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WASC/CDE Joint Process

Self-Study Report 2005-2011 Submitted to

The Accrediting Commission for Secondary Schools of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges and the California Department of Education

Sonora High School 401 South Palm Street

La Habra, California 90631 (562) 266-2001

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SONORA HIGH SCHOOL Focus on Learning Table of Contents

Introduction Title Page ............................................................................................................. ii Table of Contents................................................................................................ iii Message from the Principal ................................................................................ iv Glossary .....................………...............................................................................v Visiting Committee................………............................................................... xiv Sonora Administration ........................................................................................xv Chapter 1:

Student/Community Profile and Supporting Data and Findings……….1

Chapter 2:

Student/Community Profile: Overall Summary from Analysis of Profile Data …………………………………………………….71

Chapter 3:

Progress Report.......................................................................................75

Chapter 4:

Self-Study Findings…………………………………………………….83 Focus Group A: Organization: Vision and Purpose, Governance, Leadership and Staff, and Resources ..........................................85 Focus Group B: Standards-based Student Learning: Curriculum.........116 Focus Group C: Standards-based Student Learning: Instruction..........134 Focus Group D: Standards-based Student Learning: Assessment and Accountability……………..………………………………….. 153 Focus Group E: School Culture and Support for Student Personal and Academic Growth ....................................................................167

Chapter 5:

Schoolwide Action Plan........................................................................187

Appendices....................................................................................................................192

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Glossary

Accelerated Math The interactive, computer-based math program that allows students to work on the skills upon which they need to focus . It is used as the curriculum in the Math Learning Lab classes. Additionally, it is used in other math classes as enrichment to review or practice more advanced concepts. Advanced Reading The intervention/support class that freshman and some sophmores take to help them improve their reading level. Students with a CST ELA score of 1 or 2 are placed in the class. Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) AVID is a support program designed to prepare students in the academic middle for fouryear college eligibility. Agriculture The Agriculture Program offers the freshman Ag Earth Science, sophmore Ag Biology, junior Veterinary Science, and senior Ag Economics classes as the core classes. These classes fulfill Science graduation requirements with the exception of Ag Economics which meets Social Science. Additional Agriculture classes include Floriculture, Wood Shop, and Small Gas Engines, all of which meet elective requirements.

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Algebra Foundations A two year Algebra I program that covers the same standards as the traditional Algebra I class but over a two year period. Assistant Principal of Instruction and Operations (APIO) This Assistant Principal’s main responsibilities include Master Schedule and Budget. Assistant Principal of Pupil Services (APPS) This Assistant Principal’s main responsibilities include Guidance and Special Education. Assistant Principal of Student Affairs (APSA) This Assistant Principal’s main responsibilities include Activities, Athletics, and Discipline. Autism Program The Autism program addresses the needs of selected students with Autism throughout the FJUHSD district. This is a specialty program designed to promote a student’s independent working through organizing and structuring their environment. Research based strategies are matched to the needs of students in order to improve their adaptation, skill enhancement, provide meaningful outcomes, and ensure an optimal learning environment. Best Buds Best Buds pairs general education students with special needs students creating the opportunity for one-on-one friendships outside of the program for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

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Community Based Instruction (CBI) CBI is an exemplary and model instructional program tailored to the individual needs of students with disabilities. This program enhances positive outcomes for students through pragmatic academics reflecting all domains of adult life, balanced curriculum content areas based on California State Standards, home-school partnership, school-business collaborative, inter-agency linkages, community involvement, and community based vocational experiences. The curriculum database for the program is crafted out of the CAPA (California Alternate Performance Assessment). CBI is a sustainable educational reform, which has increased the access and quality of our educational services to ensure local delivery options for students and their families, while improving positive student outcomes for adult living. Conflict Management Student led mediation for student conflicts. Creativity, Action, Service (CAS) One of the IB diploma requirements is to voluntarily engage in Creativity, Action, Service (CAS). Students must select a topic that is thematically integrated to their IB learner profile. Once it is approved by IB, the student has two years to complete her/his 150 hours of activities/services. Dean of Academic Services A teacher on Special Assignment that assists the administrators. Formerly known as Dean of Attendance, this individual still helps monitor and oversee attendance related issues. The position now also acts as the EL , Title I , and McKinney-Vento Coordinator.

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EL and Recent RFEP Counselor The current counselor caseload has a counselor who is exclusively devoted to EL and recently predestinated students. The cutoff for recent RFEPs is May of 2007. Extended Essay (EE) Each IB full diploma candidate must develop and investigate a research question related to a topic of special interest in one of the subjects of the IB curriculum. The essay is written under the direct supervision of a qualified faculty mentor at the school. Extravaganza Show A show consisting of skits written and presented by World Language and ELD students in the target language. Food Drive The Food Drive is an annual holiday season event. In recent history, SOHS has annually provided as many as 120 less fortunate local community families with provisions valued at more than $25,000. This philanthropic endeavor is a huge undertaking that involves most SOHS departments, clubs, and teams with the goal of providing sufficient food and household items to last a month. Students take a very active role in the process personally raising the money, collecting the food donations, purchasing the supplies at the local supermarket, and delivering the bounty to the families. Many graduates report that the Food Drive is one of their favorite and most memorable high school experiences. Future Farmers of America (FFA) FFA is a co-curricular club associated with the Agriculture Department. It teaches that agriculture is more than planting and harvesting-- it's a science, it's a business and it's an art. FFA helps members to develop their own unique talents and explore their interests in a broad range of

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career pathways. Students raise and show animals, participate in the Home Building competition, and/or do work experience to fulfill their FFA hours. Human Occupations Students of America (HOSA) HOSA is a co-curricular club associated with the Medical Careers Academy, and it is the premier organization for student leaders preparing for careers in the healthcare industry. HOSA is America's pipeline of future healthcare professionals, and is opened to all students who are interested in learning more about a job in the medical field. Humanities A junior year cross-curricular program that aims to draw the connections between American literature and U.S. History. The courses are taught thematically and the same time period is covered concurrently. IMPACT IMPACT is a peer mentoring program. Assigned mentors meet with every freshman once a month in groups of 3-5 to give them information about social activities, academics, and other concerns. A registration barbecue starts off their first year of high school and helps them meet people and feel connected as a Sonora Raider. International Baccalaureate (IB) An international honors program recognized by many colleges and universities for credit. Students can test for individual certificates in isolated subjects or earn the full diploma. In order to complete the diploma, students must take six different tests (three standard level and three higher level), take Theory of Knowledge, complete an Extended Essay, and perform their Creative, Action, Service community service hours.

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Integrated Science The course integrates the four major sciences of biology, chemistry, physics, and earth science. It is taught at a conceptual level with the goal of 80% active-learning occurring within the classroom environment. Offered freshman year, this course is an introduction to the full year courses of biology, chemistry, and physics. Introduction to Algebra Skills A one semester class offered to students that are unsuccessful in Algebra Foundations IA. Instead of allowing those unsuccessful students to move onto Algebra Foundations IB, students take Introduction to Algebra Skills to focus on pre-algebraic concepts so they can be more successful in Algebra Foundations IA the following year. Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps (JROTC) JROTC at Sonora is affiliated with the army and has as its mission to “motivate young people to be better citizens�. Their purpose is to develop and enhance leadership skills and to create good citizens. The class fulfills the physical education requirement. March Olympics An ASB sponsored yearly school spirit competition between the different grades and staff. Participants compete in events as diverse as water balloon toss, pictionary, limbo, lip sync, etc. The traditional events and activities are usually scheduled during the third week in March. Math Learning Lab The intervention/support class that freshman and some sophmores take to help them improve their math skills. Students with a CST Math score of 1 or 2 are placed in the class.

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Medical Careers The MCA is designed for students who have an interest in a career in the medical field. In order to create a small learning community, courses are offered at each grade level, and students take core curricular classes in science, history and English together,. Academy courses focus on health, medical terminology, bodily disorders and diseases, and our capstone class is Medical Assisting. Students who complete all the necessary components can earn a medical assisting certificate upon graduation. Students must apply for admittance to the academy and applications can be obtained from the front office. La Vista High School (LVHS) One of the Fullerton Joint Union High School District (FJUHSD) Alternative Education High Schools to which students may be referred when they fall behind on units. Upon getting caught up, students are welcomed back to SOHS. La Sierra High School (LSHS) The other FJUHSD Alternative Education High School which includes both Independent Study and the 9th and 10th grade Opportunity Program. Students may be referred to one of LSHS programs when they fall behind on units. students are referred when they fall behind on units and are welcomed back to SOHS upon getting caught up. Opportunity Program A accelerated unit recovery program offered to 9th and 10th grade students through La Sierra High School. Parent Institute for Quality Education (PIQE) A nine week program designed to help parents learn about high school and college entrance requirements.

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Practical Math A new math class created during this six year cycle. Can be used as the third year math requirement. Pre-IB Classes Many of the 9th and 10th grade honors classes begin to prepare students for IB. Read 180 The interactive reading program used in the higher Advanced Reading classes. Students practice reading at their current level both with the computer software and with the program high interest library. The program focuses more on the comprehension aspect of reading. Reach Reading The reading program used in the lower Advanced Reading classes. The program focuses more on the decoding aspect of reading. These classes are blocked scheduled with certain freshman English classes to help students be more successful. Spring Fiesta The Latino themed dance sponsored by the World Language Department, Spanish Club, and MeChA. The proceeds go to help subsidize the cost of World Language AP tests. Student Intervention Team (SIT) The Student Intervention Team (SIT) at SOHS is a school-based, problem-solving group designed to assist school staff and families in the development of interventions and strategies that improve the learning and/or school adjustment of referred students. This team seeks creative ways to maximize the use of available resources. The purpose of the SIT is to provide SOHS with an efficient, effective and clearly defined procedure for providing assistance to teachers,

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students, and families. It is a collaboration model which provides a forum for routine and timely problem solving. Theory of Knowledge (TOK) This IB course, which calls for an examination of the ways of proper thinking in different disciplines, is taught senior year. It is an interdisciplinary requirement to stimulate critical reflection on knowledge and experience gained inside or outside the classroom. It is a requirement for the IB diploma. Unit Recovery Program Program developed to enable students to recover units lost due to unexcused absences. Unsatisfactory Progress Reports (UPR) Mailed home at the midpoint of each quarterly grading period for students that are struggling academically.

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The Visiting Committee Representing the Western Association of Schools and Colleges and the California Department of Education

CHAIRPERSON Mrs. Diane Sauvageau Director Assessment and Technology Charter Oak Unified School District

MEMBERS

Dr. William B. Davidson Assistant Principal Long Beach Polytechnic High School

Ms. Mindy Davis Teacher Mt. Carmel High School

Mr. Joseph N. Granish Teacher/Dean of Students Birmingham Community Charter High School

Ms. Kimberly Marie Mac Kinney Director, Secondary Education Fontana Unified School District

Mr. Bill Moyer Teacher Great Oak High School

Dr. Nancy Padilla Principal Nogales High School

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Sonora High School

Administrative Team

Mr. John Oldenburg, Principal Mr. Gary Day, Assistant Principal, Instruction and Operations Ms. Stephanie Henry, Assistant Principal, Pupil Services Mr. Scott Edwards-Silvia , Assistant Principal, Student Affairs Ms. Magdalena Villalba, Dean of Academic Services

Self-Study Team

Dr. Jack Hawkins, Self-Study Coordinator Ms. Magdalena Villalba, Self-Study Coordinator

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1 Student/Community Profile 1


Chapter 1 Student/Community Profile Introduction Sonora High School was the seventh comprehensive high school in the Fullerton Joint Union High School District when it opened in 1966. At that time, the population of North Orange County was experiencing rapid growth, and schools were overcrowded with Sonora being designed to alleviate these conditions at especially two of the other schools, La Habra and Sunny Hills High Schools. Designed for approximately two thousand students, the school rapidly grew to about 1900, but in the late eighties the enrollment began to decline severely in the North County, resulting in the closure of one comprehensive high school, Lowell, and reducing the enrollment at Sonora to just over 1100. Since that time, enrollment has grown steadily to an average of 1950-2100 students. Last year, 2009-2010, the school reached its alltime peak for students being served with an enrollment of 2182. A number of factors have resulted in this relative enrollment boom, with the school having been privileged to essentially extend its attendance area to many more surrounding communities. This has occurred through the unique offerings of the Medical Careers Academy, the International Baccalaureate Program, the award-winning Agricultural Program, the Army Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps, and the special programs designed to meet the needs of its English Learner population, among others. Most recently, the school has become one of two schools designated in the district to provide Community Based Instruction (CBI) services, and just last school year, being designated to educate autistic high school students. The ensuing description, accompanied when appropriate with supporting charts and graphs, will provide the context in which the unique learning environment that is Sonora High School serves the community. The Community While Sonora serves a number of communities, the school is located in the North Orange County city of La Habra. La Habra is situated primarily in a valley, with portions of the city in the hills on both sides. The pass through the northern hills, leading from the San Gabriel Valley to La Habra, is thought to have given the city its name. The name apparently is derived from a colloquial Spanish expression meaning “the opening”, or “the pass through the hills”. La Habra was a former citrus, walnut and avocado agricultural center, being the birthplace of the famed and nutritious Haas avocado. Experiencing its first big population boom in the early 1920’s, La Habra now occupies 7.3 square miles 298 feet above sea level with a population of approximately 59,155, a growth of 0.3% since 2000. As the northernmost city in Orange County, La Habra residents enjoy being just a relatively short drive from the beach, the local mountains and the desert.

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The District Sonora High School is a part of the Fullerton Joint Union High School District (FJUHSD) that serves a fifty square mile area of northern Orange County and southeastern Los Angeles County. Feeder elementary districts include the Buena Park School District, the Fullerton School District, the La Habra City School District, and the Lowell Joint School District. At least some students from each of the latter three of these school districts are in the Sonora attendance area. The FJUHSD consists of six four-year comprehensive high schools: Buena Park, Fullerton Union, La Habra, Sonora, Sunny Hills and Troy. La Vista High School, a continuation high school, and La Sierra High School, an alternative high school, also serve FJUHSD students. Through its schools, the district also operates a large and quite comprehensive summer school program each year. However, due to the current funding problems across the state, most recently the summer school programs have focused upon those students most challenged in meeting success in English and mathematics, with other courses offered based upon student graduation needs. Nevertheless, it has still been possible for a few students to advance in their studies, by joining a class that was primarily intended for unit makeup/recovery purposes. The School Sonora High School was originally built on forty-two acres on the eastern side of La Habra and opened to ninth and tenth graders in 1966, becoming a full, four-year senior high school in 1968. The school was initially planned to provide educational services to the families of 2000 students, but, as of the 2010 California Basic Educational Data System (CBEDS) report, the school was serving 2032 students. The school garnered a number of architectural design awards at its inception, with its nearly entirely indoor, but very open, classroom arrangement. This design, at the time, was considered the epitome of a learning environment that would meet the needs of students, staff and the community while maximizing opportunities for student learning. Ten wings, a gymnasium/locker room/pool complex, a food services area, a lecture hall/amphitheatre arrangement, and the school offices all surround three large indoor “commons” areas, in the middle of which is the library/media center. As times and educational philosophies changed, the school began adding doors to the various classrooms in the wings. Today, nearly all classrooms have doors, with the exception of the 420 Science Wing. Most staff feel that this has enhanced the ability of their students to concentrate on their learning, paving the way for higher achievement. Further, at the beginning of the 2004-2005 school year, students and staff began learning in a state-of-the-art, two-story, fifteen classroom building devoted to the natural and social sciences. The school underwent a two year modernization program beginning in the 2006-2007 school year. Finally, during the 2009-2010 school year, the area of the lower commons behind the library was converted into an attractive, multi-purpose facility for students, staff and the community, sometimes referred to as the “Sonora Café”. This indoor environment overall has been most favorable from the point of view of safety and togetherness. With limited points of entry to the campus, it is much easier to keep track of both students and visitors. Also, the somewhat forced togetherness coupled with special programs such as IMPACT, a yearlong Freshman mentoring program, has led to the distinctive sense of community among the students, staff and parents at the school. This pervasive culture 3


has no doubt been a major factor in the recognition by the state as a California Distinguished School four times in the last sixteen years, in 1994, 1998, 2000, and 2006. The Staff The 2009-2010 school year ended with a new principal being named to Sonora High School. The new principal was selected through a rigorous and intensive process designed to attract the interest of leaders who were particularly suited to the challenges of meeting the critical needs of the students at Sonora, as identified in both our proposed WASC Action Plan and CDE Single School Plan. There are 137 staff members at Sonora High School, of which 99 are certificated and 38 are classified. The certificated staff, including teachers, counselors, specialists, and administrators is well educated, experienced, and committed to the education of every young person that walks through our doors. Most are involved in ongoing educational renewal, as demonstrated through the pursuit of advanced degrees and participation in workshops and inservice programs. Fifty-nine per cent of our teaching staff has an M.A./M.S. degree. Three staff members have either a PhD, EdD or Doctor of Chiropractic. Of the remaining, twenty-four per cent have thirty or more units past the B.A./B.S. degree. Thirty-seven per cent of the teaching staff is bilingual or multilingual. One hundred per cent of the staff is qualified to work with English Learners, having completed certification through one or more programs including SDAIE, CLAD and/or BCLAD, either in addition to or as a part of their credentialing programs. The classified staff of 38 is effective, skilled, and dedicated to serving the needs of students, parents, the community, and other staff members. Forty-seven percent of the classified staff have served ten years or more with twenty-four percent having served fifteen years or longer. Classified staff members update their knowledge and skills through attending campus, district, and area workshops and conferences. Together, both certificated and classified staff work toward creating a collegial community that focuses on ensuring highly successful and productive learning in young people. This has been especially important during the last two years, when the classified staff in particular has experienced significant personnel reductions and job reassignments. The Students Student Demographic Data The following data, continuing through page 57, presents a graphic view of the successes and challenges experienced by the Sonora community. While some of the data might have been relegated to the appendix, each of the focus and home groups participating in the study felt that this data presents not only a picture of the many successes enjoyed by Sonora today, but also dramatically illustrates the major challenges as identified in Chapters Two and Four, and addressed in the Action Plan in Chapter Five. Thus it was a nearly unanimous decision by all stakeholders to include all of the following items in this chapter, albeit appearing at times to be quite repetitive, particularly across subject matter test performance presentation. 4


Enrollment Data Sonora’s enrollment has been relatively stable during the past six years. Both the school and the district allow and encourage students to find special programs in which they are interested. Students can transfer to Sonora by way of the two-week district Open Enrollment period. Additionally, students may transfer to Sonora with approved interdistrict or intradistrict permits for special programs not available at their home school. This contributes to the year to year enrollment fluctuation shown below. Enrollment by Academic Grade and Total Year 2005-2006 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011

Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

# of Students

# of Students

# of Students

# of Students

613 682 724 648 596 483

434 515 516 478 538 560

511 402 442 567 570 485

470 381 383 433 478 504

Total 2028 1980 2065 2126 2182 2032

During the 2006-2007 school year, as a response to national, state and local needs for successfully educating every student, students were classified not only according to the calendar years they had attended high school, but also by the number of units they had completed relative to the requirements for eventual graduation. This was both in response to federal and state guidelines, as well as to the evident difficulty for new-comers to immediately adjust to their new language of instruction, academically and socially. This dual classification will lead to some anomalies in the subsequent data, particularly with reference to the 2007-2008 school year. These anomalies are the result of what is generally referred to as the “social grade� of certain students.

Student Ethnicity Data Sonora has continued to experience a continued, yet gradual, change in the ethnic composition of the student body. The two most significant ethnic sub-groups continue to be the Hispanic and White populations. It will be noted, however, that the Asian population has consistently grown over the past five years at a much greater rate than the Asian population throughout the district.

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Enrollment by Ethnicity Ethnicity Total American Indian Asian Pacific Islander Filipino Hispanic/ Latino African American White Other/ Unknown

Total # % # % # % # % # % # % # % # %

2005-06 2028 3 0.1 137 6.8 6 0.3 29 1.4 977 48.2 36 1.8 718 35.4 122 6.0

2006-07 1980 1 0.1 154 7.8 1 0.1 31 1.6 972 49.1 28 1.4 657 33.2 136 6.9

2007-08 2065 0 0.0 172 8.3 0 0.0 30 1.5 1085 52.5 34 1.6 623 30.2 121 5.9

2008-09 2126 1 0.0 197 9.3 1 0.0 33 1.6 1157 54.4 36 1.7 590 27.8 111 5.2

2009-10 2182 6 0.3 216 9.8 5 0.2 37 1.7 1246 57.1 44 2.0 619 28.4 9 .4

2010-2011 2032 8 0.4 213 10.5 2 0.0 36 1.8 1153 56.7 32 1.6 509 25.0 79 3.9

For comparison purposes, the District-wide ethnic distribution is presented below. FJUHSD Enrollment by Ethnicity Ethnicity Total American Indian Asian Pacific Islander Filipino Hispanic/ Latino African American White Other/ Unknown

Total # % # % # % # % # % # % # % # %

2005-06 16,299 36 0.2 2,816 17.3 54 0.3 383 2.3 7,500 46.0 387 2.4 4,234 26.0 889 5.5

2006-07 16,499 29 0.2 2,911 17.6 47 0.3 403 2.4 7,625 46.2 372 2.3 4,183 25.4 929 5.6

2007-08 16,321 26 0.2 2,995 18.4 48 0.3 418 2.6 7,697 47.2 359 2.2 3,927 24.1 851 5.2

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2008-09 16,343 29 0.2 3,084 18.9 48 0.3 435 2.7 7,945 48.6 336 2.1 3,763 23 703 4.3

2009-10 15,095 63 0.4 2844 18.8 60 0.4 477 3.2 7227 47.9 376 2.5 3998 26.5 50 0.3

2010-11 14642 56 0.4 2819 19.3 30 0.2 488 3.3 7559 51.6 353 2.4 3273 22.4 59 0.4


Enrollment by Ethnicity, Orange County and the State of California 2009-10 Sonora was quite close to the county-wide ethnic distribution in 2009-2010, with the exception of the Asian population at the school, which is nearly fifty per cent less than that of the county. Comparisons with the state indicate substantially smaller populations, percentage-wise, of African American, Asian, and American Indian students at Sonora. The data table is found on the top of page 6. (Please note that the actual numbers of each category are presented in terms of thousands of students.) 20092010 County # % State # %

American Indian 2.5 0.4 44.9 0.7

Asian Pacific Islander 71.1 2.6 14.2 0.5 526.9 37.0 8.5 0.6

Filipino Hispanic/ Latino 9.1 235.7 1.8 46.9 156.4 3118.4 2.5 50.4

African American 8.2 1.6 424.3 6.9

White

Other Total

159.5 31.8 1673.3 27.0

13.3 2.6 209.2 3.4

502.2 100 6190.4 100

Socioeconomically Disadvantaged Data Whereas in the past Sonora had struggled to convince the majority of apparently eligible families in the community to register for the Reimbursable Meals Program, and had met with very little success perhaps due to social stigma on the part of students and their families, the school’s recent numbers more accurately reflect the reality of our students’ economic situation. Perhaps due to the difficulties presented to families as a result of the recent and ongoing economic recession, this reporting has changed in the last few years. It may, however, have been a lack of awareness by the school community regarding the reimbursable meals program, as well as the previously stated reluctance to be so identified that long kept many eligible families from participating perhaps due to the economic recession. A strong push by the school to meet the needs of the families through the use of a program that intentionally avoided any social stigma allowed the school to significantly increase program participation. In the last few years, students who qualified for the reimbursable meals program also qualified for test fee reductions/ waivers, athletic transportation payment programs/fee waiver, ASB fee waiver for athletes, ROP fee reductions/waivers, and/or OCTA public bus passes. The following table shows the dramatic increase in just the last five years. Students in Reimbursable Meals Program Year 2005-2007 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011

# 59 152 313 568 831 954

% 3.2 8.1 16.0 28.3 40.0 46.9 7


Parent Education Level It is well-documented that the level of education achieved by the parents in a family tends to be a strong indicator of that pursued by their children. The relative level of parent education at Sonora has not changed dramatically over the past six years for those who report their level. What is dramatic, however, is the near-doubling of those in the “Decline-to-State” category, from 10.5% in 2005-06 to 19.6% in 2009-10. There is a drop in every other category, except high school graduate which shows a modest 1.4% increase. Correspondingly, the “Not a High School Graduate” category had a 1.3% drop. Parent Education Level Year

200506 200607 200708 200809 200910 201011

Total

Not a High School Graduate

1866

# 264

% 14.1

High School Graduate # % 322 17.3

Some College

1883

266

14.1

320

17.0

410

21.8

400

21.2

254

13.5

233

12.4

1958

278

14.2

324

16.5

403

20.6

412

21.0

253

12.9

288

14.7

2009

294

14.6

361

18.0

398

19.8

407

20.3

246

12.2

303

15.1

2074

265

12.8

387

18.7

363

17.5

401

19.3

252

12.2

406

19.6

2032

265

13.0

379

18.7

369

18.2

396

19.5

261

12.8

362

17.8

# 420

College Graduate

Graduate School

% 22.5

# 389

% 20.8

# 275

% 14.7

# 196

% 10.5

8

Decline to State


English Learners English Learners’ Language Proficiency Status Year

Total

English Only

English Learner

Initially Fluent English Proficient

# % # % # % 2005-06 1866 1187 63.6 291 15.6 279* 15.0 2006-07 1883 1161 61.7 272 14.4 254* 13.5 2007-08 2065 934 45.2 353 17.1 299 14.5 2008-09 2126 819 38.5 361 17.0 401 18.9 2009-10 2074 1173 56.6 288 13.9 140 6.8 2010-11 2032 1119 55.1 340 16.7 136 6.7 *Denotes students that used to be identified as Fluent English Proficient.

Redesignated Fluent English Proficient # % 109 5.8 196 10.4 479 23.2 545 25.6 473 22.8 437 21.5

Anomaly: Less attention used to be paid to the difference between Initially and Redesignated Fluent English Proficient students when the Fluent English Proficient tagging was still used. It is likely that the Redesignated numbers are artificially low prior to 2007-08 due to this fact and that some students that should have truly been reported as Redesignated ended up in the generic Fluent English Proficient category. Redesignation of English Learner Students per Year Number of Students Redesignated 53 17 38 43 27

2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10

CELDT Overall Scores Total 200506 200607 200708 200809 200910

205

CELDT 1 # % 7 3.4

CELDT 2 # % 17 8.3

CELDT 3 # % 42 20.5

CELDT 4 # % 90 43.9

CELDT 5 # % 49 23.9

276

21

7.6

33

12.0

90

32.6

114

41.3

18

6.5

339

32

9.4

44

13.0

132

38.9

105

31.0

26

7.7

366

31

8.5

59

16.1

147

40.2

115

31.4

14

3.8

342

36

10.5

43

12.6

135

39.5

105

30.7

23

6.7

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*Beginning in 2006-07, CELDT results are reported with a different common scale than in previous years. As a result, 2005-06 results cannot be compared to those of later years. Home Language of English Learners The following table indicates a drop of nearly 3% among those who speak a language other than English at home, with the greatest change among the native Spanish speakers.

Year

Total School Populati on

2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11

2028 1980 2065 2126 2182 2074

Spanish

# 319 298 313 328 338 266

% 15.7 15.1 15.1 15.4 15.5 12.8

Korean

# 9 14 19 16 15 12

% .4 .7 .9 .8 .7 .6

All Other

# 8 23 21 17 14 10

% .4 1.3 1.0 .8 .6 .5

Total ELs

# 291 272 353 361 288 340

% 15.6 14.4 17.1 17.0 13.9 16.7

Attendance Data Per Cent Actual Attendance This data is drawn from the P2 attendance report each year. 19992000 95.23

20002001 95.48

20012002 95.77

20022003 95.94

20032004 95.89

2004- 2005- 2006- 2007- 2008- 20092005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 96.01 95.87 96.25 96.36 96.46 96.13

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Student Dropout Data Student Dropout Data The traceable dropout number is almost negligible among all ethnic groups, and was the largest in the past six years among Hispanic/Latino students in their senior year during the 2005-2006 school year. We attribute our very low dropout rates to many intervention programs, such as Opportunity at La Sierra High School and to continuing and alternative programs that our district offers at La Vista and La Sierra High Schools.

Ethnicity Asian

Grades 9 10 11 12

2005-06 0 0 0 0

2006-07 0 0 0 0

2007-08 0 0 0 0

2008-09 0 0 0 0

2009-10 0 0 0 0

Hispanic/Latino

9 10 11 12

0 0 1 13

2 0 2 3

2 0 2 3

1 0 3 2

0 0 0 2

African American

9 10 11 12

0 0 0 1

0 0 0 1

0 0 0 1

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

White

9 10 11 12

0 0 0 1

0 0 1 1

0 0 1 1

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

Other

9 10 11 12

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

11


Suspension and Expulsion Data Number of Suspensions and Expulsions The data show that the number of suspensions during the 2008-2009 school year was much larger than any other year among this five year period, even though that year represented only the third largest enrollment of these years. Data for only the first five years are presented as we are currently in the sixth year. Suspensions

2005-06 152

2006-07 169

2007-08 142

2008-09 197

2009-10 144

Expulsions

7

3

2

2

4

Student Performance Data API Results API Test Results for Significant Subgroups This data is the first presentation of the source of the major challenges that must be addressed by the school: teaching and learning at Sonora appears to be the least effective for those students with disabilities, English Learners, who are socioeconomically disadvantaged students, or who are Hispanic/Latino. Of course, many of these categories may include the same students. 2006 Asian 881 Hispanic/Latino 716 White 824 SED 685 EL 633 Students with N/A Disabilities Schoolwide 776

2007 862 699 808 680 651 N/A

2008 870 700 831 673 637 541

2009 884 720 834 697 646 N/A

2010 906 731 858 733 680 574

756

762

776

798

12


CST Results The following examination results appear to clearly demonstrate not only the areas of high achievement by the students at Sonora, but also somewhat strikingly identify at least three areas of high need: English Learners, Special Education Students, and students from Socioeconomically Disadvantaged home environments, as indicated in the general data table immediately preceding. Each set of results, beginning with the English Language Arts examinations, are first presented by grade level data, followed by Trend Analysis Graphs that nearly inevitably show reasonable performance among all students, followed by clear deficiencies in the English Learner, Special Education and Socioeconomically Disadvantaged subgroups. As the data proceeds through the grade levels, the English Learner population tends to perform even less ably, while the Special Education and Socioeconomically Disadvantaged students appear to perform somewhat better each year. In 2007-2008, the socioeconomically disadvantaged data appears to be unreliable. That year apparently corresponds with the Fullerton Joint Union High School District transition to the federally funded reimbursable meals program. During the change from the old program to the new, our economically challenged students were not properly tagged in our student data base. This anomaly will appear in all of the following CST subgroup analysis charts. CST ELA 9th Grade 2005-06 % of Students 23 28 28 13 8

Advanced Proficient Basic Below Basic Far Below Basic % of Students 98.9% Tested Students 603/610 Tested/Students Enrolled

2006-07 % of Students 23 29 27 14 6

2007-08 % of Students 27 28 25 16 3

2008-09 % of Students 26 27 27 13 6

2009-10 % of Students 32 35 22 7 4

99.4%

96.0%

98.1%

94.2%

647/651

651/678

530/540

537/570

13


Schoolwide

CST ELA 9th Grade English Learners

14


Scial Education

CST ELA 9th Grade

15


CST ELA 10th Grade 2005-06 % of Students 25 34 25 12 3

Advanced Proficient Basic Below Basic Far Below Basic % of Students 95.9% Tested Students 398/415 Tested/Students Enrolled

2006-07 % of Students 16 28 32 15 8

2007-08 % of Students 27 28 28 11 5

2008-09 % of Students 26 28 29 11 6

2009-10 % of Students 26 26 31 10 7

97.8%

97.2%

97.3%

97.5%

487/498

489/503

547/562

511/524

Schoolwide

16


English Learners

CST ELA 10th Grade Special Education

17


Socioeconomically Disadvantaged

CST ELA 11th Grade 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 % of % of % of Students Students Students 22 27 21 26 27 27 25 27 32 15 11 13 13 8 6

Advanced Proficient Basic Below Basic Far Below Basic % of Students 98.0% Tested Students 432/441 Tested/Students Enrolled

2008-09 % of Students 21 33 28 12 7

2009-10 % of Students 26 25 28 12 8

98.9%

97.8%

98.3%

96.9%

354/358

394/403

466/474

530/547

18


CST ELA 11th Grade Schoolwide

English Learners

19


CST ELA 11th Grade Special Education

Socioeconomically Disadvantaged

20


The following data reflect performance on the CST Algebra I examinations. There is less difference among the subgroups on this exam, at least partially due to most students taking Algebra I in middle school. Thus there are few at the 9th grade level and above who are taking it for the first time. Additionally, Sonora also offers a two-year Algebra I program entitled Algebra Foundations. Students in the first year of this program take the Algebra I CST, even though they have only been exposed to the first half of the Algebra I curriculum. Further, most takers were not successful previously, and this performance tends to perpetuate itself, as indicated in the following tables. Interestingly, the socioeconomically disadvantaged students tend to almost mirror the overall subpopulation of the school who are taking this test. With the exception of the socioeconomically disadvantaged population in 2007, this trend is fairly constant. CST Algebra I (9th Grade) 2005-06 % of Students 1 14 25 41 18

Advanced Proficient Basic Below Basic Far Below Basic % of Students 75.9% Tested Students 463/610 Tested/Students Enrolled

2006-07 % of Students 1 13 30 41 15

2007-08 % of Students 0 19 49 25 7

2008-09 % of Students 3 13 22 48 15

2009-10 % of Students 7 19 24 38 12

75.3%

31.3%

70.2%

60.4%

490/651

212/678

379/540

344/570

CST Algebra I (10th Grade) 2005-06 % of Students 1 14 41 38 7

Advanced Proficient Basic Below Basic Far Below Basic % of Students 35.7% Tested Students 148/415 Tested/Students Enrolled

2006-07 % of Students 0 8 34 43 14

2007-08 % of Students 0 14 36 40 11

2008-09 % of Students 0 7 28 47 18

2009-10 % of Students 0 11 36 42 10

40.8%

42.7%

46.3%

42.6%

203/498

215/503

260/562

223/524

21


CST Algebra I (11th Grade) 2005-06 % of Students 0 9 31 43 16

Advanced Proficient Basic Below Basic Far Below Basic % of Students 29% Tested Students 128/441 Tested/Students Enrolled

2006-07 % of Students 0 4 28 54 14

2007-08 % of Students 0 6 29 42 23

2008-09 % of Students 0 8 26 45 20

2009-10 % of Students 1 6 36 44 13

15.9%

11.9%

23.2%

20.5%

57/358

48/403

110/474

112/547

Schoolwide

22


CST Algebra I English Learners

Special Education

23


CST Algebra I Socioeconomically Disadvantaged

Following are the CST Geometry performances for the 9th, 10th and 11th grades. Interestingly, the performance of the subgroups that generally are the most challenged tend to appear more successful when compared to the general population on the geometry assessments. As would be expected, those students who enrolled in Geometry when beginning high school in the ninth grade performed better than those who began their Geometry studies as tenth or eleventh graders, which show progressive declines in performance with each successive year of high school.

CST Geometry (9th Grade) 2005-06 % of Students 8 36 41 13 2

Advanced Proficient Basic Below Basic Far Below Basic % of Students 16.4% Tested Students 110/610 Tested/Students Enrolled

2006-07 % of Students 19 31 41 9 0

2007-08 % of Students 30 30 23 15 1

2008-09 % of Students 19 36 28 17 0

2009-10 % of Students 15 43 32 10 0

17.8%

20.2%

21.5%

24.6%

116/651

137/678

116/540

140/570

24


CST Geometry (10th Grade) 2005-06 % of Students 1 21 48 27 4

Advanced Proficient Basic Below Basic Far Below Basic % of Students 29.9% Tested Students 124/415 Tested/Students Enrolled

2006-07 % of Students 2 8 40 41 9

2007-08 % of Students 2 17 37 39 5

2008-09 % of Students 2 21 38 36 3

2009-10 % of Students 1 21 52 24 3

29.1%

25.6%

23.1%

19.5%

145/498

129/503

130/562

102/524

CST Geometry (11th Grade) 2005-06 % of Students 0 9 30 56 6

Advanced Proficient Basic Below Basic Far Below Basic % of Students 18.4% Tested Students 81/441 Tested/Students Enrolled

2006-07 % of Students 1 6 20 63 9

2007-08 % of Students 0 4 33 48 15

2008-09 % of Students 0 3 37 50 10

2009-10 % of Students 0 5 25 60 10

22.1%

23.3%

21.5%

23.0%

79/358

94/403

102/474

126/547

25


CST Geometry Schoolwide

English Learners

26


CST Geometry Special Education

Socioeconomically Disadvantaged

The CST Algebra II results follow, with the trend noted in the geometry comments again reflected in these performances. The major difference in achievement, however, occurs, as would be expected, between the 10th and 11th grades. Again, the 11th grade scores largely represent students who began their Algebra I course at the high school level instead of at the middle school.

27


CST Algebra II (9th Grade) 2005-06 % of Students 9 24 42 21 3

Advanced Proficient Basic Below Basic Far Below Basic % of Students 5.4% Tested Students 33/610 Tested/Students Enrolled

2006-07 % of Students 19 58 19 4 0

2007-08 % of Students 8 50 42 0 0

2008-09 % of Students 24 52 18 6 0

2009-10 % of Students 28 52 16 4 0

4.0%

1.8%

6.1%

4.4%

26/651

12/678

33/540

25/570

CST Algebra II (10th Grade) 2005-06 % of Students 5 26 45 21 3

Advanced Proficient Basic Below Basic Far Below Basic % of Students 26.0% Tested Students 108/415 Tested/Students Enrolled

2006-07 % of Students 4 24 45 26 1

2007-08 % of Students 10 43 28 16 4

2008-09 % of Students 11 40 40 9 0

2009-10 % of Students 17 40 29 12 2

24.7%

22.3%

24.9%

26.5%

123/498

112/503

140/562

139/524

28


CST Algebra II (11th Grade) 2005-06 % of Students 1 12 38 36 13

Advanced Proficient Basic Below Basic Far Below Basic % of Students 37.0% Tested Students 163/441 Tested/Students Enrolled

2006-07 % of Students 2 10 35 45 8

2007-08 % of Students 2 21 41 27 8

2008-09 % of Students 1 21 43 31 4

2009-10 % of Students 2 19 45 28 7

43.0%

36.5%

32.9%

32%

154/358

147/403

156/474

175/547

Schoolwide

29


CST Algebra II English Learners

Special Education

30


CST Algebra II

Socioeconomically Disadvantaged The Summative High School Math scores, presented in the following two charts, also reflect higher achievement overall in the 10th grade as compared to the 11th. It may also be noted that fewer ELs take this examination, with resulting higher performance for those that do. CST Summative High School Math (10th Grade) 2005-06 % of Students 22 39 39 0 0

Advanced Proficient Basic Below Basic Far Below Basic % of Students 4.3% Tested Students 18/415 Tested/Students Enrolled

2006-07 % of Students 31 38 31 0 0

2007-08 % of Students 24 33 29 14 0

2008-09 % of Students 27 36 36 0 0

2009-10 % of Students 30 60 10 0 0

2.6%

4.2%

2.0%

3.8%

13/498

21/503

11/562

20/524

31


CST Summative High School Math (11th Grade) 2005-06 % of Students 14 47 25 14 0

Advanced Proficient Basic Below Basic Far Below Basic % of Students 13.4% Tested Students 59/441 Tested/Students Enrolled

2006-07 % of Students 12 37 30 20 2

2007-08 % of Students 10 41 39 10 0

2008-09 % of Students 24 46 25 4 0

2009-10 % of Students 21 49 23 6 0

16.8%

14.6%

15.0%

17.4%

60/358

59/403

71/474

95/547

Schoolwide

32


CST Summative High School Math English Learners

Socioeconomically Disadvantaged

33


Performance on the CST World History examination has improved overall, and this improvement is shared by all sub-groups. The only exception is seen in those students taking the test in the 11th grade in the years 2007-2008 and 2008-2009. In general, students that take World History in their 11th grade year, have to do so because of an impacted schedule resulting from intervention and support classes. Thus, it is not surprising that these at-risk students continue to struggle.

CST World History (9th Grade) 2005-06 % of Students Advanced Proficient Basic Below Basic Far Below Basic % of Students Tested Students Tested/Students Enrolled

2006-07 % of Students 8 12 34 20 26

2007-08 % of Students 6 15 29 19 31

2008-09 % of Students 1 0 0 0 0

11.4%

12.7

.9%

74/651

86/678

5/540

2009-10 % of Students

CST World History (10th Grade) 2005-06 % of Students 21 27 31 12 9

Advanced Proficient Basic Below Basic Far Below Basic % of Students 95.9 Tested Students 398/415 Tested/Students Enrolled

2006-07 % of Students 20 24 37 12 8

2007-08 % of Students 25 28 28 9 10

2008-09 % of Students 26 23 26 13 11

2009-10 % of Students 32 25 25 8 10

75.9%

74.4%

84.2%

87.6%

378/498

374/503

473/562

459/524

34


CST World History (11th Grade) 2005-06 % of Students

2006-07 % of Students

Advanced Proficient Basic Below Basic Far Below Basic % of Students Tested Students Tested/Students Enrolled

35

2007-08 % of Students 8 0 8 8 75

2008-09 % of Students 0 0 0 0 100

4.0%

3.6%

16/403

17/474

2009-10 % of Students


CST World History Schoolwide

English Learners

36


CST World History Special Education

Socioeconomically Disadvantaged

The performance of students on the U.S. History (11th Grade) examinations has demonstrated generally continual improvement for the previous five years, with 38% of those students taking the examination achieving in the advanced range for the 2009-2010. Both the Below Basic and Far Below Basic categories have declined from double digit to single digit percentages during this same time frame. The consistently improving performance of the Socioeconomically Disadvantaged students tends to mirror the overall performance of the general population of All Students.

37


CST U.S. History (11th Grade) 2005-06 % of Students 18 28 29 14 11

Advanced Proficient Basic Below Basic Far Below Basic % of Students 97.5% Tested Students 430/441 Tested/Students Enrolled

2006-07 % of Students 20 33 31 11 5

2007-08 % of Students 28 35 21 9 7

2008-09 % of Students 33 32 19 8 9

2009-10 % of Students 38 31 18 6 7

97.2%

97.3%

98.1%

96.3%

348/358

392/403

465/474

527/547

Schoolwide

38


CST U.S. History English Learners

Special Education

39


CST U.S. History Socioeconomically Disadvantaged

The Department of Natural Sciences at Sonora has undergone a major curricular change over the past nine years, with the major changes having been finalized just at the beginning of the second half of this current accreditation cycle. The department had been entirely in an Integrated Science curriculum, combining Earth Science, Biology, Chemistry and Physics at both the standard and honors levels. Other science electives, however, were offered and continue to be available to all students. These include Astronomy, Marine Science, Organic/Biochemistry and Physiology. The transition back to the more traditional science curriculum model began with allowing new incoming students to select either Integrated Science I or Biology (Honors or Regular) for their freshman course. Their second course then would be either Biology or Chemistry. The school has maintained the Integrated Science I course for all students, should they choose to begin with such a survey course. A major result of this is a large current Physics offering, including Regular, Honors, and Honors/IB. The current school year is the third year of offering the traditional Physics course after approximately an eight-year absence during the Integrated Science period. During the entire time of both total Integrated Sciences and the transition, Higher Level International Baccalaureate Biology has been successfully maintained. Also during this transition time, the Agriculture program, in line with Agriculture programs across the state, began offering certain curricula with an Agriculture emphasis. On the Sonora campus, in terms of the sciences, this has included Biology with an Agriculture emphasis, and Earth Science. Following these courses, interested students generally transition into the standard science curricula for Chemistry, Physics, and/or the previously described science elective courses. Knowledge of the existence of two different methods of science education during this current accreditation cycle, the transition years between the two, and the interrelationship with the Agriculture Program may help the reader better understand the data tables presenting science achievement that follow.

40


The first set of examination results presented are those showing achievement on the statewide tenth grade examination of Life Science, in compliance with the requirements of the No Child Left Behind legislation. The increased numbers across the years reflect the largely increasing overall school enrollment during the time period. CST Life Science (10th Grade) 2005-06 % of Students 21 23 37 13 7

Advanced Proficient Basic Below Basic Far Below Basic % of Students 95.9% Tested Students 398/415 Tested/Students Enrolled

2006-07 % of Students 19 25 27 16 12

2007-08 % of Students 27 23 27 14 10

2008-09 % of Students 26 27 28 12 7

2009-10 % of Students 30 24 28 12 5

97.2%

97.0%

97.3%

95.2%

484/498

488/503

547/562

499/524

The following CST Biology/Life Science results are those of the regular CST Biology examination, separated by grade level, but combined along with the Earth Science results when represented with the bar graphs. It should be recalled that the years with “gray fill� are times when one or more courses were in transition. While overall successful performance has nearly doubled in the past four years with similar results seen in the Socioeconomically Disadvantaged data, there appears to be great need in EL and Special Education. CST Biology/Life Science (9th Grade) 2005-06 % of Students Advanced Proficient Basic Below Basic Far Below Basic % of Students Tested Students Tested/Students Enrolled

2006-07 % of Students 3 16 32 33 17

2007-08 % of Students 31 41 18 8 3

2008-09 % of Students 44 44 10 1 0

2009-10 % of Students 63 30 7 1 0

11.7%

30.2%

28.3%

26.7%

76/651

205/678

153/540

152/570

41


CST Biology/Life Science (10th Grade) 2005-06 % of Students 0 20 55 20 5

Advanced Proficient Basic Below Basic Far Below Basic % of Students 4.8% Tested Students 20/415 Tested/Students Enrolled

2006-07 % of Students 18 26 40 10 6

2007-08 % of Students 22 35 32 7 4

2008-09 % of Students 5 24 51 13 7

2009-10 % of Students 6 29 47 11 6

80.5%

77.5%

62.1%

60.5%

401/498

390/503

349/562

317/524

CST Biology/Life Science (11th Grade) 2005-06 % of Students Advanced Proficient Basic Below Basic Far Below Basic % of Students Tested Students Tested/Students Enrolled

2006-07 % of Students 6 27 40 10 17

2007-08 % of Students 10 28 45 10 7

2008-09 % of Students 14 17 49 14 6

2009-10 % of Students 3 9 47 28 13

17.6%

7.2%

7.4%

5.9%

63/358

29/403

35/474

32/547

42


CST Biology/Life Science Schoolwide

English Learners

Special Education

43


Socioeconomically Disadvantaged

CST Earth Science (9th Grade) 2005-06 % of Students 0 6 31 27 36

Advanced Proficient Basic Below Basic Far Below Basic % of Students 10.5% Tested Students 64/610 Tested/Students Enrolled

2006-07 % of Students 1 12 30 28 28

2007-08 % of Students 1 17 48 24 11

2008-09 % of Students 2 16 42 25 14

2009-10 % of Students 1 23 48 15 13

14.1%

12.4%

15.7%

18.9%

92/651

84/678

85/540

108/570

44


CST Earth Science (10th Grade) 2005-06 % of Students 0 7 53 20 20

Advanced Proficient Basic Below Basic Far Below Basic % of Students 3.6% Tested Students 15/415 Tested/Students Enrolled

2006-07 % of Students 0 8 15 38 38

2007-08 % of Students

2008-09 % of Students

2009-10 % of Students 6 6 12 18 59

2.6%

3.2%

13/498

17/524

CST Earth Science (11th Grade) 2005-06 % of Students 3 6 44 36 11

2006-07 % of Students

Advanced Proficient Basic Below Basic Far Below Basic % of Students 21.3% Tested Students 94/306.9 Tested/Students Enrolled

45

2007-08 % of Students

2008-09 % of Students

2009-10 % of Students


CST Earth Science Schoolwide

English Learners

46


CST Earth Science Special Education

Socioeconomically Disadvantaged

The following data regarding CST Chemistry again indicated no discrete Chemistry course during the 2005-2006 school year, with few tenth graders in the program during the years 2006-2008. However, as the traditional program began to dominate in course offerings, the number of advanced and proficient students increased dramatically. It should be noted that tenth graders in Chemistry are usually honors-level students. The graphical representations of the data once again clearly confirm the school-wide need to strongly address especially the subpopulation of English Learners, Special Education students, and, to a slightly lesser extent, the Socioeconomically Disadvantaged students.

47


CST Chemistry (10th Grade) 2005-06 % of Students Advanced Proficient Basic Below Basic Far Below Basic % of Students Tested Students Tested/Students Enrolled

2006-07 % of Students 6 19 31 31 13

2007-08 % of Students 6 6 50 13 25

2008-09 % of Students 21 41 33 5 1

2009-10 % of Students 32 42 21 4 1

3.2%

3.2%

27.6%

29.8%

16/498

16/503

155/562

156/524

CST Chemistry (11th Grade) 2005-06 % of Students Advanced Proficient Basic Below Basic Far Below Basic % of Students Tested Students Tested/Students Enrolled

2006-07 % of Students 4 24 52 14 6

2007-08 % of Students 11 27 43 11 7

2008-09 % of Students 9 34 42 11 4

2009-10 % of Students 5 20 42 20 13

66.2%

65.0%

61.8%

47.7%

237/358

262/403

293/474

261/547

48


CST Chemistry Schoolwide

English Learners

49


CST Chemistry Special Education

Socioeconomically Disadvantaged

The final science course to complete the cycle in the Integrated to Classical Science pattern of instruction was Physics, as indicated in the CST Physics. In this first year of CST testing, 2009-2010, 68 students, or 53%, of those tested were Proficient or Advanced. It might be reasonable at this point to remind readers that students do not sit for CST exams as seniors, the grade level of many Physics students.

50


CST Physics (11th Grade) 2005-06 % of Students

2006-07 % of Students

2007-08 % of Students

2008-09 % of Students

Advanced Proficient Basic Below Basic Far Below Basic % of Students Tested Students Tested/Students Enrolled

2009-10 % of Students 18 50 29 2 2 23.6% 129/547

CST Integrated/Coordinated Science I (9th Grade) 2005-06 % of Students 2 22 56 16 5

Advanced Proficient Basic Below Basic Far Below Basic % of Students 80.3% Tested Students 490/610 Tested/Students Enrolled

2006-07 % of Students 5 22 50 15 8

2007-08 % of Students 0 15 48 17 19

2008-09 % of Students 2 13 49 20 16

2009-10 % of Students 1 29 50 12 7

72.2%

50.3%

51.9%

49.3%

470/651

341/678

280/540

281/570

51


CST Integrated/Coordinated Science I (10th Grade) 2005-06 % of Students 0 7 71 18 4

Advanced Proficient Basic Below Basic Far Below Basic % of Students 6.7 Tested Students 28/415 Tested/Students Enrolled

2006-07 % of Students 0 7 41 27 25

2007-08 % of Students 0 11 19 37 33

2008-09 % of Students 0 5 45 14 36

8.8%

5.4%

3.9%

44/498

27/503

22/562

CST Integrated/Coordinated Science I (11th Grade) 2005-06 % of Students 0 0 47 47 7

Advanced Proficient Basic Below Basic Far Below Basic % of Students 3.4% Tested Students 15/441 Tested/Students Enrolled

52

2006-07 % of Students 0 7 55 21 17 11.7% 42/358

2009-10 % of Students


Schoolwide

CST Coordinated/Integrated Science English Learners

53


Special Education

CST Coordinated/Integrated Science Socioeconomically Disadvantaged

54


CST Integrated/ Coordinated Science II (9th Grade)

Advanced Proficient Basic Below Basic Far Below Basic % of Students Tested Students Tested/ Students Enrolled

2005-06 % of Students 0 2 29 45 24 6.9% 42/610

CST Integrated/ Coordinated Science II (10th Grade) 2005-06 % of Students 3 19 50 20

Advanced Proficient Basic Below Basic Far Below Basic % of Students Tested Students Tested/ Students Enrolled

7 80.7% 335/415

55

CST Integrated/ Coordinated Science II (11th Grade)

Advanced Proficient Basic Below Basic Far Below Basic % of Students Tested Students Tested/ Students Enrolled

2005-06 % of Students 0 11 54 24 11 14.3% 63/441


CST Integrated/Coordinated Science III (11th Grade) 2005-06 % of Students 6 34 49 8 3

Advanced Proficient Basic Below Basic Far Below Basic % of Students 56.5% Tested Students 249/441 Tested/Students Enrolled CAHSEE Results

Since Sonora recently became a Title I targeted school, it becomes important to begin tracking the number of students that are scoring proficient on the CAHSEE. Hence, proficiency rates are included beginning with the 2009-10 school year.

California High School Exit Exam Results for 10th Grade Students Math Year 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10

Tested Passed Tested Passed Tested Passed Tested Passed Tested Passed Proficient or Above

Total

Special Education

English Learners

401 370 469 405 471 405 462 395 415 371 253

18 11 19 9 17 4 16 4 19 9 4

50 37 (74.0%) 102 61 (59.8%) 73 38 (52.1%) 72 44 (61.1%) 50 27 (54.0%) 5 (21.1%)

(92.3%) (86.4%) (86.0%) (85.5%) (89.4%) (61.0%)

56

(61.1%) (47.4%) (23.5%) (25.0%) (47.4%) (21.1%)

Socio economically Disadvantaged 61 54 (88.5%) 87 66 (75.9%) 101 78 (77.2%) 142 106 (74.6%) 169 137 (81.1%) 74 (43.8%)


ELA Year 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10

Tested Passed Tested Passed Tested Passed Tested Passed Tested Passed Proficient or Above

Total

Special Education

English Learners

401 352 (87.8%) 469 403 (85.9%) 473 411 (86.9%) 463 396 (85.5%) 414 361 (87.2%) 257 (62.1%)

18 8 (44.4%) 22 5 (22.7%) 18 5 (27.8%) 17 4 (23.5%) 19 8 (42.1%) 1 (5.3%)

50 18 (36.0%) 103 54 (52.4%) 76 40 (52.6%) 73 33 (45.2%) 49 18 (36.7%) 2 (4.1%)

Socio economically Disadvantaged 61 45 (73.8%) 85 58 (68.2%) 102 78 (76.5%) 143 104 (72.7%) 169 129 (76.3%) 71 (42.0%)

AYP Results Schoolwide, Sonora has met its AYP every year since the last visit. However, there is still concern about the subgroups that have not been able to do so. AYP 2005-2006

57


AYP 2005-2006

AYP 2006-2007

58


AYP 2007-2008

AYP 2007-2008

AYP 2008-2009

59


AYP 2008-2009

Test Fee Reductions Increased monetary assistance for standardized tests has provided more accessibility to these tests than in previous years. Test Fee Reductions Test

2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

AP IB PSAT

Fee % Reduction/ Total Tests 31/447 6.9 6/143 4.2 7/168 4.2

Fee % Reduction/ Total Tests 106/469 22.6 9/104 8.7 6/149 4.0

Fee % Reduction/ Total Tests 204/733 27.8 118/246 50.0 3/170 1.8

Fee Reduction/ Total Tests 107/222 22/179

%

48.3 12.3

ACT Results ACT Results Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

Number of Students 63 85 90 90 116 129

English

Math

Reading

21.9 22.4 21.8 21.2 21.2 22.1

22.0 23.3 22.4 21.7 22.1 23.2

23.2 22.8 22.7 22.0 21.6 22.6

60

Science Reasoning 21.8 21.8 21.6 20.8 21.4 22.1

Composite 22.3 22.7 22.3 21.5 21.7 22.6


SAT I Results SAT I Results Year

Number of Students Tested

Math Scores

2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

219 207 191 193 186

523 514 517 501 528

Critical Reading Scores 516 504 507 486 514

Writing Scores 519 506 510 482 513

Advanced Placement Exam Results The data indicate strong performance in that while nearly increasing the total students taking the Advanced Placement Examinations by approximately 2.5 times, the passage rate, instead of stagnating or lowering, actually increased by 6 %. Total Advanced Placement Exams Year Number of Tests Taken Passage rate, %

2006 244

2007 220

2008 249

2009 286

2010 719

67

70

65

78

73

Advanced Placement Examination results for the years 2006-2010 may be found below, presented by year and by subject area tested within that year. Advanced Placement Exam Results (The data appears on the following page.)

61


Advanced Placement Exam Results

Statistics

Studio Art 2D

U.S. History 11 12 20

2 1 Tot

12 1 34

3 5 15

3 0 51

19 5 69

2 3 6

15 0 43

4 2 47

9 6 43

0 4 7

2 5 13

4 0 4

12 1 56

2007 5 4

Total # of Tests: 220 3 1 1 0 16 7 0 2

5 10

4 15

0 0

1 4

6 28

8 11

0 2

0 0

0 0

10 20

12 10 33

3

9

2

0

1

22

23

1

10

16

6

0

5

2

17

2 1 Tot

6 4 38

8 16 34

0 0 1

5 7 15

8 0 45

9 4 55

0 1 2

14 3 32

3 5 58

9 6 40

0 0 2

2 0 7

0 0 2

7 0 54

2008 5 4 3

Total # of Tests: 249 6 8 0 5 10 0 2 9 1

5 12 19

3 5 44

0 0 1

1 1 9

9 18 15

3 10 12

1 2 4

0 1 6

8 22 16

2 1 Tot

7 6 26

2 0 38

10 9 71

2 2 5

14 5 30

9 3 54

15 11 51

4 1 1 2

9 4 20

10 1 57

2009 5 4

Total # of Tests: 286 12 6 2 1 6 9 5 2

1 6

4 10

17 23

1 1

3 3

0 0

18 27

17 15

0 0

0 3

0 2

10 24

4 2 33

8 8 17

3

6

12

0

1

18

10

32

0

5

1

12

9

0

2

0

19

2 1 Tot

5 5 34

6 4 37

0 0 7

4 3 11

11 2 38

4 0 28

7 4 83

0 2 4

6 4 21

0 0 1

4 3 64

4 5 50

0 1 1

2 1 8

0 0 2

9 3 65

62

38 93 15 1 97 42 42 1

39 11 5 11 4 71 46 38 5

44 86 13 8 94 52 41 4

92 13 6 12 7 62 37 45

Percentage of Total

Spanish Literature

0 0 0

Total Grades Reported

Spanish Language

0 2 4

Human Geography

Psychology

Studio Art-Drawing

French Language

0 1 2

Physics B

European History

8 10 10

U.S. Government

English Lit/Comp

4 20 17

English Language

1 8 19

Econ Macro

1 0 0

Calculus BC

3 6 36

Calculus AB

5 17 26

Biology

Total # of Tests: 244 3 1 1 10 5 2 8 5 4

AP Exam Score 2006 5 4 3

9 22 36 23 10 100

10 30 30 18 12 100

11 21 33 23 13 100

20 30 28 14 8 100


4 2010 5

Total # of Tests: 719 4 4

6

1

7

0

4

0

28

21

3

1

1

0

22

22

4

5

4

7

14

24

0

1

0

31

15

5

1

0

1

31

38

3

12

17

24

29

38

2

19

1

14

11

6

6

0

0

13

35

2

3

9

15

15

9

0

20

0

8

9

1

1

0

1

12

21

1 Tot

4 28

15 49

0 52

3 62

11 89

2 4

5 49

3 4

5 86

4 60

1 1 6

2 11

0 1

0 2

1 79

11 127

(Advanced Placement Exam Results continued.)

International Baccalaureate Exam Results Sonora offers the International Baccalaureate program to all interested students. Whereas the school may not have as many full diploma graduates as other schools, students are strongly encouraged to do certificates in their subject areas of interest. Scores of four or higher are considered passing. International Baccalaureate Exam Results

0 0 5 4 5 3

0 1 8 5 5 1

0 2 0 0 0 0

1 0 4 5 9 0

Visual Arts SL

1 3 7 2 5 3 0 0 1 21

Visual Arts HL

63

Spanish B SL

1 0 0 0 0 0

Spanish B HL

0 2 7 12 0 0

0 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 4

Spanish AB

0 0 0 2 1 0

0 0 2 9 2 3 0 0 2 16

Russian B SL

0 0 0 0 1 0

0 3 6 16 7 3 0 0 3 35

Psychology SL

0 12 23 6 0 0

0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

Physics SL

0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

Math Studies SL

0 9 16 5 2 0 0 0 2 32

Mandarin B SL

0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 2

Korean B SL

0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

Japanese B SL

1 10 30 8 0 0 0 0 0 49

Mandarin B HL

History of Europe HL Hebrew B SL

0 0 3 13 13 0

French B SL

2007 7 6 5 4 3 2

French B HL

0 0 0 0 5 5 0 0 0 10

English A1 HL

Chemistry SL

0 1 3 9 18 5 0 0 0 36

Economics HL

Biology HL

IB Exam Score 2006 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 P N Tot

0 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 4

0 0 1 2 0 0

0 0 0 2 0 2

12 4 17 6 22 8 12 4 67 71 9

17 24 32 17 9 100


1 P N Tot

0 0 0 29

0 0 0 41

0 0 0 1

2008 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 P N Tot

0 1 6 5 8 0 0 0 1 20

1 8 24 4 0 0 0 0 1 37

0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

2009 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 P N Tot

0 4 9 7 5 2 0 0 0 27

2 9 16 1 0 0 0 0 1 29

2010 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 P N Tot

1 1 3 5 15 3 0 0 0 27

0 9 25 9 3 0 0 0 1 46

0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2

0 0 0 3

0 0 0 21

0 0 0 1

0 0 5 9 3 0 0 0 2 17

0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

1 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 3

0 0 10 4 0 0 0 0 1 15

0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

0 2 3 2 3 0 0 0 2 12

0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1

1 1 4 9 5 1 0 0 4 19

0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 2

1 1 3 7 5 0 0 0 1 17

1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

0 2 4 4 1 0 0 0 3 11

0 0 1 2 6 6 0 0 11 15

1 3 4 12 0 0 0 0 14 20

1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

64

0 0 9 17

0 0 0 20

1 1 6 3 1 1 0 0 4 13

0 6 4 5 0 0 0 0 1 15

0 0 0 2

0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

0 0 1 19

0 0 0 3

0 0 0 40

1 0 2 6 0 0 0 0 1 9

0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 3

0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

0 2 3 2 1 0 0 0 1 9

1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1

0 7 7 10 3 0 0 0 2 27

3 1 3 3 0 0 0 0 1 10

0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 4

0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 2 3


International Baccalaureate Exam Results, continued Theory of Knowledge/Extended Essay 2006 ToK EE A (Excellent) B (Good) C (Satisfactory) D (Mediocre) E (Below Average)

2007 ToK EE

2008 ToK EE

2009 ToK EE

2010 ToK EE

3

1

0

3

0

0

1

2

0

3

16

6

6

5

2

1

4

2

0

2

6

10

11

12

2

3

5

5

5

5

0

7

5

2

0

0

0

1

7

2

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

International Baccalaureate Diplomas Earned International Baccalaureate Diplomas Earned Year 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

Number of Diploma Candidates 24 22 4 10 12

Number Receiving IB Diplomas

Per Cent Receiving IB Diplomas

17 16 3 10 9

70 73 75 100 75

Special Programs International Baccalaureate Classes Advance Placement Classes Integrated Science I Introduction of Mandarin as an additional World Language option Cross-curricular Humanities Program for college prep students in their Junior English and Social Science Classes AVID 65


Medical Careers Academy JROTC Agriculture ROP Community Based Instruction (CBI) AB 1802 Counseling meetings Student Activities, Co-Curricular and Extra-Curricular Sonora students enjoy the opportunity to participate in a wide range of activities, including: Academic Clubs: Academic Decathlon, Art Club, AP/IB Club, Book Club, Choir Club, French Club, Math Club, Science Club, Spanish Club, Speech and Debate Special Interest Clubs: Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Future Farmers of America (FFA), Girls’ Athletic Association, Girls’ League, Home Economics Club, Journalism Club Service Clubs and Organizations: Best Buds, Conflict Management, Friday Night Live, Holiday Food Drive, Key Club, Leos, MEChA, PALS, Honorary Organizations: California Scholarship Federation (CSF), National Honor Society (NHS) Student Government (ASB) Freshman Mentoring Impact Program Performing Organizations: Choir, Concert Band, Dance, Dance Production, Drama, Drum Line, Jazz Band, Madrigals, Marching Band, Pep Squads, Raiderette Drill Team, and Tall Flags Publications: School Paper, Yearbook Dances: Welcome Back, Homecoming, Winter Formal, Sadie Hawkins, Spring Fiesta, Prom, as well as others from time to time, including Valentine’s, and Hula Hawkins

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Special Nights: Dancing with the Staff, Lip Sync, Talent Show, Mr. Sonora, Raiderette Show, Dance Show, Fall and Spring Plays, Spring Musical Special Weeks: Spirit Week, Holiday Food Drive, March Olympics Special Events: Academic Awards, Cross the Line, Freshman Awards, Senior Breakfast, Senior Luau, Senior Awards Athletics: Two-four levels (Freshman, Sophomore, Frosh-Soph, Junior Varsity and Varsity) of many CIF team sports, including Fall: Football, Men’s Water Polo, Men and Women’s Cross Country, Women’s Tennis, Women’s Volleyball, Winter: Men and Women’s Basketball, Women’s Water Polo, Men and Women’s Soccer, Wrestling, Spring: Baseball, Softball, Golf, Men’s Tennis, Men and Women’s Swimming and Diving, Men’s and Women’s Track and Field Class Size Report Class size has gradually increased over the last six-year period. The increase in the English class sizes can be attributed at least in part to the loss of 20:1 district-wide. Class Size Year 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11

English 25.4 20.6 22.1 19.5 18.5 24.9

Math 29.6 26.1 28.3 26.7 22.6 25.8

Subject Area Social Science 29.4 29.7 31.4 28.3 22.3 23.4

Science 28.6 26.1 28.0 27.0 24.8 25.7

Certificated Staff Per-Pupil Report Certificated Staff Per-Pupil as reported through CBEDS Explanation of Service Categorization Administrators include principals, assistant principals, program directors and/or coordinators, and other certificated staff not providing direct services to students.

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Pupil Services personnel include certificated employees who provide direct services to students but are not teachers, including counselors, nurses, psychologists, social workers, librarians, speech specialists, and other medical personnel.

Administrators Pupil Services

2005-06 4 7

2006-07 4 6

2007-08 4 8

2008-09 4 9

2009-10 4 8

Teacher Credential Report Teacher Credential Report # of Teachers

2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11

Full Credential

# 77 77 80 80 94 89

81 80 83 83 94 89

University Intern

% 95.1 96.2 96.4 96.4 100.0 100.0

# 2 2 2 2 0 0

District Intern

% 2.5 2.5 2.4 2.4 0.0 0.0

# 0 0 1 1 0 0

Emergency

% 0 0 1.2 1.2 0.0 0.0

# 2 1 1 1 0 0

% 2.5 1.2 1.2 1.2 0.0 0.0

Waiver

# 1 1 1 1 0 0

% 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 0.0 0.0

Teacher Education Level Report # of Teachers

2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10

81 80 83 83 81

Doctorate

Master’s +30

Master’s

Bachelor’s +30

Bachelor’s

Less than Bachelor’s

# 2 2 2 2 2

# 17 17 24 26 25

# 19 21 22 20 22

# 24 27 23 29 24

# 18 12 12 8 8

# 1 1 0 0 0

% 2.5 2.5 2.4 2.4 2.5

% 21 21.2 28.9 30.6 30.9

68

% 23.5 26.2 26.5 23.5 27.2

% 29.6 33.8 27.7 34.1 29.6

% 22.2 15.0 14.5 9.4 9.9

% 1.2 1.2 0 0 0


Teachers by Ethnicity Report Teachers by Ethnicity Reported by Per Cent

Year 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10

American Indian or Alaska Native

Asian

Pacific Islander

Filipino

Hispanic Or Latino

African American (not Hispanic)

White (not Hispanic)

Multiple Or no Response

Total

0 0 0 0 0

7 7 5 5 6

0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0

10 12 12 13 13

0 0 0 0 0

64 61 66 67 62

0 0 0 0 0

81 80 83 85 81

Classified Staff Classified Staff

2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10

Paraprofessional # % 10 27.8 8 23.5 16 36.4 16 37.2 16 36.4

Office/Clerical # % 12 33.3 13 38.2 14 31.8 14 32.6 12 27.2

Other # % 14 38.9 13 38.2 14 31.8 13 30.2 16 36.4

Total # 36 34 44 43 44

Opportunities for Parent and Community Participation Activity Booster Clubs, Athletic Booster Clubs, Grad Night, Parent Institute, PTSA and Academic Boosters, ROP Course Offerings, School Site Council, ELAC, DELAC Technology Computers purchased since the last visit 32 (Library) 40 (Intervention Courses such as Read 180 & Accelerated Math) 30 laptops (Agriculture) Computer Software/Instructional Programs Purchased since the last visit Read 180 69


Accelerated Math Rosetta Stone Modernization New LCD projectors in all the classrooms Additional electrical outlets in all the classrooms Additional data jacks throughout the campus Internet Sites Aeries Browser Interface (ABI) has attendance, student information, and gradebook available on-line for teachers, parents, and students New school website Projected Improvements for 2010-11 4th T1 line will improve internet access school wide Fiber Optic line which will allow for the use of streaming video in instruction VoIP telephone system in the entire school Student Feedback Clickers for Medical Careers

Critical Academic Needs of Sonora High School Based on all the data gathered during the self study process, Sonora High School will: 1. Improve academic achievement of all students in all content areas as measured by the CSTs and the CAHSEE by providing all teachers with the training, tools and materials to conduct effective instruction and assessment and by providing students with the necessary supports and courses to promote their academic success. 2. Support our English Learners and Special Education subgroups to close the achievement gaps. 3. Develop and implement a system to support students to learn and achieve grade-level standards in English Language Arts, mathematics, science, and social science.

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2 Student/Community Profile: Overall Summary from Analysis of Profile Data 71


Chapter 2 Student/Community Profile: Overall Summary from Analysis of Profile Data The comprehensive analysis of all data relevant to the successful education of every student at Sonora High School is summarized briefly as follows:

Implications of the Data with respect to Student Achievement

Student achievement at Sonora is measured and reported through a wide range of assessments. In terms of the basic and fundamental student/teacher relationship, these may include individual classroom participation and classwork, homework, laboratory investigations, student projects, unit topical examinations, oral presentations, effective group studies, and final examinations, as appropriate to a specific curriculum. Additionally, benchmark exams in the core curriculum are periodically given to measure student achievement relative to California state standards for the courses. These latter exams are then used by both staff and students to determine areas of excellence, as well as those needing further attention. The benchmark exams also help the instructors analyze their own effectiveness in terms of student performance on specific topics, and, through the professional learning communities, share strategies for more effective teaching and learning as measured by external exams.

These external exams may include, depending upon the specific student and their individual interests and goals, the API Content Standards Examinations, the California High School Exit Examination, SAT and ACT exams and related subject-specific achievement tests, Advanced Placement exams, International Baccalaureate standard and higher level exams, and the California English Language Development Test.

Finally, a traditional overall indicator of student achievement is the graduation rate. In terms of the IB program, the percentage of IB Diploma candidates actually earning the full diploma, is also a helpful measure.

Sonora has increased its API steadily from 730 in 2004 to 798 in 2010, and is now the 3rd highest performing school in the district. However, three groups of students, while generally improving, are clearly not achieving at the same levels as most of the 72


student body. These groups who need particular support are English Learners, Special Education students, and Socio-economically challenged students. Certainly, some students fall into more than one of these categories, and some are in all three. As described more thoroughly in Chapter 3, a number of interventions were begun, especially during the last three years, to address these needs.

The historical achievement gap that has existed between the schoolwide population and many of the significant subgroups has become smaller but unfortunately, still exists. The reduction in the achievement gap is evidenced by the fact that, from 2006 to 2010, schoolwide Sonora’s API improved 27 points. Whereas this is a significant improvement, it is not as large an increase as it was for the significant subgroups that have historically struggled. During that same time period, the Hispanic/Latino subgroup improved 44 points, the socioeconomically disadvantaged subgroup improved 63 points, and the English Learners subgroup improved 64 points. The Special Education subgroup has been a significant subgroup some of the years but not all of them. During this time period, the Special Education subgroup improved 30 points. Since an achievement gap nevertheless persists, these subgroups continue to be a major area of concern and focus.

Sonora has met its AYP for each of the years during this accreditation period. However, the same groups identified above also are the lowest achieving demographic groups relative to the AYP determination. The very same trends also appear in the achievement profile for the CAHSEE, with the Socio-economically challenged students, because of their sheer group size, having the largest overall impact on the pass rate of the school.

Over this last accreditation period, student performance on the ACT has remained relatively stable, with the years 2006 and 2010 being the highest. SAT I scores have declined somewhat, as have the numbers of students taking the exam, which are down about 8 %. However, the number of students taking AP exams has increased tremendously, from 244 individual exams in 2006 to 719 exams in 2010. Almost incredibly, the pass rate has also jumped from 67% overall to 73%! The number of IB exams written each year has remained relatively stable. The percentage of students earning IB diplomas has remained at a relatively healthy 75% of actual candidates, with the exception of 2009, in which year 100% of candidates actually earned the IB diploma.

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Identified Critical Academic Needs Sonora High School will:

1. Improve academic achievement of all students in all content areas as measured by the CSTs and the CAHSEE by providing all teachers with the training, tools and materials to conduct effective instruction and assessment and by providing students with the necessary supports and courses to promote their academic success. 2. Support our English Learners and Special Education subgroups to close the achievement gaps. 3. Develop and implement a system to support students to learn and achieve grade-level standards in English Language Arts, mathematics, science, and social science. Key Questions

• •

How effective have newly implemented intervention programs such as Reach Reading, Read 180, Accelerated Math, and CAHSEE Review proven to be for EL, Special Education Students, and socioeconomically disadvantaged students? Although some progress has been made with regard to reducing the achievement gap, what additional steps need to be taken to further effectively close and/or eliminate the achievement gap?

74


3 Progress Report 75


Chapter 3 Progress Report

Introduction

This chapter will describe the progress made since the last full six-year WASC visit and accreditation. That previous self-study, visit, and accreditation recommendation resulted in Sonora being awarded a six year term of accreditation with a third year revisit. The following description will be presented in four sections. The first section will state the critical areas of growth identified by the visiting committee as needing immediate attention. The school staff and community joined with the committee in the recognition that it was essential for these needs to be addressed vigorously and without delay to ensure the continued successful academic growth of all students served by Sonora. The second section will describe the steps taken in the first three years to address these needs. Following, the third section will recapitulate the results of the implementation of the plan during that first three years of the new accreditation term. Finally, the fourth portion will describe the continued efforts of the school community that have ultimately led to the greatest API growth in the history of the school.

At the conclusion of the last accreditation observation, the visiting committee identified three critical academic needs of the students being served by Sonora High School. These included:

1. Improve academic achievement for EL students. 2. Improve reading, writing, and computational skills for all students enrolled at Sonora High School. 3. Increase the number of students advancing to the Proficient and Advanced levels on both the California Standards Tests and on the High School Exit Exam.

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Based upon these three critical needs, the school community developed three corresponding goals:

Goal 1: Improve the academic achievement for English Language Learners as measured by grades, standardized test scores, and language acquisition measures.

Goal 2: Improve reading, writing and computational skills for all students enrolled at Sonora High School as measured by improvement on standardized examinations, improvement on grades received in classes, and in terms of writing, by scores received on district writing exams.

Goal 3: Increase the number of students moving from basic to proficient levels and from proficient to advanced levels on the CST and the CAHSEE.

The steps taken by the school community to achieve these goals follow.

Goal 1: Improve the academic achievement for English Language Learners as measured by grades, standardized test scores, and language acquisition measures.

Teachers were provided effective instructional methodologies for EL students. Teachers continued training and reviewing the “Classroom Instruction That Works” strategies. All teachers became SDAIE or CLAD certified.

Data Director and Aeries Browser Interface (ABI) training provided teachers with the access to pertinent data so that they were able to adjust and focus instruction in the appropriate areas to help students succeed on both individual and group bases.

EL students are closely monitored both at the time of placement and then throughout the school year to ensure that they are receiving appropriate instruction.

Additional funding from the district was provided that has allowed Learning Lab classes to be added to the master schedule to provide instructional support for EL students in the subjects of English and Mathematics. These classes provide additional opportunities for EL students to acquire English language and 77


mathematic skills. The classes also provide the students study skill strategies needed for academic success. •

All teachers were trained in the Jane Schaffer writing strategies. These strategies are utilized by teachers in all classes for all students as part of a schoolwide writing across the curriculum effort.

Students are able to utilize the credit/no credit grading option when appropriate so that they may accumulate credits toward graduation.

Personal support of EL students and their families has been enhanced through the implementation of Sonora’s Parent Institute training over this entire six year accreditation period. EL student and parent involvement has increased in ELAC, DELAC, SSC and the WASC self study process.

A bilingual counselor has been devoted to EL and recent Redesignated Fluent English Proficient students to focus on their unique academic needs.

Goal 2: Improve reading, writing and computational skills for all students enrolled at Sonora High School as measured by improvement on standardized examinations, improvement on grades received in classes, and in terms of writing, by scores received on district writing exams.

Teachers have access to student achievement data and examine the data through the Data Director system and Aeries Browser Interface (ABI). This system provides the instructional staff with standardized test data as well as student reading, writing and computational results to assist them in the planning of instruction.

The staff continues to support and model good practice through the campus wide SSR program. The teachers have embraced effective “bell to bell” instructional strategies.

• A two-year Algebra Foundations program has been established to assist students gain mastery of the Algebra content. This program benefits students by delivering the content at a slower pace, with extended guided practice and a longer period of time to master the standards.

78


• Students were placed in the Algebra Foundations program based upon prior performance as well as standardized testing results. • Teachers, counselors, and administrators utilize the TeleParent parental involvement phone system to send personalized messages in multiple languages to the families of their students. These messages provide the family information regarding classroom behavior, academic performance and scheduling of upcoming examinations or major projects. • One full-time counselor and one part-time counselor were able to be added to the staff at that time through AB 1802 funding. Goal 3: Increase the number of students moving from basic to proficient levels and from proficient to advanced levels on the CST and CAHSEE.

The following steps have been taken to address this goal:

• Departments aligned curricula and assessments to state standards. Pacing guides for the various subject areas were created to ensure that all students learned topics in an appropriate sequence, and were thus prepared for the periodic benchmark examinations. These examinations were developed initially under district coordination and guidance for the purposes both of assessment and to aid in the identification of areas that would need reteaching. • Individual teachers used Data Director to analyze specific student achievement in order to determine borderline category students as well as those students whose performance on the standardized tests does not reflect their school classroom performance. • Teachers collaborated to investigate the current research for strategies that have proven successful in improving student achievement. • The strategies were applied where appropriate to all students, whether a given student was determined to be in a borderline category or not. • Students were tested in comfortable and familiar conditions.

79


• The uses and value of state tests were honestly described to students and parents to encourage students to perform at the best of their ability. • Collaboration time was provided to staff through banked minutes, staff development days and SLC funded release time. This allowed teachers time to both find and share successful strategies for improving student achievement. • Students that improved their scores on standardized tests were honored by the school in a manner both appropriate and sensitive to student needs, while maintaining individual student confidentiality. In order to continue past progress, during the school year 2008-2009, the staff made the decision to use the early release days as professional learning days. Twice a month, the faculty meets in PLCs to discuss academic achievement. A number of strategies were implemented with the intention of increasing on a broad basis the academic performance of students schoolwide. The PLCs provided time as well as an atmosphere that engendered problem solving on a campus-wide basis to examine our essential standards and develop pacing guides for all subjects. These release times also allowed the development of common assessments and benchmarks that are given at strategic times throughout the school year. These meetings proved highly successful, with one result being that the school now makes use of four minimum days throughout the year to meet in the PLCs to input the results into Data Director and disaggregate the findings of the benchmark exams. The teachers then meet again with their PLCs to discuss the results and develop plans for the best reteaching of standards that were not mastered. Thus, the data is used to drive classroom instruction in a manner that will directly enhance student learning and achievement.

The student performance results following the implementation of the strategies described above are detailed in Chapter One of this report. However, a few comments at this point would be appropriate. Sonora did not meet its Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) in 2005, as its percentage of proficiency for mathematics and English-Language Arts criteria were not met. However, beginning in 2006, Sonora did meet the AYP requirements by meeting both proficiency and participation rates in all 18 of 18 AYP criteria and has continued to meet these standards since.

As can also be seen in the data presented in Chapter 1, the school has increased its API each year, beginning with 730 in 2004, and growing dramatically to 798 in 2010. However, the data clearly demonstrates that certain subgroups, such as English Language Learners, Special Education students, and socioeconomically disadvantaged students, do not perform at the same level as other subgroups, therefore resulting in an achievement gap.

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Nevertheless, Sonora did apply for and received its fourth Distinguished School Award from the State of California in 2007. A copy of that application may be found in the Appendix, and may be helpful in providing additional insight into the many academic and co-curricular opportunities at the school, as well as school, district and community programs.

Finally, a number of additional strategies and programs have been implemented during the past three years following the mid-term visit. These include, among others, strategic interventions in both reading and mathematics, as described below.

The Reach Reading program is being used as the curriculum for an intervention course for ninth graders that are struggling readers. Emphasis is placed on both the decoding and encoding aspects of reading. Students who scored far below basic or below basic on the previous year’s CST English Language Arts test are selected for the class. Additionally, teacher recommendation of other students whose scores may be just slightly higher has also proven to be a successful method of supporting students who need to improve their reading skills. The program is available to both identified Special Education students and General Education students. To measure student progress, students take both pre- and post-tests in the class. In order to maximize the effectiveness of the program, these students’ Reach Reading class is blocked with their regular English class.

For students who have mastered decoding, but score either below or far below basic in English Language Arts on their CSTs, and/or have below grade level reading scores on the Nelson reading test. the Scholastic Read 180 program has been implemented to improve reading comprehension. This course is provided for English Language Learners, English only, Redesignated and Initially Fluent students with class sizes being held to no larger than twenty students. Teachers provide systematic reading intervention through the use of Read 180 software that is individualized to meet student needs, as well as small group instruction that focuses on comprehension, academic vocabulary, and writing strategies. Students also participate in silent reading on a daily basis, using the Scholastic library of high-interest titles, and take quizzes upon completion of each book to assess progress. Student software progress is also continually monitored to assess student needs and adjust or differentiate instruction accordingly. The reading comprehension of the students is assessed five times per year using the Scholastic Reading Inventory (SRI), which provides a CST equivalent of proficiency. CST and SRI data have demonstrated significant growth for students in the Read 180 program.

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In mathematics, the school is using the Accelerated Math program in many intervention and support classes. The program was originally used to provide instruction and practice in the intervention math learning lab class for 9th grade students with CST math scores of far below basic and below basic. These students are concurrently enrolled in a traditional math class and the learning lab. The math faculty has developed a 152 objective library that students are expected to complete which consists of basic math facts, such as fractions, decimals, and integers. Secondly, this year Accelerated Math is also used in general math and special education classes for guided practice as well as the reteaching of concepts that have not yet been mastered. Thirdly, Accelerated Math is used as a curriculum for the Introduction to Algebra Skills class for students that have failed the first semester of Foundations Algebra I. This class was designed for students who have failed the first semester of Algebra I Foundations and need to focus on the mastery of pre-algebraic concepts.

For incoming freshman that were middle school non-graduates, Sonora offers the SNAP (Students Needing Academic Preparation) summer school course. For the math component of the program, Accelerated Math is used to help students master the skills necessary to transition to the comprehensive high school. For the English component, Read 180 is used to help students improve their reading skills.

In an attempt to identify and serve students who might have difficulty with the CAHSEE, we have begun administering a Mock CAHSEE to all freshmen. We began using this mock exam three years ago. Students take the exam in the same testing setting as they will as sophomores in order to approximate the actual testing environment. Students who do not perform successfully may be involved in one or both of two additional programs: the CAHSEE Boot Camp, and/or participation in a CAHSEE intervention class. The Boot Camp is a strategic and intensive test preparation pull-out four class course that students attend to increase the likelihood of passing the actual test. The CAHSEE intervention class is a semester-long class taught either during the summer or during the regular school day, replacing one of the student’s elective classes.

Special strategies designed to improve the education of EL students include differentiated instruction provided by instructors who have had training beyond the state requirement. Scheduling-wise, these students are, whenever possible, placed in classes that are sixty per cent English only, Redesignated Fluent English Proficient, or Initially Fluent English Proficient and forty per cent EL students. The EL students also have full access to the READ 180 program, and, just this year, to the learning of English through Rosetta Stone. EL teachers are provided with additional release time, and there is a continual, on-going reevaluation of students to ascertain that they are always in the optimal EL placement that best meets their academic needs.

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XFdssaf

4 Self-Study Findings 83


Chapter 4 Focus Group Reports Introduction

This chapter contains the reports of the results of the self-study as conducted by each of the five Focus Groups. Each report is preceded by a list of the members and the Focus Group Chairs. Please note that since the major portions of the Self-Study were conducted over the two year period, 2009-11, significant change in both students and staff has occurred. All participating members, regardless of the time served, have been included in the Focus Group lists at the beginning of each section of this chapter.

Each report was written by the Focus Group leaders based upon the discussions that occurred in their Focus Group meetings. Thus, while all reports address the appropriate guide questions, evaluate the school with respect to the questions under consideration, connect the discussion to pertinent Expected Schoolwide Learning Results, and provide evidence, each section of the report is somewhat unique.

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Organization: Vision and Purpose, Governance, Leadership and Staff, and Resources: Leaders: Sue Singh, Special Education Juan Viveros, World Language Alonzo

Terrinda

Student

Arnett

Mike

Parent

Barajas

Melissa

English

Behymer

Christopher

Aide

Bencomo

Ashley

Student

Chiotti

Paul

Social Science

Chyun

Hana

Student

Cullinan

Krystle

Nurse

Diaz Sanchez

Luis

Student

Endo

David

ROP

Han

Stanley

Student

Heller

Paul

Science

Hermosillo

Jessica

Student

Hernandez

Rey

Custodial

Horan

Hayden

Student

Hunt

Gary

Agriculture

Jew

Kathy

Parent

Khamo

Aleen

Student

Kim

Sally Jung Hyun

Student

Lao

Annie

Math

Leung

Joshua

Student

Longbotham

Greg

Technology

Lopez

Monica

Office

Marquez

David

JROTC

Meyer Ferris

Austin

Student

Morales

Emily

Student

Moreno

Liz

Food Services

Murphy

Mike

PE

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Peterson

Rich

Admin

Poitras

Nancy

Aide

Rodriguez

Remigio

Custodial

Rodriguez

Kris

English

Rojo

Joseph

Student

Serna

Yesenia

Student

Shetland

Jen

Arts

Singh

Sue

Special Ed.

Sipple

Russ

Special Ed.

Soares

Jana

World Languages

Sowell

Tim

Student

Spear

Bill

Math

Spiteri

Teresa

Science

Stevens

John

Security

Stone

Belia

Attendance

Torres

Brianna

Student

Tourville

Marc

Math

Vasquez

Antonieta

Counseling

Villalovos Monroy

Maria

Student

Viveros

Juan

World Languages

Vorell

Peggy

Office

Welch

Bruce

Parent

Williams

Samantha

Student

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Category A: Organization: Vision and Purpose, Governance, Leadership and Staff, and Resources A1. Vision and Purpose Criterion To what extent a) does the school have a clearly stated vision or purpose based on its student needs, current educational research and the belief that all students can achieve high levels and b) is the school's purpose supported by the governing board and the central administration and further defined by expected school wide learning results and the academic standards? Vision – ESLRs – Profile

Sonora has established a clear, coherent vision (purpose) of what students should know and perform; it is based upon high quality standards and is congruent with research, practices, the student/community profile data, and a belief that all students can learn. Sonora High School received input from representatives of all stakeholders, and through focus groups, to develop our ESLRs as well as the revision of student goals to align to state, local and National standards. Comment on pertinent student/community profile data that has impacted the development of the vision and the expected school wide learning results. Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

the end of Category A]

Sonora High School has a vision statement that supports the belief that all students can learn and achieve high levels. We acknowledge the importance of all stakeholders to the process of education and the welfare and achievement of our students. Our ESLRs and vision emphasize these same values for each student, promoting the realization of their individual potential The ever changing community demographics are monitored carefully to ascertain the continued relevance of each ESLR and/or ESLR group School Site Council, ELAC, and Principal’s Advisory Board reflects participation from all stakeholders who review and have a voice in the implementation of the ESLRs

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• Student Goals (ESLRs) • Regular review and revision as needed at PLCs and Home Groups. • Minutes from Focus group and Home group meetings. • Meeting Agendas, sign-in sheets, emails, student goals • Website, handouts • Teachers tie lessons to student goals • Student handbook has the vision and mission statements • A-G requirements • Data Director • CELDT Scores • CST Scores


• • • • •

School Site Council ELAC Principal’s Advisory Board ABI Common Assessments/ Benchmarks

Development/Refinement of Vision/ESLRs

The processes to ensure involvement of representatives from the entire school community in the development/refinement of the vision and expected school wide learning results are effective. Collaborative efforts were made with all stakeholders’ input to review the mission and vision statements. We revisit our ESLRs regularly to ensure that they align with state and Sonora standards and needs. Examine the effectiveness of the processes to ensure involvement of representatives from the entire school community in the development/refinement of the vision and expected schoolwide learning results. Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

• •

• • •

the end of Category A]

ESLRs are reviewed regularly by all stakeholders at PTSA, SSC, ELAC, and Principal’s Advisory Board meetings. They are fine tuned to meet the current needs of the SOHS population. Sonora High School ESLRs are aligned with the current vision and mission statements. Students, all staff (classified and certificated), administration, and parents contributed to the creation of mission and vision statements, and the adoption of the ESLRs. Teachers list student goals in their syllabus A-G requirements are posted and students are encouraged to learn and succeed. Single School for Student Achievement also reflects the application of the ESLRs, as does the WASC Action Plan

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• Monthly Leadership meetings with administrators and department chairs • Home Group and PLC meetings • Focus Group meetings • SSC, PTSA, ELAC, and Principal’s Advisory Board meetings • Weekly leadership meetings for the administrative staff • ESLRs are posted in all classrooms and all instructional venues • Website • Student Agendas • Graduation Goals


Understanding of Vision and ESLRs

Students, parents, and other members of the school community demonstrate understanding of and commitment to the vision and the expected schoolwide learning results. Examine the effectiveness of the processes to ensure involvement of representatives from the entire school community in the development/refinement of the purpose and expected schoolwide learning results. Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

• •

the end of Category A]

Sonora High School provides support to the learning community by offering a framework of course offerings that meet the needs of all students. This includes making the honors, International Baccalaureate (IB), and Advanced Placement (AP) courses and tests (fee waivers/reductions are available) accessible to more students. Sonora offers a continuum of Special Education services and placement options for students with disabilities. Students are ensured an education and access to curriculum that is tailored to the content standards, graduation requirements, and A-G approved courses. Teachers provide daily rigorous coursework in content standards. Sonora High School ESLRs conform to the FJUHSD goals. Master schedule is created in response to student needs allowing for coursework designed to meet the ever-changing needs of the student body. Teacher conference periods and banked minutes allow parents and staff to meet and discuss Single Plan for Student Achievement, ESLRs, and/or other concerns.

• • • •

• • • • • • • • • • •

School Website District website School Site Council Parent Institute for Quality Education (PIQE) Principal’s Newsletter in the PTSA Spotlight Student Handbook PLC and Home Group meetings A-G requirements Curriculum Committees Pacing Guides Common Assessments Benchmark Assessments Course Catalogues Special Education Information Sharing Day Students and parents meet with counselors to plan coursework

Regular Review and Revision

The school is implementing an effective process for regular review/revision of the school purpose and the expected school wide learning results based on student needs, global, national and local needs, and community conditions. Examine the effectiveness of the process for regular review/revision of the school purpose and the expected school wide learning results based on student needs, global, national and local needs, and community conditions.

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Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

• • • •

the end of Category A]

School goals, plans, and revisions are approved by School Site Council which is comprised of a representative sample from all stakeholders Administration, teachers and counselors speaks with students regarding the importance of testing/vision All departments are represented at Leadership Teachers use data director to access info about academic needs of students PLC release time to promote collaboration

• PTSA Sonora Spotlightanother way that vision is communicated • Administration expected behavior class visits • Administration testing pep/prep talks • Teachers hold Student Success Conferences (SSC) with students to create goals for CSTs • Staff Development Days to communicate and address new or changing needs

Additional Findings

What have you learned from analysis of additional evidence regarding this criterion? Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

• •

the end of Category A]

We have good communication between the district office, school administration and the communication between staff and parents Everyone has a voice that is heard Students, parents and staff take pride in their school and the learning environment

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• Leadership Meetings • All staff meetings • Visits from the Superintendent • Open forum for discussion with Superintendent • Board Meetings twice a month • PTSA, ELAC, Principal’s Advisory Board, and booster meetings • Parent Institute to promote parent participation • Highest rated school in parent satisfaction for the entire district


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A2.

Governance Criterion

To what extent does the governing board a) have policies and bylaws that are aligned with the school's purpose and support the achievement of the expected schoolwide learning results and academic standards based on data-driven instructional decisions for the school; b) delegate implementation of these policies to the professional staff; and c) regularly monitor results and approve the single schoolwide action plan and its relationship to the Local Educational Association (LEA) plan? Governing Board

The FJUHSD Board of Trustees clearly states its regulations, policies, and bylaws procedures in the district’s Board Policy Manual and the District’s website. The District informs all stakeholders of its activities by sending publications and posting information through this website. Sonora High School follows the school District’s regulations and policies and aligns them with the ESLRs. With the vision of its Leadership Committee and through the direction of the administrators, Sonora is able to delegate, implement and monitor the implementation of its policies. This is an ongoing process and on a yearly basis, which in turn drives the Single Plan for Student Achievement. Comment on the clarity of the policies and procedures regarding the selection, composition and specific duties of the governing board, including the frequency and regularity of board meetings. Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

• • • • •

the end of Category A]

The district board meetings are held at the district twice a month Policies and procedures are developed by the district’s Superintendent and approved by the Board of Trustees All staff hiring must be approved by the district’s Board of Trustees The Board of Trustees approves the district and school’s budget Sonora High School implements courses from a Course Catalog that is posted yearly and approved by the Board of Trustees Sonora High School’s Leadership Comittee and Administration implement District Board Policy by monitoring and evaluating school data. The FJUHSD Board of Trustees is composed of 5 members that have all been on the board for a minumum of 28 years. The FJUHSD Board also has a student representative to communicate student concerns and perspective to the elected board members and Superintendent.

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• The district posts the Board Meeting agenda on it’s website • The district’s policies and bylaws of the Board of Trustees and regulations to implement them are found in the Board Policy Manual and the district’s website • The district sends out a bulletin called In Touch which provides information about its meetings and what’s going on within the district • The Course Catalog is posted on the district’s website • Leadership Committee minutes


Relationship of Governance to Vision and ESLRs

The policies and procedures regarding the selection, composition and specific duties of the governing board are clear. Comment on the clarity of the policies and procedures regarding the selection, composition and specific duties of the governing board, including the frequency and regularity of board meetings. Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

• • • • • • •

the end of Category A]

The Board of Trustees is elected by voters living within district boundary lines District’s Board meetings are open to teachers and community members Board members contact information is published for teachers and community members Board attends “Principals’ Summit” Board sends out monthly newsletter to staff Board sends out quarterly newsletters to the community Board Meetings and decisions are discussed in Sonora’s School Site Council and PTSA meetings

• The FJUHDS announces it’s meetings, minutes, policies, contact phone numbers, and school website links, 0n its website • In Touch publication is sent to all staff members at each site

Understanding Role of Governing Board

Sonora’s stakeholders are informed of the school’s and District’s decisions. All stakeholders are invited to get involved in school activities, programs, and governing processes. Sonora’s School Site Council is a reflection of its stakeholders by including students, staff, and members of its community. To what degree does the school community understand the governing board’s role, including how parents can participate in the school’s governance? Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

the end of Category A]

Sonora’s School Site Council communicates the school and District’s policies and information PTSA meetings

District’s Newsletters

District Summer Information Packet

EL parents receive the school and District policies and information at ELAC and DELAC meetings

• School Site Council is composed of students, parents, community members, classified staff, teachers, counselors, and administrators • Sonora’s PTSA meets on the 4th Tuesday of every month in the teacher’s lounge • Quarterly ELAC and DELAC meetings • Newsletters are sent to the district’s community on a quarterly basis

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Governing Board’s Involvement in Review/Refinement

The FJUHSD is a data-driven district. The Board of Trustees expects each school to use Data Director, and other Test Scoring programs to guide and improve upon previous achievement. The governing board is regularly informed of all school’s performance and this enables them to create policy for the schools. How is the governing board involved in the regular review and refinement of the school’s vision and purpose and expected schoolwide learning results? Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

• • • • •

the end of Category A]

Board encourages and expects schools to regularly use Data Director CST scores and API/AYP are analyzed Board annually approves single school action plan Board annually reviews school scores such as CSTs, CAHSEE, AP etc. Board members regularly visit Sonora to kick off the school year, make announcements, and attend events such as Open House and Back-to-School year Board posts its Course Catalog yearly

• Board reviews Data Director results • Data Director is used by teachers and administrators • District Board meets regularly (bi-monthly) • API/AYP posted on Data Quest website • Website Course Catalog revised and ratified by the Board of Trustees

Professional Staff and Governing Board

Sonora High School, through its Leadership Committee, School Site Council, ELAC, and the vision of the Administration is in constant communication with all stakeholders to relay any new information in relation to the governing policies adopted by the District. In turn, all communication comes from its leaders who inform all of the school’s stakeholders. To what degree is there clear understanding about the relationship between the governing board and the responsibilities of the professional staff? Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

• • •

the end of Category A]

Sonora’s Leadership Committee meetings School Site Council meetings Staff Development meetings

• Leadership Committee minutes • School Site Council Minutes • Staff Development Agenda

Board’s Evaluation/Monitoring Procedures

The governing board has a defined and clear evaluation process for all school personnel that includes the school performance, and the school personnel in each of its operating sectors.

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Comment on the clarity of the evaluation and monitoring procedures carried out by the governing board, including review of student performance, overall school operations, and fiscal health of the school. Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

• • • • • • • •

the end of Category A]

CST scores for entire school Practice CAHSEE Results for freshmen CAHSEE Results for student body Yearly evaluation procedures for classified personnel Permanent Teachers are evaluated yearly Temporary teachers are evaluated during their two year probation period Teachers set personal goals for their professional improvement All stakeholders approve the categorical expenditures in the Single Plan for Student Achievement at School Site Council Final approval of the categorical expenditures outlined in Single Plan for Student Achievement is given by the FJUHSD Board of Trustees on an annual basis

CST results CAHSEE Results Practice CAHSEE Results Yearly Certificated Evaluation Forms • Yearly Classified Evaluation Forms • Teacher Professional Development Goals and Pre-Evaluation Conference Forms • • • •

Complaint and Conflict Resolution Procedures

The established governing board/school’s complaint and conflict resolution procedures as they apply to the school’s shareholders are effective. Examine and comment on the established governing board/school’s complaint and conflict resolution procedures as they apply to your school’s shareholders. Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

• • • • • •

the end of Category A]

Parents, teachers, and/or students can address concerns at PTSA meetings Superintendent offers school site volunteer meetings to meet with Sonora’s staff Uniform complaint procedure Comment cards to speak at the Board meetings Students can express concerns through ASB and Principal’s Advisory Board Both classified and certificated staff can address their contractual concerns to their corresponding employee organizations

95

• PTSA meeting minutes • Universal Complaint Procedure is available in the school/district office and in the District’s website. • The district provides a list of the district’s phone numbers


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A3.

Leadership and Staff Criterion

To what extent based on student achievement data, does the school leadership and staff make decisions and initiate activities that focus on all students achieving the expected school wide learning results and academic standards? To what extent do the school leadership and staff annually monitor and refine the single school wide action plan based on analysis of data to ensure alignment with student needs? Broad-Based and Collaborative

Sonora High School’s planning process is broad-based, collaborative and has commitment of the shareholders, including the staff, students, and parents. Document that the school planning process is broad-based, collaborative and has commitment of the shareholders, including the staff, students, and parents. Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

• •

• •

• •

the end of Category A]

Articulation meetings are held with the feeder schools/districts Special education department holds transition meetings with the feeder schools for each incoming student in special education Master schedule meetings with department chairs are held at the end of each school year to plan for next school year During the Special Education Information Sharing Day, the case carriers meet with all General Education teachers that have Special Education students in their classes to inform them of IEP goals and objectives. Departments collaboratively analyze data in making instructional and intervention decisions A Parent Institute has been held at our school for numerous years, to address the needs of our EL population Departments meet in PLCs decide on pacing guides and essential standards Master schedule is designed to promote collaboration opportunities between staff School Site Council meetings are held to get input from all the stakeholders Departments decide on benchmark exams and student scores are reported in Data Director, which guides our instruction

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• • • • •

• • •

Master Schedule Staff Meetings Single Plan for Student Achievement School Site Council Meetings Special Education Information Sharing Days Special Ed/General Ed Collaboration Classes Data Director At least Quarterly Benchmark exams Sophomore Research Project (multidisciplinary, English and History components) Humanities Offerings (aligns US History and American English curricula) Visual Arts department collaborates with the World Language to


• • •

All instruction in classroom is aligned to state and national standards Superintendent comes on campus to have informal meetings with staff Data analyzed includes but is not limited to CST, SAT, CELDT, CAHSEE, CMA, and CAPA scores. Other formative, summative, and district assessments are also used. Additionally, AYP and API are analyzed. Based upon all of this data, curricular and instructional decisions are made. IB teachers meet monthly to schedule major projects and exams

plan and create decorations for the Spring Fiesta Dance Agriculture Program meets selected Science and Social Science graduation requirements MCA teachers meet to discuss curricular connections IB monthly calendar meetings

School Plan Correlated to Student Learning

Sonora High School’s Single Plan for Student Achievement analyzes student achievement of the critical academic needs, expected school wide learning results, and academic standards. What evidence supports that there is a correlation between the Single Plan for Student Achievement and analysis of student achievement of the critical academic needs, expected school wide learning results, and academic standards? Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

• •

• • • • •

the end of Category A]

ELA CST reading scores of all incoming Freshmen are analyzed before they start school Based on student performance on CST, freshmen who score a 1 or 2 on ELA are tested on a diagnostic reading assessment that determines placement in the REACH intervention Program or the READ 180 program CELDT scores of incoming EL freshman and newly enrolled students are analyzed for student placement Counselors have meetings with students on their caseload to work on students’ four year plans Counselors and staff determine the appropriate placement of students based on multiple criteria Collaboration classes are offered for mainstreamed students in special education Staff has had trainings on Differentiated Instruction Counselors, teachers, and the Dean conduct on-

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

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Data Director CST Scores Reading Diagnostic Tests Benchmark Assessments CELDT scores Common Assessments Focus on Essential Standards 4 year plan form Data Director Pacing Guides Collaboration between teachers CAHSEE boot camp Collaboration classes TeleParent


going evaluation of EL placements Release time is provided for EL teachers to collaborate and revisit instruction, discuss and receive training on strategies, and review intervention and placement for students

EL release days/time for teachers, counselor, Dean, and Administration

Correlation between All Resources, ESLRs and Plan

There is correlation between allocation of time/fiscal/personnel/material resources, expected school wide learning results, and the improvement school wide action plan. What evidence supports the correlation between allocation of time/fiscal/personnel/material resources, expected school wide learning results, and the improvement school wide action plan? Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

• • •

• • •

the end of Category A]

CAHSEE Math and CAHSEE ELA classes are offered for students who have not yet passed the CAHSEE Mock CAHSEE practice test is offered for all 9th graders CAHSEE Boot camp for students that scored low on the practice test Accelerated Math for 9th grade students who score 1 or 2 on their CST test- this offers smaller class sizes and targeted Math interventions READ 180 or REACH Reading- 9th graders who score 1 or 2 on the CST Rosetta Stone for ELD students School has added the Teleparent component to improve the communication between home and school Title I monies allow more socioeconomically disadvantaged students to have access to more AP, IB, PSAT, PLAN, SAT & ACT Tests Our district maintains funding for the IB Program that draws more intradistrict and interdistrict transfer students Teachers and Administrators meet with students who are not being successful for Student Academic Conferences

99

• • • •

• • •

• •

Leadership Team Meetings School Site Council Principal’s Advisory Committee Parent Institute for Quality Education (PIQE) classes Daily Announcements Website updates Student in the Reimbursable Meals Program can qualify for test fee reductions/waivers Open Enrollment Professional Development for teachers teaching intervention and IB curriculum Academic Conferences conducted by counselors and administration


Additional Findings

What have you learned from examining additional evidence regarding this criterion? Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

• •

• • •

the end of Category A]

Sonora High has increased student learning and opportunities for student success. Focus has been placed on Interventions, adding rigor and supporting the current programs that have proved to be successful Specific professional development is provided for teachers Parents are included as partners in all decisions Our API increased from 776 in 2006 to 798 in 2010

100

• • • •

All intervention classes IB, AP offerings Professional Development Academic Interventions and Conferences


A4.

Leadership and Staff Criterion

Sonora is a data-driven school that makes decisions based on school wide results. Sonora’s students, parents, staff, and personnel take pride on the school’s academic achievement, which is directly connected to the established ESLRs. The school’s leadership and staff monitor the school action plan, its alignment to the needs of students, and yearly refinement of it. To what extent based on student achievement data, does the school leadership and staff make decisions and initiate activities that focus on all students achieving the expected schoolwide learning results and academic standards? To what extent does the school leadership and staff annually monitor and refine the single schoolwide action plan based on analysis of data to ensure alignment with student needs? Employment Policies/Practices

The school has clear employment policies and practices related to qualification requirements of staff. Sonora High School follows clear and defined employment policies that have been established by the District. Evaluate the clarity of the employment policies/ practices related to qualification/statutory requirements of staff. Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

the end of Category A]

District/school employment policies are described in the District Policy Manual and SOHS Staff Handbook Employment policies and procedures are specified in the District Policy Manual under Human Relations

• District Policy Manual – Human Relations, Teacher responsibilities and duties • SOHS Staff Handbook • Fullerton Secondary Teachers Organization (FSTO) and District Agreement • California School Employees Association (CSEA) and District Agreement

Qualifications of Staff

The school has procedures to ensure that staff members are qualified based on staff background, training and preparation. Evaluate the procedures to ensure that staff are qualified based on staff background, training and preparation.

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Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

• •

• •

the end of Category A]

The district hires all teachers based upon recommendations of the principal, leadership team, and other certificated staff members Permanent Teachers are evaluated biennially The district hires classified personnel upon recommendations of the principal, leadership team, and classified personnel Classified personnel are evaluated on a yearly basis by a supervisor Assistant Superintendent of Human Resources reviews all staff applications and qualifications

• District Policy Manual – Human Resources • Fullerton Secondary Teachers Organization (FSTO) and District Agreement • California School Employees Association (CSEA) and District Agreement

Maximum Use of Staff Expertise

The process to assign staff members in order to maximize the use of their expertise in accomplishing quality student learning is effective. How effective is the process to assign staff members in order to maximize the use of their expertise in accomplishing quality student learning? Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

the end of Category A]

Staff members applications are checked by Superintendent of Human Resources and every employee is subject to a probationary period prior to being permanently hired Staff supervisors ensure the qualifications of the staff members are met

• • •

District Policy Manual Certificated staff evaluations Classified staff evaluations

Defining and Understanding Practices/Relationships

The school has clear administrator and faculty written policies, charts, and handbooks that define responsibilities, operational practices, decision-making processes, and relationships of leadership and staff. Evaluate the administrator and faculty written policies, charts, and handbooks that define responsibilities, operational practices, decision-making processes, and relationships of leadership and staff. Determine the clarity and understanding of these by administration and faculty.

102


Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

the end of Category A]

All faculty responsibilities and duties are specified in the District Policy Manual, SOHS staff handbook, and in the contract agreement for staff. Prior to the commencement of the school year, the Superintendent and his team review these policies and procedures with the site administration team. In turn, the administration reviews these policies and with the site staff. There is a contract agreement for certificated personnel ratified by Fullerton Secondary Teachers Organization (FSTO) Bargaining Unit and approved by the Board of Trustees There is a contract agreement for classified personnel ratified by the California Schools Employee Association (CSEA) Chapter 82 and approved by the Board of Trustees

• • • •

District Policy Manual – Human Resources SOHS Staff Handbook FSTO Contract Agreement CSEA Contract Agreement

Internal Communication and Planning

The school has effective existing structures for internal communication, planning, and resolving differences. How effective are the existing structures for internal communication, planning, and resolving differences? Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

the end of Category A]

The structures of planning and internal communication throughout the district occur in a variety of forms both electronically and nonelectronically

District e-mail

Telephone Directories

District mail

Telephone directories

School’s website and links

Bulletin Boards

Bulletin Boards

Inter-district mail

Website links

District Policy ManualCode of Ethics

Policies for resolving differences are prescribed in the District Policy Manual

Minutes of district curriculum meetings

The district curriculum meeting are a forum for department leaders from across the district to communicate subject matter concerns and plan the curricular calendars

Union meetings allow for staff members to communicate labor issues

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Staff Actions/Accountability to Support Learning

The school evaluates the effectiveness of the processes and procedures for involving staff in shared responsibility, actions, and accountability to support student learning. This includes an evaluation of the kinds of collegial strategies used to implement innovations and encourage improvement, such as shadowing, coaching, observation, mentors, group presentations. How effective are the processes and procedures for involving staff in shared responsibility, actions, and accountability to support student learning? Include comments on the kinds of collegial strategies used to implement innovations and encourage improvement, such as shadowing, coaching, observation, mentors, group presentations? Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

• • •

the end of Category A]

Certificated staff members are encouraged to observe of its colleagues within the school Every certificated staff member must participate in Sonora’s co-curricular activities per contract. PLC time is used to plan new curricular innovations and mentor fellow department teachers

Department Chairs help facilitate collegial staff observations Certificated Personnel must accumulate three extracurricular points. PLC/Department agendas and meetings

Evaluation of Existing Processes

The school leadership regularly reviews the existing processes to determine the degree to which actions of the leadership and staff focus on successful student learning. To what extent does the school leadership regularly review the existing processes to determine the degree to which actions of the leadership and staff focus on successful student learning? Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

the end of Category A]

Sonora High School reviews and evaluates its existing processes on a yearly basis in order to increase its academic achievement

• Increased 20 points from previous year to achieve an API score of 798

Sonora’s leadership team analysis data of student’s performance

• CST Data

Student’s performance dictates in which programs are placed

• Read 180 and Reach Reading program

• Data Director Data

• Accelerated Math • CAHSEE Review for English and Math

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A5.

Leadership and Staff Criterion

Leadership and staff are involved in ongoing research or data-based correlated professional development that focuses on identified student learning needs. To what extent are leadership and staff involved in ongoing research or data-based correlated professional development that focuses on identified student learning needs? Support of Professional Development

Sonora High School effectively supports professional development with time, personnel, material, and fiscal resources to facilitate all students achieving the academic standards and the expected schoolwide learning results. How effective is the support of professional development with time, personnel, material, and fiscal resources to facilitate all students achieving the academic standards and the expected schoolwide learning results? Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

• • • •

• • • • • • •

the end of Category A]

Four staff-development days are scheduled for the year are scheduled throughout the year Minimum days for benchmark analysis Parent emails and phone calls are sent out by teachers to ensure communication Student success conferences are held by staff and summer meetings are held with identified students in the summer by administrative staff AVID is offered for students to ensure access support for getting into college Staff utilizes research based practices Faculty and peer tutoring opportunities are made available for students in need Parent have access to student grades through ABI Sonora has also implemented a credit recovery program for students on campus Counselors develop 4 year plans with their caseload students and parents Teacher websites for additional information

• • • • • • •

Professional Development Opportunities TeleParent Tutoring Calendar Credit recovery Program at Sonora High School ABI Counseling and Guidance Pacing Guides on website AVID tutorial sheets

Supervision and Evaluation

Sonora High School implements effective supervision and evaluation procedures in order to promote professional growth of staff. Staff and School Leadership continually increase their skills as professional educators. This education is accomplished through, but not limited to, on-site training, professional development programs, and formal education. The Fullerton Joint Union High School District provides these opportunities in order to

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ensure that educators are well qualified to meet the needs of our diverse and ever changing student body. How effective is the school’s supervision and evaluation procedures in order to promote professional growth of staff? Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

• •

the end of Category A]

At Sonora, professional educators are evaluated on an annual basis until tenure is achieved. After tenure, educators are evaluated on a bi-annual basis. Through the evaluation process at Sonora, the educators set personal goals for their personal and professional improvement. These are discussed at a pre-observation meeting with the evaluator. Administration has offered to provide substitutes if a teacher wishes to observe another teacher within the department and learn instructional practices that are working. Feedback is provided by the administrator after formal and walk through observations. Departments meet and provide suggestions and assistance to team members who need guidance, mentoring, and assistance. The teaching staff at Sonora is highly qualified with all teachers having a full credential. Three teachers hold a doctorate degree, while more than 55% percent of the teaching staff has a master’s degree. The staff at Sonora extends themselves to the students. This is evident in viewing the number of student activities on campus at any given time. The Sonora staff is there to assist the students in the Learning Lab, After School Tutoring, Remedial Instruction, dances, athletics, band, and JROTC, to name a few. All of these student programs have dedicated staff member to guide the students to success.

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• • • • •

Evaluation list Professional Goals Formal Evaluation Procedures Home Group Meetings After school Tutoring schedule


Measurable Effect of Professional Development

There are effective operating processes that determine the measurable effect of professional development on student performance. Comment on the processes and their effectiveness in determining the measurable effect of professional development on student performance. Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

• •

• •

• •

• •

the end of Category A]

Departments evaluate and analyze scores closely to close the achievement gap The data is disaggregated by subgroups and examined closely to identify strengths and areas of needed growth This data is used to inform instruction and programs Once areas of needed growth are identified, professional development opportunities are made available to staff Professional Learning Community support is available for staff Specific trainings have been offered to staff in Differentiated Instruction, Writing across curriculum, Research Based Best Practices, Scaffolding Instruction, Curriculum Planning, Assessment, REACH Reading Instruction, READ 180 instruction etc. Data director trainings have been offered to staff. Data director reports assist staff in making instructional decisions on pacing, materials, grouping, and standards that require additional concentrated emphasis. AP, IB teachers attend professional development on curriculum and instruction Counselors attend UC/CSU trainings about the latest college requirements in order to advise students Special Education teachers receive professional development through out the year on IEP based topics. Professional development is also offered on aligning curriculum Special education teachers receive professional development in individualizing instruction for students

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• • •

• • • • • • •

Data Director PLCs Professional Development Opportunities SDAIE teaching strategies Master schedule Middle School visits Pacing Guides Special Education trainings Staff Collaboration Technology support


• • •

• •

• •

Staff is provided specific training in SDAIE teaching strategies Articulation opportunities with feeder schools for high school staff Cross curricular collaboration is promoted amongst departments. Social Science and the English department collaborate through the Humanities Program and through research projects. Agriculture Science provides Science credit for students. The special education department collaborates with all departments on campus. On site technological support is available CSUF Cohort - Master Program classes offered at the district office for staff who wish to advance professionally Staff is offered opportunity for summer conferences and subject specific trainings Coaches receive regular trainings to remain current in their certifications and up to par with current instructional practices

Additional Findings

What have you learned from examining additional evidence regarding this criterion? Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

the end of Category A]

Specific trainings that enhance the ability of staff to utilize available technological resources are available

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A6.

Resources Criterion

The human, material, physical, and financial resources are sufficient and utilized effectively and appropriately in accordance with the legal intent of the program(s) to support students in accomplishing the academic standards and the expected schoolwide learning results. To what extent are the human, material, physical, and financial resources sufficient and utilized effectively and appropriately in accordance with the legal intent of the program(s) to support students in accomplishing the academic standards and the expected schoolwide learning results? Allocation Decisions

There is a relationship between the decisions about resource allocations, the school’s vision and purpose and student achievement of the expected schoolwide learning results and the academic standards. The school leadership and staff are involved in the resource allocation decisions Evaluate the relationship between the decisions about resource allocations, the school’s vision and purpose and student achievement of the expected schoolwide learning results and the academic standards. Additionally, comment on the extent to which leadership and staff are involved in the resource allocation decisions. Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

the end of Category A]

Financial resources allocated are utilized as effectively and appropriately in support of students in accomplishing the academic standards and the expected schoolwide results The APIO assures that resource allocations are utilized in support of student achievement as per the Fullerton Joint Union High School District guidelines The school informs stakeholders of goals, possible future steps, and funds available. SSC members participate in the decision making process and ultimately approve the Single Plan for Student Achievement

• Budget approved by the district • School site council meetings • Single Plan for Student Achievement

Practices

There are processes operating in relationship to district practices for developing an annual budget, conducting an annual audit, and at all times conducting quality business and accounting practices, including protections against mishandling of institutional funds. (Note: Some of this may be more district-based than school-based.) Evaluate the school’s processes in relationship to district practices for developing an annual budget, conducting an annual audit, and at all times conducting quality business and accounting practices, including protections against mishandling of institutional funds. (Note: Some of this may be more district-based than school-based.) 109


Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

• •

• •

the end of Category A]

Campus guidelines are prepared based upon guidelines developed by the District each year Budget Preparation is in accordance with the provisions of the Education Code, the Administrative Code, and the California School Accounting Manual Budget Preparation is to be done by the Assistant Superintendent, Business Services The District budget is discussed in Budget Study meetings. In addition to District members, the principal, and the APIO, each school site has a certificated, classified, and parent representative they send to the meetings. The district and school ASB and Attendance accounts are audited by an independent company

• District Policy Manual • Fiscal Crisis and Management Assistance Team (FCMAT) ASB Accounting Manual and Desk Reference • Budget Study meeting minutes • Administrative Council meetings • APIO meetings

Facilities

Learning takes place in a safe, nurturing, and positive environment. Custodial staff maintains the campus grounds and facilities. Determine if the facilities are adequate to meet the school’s vision and purpose and are safe, functional, and well-maintained. Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

the end of Category A]

With modernization taking place, several improvements were made to create a more positive environment

• •

• • •

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New bathroom facilities for boys, girls and staff New student eating areas designated with tables and chairs (Sonora Café) Permanent Graphics in newly designated student eating areas New display cabinets Parking lot Resurfaced Black Top New Air Conditioning modules were installed during modernization


Instructional Materials and Equipment

The human, material, physical, and financial resources allocated are utilized effectively and appropriately to support students in learning academic standards and internalizing the expected school wide learning results The procedures for acquiring and maintaining adequate instructional materials and equipment, such as textbooks, other printed materials, audio-visual, support technology, manipulatives, and laboratory materials are effective. Evaluate the effectiveness of the procedures for acquiring and maintaining adequate instructional materials and equipment, such as textbooks, other printed materials, audiovisual, support technology, manipulatives, and laboratory materials. Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

• •

• •

the end of Category A]

The APIO assures that resource allocations are utilized effectively Books, other printed materials, and technology such as online databases and ebooks are available at/through the Campus Library and corresponding webpage CAHSEE Classes for Language Arts and Math for students that have not passed the exam The Accelerated Math Program has been acquired as the instructional materials for the Math Lab classes The Read 180 and Reach Reading Programs have been acquired as the instructional materials for the Advanced Reading classes The AVID program uses a plethora of materials to prepare middle performing students for college Career Center services including 4 computers for student use and license for COIN3 a career and college research program Rosetta Stone Language Program is a audiovisual, technology program newly acquired to supplement the ELD curriculum The fulltime IT technician on campus help maintain the upkeep of computers and other technology used for instruction Modernization of school has provided 5 modern science labs in the 900 building for a total of 11 science labs LCD projectors were installed in all classrooms, 111

• •

• •

The school implements policies that encourage prompt payment of fees for lost books which allows the school to use less site funds for purchasing replacement books for lost or damaged books Access to library technician Computers available in multiple locations on campus Interactive technology based instructional materials for intervention classes Technology such as COIN3, Rosetta Stone, online databases and ebooks LCD projectors Alphasmarts


• • • • • • • • • • • • •

library, and career center Computers or laptops are available in the English Computer Lab (13 computers), yearbook classroom (15 computers), Agricultural Department (28 laptops) More computers are available in ROP Auto Shop, JROTC, Science Lab, ELD classroom Pasco equipment for use with computers in Physics lab Alphasmarts are available for students in the CBI Program Books on tape are available for Special Education Department Assistive Technology is used in Special Education Math Department uses textbook on CD Rom TI Calculators in Math Slateboards in Math Geometry Sketchpad and Mathtype software programs American Honda training resources Boardmaker in Special Education PECS- Special Education CAHSEE Bootcamp uses review instructional materials to help student prepare for the test

Well-Qualified Staff

Resources are available to enable the hiring and nurturing of a well-qualified staff, including ongoing professional development. Determine if the resources available enable the hiring and nurturing of a well-qualified staff, including ongoing professional development. Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

the end of Category A]

Sonora High School teachers’ expertise and abilities are utilized to support student learning. The school master schedule is student-driven and is built with staff input to identify teaching strengths and experience. All teachers are assigned classes appropriate to their state certified credential authorization. Departments routinely evaluate their course offerings to

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All teachers SDAIE/CLAD trained and credentialed Instructional Aides support student learning in the classroom and avoid academic slippage Schoolwide Sustained


ensure the needs of students are being met. Professional development focuses on all students achieving the ESLRs and academic standards. Early Release schedules allow teachers to learn and exchange ideas for the improvement of curriculum for students that provide a depth of subject matter understanding that relates disciplines and real world applications. The school professional development committee in collaboration with the school and district leadership examines staff, student and parent surveys, state mandated testing results, district testing results, and staff discussions to establish a plan that focuses on student achievement. The staff banks minutes to support faculty meetings, where teachers collaborate on methods and techniques that build student knowledge, academic and leadership skills.

Silent Reading (SSR) – 15 minutes per day • Princeton Review • PLC time for departmental professional development. • District Surveys • CST, CELDT, CAHSEE, CAPA, and CMA test scores

Long-Range Planning

The district and school’s processes for regular examination of a long-range plan to ensure the continual availability and coordination of appropriate resources that support student achievement of the academic standards and the expected schoolwide learning results are effective and are regularly evaluated. Evaluate the district and school’s processes for regular examination of a long-range plan to ensure the continual availability and coordination of appropriate resources that support student achievement of the academic standards and the expected schoolwide learning results. Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

the end of Category A]

The District has established Curriculum Committees to evaluate and improve educational program

PLC times is allocated for department planning to ensure common assessments match long term goals

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• District Policy Manual • Common assessments • Bench Marks • Banked minute schedule


WASC Category A. Organization: Vision and Purpose, Governance, Leadership and Staff, and Resources: Supporting Evidence, Strengths, and Growth Needs Include the supporting evidence for findings, if not included with the sample prompts. Determine and prioritize the strengths and areas of growth needs for Category A. Category A: Organization: Vision and Purpose, Governance, Leadership and Staff, and Resources: Areas of Strength

Teachers 1. PLCs help teachers in assisting students to succeed. Common assessments help in examining student progress and needs. Benchmarks are an excellent guide for both the teaching and learning process. 2. Assistance is provided for students through tutoring and support classes. 3. The diverse educational needs of Sonora students are met through a broadly based curriculum, including standard level courses, IB, AP, Vocational, CBI and Autism classes. 4. Sonora is one of two public high schools in the nation offering Organic/Biochemistry. 5. Sonora offers AP Human Geography for freshmen. The Sonora pass rate for the corresponding AP exam significantly exceeds the National average. Parents 6. Parents have access to student grades, homework assignments, and attendance on ABI. Parents receive informational calls from Teleparent. 7. Sonora parents and students rated Sonora the highest within the district on annual satisfaction surveys. Students 8. Students have numerous opportunities to get involved in leadership - clubs, IMPACT, ASB, Best Buds, SSC, and Principal’s Advisory Board, electives, etc. 9. Student involvement is evident by the number of attendees in after-school courses/seminars, activities, sports and other after-school events.

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Category A: Organization: Vision and Purpose, Governance, Leadership and Staff, and Resources: Areas of Growth Needs

1. Our Faculty/Staff needs input on how we spend our Staff Development time and money. The committee, instead of the administrators, needs to reconvene and make decisions based on our school's goals. 2. All teachers should have access to CST Scores from previous school, especially feeder schools prior to their arrival to Sonora High School. 3. PLC time is limited. PLC tasks further limit the time available for the sharing and discussing of teaching/learning strategies (i.e., too much structure). The strength of PLCs varies departmentally. 4. PLCs are defined by subject area. Teachers who are teaching multiple subjects cannot attend all of the corresponding PLCs. There is a need for secondary PLC time. 5. Funds need to be allocated for the reemployment of necessary support staff. For example, cutbacks in the career center and library result in a lack of support for students. 6. As the number of students in AP/IB classes increases, additional teacher support is needed. 7. The effective marketing of Sonora High School to the community of feeder schools (public and private). Marketing should not be exclusively focused on adults. Rather it should also target prospective students. 8. Clarification for both parents and students regarding the testing program used to determine honors placement. Parents and students can be and often are confused by the title and purpose of the exam. 9. Improve parent participation both in using the ABI tool and becoming actively involved on the school campus. Reach out to parents to assist with needed miscellaneous tasks such as photocopying and organizing classroom materials. 10. Enhance and maintain the website of the school. Suggestions for improvement: update displayed pictures on a frequent basis, encourage teachers to build/maintain professional websites on the school site, and include the subject of expertise with the teacher’s name in the directory. 11. Increase school spirit by embracing the mascot; add a mascot to the Spirit Squad.

Category A: Organization: Vision and Purpose, Governance, Leadership and Staff, and Resources: Supporting Evidence

The Supporting Evidence is included with the Findings as presented above.

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Curriculum:

Leaders: Shannon Appenrodt, Social Science Christian Nguyen, Arts Alvarez

Santiago

Aide

Angelo

Julia

Student

Appenrodt

Shannon

Social Science

Boothroyd

Brian

Social Science

Brem

Jeff

English

Choi

Katie

Student

Corona

Patricia

Aide

Day

Gary

Admin

Enriquez

Kayla

Student

Etter

Natalie

Student

Feinzimer

Paul

Parent

Gaarder

Christopher

Student

Gordon

Mariel

Parent

Gordon

Soon-Ya

World Languages

Guirguis

Mariam

Student

Hager

Bill

Custodial

Heuer

Alan

Parent

Hwang

Philip

Student

Kiesselbach

David

Special Ed.

Kim

Paul

Student

Kim

Byung Joon

Student

Kuester

Michelle

Agriculture

Lee

Jin

Student

Lodding

Rich

PE

Mack

Alice

World Languages

Mack

Alice

World Languages

Mays

Daryl

ROP

McGee

Laurie

English

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Miller

Kenneth

Student

Morris

Mason

Science

Nguyen

Christian

Arts

Oliver

Robin

Science

Posthuma

David

Library

Rios

Anthony

Student

Rivas

Bernie

Custodial

Rodriguez

Daniel

Student

Row

Laurie

English

Scott

Tina

World Languages

Shin

Phoebe

Student

Shin

Phoebe

Student

Skytte

Kim

Math

Stein

Jason

Social Science

Taege

Brandi

Counseling

Torres

Guadalupe

Aide

Vasquez

Jeff

Student

Venegas

Emily

Student

Witt

Cory

Medical Careers

Wolkenhauer

Cathy

Special Ed.

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B: Standards-based Student Learning: Curriculum B1.

Curriculum Criterion

To what extent do all students participate in a rigorous, relevant, and coherent standards-based curriculum that supports the achievement of the academic standards and the expected schoolwide learning results? [Through standards-based learning (i.e., what is taught and how it is taught), the expected schoolwide learning results are accomplished.]. Current Educational Research and Thinking

The school provides examples that document the use of current educational research related to the curricular areas in order to maintain a viable, meaningful instructional program for students. Provide examples that document the use of current educational research related to the curricular areas in order to maintain a viable, meaningful instructional program for students. Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category B]

Sonora High School provides a rigorous, relevant, and coherent standards-based curriculum that supports the achievement of the academic standards set by the state ofCalifornia and the Fullerton Joint Union High School District.

• FJUHSD Board Policy and Curriculum Course Description and Outlines

Sonora has developed Professional Learning Communities (PLC) learning communities to help enrich our instructional programs. Teachers across all departments plan, develop, and implement quarterly Common Assessments and Common Benchmarks for students so that they are placed in appropriate subject-area and performance level courses.

• PLC meetings take place during time reserved by banked minutes • PLC developed standards and pacing guides • End of the quarter Common Assessment Exams

Teachers utilize Data Director for assessment and data analysis to develop a more meaningful instructional program

• Results from Data Director

AP/IB courses at Sonora are taught according to the California State Standards and Framework, as well as, AP/IB guidelines. AP/IB courses are aligned with the AP/College Board standards and International Bacccalaureate standards and accepted by both the CSU and UC systems. Participation in these courses has

• AP English Language, AP Lit/Comp, AP Spanish Language, AP Spanish Literature, AP French Language, AP Calculus AB, AP Statistics, AP

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steadily been growing.

Biology, AP Physics, AP European History, AP US History, AP Government, , AP Psychology • IB Biology HL, IB Chemistry SL, IB English HL, IB French HL/SL, IB History of the Americas HL, IB Math Studies SL, IB Physics SL, IB Psychology SL, IB Spanish HL/SL, IB Visual Arts HL/SL

New IB and AP courses have been added to better serve our student populations.

• IB Dance HL/SL • IB Film HL/SL • AP Human Geography

The Community Based Instruction (CBI), including the Autism, programs are CAPA standards based programs designed to meet the unique standards of Special populations with meaningful instruction. Since these programs are not available at all district schools, SOHS serves many students that might otherwise attend a different school.

• CBI, including the Autism program curriculum

. Academic Standards for Each Area

The school has defined academic standards for each subject area, course, and/or program. To what extent are there defined academic standards for each subject area, course, and/or program? Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category B]

All courses have district approval and state, national, and/or internationally approved standards All textbooks are in line with these standards and district approved

Benchmark Exams are in line with standards in all curricular areas 119

• Copies of standards for all curriculum (e.g., World Languages’ national standards, AP national standards, IB international standards) • List of approved texts • Benchmark Exams


IEP Benchmarks are also in line with curricular standards Case carriers monitor IEP goals and benchmarks at each grading period All on campus ROP class curricula and syllabi are aligned with North Orange County ROP standards

• IEP Benchmarks and Progress Reports • Syllabi

• ROPERS (Regional Occupational Program Expected Results for Students)

Congruence

There is congruence between the actual concepts and skills taught, the academic standards and the expected schoolwide learning results. To what extent is there congruence between the actual concepts and skills taught, the academic standards and the expected schoolwide learning results? Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category B]

Teachers design a curriculum based upon both the state standards and the ESLRs All textbooks are aligned with state standards

Common Assessments developed in PLCs align with academic standards

• Improvement in CST Scores • State Standards posted in many classrooms or on syllabi • Standards are listed in textbooks along with activities to enrich standards based learning • Common Assessments

Teachers evaluate the results of common assessments and reteach concepts as necessary. Student Work — Engagement in Learning

The examination of representative samples of student work and snapshots of student engagement in learning demostrate the implementation of a standards-based curriculum and ESLRs. How does the examination of representative samples of student work and snapshots of student engagement in learning demonstrate the implementation of a standards-based curriculum and the schoolwide student goals (ESLRs)? Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category B]

Students engage in a multitude of activities and assessments to demonstrate their knowledge of academic standards.

120

• Common Assessments • Portfolios in Visual Arts • District Art Show


All Departments use homework, quizzes, projects, and common assessments to reinforce curriculum. In Visual Arts, students compile a portfolio that demonstrates the mastery of the curriculum. In the English and Social Science Departments, student engagement in learning is demonstrated by their participation in a variety of academic enrichment activities. In the Math and Science Departments, student engagement in learning is demonstrated by their participation in a variety of academic enrichment activities. In the Physical Education Department, students engage in learning by displaying their improved fitness skills. In the World Language and ELD Departments, students’ engagement in learning is demonstrated by their participation in a variety of academic enrichment activities. In the Career and Technical Education Departments, student engagement in learning is demonstrated by their participation in a variety of academic enrichment activities. In the CBI Program within the Special Education Department, student engagement in learning is demonstrated by their participation in a variety of academic enrichment activities.

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submissions • Research papers, poster board projects, video projects, mock elections, a mock 18th century salon, newspapers, scrapbooks, poetry notebooks • Face Projects in Math, The Volume Project in Math, participation in extensive Lab work • Lab book created in IB Biology • Students compete in the countywide Orange County Science Olympiads • Physical Fitness Tests • Hispanic Artist Projects, Day of the Dead Projects, City of Paris Building Project, Spring Fiesta Dance • Oral exams that are administered by advanced/native students, Oral dramatizations at every level, Extravaganza Show • Raise steers, lambs, pigs, and show them at Orange County and/or La Habra Valley Community Fairs • Orange County Home Building Competition • Farm Work Experience opportunities to fulfill Future Farmers of America (FFA) required hours • CBI students are placed in internships at St. Jude Medical Center in the City of Fullerton or through Workability 1 in paid or


unpaid internships in the City of La Habra • Contests among culinary arts that are judged by staff • Medical Careers Academy Senior Portfolios and interviews Accessibility of All Students to Curriculum

A rigorous, relevant and coherent curriculum is accessible to all students. The school examines the demographics and situation of students throughout the class offerings. The school’s instructional practices and other activities facilitate access and success for special needs students. What have you learned about the accessibility of a rigorous, relevant and coherent curriculum to all students? What did you learn from examining the demographics and situation of students throughout the class offerings? How do the instructional practices and other activities facilitate access and success for special needs students? Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category B]

Sonora’s AVID program supports middle achieving students to aid them in meeting schoowide acamdemic standards and all benchmarks of the ESLRs. All EL students take the CELDT exam to assess their reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills and place them appropriately in ELD and/or SDAIE English courses. These students are given continuous support in providing a rigorous and relevant curriculum. After school tutoring is offered in many academic areas, both formally and informally After school tutoring is offered in core academic areas. During the 2010-11 school year, this tutoring has also been offered in Spanish for the EL students that need additional help in the native language. Accelerated Math is a curriculum used in the Math Learning Lab for students with CST scores of 1 or 2. Reach Reading and Read 180 are the curricula used in the Advanced Reading classes with CST scores of 1 or 2. Students Needing Academic Preparation (SNAP) are offered the summer before freshman year for at risk students in both math and English Mainstreaming and integration opportunities are made available to CBI students (students that are functioning in the moderate to severe range of cognitive abilities). This promotes social integration in this population.

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• Weekly grade checks, research on prospective college choices, tutoring, assistance with student schedules, organizational and note-taking skills • AVID students need to take one AP/IB course • Training for differentiated instruction • 60/40 SDAIE classes • Accelerated Math • READ 180 • Reach Reading • Tutoring sign-in sheets, many teachers have an open door policy after school and during lunch • Student Tutors three times a week in the library • Tutoring sign in sheets • Smaller classrooms, strategic math intervention


There is a 504 Coordinator that assists students, parents, and administrators to develop 504 accomodation plans to allow access and success to curriculum

• SNAP enrollment lists • CBI students mainstreamed in general education classrooms, class rosters • Assistance of Instructional Aides • Designated 504 Counselor and her assistance to students • Home/hospital teaching for medically fragile students

Integration Among Disciplines

There is integration among disciplines at the school. To what extent is there integration among disciplines? Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category B]

Many departments work together to create interdisciplinary lessons and align standards based curriculum among the disciplines Sonora’s Medical Careers Integration Team consists of teachers from different curricular areas that receive special training on how to integrate the medical careers into their disciplines Sonora’s Agricultural program works closely with the Science Department to meet science requirements. World Language Department colloborates with Visual Arts in producing a project that connects to the curriculum Our Visual Arts Department works with US history teachers to help students create videos that connect to a historical event Honors English and AP European History at the sophomore level are coordinated in terms of pacing and aligning curricular standards in both English and History Pacing guidelines in all curricular areas are shared with the Special Education Department

•Humanities Program offered at the Junior level for English III and US History Students •Medical Careers Staff • Students can earn Biology and/or Earth Science credits when taking an Agricultural Science Course •Students can earn Economics Credits in Agricultural/Economics • Student projects • Student Video Project • Curricular Alignment • Students read novels that correspond with the historical events

Curricular Development, Evaluation, and Revisions

The school assesses its curriculum review, evaluation, and review processes for each program area, including graduation requirements, credits, grading policies, and homework policy regarding the impact of these processes on providing a challenging, coherent, and relevant curriculum for all students.

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Comment on the curriculum review, evaluation, and review processes for your program area, including graduation requirements, credits, grading policies, and homework policy. Comment on the impact of these processes on providing a challenging, coherent, and relevant curriculum for all students. Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category B]

During the first few years of the current six year cycle, students had both academic and social grade taggings. If a student was significantly lacking units, this was reflected in the student’s academic grade level. Counselors met with these students to discuss graduation requirement concerns associated with this credit deficiency. When appropriate, students were placed in intervention/support programs which served a dual purpose: a) taught students missing skills, b) allowed students to earn elective credits. The assigning of an additional academic grade tag has been discontinued, however the rest of the school’s review, evaluation, and review process remains the same. There is an on-site after school Credit Recovery Class offered in multiple core academic areas to assist students in meeting graduation requirements Grading and homework polices for each course are clearly outlined in the syllabi. Department chairs and the administration receive copies of these policies. The district curriculum committees continually review, evaluate, and update curriculum

• Summer school remedial classes • Enrollment lists • Syllabi for each class • Minutes of district curriculum committee meetings

Policies-Rigorous, Relevant, Coherent Curriculum

The school assesses the curriculum and its rigor, relevancy and coherency after examination of policies regarding course completion, credits, grading policies, homework, etc. What have you learned about the accessibility of a challenging, relevant and coherent curriculum to all students? What have you learned from examining the demographics and distribution of students throughout the class offerings, e.g., master class schedule and class enrollments? Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category B]

AP and IB enrollment has been steadily growing with a rapid increase in the past year Many AP and IB students are in the Reimbursable Meals Program and were able to quality for a fee waiver/reduction for the exams Families receive information about the Reimbursable 124

• AP Tests given in 2009-286 • AP Tests given in 2010719 • Pass Rates continued to improve34 IB Students on free and reduced lunch took 83 IB exams in


Meals Program in the schoolwide summer mailer. Applications are also available in the office and/or cafetoria. Teachers and staff encourage students and families who qualified for the Reimbursable Meals Program to also apply for exam fee reductions/waivers. This helped increase student enrollment in both AP and IB courses and the opportunity to take IB and AP exams. Practical Math is offered for the first time this year to better serve students that traditionally struggle in math but needed a third year of math for graduation requirements

2009/2010 year • The number of AP test taken increased from 244 tests in 2006 to 719 tests in 2010 • In 2010, 28.8% of students taking AP tests and 50% of students taking IB tests qualified for fee waivers/reductions • Practical Math class enrollment lists

Articulation and Follow-up Studies

The school articulates regularly with feeder schools and local colleges and universities. The school uses follow-up studies of graduates and others to learn about the effectiveness of the curricular program. Share examples of articulation with feeder schools and local colleges and universities, including comments on the regularity of their occurrence. What has been revealed through the follow-up studies of graduates and others regarding the effectiveness of the curricular program? Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category B]

Counselors go to feeder schools and register all eighth grade students Interested prospective 8th graders take an IB entrance exam and results from both the exam and application process are shared with counselors who will be registering 8th graders 8th grade students and families are invited to Open House Night Campus tours are available for 8th graders and their families Prospective Special Education students had a campus tour The feeder schools send middle school AVID students to shadow SOHS AVID students for the day. Sonora’s Science Department meets with local junior high teachers to coordinate curriculum and expectations SOHS Math teachers administer a math placement test to 8th graders to properly select their freshman math classes 125

• Registration forms and conferences with middle school students • Transitional IEPs • IB entrance exams and application process • AVID field trips • Sonora College Night • Open House


Feeder schools/districts roll over Aeries data including standardized test scores. Unfortunately, this occurs early in the second semester when 8th grade CST scores are still unavailable. Freshman teachers report this creates a challenge early in the schoolyear until that supplemental data file is rolled over from the feeder school/district and/or arrives in student cummulative files. The AVID program encourages students to acquire information about prospective colleges and their options. Some ROP and Medical Careers classes articulate with the local community colleges College and University representatives from across the nation attend College Night to disseminate information about their programs Students can take Fullerton Community College placement exams in the SOHS Career Center Additional Findings

What have you learned from the analysis of additional evidence regarding this criterion? Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category B]

There is an extensive effort being made to serve our EL population with a variety of tutoring opportunities, courses offered, and support staff CST scores continue to rise as the staff meets the needs of all students

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• EL Coordinator/Dean of Academic Services and EL and recent RFEP Counselor • Increase in API- one of the biggest in Orange County


B2.

Curriculum Criterion

All students have equal access to the school’s entire program and assistance with a personal learning plan to prepare them for the pursuit of their academic, personal and school-to-career goals. Do all students have equal access to the school’s entire program and assistance with a personal learning plan to prepare them for the pursuit of their academic, personal and school-to-career goals? Variety of Programs — Full Range of Choices

All students have opportunities to make appropriate choices and pursue a full range of realistic career and educational options. The school provides for career exploration, preparation for postsecondary education and pre-technical training for all students. What have you learned regarding the extent to which all students have opportunities to make appropriate choices and pursue a full range of realistic career and educational options? How does the school provide for career exploration, preparation for postsecondary education and pre-technical training for all students? Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category B]

All students have access to AP and IB courses.

There is an on campus ROP career guidance specialist Medical Careers has job shadowing opportunities, externing, and summer programs

Sonora has an on site designated EL counselor that continues to follow the progress of EL students even after they have been reclassified

There are a variety of courses offered in the Career and Technical Education and ROP areas that let students explore a variety of options

• •

Ongoing increase in socioeconomic disadvantaged students taking the AP and IB exams Counselor and support interviews and progress tracking EL and recent RFEP counselor Medical Careers speakers, work hour logs, job shawdowing JROTC, Agricultural, Culinary Arts, Marine Diving, Wood Shop, Auto Shop, Forensics, and Legal Law

Student-Parent-Staff Collaboration

Parents, students and staff collaborate in the development and monitoring of a student's personal learning plan, based upon a student's learning style and career and educational goals. To what extent do parents, students and staff collaborate in the development and monitoring of a student's personal learning plan, based upon a student's learning style and career and educational goals?

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Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category B]

Sonora High School’s full range of academic choices gives both students and parents many options and opportunites to develop plan and monitor progress

Sonora teachers use a variety of resources to keep parents informed of progress and academic options based upon their performance

IB Coordinator meets with both parents and students for academic planning EL parents at Sonora High School are invited to ELAC meeting and to Parent Institute for Quality Education (PIQE) classes to become involved. Counselors help students develop and revise, as necessary, a four-year plan

• • • •

ABI, students and parents can monitor academic performance and progress Teleparent, Sonora website, teacher websites Individual conferences with students, IB Parent Nights PIQE attendance and graduation lists Four Year Plans Letters are mailed home inviting families to attend individual counseling meetings Counseling Meetings

Counselors have senior meetings with all students There is a classroom gudiance unit on financial aid and college applications Case carriers write and modify, as necessary, IEPs The EL Counselor and the EL Coordinator/Dean of Academic Services develop Individual Learning Plans for EL students Monitoring/Changing Student Plans

The school implements processes for monitoring and making appropriate changes in students' personal learning plans (e.g., classes and programs) and regularly evaluates them. What processes are utilized for monitoring and making appropriate changes in students' personal learning plans (e.g., classes and programs)? How effective are these? Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category B]

Counselors meet with students individually to register for their courses that will help them meet their goals

Individual registration conferences

EL counselor follows students even after they have been reclassified

Designated EL and recent RFEP counselor

Counselors review student progress and recommend

Student conferences

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credit recovery options or better class selection Teachers have Student Success Conferences with students to and review CST scores from the previous year and encourage them to perform well on the current year’s CSTs Students that fail 2 or more core subject-areas courses are required to attend a Grade Intervention Meeting to address intervention options/placements.

with counselors •

9th grade Success Conferences

Grade Intervention Meeting

Attendance queries and home visits

There is an informational day hosted by the Special Education Department to share information with general education teachers Sonora’s counselors and the Dean also monitor attendance and contact parents when they see a disturbing pattern or trend. When necessary, the Dean and the School Resource Office (SRO) do home visits. Post High School Transitions

The school implements strategies and programs to facilitate transitions to post high school options and regularly evaluates their effectiveness. How effective are strategies and programs to facilitate transitions to post high school options? Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category B]

IB and AP courses help students attain the skills and knowledge needed to compete and succeed in college

Course offerings and curriculum

Many students are able to start college with advanced standing in regard to units as a result of having passed IB and AP exams

IB and AP success rates on exams and curriculum

Many Career and Technical Education classes provide students with skills that could be applicable to post high school options

Auto shop, Wood shop, culinary arts, forensics, Legal Law, Marine diving, JROTC, Medical Careers, Agriculture

MCAIII students qualify as medical assistants right after high school when they pass exam

Sonora’s Agricultural Program includes an Agricultural Incentive Grant graduate follow-up. In qualify for this grant, the department must keeps track of program graduates to see who went on to either full or part-time employment, community college and four-year college, and military service. It also keeps track of which graduates continued in the Agricultural industry/career or choices. 129


•

Medical Careers LVN program that transitions well to a RN program

•

Agriculture Grant Report that includecolleges attend, and job placement, Agriculture or nonAgriculture

Additional Findings

What have you learned from the analysis of any additional evidence regarding this criterion? Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category B]

Sonora offers a rich variety of Career and Technical educational options. All Career and Technical Education classes meet once a year with professionals from their industry.

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B3.

Curriculum Criterion

Upon completion of the high school program, students have met all the requirements of graduation. To what extent are students able to meet all the requirements of graduation upon completion of the high school program? Real World Applications — Curriculum

All students have access to real world applications of their educational interests in relationship to a rigorous, standards-based curriculum. To what extent do all students have access to real world applications of their educational interests in relationship to a rigorous, standards-based curriculum? Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category B]

Sonora teachers are continually connecting standards and student goals to real-life applications. Corporate mentors donate time, providing leadership and industry expertise to a number of Sonora programs.

• •

ROP and Agriculture classes require students to write professional resumes and cover letters and offer mock interview opportunities. The World Language national standards (communication, culture, connections, comparisons, and culture) create an environment that promotes using the target language and culture in authentic settings. Teachers focus on real world application and practice of their world language in a plethora of activities.

• •

Medical Career classes create first aid kits for the annual food drive HOSA participates in state and national competition levels.

ROP and Agriculture resumes and mock interviews Extravaganza Show, Holiday Caroling in the target language, Field Trips, Cultural Research Portfolios, Cultural Dances, Spring Fiesta, Building Paris, Scavenger hunts in cultural areas in terms of both food, language, and traditions First aid kits created by medical career classes Field Trips within the community, financial training and menu planning and meal preparation Poll worker volunteer list

CBI classes provides an independent living class on Students in the Government class volunteer as poll workers during election time Meeting Graduation Requirements

The school implements academic support programs to ensure students are meeting all requirements, including the CAHSEE.

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How effective are academic support programs to ensure students are meeting all requirements, including the CAHSEE? Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category B]

A Mock CAHSEE is given to the all freshman students to identify students that need additional help preparing for it CAHSEE boot camp is offered to sophmore students on the cusp of passing the exam. The boot camp is a pull out program to reinforce and further develop skills given to students that were close to passing CAHSEE review class is a semester long class and is offered to both students that have taken and not passed the exam and sophomores who had significantly lower CAHSEE scores on the mock exam

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Results of mock exam Enrollment list of boot camp pull out program Class roster for CAHSEE review


WASC Category B. Standards-Based Student Learning: Curriculum: Supporting Evidence, Strengths, and Growth Needs Include the supporting evidence for findings, if not included with the sample prompts. Determine and prioritize the strengths and areas of growth needs for Category B. Category B: Standards-based-Student Learning: Curriculum: Areas of Strength

Overall Improvement in CSTs Intervention opportunites for students that need help in succeeding in academic areas Common assessments and benchmarks that measure academic growth and are aligned with state standards Improved access to AP and IB classes and exams for socioeconomically disadvantaged students Vast curricular offerings, especially in Career and Technical Education Category B: Standards-based-Student Learning: Curriculum: Areas of Growth Needs

Improve EL and socioeconomically disadvantaged students’ performance on CST scores Continued focus on CAHSEE intervention to improve pass and proficiency rates. Continue to work with special education department to assess student needs and improve Special Education performance on standardized exams Continue integrating writing across the curriculum, with common expectations and assessments for all student levels Continue to cultivate all parent involvement and communication with staff and administration

Category B: Standards-based-Student Learning: Curriculum: Supporting Evidence

API Common Assessments and Benchmarks AP and IB class enrollment and examination passage rates Teacher Reflection Sheets Additional Supporting Evidence may be found throughout the Category B Focus Group Analysis

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Instruction Leaders: Marjie Blevins, English Jerome Diebolt, Arts Adame

Jenny

Aide

Aparicio

Karem

Student

Ayala

Lilia

Parent

Balandran Rivera

Erick

Student

Barr

Amanda

Student

Beckwith

Margo

Aide

Blevins

Marjie

English

Bouman

Daniel

Student

Boyle

Kristen

Special Education

Campos

George

Custodial

Chang

Sarah

Student

Clarke

Christine

Science

Cooke

Cameron

Student

Cruz

Alex

Student

Diebolt

Jerome

Arts

Fasano

Tom

English

Fiene

Sandra

English

Forsythe

Carrie

Math

Gourbin

Annie

World Languages

Greer

Carly

Student

Guerra Chavez

Juan

Student

Hardy

Steve

Special Education

Harris

Lisa

ROP

Henry

Stephanie

Admin

Hermosillo

Jessica

Student

Heuer

Teri

Parent

Hong

Diane

Student

Husodo

Sam

Student

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Ifejeokwu

Onwodi (Victoria)

Student

Kim

Alec

Student

Kim

Paul

Student

Kim

Helia

Student

Kim

Eunice

Student

Lee

Tori

English

Lucero

Barbara

Office

Maldonado

Nora

Parent

Masse

Alene

Aide

Medrano

Howard

Social Science

Medrano

Howard

Social Science

Mendoza

Maira

Student

Meza

Patricia

Parent

Moreno

Russ

Math

Murillo

Belen

World Languages

Oropeza

Olga

Social Science

Rodriguez

Jimmy

Custodial

Rodriguez

Jaime

Parent

Rodriguez

Ann

Student

Rodriguez

Ann

Student

Schade

Deborah

English

Sullivan

John

Counseling

Tisca

Maria

Parent

Trudell

Kyle

Science

Velazquez

Wayne

Aide

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C: Standards-based Student Learning: Instruction C1.

Ins tr uc tion C r ite r ion

To what extent are all students involved in challenging learning experiences to achieve the academic standards and the expected schoolwide learning results? Results of Student Observations and Examining Work The school’s observations of student working and the examining of student work provide information on the degree to which all students are involved in learning to assist them in achieving the academic standards and the expected schoolwide learning results. The school, particularly, has evaluated the degree of involvement in the learning of students with diverse backgrounds and abilities and modified approaches based on findings. To what extent did the observations of student working and the examining of student work provide information on the degree to which all students are involved in learning to assist them in achieving the academic standards and the expected schoolwide learning results? Particularly, comment on the degree of involvement in the learning of students with diverse backgrounds and abilities. Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

the end of Category C]

All students at Sonora, including those with diverse backgrounds and abilities, have the opportunity to participate in a wide variety of programs. These programs include: Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) – a four-year curriculum designed to give those students in the academic middle the opportunity to go to college. Honors and Advanced Placement (AP) courses – these are primarily upper-level, challenging, college level classes, including the newly offered (now in only its second year at Sonora) AP Human Geography course, taught primarily to entering Freshmen. International Baccalaureate (I.B.) courses which offer certificates and diplomas—again, offering students who want more demanding work a choice of the most rigorous academic trajectory—the I.B. diploma—or rigorous coursework without the additional requirements of the diploma. The Sonora Faculty brought the request to begin the IB Program to Sonora over two decades ago to the administration, who then thoroughly embraced the idea and provided excellent support. Two new I.B. courses have been added to the curriculum within the last two years, I.B. Film and I.B. Dance. Evidently, it is quite rare for a U.S. high school to successfully offer both of these courses. Medical Careers – classes and a 3-year curriculum designed around various opportunities in the medical

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Sonora and ROP class rosters Master Schedule CST scores A.P./I.B. scores Reach Reading/Read 180 rosters and scores ABI grades IEP sign-in sheets and records Photographs from Orange County and La Habra Valley Community Fairs— Agriculture Medical Careers portfolios and internships Tutor sign-in sheets World Language oral finals I.B. orals, labs, art portfolios, and essays are adjudicated around the world, using international


field; Agricultural Sciences - classes and curriculum designed around the agriculture field, including coursework from the traditional high school program taught from the perspective of the courses’ application to agriculture and vice-versa. Army Junior Reserve Officer Training Corp (JROTC)– classes and curriculum taught and conducted in association with the United States Army. Additional programs offered at Sonora include classes through the Regional Occupational Program (ROP) such as marine diving, engineering, forensic science, legal law, auto mechanics, culinary arts, and art and animation Community Based Instruction (CBI)-a program which places students with special needs into the community Reach Reading and Read 180—two separate reading intervention programs) Math Intervention—a class that uses the Accelerated Math program designed to help students succeed in their standard math class); and California High School Exit Exam preparation classes; Tutoring sessions – extra help is available in the afternoons four days per week provided by CSF and NHS students and teachers alike; During Finals Week, the World Language Department utilizes, Spanish for Spanish Speakers, Spanish IV and French IV students to help give the oral component of finals to the Spanish I and II and the French I and II students; Students from traditionally disadvantaged backgrounds (English Learners—ELs--, Special Education, and socioeconomically disadvantaged students) are provided a challenging learning environment in all of their classes, especially those which offer the EL students the 60/40 ratio of a non-EL/EL population in the classes. This enhances both effective learning of the same course content as well as ensuring more effective cultural assimilation. The EL teachers, the CBI teachers, the campus speech psychologist, counselors, and teachers work together to modify goals and lessons based on individual students’ needs and their IEPs. Several years ago, Jane Schaffer visited our school site

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• • •

• • • •

rubrics Dissections Math projects Social Science/English Department 10th grade research paper Speech and Debate Academic Decathlon Science Olympiad World Language and ELD Extravaganza Show Four class sections of AP Human Geography offered to entering Freshmen during the schoolyear 2009-2010, the first year of the course on campus


for five days. Each teacher was taught her writing program, and her lexicon and ideas are used across all subject areas. Back-to-School Night, Freshmen Parent Night, I.B. Freshmen/Sophomore/Junior/Senior Nights and the Sonora Parent Institute all focus on distributing information to parents of various educational and economical backgrounds.

Student Understanding of Performance Levels The students know beforehand the standards/expected performance levels for each area of study. To what extent do students know beforehand the standards/expected performance levels for each area of study? Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

the end of Category C]

The staff and students at Sonora High School have created a vision of success firmly rooted in the California State, national and/or international standards, guided by both the Single Plan for Student Achievement and the Expected School-wide Learning Results (ESLRs). At the beginning of each semester and course, teacher expectations are communicated to students. This information is disseminated through the syllabi distributed in each class and reviewed throughout the semesters. These documents are taken home for parent signatures to ensure understanding and acknowledgement, and a copy of each syllabus is kept on file with the administration. Common semester, quarterly, and unit benchmark assessments within departments have been developed to insure proper attention to standards and the ESLRs. In 1987, Sonora’s English Department was the first department in our district to create and regularly use common writing assessments (funds have not been available for the last three years to continue with this assessment). Benchmark assessments are also administered which are aligned with the California Standards Tests. Teachers frequently use pre-tests, anticipation and pacing guides, in addition to KWL charts and other strategies to introduce concepts to students. Diagnostic tests are used in many classes to ensure correct placement. California standards, lesson objectives, and daily 138

• •

• •

• •

• • •

Syllabi California, national and/or international Content Standards ESLR posters Current standards posted on classroom board Common benchmark assessments Posted California State, national and/or international Standards Diagnostic tests, pretests Weekly calendars Information about assignments and assessments posted on the teachers’ websites Intro activities to each unit (anticipation guides and pacing guides) KWL charts and Venn diagrams


agendas are often written on boards in the front of classrooms to aid students to focus their learning process. High academic expectations are set at the beginning of the school year and set a tone for success for all grades and academic levels (i.e. Honors/AP/IB courses, general education, English Learners, and Special Education). Many English classes have mandatory summer reading; each teacher provides a list of guiding questions or thematic areas upon which to reflect. Students are tested with both short answer examinations and in-class essays

• • •

Quick writes Hypothesis are formulated Summer reading lists and assessments

Differentiation of Instruction The school’s instructional staff members differentiate instruction and evaluate its impact on student learning. To what extent is differentiation of instruction occurring and what is the impact on student learning? Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

the end of Category C]

Differentiated instruction plays a significant role in the day-to-day teaching in classrooms. The faculty utilizes a wide variety of strategies to reach the greatest number of students. As all students learn and develop differently, Sonora uses programs that are cohesive and self-paced. Sonora implements many different techniques in its teaching such as lab versus lecture and tactile versus auditory. Pairs, collaborative and cooperative learning are found in classrooms across the curriculum. Teachers make a conscious effort to make both the information and skills meaningful to students. Innovation is often seen at Sonora and the staff uses a variety of methods to reach out to students. Sonora has done an excellent job of allowing for teacher innovation and student preference as well as meaningful and individualized learning within the school framework. Teachers work in conjunction with other staff members to reach all students. This partnership includes general education teachers, Community Based Instruction teachers, counselors, the school psychologist and speech therapist, and community partners who may provide employment training and work opportunities for the CBI students. Because one of the great strengths of Sonora is the importance teachers place on getting to know their students on a personal level, these close relationships

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Attendance and ABI rosters that reflect 60/40 percentages in English I, Integrated Science, Biology, World History, U.S. History, Government, and Economics School announcements Media and oral presentations Debates Writing portfolios Inquiry learning in science Agriculture showing of animals Survey projects Lab experiments World Language and ELD Extravaganza Show Band, Choir, Drama, and Dance


allow them to teach both to the strengths and to the areas that need strength. Both Impact Mentoring and Best Buds help accentuate the vital importance of asking questions, supporting one another, and helping every single student. Individual student work is often displayed in individual classrooms as well as in the common areas of campus and, occasionally, at the district office. This work exposes students to their peers’ talents and what is occurring in other classes. Shared work also encourages students to try new things and take risks.

• •

• • •

performances Display cases Special Education Share Day with all teachers DVD’s created for projects Impact and Best Buds Jane Shaffer Writing style: 1-chunk paragraphs for lower skilled/2-3 chunk for higher skilled (structure for and color coding of essays) Journals

Student Perceptions The students understand the expected level of performance based on the standards and the schoolwide learning results. Through interviews and dialogue with students that represent the school populations, the school learns about the students’ perceptions of their learning experiences. Through interviews and dialogue with students that represent the school population, comment on a) their level of understanding of the expected level of performance based on the standards and the schoolwide learning results and b) their perceptions of their learning experiences. Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

the end of Category C]

According to the students, Sonora has created an environment of acceptance, high standards, and friendliness. A district survey is completed every two years by students, parents, and faculty alike. According to the latest survey, Sonora’s staff earned top districtwide recognition as an outstanding group, as voted upon by the students completing the survey, which was approximately ninety-eight per cent of the enrollment. Sonora is frequently visited by former students who share how their learning at Sonora impacted them while at college. A.P. and I.B. students often come back from college and say that Sonora prepared them extremely well, particularly in I.B. Biology, A.P. Psychology, and English IV. Other returning graduates additionally comment that Sonora actually over-prepared them: Their experiences are easy and less stressful than those of their peers. Students also return from college and work on the

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Student interviews District survey Pictures of students doing work in class API banner in Lower Commons of academic improvement Staff directory Volunteer lists The school newspaper UC Personal Statements PTSA Spotlight/Principal’s Newsletter Freshman Newsletter


campus as tutors, mentors, and volunteers. They work with programs such as AVID, I.B., Academic Decathlon, and even sports. The summer basketball program is particularly strong due to a large population of returning students who help the coach mentor and coach the young kids who participate in the camp. Approximately twelve current staff members, ten teachers and two classified, are graduates of the school. Just recently, four students of high caliber and leadership on our campus visited local intermediate schools with the I.B. Coordinator to share and celebrate their experiences at Sonora. Further, a student from Bennington is doing an internship at Sonora for the next month, as part of the university coursework.

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Letters from former students Interviews with students during lunch and in notes to teachers Back-to-School Night Sing-in sheets of the parents who attended Back-to-School Night Brochures for all parent nights


C2.

Instruction Criterion

All teachers use a variety of strategies and resources, including technology and experiences beyond the textbook and the classroom that actively engage students, emphasize higher order thinking skills, and help them succeed at high levels. To what extent do all teachers use a variety of strategies and resources, including technology and experiences beyond the textbook and the classroom, that actively engage students, emphasize higher order thinking skills, and help them succeed at high levels? Current Knowledge Teachers are current in the instructional content taught and research-based instructional methodology. Provide a range of examples that demonstrate teachers are current in the instructional content taught and research-based instructional methodology. Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

the end of Category C]

The faculty at Sonora continues to stay on top of the latest trends in teaching through a variety of methods. Teachers attend many conferences for their curriculum areas as well as education practices in general. Some of these include Medical Careers Academy, AVID, AP, IB. Counselor receive special training at a number of conferences that address topics such as, UC, CSU, private colleges requirements. Additionally, the attend College Board and financial aid conferences. Current textbooks are used in classrooms throughout the campus and are replaced on a rotational basis. The English Learners population at Sonora is a quite significant segment of the population of the school, as presented in Chapter One of this report. Thus, SDAIE and CLAD/CTEL strategies are used in all classes. Every teacher at Sonora has taken courses to help them differentiate both instruction and assessments. All certificated staff possess at least one type of CLAD credential, SDAIE training, or equivalent. Some of the resultant strategies used in the classrooms include: visual aides such as flashcards, nonlinguistic representations, activities that connect new information to prior knowledge, time accommodations, small groups, scaffolding, and cooperative learning. The Sonora administration encourages teachers to observe in the classrooms of colleagues, both within and outside of their area of expertise, including providing release time for such visits. These opportunities allow staff members to witness effective instructional practices that are being implemented across the campus.

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Degrees and certificates of staff Staff development agendas PLC meetings and minutes Data Director reports Classroom observation reports Science, World Language, and English field trips Play program notes Classroom activities across the campus, including debates, essays, research papers and other both typical and unique educational opportunities SDAIE instructional tools and activities


Our Early Release days consistently provide informal sharing in departments through Professional Learning Community meetings, and lively discussions even occur during break and lunch. The Math Department eats lunch with one another daily and the Science Department share food, strategies and ideas at break throughout the schoolyear. Sonora has implemented a data-driven plan of action to improve performance for all students. The online program Data Director is used extensively throughout the school year for this purpose. Past scores are analyzed on a regular basis. Staff members have participated in training for this program. In the Science Department, field trips are an integral part of the learning process. The semester long Marine Science class takes four field trips. They visit the Dana Point Ocean Institute and Floating Laboratory, the Corona del Mar Tide Pools, the Long Beach Aquarium of the Pacific, and the Bolsa Chica Wetlands. The I.B. Biology class goes to the Los Angeles College of Chiropractic Medicine and students have the opportunity to study dissected cadavers. The Introduction to Physiology class visits either the above Chiropractic School, a local hospital, or, when available, one of the Body World travelling exhibitions. The Foreign Language Department offers several opportunities outside of the classroom. Several of the French students attend a weekend long French Camp Sponsored by the Foreign Language Association of Orange County (FLA-OC) in April. Sonora is in its fourth groundbreaking year of offering Mandarin. The English Department provides opportunities for students to view movies and plays outside of Sonora taking advantage of the many culturally enhancing productions in the wider Los Angeles basin. When possible, English classes attend plays at local theatres such as the South Coast Repertory and/or the Renaissance Faire. The Social Science Department encourages seniors to get involved with the city government, shadowing the Mayor and other city leaders for an entire day. Every two years, students also volunteer to work the election polls in local precincts. The Music Department occasionally hears professional 143


concerts, and the Dance Department saw Alvin Ailey perform two years ago. Sonora boasts an acceleration of honors, AP classes and IB courses within the last several years. We added AP Human Geography, AP English Language and Composition, IB Dance, and IB Film. We now offer an increasing number of AP and IB courses. The pervasive financial and maintenance staffing problems associated with up-to-date technology largely limits Sonora students from taking advantage of the many online educational opportunities. Teachers as Coaches Teachers work as coaches to facilitate learning for all students. To what extent do teachers work as coaches to facilitate learning for all students? Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

the end of Category C]

Student accessibility to teachers has been a dynamic element in the culture of Sonora for many years. Teachers have embraced an attitude of being a “guide on the side” as opposed to a “sage on the stage,” working alongside students as partners and not limiting teaching to lectures. Teachers at Sonora are constantly acting as coaches in order to facilitate learning for all students. Formal tutoring takes place on campus four days a week after school in various classrooms and in the library. During this time, students can get extra help on a variety of subjects. Informally, tutoring occurs on a daily basis before school, during teachers’ prep periods, during breaks, during lunches, and after school. The inception of two strong programs, ABI and Teleparent have allowed more thorough and precise communication among parents, teachers, and students. For the past several years, teachers, students and parents have had access to online grades. Updated in an ongoing manner, the ABI program allows parents and students to keep track of grades on a daily basis. For the 2010-2011 school year, Sonora brought back the Teleparent program for use by staff members. This program allows calls of a variety of topics to go to students’ homes in their home language. Various forms of recognition occur on campus to

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Tutoring sign-in sheets ABI access logs Teleparent access logs Student of the Month lists Principal’s Honor Roll lists Teacher/student conference forms Counseling notes Homework logs Grade checks FFA/Agriculture hours English, Science, and Social Science tutoring and end of semester review classes Science labs Athletics Afternoon and evening learning experiences for AP/IB exams Student Agenda


encourage success. Each month, a Student of the Month is chosen from each department. These students receive a certificate signed by their department head as well as the principal. A similar certificate is given to all students who make the Principal’s Honor Roll each semester. Student conferences take place on a regular basis on campus. Teachers and counselors meet with students to discuss schedules, grades, behavior, specific issues, and California Standards Test results. Another technique used at Sonora to encourage the coaching role of teachers is the use of weekly calendars, goal sheets, and student reflective feedback regarding their learning. These sheets take a variety of forms, but all give students a way to keep track of various pieces of information in one place, set specific goals, and allow students more independence and power in the assessment of their own learning. Weekly calendars and grade checks are often taken home to be perused, verified, and signed by parents. Counselors also work as coaches in a one-on-one setting with students. By providing guidance on things as disparate as college choice and depression, counselors are a great resource for students.

Booklets

Examination of Student Work Representative samples of student work demonstrate: a) structured learning so that students organize, access and apply knowledge they already have acquired; b) that students have the tools to gather and create knowledge and have opportunities to use these tools to research, inquire, gather, discover and invent knowledge on their own and communicate this. To what extent do the representative samples of student work demonstrate: a) structured learning so that students organize, access and apply knowledge they already have acquired? b) that students have the tools to gather and create knowledge and have opportunities to use these tools to research, inquire, gather, discover and invent knowledge on their own and communicate this? Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

the end of Category C]

All departments demonstrate the academic gamut of teaching strategies which structure learning so that students can synthesize and apply their knowledge toward higher level thinking skills. The I.B. Program focuses on empowering the students to think and be engaged in stimulating courses that will demand that they use many tools to enhance and deepen their own learning. They must choose a topic that reflects their own passion and research it, culminating with a 4,000 word extended essay. They must do orals 145

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Sophomore English/Social Science research paper Media and oral presentations History debates Writing portfolios Inquiry learning in the sciences


internal assessment in both World Language and English; these orals are sent to outside readers often in another country to be judged. They must take the Theory of Knowledge (TOK) course which focuses entirely on teaching students how and why we think the ways we do. The papers written during the class are also sent elsewhere, generally to another country to be adjudicated. Science, art, English, and math require that the students submit labs, artwork, World Literature papers, and projects, which, again, will be sent to other countries to be assessed, if a part of the IB program. Sophomore students write a cross-curricular research paper for their English and World History. The departments closely work together on process and the final product. The renowned Agriculture Department shows animals at the Orange Country and La Habra Valley Community Fair. Students also take care of an animal all year at Sonora. The English Department asks the students to maintain their writings in their portfolios. Students are occasionally asked to reflect upon their writing and their learning in their portfolios. The Social Science Department requires seniors to run for office and deliver speeches on camera. They are also to make posters and interview others to support their programs. The World Language and ELD Departments create skits in either Spanish, French, Mandarin, or ELD classes with the best skits being selected for the Extravaganza, an evening show in the target languages. Students in A.P. Spanish Language choose an element of the Spanish speaking world and create an extensive project exploring that element. The projects are showcased in the library at the end of the year. Students in the French classes recreate different Parisian building and monuments. Fellow students and parents are invited to tour the mock city and receive historical, architectonic, and cultural information from their student tour guides. In science, there is frequent use of student warm-ups to open class, allowing students to access previously acquired science standards. Instruction in the science curriculum closely ties laboratory investigation with

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PowerPoint presentations Animal showing at the Orange County and La Habra Valley Community Fair Students raise animals during their time at Sonora Speeches DVD projects Cornell Notes for AVID IB Extended Essays IB prompts and assignments AP tests Political videos and posters Video of World Language and ELD Extravaganza Photos of recreation of Paris Labs The AP Spanish Language cultural project Science labs


other classroom learning experiences. Classes are often split into groups to perform hands on labs such as the tsunami lab in Integrated Science. The kinesthetic and visual aspects of the labs is ideal because it allows students to research, inquire, gather, discover, and invent knowledge on their own and with peers. One of the culminating activities for Integrated Science is a 4th quarter Energy Project. Teams of students research a means of generating electricity and are asked to design a model, and a PowerPoint presentation where real-world benefits and costs are presented. Representative samples of student work demonstrate that students are able to think, reason, and problem solve in group and individual activities, project, discussions and debates and inquiries related to investigation. To what extent do the representative samples of student work demonstrate that students are able to think, reason, and problem solve in group and individual activities, project, discussions and debates and inquiries related to investigation? Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

the end of Category C]

Much collaboration occurs among the students both within and outside of the classroom. In a number of classes, students can take partner or group tests. In Social Science, they are involved with debates, surveys for which they must gather and interpret statistics, election projects for President, and shadowing the city government employees for a day. In Science, they do an energy project in Integrated Science I, a partner-oriented series of purification labs in Organic/Biochemistry, and students actually take turns teaching Science Seminar during the afternoons. For most of the arts, students are required to work together, be it Band, choir, the fall play, the spring play, the musical, and/or dance. As a part of the World Language and ELD coursework, all students must coordinate efforts for their World Language and ELD skits for the Extravaganza. In French, students recreate Paris. Students in English must work together to present their projects on Macbeth, Catch-22, Blood Wedding, and the I.B. English amalgamation project where students synthesize at least six characters and create a play using those characters. By the sheer nature of their activities, students in athletics must work together in order to succeed and improve. In Floriculture, students learn to both make and sell beautiful floral arrangements. Further, students have the opportunity to volunteer their time to help decorate the floats for the Tournament of Roses Parade.

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History debates City Government Shadowing for a day Stats survey project Integrated science Energy Projects Extravaganza Band, choir, drama, dance performances English projects I.B. English amalgamation project Floriculture projects NHS Students Special Olympics


For the NHS Induction, senior students must create, run, and participate in the ceremony to bring in new juniors and seniors. The ceremony is formal, demanding precise organization and serious countenances from the students. Students in CBI and in Best Buds work together on the Special Olympics put on in May at Cal State Fullerton. Representative samples of student work demonstrate that students use technology to assist them in achieving the academic standards and the expected schoolwide learning results. To what extent do the representative samples of student work demonstrate that students use technology to assist them in achieving the academic standards and the expected schoolwide learning results? Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

the end of Category C]

There are a variety of programs that are technologically generated in which students can learn and excel. PowerPoint presentations are ubiquitously used by teachers and students. The Accelerated Math Program, READ 180, and the Rosetta Stone are all invaluable programs that help students greatly improve their basic educational skills, usually rapidly preparing them to learn much more successfully in their general education classes. Students are allowed to use their laptops in class, providing immediacy and clarity to their learning. The LCD projectors in each class help with Power point and showing films in class. The departments require students to do internet research. The Math and Science Departments use Smart Boards. Computers are available in the library for student use. For all intents and purposes, several computer labs were built for our school. However, these areas are not kept up nor are they serviced by any technician. As a result, very few computers are in consistent use. The Science Department has seven to nine computers per classroom. Keeping these computers running, and thus using them effectively, continues to be a challenge.

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Rosetta Stone Accelerated math Read 180 Reach Reading PowerPoint Computer lab LCD Projectors in each classroom Laptops Library computer lab Internet research Visual arts classes Smart Boards Organic/Biochemistry individual Research Projects


Representative samples of student work demonstrate student use of materials and resources beyond the textbook, such as utilization and availability of library/multimedia resources and services; availability of and opportunities to access data based, original source documents and computer information networks; and experiences, activities and resources which link students to the real world. To what extent do the representative samples of student work demonstrate student use of materials and resources beyond the textbook, such as utilization and availability of library/multimedia resources and services; availability of and opportunities to access data based, original source documents and computer information networks; and experiences, activities and resources which link students to the real world? Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

the end of Category C]

In the area of technology, one of the school’s major challenges is that we don’t have many computers for students to use. This challenge is exacerbated by the fact that many students in our school do not have computers at home to use. Medical Careers classes use real medical equipment and technology both in class and in internships to link the academic learning to applied medical care. Students can research topics in either of the library two online databases, Student Resources in Context and

Opposing Viewpoints in Context. The following ebooks are available for student research: Encyclopedia of World Biography , The Gale Encyclopedia of Surgery , Countries and Their Cultures, The Gale Encyclopedia of Science , and Genetics.

World Language research projects have students navigate authentic websites in the Target Language. Agriculture uses laptops and accounting software to create record books. This year, students are planning, organizing, and building Raider Ranch. For this assignment, students must develop and write a business plan for Raider Ranch where, after conducting internet research, they estimate/project the costs associated with building it. Social Science classes use the internet to research alternative perspectives and get different view points about historical events. Science

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School website Individual teachers’ websites Library Website


Real World Experiences Opportunities for shadowing, apprenticeship, community projects and other real world experiences and applications are available to all students. To what extent are opportunities for shadowing, apprenticeship, community projects and other real world experiences and applications available to all students? Evidence [note evidence here or at

Findings

the end of Category C]

Students at Sonora have a wide variety of opportunities to participate in apprenticeship and shadowing. The Community Based Instruction Program is designed to allow students a unique, safe environment in which to acquire the benefits of a standards-based academic program that focuses on individual needs. Integral within the program are work experience opportunities and life skills instruction.

• • • • • •

The annual Sonora Holiday Food Drive has become one of the most important and most anticipated events of the year. Over the years, it has grown into a three week long event in which up to $36,000 has been raised to feed and give gifts to needy families in La Habra. In 2010, over 120 families were supported with just over $25,000 collected. Students ‘shop’ for food both at Albertson’s and at Sonora. At Sonora, food and supplies are set up inside the school and the kids, then, deliver the gifts to the families themselves. Several programs, including the Counseling staff, take students on college visitations throughout the school year. Students attend UC Irvine, Cal State Fullerton, and Fullerton College with other seniors to see and learn about the campuses and what to expect in college. Students in JROTC perform on Veteran’s Day for parades to honor those men and women who have served our country and also travel to summer camps at local military bases. Students in Social Science, Science, and English have powerful speakers come to teach them about skills needed in their prospective career, about college, and life in general. Students have multiple chances to bring their work to the community through performances, projects, and competitions. These opportunities demonstrate to the community at large that Sonora students are active learners who are encouraged to nurture the idea that

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Holiday Food Drive Community Based Instruction College visitations Public performances Foreign Language Extravaganza Creative Writing Club—poems and prose written, read, and published Guest Speakers Science field trips to view and study human cadavers Field trips to view and study marine life Plays CAS


they can be lifelong learners and contributors to their communities. Examples of these occasions include: the Holiday Food Drive, Art exhibits, Drama plays and musicals, Concert Band performances, Choir performances, Dance and Drill Team performances and competitions, Marching Band competitions, Percussion and Color Guard competitions, JROTC competitions, Science Olympiad competitions, Speech and Debate competitions, Academic Decathlon, Science field trips, English field trips, local fair showing of animals, Medical Careers portfolios and internships, Creative Writing Club—writing, reading, and publishing poetry and other pieces of writing. Since the IB goal is to educate the whole person and foster responsible, compassionate citizens, one of the IB diploma requirements is to voluntarily engage in Creativity, Action, Service (CAS). Students must select a topic that is thematically integrated to their IB learner profile. Once it is approved by IB, the student has two years to complete her/his 150 hours of activities/services.

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WASC Category C. Standards-based Student Learning: Instruction: Supporting Evidence, Strengths, and Growth Needs Category C. Standards-based Student Learning: Instruction: Areas of Strength

• • • • • • • • • •

Students have great accessibility to teachers and other staff members. The school provides a wide variety of program opportunities, including intervention courses. The curriculum promotes a college-bound atmosphere for all students. There is a wide variety of ROP classes available to all students. Access to higher level courses has increased for all students. Sonora students evidence great participation in a number of community activities and events. Sonora students have access to many projects in both the school and the wider community that require students to apply and synthesize their skills into academic and general life situations. Sonora has a positive approach to helping our students by giving much time to our lessons and to assisting them beyond the classroom. Sonora has a rich offering of multiple courses that serve a variety of learning styles and skills. Sonora offers incredible opportunities beyond the classroom.

Category C. Standards-based Student Learning: Instruction: Areas of Growth Needs

Obtain eighth grade test results for incoming freshmen in time to plan lessons to meet the individual student needs.

Many parents are often not able to access ABI effectively

Faculty meetings need to be occasionally organized such that academic interchange may take place, as compared to only administrative information sessions, important as they may be.

The library needs to reinstate adequate additional learning and resource opportunities.

Student access to adequate technology needs to be significantly improved.

Category C. Standards-based Student Learning: Instruction: Supporting Evidence

The Supporting Evidence is included with the Findings as presented above.

152


Assessment/Accountability Leadership: Paul Haplin, English Kirk Lathrum, Math Altieri

Nicki

Science

Angelo

Ted

Parent

Blazey

Amanda

Student

Bliss

Brock

Aide

Brodmann

Valeri

Attendance

Bumcrot

Karen

Aide

Campbell

Megan

Special Ed.

Chalian

Raffi

Student

Choi

Ben

Student

D'Amelia

Joe

Social Science

Day

Christina

Student

De Leon

Elvira

Attendance

Diaz

Sonia

Counseling

Garcia

Arielle

Student

Godinez

Jennifer

Student

Gonzalez

Marlene

World Languages

Grabuskie

Georden

Student

Halpin

Paul

English

Henry

Stephanie

Admin.

Higgins

Susan

Math

Hohl

Mike

Social Science

Hohl

Cindy

Student

Hultberg

Linnea

Student

Jarnutowski

Amy

Parent

Kang

Vianney

Science

Kevorkian

Dominique

Student

Lathrum

Kirk

Math

Lathrum

Christy

Special Ed.

153


Layana

Nick

Math

Marquez

Danelia

Aide

Martinez

Abby

Special Ed.

Medina

Lourdes

Office

Middleton

Marilyn

Social Science

Myers

Kari

Math

Olguin

Valerie

Parent

Pando

Theresa

Food Services

Papageorge

Nick

Arts

Parise

Christina

Student

Pieper

Barbara

ROP

Ramirez

Frank

Security

Rim

Eddie

Student

Rodriguez

Fidel

Custodial

Rodriguez

Jose

World Languages

Salido

Talia

Student

Sanchez

Jalene

Student

Sherrill

Kathie

ROP

Stack

Patty

PE

Tari

Jennifer

Student

Toth

Marta

Aide

Yeandle

Janet

English

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D. Standards-based Student Learning: Assessment and Accountability D1 & D2.

Assessment and Accountability Criterion

To what extent does the school use a professionally acceptable assessment process to collect, disaggregate, analyze and report student performance data to the parents and other shareholders of the community? D2a. To what extent do teachers employ a variety of assessment strategies to evaluate student learning? D2b. To what extent do students and teachers use these findings to modify the teaching/learning process for the enhancement of the educational progress of every student? Professionally Acceptable Assessment Process

The school uses effective assessment processes to collect, disaggregate, analyze and report student performance data to the parents and other shareholders of the community. Comment on the effectiveness of the assessment process to collect, disaggregate, analyze and report student performance data to the parents and other shareholders of the community. Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category D]

Sonora High School uses professionally acceptable assessment tools to collect, disaggregate, analyze, and report student performance data to parents and other shareholders of the community. Assessment data is reported to parents and other shareholders through a variety of methods. After results of various tests and other assessments are received by the school, the school send letters and UPRs (Unsatisfactory Progress Reports) to the families. This information can also be shared through the TeleParent program and/or accessed via the Internet on the school’s website and/or ABI. Individual Test scores are also communicated during parent conferences, SIT, IEP, and/or 504 meetings. Schoolwide assessment data are also included in the Single Plan for Student Achievement, which are shared with stakeholders at school site council and district board meetings.

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API AYP DataDirector DataQuest Newsweek Parent Institute for Quality Education (PIQE) for EL UPRs CAHSEE scores CST results School Website District Website Letters home Parent conferences ABI/Aeries AP & IB Results Community newspapers School Newspaper School Site Council District Board Meetings SAT, ACT, PSAT, PLAN CAPA results CMA scores RSP, SIT, IEP, 504 plans CELDT results TeleParent


Basis for Determination of Performance Levels

The school has determined the basis upon which students’ grades and their growth and performance levels are determined and uses that information to strengthen high achievement of all students. Upon what basis are students’ grades, their growth and performance levels determined and how is that information used? Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category D]

Sonora High School determines the students’ grades and their growth through an assortment of assessments to support and bolster the achievement of all students. This information is used to determine, among other items: students’ placement, acquisition of standards, bases for reteaching/spiraling instruction, progress toward graduation, test retakes, and tutoring. Based upon assessment results, students are provided intervention classes in an attempt to address the achievement gap. Students with multiple areas of concern meet with counselors to determine which intervention and/or support classes are most beneficial. Counselors meet with all students to develop a 4-year plan to ensure progress toward completion of graduation requirements and post-secondary goals. Teachers use the data that is disaggregated on DataDirector to develop SMART goals, which are Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic, and Timely, to move students toward proficiency and mastery of the standards. CELDT, CST, CAHSEE, and site administered assessments are used to place ELs in classes. Students are placed according to the district EL Master Plan recommendations and students’ individual circumstances (grade, post-secondary goals, units, etc.).

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DataDirector AYP API CAHSEE CSTs Tutoring PSAT, PLAN, SAT, ACT SMART Goals CAPA CMA Common Benchmarks Reteaching/Spiraling instruction CAHSEE Review classes REACH Reading Read 180 Accelerated Math CAHSEE Bootcamp/Mock CAHSEE Nelson Testing RSP, SIT, IEP, 504 plans AP/IB Results Counseling – 4 year planning CELDT Sheltered/SDAIE classes


Appropriate Assessment Strategies

Teachers use appropriate assessment strategies to measure student progress toward acquiring a specific body of knowledge or skills such as essays, portfolios, individual or group projects, tests, etc. To what extent do teachers use appropriate assessment strategies to measure student progress toward acquiring a specific body of knowledge or skills? Examples of these strategies include essays, portfolios, individual or group projects, tests, etc. Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category D]

Teachers at Sonora High School use various assessment strategies in order to determine students’ progress and acquisition of a specific body of knowledge and skills. Portfolios, which are a means of compiling student work, allow teachers and students to assess growth over a period of time (i.e. one semester, one year, etc.). The World Language and ELD departments produce Extravaganza, which enables students to demonstrate mastery of the target language by writing and performing student skits. Calculus and Algebra II students complete a Summer Packet in order to review the skills and prior knowledge necessary to be successful for the upcoming course. The Special Education Department hosts an “Information Share Day” each year to communicate and review assessment results and student achievement with general education teachers. General education teachers are informed as to which assessement tools are most beneficial and effective for their Special Education students, who have IEPs.

• •

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Portfolios Classroom assessments Tests, quizzes, essays, homework, presentations, dramatizations, taskbased activities, warm-up activities, discussions Summer Packets Extravaganza Common Benchmarks IEPs Peer review Reteaching/Spiraling Instruction Test Retakes Pacing Guides

Pacing guides have been developed in all core subjects to ensure continuity across each grade level or subject matter, which enables teachers to work together to develop common assessments and benchmarks. Demonstration of Student Achievement

A range of examples of student work and other assessments demonstrate student achievement of the academic standards and the expected schoolwide learning results, including those with special needs. Provide a range of examples of how student work and other assessments demonstrate student achievement of the academic standards and the expected schoolwide learning results, including those with special needs.

157


Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category D]

All students’ work (including those students with special needs) demonstrates the extent of achievement of academic standards and ESLRs through multiple methods. Class activities and discussions are related to the content standards in each subject. The Community Based Instruction (CBI) program curriculum is tied to the CAPA standards. Students are assessed on mastery of life skills and applied academics. AP and IB national/international assessments evaluate student achievement of academic standards. Practice test and Internal Assessments allow for assessment of mastery of standards prior to the final cummulative exam. Quarterly Benchmarks in Math, English, Science, Social Science, and World Language assess where students are at the end of each grading period.

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CBI program Tests/Quizzes Essays Rubrics Homework Presentations Dramatizations Task-based activities Warm-ups Standards-based activites Discussions Benchmarks AP and IB practice test and Internal Assessments

Curriculum Embedded Assessments

The school regularly examines standards-based curriculum embedded assessments in English Language and math, including performance examination of students whose primary language is not English, and uses that information to modify the teaching/learning process. Provide examples of standards-based curriculum embedded assessments in English Language and math, including performance examination of students whose primary language is not English. Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category D]

Sonora High School evaluates, in a timely manner, standards-based curriculum embedded assessments in English Language and math, including performance examinations of English Learners and strives to use the results to differentiate instruction for and/or, as necessary, reteach all students. Teachers also use everyday informal assessments to check student progress toward acheivement of the standards. For example, students, including EL students, demonstrate comprehension of the standards through whole class or small group discussions, pair share, gesturing (hands up, thumbs up, etc.), and visual representation (slate board, storyboards, etc.). In the Extravaganza Show, ELD students have an

158

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Class Discussions Small Group Discussions Pair Share Informal Assessments Presentations Common Benchmarks District Finals Subject-alike Benchmarks Unit Tests/Quizzes Writing Assessments Rubric-based writing


opportunity to perform the script they have developed as a means of demonstrating their mastery of English.

Extravaganza

Student Feedback

Student feedback is an important part of monitoring student progress over time based on the academic standards and the expected schoolwide learning results. To what extent is student feedback an important part of monitoring student progress over time based on the academic standards and the expected schoolwide learning results? Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category D]

Sonora High School uses student feedback to gauge students’ performance over various time intervals to determine students’ proficiency in academic standards and ESLRs. Based on student progress, some students are required by parents, coaches, and/or counselors to obtain and fill out Weekly Progress Reports or Daily homework logs to monitor student progress throughout a semester and/or school year. Weekly Progress Reports and Daily logs allow students, parents, coaches, and counselors to verify student progress or lack of progress in each class. Student Success Conferences, conducted during SSR in the weeks leading up to the CSTs, allow teachers an opportunity to discuss last year’s results with each student. Through this one-on-one meeting, teachers and students can identify areas of strength and weaknes, in preparation for the upcoming CST. At this point teachers can also review with students once again the progress they have made on the current year’s standards using data from the benchmarks and other assessments. Parent, student, teacher conferences, counseling meetings, and IEPs, 504 Plan, and SIT meetings are held to provide feedback to all involved. During these meetings, students communicate their opinions about personal progress they have made toward the standards and ESLRs. In ASB, Principal’s Advisory Board, PTSA, SSC, ELAC, and other meetings, students express feedback about schoolwide progress toward meeting the academic standards and ESLRs.

• • • • • • •

• • • •

Weekly Progress Reports Daily homework logs UPRs Report Cards ABI Daily quizzes Student Success Conferences Parent, Student, Teacher conferences Counseling meetings IEP, SIT, and 504 meetings ASB, Principal’s Advisory Board, PTSA, SSC, ELAC

Modification of the Teaching/Learning Process

Assessment data is collected, analyzed, and used as the basis to make decisions and changes in the curricular and instructional approaches. Evaluate the effectiveness of how assessment data is collected, analyzed, and used as the basis to make decisions and changes in the curricular and instructional approaches. 159


Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category D]

Sonora High School effectively collects and analyzes assessment data to guide and modify future planning, instruction, and assesments. Teachers meet in their PLCs to review data collected from DataDirector and/or ABI to evaluate and modify instruction and assessments. For instance, teachers whose students performed well in a specific standard share their instructional practices with their PLC. Based upon the data, teachers formulate pacing guides and SMART Goals to address areas of concern and/or strength.

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Release time for teachers to analyze data PLCs SMART Goals Department meetings DataDirector ABI/Aeries Pacing Guides

Monitoring of Student Growth

The school has an effective system to monitor all students’ progress toward meeting the academic standards and expected schoolwide learning results. Provide representative examples of how progress of all students toward meeting the academic standards and expected schoolwide learning results is monitored. Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category D]

Sonora High School has a system in place to monitor all students’ progress toward meeting the academic standards and ESLRs. Specifically, the school uses DataDirector to monitor student progress toward proficiency on both standardized assessments and site-generated benchmarks, which are standards-based. These findings are analyzed by teachers, counselors, and administrators to determine student progress. When concerns arise that a student is not making adequate progress towards academic standards and ESLRs, referrals are made to the counselors and/or, in the case of Special Education, the case carrier. When students fall significantly behind in units, the counselor and/or the APPS may refer the student to Credit Recovery, the Opportunity Program, or other continuing or alternative education options. When there are linguistic and/or academic concerns that an EL student is not making adequate progress, the EL and Recent RFEP counselor and/or Dean of Academic Services meets with the student and/or family. During this six year cycle, when it became apparent that a disproportionate number of ELs were not making progress towards meeting the academic standards and/or ESLRs, the school made the systemic switch over to the

160

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Report cards UPR TeleParent ABI/Aeries Grade checks Benchmarks Dictrict finals Counseling EL Coordinator/Dean of Academic Services EL and Recent RFEP Counselor Counseling referrals Opportunity Program referrals La Vista High School and La Sierra High School referrals Credit Recovery Program referrals


current SDAIE composition in clases. It consists of 60% English Only, IFEPs, and/or RFEPs to 40% ELs in the English, Science, and Social Science Departments. Additional Findings

What have you learned from analysis of additional evidence regarding this criterion? Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category D]

Sonora High School analyzes a wide range of assessments to determine all students’ progress and performance levels in relationship with standardsbased assessments and ESLRs. The school employs DataDirector as a means to collect data from several sources: CSTs, CAHSEE, Subject-specific Benchmark Exams, CELDT, CMA, and CAPA. Teachers and administrators use DataDirector to assess the success of their SMART goals, to identify the students who need interventions and/or additonal academic support, and to measure all students’ progress toward proficiency on standards-based assessments. Sonora High School’s shareholders are informed of the data by letters home, access to ABI/Aeries, the school and district websites, report cards and UPRs, and TeleParent. Teachers meet in PLCs to analyze data in order to modify instruction, to reteach, to use professionally acceptable instructional and assessment strategies to ensure all students continue to progress toward proficiency of the standards and ESLRs.

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API AYP DataQuest DataDirector Newsweek Parent Institute for Quality Education (PIQE) for EL parents UPRs CAHSEE scores CST results Letters home ABI/Aeries Read 180 REACH Reading Accelerated Math ABI/Aeries AP & IB Results Community newspapers Princeton Review Common Benchmarks District-wide Finals SAT, ACT, PSAT, PLAN SMART Goals CAPA results CMA scores CAHSEE results CAHSEE Review courses Sheltered/SDAIE classes Reteaching/Spiraling RSP, SIT, IEP, 504 plans CELDT Tests Nelson Testing


• • • •

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162

Tutoring Test retakes IMPACT mentoring Classroom assessments • Tests, quizzes, essays, homework, presentations, dramatizations, taskbased activities, warm-up activities, discussions Mock CAHSEE Portfolios CAHSEE Bootcamp Extravaganza Pacing Guides Summer Packet PLCs/Focus groups Rosetta Stone Essential Standards Single Plan for Student Achievement 60/40 SDAIE classes On-going re-evaluation of EL placement TeleParent School Website Counseling – 4-year planning Letters home to parents Report cards & UPRs


D3 & D4.

Assessment and Accountability Criterion

The school with the support of the district and community has an assessment and monitoring system to determine student progress toward achievement of the academic standards and the expected schoolwide learning results. The assessment of student achievement in relation to the academic standards and the expected schoolwide learning results drives the school’s program, its regular evaluation and improvement, and the allocation and usage of resources. To what extent does the school with the support of the district and community have an assessment and monitoring system to determine student progress toward achievement of the academic standards and the expected schoolwide learning results? To what extent does the assessment of student achievement in relation to the academic standards and the expected schoolwide learning results drive the school's program, its regular evaluation and improvement and usage of resources? Assessment and Monitoring Process

The following shareholders are involved in the assessment and monitoring process of student progress: district, board, staff, students and parents. To what extent are the following shareholders involved in the assessment and monitoring process of student progress: district, board, staff, students and parents? Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category D]

The shareholders for Sonora High School, which include district, board, staff, students, parents, and interested community members are actively involved in the assessment and monitoring process of student progress. The school administration reports and analyzes standardized test scores in the Single Plan for Student Achievement. This plan is presented at the School Site Council meeting, which is comprised of parents, students, and staff. Upon School Site Council approval, the plan is presented to the School Board for final approval. Information from the Single Plan for Student Achievement is presented to the leadership team, who share the information with their departments. The curriculum meetings occur once a month to monitor student progress and assessments. When changes or adaptations need to be implemented, they go to the staff, parents, and district board for approval. Students and parents receive all assessment results so they, too, can be active participants in monitoring student progress. Much pertinent data are published in the SARC which is available on the website for all stakeholders to view.

163

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DataDirector District Curriculum Commitees District Finals Common Benchmarks Letters home District Newsletters PTSA Newsletters TeleParent ABI/Aeries School Board Meetings/Minutes SARC


Reporting Student Progress

There are effective processes to keep district, board and parents informed about student progress toward achieving the academic standards and the expected schoolwide learning results. How effective are the processes to keep district, board and parents informed about student progress toward achieving the academic standards and the expected schoolwide learning results? Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category D]

Sonora High School has processes in place to effectively inform district, board, and parents about student progress toward achieving the academic standards and ESLRs. The processes that SOHS has in place, as previously described, are highly effective as evidenced by our continuous increase in API. Additional evidence is listed to the right.

• • • • • • • • •

DataDirector DataQuest District Finals Letters home District Newsletters PTSA Newsletters TeleParent ABI/Aeries School Board Meetings/Minutes

Modifications Based on Assessment Results

The school uses assessment results to make changes in the school program, professional development activities and resource allocations, demonstrating a results-driven continuous process. Provide examples of how assessment results have caused changes in the school program, professional development activities and resource allocations, demonstrating a resultsdriven continuous process. Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category D]

Sonora High School, along with its shareholders, uses assessment results to direct changes in the school program, professional development activities, and resource allocations, which demonstrates a resultsdriven continuous process. Based upon assessment results, students are placed into intervention classes, such as: Math Lab, Advanced Reading, CAHSEE Bootcamp, and CAHSEE Review classes. Based upon the assessment results, teachers and staff are also provided opportunities to attend professional development conferences, such as: Jane Schaffer Writing Training, Steven Krashen and Kate Kinsella speakers, and various subject matter conferences through OCDE. Analysis of assessment results has been an on-going conversation point in PLC meetings. The results are the

164

• • • • • • • • • • • •

Accelerated Math (Math Lab) REACH Reading (Advanced Reading) Read 180 (Advanced Reading) CAHSEE Review classes Math Lab Princeton Review CAHSEE Bootcamp Pacing Guides SMART Goals Tutoring Jane Schaffer Steven Krashen and


basis for creating Pacing Guides and SMART goals to drive program changes. The Princeton Review training enabled attendees to share with their peers and students the criteria for CST scoring, test-taking strategies, and released test questions. Assessment results are shared with the School Site Council and school program changes are voted upon and included as appropriate in the Single Plan for Student Achievement.

• •

Kate Kinsella for EL teachers/staff IMPACT Single Plan for Student Achievement

Additional Findings

What have you learned from analysis of additional evidence regarding this criterion? Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category D]

Performance data from state, district, and classroombased assessment is collected and distributed to the shareholders in a variety of ways. The collected data is analyzed and used to determine student progress toward achievement of the standards and ESLRs. Based upon the results, the school and district modify and develop programs and allocate funds as a means of supporting all students. Furthermore, the data is the impetus in developing the Single Plan for Student Achievement.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

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DataDirector DataQuest District Finals Letters home District Newsletters PTSA Newsletters TeleParent ABI/Aeries School Board Meetings/Minutes Accelerated Math REACH Reading Reading 180 CAHSEE Review classes CAHSEE Bootcamp Princeton Review Pacing Guides SMART Goals Tutoring Jane Schaffer Steven Krashen EL Conference IMPACT Single Plan for Student Achievement


WASC Category D. Standards-based Student Learning: Assessment and Accountability: Supporting Evidence, Strengths, and Growth Needs Include the supporting evidence for findings, if not included with the sample prompts. Determine and prioritize the strengths and areas of growth needs for Category D. Category D. Standards-based Student Learning: Assessment and Accountability: Areas of Strength

• • • • • • •

School-wide API increased 22 points last year to 798 in 2009-10 and increased 61 points since 2004-05 All significant subgroups demonstrated increases in API helping reduce the achievement gap The percentage of students scoring in the Advanced and Proficient bands increased The administration has provided teachers more time to meet in PLCs to create and analyze data Sonora has developed and is analyzing Common Benchmarks to monitor student progress toward standards and ESLRs The number of students taking an AP test has increased from 244 in 2006 to 719 in 2010 with the passing rate increasing from 67% to 73% Intervention and support programs have been developed and implemented as a result of assessment results to meet the needs of all students

Category D. Standards-based Student Learning: Assessment and Accountability: Areas of Growth Needs

• • • •

Latino, SED, EL, and SWD subgroups need to continue to improve in API, CSTs, CAHSEE English Language Arts, and CAHSEE Math to continue to reduce the acheivement gap Students’ CELDT performance need improvement Continue modifying and improving Common Benchmarks and Pacing Guides for all subjects More professional development time and training to dissagreggate and analyze data is needed

Category D. Standards-based Student Learning: Assessment and Accountability: Supporting Evidence

The Supporting Evidence is included with the Findings as presented above and/or Chapter 1 of this report. /

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Culture & Support for Personal & Academic Growth: Leaders: Keesha Mandella, World Language Phil Pacia, Agriculture Agnew

Cassandra

Social Science

Allinson

Deborah

Social Science

Ambriz Jr.

Jesus

Student

Arnett

Dori

Parent

Barlow

Jeannette

Parent

Barrios

Zeke

Aide

Beecher

Kath

English

Braun

Alicia

Food Services

Butler

Brenda

Nurse

Coleman

Jason

SRO

Cushing

Maria

Office

Dinh

Dang

Student

Duarte

Juan Carlos

Custodial

Duckett

Shelbie

Student

Edwards-Silva

Scott

Admin

Espinosa

Jessica

Student

Espinoza Cedillo

Alexis

Student

Farrell

Kelsey

Student

Faudoa

Iliana

Aide

Fuller

Jonathan

Student

Gaarder

Susan

Parent

Garcia

Luica

Parent

Gibson

Heather

English

Gomez

Justino

Custodial

Grebbien

Danielle

Student

Hutcherson

Andrew

Student

Kim

Jung Hyun

Student

Mandella

Keesha

World Languages

167


Martinez

Eric

Student

McClung

Karen

World Languages

Nguyen

Duy

Math

Pacia

Phil

Agriculture

Park

Brandon

Student

Perez

Fernando

Arts

Plascencia

Vina

Aide

Raza

Mohammad

Student

Reyes

Irene

Student

Ricketts

Mary

Special Ed

Roach

Tim

Social Science

Rodriguez

Melinda

Aide

Rodriguez

Michelle

PE

Rodriguez

Melinda

Office

Saalman

Fritz

JROTC

Schaad

Janet

Counseling

Sotingco

Jonas

Student

Stites

Roger

Math

Tellers

Pat

Science

Thrift

Claudia

Counseling

Tushla-Sanchez

Jen

Social Science

Vargas

Brittnie

Student

Williams

Jana

Parent

Woods

Merynda

Student

Yost

Barney

Admin

Zambrano

Teresa

Office

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E: School Culture and Support for Student Personal and Academic Growth E1.

School Culture and Student Support Criterion

To what extent does the school leadership employ a wide range of strategies to encourage parental and community involvement, especially with the teaching/learning process? Regular Parent Involvement

The school implements strategies and processes for the regular involvement of parents and the community, including being active partners in the teaching/learning process. The school involves non-English speaking parents. Evaluate the strategies and processes for the regular involvement of parents and the community, including being active partners in the teaching/learning process. Comment on the effectiveness of involving non-English speaking parents. Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category E]

Sonora employs a wide range of strategies to encourage parental involvement including: • Parent nights (IB, Guidance, ELAC, AG, Medical, Boosters, etc.) • Newsletters • Parent Institute for Quality Education (PIQE) is a nine-week program that teaches parents about graduation requirements and A-G requirements. It empowers parents to become more involved in their students education. • Website • PTSA Involvement • Local resources translated in second language are available for parents and community • Parents are responsible for Grad-Nite for Senior class

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Parent letters (IB, Guidance, ELAC, AG, Medical, Boosters, etc.) PIQE graduation program PTSA Involvement www.sonorahs.org

School Accountability Report Card (SARC) Non-English speaking parent communications ~second language notices/newsletters ~parent meetings minutes ~PTSA Spotlight which includes the principal’s newsletter ~School Site Council to approve future spending of categorical money ~Teleparent ~Beginning of the year orientation packet


~Bilingual administration/ office staff Use of Community Resources

The school uses community resources to support students, such as professional services, business partnerships, and speakers. How effective is the school use of community resources to support students, such as professional services, business partnerships, and speakers? Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category E]

Agriculture uses corporate sponsors for animals/feed and has strong ties to the community with the annual La Habra Valley Community Fair and the Orange County Fair. The department has strong ties with local businesses and place students in internships for industry practice. The Ag. Department has a 2+2+2 articulation with Mount San Antonio Community College and Cal Poly Pomona. As part of this articulation agreement among the schools, students that take agriculture course at SOHS qualify for college units at both Mount San Antonio Community College and/or Cal Poly Pomona. The department also provides a strong leadership program, Future Farmers of America (FFA) which places students out in the city to fulfill community service activities. Medical Careers relies on St. Jude and Whittier Presbyterian hospitals as important resources to provide real world applications to our students. Students are provided with an internship during the summer of their junior and senior year. This provides the opportunity for the businesses to see that the high school is offering career preparedness courses. Special Education connects community and job building skills with their partnership at St. Jude and local businesses in the City of La Habra. The department also works in conjunction with the Workability 1 program administered by the California Department of Education (CDE) to place students with special needs in paid/unpaid positions in the community. The City of La Habra is fortunate to have a community resource center, The Gary Center, which provides counseling, dentistry, and other services to 170

• • • • •

• • • •

Agricultural Internship and scholarship. Graduate follow-up Internship with St. Jude/Medical Careers St. Jude Community Partnership/CBI internship Rotary Involvement-monthly Student Scholarships Breaking the Image, STAMP, Anaheim Regional Memorial, ADEPT, 10 Principles of Success, etc. Gary Center interns Lions’ Club and local optometry referrals for glasses Local medical clinics Advance!, a unique community outreach organization that offers free college application, financial aid, and scholarship information.


those in need on a sliding scale. They send interns to Sonora to provide students weekly one-on-one social counseling that academic counselors might not be able to address. Rotary / Lions’ Clubs in La Habra are comprised of local civic leaders, businessmen, and school administrators and teachers that help provide scholarships and financial assistance for our high school needs such as monetary scholarships, financial assistance to programs and teen representative positions. When appropriate, the school nurses provide students and families referrals to optometry, dental, and/or medical clinics and local Lion’s Club. Guest Speakers from the community are invited yearly to bring a sense of urgency to the campus on topics such as drugs, tobacco, and alcohol. Additionally, motivational speakers, such as, 10 Principles of Success, past graduates, etc., are invited to provide a different perspective. Individual classes also draw on community resources to further their message (i.e. Agriculture, AVID, JROTC, Medical Careers, etc.). Parent/Community and Student Achievement

The school ensures that the parents and school community understand student achievement of the academic standards/expected schoolwide learning results through the curricular/co curricular program. How does the school ensure that the parents and school community understand student achievement of the academic standards/expected school-wide learning results through the curricular/co-curricular program? Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category E]

School to parent communication has greatly increased with the technology available through TeleParent, the improved school website including teacher pages with homework and standards links, as well as school activities and resources. ABI (Aeries Browsers Interface) is the web based program where parents and students may access attendance and academic progress on a 24 hour basis. DataQuest is a website available for all community members and parents to view schoolwide data including academic achievement, standardized test results, demographics, API/AYP information, and English Learner data. Additionally, SOHS performance 171

• • • • • •

Student handbooks, teacher syllabi, teacher websites, Teleparent School Website ABI Data Quest Back to School/Open House informational nights School Accountability Report Card (SARC)


on standardized test is shared with parents and community members at PTSA, ELAC, and SSC meeting. Back to School/Open House night’s present opportunities to see student successes in all departments, as well as extra-curricular presentations. While individual grades may be posted, these nights are intended to showcase work and not detail individual student progress.

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E2.

School Culture and Student Support Criterion

The school is a) a safe, clean, and orderly place that nurtures learning and b) has a culture that is characterized by trust, professionalism, high expectations for all students, and a focus on continuous school improvement. a) To what extent is the school a safe, clean, and orderly place that nurtures learning? b) To what extent is the culture of the school characterized by trust, professionalism, high expectations for all students, and a focus on continuous school improvement? Safe, Clean, and Orderly Environment

The school has existing policies, regulations and uses its resources to ensure a safe, clean and orderly place that nurtures learning. Comment on your analysis of a) the existing policies and use of resources to ensure a safe, clean and orderly place that nurtures learning and b) all aspects of the school with respect to safety regulations. Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category E]

A. A. • The staff and administration at Sonora High School • strive to improve the academic and physical • environment of the school site on a daily basis. Thanks • to the continued commitment of students, parents, administrators, custodial staff, classified staff, and teachers, our school is a safe, clean and orderly place • that allows learning to be nurtured on every level. As an indoor campus, the school is more protected than • others due to limited doors of entry. Custodial staff maintains the common areas after break and lunch as well as individual classrooms after hours. Additional security keys and lights have been added to the gym, as well as a new sound system and score board. Sonora themed, student drawn murals grace the walls of several department halls that are maintained and • respected by staff and students. The recently added Sonora Café has provided students • with booths and tables conducive to study groups and adds to the school culture with positive messaging on • professional billboards. Many of the clubs and organizations on campus facilitate a safe learning environment by providing positive involvement with special groups. IMPACT Pals provide mentoring for all freshmen students. They • address social concerns with the Cross the Line activity during which students can visually see how many fellow students have experienced difficult life experiences such • as the loss of a parent, and/or engaged in risky behavior 173

Gym improvements Themed murals Sonora Café IMPACT peer mentoring program for all freshmen. Best Buds mentoring program for CBI Explicitly taught safety, health, and organizational lessons in Agriculture, MCA, CBI, Culinary Arts, JROTC, and Science, Athletic/PE classes Athletic teams build trust and teamwork Gary Center interns on site for counseling Programs available to address tobacco prevention and cessation classes are available (TAP/TEG) Conflict mediation available for alternative discipline After school staff and


such as tobacco/drug use. IMPACT also promotes the commitment and good choices messages in other activities including Red Ribbon Week and Step-Up Grade Challenge at the end of the first semester. The Step-Up Grade Challenge encourages students to improve current grades and rewards those that accomplish it with a carnival. Conflict Management offers peer mediation as a precursor/alternative to disciplinary actions such as Saturday School or suspension. The Best Buds Club mentors the special education student in Community Based Instruction (CBI) with activities year round. The school has a La Habra Police Department Special Resource Officer (SRO) assigned to the school site during the school day. Additionally, police officers work games and dances for extra supervision and security. Sonora also has two full time campus security guards. They comb the grounds to ensure that students attend classes and keep trespassers off school grounds. Custodial and campus security staff help keep traffic moving in an orderly and safe fashion in the parking lot before and after school.

peer tutoring available Monday-Thursday School nurse on site to address student needs

B. B. Sonora High School places the utmost importance on safety of all that attend and/or work on campus. While many programs and services uphold the safety regulations, communication remains the key component to ensure that a safe environment is created and maintained. Our student handbook provides every student with detailed information on safety protocols, including code of conduct expectations and directions for all cases of emergency. There are also staff handbooks for disaster preparedness in each classroom along with posted reminders of unsafe items that are prohibited on campus. The disaster preparedness committee prepped each classroom with a flashlight, fire extinguishers, and first aid packs. Administrators visit each 3rd period class at the beginning of the year to go over safety and expected behavior concerns with all students. Practice (both announced and unannounced) drills are held throughout the year for fires, earthquakes, and intruders. These drills improve safety by ensuring the roles and responsibilities are clear in case of emergency. Science and Career and Technical education classes all

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• • • • • •

Student handbooks School Resource Officer Security Guards Evacuation plans Safety Committee High expectations of student behavior posted in every classroom Cleanliness is a high priority for staff, security, administration, and custodial staff Fast and effective response to unexpected situations such as the stabbing or unplanned fire evacuations, and power outages of 2009 Updated Teacher


have strict safe practices testing that must be passed before participating in lab activities. Sonora employs a full-time police officer (SRO) as well as two campus supervisors that ensure student orderliness. In addition to keeping the students safe, they also assist with student conflicts, and campus guidance.

Handbooks of Disaster Plans Red Cross Disaster Bags in each classroom with flashlights and supplies for emergencies. Annual Earthquake and Fire Drills to ensure teacher and student readiness

High Expectations/Concern for Students

The school demonstrates caring, concern, and high expectations for students in an environments that honors individual differences and is conducive to learning. To what extent does the school demonstrate caring, concern, and high expectations for students in an environment that honors individual differences and is conducive to learning? Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category E]

One of Sonora High School’s strength is the broad spectrum of course offerings that meet the needs of different learning styles as well as different academic levels of achievement. This includes special programs such as Medical Careers, Agriculture, and AVID as well as IB/AP courses. Sonora High School places a tremendous focus on being a safe and welcoming academic and social environment for all students. For example, ASB leads such activities as Spirit Week, March Olympics, Dancing with the Staff, honorary assemblies for athletic teams, lunch rallies to demonstrate the value of philanthropy and involvement in the community. Sonora’s largest and most significant community outreach program is the Holiday Food Drive. This schoolwide endeavor has grown over its more than 35 year history to its current state which for the last two years has served 120 families with enough food and supplies for a month. High expectations are upheld and rewarded with such recognition as Principal’s Honor Roll and Advisory Board, Student of the Month by department, and Senior Award night. Individual differences are honored in ROP courses, Extravaganza skits, musicals, talent shows, Mr. Sonora night, and other diverse club activities. 175

• • • • • • • • • • •

AP and IB courses available and encouraged for all Variety of diverse course offerings and programs EL support with SDAIE classes ASB school wide activities Principal’s Honor Roll Principal’s Advisory Board Student of the Month Talent Show, Mr. Sonora Extravaganza World language and ELD skit night Musicals that value the performing arts, Strong participation in over 40 diverse clubs on campus including but not limited to:


The Regional Occupational Program (ROP) continues to provide a wide array of programming for the student body. ROP offers courses in engineering, marine diving, graphic arts and forensic sciences. The ROP plays and important role in the area of Career and Technical education on our campus. A large percentage of our student body is also involved in many different clubs which are both intra and extra curricular at Sonora. The strength of our campus is our organizations which come together on many levels to support the student body, campus and community needs on a year to year bases. Each club addresses different needs and is made up of a vast collection of students from many different backgrounds. As part of Best Buds, general education students are paired up with CBI students. The “best buds” often eat lunch together and participate in extracurricular activities such as dances, BBQs, games, etc. MEChA and Spanish Club, in conjunction with the World Language Department plan and host the Spring Fiesta dance. At this Latino themed dance, students have an opportunity to see their home culture and language legitimized at school while fund-raising to help subsidize the cost of World Language AP tests.

• •

Federation of Christian Athletes (FCA), Junior Statesmen of America (JSA), National Honor Society (NHS), California Scholarship Federation (CSF), Bible Club, Girls League, Future Farmers of America (FFA), MEChA, Spanish Club, Best Buds, etc. Special Education IEPs Strong ROP program

Atmosphere of Trust, Respect and Professionalism

The school has an atmosphere of trust, respect and professionalism. To what degree is there evidence of an atmosphere of trust, respect and professionalism? Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category E]

The culture and climate of Sonora High School strives to create an atmosphere of trust, respect and professionalism among the staff. Departments work together on common early release days to align curriculum, analyze alignment of standards, establish common assessments, and departmentalized final exams. Cross-curricular assignments have also been designed to interconnect subjects, such as Sophomore research paper. Outside the school day, staff and students participate in school wide events such as the annual Food Drive to help La Habra families in need, Dancing with the Staff (student taught), Lip Sync, Spring Fiesta (the dance hosted by MEChA club and the World Language Department for the Latino Community), etc. 176

• • • •

Departmentalized assessments and standards School wide events SIT teams for intervention Professional Learning Communities


Administrative team, staff works collaboratively to create student intervention for conflict resolution outside of the academic environment. Professional Learning Communities have been established to provide staff with time and resources to work together to strengthen individual department needs. The SIT team is composed of counselors, teachers, psychologist, Dean, APs, and classified staff. This team professionally looks at at-risk students’ academic and social history to see what interventions it can recommend.

177


E3 & 4.

School Culture and Student Support Criterion

All students receive appropriate support along with an individualized learning plan to help ensure academic success. Students have access to a system of personal support services, activities and opportunities at the school and within the community. E3. To what extent do all students receive appropriate support along with an individualized learning plan to help ensure academic success? E4. To what extent do students have access to a system of personal support services, activities and opportunities at the school and within the community? Adequate Personalized Support

The school has available adequate services, including referral services, to support students in such areas as health, career and personal counseling, and academic assistance. To what extent does the school have available adequate services, including referral services, to support students in such areas as health, career and personal counseling, and academic assistance? Evidence [note evidence here or at the end of Findings

Category E]

At Sonora High School, Individual Learning Plans are created in a variety of programs and intervention services. These may include: the guidance-created four year, English Learners, 504, IEPs, IB, AVID, and/or MCA plans. We offer a variety of counseling support services that address social, emotional, and mental well-being. These include an onsite psychologist, referrals to the Gary Center, as well as student-led programs such as IMPACT peer mentoring and Conflict Mediation that promote peer assistance. All teachers are CPR trained. Coaches are both CPR and First Aid certified. Aquatics and PE instructors have an additional water safety certification. A school trainer is also available to attend to sports related injuries or concerns. Sonora is fortunate to have multiple certified nurses on campus. One of the Medical Careers Academy teachers is a Registered Nurse and often responds to emergency, particularly when they occur on her side of

178

Health Services/Personal Counseling: • School Nurses • Medical Clinic referrals • Gary Center counseling referrals • Onsite psychologist & speech pathologist • IMPACT peer mentoring program • Best Buds • Tobacco Cessation Services • Conflict Mediation by peers • Student Intervention Team (SIT)


the building. We have a Registered Nurse who is assigned to SOHS 40% of the time for referrals and IEPs. Lastly, there is a Licensed Vocational Nurse on site full time. The nurses provide on-site first response medical attention to students. When on-going or more elaborate medical attention is necessary, they provide referrals to outside medical agencies or clinics. In cases of emergency, paramedics are called. Academic assistance is also prevalent on campus through individualized 4 year plans for all, weekly tutoring in the library, career center of information, and specialized courses to address their individual needs. In addition, Sonora High School offers parents the opportunity to participate in an annual individualized meeting with a counselor to review career and educational goals. This meeting allows the staff, parents, and students to come up with a plan that addresses four year program planning, preparation of college applications, information about standardized testing schedules, and/or other post-high school options. Seniors are given practical guidance on completing admission applications, financial aid documents, and other available service. When students need additional help with college, FAFSA, and/or scholarship applications they can go to Advance!, a unique community outreach organization in the City of La Habra. For the non-college bound students the school provides information on career and technical education available as well as ROP and military training as alternative options for students on campus. One member of the counseling staff has a case load of English Learners and recent RFEPs to aid those students with career planning and educational planning. Her efforts are supported by the Dean of Academic Services who oversees the program for English Learners.

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Career and Academic Assistance: • Individualized counseling meetings available to parents and students • Senior Plans (parents welcome) • Student Intervention Team (SIT) • Tutoring in the library ~Peer to Peer ~Teacher Assistance • Instructional Resources 1. United Streaming Technology resource 2. ROP 3. AVID program 4. IB Program 5. CAHSEE Boot camps 6. CAHSEE courses 7. JROTC 8. REACH Reading 9. READ 180 10. Math Learning Lab 11. Intro to Algebra Skills 12. Princeton Review Inservice 13. Princeton Review Practice Exams/Class offerings 14. Choice of Programs, including Career and Technical Education 15. Expanded Opportunity for AP Enrollment • Club Rush • EL Coordinator/ Dean of Academic Services • EL Differentiated Instruction • Principal’s Advisory Board • Career Center • Teacher Availability


In reference to the SIT team, teachers have the ability to refer student to the counseling team who are “at risk” due to attendance, behavioral, or academic deficiency. To help these students, the school provides tutoring, facilitates teacher- student communication, and trains students to use organizational and time management strategies to enhance their educational needs. Additionally, possible SIT recommendations may consist of the counseling staff, school psychologist, and/or nurses offering crisis counseling and referrals to outside agencies to help students cope with issues in their lives. On occasion, the SIT may recommend the student be assessed for qualification for Special Education services. Based on data from standardized tests and students “history of achievement,” they are placed in appropriate support classes and programs, such as CAHSEE review, Boot camps and review courses like Advanced Reading and Math Learning Labs. Direct Connections

The school has direct connections between academic standards and expected schoolwide learning results and the allocation of resources to student support services, such as counseling/advisory services, articulation services, and psychological and health services or referral services. How direct are the connections between academic standards and expected school wide learning results and the allocation of resources to student support services, such as counseling/advisory services, articulation services, and psychological and health services or referral services? Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category E]

The direct connection is a tiered program of services which assesses the level of need a student may have and selects the appropriate service(s) for that child. As demonstrated in evidence we have a support staff in place to deal with all the student needs on campus. Those services may be used when necessary and are available in many different forms. The supports service provided directly relate to student achievement and performance and are provided to ensure that a student gets back on track as soon as possible. Depending on 180

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EL Coordinator/Dean of Academic Services School Nurses Gary Center Counseling Onsite psychologist & speech pathologist Special Education Services CBI Program


the severity and urgency of the situation, various levels of aid are available. The listed programs are also in place to serve all our students with special needs. The services are offered to students and their families as the needs arise and the SIT and/or IEP teams feel would be advantageous for the students’ emotional health and academic performance.

• • •

Student Invention team Regional center Community medical clinics

Strategies Used for Student Growth/Development

Strategies are used by the school leadership and staff to develop personalized approaches to learning and alternative instructional options which allow access to and progress in the rigorous standards-based curriculum. Examples of strategies include: level of teacher involvement with all students, a curriculum that promotes inclusion, processes for regular review of student and schoolwide profiles, and processes and procedures for interventions that address retention and redirection. Evaluate the types of strategies used by the school leadership and staff to develop personalized approaches to learning and alternative instructional options which allow access to and progress in the rigorous standards-based curriculum. Examples of strategies include: level of teacher involvement with all students, a curriculum that promotes inclusion, processes for regular review of student and schoolwide profiles, and processes and procedures for interventions that address retention and redirection. Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category E]

Specialized Programs: Students on our campus have the ability to apply to any program they wish to be involved in. In most cases there are no perquisites or measures of student’s ability. Students can choose more than one program and generally after time narrow their scope to one or two on campus. It is promoted within the student body to be involved and most students become apart of some specialized program Counseling: Teachers are the first line of defense offering advice to students. Many teachers/program coordinators advise students about academic choices. Guidance Department service is provided to all students which meet with a member of the staff at least one time during the school year. At that time, counselors review student’s profile and academic performance. If necessary, SIT referral may be made for additional input from other stakeholders. Students take advantage of an “open door” type policy that allows the counselors to be available anytime during the school day so if a student needs help they are their to assist.

181

• • • • • •

• •

Individualized Learning Plans (the guidancecreated four year, English Learners, 504, IEPs, IB, AVID, and/or MCA plans) Individual and Group counseling Many specialized programs Student Intervention Team Gary Center referrals Alterative programs Referrals to continuation programs such as Opportunity at La Vista or La Sierra High Schools Intervention/Support Classes Unit Recovery


Remedial Academic Services: Teachers offer tutoring both formally (schoolwide tutoring schedule) and informally (per student request and by appointment). Students are periodically evaluated on academic, attendance, and behavioral progress to evaluate students’ placement in alterative programming such as tutoring, intervention/support classes, unit recovery, SIT, alternative/continuing education, Special Education, or other program services offered at the school or by the district. In many cases, when students are referred to alternative/continuing education, they have the option to return to SOHS upon becoming current with graduation requirements. Support Services and Learning

The school leadership and staff ensure that the support services and related activities have a direct relationship to student involvement in learning, e.g., within and outside the classroom, for all students, including the EL, GATE, special education and other programs. To what extent does the school leadership and staff ensure that the support services and related activities have a direct relationship to student involvement in learning, e.g., within and outside the classroom? Particularly, evaluate this with respect to the EL, GATE, special education and other programs. Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category E]

The administrative team collaborates with the staff to create services, within and outside the classroom, that have a direct relationship to student involvement in learning. • Supports Specialized Programs • Created and established CBI, including Autism, Programs • Invites and supports Parent Institute for Quality Education (PIQE) for EL and Title I parents • Sits on Medical Careers and Agriculture advisory boards • Supports the development and growth of all programs on campus • Supports and establishes an academic atmosphere on campus for all students • Promotes growth in student learning by implementing academic programs that reteach concepts not yet mastered • Continues to offer current AP and IB courses and introduce new ones 182

• • • • • • • • • •

IMPACT JROTC AP and IB Medical Careers Agriculture Athletics CBI/Autism Program EL Program PIQE Newly introduced courses-IB film, IB dance, AP Human Geography


Equal Access to Curriculum and Support

All students have access to a challenging, relevant and coherent curriculum. The school regularly examines the demographics and distribution of students throughout the class offerings (e.g., master schedule and class enrollment numbers) and the types of alternative schedules available for repeat or accelerated classes (e.g., summer and class periods beyond the traditional school day). What have you learned about the accessibility of a challenging, relevant and coherent curriculum to all students? What have you learned from examining the demographics and distribution of students throughout the class offerings (e.g., master class schedule and class enrollments)? What type of alternative schedules is available for repeat or accelerated classes (e.g., summer, class periods beyond the traditional school day)? Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category E]

Master schedule development is a collaboration between administration and department chairs Intervention courses and elective classes are offered for all students Thanks to fee waivers/reductions, there has been more access to AP and IB tests for a larger percentage of the student body Zero and 7th period classes are offered for students to have room for elective classes and special program needs such as AVID, JROTC, dance, etc. SOHS and FJUHSD continue to offer a fairly extensive summer school program even during these difficult economic times to help facilitate students’ ability to take relevant courses as part of a coherent curriculum. Classes are offered in Unit Recovery beyond the traditional school day

• • • • •

ROP Courses Summer programming Advanced Placement Programs “Zero” to 7th Period day

Co-Curricular Activities

School leadership and staff link curricular and co-curricular activities to the academic standards and expected schoolwide learning results. To what extent does the school leadership and staff link curricular and co-curricular activities to the academic standards and expected schoolwide learning results? Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category E]

Many classes, programs, and clubs link curricular and co-curricular activities to academic standards. The connection is embedded in the curriculum as part of the schoolwide learning outcomes such as: Medical Careers, Athletics, Agriculture, JROTC, Girls’ League, IB and many more. Most of the co-curricular activities have a foundation and/or connection to the curriculum

183

• •

CSF/NHS clubs provide tutors for peer to peer tutoring days Athletic teams require grade checks and CIF requires 2.0 grade average to participate


(e.g., Health Occupatios Students of America is linked to Medical Careers Academy, Future Farmers of America is linked to Agriculture, Science Olympiad to Science, Speech and Debate is linked to English). The number of students present and participating in activities after the school day has concluded is a testament to their interest in and devotion to the clubs and real world learning.

• •

FFA Club awards points for community activities The IB diploma requires Creativity, Action, Service (CAS)-150 hours of volunteer work JROTC requires community service

Student Involvement in Curricular/Co-Curricular Activities

The school has an effective process for regularly evaluating the level of student involvement in curricular/co-curricular activities and student use of support services. Comment on the effectiveness of the school process for regularly evaluating the level of student involvement in curricular/co-curricular activities and student use of support services. Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category E]

FFA Because FFA, JROTC, and HOSA all have the coHOSA curricular activities directly tied to the program’s coursework, advisors can effectively evaluate the level of JROTC student participation in their curricular and co-curricular activities. Student Perceptions

The school is aware of the student view of student support services through such approaches as interviewing and dialoguing with student representatives of the school population. Comment on the student view of student support services after interviewing and dialoguing with student representatives of the school population. Evidence [note evidence here or at Findings

the end of Category E]

Student representatives feel supported by the services available. This has been repeatedly communicated at ASB, Principal’s Advisory Board, PTSA, SSC, ELAC, and other meetings. Students also feel comfortable addressing teachers and other staff members, in the classroom and in less formal settings, about their views.

• • • • • •

184

ASB Principal’s Advisory Board PTSA SSC ELAC District biennial survey


WASC Category E. School Culture and Support for Student Personal and Academic Growth: Supporting Evidence, Strengths, and Growth Needs Category E. School Culture and Support for Student Personal and Academic Growth: Areas of Strength

Committed & Invested Staff o Large percentage of alumni return to teach at SOHS

Plethora of AP and IB offerings

Student Assistant Programs o Spirit related programs such as ASB and IMPACT o Guidance services including referrals to outside agencies o Intervention and Support classes

Community Service o Food Drive o Club/class service projects o CAS (IB)

Community Partnerships o FFA o Medical Careers o AVID o JROTC o Rotary Club

Category E. School Culture and Support for Student Personal and Academic Growth: Areas of Growth Needs

Library Services

Career Center Services

Improved Access to Technology

185


Website Improvement

Incorporate more Cultural/Ethnically Diverse Events such as Spring Fiesta

Enhance features of school security by considering possible ID badges/lanyards for staff and students

Stronger Introduction to Sonora o 1st day assembly o Alma mater o School pride o Attendance at Athletic/Extracurricular Events

Category E. School Culture and Support for Student Personal and Academic Growth: Supporting Evidence

The Supporting Evidence is included with the Findings as presented above.

186


g

5 Schoolwide Action Plan 1


Chapter 5 Schoolwide Action Plan Goal 1 (Area of Improvement): Sonora High School will improve academic achievement of all students in all content areas as measured by the CSTs and the CAHSEE by providing all teachers with the training, tools and materials to conduct effective instruction and assessment and by providing students with the necessary supports and courses to promote their academic success.

Rationale: • • •

The school has an API of 798, 2 points away from 800 (the state’s defining measure of High Performing Schools). For the Class of 2009, 36.7% of graduating students completed UC/CSU required courses. Although SOHS met school-wide API growth target and AYP proficiency targets: o Students with Disabilities, Socio Economic Disadvantaged, Hispanic, and English Learners did not meet the AYP criteria for ELA and Math proficiency. o Students with Disabilities, Socio Economic Disadvantaged, and English Learners API and AYP scores are significantly lower than the school-wide scores

Expected School-wide Learning Results Addressed: Communicates Skillfully, Thinks Critically, Behaves Responsibly, and Applies Learning

Yearly Growth Targets: • •

Increase by 3 percent the number of students school-wide scoring Proficient or better on the CSTs in each content area Increase by 5 percent the number of students in each significant subgroup scoring Proficient or better on the CSTs in each content area

2


• • •

Increase by 3 percent the number of students school-wide scoring Proficient or better on the CAHSEE ELA and Math Increase by 5 percent the number of students in each significant subgroup scoring Proficient or better on the CAHSEE ELA and Math Increase by 2 percent the number of students graduating completing UC/CSU required courses

TASKS

1.

2.

RESPONSIBLE PERSON(S) INVOLVED

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT/ RESOURCES

Continue the use of Professional Learning Communities for: • Student data analysis from CSTs, CAHSEE, CELDT, CMA, Benchmark assessments, and common assessments • Identification and sharing of instructional best practices • Collaborative planning, and implementation of lessons, activities, assessments, etc. • Review and revise PLC objectives and protocols • Identification of standards for re-teaching and review • Reevaluation and modification of SMART goals

Teachers Department Chairs APIO, Principal

General Funds Title I Funds EIA-LEP Funds

Review, and revise quarterly benchmark assessments in English, ELD, Math, Science, Social Science, and World Languages • Continue to review and revise identified Essential Standards in ELD, English, Math, Science, Social Science, and World

Teachers, APPS, APIO, Principal, Dean of Academic Services

MEANS TO ASSESS IMRPOVEMENT

TIMELINE

REPORTING

PLC Minutes Department Minutes Pacing Guides Benchmark Assessments

Ongoing

PLC meetings Department meetings Leadership meetings School Site Council meetings

Teachers, Department Chairs

Lesson Plans

Ongoing

PLC Minutes

Department Chairs, APIO

Protocols

August, 2011

PLC Minutes

Teachers, Department Chairs

Lesson Plans

Ongoing

PLC Minutes

Master Schedule Tutoring Logs Class enrollment sheets Pacing Guides Benchmark Assessments

October, 2010 and ongoing

Staff meetings Leadership meetings

General Funds

3

PLC meetings


• •

3.

4.

Languages Continue to review and revise pacing guides Quarterly Benchmark Assessments, aligned with the State Standards, in ELD, English, Math, Science and Social Science Quarterly Benchmark Assessments, aligned with National Standards in World Languages Identification of standards for re-teaching and review

Review the implementation of student support/interventions and their impact on improving student academic achievement in the following: • Reach Reading • Advanced Reading (Read 180) • Math Learning Lab - Accelerated Math Program/Skill Building • CAHSEE English Intervention Classes • CAHSEE Math Intervention Classes • After school Tutoring • Student Intervention Team • 10th Grade CAHSEE Boot Camp – provided by Adelante (Princeton Review) • Grade-level counseling meetings • IMPACT Mentor Program • Best Buds Program Develop and implement a Schoolwide Staff Development Plan • Continue to support teacher attendance at relevant conferences and workshops o Read 180 o Accelerated Math

Selected Content Teachers Department Chairs Dean of Academic Services APPS, APIO, Principal, SIT Team

General Funds Title I Funds EIA-LEP Funds

Master Schedule Lesson Plans Impact Training and Schedule Tutoring Schedule and Sign-ins SIT Schedule and Agenda Guidance Schedule

Ongoing

PLC meetings Department meetings Leadership meetings School Site Council meetings

August, 2012 August, 2011 August, 2011 August, 2012 August, 2012 August, 2011 June, 2011 June, 2012 August, 2011 June, 2012 June, 2011 June, 2012

Leadership Team, IB Coordinator, APIO, Principal

General Funds District Staff Development Funds

4

Staff Development Plan Single Plan for Student Achievement WASC Action Plans Conference Agendas

August, 2011 and ongoing

As needed As needed

Administrative meetings Leadership meetings PLC meetings


Reach Reading SDAIE/Scaffolding Strategies o Process Writing o Effective EL Strategies o Data Director o Academic Vocabulary o ACES o ABI o Technology o Content Growth and Support Continue to support AP and IB teachers attendance at AP and IB workshops Embed Staff Development into WASC Action Plan and Single Plan for Student Achievement

As needed Aug., 2011 -review

o o

• •

5.

Review Data Director protocols and implement training as necessary • Teacher Survey • Identify Target Protocols • Implementation during Staff Development Days

Aug., 2012 -review August, 2012 As needed As needed As needed As needed As needed As needed IB Coordinator, APIO

Computer Technician, Department Chairs, APIO

District Staff Development Funds

General Funds Title I Funds

5

Professional Development Agendas WASC Action Plan Single Plan for Student Achievement

As needed

Staff Development Agenda, PLC Minutes

Ongoing

August, 2011

PLC meetings Leadership meetings


Goal 2 (Area of Improvement): Sonora High School will support our English Learners, Socio Economic Disadvantaged, and Special Education subgroups to close the achievement gaps.

Rationale: • • •

Students with Disabilities, Socio Economic Disadvantaged, Hispanic and English Learners did not meet the AYP criteria for ELA and Math proficiency. Students with Disabilities, Socio Economic Disadvantaged, and English Learners API and AYP scores are significantly lower than the school-wide scores EL Students did not meet the District’s Title III AMAOs targets.

Expected School-wide Learning Results Addressed: Communicates Skillfully, Thinks Critically, Behaves Responsibly, and Applies Learning

Yearly Growth Targets: • • •

Increase by 5 percent the number of students in each significant subgroup scoring Proficient or better on the CSTs in each content area Increase by 5 percent the number of students in each significant subgroup (especially Students with Disabilities, Socio Economic Disadvantaged, Hispanic, and English Learners) scoring proficient or better on the CAHSEE ELA and Math Increase by 5 percent the number of EL students meeting the District’s Title III AMAO targets

6


TASKS

1.

2.

RESPONSIBLE PERSON(S) INVOLVED

With a focus on EL and Sp Ed students, continue the use of Professional Learning Communities for: • Student data analysis from CSTs, CAHSEE, CELDT, CMA, CAPA, Benchmark assessments, and common assessments (disaggregate the data and analyze the performance of each subgroup • Identification and sharing of instructional best practices with a focus on differentiating instruction • Collaborative planning, and implementation of lessons, activities, assessments, etc.

Teachers Department Chairs APIO, Principal

Review the implementation of SDAIE strategies in English, Math, Science and Social Science, and their impact on improving the academic achievement of EL students • Continue to support content area teachers in the implementation of SDAIE and scaffolding strategies • Review the possible schoolwide implementation of SIOP (Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol) or similar protocol as an instructional delivery model

Teachers, Department Chairs Dean of Academic Services EL Counselor APIO, Principal,

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT/ RESOURCES General Funds Title I Funds Title III Funds EIA-LEP Funds

MEANS TO ASSESS IMRPOVEMENT

PLC Minutes Department Minutes Pacing Guides Benchmark Assessments

TIMELINE

Ongoing

REPORTING

PLC meetings Department meetings Leadership meetings School Site Council meetings ELAC meetings

August, 2011 and ongoing

Title I Funds EIA-LEP Funds Title III Funds District CAHSEE Funds

PLC Minutes Department Minutes Course Description/Syllabi

Ongoing

Administration meetings Leadership meetings School Site Council meetings

Content area teachers, Dean of Academic Services, APIO, Principal

Professional Development Agenda, Lesson Plans

August, 2011 and ongoing

Department meetings Leadership meetings PLC meetings

Content area Department Chairs, Dean of Academic Services, APIO

Professional Development Agenda

Ongoing

PLC meetings Leadership meetings

7


3.

4.

to support EL students in content classes Develop a consistent team of ELD teachers to support the language acquisition and academic achievement of ELD students Develop a consistent team of SDAIE teachers to support the academic achievement of EL students in content classes

Content area Department Chairs, Dean of Academic Services, APIO

Master Schedule

August, 2011

Content area Department Chairs, Dean of Academic Services, APIO

Master Schedule

August, 2013

PLC Minutes Department Minutes Master Schedule IEPs

August, 2011

Leadership meetings Department meetings

Sp Ed Teachers, Department Chair, APPS, Principal

Department Minutes

August, 2012

Department meetings Leadership meetings

Sp Ed Teachers, General Education Teachers, Department Chair, APPS

Master Schedule

Ongoing

Department meetings Leadership meetings

Sp Ed Teachers, Department Chair, APPS

Lesson Plans

August, 2011

Department meetings

Sp Ed Teachers, Department Chair, APPS

Lesson Plans

August, 2011

Department meetings

Selected Content Teachers Department Chairs Dean of Academic Services APPS, APIO Four Year Plans

Ongoing

Department meetings Leadership meetings PLC meetings School Site Council meetings

Continue to develop and implement Collaborative and CoTaught classes for Sp Ed students in English, Math, Science and Social Science • Review the implementation of the Collaborative model and its impact on improving the academic achievement of Special Education students • Develop a consistent team of Collaborative teachers to support the academic achievement of Sp Ed students • Implement CST/CAHSEE test preparation activities in the Study Skills Curriculum • Implement the Accelerated Math program in Study Skills Curriculum

Sp Ed Teachers, Selected Content Area Teachers, Guidance Counselors APPS, Principal

Review the implementation of student support/interventions and their impact on improving student academic achievement in the following (focusing on EL and Special Education students): • Reach Reading • Advanced Reading (Read 180)

Selected Content Teachers Department Chairs Dean of Academic Services APPS, APIO, Principal, SIT Members

General Funds

General Funds Title I Funds EIA-LEP Funds

8

August, 2012 August, 2011


• • • • • • • • •

Math Learning Lab Accelerated Math Program/Skill Building CAHSEE English Intervention Classes CAHSEE Math Intervention Classes After school Tutoring Student Intervention Team 10th Grade CAHSEE Boot Camp – provided by Adelante (Princeton Review) Grade-level counseling meetings IMPACT Mentor Program Best Buds Program

August, 2011 August, 2012 August, 2012 June, 2011 June, 2012 August, 2011 June, 2012 June, 2011 June, 2012

5.

Provide EL student academic support through the Guidance Counselor Case Carrier Model • EL and Recent RFEP Counselor • 4 year academic/career planning guide • Student and Parent conferences • Career Center • ELAC

Guidance Counselors, Dean of Academic Services, APIO, Principal

General Funds

Student 4 year plans Counseling Notes

Ongoing

PLC meetings Leadership meetings ELAC meetings

6.

Provide Sp Ed support through the Case Carrier Model and the IEP Process • IEPs • Student monitoring • Collaboration Model

Sp Ed Teachers, General Education Teachers, Guidance Counselors, APPS, Case Carriers

General Funds

SASE Notes IEPs

Ongoing

Department meetings IEP meetings

9


Goal 3 (Area of Improvement): Sonora High School will develop and implement a system to support students to learn and achieve grade-level standards in English Language Arts, mathematics, science, and social science.

• •

Self-Study findings indicate a need to support students at risk of not meeting academic proficiency. o Increase the percentage of students school-wide scoring Proficient or better on the CSTs in each content area o Increase the percentage of students in each significant subgroup scoring Proficient or better on the CAHSEE ELA and Math The school recognizes the importance of providing opportunities and classes to support student achievement. EL Students did not meet the District’s Title III AMAOs targets.

Expected School-wide Learning Results Addressed: Communicates Skillfully, Thinks Critically, Behaves Responsibly, and Applies Learning

Yearly Growth Targets: • • • • • •

Increase by 3 percent the number of students school-wide scoring Proficient or better on the CSTs in each content area Increase by 5 percent the number of students in each significant subgroup scoring Proficient or better on the CSTs in each content area Increase by 3 percent the number of students school-wide scoring Proficient or better on the CAHSEE ELA and Math Increase by 5 percent the number of students in each significant subgroup scoring Proficient or better on the CAHSEE ELA and Math Increase by 5 percent the number of EL students meeting the District’s Title III AMAO targets Increase by 3 percent the number of students graduating completing UC/CSU required courses

187


TASKS

RESPONSIBLE PERSON(S) INVOLVED

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT/ RESOURCES

MEANS TO ASSESS IMRPOVEMENT

TIMELINE

REPORTING

1.

Review the implementation of student support/interventions and their impact on improving student academic achievement in the following:

See goal #1

2.

Explore the option of adding a formal second year of Read 180 • Determine the number of students that would benefit from a 2nd year • Identify and purchase materials and develop a curriculum and pacing for 2nd year course

Teachers, Department Chairs, APIO, Principal

3.

Provide student academic support through the Guidance Counselor Case Carrier Model • Separate EL and Recent RFEP Counselor • 4 year academic/career planning guide • Student conferences • Grade-level counseling meetings

Guidance Counselors, Dean of Academic Services, APIO, Principal

General Funds

Four year plans Counseling Notes

Ongoing

Guidance meetings Leadership meetings

4.

Expand the afterschool tutoring support in the core academic courses. • Peer Tutoring • Staff Tutoring

Selected Teachers, APPS, APIO

General Funds Title I Funds

Tutoring Schedule and Sign-ins

August, 2011

Department meetings Leadership meetings

Title I Funds EIA-LEP Fund

Master Schedule PLC Minutes Department Minutes Leadership Minutes Site Council Minutes

August, 2012

PLC meetings Department meetings Leadership meetings School Site Council meetings

August, 2013

188


5.

Continue with the IMPACT Program; designed to provide Impact Mentors (upper classmen) to support freshmen as they transition into high school.

IMPACT Coordinator, APSA, APIO

General Funds

IMPACT Training and Schedule

Ongoing

Leadership meetings

6.

Review the implementation of the Credit Recovery Program and its impact on students getting back on track to graduate.

Credit Recovery Teacher, Counselors, APPS

General Funds

Student Attendance Student Transcripts

August, 2011

Guidance meetings Leadership meetings

7.

Review the implementation of the CAHSEE ELA and Math Support classes for identified students. Revise curriculum. • Review CAHSEE pass rates • Review CAHSEE proficiency rates

Selected Teachers, Selected Department Chairs, APIO

General Funds Title I Funds

Lesson Plans CAHSEE Pass Rates

July, 2012

PLC meetings Leadership meetings School Site Council

8.

Review the goals of the AVID program to better serve SOHS students • Structured tutoring program • Student Identification • Monitoring of student academic progress • Increase the number of AVID students meeting A-G requirements

AVID Coordinator, AVID Tutors, APIO

General Funds CPA Funds Perkins Funds

PLC minutes, AVID Binder

August, 2012

PLC meetings AVID Team meetings

9.

Continue and expand the SLC opportunities available through the International Baccalaureate Program, the Agriculture program, the Medical Careers Academy, and the Culinary Academy. • Explore the possibility of

Department Chairs, Program Coordinators, APIO, Principal

General Funds

PLC minutes, Master Schedule

January, 2012

PLC meetings Leadership meetings

Art Teachers, APIO,

PLC minutes

189

PLC meetings


developing a Media Technology/Film Production program Develop curriculum and sequence of courses for the Media Technology program

Principal

Leadership meetings

10. Work with Washington Middle School and other feeders to articulate core content curriculum • Articulate Math and English content and pacing • Review SLC and other programs available • Articulate with school’s ELAC and other parent groups to familiarize them with high school requirements programs

Department Chairs, Program Coordinators, Dean of Academic Services, APSA, APPS, APIO, Principal

General Funds Title I Funds

Articulation agendas

August, 2013

11. Develop and implement a schoolwide Technology Plan • Conduct a needs assessment • Explore and identify possible funding sources

Computer Technician, Department Chairs, APIO, Principal

General Funds Available Grants

Technology Plan Needs Assessment Grant Applications

December, 2012

12. Parent Communication and Support • Parent Institute for Quality Education • Parent Resource Center • PTSA • Back to School Night • Open House • IB Parent Night • Ag Parent Night and FFA • Medical Careers Academy Parent Night • Increase usage of ABI • Website

Teachers, Department Chairs, Dean of Academic Services, APSA, APPS, APIO, Principal

General Funds Title I Funds EIA-LEP Funds

Brochures, Website, Agendas, Sign-in Sheets, Teleparent usage data, ABI usage data, meeting minutes

September, 2011 December, 2011 Ongoing Ongoing Ongoing Ongoing Ongoing Ongoing November, 2011 Ongoing

190

Articulation meetings Leadership meetings

Leadership meetings School Site Council meetings

PLC meetings Department meetings School Site Council meetings ELAC meetings PTSA meetings Booster meetings Leadership meetings


• • • • •

Teleparent Spotlight Newsletter School and Program Brochures Feeder and private school visits Twitter

Ongoing Ongoing Ongoing Ongoing August, 2011

191


Appendices

Appendix A: Results of student, parent, and staff survey results Appendix B: Master Schedule Appendix C: School Accountability Report Appendix D: CBEDS school information Appendix E: Graduation Requirements Appendix F: Single Plan for Students Achievement Appendix G: Standards-based local board adopted textbooks


Appendix A: Results of student, parent, and staff survey results


Appendix B: Master Schedule


Appendix C: School Accountability Report


School Accountability Report Card Reported for School Year 2008-09 Published During 2009-10 Executive Summary School Accountability Report Card, 2008-09 Sonora High School Address: Principal:

401 South Palm St. , La Habra CA 90631-5735 Rich Peterson

Phone: Grade Span:

562-266-2003 9 - 12

This executive summary of the School Accountability Report Card (SARC) is intended to provide parents and community members with a quick snapshot of school accountability. The data presented in this report are reported for the 2008-09 school year, except the School Finances and School Completion data that are reported for the 2007-08 school year. For additional information about the school, parents and community members should review the entire SARC or contact the school principal or the district office.

About This School Sonora High School is a California Distinguished School that has become known throughout the community for promoting the success of all students in an atmosphere of mutual respect and caring. The 2008/09 student body included over 2,029 students from La Habra, La Habra Heights, Fullerton, and surrounding communities. Sonora provides a balanced program for a diverse student body. Students, staff members, and parents work closely together to strive for excellence in academics, activities, athletics, and service to the community. Sonora High School’s educational program emphasizes the development of each student’s maximum academic potential. This concern drives the setting of high standards, promotion of individual responsibility among staff members and students, insistence on academic honesty, strong student effort, and high expectations regarding homework, attendance, and punctuality. A continuous review of student outcomes ensures that all students receive vigorous instruction that actively engages them in their learning. In addition, Sonora has an extremely active student body that engages in a multitude of activities and clubs. Sonora High School’s excellence is evidenced in the full six-year accreditation received from Western Association of Schools and Colleges in May 2006, with a successful three-year midterm visit in February, 2008, and four Distinguished School Awards, the latest in May, 2007. Mission Statement Sonora High School promotes the success of all students in an atmosphere of mutual respect and caring by the following means: ƒ Educating students to their individual learning potential ƒ Fostering in each student an acceptance of ethnic and cultural diversity ƒ Promoting school spirit and school loyalty ƒ Instilling within each student a commitment to the values of community and the American democratic society Sonora High School strives for excellence in academics, activities, athletics, and service by:


ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Providing academically challenging programs for students with different interests and abilities Providing a challenging array of curricular, extra-curricular, aesthetic, and athletic programs Providing the tools to access, evaluate and use information from a variety of technological sources Equipping students with the skills necessary for a successful transition to college and/or work

Student Enrollment Group African American American Indian or Alaska Native Asian Filipino Hispanic or Latino Pacific Islander White (not Hispanic) Multiple or No Response Socioeconomically Disadvantaged English Learners Students with Disabilities Total Number of Students

Percent 1.69 % 0.05 % 9.27 % 1.55 % 54.42 % 0.05 % 27.75 % 5.22 % 29.00 % 18.00 % 7.00 % 2126

Teachers Indicator Teachers with full credential Teachers without full credential Teachers Teaching Outside Subject Area of Competence Misassignments of Teachers of English Learners Total Teacher Misassignments

Teachers 84 1 1 0 1

Student Performance Subject English-Language Arts Mathematics Science History-Social Science

Students Proficient and Above on California Standards Tests 53.6 24.5 45.5 57.2

Academic Progress Indicator 2009 Growth API Score (from 2009 Growth API Report) Statewide Rank (from 2008 Base API Report) 2009-10 Program Improvement Status (PI Year)

Result 776 7 Not in PI

School Facilities Summary of Most Recent Site Inspection During the 2007/08 school year, modernization was completed at all of the six comprehensive high schools in the District. This work included upgrades to classrooms and restroom facilities, as well as making improvements to grounds and landscaping. With the completion of the modernization, all educational facilities in the District are in excellent condition and repair.


2007 saw the start of construction on a new 60,000 square foot facility that will house the District’s continuation and alternative high schools. This planned improvement for the school years 2008/09 and 2009/10 will provide all students in the District with exceptional facilities. During 2008/09, as in previous years, the sites have been inspected by District maintenance staff three times a year. These inspections check all facilities for cleanliness, upkeep, and safety.

Repairs Needed As of the last site inspection no major or emergency repairs were needed. Any minor repairs were noted on the inspection summary and are routinely corrected before the next inspection. Corrective Actions Taken or Planned Using the District Deferred Maintenance Five-Year Plan, preventative and routine repairs are handled in a timely manner avoiding most emergency repairs. The District Service Center responds to site needs as they arise and provides regularly scheduled maintenance in support of the site facilities. Each year items that are not on the routine maintenance list become topics of discussion with the District Budget Study Committee for recommendations as summer projects to address campus improvements beyond the basic operational needs.

Curriculum and Instructional Materials Core Curriculum Areas Reading/Language Arts Mathematics Science History-Social Science Foreign Language Health Visual and Performing Arts Science Laboratory Equipment (grades 9-12)

Pupils Who Lack Textbooks and Instructional Materials 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

School Finances Level School Site District State

Expenditures Per Pupil (Unrestricted Sources Only) $5,608 $5,980 $5,512

School Completion Indicator Graduation Rate

Result 96.9 %

Postsecondary Preparation Measures Pupils Who Completed a Career Technical Education Program and Earned a High School Diploma Graduates Who Completed All Courses Required for University of California or California State University Admission

NAEP Reading, Grade 4 Level

Result

Percent 91.1% 30.2%


Average Scale Score - State Average Scale Score - National Achievement Level - Basic Achievement Level - Proficient Achievement Level - Advanced

209 220 30% 18% 5%

NAEP Reading, Grade 8 Level Average Scale Score - State Average Scale Score - National Achievement Level - Basic Achievement Level - Proficient Achievement Level - Advanced

Result 251 261 41% 20% 2%

NAEP Mathematics, Grade 4 Level Average Scale Score - State Average Scale Score - National Achievement Level - Basic Achievement Level - Proficient Achievement Level - Advanced

Result 232 239 41% 25% 5%

NAEP Mathematics, Grade 8 Level Average Scale Score - State Average Scale Score - National Achievement Level - Basic Achievement Level - Proficient Achievement Level - Advanced

Result 270 282 36% 18% 5%


School Accountability Report Card Reported for School Year 200809 Published During 2009-10 The School Accountability Report Card (SARC), which is required by law to be published annually, contains information about the condition and performance of each California public school. More information about SARC requirements is available on the California Department of Education (CDE) SARC Web page. For additional information about the school, parents and community members should contact the school principal or the district office.

I. Data and Access DataQuest DataQuest is an online data tool located on the CDE DataQuest Web page that contains additional information about this school and comparisons of the school to the district, the county, and the state. Specifically, DataQuest is a dynamic system that provides reports for accountability (e.g., Academic Performance Index [API], Adequate Yearly Progress [AYP]), test data, enrollment, graduates, dropouts, course enrollments, staffing, and data regarding English learners).

Internet Access Internet access is available at public libraries and other locations that are publicly accessible (e.g., the California State Library). Access to the Internet at libraries and public locations is generally provided on a first-come, firstserved basis. Other use restrictions include the hours of operation, the length of time that a workstation may be used (depending on availability), the types of software programs available on a workstation, and the ability to print documents.

II. About This School Contact Information (School Year 2009-10) This section provides the schools contact information. School School Name Street City, State, Zip Phone Number Principal E-mail Address

Sonora High 401 South Palm St. La Habra , CA 90631-5735 562-266-2003 Rich Peterson rpeterson@fjuhsd.net

District Name Phone Number Web Site Superintendent E-mail Address CDS Code

District Fullerton Joint Union High 714-870-2800 www.fjuhsd.net George Giokaris ggiokaris@fjuhsd.net 30- 66514- 3037090

School Description and Mission Statement (School Year 2008-09) School Description and Mission Statement (School Year 2008-09)

Sonora High School is a California Distinguished School that has become known throughout the community for promoting the success of all students in an atmosphere of mutual respect and caring. The 2008/09 student body included over 2,029 students from La Habra, La Habra Heights, Fullerton, and surrounding communities. Sonora provides a balanced program for a diverse student body. Students, staff members, and parents work closely together to strive for excellence in academics, activities, athletics, and service to the community.


Sonora High School’s educational program emphasizes the development of each student’s maximum academic potential. This concern drives the setting of high standards, promotion of individual responsibility among staff members and students, insistence on academic honesty, strong student effort, and high expectations regarding homework, attendance, and punctuality. A continuous review of student outcomes ensures that all students receive vigorous instruction that actively engages them in their learning. In addition, Sonora has an extremely active student body that engages in a multitude of activities and clubs. Sonora High School’s excellence is evidenced in the full six-year accreditation received from Western Association of Schools and Colleges in May 2006, with a successful three-year midterm visit in February, 2008, and four Distinguished School Awards, the latest in May, 2007. Mission Statement Sonora High School promotes the success of all students in an atmosphere of mutual respect and caring by the following means: ƒ Educating students to their individual learning potential ƒ Fostering in each student an acceptance of ethnic and cultural diversity ƒ Promoting school spirit and school loyalty ƒ Instilling within each student a commitment to the values of community and the American democratic society Sonora High School strives for excellence in academics, activities, athletics, and service by: ƒ Providing academically challenging programs for students with different interests and abilities ƒ Providing a challenging array of curricular, extra-curricular, aesthetic, and athletic programs ƒ Providing the tools to access, evaluate and use information from a variety of technological sources ƒ Equipping students with the skills necessary for a successful transition to college and/or work

Opportunities for Parental Involvement (School Year 2008-09) Opportunities for Parental Involvement (School Year 2008-09)

Parents are given many opportunities throughout the year to support students. Among these are Back-toSchool Night in the fall and Open House in January. At these events, parents are encouraged to come to the school and meet with teachers and staff members to discuss expectations, concerns, and student progress. The Sonora PTSA (Parent Student Teacher Association) meets monthly and supports many school activities. Other organizations include the Academic Boosters Club, several athletic booster clubs, the AVID parents’ meetings, School Site Council, Vocational Advisory Boards, and the English Language Learners Advisory Committee (ELAC). The International Baccalaureate program holds grade-level parent nights. The guidance office meets with every parent and his/her freshman to develop a four-year plan. In addition, the school offers a Parent Institute for Quality Education to encourage parents to become involved in the school.

Student Enrollment by Grade Level (School Year 2008-09) This table displays the number of students enrolled in each grade level at the school.


Grade Level Kindergarten Grade 1 Grade 2 Grade 3 Grade 4 Grade 5 Grade 6 Grade 7 Grade 8 Ungraded Elementary Grade 9 Grade 10 Grade 11 Grade 12 Ungraded Secondary Total Enrollment

Number of Students 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 648 478 567 433 0 2126

Student Enrollment by Group (School Year 2008-09) This table displays the percent of students enrolled at the school who are identified as being in a particular group. Group African American American Indian or Alaska Native Asian Filipino Hispanic or Latino Pacific Islander White (not Hispanic) Multiple or No Response Socioeconomically Disadvantaged English Learners Students with Disabilities

Percent of Total Enrollment 1.69 % 0.05 % 9.27 % 1.55 % 54.42 % 0.05 % 27.75 % 5.22 % 29.00 % 18.00 % 7.00 %

Average Class Size and Class Size Distribution (Secondary) This table displays by subject area the average class size and the number of classrooms that fall into each size category (a range of total students per classroom). 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 Number of Number of Number of Classrooms Classrooms Classrooms Avg. Class Avg. Class Avg. Class Subject Size 1-22 23-32 33+ Size 1-22 23-32 33+ Size 1-22 23-32 33+ English 25.9 40 15 25 25.8 42 13 29 25.5 38 23 26 Mathematics 32.5 2 23 30 32.2 2 30 24 32.1 6 22 30 Science 33.1 2 22 24 33.4 2 14 34 33.4 4 10 35 Social 33.7 2 17 30 33.8 3 15 31 33.5 4 11 37 Science

III. School Climate


School Safety Plan (School Year 2008-09) This section provides information about the school's comprehensive safety plan.

Sonora High School has adopted a comprehensive school safety plan, which is reviewed and approved by the School Site Council annually. The school safety plan includes a review of California Safe Schools Assessment Data, descriptions of available intervention programs, and detailed procedures for: 1) maintaining a safe and orderly school environment; 2) campus access; 3) child abuse reporting; 4) staff notification of potentially dangerous situations; 5) disaster preparedness; 6) dress code policy and enforcement; 7) discipline; 8) maintaining a drug, alcohol, and tobacco free campus; and 9) sexual harassment, crime, and other reporting requirements. Copies of faculty and student handbooks, disaster preparedness manuals, and District policies and procedures are incorporated in the plan for staff reference and use. A copy of this comprehensive plan is available for public review in the Principal’s office.

Suspensions and Expulsions This table displays the rate of suspensions and expulsions (the total number of incidents divided by the total enrollment) at the school and district levels for the most recent three-year period.

Rate Suspensions Expulsions

2006-07 8.5 0.2

School 2007-08 6.9 0.1

2008-09 9.3 0.1

2006-07 9.6 0.2

District 2007-08 10.2 0.2

2008-09 8.4 0.4

IV. School Facilities School Facility Conditions and Planned Improvements (School Year 2009-10) This section provides information about the condition of the school’s grounds, buildings, and restrooms, and a description of any planned or recently completed facility improvements.

General The District takes great efforts to ensure that all schools are clean, safe, and functional. To assist in this effort, the District uses a facility survey instrument to inspect the condition of the buildings and grounds on the campus quarterly. The results of this survey are available at the principal’s office or at the Business Services office at the District Education Center. School Buildings Sonora High School was built on 42 acres in 1966 and originally planned to house up to 2,000 students. With recent internal constructions to reconfigure classrooms and technology lab space, the school remains current as a high school plant that fulfills today’s educational needs. Sonora students are currently housed in an enclosed, air- conditioned environment of 228,000 square feet. With the passing of the high school bond, construction started in the fall semester of 2003 on a new 15-classroom building housing five science labs and ten new classrooms. Slight adjustments were made to the educational process as it relates to facilities during this time. Construction concluded on the new building in time for classes to be held in the new classrooms fall of 2004. Modernization of the parking lot and interior of the original building were


completed by the end of the 2007/08 school year. Cafeteria seating for approximately 250 was added to the lower commons in the fall of 2009. Restrooms are checked and stocked on an hourly basis with close attention paid to all facilities regarding cleanliness and safety. Each year a minimum of three drills are practiced for the safety of all stakeholders. The three drills are code 99 (intruder on campus); duck, cover, and evacuate (earthquake); and fire drill. Cleaning Process and Schedule The District has adopted cleaning standards for all schools in the District. The principal and assistant principal of instruction/operations work with the custodial staff members to develop cleaning schedules to ensure a clean and safe school. Deferred Maintenance Budget The District participates in the State School Deferred Maintenance Program, which provides State matching funds on a dollar-for-dollar basis, to assist school districts with expenditures for major repair or replacement of existing school building components. Typically this includes roofing, plumbing, heating, air conditioning, electrical systems, interior or exterior painting, and floor systems. For the 2006/07 school year, the District budgeted approximately $1,400,000 for the deferred maintenance program, an amount that represents one percent of the District’s General Fund Budget. Deferred Maintenance Projects During the 2007/08 school year, modernization was completed at all of the six comprehensive high schools in the District. This work included upgrades to classrooms and restroom facilities, as well as making improvements to grounds and landscaping. With the completion of the modernization, all educational facilities in the District are in excellent condition and repair. 2007 saw the start of construction on a new 60,000 square foot facility that will house the District’s continuation and alternative high schools. This planned improvement for the school years 2008/09 and 2009/10 will provide all students in the District with exceptional facilities. During 2008/09, as in previous years, the sites have been inspected by District maintenance staff three times a year. These inspections check all facilities for cleanliness, upkeep, and safety. Modernization Projects During the 2006/07 school year, local bond funds (Measure AA) and State matching funds were used to install new heating, ventilation, and air conditioning in classrooms, provide wiring for technology; replace lighting in classrooms; install dropped ceilings in classrooms; install insulation in classrooms; and replace all utility mains including gas, water, sewer, and electrical. The work on this project began in the summer of 2006 and was completed at the end of the summer of 2009.

School Facility Good Repair Status (School Year 2009-10)


This table displays the results of the most recently completed school site inspection to determine the school facility’s good repair status. Repair Status Repair Needed and Action Taken or System Inspected Exemplary Good Fair Poor Planned Systems: Gas Leaks, Mechanical/HVAC, Sewer N/A X Interior: Interior Surfaces N/A X Cleanliness: Overall Cleanliness, Pest/ Vermin Infestation N/A X Electrical: Electrical N/A X Restrooms/Fountains: Restrooms, Sinks/ Fountains N/A X Safety: Fire Safety, Hazardous Materials N/A X Structural: Structural Damage, Roofs N/A X External: Playground/School Grounds, Windows/ N/A X Doors/Gates/Fences Overall Rating GOOD

V. Teachers Teacher Credentials This table displays the number of teachers assigned to the school with a full credential, without a full credential, and those teaching outside of their subject area of competence. Detailed information about teacher qualifications can be found on the CDE DataQuest Web page.

Teachers With Full Credential Without Full Credential Teaching Outside Subject Area of Competence

2006-07 77 3 0

School 2007-08 80 3 0

2008-09 84 1 0

District 2008-09 610 12 1

Teacher Misassignments and Vacant Teacher Positions This table displays the number of teacher misassignments (teachers assigned without proper legal authorization) and the number of vacant teacher positions (not filled by a single designated teacher assigned to teach the entire course at the beginning of the school year or semester). Note: Total Teacher Misassignments includes the number of Misassignments of Teachers of English Learners. Indicator Misassignments of Teachers of English Learners Total Teacher Misassignments Vacant Teacher Positions

2007-08 1 1 0

2008-09 0 0 0

Core Academic Classes Taught by No Child Left Behind Compliant Teachers (School Year 2008-09) This table displays the percent of classes in core academic subjects taught by No Child Left Behind (NCLB) compliant and non-NCLB compliant teachers in the school, in all schools in the district, in high-poverty schools in the district, and in low-poverty schools in the district. High poverty schools are defined as those schools with student participation of approximately 75 percent or more in the free and reduced price meals program. Low poverty schools are those with student participation of approximately 25 percent or less in the free and reduced price meals program. More information on teacher qualifications required under NCLB can be found on the CDE Improving Teacher and Principal Quality Web page.

2009-10 0 1 0


Percent of Classes In Core Academic Subjects Taught by NCLB Compliant Teachers Taught by Non-NCLB Compliant Teachers 97.9 2.1 99.3 0.7

Location of Classes This School All Schools in District High-Poverty Schools in District Low-Poverty Schools in District

99.8

0.2

VI. Support Staff Academic Counselors and Other Support Staff (School Year 2008-09) This table displays, in units of full-time equivalents (FTE), the number of academic counselors and other support staff who are assigned to the school and the average number of students per academic counselor. One FTE equals one staff member working full time; one FTE could also represent two staff members who each work 50 percent of full time.

Title Academic Counselor Library Media Teacher (Librarian) Psychologist Social Worker Nurse Speech/Language/Hearing Specialist Resource Specialist (non-teaching) Other

Number of FTE Assigned to School 4.0 1.0 1.0 .2

Average Number of Students per Academic Counselor 531 N/A N/A N/A N/A

1.0

N/A

0 1.0

N/A

VII. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Quality, Currency, Availability of Textbooks and Instructional Materials (School Year 2009-10) This table displays information about the quality, currency, and availability of the standards-aligned textbooks and other instructional materials used at the school, and information about the school’s use of any supplemental curriculum or non-adopted textbooks or instructional materials.

Core Curriculum Area Reading/Language Arts Mathematics Science History-Social Science Foreign Language Health Visual and Performing Arts Science Laboratory Equipment (grades 9-12)

VIII. School Finances

Quality, Currency, and Availability of Textbooks and Instructional Materials Good, Yes, Yes Good, Yes, Yes Good, Yes, Yes Good, Yes, Yes Good, Yes, Yes Good, Yes, Yes Good, Yes, Yes

Percent of Pupils Who Lack Their Own Assigned Textbooks and Instructional Materials 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Good, Yes, Yes

0


Expenditures Per Pupil and School Site Teacher Salaries (Fiscal Year 200708) This table displays a comparison of the school’s per pupil expenditures from unrestricted (basic) sources with other schools in the district and throughout the state, and a comparison of the average teacher salary at the school site with average teacher salaries at the district and state levels. Detailed information regarding school expenditures can be found on the CDE Current Expense of Education & Per-pupil Spending Web page and teacher salaries can be found on the CDE Certificated Salaries & Benefits Web page.

Level School Site District Percent Difference – School Site and District State Percent Difference – School Site and State

Total Expenditures Per Pupil $6,905 $7,912

Expenditures Per Pupil (Supplemental / Restricted) $1,298 $1,932

Expenditures Per Pupil (Basic / Unrestricted) $5,608 $5,980

Average Teacher Salary $70,840 $74,427

12.7%

32.8%

6.2%

4.8%

$7,977

$2,465

$5,512

$68,332

13.4%

47.3%

1.7%

3.7%

Types of Services Funded (Fiscal Year 2008-09) This section provides information about the programs and supplemental services that are available at the school and funded through either categorical or other sources.

Title II funds are designated to improve teacher quality and increase the number of highly qualified teachers. The program focuses on research based strategies to prepare and train highly qualified teachers. Title III funds are designated to ensure that students attain English proficiency and meet the same challenging academic content and academic achievement standards required of all students. Funds are used to teach a pilot course in technology, pay for substitutes, instructional aides, supplemental books, and conferences. EIA funds are designated to provide a supplemental instructional program for immigrant students. EIA funds are allotted for tutorial support, substitutes, instructional aides, supplemental books, instructional supplies, and consultant fees. School Improvement funds are allotted to pay for substitutes, instructional aides, a campus supervisor, conferences, supplemental books, instructional supplies, and fund the intramural program. EIA/LEP funds provide support to develop English fluency in LEP students, promote students’ selfconcept, promote cross-cultural understanding, and provide equal opportunity for academic achievement. EIA/LEP funds support after-school tutoring, instructional aides, supplemental books, instructional supplies, conferences, and postage. SB813 funds are allotted to facilitate advisement conferences that allow counselors to meet individually with all tenth-grade students and their parents.

Teacher and Administrative Salaries (Fiscal Year 2007-08)


This table displays district salaries for teachers, principals, and superintendents, and compares these figures to the state averages for districts of the same type and size. The table also displays teacher and administrative salaries as a percent of a district's budget, and compares these figures to the state averages for districts of the same type and size based on the salary schedule. Detailed information regarding salaries may be found on the CDE Certificated Salaries & Benefits Web page. Category Beginning Teacher Salary Mid-Range Teacher Salary Highest Teacher Salary Average Principal Salary (Elementary) Average Principal Salary (Middle) Average Principal Salary (High) Superintendent Salary Percent of Budget for Teacher Salaries Percent of Budget for Administrative Salaries

District Amount $48,572 $80,263 $104,502

State Average For Districts In Same Category $42,810 $69,375 $89,104

$144,103 $229,130 38.70 % 5.00 %

$120,314 $126,901 $198,563 37.30 % 5.20 %

IX. Student Performance Standardized Testing and Reporting Program The Standardized Testing and Reporting (STAR) Program consists of several key components, including the California Standards Tests (CSTs); the California Modified Assessment (CMA), and the California Alternate Performance Assessment (CAPA). The CSTs show how well students are doing in relation to the state content standards. The CSTs include English-language arts (ELA) and mathematics in grades two through eleven; science in grades five, eight, and nine through eleven; and history-social science in grades eight, and ten through eleven. The CAPA includes ELA, mathematics, and science in grades two through eleven, and for science for grades five, eight, and ten. The CAPA is given to those students with significant cognitive disabilities whose disabilities prevent them from taking either the CSTs with accommodations or modifications or the CMA with accommodations. The CMA includes ELA and mathematics for grades three through eight and science in grade five and is an alternate assessment that is based on modifiedachievement standards. The CMA is designed to assess those students whose disabilities preclude them from achieving grade-level proficiency on an assessment of the California content standards with or without accommodations. Student scores are reported as performance levels. Detailed information regarding the STAR Program results for each grade and performance level, including the percent of students not tested, can be found on the CDE Standardized Testing and Reporting (STAR) Results Web site. Program information regarding the STAR Program can be found in the Explaining 2008 STAR Program Summary Results to the Public guide. Note: Scores are not shown when the number of students tested is ten or less, either because the number of students in this category is too small for statistical accuracy or to protect student privacy. In no case shall any group score be reported that would deliberately or inadvertently make public the score or performance of any individual student.

Standardized Testing and Reporting Results for All Students – Three-Year Comparison This table displays the percent of students achieving at the Proficient or Advanced level (meeting or exceeding the state standards).

Subject English-Language Arts Mathematics Science History-Social Science

2006-07 50 19 44 45

School 2007-08 54 27 49 54

2008-09 54 26 54 57

2006-07 54 32 48 47

District 2007-08 58 36 52 50

2008-09 57 37 55 55

2006-07 43 40 38 33

State 2007-08 46 43 46 36

2008-09 50 46 50 41

Note: Scores are not shown when the number of students tested is 10 or less because the number of students in this category is too small for statistical accuracy or privacy protection. In no case shall any group score be reported that would deliberately or inadvertently make public the score or performance of any individual student.


Standardized Testing and Reporting Results by Student Group (School Year 2008-09) This table displays the percent of students, by group, achieving at the Proficient or Advanced level (meeting or exceeding the state standards) for the most recent testing period.

Group African American American Indian or Alaska Native Asian Filipino Hispanic or Latino Pacific Islander White (not Hispanic) Male Female Economically Disadvantaged English Learners Students with Disabilities Students Receiving Migrant Education Services

Percent of Students Scoring at Proficient or Advanced English-Language Arts Mathematics Science History-Social Science 49 12 * 55 * * * * 80 52 83 78 90 35 * * 41 16 38 45 * * * * 70 34 71 71 53 30 60 65 56 21 49 49 35 15 35 39 8 9 19 11 30 26 32 20

Note: Scores are not shown when the number of students tested is 10 or less because the number of students in this category is too small for statistical accuracy or privacy protection. In no case shall any group score be reported that would deliberately or inadvertently make public the score or performance of any individual student.

California High School Exit Examination Results The California High School Exit Examination (CAHSEE) is primarily used as a graduation requirement. However, the grade ten results of this exam are also used to establish the percentages of students at three proficiency levels (not proficient, proficient, or advanced) in ELA and mathematics in order to compute Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) designations as required by the federal NCLB Act of 2001. Detailed information regarding CAHSEE results can be found at the CDE California High School Exit Examination (CAHSEE) Web site. Note: Scores are not shown when the number of students tested is ten or less, either because the number of students in this category is too small for statistical accuracy, or to protect student privacy. In no case shall any group score be reported that would deliberately or inadvertently make public the score or performance of any individual student.

California High School Exit Examination Results for All Students – Three-Year Comparison This table displays the percent of students achieving at the Proficient or Advanced level in ELA and mathematics.

Subject English-Language Arts Mathematics

2006-07 56.5 58.3

School 2007-08 64.5 61.9

2008-09 63.3 58.7

2006-07 62.8 66.3

District 2007-08 70.1 67.7

2008-09 72.8 73.6

2006-07 48.6 49.9

State 2007-08 52.9 51.3

Note: Scores are not shown when the number of students tested is 10 or less, either because the number of students in this category is too small for statistical accuracy or to protect student privacy. In no case shall any group score be reported that would deliberately or inadvertently make public the score or performance of any individual student.

2008-09 52.0 53.3


California High School Exit Examination Results by Performance Level for Student Groups – Most Recent Year This table displays the percent of students, by group, achieving at each performance level in English language-arts and mathematics for the most recent testing period. English Mathematics Not Proficient Proficient Advanced Not Proficient Proficient Advanced Group All Students 36.7 23.9 39.4 41.3 35.9 22.9 Male 39.8 21.8 38.4 35.8 35.8 28.4 Female 33.8 26.0 40.3 46.3 35.9 17.7 African American * * * * * * American Indian or Alaska Native * * * * * * Asian 21.3 16.4 62.3 14.8 24.6 60.7 Filipino * * * * * * Hispanic or Latino 53.5 21.5 25.0 57.3 32.2 10.6 Pacific Islander * * * * * * White (not Hispanic) 17.5 27.3 55.2 26.6 46.2 27.3 English Learners 78.8 10.6 10.6 71.4 20.5 8.0 Socioeconomically Disadvantaged 59.6 19.1 21.3 63.0 31.1 5.9 Students Receiving Migrant Education * * * * * * Services Students with Disabilities 94.4 0.0 5.6 82.4 11.8 5.9 Note: Scores are not shown when the number of students tested is 10 or less, either because the number of students in this category is too small for statistical accuracy or to protect student privacy. In no case shall any group score be reported that would deliberately or inadvertently make public the score or performance of any individual student.

California Physical Fitness Test Results (School Year 2008-09) The California Physical Fitness Test is administered to students in grades five, seven, and nine only. This table displays by grade level the percent of students meeting fitness standards for the most recent testing period. Detailed information regarding this test, and comparisons of a school’s test results to the district and state levels, may be found on the CDE Physical Fitness Testing (PFT) Web page. Note: Scores are not shown when the number of students tested is ten or less because the number of students in this category is too small for statistical accuracy or privacy protection. In no case shall any group score be reported that would deliberately or inadvertently make public the score or performance of any individual student.

Grade Level 5 7 9

Percent of Students Meeting Healthy Fitness Zones Four of Six Standards Five of Six Standards Six of Six Standards 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 22.3 33.2 29.8

X. Accountability Academic Performance Index The Academic Performance Index (API) is an annual measure of the academic performance and progress of schools in California. API scores range from 200 to 1,000, with a statewide target of 800. Detailed information about the API can be found on the CDE Academic Performance Index (API) Web page.


Academic Performance Index Ranks – Three-Year Comparison This table displays the school’s statewide and similar schools API ranks. The statewide API rank ranges from one to ten. A statewide rank of one means that the school has an API score in the lowest ten percent of all schools in the state, while a statewide rank of ten means that the school has an API score in the highest ten percent of all schools in the state. The similar schools API rank reflects how a school compares to 100 statistically matched “similar schools.” A similar schools rank of one means that the school’s academic performance is comparable to the lowest performing ten schools of the 100 similar schools, while a similar schools rank of ten means that the school’s academic performance is better than at least 90 of the 100 similar schools. API Rank 2006 2007 2008 Statewide 8 8 7 Similar Schools 7 5 4 "N/A" means a number is not applicable or not available due to missing data. "B" means this is either an LEA or an Alternative Schools Accountability Model (ASAM) school. Schools participating in the ASAM do not currently receive growth, target information, or statewide or similar schools rankings on this report in recognition of their markedly different educational missions and populations served. ASAM schools are covered under the Alternative Accountability system as required by Education Code Section 52052 and not the API accountability system. However, API information is needed to comply with the federal No Child Left Behind (NCLB) law. Growth, target and rank information are not applicable to LEAs. "C" means this is a special education school. Statewide and similar schools ranks are not applicable to special education schools. " * " means this API is calculated for a small school or a small LEA, defined as having between 11 and 99 valid STAR Program test scores included in the API. APIs based on small numbers of students are less reliable and therefore should be carefully interpreted. Similar schools ranks are not calculated for small schools.

Academic Performance Index Growth by Student Group – Three-Year Comparison This table displays, by student group, the actual API changes in points added or lost for the past three years, and the most recent API score. Note: "N/A" means that the student group is not numerically significant.

Group All Students at the School African American American Indian or Alaska Native Asian Filipino Hispanic or Latino Pacific Islander White (not Hispanic) Socioeconomically Disadvantaged English Learners Students with Disabilities

Actual API Change 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 -5 6 14

Growth API Score 2009 776

-1

8

14

884

-3

1

20

720

2 11 35

23 -7 -14

3 24 9

834 697 646


"N/A" means a number is not applicable or not available due to missing data. "*" means this API is calculated for a small school, defined as having between 11 and 99 valid Standardized Testing and Reporting (STAR) Program test scores included in the API. The API is asterisked if the school was small either in 2008 or 2009. APIs based on small numbers of students are less reliable and therefore should be carefully interpreted.

Adequate Yearly Progress The federal NCLB Act requires that all schools and districts meet the following Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) criteria: Participation rate on the state’s standards-based assessments in ELA and mathematics Percent proficient on the state’s standards-based assessments in ELA and mathematics API as an additional indicator Graduation rate (for secondary schools) Detailed information about AYP, including participation rates and percent proficient results by student group, can be found on the CDE Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) Web page.

Adequate Yearly Progress Overall and by Criteria (School Year 2008-09) This table displays an indication of whether the school and the district made AYP overall and whether the school and the district met each of the AYP criteria.

"Yes" "No"

AYP Criteria Overall Participation Rate - English-Language Arts Participation Rate - Mathematics Percent Proficient - English-Language Arts Percent Proficient - Mathematics API Graduation Rate Met 2009 AYP Criteria Did not Meet 2009 AYP Criteria

School No Yes Yes No No Yes Yes

District Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Federal Intervention Program (School Year 2009-10) Schools and districts receiving federal Title I funding enter Program Improvement (PI) if they do not make AYP for two consecutive years in the same content area (ELA or mathematics) or on the same indicator (API or graduation rate). After entering PI, schools and districts advance to the next level of intervention with each additional year that they do not make AYP. Detailed information about PI identification can be found on the CDE Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) Web page. Indicator Program Improvement Status First Year of Program Improvement Year in Program Improvement Number of Schools Currently in Program Improvement Percent of Schools Currently in Program Improvement

School Not in PI

N/A N/A

District In PI 2004-2005 Year 3


XI. School Completion and Postsecondary Preparation Admission Requirements for California Public Universities University of California Admission requirements for the University of California (UC) follow guidelines set forth in the Master Plan, which requires that the top one-eighth of the state's high school graduates, as well as those transfer students who have successfully completed specified college work, be eligible for admission to the UC. These requirements are designed to ensure that all eligible students are adequately prepared for University-level work. For general admissions requirements please visit the General Admissions Information Web page (Outside Source).

California State University Admission requirements for the California State University (CSU) use three factors to determine eligibility. They are specific high school courses; grades in specified courses and test scores; and graduation from high school. Some campuses have higher standards for particular majors or students who live outside the local campus area. Because of the number of students who apply, a few campuses have higher standards (supplementary admission criteria) for all applicants. Most CSU campuses utilize local admission guarantee policies for students who graduate or transfer from high schools and colleges that are historically served by a CSU campus in that region. For general admissions requirements please visit the Undergraduate Admission & Requirements Web page (Outside Source).

Dropout Rate and Graduation Rate This table displays the school’s one-year dropout and graduation rates for the most recent three-year period for which data are available. For comparison purposes, data are also provided at the district and state levels. Detailed information about dropout rates and graduation rates can be found on the CDE DataQuest Web page.

Indicator Dropout Rate (1-year) Graduation Rate

2005-06 0.8 95.5

School 2006-07 0.8 96.4

2007-08 0.6 96.9

2005-06 0.7 96.6

District 2006-07 2.3 96.3

2007-08 2.8 95.2

2005-06 3.5 83.4

State 2006-07 4.4 80.6

2007-08 3.9 80.2

Completion of High School Graduation Requirements Students in California public schools must pass both the ELA and mathematics portions of the CAHSEE to receive a high school diploma. For students who began the 2008-09 school year in grade twelve this table displays by student group the percent who met all state and local graduation requirements for grade twelve completion.

Group All Students African American American Indian or Alaska Native Asian Filipino Hispanic or Latino Pacific Islander White (not Hispanic) Socioeconomically Disadvantaged English Learners Students with Disabilities

Graduating Class of 2009 School District 96.1 97.1 2.6 2.5 0 0.3 11.9 24.3 3.8 4.0 49.2 40.3 0 0.4 32.3 27.6 21.7 21.1 25.8 24.3 5.2 5.0

State N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A


Career Technical Education Programs (School Year 2008-09) This section provides information about the degree to which pupils are prepared to enter the workforce, including a list of career technical education (CTE) programs offered at the school.

The District’s instructional programs foster acquisition and growth of vital work readiness skills including critical thinking, problem solving, communication, use of technology, interpersonal relationships, and personal moral and civic values. Specialized programs for students are offered which integrate career learning and work readiness as follows: Regional Occupational Programs, Career Center Units, Carl Perkins Vocational Education, AVID, Freshman Academy, and AJROTC. Sonora High School also participates in various local business partnerships. In conjunction with the North Orange County Regional Occupational Program (NOCROP), students can enroll in other specialized programs that integrate academic learning and work readiness. Offerings include retail trades/hardware/home improvement, health careers, automotive technology, computer-aided drafting, business technology, agriculture, the law and legal careers, and computer technology.

Career Technical Education Participation (School Year 2008-09) This table displays information about participation in the school’s CTE programs.

Measure Number of the school’s pupils participating in CTE Percent of the school's pupils completing a CTE program and earning a high school diploma Percent of school's CTE courses sequenced or articulated between the school and institutions of postsecondary education

CTE Program Participation 995 91.1% 100%

Courses for University of California and/or California State University Admission (School Year 2007-08) This table displays, for the most recent year, two measures related to the school’s courses that are required for University of California (UC) and/or California State University (CSU) admission. Detailed information about student enrollment in, and completion, of courses required for UC/CSU admission can be found on the CDE DataQuest Web page. UC/CSU Course Measure Students Enrolled in Courses Required for UC/CSU Admission Graduates Who Completed All Courses Required for UC/CSU Admission

Percent 82.5 30.2

Advanced Placement Courses (School Year 2008-09) This table displays for the most recent year the number of Advanced Placement (AP) courses that the school offered by subject and the percent of the school’s students enrolled in all AP courses. Detailed information about student enrollment in AP courses can be found on the CDE DataQuest Web page. Subject Computer Science English Fine and Performing Arts Foreign Language

Number of AP Courses Offered 2 2

Percent of Students In AP Courses N/A N/A N/A N/A


Mathematics Science Social Science All courses

3 4 11

N/A N/A N/A 4.6

XII. Instructional Planning and Scheduling Professional Development This section provides information on the annual number of school days dedicated to staff development for the most recent three-year period.

Rich Peterson is in his fourth year as principal of Sonora High School during the 2008/09 school year. The administrative team includes three assistant principals and a Dean of Attendance. The Leadership Council consists of the department chairs, the WASC focus group leaders, the Title I/LEP Coordinator, and the administrators. The School Site Council is also actively involved in the decision-making process at the school and membership includes teachers, classified staff members, students, parents, and the principal. Parent participation at Sonora High School can be observed in almost every aspect of campus life. Parents are represented on the following District and school policy-making groups: School Site Council, WASC, Title I/ELL Advisory Committee, and Budget Study Committee. Booster clubs are also an important key to the success of the school. Sonora High School offers students a comprehensive program in both the academic and co-curricular areas. Standards-based instruction and data-driven decision making are stressed. The school offers a wide range of subjects and programs to meet students’ varying needs and interests. All students take the core curriculum to meet graduation requirements and to prepare them for the challenges of life beyond high school. Special programs exist for students with identified special needs (Special Education, Title I, English Language Development). Academic courses that prepare students for admission to the University of California/California State University system, and most private universities are available to students who indicate that preference. International Baccalaureate, Advanced Placement (AP), and honors level courses are offered as part of the regular curriculum. Army Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (AFJROTC) is available to all students. The cadets learn to follow and lead. The goal of ROTC is to build better and more productive citizens. Regional Occupational Program (ROP) classes are also offered for those students indicating a preference in pursuing a vocation directly upon graduating from high school. Guidance staff members work closely with students, parents, and instructional staff members to ensure that each student is enrolled in a course of study aligned with his/her individual career goals. Staff members at Sonora High School are dedicated to fostering the intellectual, emotional, physical, and social growth of all students. Students are treated as valuable members of the learning community. Highly qualified staff members work to create an engaging and challenging curriculum – one designed to promote academic success for all students. Staff members at Sonora High School believe that professional development is a critical component in


maintaining a positive and enriching learning environment. Instructional staff members are involved in determining the focus of staff development as well as providing the leadership for various sessions. Staff members are also encouraged to participate in conferences/workshops, which provide the latest information, and trends in education. Three full instructional days are designated for professional development activities. Banked-minute days are also used to address the needs of staff members and review data generated from standardized tests. Money is available from a number of sources to send staff members to workshops or conferences for purposes of professional development. The areas of concentration are technology assessment, critical thinking, reading and writing, and cultural awareness. The two-year staff development plan addressed the key needs of staff members as determined by the staff development committee and data gathered from assessments. All departments are committed to an awareness of the various learning styles of students. Staff development in recent years has highlighted aligning department curricula with State and District standards and frameworks, Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English, technology, and Classroom Instruction That Works instructional strategies.

XIII. National Assessment of Educational Progress National Assessment of Educational Progress The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) is a nationally representative assessment of what America's students know and can do in various subject areas. Assessments are conducted periodically in mathematics, reading, science, writing, the arts, civics, economics, geography, and U.S. history. Student scores for reading and mathematics are reported as performance levels (i.e., basic, proficient, and advanced) and the participation of students with disabilities and English language learners is reported based on three levels (identified, excluded, and assessed). Detailed information regarding the NAEP results for each grade, performance level, and participation rate can be found on the National Assessment of Educational Progress Web page (Outside Source). Note: Only a sample group of California's schools and districts participate in the NAEP testing cycle. Therefore, students in any particular school or district may not be included in these results. The NAEP reflects state test results and is not reflective of either the LEA or the individual school. Comparisons of student performance on the NAEP and student performance on the Standardized Testing and Reporting (STAR) Program assessments cannot be made without an understanding of the key differences between the two assessment programs. For example, the NAEP only assesses grades four, eight and twelve and for long-term trends assesses grades nine, thirteen, and seventeen. Additionally, the NAEP only provides state test results for grades four and eight. The California Standards Tests (CSTs) are based on a different set of standards than the NAEP assessments. For example, the NAEP is not aligned with California academic content and achievement standards and, therefore, does not necessarily reflect the curriculum and instruction to which students are exposed in the classroom. The NAEP assesses reading and writing separately, while the CSTs assess English-language arts (ELA), encompassing reading as well as writing conventions, spelling, and grammar. Scores on the CSTs and other assessments are not directly comparable to those on NAEP. The averages and percentages presented are estimates based on samples of students rather than on entire populations. Finally, the questions students respond to are only a sample of the knowledge and skills covered by the NAEP frameworks. Information on the differences between NAEP and CST can be found on the CDE National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Web page.

National Assessment of Educational Progress Reading and Mathematics Results by Grade Level – Aggregated This table displays the scale scores and achievement levels on the National Assessment of Educational Progress Results for reading (2007) and mathematics (2009) for grades four and eight


Subject and Grade Level Reading 2007, Grade 4 Reading 2007, Grade 8 Mathematics 2009, Grade 4 Mathematics 2009, Grade 8

Average Scale Score State National 209 220 251 261 232 239 270 282

State Percent at Achievement Level Basic Proficient Advanced 30 18 5 41 20 2 41 25 5 36 18 5

National Assessment of Educational Progress Reading and Mathematics Results for Students with Disabilities and/or English Language Learners by Grade Level – Aggregated This table displays the state and national participation rates on the National Assessment of Educational Progress for reading (2007) and mathematics (2009) for students with disabilities and/or English language learners for grades four and eight.

Subject and Grade Level Reading 2007, Grade 4 Reading 2007, Grade 8 Mathematics 2009, Grade 4 Mathematics 2009, Grade 8

State Participation Rate Students With English Language Disabilities Learners 74 93 78 92 79 96 85 96

National Participation Rate Students With English Language Disabilities Learners 65 80 66 77 84 94 78 92


Appendix D: CBEDS School Information


Appendix E: Graduation Requirements


Appendix F: Single Plan for Students Achievement


Form C: Programs Included in this Plan Check the box for each state and federal categorical program in which the school participates and, if applicable, enter amounts allocated. (The plan must describe the activities to be conducted at the school for each of the state and federal categorical program in which the school participates. If the school receives funding, then the plan must include the proposed expenditures.)

State Programs California School Age Families Education Purpose: Assist expectant and parenting students succeed in school. Economic Impact Aid/ State Compensatory Education Purpose: Help educationally disadvantaged students succeed in the regular program. Economic Impact Aid/ English Learner Program Purpose: Develop fluency in English and academic proficiency of English learners

Allocation $ N/A

$ N/A

$ 198,000

High Priority Schools Grant Program Purpose: Assist schools in meeting academic growth targets.

$ N/A

Instructional Time and Staff Development Reform Purpose: Train classroom personnel to improve student performance in core curriculum areas.

$ N/A

Peer Assistance and Review Purpose: Assist teachers through coaching and mentoring.

$ N/A

Pupil Retention Block Grant Purpose: Prevent students from dropping out of school.

$0

School and Library Improvement Program Block Grant Purpose: Improve library and other school programs.

$

School Safety and Violence Prevention Act Purpose: Increase school safety.

$ N/A

Tobacco-Use Prevention Education Purpose: Eliminate tobacco use among students.

$ N/A

List and Describe Other State or Local funds (e.g., Gifted and Talented Education)

N/A

Total amount of state categorical funds allocated to this school $ 198,000

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15


Federal Programs under No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Title I, Neglected Purpose: Supplement instruction for children abandoned, abused, or neglected who have been placed in an institution

$ N/A

Title I, Part D: Delinquent Purpose: Supplement instruction for delinquent youth

$ N/A

Title I, Part A: Schoolwide Program Purpose: Upgrade the entire educational program of eligible schools in high poverty areas Title I, Part A: Targeted Assistance Program Purpose: Help educationally disadvantaged students in eligible schools achieve grade level proficiency Title I, Part A: Program Improvement Purpose: Assist Title I schools that have failed to meet NCLB adequate yearly progress (AYP) targets for one or more identified student groups Title II, Part A: Teacher and Principal Training and Recruiting Purpose: Improve and increase the number of highly qualified teachers and principals Title II, Part D: Enhancing Education Through Technology Purpose: Support professional development and the use of technology Title III, Part A: Language Instruction for Limited-English-Proficient (LEP) Students Purpose: Supplement language instruction to help limited-Englishproficient (LEP) students attain English proficiency and meet academic performance standards Title IV, Part A: Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Purpose: Support learning environments that promote academic achievement Title V: Innovative Programs Purpose: Support educational improvement, library, media, and at-risk students Title VI, Part B: Rural Education Achievement Purpose: Provide flexibility in the use of NCLB funds to eligible LEAs Other Federal Funds (list and describe7) ARRA

7

Allocation

$ N/A $ 237,419

$ N/A

$ N/A

$ N/A

$ 48,776

$

$

$ N/A

$

Total amount of federal categorical funds allocated to this school

$ 286,195

Total amount of state and federal categorical funds allocated to this school

$ 455,476

For example, special education funds used in a School-Based Coordinated Program to serve students not identified as individuals with exceptional needs.

Guide to the Single Plan for Student Achievement

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Form D: School Site Council Membership

8

Secondary Student

Parent or Community Member

Other School Staff

Classroom Teacher

Names of Members

Principal

Education Code Section 64001(g) requires that the SPSA be reviewed and updated at least annually, including proposed expenditures of funds allocated to the through the Consolidated Application, by the 8 school site council. The current make-up of the school site council is as follows:

At elementary schools, the school site council must be constituted to ensure parity between (a) the principal, classroom teachers, and other school personnel, and (b) parents of students attending the school or other community members. Classroom teachers must comprise a majority of persons represented under section (a). At secondary schools there must be, in addition, equal numbers of parents or other community members selected by parents, and students. Members must be selected by their peer group.

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Form E: Recommendations and Assurances The school site council recommends this school plan and proposed expenditures to the district governing board for approval and assures the board of the following: 1. The school site council is correctly constituted and was formed in accordance with district governing board policy and state law. 2. The school site council reviewed its responsibilities under state law and district governing board policies, including those board policies relating to material changes in the school plan requiring board approval. 3. The school site council sought and considered all recommendations from the following groups or committees before adopting this plan (Check those that apply):  School Advisory Committee for State Compensatory Education Programs  English Learner Advisory Committee  Community Advisory Committee for Special Education Programs  Gifted and Talented Education Program Advisory Committee ___ Other (list) 4. The school site council reviewed the content requirements for school plans of programs included in this Single Plan for Student Achievement and believes all such content requirements have been met, including those found in district governing board policies and in the LEA Plan. 5. This school plan is based on a thorough analysis of student academic performance. The actions proposed herein form a sound, comprehensive, coordinated plan to reach stated school goals to improve student academic performance. 6. This school plan was adopted by the school site council at a public meeting on: _______. Attested: _________________________ Typed name of school principal

_______________________ Signature of school principal

________ Date

_________________________ Typed name of SSC chairperson

_______________________ Signature of SSC chairperson

________ Date

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Appendix G: Standards-Based Local Board Adopted Textbooks



Complete Full Report