

2480E

N IL 49

\ [

\ [ 15

CITY OF CASEY CLARK AND CUMBERLAND COUNTIES, IL

PRIME AGRICULTURE CASEY COUNTY

LAND USE COMMERCIAL OPEN SPACE

PARCEL

PARK

FORESTED AREA

INDUSTRIAL

OPEN WATER RIVER/STREAM

AGRICULTURAL

DATA SOURCES: MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY AND PARCELS PROVIDED BY CLARK COUNTY. ROADS, TOWNSHIPS AND COUNTIES PROVIDED BY US CENSUS (2013). LAND USE IN CLARK COUNTY DERIVED FROM PARCEL DATASET. LAND USE IN CUMBERLAND COUNTY DERIVED FROM AERIAL INTERPRETATION. OPEN WATER AND RIVERS/STREAMS PROVIDED BY USGS (NHD). FORESTED AREA DERIVED FROM USDA-NRCS CROPLAND DATA LAYER (2012).

INSTITUTIONAL RESIDENTIAL VACANT

0

0.25

Printed By: sbrown, File:

C-16

E 750TH RD

OAK LEAF RD

\ [

E 800TH RD

N 250TH ST

2300E

CR CRO OOK OKED ED C CR REEK EEK TOW TOWNS NSH HIIP P

2350E

E 830TH RD

N 450TH ST

600N

N 100TH ST

[ \ \ [

2480 E ST

2425E

E 870TH RD

N 150TH ST

\ [

600N

\ [

49

N 240TH ST

\ [

V U

2480 E CO RD

700N

700N

0.5

Miles 1

E Print Date: 4/2/2014

MSA Professional Services, Inc.


APPENDIX C MAPS

C.9 NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNING AREAS 180TH ST

CA CASEY SEY TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP

\ [

± ³

1050N

1180

40 £ ¤

± ³

2450E

N 300TH ST

\ [

N 230TH ST

N 25TH ST

N 100TH ST

7

\ [

70 § ¦ ¨

WESTFIELD RD N 180TH ST

E 1250TH RD

25

E 1180TH RD

N COLES ST

975N

70 ¦ ¨ §

2480E

V U

NE 16TH ST

\ [

49

HO

E LN

L ST

NE 25TH

LN

1 0T

ST

T HS

E WASHINGTO N RD

E WASHINGTO N ST

E ADAM S AVE

E MADISON AVE

SE 5TH ST

E JEFFERSON AVE

ST RD

O PA

D DR

N 13 TH

SE

SW 4TH ST

AN

ORY

H ST 1 3T

ST

RL

HICK

SE

T HS

AIN

T 5TH S NE 1

E AV

BE

E HI L LCRE E MONROE AV E

E VAN BUREN AVE

N 230TH ST

E HARRISON AVE

E TYLER AVE

N 150TH ST

N IL 49

N COLES ST

\ [ 230E

E 950TH RD

E 930TH RD

\ [

N 100TH ST

2480 E ST

\ [

2425E

MA

E WASHI NGTON AVE

W TYLER AVE

\ [

BA

UM

SE 8TH ST

W VAN BUREN AVE W HARRISON AVE

LA

0T

D

EA

N1

DR

T NE 9T H S

N LA

EM

SE 6TH ST

ER

VE YA

SE 3RD ST

MB

AN

SE 1ST ST

CU

LB

SE 2ND ST

W MONROE AVE

NE 5TH ST

EA

4TH ST

AVE

S CENTRA L AVE

ST

E COLORA DO AVE

SE

MA

N CENTRAL AVE

W ALA B A

NW 2ND ST

NW 5TH ST

NW 4TH ST

COLES ST W

IN MA

NW 3RD ST

W DELAWARE AVE

E EDGAR AVE

NE 4TH ST

IDA AVE OR FL W EDGAR AVE

NW 1ST ST

K CL ARK CLAR

850N

NE 2ND ST

W

AND ERLLAND CUM BER CUMB

\ [

NE 13TH ST

E GEORGI A AVE

1100N

UN UNIIO ON N TOWN TOWNS SH HIP IP

RSE S DEER RUN LN

NE 14TH ST

\ [

HO

40 £ ¤

EC

220E

2480E

NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNING AREAS CASEY

NORTHWEST

COUNTY

SOUTHWEST

PARCEL

DOWNTOWN

FORESTED AREA

NORTHEAST

OPEN WATER

FAIRVIEW

RIVER/STREAM

EAST

CITY OF CASEY CLARK AND CUMBERLAND COUNTIES, IL DATA SOURCES: MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY AND PARCELS PROVIDED BY CLARK COUNTY. ROADS, TOWNSHIPS AND COUNTIES PROVIDED BY US CENSUS (2013). LAND USE IN CLARK COUNTY DERIVED FROM PARCEL DATASET. LAND USE IN CUMBERLAND COUNTY DERIVED FROM AERIAL INTERPRETATION. OPEN WATER AND RIVERS/STREAMS PROVIDED BY USGS (NHD). FORESTED AREA DERIVED FROM USDA-NRCS CROPLAND DATA LAYER (2012).

GOLF COURSE

0

Printed By: sbrown, File: P:\12700s\12790s\12793\12793000\GIS\BaseMap.mxd

0.25

0.5

Miles 1

E Print Date: 3/25/2014

Casey, Illinois

C-17


C.10

DOWNTOWN PLANNING AREAS W COLORADO AVE

E BUCKEYE AVE

E ALA

BAM A

AV E