Bay Week 2023 - Program Catalogue

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On The Cover: The Maryland Dove courtesy of Historic St. Mary’s City - www.marylanddove.org

Maryland Public Television invites you to help foster public awareness and education about the environment and conservation by participating in

Bay Week 2023

Celebrating how our nation’s waterways touch our lives and connect us with eachother. Suggested scheduling around Earth Day - April 22, 2023 or create your own themed week with programs from our growing library.

All programs will be available to stations through sIX. Program Rights (unless otherwise noted): Five plays through 12/31/23 granted, including Linear Live Streaming rights; school re-record rights not granted; cable VOD rights not granted; on-demand digital publishing rights not granted*; radio simulcast rights not granted. *MPT will directly publish many of these programs to the PBS Video Player architecture for national digital VOD access.

Program assets available at: chesapeakebayweek.org

for more information:

410.581.4187

phillip.guthrie@mpt.org

Photo Credit: George Sass, Chesapeake Maritime Museum Captain Tyrone Meredith in Water’s Edge: Black Watermen of the Chesapeake

Bay Week 2023 - Program Offers

click on a title to navigate to the program page Water’s Edge: Black Watermen of the Chesapeake..............................................................................................2 Discovering the Dove..............................................................................................................................................3 Kent County’s Storied Landscape: Place - Past and Present................................................................................4 Eatin’ Blue Catfish....................................................................................................................................................5 Search for the Cooper: A River Hidden in Plain View........................................................................................6 Outdoors Maryland: Uncertain Waters......................................................…….….........................……...….....7 Chesapeake Decoys: The Nature of Waterfowl Art .............................................................................................8 Creatures of The Chesapeake........... ….…..............……......…............….…..………..…......................…..…9 Chesapeake Beacons…..................................…………................…...............………..………........................10 Power of the Paddle....................………......……...............................….....…………..……...….....................11 Water’s Way: Thinking Like a Watershed..........…..........................……......…..……..……......................….12 The Sentinels......................................................................................………........................…............................13 Tidewater............................................................................................………................….......…...….................14 A Voice for the Rivers......................................................…….................…...........…....................................…15 Maryland Farm & Harvest: Water & Agriculture Special........................................................................……16 Oysterfest..................................................................................................…........................…........................….17 The Chesapeake & Delaware Canal: Gateway to the World...................…....................….……..........……..18 Maryland Crabs: Tradition & Taste…..........................................................................…….…….....................19 An Island Out of Time…...............................................……………..............…......….........................………20 Saving Ellicott City……..............…………………...............….............….......……....................................…21 Eatin the Chesapeake: The Five Feasts……................…………........................…....…..................................22 High Tide in Dorchester..……………..........................……….......................…….....................................…23 Healing Baltimore’s Harbor: A Pipe Dream?......................................................................................................24 Run Wild Run Free: 50 Year of Wild & Scenic Rivers..............................…........…..............................…….25 Search for the USS Scorpion.................................................................................................................................26 Eatin’ Oysters: Chesapeake Style! ...................………….............…..........……..........….............................…27 Keeping the Potomac: The Politics of Water…………….............….........…….......….…..........................…28 The Concert for the Bay: Fan Favorites.....................……..............………...........…..…….............................29 Conowingo Dam: Power on the Susquehanna..……..............…………..................….…........................….30 Potomac by Air: Our Nation’s River …………………...............………...................…...…….......................31 Tilghman Tales: Building Boats, Lives & Memories on the Chesapeake Bay ...............................................32 Downee Ocean, Hon! ................................…………………………...…..........................…….......................33 Another Dawn: Tilghman in Transition...………………..………..............................……...........................34 Distinctive Homes of the Chesapeake.………..…………….............….….........................................………35 The Great Aquarium Treasure Hunt.……..………………..............…............…………...............................36 Secrets of the Chesapeake ....………….………………..............…..............…................................................37 Chesapeake Bay By Air..........………..……………………..............…............…….……...............................38 The Chesapeake Bay Bridge .…………………………….........................…….......................................……39 Growing up on Tilghman.……….........……………...............................……….….…....................................40 The Skipjacks .............................……….....…………............................….........................................................41 Bugeye: A Chesapeake Legacy .............………..……..........................………….…................................……42 Eatin’ Crabcakes: The Best I Ever Had ...........................………….........................…..............................……43 Eatin’ Crabs: Chesapeake Style.............................................................................................................................44

Water’s Edge: Black Watermen of the Chesapeake

NOLA: WEBW 0000

60 minutes, 2023

Release Date: 4/18/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

The unique relationship between African Americans and the Chesapeake Bay contains an abundance of untold stories, tales revealed in a new documentary, Water’s Edge: Black Watermen of the Chesapeake.

Mid-nineteenth century Maryland offered pseudo-freedom to African Americans who lived and worked on the water. Between 1790 and 1860, the population of free Blacks grew tremendously; some 58% of the Black population was free. This was the largest population of free African Americans in the entire United States, and watermen were central to the success of these communities. In Maryland, the tradition of seafood fed millions and offered an opportunity for innovation that extended to both the free and enslaved.

Water’s Edge: Black Watermen of the Chesapeake chronicles unsung Marylanders that revolutionized an industry, dreamed beyond their circumstance and are still keeping this tradition alive today. Join Maryland Public Television as we chronicle stories of bravery and resilience, illuminating an industry packed with African American pioneers. Meet George H. Brown, an ambitious steamboat captain that revolutionized recreation for Black Marylanders in the early twentieth century, Downes and Albert Curtis, renowned sailmakers on Tilghman Street in Chestertown and innovators like the Turner Family of Bellevue and present-day captains who have survived by shifting their businesses from commercial fishing to chartering fishing parties. Black Watermen and the Bay celebrates the resilience, culture and beauty created by these extraordinary people.

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Discovering the Dove

NOLA: DOVE 0000

30 minutes, 2023

Release Date: 4/19/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

In November of 1633, two ships—the Ark and the Dove— set sail from the Isle of Wight in England, embarking on a grueling 3000 mile journey across the Atlantic. Aboard, some 140 passengers awaited a new life in an unknown world. Their destination: a stretch of land about ten miles from the mouth of the great Patawomeck River, on the ancestral homeland of the Piscataway and Yaocomico people. But they would christen it St. Mary’s City… the first capital of the new British colony of Maryland.

In Discovering the Dove , the centuries-old story of Maryland’s founding enters a brand new chapter as a team of shipbuilders endeavor to recreate the Dove of 1633… without a blueprint. Over the course of the half hour, viewers will join historians and craftspeople in unraveling the mystery of what the 17th century ship might have looked like. They’ll discover clues in passenger diaries, period artwork and sunken ships, and visit the shipyard at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum to watch as this New Maryland Dove takes shape, plank by plank. Finally, they’ll accompany the crew of the new vessel for her maiden voyage across the Bay to Historic St. Mary’s City—a journey that highlights just how much we can discover about the past through recreating it.

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new program

new program

Kent County’s Storied Landscape: Place — Past and Present

NOLA: KCSL 0000

30 minutes, 2023

Release Date: 4/19/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

How is history expressed in a landscape?

Kent County, Maryland, lies between the Sassafras and Chester Rivers on the Eastern Shore of the Chesapeake Bay. In an era of building, development and habitat destruction, Kent County is unique in its continuity of working agricultural lands and waterways that embody patterns of life from prehistoric times to today. Travel the length and breadth of this peninsula, exploring by land, air, and sea. Walk the pristine coastline where Native Americans once lived, and meet an archaeologist finding burn marks on rocks used for roasting oysters centuries ago. See how footprints of English settlements are revealing fascinating evidence of early colonial trade, and find out what a fascinating new map of the region has revealed. Follow a young man as he walks an African American graveyard, studying tombstones to seek out his ancestors’ lost heritage for the historical record. Then squint into the rising sun as watermen continue to harvest the Chesapeake Bay’s iconic rockfish, oysters and crabs, using the fishing techniques of the first indigenous people. Survival has always been about understanding and adaptation. Kent County’s Storied Landscape tells these stories and more—tales of the land and the people whose lives have weaved a tapestry of cultures, races and customs.

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Eatin’ Blue Catfish

NOLA: EBCF 0000

30 minutes, 2023

Release Date: 4/21/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

There’s a new item hitting restaurant menus, grocery stores, and dinner plates. First found in a Chesapeake Bay tributary in the 1970s, the “blue cat” is a ravenous fish with no natural predators. The population of this invasive species has mushroomed, threatening to upset the biological balance of the Bay.

Now, a coalition of wildlife managers, seafood marketers, commercial watermen, and recreational fishers have come together to tackle the problem. Meet cooks, consumers, biologists, and businesses as they appeal to our appetites in an effort to find solutions to problems presented by this Chesapeake bully.

Come along as Bay anglers target the plentiful and easy-to -find fish, whose weight can exceed 100 pounds. With no limits on the catch, recreational bowfishing groups venture out at night, hunting the fish with a mix of new and old technologies. Learn how commercial watermen are shifting their businesses, processing and selling nearly seven million pounds of wildcaught blue cat a year across the region. Also find how a local food bank is distributing blue catfish to recovery shelters to address food insecurity– a clear win for those concerned about the environment, sustainable business, and feeding the hungry.

Finally, the heat is on! Visit the kitchens oflocal chefs as they get creative, testing delicious ways to prepare and serve this savory predator in preparation for a seafood cooking competition. Get your forks and appetites ready as we see which chef has what it takes to get the judges excited about Eatin’ Blue Catfish, Chesapeake Style!

Bay Week Program Offers 5
new program

Search for the Cooper: A River Hidden in Plain View

NOLA: SFCR 0000

30 minutes, 2022

Release Date: 4/20/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

Search for the Cooper: A River Hidden in Plain View follows four teenagers who kayak, hike, muck and bushwhack for six days along the neglected Cooper River in Camden County, NJ. Their unprecedented challenge is to find the source of the river, seventeen miles upstream from its mouth on the Delaware River.

As they embark upon their journey, the teens quickly discover there is much more to Camden County than they anticipated. But they aren’t deterred– even as American eels swim underneath their kayaks and spiders crawl above their heads in dark and windy tunnels. They hike in the heat and paddle through frigid rain before finally arriving to revel in the beauty at the source of the river. Their journey of discovery - of the Cooper River and themselves - inspires people everywhere to experience, protect and preserve their urban waterways.

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new program

Outdoors Maryland: Uncertain Waters

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30 minutes, 2022

Release Date: 4/16/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

Outdoors Maryland: Uncertain Waters explores threats to wildlife residing where land meets water: the diamondback terrapin and three species of shore birds.

First, A Diamond in the Marsh explains how warmer temperatures and sea level rise brought about by climate change threaten to impact the reproductive patterns of Maryland’s state reptile, the diamondback terrapin. Chris Rowe, an associate professor at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, is studying a population of terrapins at the Naval Air Station Patuxent River with the goal of predicting how significant that impact will be. Meanwhile, Rebecca Stump, a natural resource specialist with the US Navy, works with a team of volunteers to survey and protect terrapin nests and hatchlings.

Then, in Wing and a Prayer, viewers learn why barrier island nesting grounds near Ocean City and Assateague Island are rapidly disappearing, unwelcome news for three species of shore birds: the common tern, royal tern, and black skimmer. The Maryland Department of Natural Resources, in partnership with Audubon Mid-Atlantic and the Maryland Coastal Bays Program, has deployed a raft that will serve as an artificial island, allowing scientists and conservationists to protect and monitor the birds and their nests.

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new program

Chesapeake Decoys: The Nature of Waterfowl Art

NOLA: CDWA 0000

30 minutes, 2022

Release Date: 4/16/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

It is a happy accident of nature that each year millions of migrating waterfowl converge on Chesapeake Bay. The uniqueness of the Bay– the shallow, wide expanse of dark brackish water, its meandering, narrow tidal creeks and the pockets of quiet, secluded marsh–creates for wildlife of all types of habitat and haven.

For the birds, Chesapeake Bay offers temporary respite from the strain of prolonged migratory flight. For hunters, the annual stopover offers the opportunity to practice the ancient art of the waterfowl hunt – a practice that has survived into our age of plenty, but has also evolved into something more.

Today, art in the form of waterfowl carvings is one that was born of hunters who slogged through marshes -- yes, to lure and to shoot birds -- but also those who saw the world as conservationists, admiring and appreciating the great beauty of their wild prey.

Chesapeake Decoys: The Nature of Waterfowl Art explores waterfowl carving as it exists today: fine art – but also big business. Viewers are also introduced to master carvers, who craft decoys from blocks of wood, the collectors who buy and sell their works for large sums, and waterfowl festivals that draw large and enthusiastic crowds who bear witness to this artform’s special singularity.

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Creatures of the Chesapeake

NOLA: CREC 0000

30 minutes, 2021

Release Date: 4/16/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

Plunge beneath the brackish waters of the nation’s largest estuary to discover a diverse and vibrant ecosystem - home to more than 3,000 unique, mesmerizing and often, quite charming Creatures of the Chesapeake

This enchanting special offers an intimate look at some of the most fascinating species in the Chesapeake Bay- the iconic and the overlooked. Macro photography allows us to get close - really close - for a rare view of these crea tures as they move, breathe, eat and reproduce. Watch a blue crab devour a shrimp, marvel at the simple ele gance of the moon jellyfish as it glides through the water, and listen for the distinctive foghorn sound of the oyster toadfish. Along the way we’ll learn why some resilient species have been unchanged for more than 250 million years - and which are at risk as our climate changes.

This fast-paced program is peppered with eye-opening facts and a must-see for kids, adults and anyone with an innate curi -

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Chesapeake Beacons

NOLA: CBEN 0000

30 minutes, 2021

Release Date: 4/16/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

They’ve illuminated the world’s harbors and shorelines for centuries. Seen today as remnants of a time gone by, lighthouses still shine up and down the coastline of the Chesapeake Bay. Towers of light once only meant to guide ships and help them avoid danger now entice people to approach and take a closer look.

Chesapeake Beacons is a breathtaking survey of the Chesapeake Bay’s most treasured navigation landmarks. The journey begins at Cape Henry, near the mouth of the bay, and travels northward to Turkey Point at its headwaters. Filmed with stunning bird’s-eye aerials, up close and personal tours, and motion time-lapse views that capture their iconic, time-honored beauty, we discover every beacon is unique. Pausing to admire each shape and form, we learn why they came into existence, how they were built, and explore their legends and lore.

A visual spectacle for viewers, this special features fantastic stories, never-before-seen aerials, up close visits and maritime history that will be enjoyed by regional and national audiences alike. This spectacular journey through America’s largest estuary reveals an awe-inspiring array of history, architecture and views of lighthouses that you will never forget.

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Power of the Paddle

NOLA: PWDL 0000

30 minutes, 2021

Release Date: 4/16/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

When Chris Hopkinson, a 46-year-old father and standup paddleboard enthusiast, decided to embark on a 200-mile journey through the nation’s largest estuary, plenty of people called him crazy. Chris was just glad they were paying attention. Inspired by his daughter’s science project and new-found knowledge that a single oyster can filter up to fifty gallons of water a day, coupled with the fact that the oyster population in the bay is at historic lows, Chris wanted to do something big to raise awareness for oyster recovery.

Power of the Paddle is a half-hour docu mentary that tells the story of the first-ever attempt to paddle the length of the Chesa peake Bay. The nine-day journey is fraught with powerful winds, unpredictable storms,

and Chris’s own haunting doubts. Motivated by a desire to keep the bay clean for his kids and theirs, Chris is anxious to unleash the power of the paddle.

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Water’s Way: Thinking Like a Watershed

NOLA: WWTW 0000

45 minutes, 2021

Release Date: 4/16/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

Millions of beaver ponds and dams once sponsored a lush mosaic of wetlands throughout the Chesapeake region. These slowed, spread and retained water flowing to the Bay from every creek and river, letting it soak in and percolate through the ground. Because beavers have been gone for so long - they were trapped out of the Chesapeake Bay watershed by 1750 - there is an ‘ecological amnesia’ as to the benefits they conferred, the world they created, and how the watershed ‘thought’ for thousands of years.

Water’s Way: Thinking Like a Watershed explores the impact of development, agriculture and the channelization of streams and creeks on the natural processes that once worked to control runoff and filter the water – and how natural elements like beavers and trees could aid efforts to restore the Bay.

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The Sentinels

NOLA: TSNT 0000

30 minutes, 2020

Release Date: 4/16/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

Directed by award-winning filmmakers, The Sentinels tells the inspirational stories of the farmers, ranchers, environmentalists, and military bases working together under the Sentinel Landscapes Partnership to create a more sustainable future.

Founded in 2013 by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Department of Defense, and Department of the Interior, the Sentinel Landscapes Partnership strives to strengthen military readiness, bolster agricultural and forestry economies, and build climate change resilience through innovative conservation projects. There are seven sentinel landscapes. The three featured in the film are: Avon Park Air Force Range Sentinel Landscape, Florida, Camp Ripley Sentinel Landscape, Minnesota, and Fort Huachuca Sentinel Landscape, Arizona. Also mentioned is the Middle Chesapeake Sentinel Landscape, which encompasses portions of Maryland, Delaware and Virginia.

Celebrating its 10th anniversary in 2023, the Sentinel Landscapes Partnership, co-founded by the U.S. Departments of Agriculture, Defense, and the Interior, strives to strengthen military readiness, bolster agricultural and forestry economies, and build climate change resilience through innovative conservation projects.

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Tidewater

NOLA: TIWA 0000

30 minutes, 2020

Release Date: 4/16/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

The Hampton Roads area of Virginia is relatively unknown nationwide, but it is the region whose vulnerability to sea level rise most af fects military readiness and our overall na tional security; it is home to the highest con centration of military assets in the country.

The electric grid and 900 miles of roads are threatened by permanent flooding in the region; a dire situation that requires $1 billion in urgent infrastructure repairs.

Tidewater explores the attempts by a wide range of stakeholders, from ordinary citizens to the U.S. Navy, to tackle the challenges posed by climate change and sea level rise.

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A Voice for the Rivers

NOLA: AVRI 0000 30 minutes, 2020

Release Date: 4/16/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

The rivers and creeks of the Eastern Shore once seemed endless havens of beauty and abundance, but today, they are polluted. Water quality is poor. Excess nutrients create algae growth, which chokes out light, oxygen, underwater grasses and estuarine life.

A Voice for the Rivers profiles four riverkeepers: dedicated scientists, environmental activists, educators, volunteers, and advocates who work daily to protect and restore the rivers of the Eastern Shore.

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Maryland Farm &

Harvest: Water & Agriculture Special

NOLA: MFHS 0000

30 minutes, 2020

Release Date: 4/16/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

This special looks at one of Earth’s most valuable resources: water, and the essential role it plays in food production. First, we visit the Choptank Oyster Company, where oyster grower Kevin McClarren is navigating challenges of low salinity after a year of unusually heavy rainfall, which makes it harder for oysters to multiply and grow. We learn how oysters are farmed and how too much rain lowers the salinity of the water, which not only hurts oysters, but changes their flavor as well.

Next, on a grain farm, if a field is too wet, farmers can install drainage tile to move water off the field and dry it out. These underground pipes help drain excess water so that crops can grow better, but there are environmental consequences. Enter a conversion drainage system, which helps both the farm and the environment through smart water and nutrient management.

Then we look at irrigation. Local farmers used over 20 billion gallons of water for crop production in 2015. That’s a lot of water! But rather than use water from lakes or underground aquifers, Kent County farmer Franklin Dill draws from an unconventional source: his local wastewater treatment plant. This puts to good use water that ordinarily would

have no use, and it helps conserve other freshwa ter sources. Plus, it also helps his crops grow better.

Finally, segment host Al Spoler meets a water man who fishes for eels, a delicacy unfamiliar to most. Al learns how to bait and catch eels, then visits The Salt Line restaurant in Washington, DC where chef Kyle Bailey serves up grilled eel.

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Oysterfest

NOLA: OYFT 0000

30 minutes, 2020

Release Date: 4/16/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

If you’re intrigued by all things bivalve, then Oysterfest is a treat not to be missed. This compilation of three short films, each exploring a different aspect of the oyster’s place in the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem, history and culture.

The Incredible Oyster Reef explains why these filter feeders are a keystone species in the Bay with an indispensable ability to heal its waters. Lifeline: A Chesapeake Oyster Documentary examines why Chesapeake oyster populations have plummeted over the past century and the oyster’s impact on our society and culture.

Rounding out the half-hour, The Local Oyster Stout offers some lighter fare: the story of a collaboration among an oyster farmer, a shucker, and a brewer to create what they call Maryland’s first oyster farm-to-table Oyster Stout Beer.

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photo courtesy of The Chesapeake Bay Foundation oyster sanctuary

The Chesapeake & Delaware Canal: Gateway to the World

NOLA: CDGW 0000

30 minutes, 2019

Release Date: 4/16/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

This is a little-known but fascinating story of the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, a critically-important 14-mile-long trade route used exten sively by international shipping. It’s known as “Baltimore’s back door” be cause it’s a money-saving shortcut be tween the port of Baltimore and points north via the Atlantic Ocean. The Ca nal’s construction in the early 1800’s was a major catalyst to Baltimore’s booming growth as a major inland port. Today, it is a nautical gateway to Baltimore and carries more than 40% of all trade traffic into the port.

This program shares the canal’s history and impact to the area through the stories of ship pilots, historians, lock operators, re-enactors, engineers, authors and more.

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Maryland Crabs: Tradition & Taste

NOLA: MDCT 0000

30 minutes, 2019

Release Date: 4/16/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

Ask just about anyone what comes to mind when you mention Maryland, and they’ll probably say “you know, crabs.” What they really mean is the iconic, hardy, blue-green Chesapeake crustacean known to scien tists as Callinectus Sapidus -- and to the rest of us by a bunch of other names: blue crabs, jimmies, sooks, sallies, peelers, v-bottoms and sponge crabs. No mat ter what they’re called, if they’re fished out of Chesa peake waters, they’re most likely destined for a din ner plate as a crab cake, or a paper-lined table to be hammered, cracked and picked on a summer’s day.

This is the way things have been for as long as men and women have caught the wily Blue Crab out of the Bay and the rivers that feed North America’s largest estuary. People love to eat crab and watermen are happy to catch and sell them. An entire industry grew out of this arrangement between fisher and eater, one that’s become a modern and vibrant economic engine for locals who work the water, and for the others who earn a living from its crab bounty. But times are changing, and things are shifting.

Facing some new and unexpected challenges, the blue crab industry feels a bit tentative as it looks to the future. From watermen and waterwomen working their trot lines and pulling their crab pots, to processing houses dotting the banks of the bay, uncertainty is today’s watchword for an industry that has worked largely behind the scenes and out of the public eye. From labor shortages in processing facilities to crab harvest declines, international competition and water quality issues, the waterman is facing a barrage of unforeseen and difficult challenges.

Bay Week Program Offers

An Island Out of Time

NOLA: AIOT 0000

30 minutes, 2019

Release Date: 4/16/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

An Island Out of Time takes viewers to Smith Island where they experience the lives and challenges of Mary Ada and Dwight Marshall. They personify the Chesapeake Bay’s historic seafood-harvesting culture and history, but their four children chose to break with that tradition.

The film, like Tom Horton's 1996 book, An Island Out of Time, is both a celebration and elegy for a place beset with erosion, dwindling population and vanishing economic opportunities.

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Saving Ellicott City

NOLA: SELC 0000 30 minutes, 2019

Release Date: 4/16/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

This is the story of a mill town that has lived with floods for two hundred fifty years and has always rebuilt after the waters recede. But, as the rains and flooding have worsened, and local development has greatly increased, the citizens are becoming more afraid as they continue to face the possibility of having to tear down historic buildings in order to save lives.

They have had to accept a new normal…one of fear, destruction, and rains like never before.

It’s an important story of townspeople that have been challenged and traumatized after losing four lives, several local businesses, and their last bit of hope when they experienced two different thousand-year floods that occurred in only twenty-two months’ time.

The important story of the challenges faced by this town may end up being America’s canary in a coal mine.

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Eatin’ the Chesapeake:

The Five Feasts

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30 minutes, 2018

Release Date: 4/16/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

Cream of Blue Crab soup, butter-broiled Bluefish, St. Leonard’s Stuffed Ham with collards, Wicomico Barbequed Chicken, baked n’ buttered yeast rolls, Crab Loaf, scalloped corn pudding, summer stewed tomatoes, fried clam fritters, sherry-dressed Crab Imperial, Smith Island Cake, Dog Days Succotash, Highlandtown Sauerbrauten and spätzle, Mock Turtle Soup, Duck in Aspic, Raised Pie, Fried Oysters, Baked Crab-Stuffed Rockfish, Sauteed Softshell Crab, icebox Crab Salad with Cantaloupe, farm-Beaten Biscuits and Lady Baltimore Cake.

It reads like a banquet menu, but it’s really a Chesapeake feast. In fact, The Five Feasts. Made up of Bay-region, time-tested and family-treasured recipes that we rediscover, re-create and sample in Eatin’ the Chesapeake: The Five Feasts.

From the quiet brackish shallows at Elk Neck, Maryland to the rolling hills and beauty of southern Maryland farms, and on to the lively talk and song of Eastern Shore church halls, 400 years of seafood, seashore and traditional cooking is coming home to Marylanders and their neighbors. There are favorite Chesapeake-born dishes from colonial cookbooks, crab shacks, German home-kitchen cooks, southern Maryland farms, Eastern Shore chicken-fry kitchens and Smith Island fresh-off-the-boat Chesapeake supper tables.

So pull up a chair and sample the best dishes the region has the offer in Eatin’ the Chesapeake: The Five Feasts.

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High Tide in Dorchester

NOLA: HTDO 0000

60 minutes, 2018

Release Date: 4/16/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

High Tide in Dorchester aims to create a conversation about climate change, along with related impacts of sea level rise and erosion and leverage that conversation into action. Locations around the country already have growing concerns for the future that increasingly faces coastal areas worldwide, including Dorchester County. This low-lying county on the Eastern Shore of the Chesapeake Bay is the fourth largest of Maryland’s 23 counties by land area, but it is destined to drop to the 14th largest by 2100 - or sooner - as waters rise and erosion worsens. Dorchester is fast becoming the coal miner’s canary; ground zero for the Chesapeake Region.

High Tide in Dorchester is a wake-up call: It’s time for a retreat from the shoreline, of which the Chesapeake estuary has some 11,000 miles. Historically, millions of people have sought to live as close to that shoreline as possible, but few communities are doing adequate planning to meet the imminent challenges of restraint, retreat and adaptation to living on the edges of a rising tide.

Rising seas also threaten many species of waterfowl and other birds that nest in these extensive wetlands. It is imperative that we give our wetlands space to migrate upland as they are flooded in the lowlands.

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Healing Baltimore’s Harbor: A Pipe Dream?

NOLA: HBHP 0000 30 minutes, 2018

Release Date: 4/16/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

Baltimore’s harbor is a national landmark and a source of pride for the people of the city. However, water pollution is a serious issue, affecting human health and the city’s economy. Every year, millions of gallons of sew age seep of out of the city’s aging un derground sewage infrastructure and into the waterways. The resulting bac terial presence in streams, rivers and the harbor can be a threat to anyone who comes into contact with the water.

plores the challenges facing the city as it works to meet the requirements of a federal consent decree calling for it to fix and rebuild its infrastructure, and the on-going commitment of concerned citizens.

This film engages and informs with compelling stories surrounding water pollution in the Inner Harbor and those willing to go out of their way to protect the city they love - and the water they need.

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Run Wild Run Free: 50 Years of Wild & Scenic Rivers

NOLA: RWFR 0000

44 minutes, 2018

Release Date: 4/16/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

More than 60 years ago, America was in the peak of the industrial revolution and the nation’s waterways were dying from dams, water diversions and pollution. The plight of America's rivers caught the attention of twin brothers and renowned wildlife biologists John and Frank Craighead. After witnessing the demise of their childhood river, the Potomac, and after hearing of dam proposals on Montana's most wild river where they were studying grizzly bears on the verge of extinction, they were inspired to act.

Run Wild Run Free tells the story of the resulting Wild and Scenic Rivers Act of 1968 and its legacy. Sweeping visuals accompany stories told by experts, grassroots organizations, white water enthusiasts and members of the Nez Perce tribe in Idaho.

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The War of 1812 hit the Chesapeake hard: Britain’s Royal Navy was the most powerful force in the world and her warships raided bayside towns with impunity. In Baltimore, Revolutionary War hero Joshua Barney could not sit idly by. To mount a counterstrike, he assembled a mosquito fleet dubbed The Chesapeake Flotilla… and from his flagship The USS Scorpion, Commodore Barney led a charge against the fearsome Royal Navy. After a series of daring battles, the Flotilla was chased up the Patuxent River and intentionally scuttled to prevent them from falling into enemy hands.

Search for the USS Scorpion

NOLA: USSS 0000 30 minutes, 2017

Release Date: 4/16/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

Many of the locals would be happy to tell you about the shipwrecks and how their grandparents used to cast fishing lines into them. Yet for those that went looking, the lost fleet always remained elusive. Is local legend and lore all that remained of the Flotilla?

The Search for the USS Scorpion puts the viewer on the front lines of marine archaeology. Embedded with team of scientists from the US Navy, we travel over river and underwater to follow the clues and piece together a mystery of history. Could it be that the lost flagship of Commodore Barney’s Flotilla has finally been found?

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Hidden beneath the muddy Patuxent riverbed, a nearly forgotten tale of courage has slumbered…

Eatin’ Oysters: Chesapeake Style!

NOLA: EOCS 0000

30 minutes, 2017

Release Date: 4/16/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

17th century Irish essayist Jonathan Swift dared say what so many before him believed: “He was a bold man that first ate an oyster.” The lowly oyster is a delicacy the world over, yet many people say enjoying one is an acquired taste.

In the Chesapeake Bay region, the Chesapeake Oyster is King. Whether it’s slurped down raw on the half shell or fried, baked, braised or roasted, it’s a favorite. Eatin’ Oysters: Chesapeake Style! takes viewers around the Chesapeake region in search of who’s eating oysters, where to find the best of them, and the best ways to eat them.

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Keeping the Potomac: The Politics of Water

NOLA: KPPW 0000

30 minutes, 2017

Release Date: 4/16/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

More than six million people live in the Potomac watershed area. Whether they know it or not, some of the very infrastructure that supports their modern lifestyles is poisoning the Potomac River. It is the mission of three River Keepers to patrol the Potomac and do what they must to protect it.

In the Shenandoah River, a major tributary to the Potomac, fish kills caused by algae are common and an obvious concern for River Keeper Mark Frondorf. One of the major sources of pollution in the Shenandoah is nutrient runoff from farms. Although Mark works tirelessly to encourage farmers to fence their animals out of waterways, many farmers do not engage in best management practices, which will protect the river from these dangers.

On the Upper Potomac river, River Keeper Brent Walls monitors the river for the Potomac Riverkeepers Network. One of his greatest concerns is a pipeline that pumps a foul-smelling brown fluid into an otherwise pristine section of the river 24 hours-a-day. The effluent comes from a nearby wastewater treatment plant operated by the Upper Potomac River Commission. The effluent poses a danger for fish and wildlife in the river and increases the water temperature to unnatural levels.

As the Lower Potomac Riverkeeper, Dean Naujoks contends with many sources of pollution. One source, the Coal Ash Disposal Ponds at Possum Point Power Plant, has drawn the attention of local residents, envi ronmental activists, and state legislators. These groups are concerned with Dominion Power’s claim that their coal ash disposal program is safe. We follow Dean as he fights against a serious threat to not only the Poto mac River, but also the health of those near its banks.

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This program was produced by graduate film students at American University’s School of Communication’s Center for Environmental Filmmaking.

Concert for the Chesapeake Bay: Fan Favorites

NOLA: CCBF 0000

90 minutes, 2017

Release Date: 4/16/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

For years, the Concert for the Chesapeake Bay has presented a terrific assortment of music. Ranging from indie chamber pop to rocking soul and American roots to rhythmic beat boxing, talented artists performed in support of volunteerism for the Chesapeake Bay watershed.

This year’s concert highlights some of the “fan favorites”. There were great acts such as indie pop band Jukebox the Ghost, the Great American Canyon Band, Kelly Bell Band, Bobby E Lee & the Sympathizers and The Bellevederes. There was also soul singing Brooks Long and the Mad Dog No Good and The Herd of Main Street. Then there were the Punch Brothers with lead singer Chris Thile, who was recently named host of the famed Prairie Home Companion radio show, the Ursula Ricks Project, Among Wolves, Bosley , Seattle indie band Hey Marseilles, and singer/songwriter Victoria Vox with beatboxer Shodekeh. And it was back in our very first concert that we got things started with four special acts - the amazing Chris Jacobs Band, the talented Rachael Yamagata, the unique rap/folk duo of Caleb and Saleem and the soul sounds of Old Man Brown – featuring “The Voice” finalist Adam Wakefield.

From stream cleanups to planting and other activities, they can all use your help. If you live outside the Chesapeake Bay area, please consider giving some time to an environmental volunteer group near you!

From the beaches along the Eastern shore to the headwaters of the Susquehanna River, the Chesapeake Bay plays an important role in the culture, economy, and beauty of our country. Listen to great music while celebrating volunteerism and helping preserve this beautiful natural resource. The concert is a co-production of Maryland Public Television and WTMD Radio.

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Conowingo Dam: Power on the Susquehanna

NOLA: CODP 0000

60 minutes, 2016

Release Date: 4/16/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

A historical retrospective that explores the impact of the building of the Conowingo Dam that began construction in 1926 on the lower Susquehanna River. The medium-height, masonry gravity dam opened in 1928 and is second in size only to the massive hydroelectric works at Niagara Falls, New York. When it was opened, the Conowingo was celebrated worldwide as a miraculous engineering feat. Now, the dam’s unique story and place in history is relived in a one-hour documentary that recalls the drama and controversy that has swirled around the structure since its opening. From the drowning of an historic village and rich valley farmland… to stories focusing on town life downriver… and to the fate of Chesapeake Bay and its marine life, the Conowingo Dam’s story is rich in history and irony – a tale that has waited nearly 90 years to be told.

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It’s names number more than sixty, from The Elizabeth to The Cheneoow and even the Turkey Buzzard. It has been written about by historians, pondered by philosophers, and cherished by those whose hearts it has won. It has been stolen by states, invaded by foreign navies, traversed by hostile armies and fought over by warring natives, all while serving as a silent witness to manmade history. The Potomac River is the nation’s river.

Explore the river’s natural and man-made history in Potomac by Air: Our Nation’s River. Coming on the heels of the critically-acclaimed

Potomac by Air: Our Nation’s River

NOLA: POTO 0000

60 minutes, 2015

Originally Released through APT 2/14/16

Rights: unlimited plays through 2/13/24

Streaming rights limited to Passport

“D.C.” There, the film captures beautifully shot High-Definition pictures of the nation’s col lection of monuments and memorials, from the Washington Monument, to The U.S. Capitol, the White House, Jefferson Memo rial, the National Cathedral, and many more. Flying further south, we explore the serene natural duality of the river’s life and flow, from non-tidal freshwater to brackish and tidal. Finally, emerging into the Chesapeake Bay. The program captures, as no other film, the stories of this uniquely American jewel.

Chesapeake Bay by Air, this film tells the stories of the river - tales that bring alive the history of the Potomac and our country. Beginning at the Potomac’s north branch at Fairfax Stone, West Virginia, the film captures the river’s rapid descent through the steep, rocky gorges of the Appalachian Mountains into the Piedmont region of Maryland, exploring the natural and man-made history along the way. The program follows the meandering, widening river south, past the Great Falls, and into the modern power center we know as

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Tilghman Island may be a long way from the rest of the world, but its remarkable residents, past and present, have forged a history and legacy that reaches far beyond its shores. Independent, innovative, and idiosyncratic, they fuse intuition, experience, and sheer determination to achieve whatever they set out to accomplish. Whether in building race winning log canoes, or overcoming taboos about women working on the water, their can-do attitude never wavers.

Tilghman Tales: Building Boats, Lives & Memories on the Chesapeake Bay

NOLA: TTBB 0000

30 minutes, 2016

Release Date: 4/16/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

Tilghman Tales shares the stories of a few of the island’s notables recounted by colorful storytellers, local experts, self-taught historians, innovative boat builders, “jacks-of-all-trades,” self-reliant women, and indefatigable octogenarians. Through them we meet several generations of legendary Tilghman boat builders and some intrepid women who love the water and the waterman’s life as fiercely as the men.

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Downee Ocean, Hon!

NOLA: DHON 0000

60 minutes, 2014

Release Date: 4/16/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

Ask a local where they’re headed for summer, and chances are you’re bound to hear “downee ocean” (down the ocean). That can only mean one place: Ocean City. “OC” is the major beach destination in the state, draw ing hundreds of thousands of visitors and millions of dollars to the place where land meets water each year.

Now, we celebrate the OCMD experience by creating a program about life and fun at the ocean - Downee Ocean, Hon! - a vividly shot, one-hour trip to the beach, filled with loads of fun, sun and salt water taf fy. From the beach to the boardwalk, from the Ferris Wheel to Fager’s Island, from sunrise on the beach to nightlife by the bay, this memorable trip truly cap tures the OC experience – from the rich history, fami ly traditions, and small-town charm that’s kept Ocean City as one of the East Coast’s top vacation spots.

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Another Dawn: Tilghman in Transition

NOLA: TINT 0000

30 minutes, 2014

Release Date: 4/16/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

Like generations before them, Tilghman Island’s watermen get up every morning and head out to wrest a living from the Chesapeake Bay; “it’s in their blood.” But increasingly they find it a challenge to make a living. As the Bay’s bounty de clines, regulation increases, and the cost of operating a work boat escalates, watermen turn to other livelihoods and their wives find office jobs to supplement their family’s income and provide health benefits. Another Dawn: Tilghman in Tran sition picks up the watermen’s story where it left off in Grow ing up on Tilghman, the previous film produced by the Til ghman Watermen’s Museum. How do they deal with all the changes? How do they adapt? What do they see as the future for this true watermen’s community? What remains clear through all of their words, however, is the generosity, ingenuity, and beauty that distinguish this special community.

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Distinctive

Homes of the Chesapeake

NOLA: DHCP 0000

60 minutes, 2013

Release Date: 4/16/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

The lure of waterfront living still remains irresistible, with some enjoying a dream home on the Chesapeake Bay year ‘round. Distinctive Homes of the Chesapeake opens the door to some of the unique, historic and magnificent homes surrounding the Chesapeake Bay open to tours. Explore a colonial-era manor hand-crafted in the 1700s, an unusual house boat with different waterfront views each day, and modern architec tural marvels that blend the best of Bay living with gorgeous settings.

• OCEAN HALL – From historical records and tree-ring dating - Ocean Hall in St. Mary’s County is Maryland’s oldest brick home that Dr. James Boyd and his wife Jennifer have painstakingly restored to its 1703 glory.

• LOBLOLLY HOUSE – Steve Kieran is an architect whose passion for environmental responsibility and green design resulted in his remarkable home nestled among the Loblolly pines on the water in Dorchester County.

• ASHBY - This former bed and breakfast on a tranquil Miles River setting has rooms named after family members laid to rest in the back yard cemetery – and was also the site of a Hollywood murder.

• WHITEHALL – In 1760, Maryland’s then-Provincial Governor Horatio Sharpe decided to build his colonial dream home on Chesapeake Bay, and he did -- including a front lawn with nearly 2 miles of private coastline.

• SCIENTISTS’ CLIFFS - Once an exclusive retreat for scientists and educators in the 1940s, some of the cabins on Calvert County’s famed cliffs are either frozen in time or have evolved into full time residences - depending on which road you take.

• BALTIMORE LIGHT – Few homes can claim a 360-degree unobstructed view of the Chesapeake, but this unique structure near the Bay Bridge is the only weekend getaway that’s been an operating lighthouse for over 100 years.

• THE FRIARY ON THE SEVERN - This Georgian style mansion was once used as a Catholic Friary complete with a chapel and dormitory. It was renovated into one of the most spectacular houses in the region, and is home to a couple who have sold more crab cakes than anyone else in the world.

From St. Michael’s to Easton and Annapolis to St. Mary’s, Distinctive, step inside to explore each home’s fascinating history and architecture while meeting some of the special people who live there.

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The Great Aquarium

Treasure Hunt

NOLA: GATH 0000

30 minutes, 2013

Release Date: 4/16/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

Get ready for an exciting and educational experience to share with your younger viewers! The students of South Town Middle School are ready for the coolest class field trip of the year to the National Aquarium. But this time there’s a catch – Science Teacher Mr. Hedgeman has turned it into a Treasure Hunt! What amazing things can they find and learn before time is up? Class mates Dewey and Trevor love a challenge, but will they figure out their clues and stay ahead of the other students - especially Sloane - to win the grand prize?

Join Dewey and Trevor on a wild exploration of the National Aquarium, home to thousands of species of marine life! In this fast paced adventure, meet the experts all throughout this aquatic world located

in Baltimore’s Inner Harbor. Find out what marine life is in the Chesapeake Bay, go “down under” to visit the crocodiles of Australia, discover the frogs of an indoor rainforest, and submerge yourself into the Atlantic and Pacific oceans for an up-close look at the astounding array of deep sea life from sharks to rays to dolphins!

In the end, Dewey and Trevor explore the entire aquarium, but can they be the first team to have all the answers before it’s too late? Find out in the exciting adventure of The Great Aquarium Treasure Hunt!

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Secrets of the Chesapeake

NOLA: SCPK 0000

60 minutes, 2012

Release Date: 4/16/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

From the stillness of the mass underwater graves of ancient ships... to the eye-popping, eardrum-busting fighter jets of Pax River, we discover some of the Chesapeake’s best-kept secrets. From buried treasure to haunted lighthouses, crazy legends and myths, eccentric sportingeven characters wacky and a little bizarre - to provincial cuisine and natural wonders, the Bay and surrounding locales are alive with obscure-but-fascinating destinations.

For the armchair adventurer among us who craves the uncanny - for those who veer off-the-beaten-path - enjoy this guide to discovering these home-grown places.

Travel the Chesapeake region – east and west, north

and south, from mountain to marsh – as locals offer sage advice on how to discover and uncover the most unusual places to explore and things to do.

But these aren’t ordinary tourist destinations. Instead, they’re spots that only a native would point to: remote shorelines where beachcombers can find beautiful and rare sea glass; an island gemof-a-seafood-shack; quiet crossroads where tragic local history comes alive. Secrets of the Chesapeake takes viewers to places they’ll never forget where they’ll meet people they’ve only read about.

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From the wild beauty of meandering creeks and rivers… to the dramatic allure of Calvert Cliffs… from lonely lighthouses… to the bustle of Annapolis and the power of the mighty Susquehanna… Chesapeake Bay By Air is a soaring look at the sites and attractions throughout the Chesapeake Bay Region presented in amazing High Definition.

The program opens from the sky and swoops down over famous Chesapeake-area landmarks, such as: St. Michaels, the Chesapeake Bay Bridge, Annapolis and the Baltimore Harbor. Viewers will marvel at the

Chesapeake Bay By Air

NOLA: CPBA 0000

60 minutes, 2011

Released through APT on 9/5/11

Rights: Unlimited Plays through 2/17/25

Streaming rights limited to Passport

Chesapeake Bay in all its glory - in spring, summer and fall - as we touch the history, excitement, natural beauty and appeal of the Chesapeake region and all it has to offer.

Other highlights also include: Smith Island; Crisfield; St. Mary’s City; the Blackwater Wildlife Refuge; Calvert Cliffs; Tilghman Island; Kent Island; Baltimore Light; the Port of Baltimore; Gunpowder River; the Potomac, Chesapeake and Delaware Canal and more.

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The Chesapeake Bay Bridge

NOLA: CBBB 0000

60 minutes, 2011

Release Date: 4/16/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

The Chesapeake Bay Bridge captures the physical majesty of the bridge and its distinct personality. Soaring 186 feet above the water, and spanning 4.3 miles, the Chesapeake Bay Bridge opened for business in 1952 and opened the door to a new era. The William Preston Lane, Jr. Memorial Bridge, commonly referred to as the Bay Bridge, connected the rural, historically isolated communities on the Eastern Shore with the fast-grow ing Baltimore and Washington metropolitan areas.

Using archival photos, aerials and images taken from boats on the bay, The Chesapeake Bay Bridge traces the bumpy ride to construction of the Bay Bridge, chroni cling the early setbacks and political tenacity it took to realize an idea that first percolated in the early 20th cen

tury. Interviews with key participants bring to life the colorful characters involved, the near disasters and the amazing engineering feats that created the bridge that was once the world’s longest continuous over-water steel structure.

The program also looks at the far-reaching effects the Bay Bridge has had on everything from commerce to commuting. The Bay Bridge has also helped fuel the

growth of the tourism industry, transforming tiny beachside resorts like Ocean City into crowded summertime destinations. Residents and business owners reflect on the changes, and how they were initially caught off guard by throngs of vacationers descending on the small coastal towns in 1952.

Farmers, residents of tight-knit communities along Route 50 and historians paint a vivid picture of life before and after the bridge. While those who have made a living working on the bridge, toll collectors, engineers, maintenance workers and inspectors share their stories and their unique perspective.

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Growing up on Tilghman

NOLA: GUOT 0000

30 minutes, 2011

RRelease Date: 4/16/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

Not so long ago, Tilghman’s Island was a community with few amenities and no fences - where children roamed freely, neighbors took care of each other, and families bonded together to wrest a living from the bountiful but challenging Chesapeake Bay. It was a community that valued hard work, ingenuity, good humor, and the beauty and power of the natural world.

Produced by the Tilghman Island Museum, Growing up on Tilghman takes a fond look at the history of this unique waterman’s community. Filled with beautiful footage of the Bay and archival images from years gone by, the film also introduces viewers to 11 unforgettable residents as they recall their unique heritage and discuss the challenges of sharing it with future generations.

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The Skipjacks

NOLA: SKIJ 0000 30 minutes, 2010

Release Date: 4/16/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

A sentimental look at the history of an iconic Maryland fishing vessel, the Skipjack, through the eyes of Deal Island locals who have sailed these “Mack Trucks of the Chesapeake” for decades in search of the once-ubiquitous Maryland oyster.

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Sid Dixon plans to sail it out of historic St. Michael’s piled high with watermelons. He’ll point the bow north into the calm shallows of the Miles River, pray for a stiff breeze, and hope it will push him up the Chesapeake and into Fells Point.

Dixon, a colorful Eastern Shore entrepreneur and self-proclaimed Renaissance man, is eager to set sail in the latest hand-crafted boat to emerge from his well-worn work shed.

Bugeye: A Chesapeake Legacy

NOLA: BUGE 0000

30 minutes, 2009

Release Date: 4/16/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

It’s a Bugeye, the Chesapeake Bay’s water-borne workhorse that plied this region’s waters for more than a century.

As the precursor to the skipjack, follow the story of Dixon and his Bugeye, with regular visits to his St. Michael’s boatworks shed to capture the tradition of hand-built boatmaking first-hand. The finished product is Bugeye: A Chesapeake Legacy , a fun-loving look at Dixon’s labor of love from keel-laying to launch to time under sail on the open Chesapeake Bay.

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Eatin’ Crabcakes: The Best I Ever Had

NOLA: ETCR 0000

30 minutes, 2009

Release Date: 4/16/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

Nancy Faidley makes a funny face when you ask her for her secret ingredient. She owns and runs Faid ley’s Seafood Market in a crowded corner stall in the noisy and near-ancient Lexington Market. Here, she regularly sells out of her specialty: Faidley’s famous crab cakes. Mrs. Faidley will show you how she puts her crab cakes together by hand, and even how long she deep fries them. But her secret blend of ingredients is off-limits. Forever, she says.

Her long-guarded secret reflects a happy tradition among crab aficionados, from restaurateurs and chefs to housewives and watermen: personal ownership of the world’s best-tasting crab cake recipe. Apparently, there are thousands of them!

Follow along as we track down the finest crab cakes in Eatin’ Crabcakes: The Best I Ever Had!, a fun-loving, kitchen-hopping adventure that traverses the state in search of Crab Cake Heaven.

From G&M’s famous goliath-sized crab cakes for the hungriest seafood purest among us, to the rarified palette that craves stovetop tradition with a lilt, to ol’ time tried-and-true recipes that have survived kitchen-based tests and trials of the ages, Eatin’ Crabcakes: The Best I Ever Had! is the ultimate crab cake treasure hunt across the Chesapeake region.

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Eatin’ Crabs: Chesapeake Style

NOLA: ECRA 0000

30 minutes, 2007

Release Date: 4/16/23

Rights: 5 plays through 12/31/23

Eatin’ Crabs: Chesapeake Style is a foray into the world of the blue crab from dockside to table, capturing the uniquely Maryland slice of life that is the custom of enjoying a mound of hot steamed crabs.

From Baltimore’s busiest harborside districts, filled with some of the region’s most famed crab shacks, to beloved and isolated locales filled with crab-hungry locals from Ocean City to Oakland, Eatin’ Crabs: Chesapeake Style catches the world of crab-loving and cracks it open for all to see.

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Maryland Public Television is recognized as a leading producer of nature and environmental documentaries with particular attention to stories from the Chesapeake Bay watershed areas.

Here are several of our network’s Emmy-winning films:

11767 Owings Mills Boulevard

Owings, Mills MD 21117-1499

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