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MOZILLA FESTIVAL 2017

D G TAL

vulnerability makes us human

Vulnerability

NCLUS ON BROOKLYN

today i want to talk about the vulnerabilities of being (digital and all) i don’t know if we ever truly interrogate what vulnerability is and what it means for us.

TEXT > DIGITAL INCLUSION > KEY TERMS

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as a tool to navigate the world

inc ca lus ex n’t ioa wi ist n em th ou pa t th y

EMPATHY

Technology

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Empathy is the capacity to understand or feel what another person is experiencing from within the other person’s frame of reference, i.e., the capacity to place oneself in another’s position. There are many definitions for empathy that encompass a broad range of emotional states. Types of empathy include cognitive empathy, emotional empathy, and somatic empathy.1

SELF-REFLECTION

Human self-reflection is the capacity of humans to exercise introspection and the willingness to learn more about their fundamental nature, purpose and essence. The earliest historical records demonstrate the great interest which humanity has had in itself. Human self-reflection is related to the philosophy of consciousness, the topic of awareness, consciousness in general and the philosophy of mind. 2 2

i’m rejecting the idea of vulnerability as a mode of disregarded weakness. our sense of vulnerability is in fact innately human. instead, let’s explore the vulnerabilities of being and it’s necessity to build connective collective empathy.

Feeling vulnerable online

the vulnerabilities of dreaming, in a world governed by homogeneous toxic misteachings of branded macho-ism. in a world that requires improvisation at every moment. so this is what we are exploring.

In order to create inclusive spaces, we need to create inclusive spaces

INCLUSIVITY

i want to explore the technologies we implore every day as tools to navigate all the things that exist in a very resilient selfdriven world.

Empathy

An intention or policy of including people who might otherwise be excluded or marginalized, such as those who are handicapped or learning-disabled, or racial and sexual minorities.3

BROOKLYN ASKS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Safe-space

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AUDIENCE RESPONDS Come and join us!!

SAFE-SPACE

I’m so lost (I found a way)

In educational institutions, safe space (or safe-space), safer space, and positive space are terms that, as originally intended, were used to indicate that a teacher, educational institution, or student body did not tolerate anti-LGBT violence, harassment or hate speech, thereby creating a safe place for all LGBT students. The term safe space has been extended to refer to an autonomous space for individuals who feel marginalized to come together to communicate regarding their experiences with marginalization, typically on a university campus. Safe spaces exist in educational institutions of anglophone countries. The idea of safe spaces has seen criticism on the grounds that it stifles freedom of speech. Critics claim safe spaces hinder the exposure of sensitive material that needs to be discussed and explained in an educational environment.4 4

i’m not interested in sweeping statements of empathetic learning and building for the sole purpose of opportunist capital gain.

Emotional labour

The vulnerability of the individual

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-reflection

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today i want us to imagine, to dream, to question.

There is a necessity to build a collective connected emphathy

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Empathy

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J PAKATH

TEXT > DIGITAL INCLUSION > PROJECT DESCRIPTION > BY BROOKLYN J. PAKATHI

This is my home Type of Project: Pixelated Digital Renderings | Poster Art | Public Art Project Description: this is my home, aimed at creating dialogues of empathy and diversity for a greater sense of digital inclusion, is a series of digital renderings representative of the spectrum of shades within human skin tone and overlaid with subtle and often gentle messages of understanding in hopes to promote a higher level of care and concern in digital communication and accessibility. the digital renderings will be produced as large posters and placed across the mozilla festival venue to act as a public service announcement to engage with guests in attendance, prompting viewers to feel considered in their contribution towards an open and diverse internet. Project Statement: empathy involves the inner experience of sharing in and comprehending the momentary psychological state of another person (schafer, 1959). what future do we envision, when we talk about digital inclusion? we

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Safe-space

DIGITAL INCLUSION

BROOKLYN J. PAKATHI

in searching for the connectors of cause, meaning and sense of resolve, brooklyn j’s work fundamentally speaks to the tragic vulnerability of romance he explores these themes of an existential nature, plagued by fragility, through video vignettes, digital observations, and photographic interrogations. making loneliness an art since 92’ often define inclusion as the ability of individuals and groups to access and use information and communication technologies. encompassing not only access to the internet but also the availability of hardware and software; relevant content and services; and training for the digital literacy skills required

for effective use of information and communication technologies. but in and of itself, digital inclusion can often overlook the necessity for creating and maintaining a dialogue of digital empathy. as with many other aspects of contemporary culture, rapid adoption of social and mobile technologies has altered society’s communication patterns and disrupted the expression of empathy, specifically in digital conversations. mobile and social media use has transformed when and how individuals interact with others. the ability to instantly share thoughts, feelings, and behaviors with the rest of society via digital channels can occur in mere seconds, often without the empathetic social filter that accompanies traditional communications. moreover, digital communications are devoid of many of the emotional signals and cues experienced in face-to-face settings, often leading to more impersonal interactions. creating and exploring digital empathy unlocks the digital communication of empathy, one of the core elements missing from how we currently communicate online. there are few ways to show a friend, a loved one, a group or a community as a whole that you feel empathetic towards their situation. the project, this is my home, tries to understand what it means to be digitally human taking into account the worlds of digital and non-digital are becoming more and more one in the same. the messages project empathy as enacted between a community and pay attention to someone else’s experience in a way that allows the other to realize that we all share and understand the essential quality of our digital experiences. the work aims to understand how other people feels and to be able to communicate this understanding in a way that is uniquely ‘human’. this physical and tangible work presented seemingly offline but still represented in a digital space reflects the present day failure of digital devices and online communications to facilitate the expression of empathy between people. the importance for the work to exist in and around the festival space works

accordingly to mozilla festival’s mandate and responsibility in creating an accessible and equally inclusive space for learning, growth, understanding, and diversity without any prerequisite or criteria to entry. Goals: • to create an opportunity for communities to explore communication of empathyand understanding • to build a digital culture of inclusivity without the use of active technology that can often negate individuals wants to experience digital • to create an environment that speaks to individuals main cause for fear and concern and offer safety and peace of mind

this is your home

it’s going to be okay

Embrace them. If you need a chat / walk / silent film, let me know

this is a safe space

Outcome

You are not alone and all will be well. It’s because of you, that I am still standing!! This will pass. You are fine. We are with you. Use this. Become better from experience.

Round table discussion cted

empat

hy

Safe space

[...] Making Web literacy meaningful for everyone Web literacy should mean all the skills we need to think, create, and thrive online. Many people hear the term Web literacy and think it means learning to code, or STEM (science, technology, engineering, maths) education. But Web literacy is much broader than that – it should include all the skills to be confident and competent online. To be empowered digital citizens, we all need to know how to navigate, how to share, what information to trust, and most importantly, how to expand the frontiers of our knowledge.

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[...] Cultivating digital citizenship

Web literacy should be a foundational to education as reading, writing, and maths are – and it should be taught everywhere learning happens.

A fundamental part of Web literacy is understanding the forces that shape our lives online: the companies building our experiences, the politicians crafting and supporting government policies, and the power we hold as digital citizens to create the Internet we want. Having a say in our shared future on the Web means deciding which values are most important to us, and standing up for those values when they are threatened.

Protest Culture DIGITAL CULTURE

Digital Animal Memes by The Civic Beat (Jason Li and An Xiao Mina)

(A digital thing showing top into a physical thing.)

Variation

Cross geography connections in the memes.

Variation of a same meme

The process

IMAGES

Washington, DC

Washington, DC

Digital

#nastywoman

PHOTOGRAPHS

HASHTAG

Audience creating physical memes during the Meme Lab workshop

Digital memes

Physical

Product memes

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

We traditionally think of memes and internet culture as isolated to the internet, where digital literacy exists separately from traditional notions of cultural literacy. Recent years have seen a steady breakdown of that divide in popular discourse, whether talking about notions of privacy and surveillance, the role of government in regulating the internet, and, of course, in the rapid spread of meme culture in popular culture. In both the United States and the United Kingdom, memes have leapt from the internet in new and compelling ways. The iconic red Make America Great Again hat of the Trump campaign has inspired a number of digital remixes, like Make America Mexico Again and Make Racists Afraid Again, which in turn become physical hat remixes sold to fundraise for advocacy organizations. #RefugeesWelcome, a hashtag movement started in the UK in the face of the Syrian refugee crisis, has spread throughout Western Europe, with stickers, banners and marches around the theme. The online and the offline mix and intermix, crossing digital/physical barriers and leaping across the Atlantic Ocean.

Formal taxonomies can be developed from the folk taxonomy rendered machine-readable by the markup that hashtags provide; this process is called folksonomy.6 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hashtag

MATERIAL CULTURE

Material culture is the physical aspect of culture in the objects and architecture that surround people. It includes usage, consumption, creation and trade of objects, and the behaviors, norms and rituals these objects create or take part in. The term is commonly used in archaeological and anthropological studies, specifically focusing on the material evidence which can be attributed to culture, in the past or present. Material culture studies is an interdisciplinary field telling of relationships between people and their things: the making, history, preservation, and interpretation of objects. It draws on theory and practice from the social sciences and humanities such as art history, archaeology, anthropology, history, historic preservation, folklore, literary criticism and museum studies, among others. Anything from buildings and architectural elements to books, jewelry, or toothbrushes can be considered material culture.7

For the Mozilla Festival residency, I propose #MemeLab: an installation and workshop that looks at these themes and engages attendees in co-creating the installation. The installation will take the form of a scientific laboratory, with walls covered in chalk paint, as we try to diagram meme culture in both its online and offline manifestations. This might include a world map, to help emphasize the global-ness of meme culture. We will pre-install a few diagrams, including #RefugeesWelcome, #NastyWoman, #CatsAgainstBrexit, #Covfefe and a few others in other languages. These diagrams will start with a meme sparking event, with hashtags drawn in chalk, digital memes printed out and taped to the wall, product examples, and selfies in a loop on a digital screen. Attendees will be invited to create diagrams of their own, starting with a meme sparking event, whether in politics or general life. They will then be walked through a few key exercises: Hashtag station: Select a strip of paper from a test tube and write out a hashtag. Printing station: create a simple meme,

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Material_culture

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Digital again

Selfies memes TEXT > WEB LITERACY > PROJECT DESCRIPTION > AN XIAO IN COLLABORATION WITH JASON LI

Because of its widespread use, hashtag was added to the Oxford English Dictionary in June 2014. The term hashtag can also refer to the hash symbol itself when used in the context of a hashtag.

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Washington, DC

San Jose, CA

Someone says something (‘She is a nasty woiman)

Pussycat vs. Redhat

Users create and use hashtags by placing the number sign or pound sign # (also known as the hash character) in front of a string of alphanumeric characters, usually a word or unspaced phrase, in or at the end of a message. The hashtag may contain letters, digits, and underscores. Searching for that hashtag will yield each message that has been tagged with it. A hashtag archive is consequently collected into a single stream under the same hashtag. For example, on the photosharing service Instagram, the hashtag #bluesky allows users to find all the posts that have been tagged using that hashtag.

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Washington, DC

Washington, DC

Images from An Xiao Mina’s presentation.

A thing from internet gets remixed, goes to physical world and back to digital.

A hashtag is a type of metadata tag used on social networks such as Twitter and other microblogging services, allowing users to apply dynamic, user-generated tagging that makes it possible for others to easily find messages with a specific theme or content; it allows easy, informal markup of folk taxonomy without need of any formal taxonomy or markup language.

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ARTWORK

# on manifestation boards

Internet Culture

https://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/Digital_culture

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[...] Teaching Web literacy effectively

Learning Web literacy is like any other essential skill: we learn best by doing. And in the digital world, learning happens not just with teachers in the classroom, but everywhere there’s an Internet connection. We need all kinds of educators to have the knowledge and resources to teach Web literacy the way kids learn it best. And we need to make sure every student grows up not just on the Web, but fluent in the way it works.

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Digital Culture stands for the contemporary phase of communication technologies, one that follows 19th century print culture and 20th century electronic broadcast culture, and that is deeply amplified and accelerated by the popularity of networked computers, personalised technologies and digital images. The emergence of digital culture is usually associated with a set of practices based on the ever more intensive use of communication technologies. These uses imply more participatory behaviors on the user side, an ever more visually riched environment and connection features that excell personal dimensions. Digital culture stands first of all for the changes brought about by the emergence of digital, networked and personalised media in our society and the passing from communication phases centred on print and broadcast media, to more personalised and networked media, that use digital compressing and processing capacities at their core. The consequences of such processes in societal terms and the means via which media technologies transform our modes of interaction and representation, broadly constitute what is called “digital culture”.5

HTTPS://CYBER.HARVARD.EDU/PEOPLE/AXMINA

WEB LITERACY

AN XIAO MINA IN COLLABORATION WITH JASON LI An Xiao” Mina is a technologist and writer who looks at issues of the global internet and networked creativity. As a Berkman Klein Fellow, she will study the impact of language barriers in our technology stack as the internet extends into diverse communities around the world, and she will continue her ongoing research on global internet meme culture. Mina leads the product team at Meedan, where they are building digital tools for journalists and translators, and she is co-founder of The Civic Beat, a research collective focused on the creative side of civic technology. She serves as a contributing editor to Civicist, an advisory editor to Hyperallergic, and a governing board member at China Residencies.

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Hashtag wall

Make a bag

Recently a 2016 Knight Visiting Nieman Fellow, where she studied online language barriers and their impact on journalism, Mina is currently working on a book about internet memes and global social movements (working title: “Memes to Movements”), to be published by Beacon Press.

using a meme template, of the hashtag and print it out. Making station: create a button, sticker, paper sign and/or canvas bag inspired by the hashtag. Selfie station: take a photo of yourself with the hashtag, printed meme, and object. Attach the hashtag and objects to the wall and draw chalk lines connecting them to each other and to others to which they have a thematic relationship. Since long before the internet, social movements have relied on a vast repertoire of creative actions and media to represent what they stand for: buttons, bumper stickers, paper signs, hats. Creative culture has leaned on street art, hip hop and dance to generate cultures of remix and performance. These same media actions are still utilized frequently in movements and marketing, but now, in the age of smartphones and the internet, they quickly intersect with the online world. Objects of meme culture get printed out and placed on t-shirts. People carrying clever signs watch their signs get photographed and then go viral on the

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

DIAGRAM Spatial and participatory mapping of the installation/workshop

She has spoken at venues like the Personal Democracy Forum, ACM SIGCHI, Creative Mornings, the Aspen Institute, RightsCon and the Institute for the Future, and she has contributed writing to publications like the Los Angeles Review of Books, Fusion, the New Inquiry, Nieman Journalism Lab, Places Journal and others.

Make a badge

Create a hashtag

internet. The digital and the physical are deeply intertwined, and this workshop will help visitors see the process. The installation and workshop will build on themes from “The Things of the Internet,” a lecture I gave at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University. In this talk, I explored the online-offline. I adapted the talk for a lecture at the University of Hong Kong’s Journalism and Media Studies Centre, where I developed a workshop format that proved to be quite successful and engaging with undergraduates from the University of Hong Kong and Fudan University (Shanghai). It also builds on Grotte de l’Internetz, a workshop and installation at SOMArts in San Francisco, where the artist invited participants to create Stone Age art of animal memes in the spirit of the Grotte Chauvet; as well as the World Animal Meme Map and photo exhibition, shown at the Victoria and Albert Museum’s Friday Late program this past summer.

TAKE A SELFIE

AN XIAO MINA

TEXT > WEB LITERACY > INTRO > SOURCE > ALL FROM HTTPS://WWW.MOZILLA.ORG/EN-GB/INTERNETHEALTH/WEB-LITERACY/

Make a emoji

Make a poster Use an existing Hashtag

Make a cap

OPEN NNOVAT ON

GRETTA LOUW

TEXT > DECENTRALISATION > KEY TERMS

ARCHANA PRASAD AND SEAN BLAGSVEDT

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ADAO CURRENCY NOTE Each grantee will receive a currency note, personalized with their photo

CRYPTOCURRENCY

DECENTRAL SAT ON

A cryptocurrency (or crypto currency) is a digital asset designed to work as a medium of exchange that uses cryptography to secure its transactions, to control the creation of additional units, and to verify the transfer of assets. Cryptocurrencies are classified as a subset of digital currencies and are also classified as a subset of alternative currencies and virtual currencies.

Decentralisation is outside of control of one specific autority, distributing for many form of conentration...

Bitcoin, created in 2009, was the first decentralized cryptocurrency. Since then, numerous cryptocurrencies have been created. These are frequently called altcoins, as a blend of bitcoin alternative. Bitcoin and its derivatives use decentralized control as opposed to centralized electronic money/central banking systems. The decentralized control is related to the use of bitcoin’s blockchain transaction database in the role of a distributed ledger.11 11

Decentralisation

Distribution of power from concentration? power=money? Decision making? actions? Federation? Choices? Diversity?

Visibility of a transaction chain

Traces of this transaction

Decentralisation: brings the problems of lack of trust

Value comes with trust.

Accountability means taking integrity on an action

DIAGRAM Spatial and participatory mapping of the installation/workshop

Much of the recent sociological debate about power revolves around the issue of its means to enable – in other words, power as a means to make social actions possible as much as it may constrain or prevent them. The philosopher Michel Foucault saw power as a structural expression of “a complex strategic situation in a given social setting” that requires both constraint and enablement.12

TEXT > DECENTRALISATION > PROJECT DESCRIPTION > ARCHANA PRASAD AND SEAN BLAGSVEDT

What is the ADAO? The ADAO stands for Altruistic Democratic Autonomous Organization and offers ada coins as a normative currency with 30% of token supply allocated to form an endowment. Borrowing from Ethereum’s DAO, currency holders in the ADAO will be able to vote on which socially beneficial projects are funded from the endowment. As the value of the currency pool grows, the endowment will grow with it, with the ultimate goal of creating one of the world’s largest democratically run philanthropy funds.

ACCOUNTABILITY

In ethics and governance, accountability is answerability, blameworthiness, liability, and the expectation of account-giving. As an aspect of governance, it has been central to discussions related to problems in the public sector, nonprofit and private (corporate) and individual contexts. In leadership roles, accountability is the acknowledgment and assumption of responsibility for actions, products, decisions, and policies including the administration, governance, and implementation within the scope of the role or employment position and encompassing the obligation to report, explain and be answerable for resulting consequences.

How does it work? A significant share of the currency will form an endowment to support SDG focused artists and social organizations worldwide, with governance and decisions over who gets funded controlled by the community of adacoin holders via Ethereum smart contracts. To raise funds, we will accept donations in other crypto-currencies directly such as ETH and Bitcoin. The ADAO organization will help aid recipients navigate local jurisdiction issues such that they can legally and efficiently convert crypto-donations into local currencies. We will also encourage everyone, but especially artists, developers and social organizations to accept payments in ada coins and to provide services and artifacts that can be bought in ada coins. In doing so, we will fund the greatest democratically governed social/art endowment fund in the world and ultimately monetarily encourage acts of social value.

In governance, accountability has expanded beyond the basic definition of “being called to account for one’s actions”. It is frequently described as an account-giving relationship between individuals, e.g. “A is accountable to B when A is obliged to inform B about A’s (past or future) actions and decisions, to justify them, and to suffer punishment in the case of eventual misconduct”. Accountability cannot exist without proper accounting practices; in other words, an absence of accounting means an absence of accountability.

This installation-performance will speak in the aesthetic, language and mode of a modern bank. Blurring satire with reality, participants can apply for actual grants to be paid in ADAO coins, which will be tradable for traditional currencies on crypto-currency markets. The ADAO Bank will award grants, loans and saving schemes to people interested in working on the SDG’s. It will provide investment and

Accountability is an element of a RACI to indicate who is ultimately answerable for the correct and thorough completion of the deliverable or task, and the one who delegates the work to those responsible. There are various reasons (legitimate or excuses) why accountability fails.13 13

[...] User Control: Deciding who can collect your data We should all be able to choose – with clarity and confidence – what information we share with what companies, understanding the trade-offs we’re making when we do. Right now, we all lack meaningful choice online – privacy policies are often miles long and hard to read, we don’t understand what information we’re sharing or when, and opting out is seldom on the menu.

[...] Cyber Security: Locking down your sensitive information We should all have the ability to protect our online identity. At this point, it feels like we’ve all been victims of a cyberattack somewhere, somehow. Data breaches can lay bare the passwords of millions of people, often going undiscovered for years. Which means your identity may be at risk of theft without you even knowing it.

[...] Government Surveillance: Keeping prying eyes and ears out of your business We should all have the freedom to be ourselves — online and off – without surveillance, judgement and imposed societal bias. You wouldn’t want the government following your every move in real life – there’s no reason they should be shadowing you on the Internet. The Edward Snowden disclosures showed that even democracies can and do take liberties with your privacy.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accountability

Fill out a form

Interview

Take a photo

Get tokens

Get currency note

ARCHANA PRASAD AND SEAN BLAGSVEDT IN COLLABORATION WITH FREEMAN MURRAY Round Table

Archana Prasad, is an artist from Bangalore, India. Her work is a particular conjunction of visual art, technology and urban community art, ste wed in design and research methodologies. As Founder of Jaaga.in, Archana has a unique artist-activist role. Sean Blagsvedt is a technologist and entrepreneur. His recent company babajob provided job information to 10 million blue collar workers across India. Archana and Sean are concerned about the unjust assignment of value, thus currency, that tilts towards mechanisms of successful acquisition based models and stockpiling capital, rather than rewarding innovation and creation, especially around work that fulfills important societal goals but do not create large profits.

philanthropic options for those interested in growing their crypto-currency assets. The ADAO Bank booth provides MozFest participants human connections and conversations about the coin, the bank, its goals and objectives. Additionally the “employees” at the ADAO booth have discretionary power to award a limited number of coins to deserving participants from MozFest. Interaction Model: Participants fill out a form at the booth. Similar to a loan application, they will be invited to describe their own pledges to support the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals. Two tellers - the artists, will interview applicants, take their photo and given a limited number of token grants. Each grantee will receive a currency note, personalized with their photo.

currency, with the needed crypto-graphic keys printed on it such that the participant can claim the ADAO token online). Our Vision What do we want to accomplish? 1. To Take Back Crypto-currency and money itself for 2. Creativity = Wealth Currency is a Choice of: Ethics Models Value Alignment A sustainable futur Politics

(The rendering of the note is a Deep Learning based Style filter of the participant’s photo and a traditional

DIAGRAMS

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POLARIZATION (POLITICS)

In politics, polarization (or polarisation) can refer to the divergence of political attitudes to ideological extremes. Polarization can refer to such divergence like public opinion or even to such divergence within certain groups. Almost all discussions of polarization in political science consider polarization in the context of political parties and democratic systems of government. When polarization occurs in a two-party system, like the United States, moderate voices often lose power and influence.14 14

Polarization creates

Questions polarised by the (geographical) context

Yes or No

Bringing tension to the debate by polarising the responses (he doesn’t’ believe in polarisation so that is his way of questioning it)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polarization_(politics)

INFORMATION ETHICS

The term information ethics was first coined by Robert Hauptman and used in the book Ethical challenges in librarianship. It examines the morality that comes from information as a resource, a product, or as a target. It provides a critical framework for considering moral issues concerning informational privacy, moral agency (e.g. whether artificial agents may be moral), new environmental issues (especially how agents should behave in the infosphere), problems arising from the life-cycle (creation, collection, recording, distribution, processing, etc.) of information (especially ownership and copyright, digital divide, and digital rights). It is very vital to understand that librarians, archivists, information professionals among others, really understand the importance of knowing how to disseminate proper information as well as being responsible with their actions when addressing information.15 15

By Paolo Cirio. Source > http://globaldirect.today

Experiment about liberation: people all agree if they can access the same information

TEXT > PRIVACY AND SECURITY > KEY TERMS

15 TEXT > WEB LITERACY > INTRO > SOURCE > ALL FROM HTTPS:// WWW.MOZILLA.ORG/EN-GB/ INTERNET-HEALTH/PRIVACYSECURITY/

HTTPS://THEADAO.ORG

DECENTRALISATION

The ADAO is a philanthropic cryptocurrency that supports creatives who advance the Sustainable Development Goals, representing an entirely new way to fund social and creative revolutionaries.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_(social_and_ political)

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Decentralisation is related with lack of accountability

Accountability= integrity of action? trust?

The use of power need not involve force or the threat of force (coercion). At one extreme, it closely resembles what an English-speaking person might term “influence”, although some authors distinguish “influence” as a means by which power is used. One such example is soft power, as compared to hard power.

A Healthy Internet is Secure and Private The Internet only stays healthy if we trust it as a safe place – to explore, transact, connect, and create. Our privacy and security online is under constant threat. But there’s something you can do about it: get informed, protect yourself, and make your voice heard. A healthy Internet depends on you. [...]

PHOTOGRAPHS Audience interacting at the Adao Bank installation

POWER

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PRIVACY & SECURITY PAOLO CIRIO

Decentralisation feedback mechanism in economical transactions

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cryptocurrency

12

In social science and politics, power is the ability to influence or outright control the behaviour of people. The term “authority” is often used for power perceived as legitimate by the social structure. Power can be seen as evil or unjust, but the exercise of power is accepted as endemic to humans as social beings. In business, power is often expressed as being “upward” or “downward”. With downward power, a company’s superior influences subordinates. When a company exerts upward power, it is the subordinates who influence the decisions of their leader or leaders.

Politics

PHOTOGRAPHS Participatory installation set up and audience interacting with polls part of Aesthetics of Information Ethics.

Information ethics How to represent sensible information (and the aesthetics derived from it)

Information Ecology

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Information_ethics Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

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DELIBERATION

Deliberation is a process of thoughtfully weighing options, usually prior to voting. Deliberation emphasizes the use of logic and reason as opposed to power-struggle, creativity, or dialog. Group decisions are generally made after deliberation through a vote or consensus of those involved.

VS PARTICIPATION EMANCIPATION FREEDOM

In legal settings a jury famously uses deliberation because it is given specific options, like guilty or not guilty, along with information and arguments to evaluate. In “deliberative democracy”, the aim is for both elected officials and the general public to use deliberation rather than power-struggle as the basis for their vote.16 16

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

HTTPS://PAOLOCIRIO.NET/PRESS/TEXTS/AESTHETICS-INFORMATION-ETHICS.PHP

MISLEADING POLARITIES IN INFORMATION ETHICS

INCLUSION ACCESS COMMONS

EXPLOITATION CONTROL WITHHOLDING PROPERTY

PRIVATE

PUBLIC

OPACITY

TRANSPARENCY

PRIVACY OBSCURITY EMPATHY ANONYMITY

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deliberation

COERCION

EXCLUSION

RESPONSIBILITY

SURVEILLANCE EXPOSURE HUMILIATION ACCOUNTABILITY IMPUNITY

REPUTATION

SCORING

AUTONOMY

MANIPULATION

EDUCATING

MISINFORMING

QUANTIFIABLE SIMPLICITY

UNDETECTABLE COMPLEXITY

HTTPS://CYBER.HARVARD.EDU/PEOPLE/AXMINA

PRIVACY & SECURITY

PAOLO CIRIO

Paolo Cirio works with legal, economic and semiotic systems of the information society. He investigates social fields impacted by the Internet, such as privacy, copyright, democracy, and finance. He shows his research and intervention-based works through artifacts, photos, installations, videos, and public art. Cirio has exhibited in international museums and institutions and has won numerous prestigious art awards. His artworks have been covered by hundreds of media outlets worldwide and he regularly gives public lectures and workshops at leading universities.

SOME PROBLEMATIC ISSUES CONCERNING INFORMATION ETHICS: SEARCH ENGINES & SOCIAL MEDIA MODERATION HATE SPEECH HARRASSMENT TROLLING BULLYING BLACKMAIL STIGMAS SOCIAL PROFILING SOCIAL SCORE & BIAS CONSUMER PROFILING SEX OFFENDERS CRIMINAL RECORDS PREDICTIVE POLICING RACIAL PROFILING PRIVACY & SURVEILLANCE STATE AND CORPORATE SURVEILLANCE CRYPTOGRAPHY FOR POWER STRUCTURES CRYPTOGRAPHY FOR INDIVIDUALS PUBLIC SHAMING BLOCKCHAIN, DEEPWEB AND DARKNET ANONYMITY TRUST PRIVACY FRAUD HATE SPEECH CRUELTY ALGORITHMS ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE CONTROL ACCOUNTABILITY OF CODERS ROBOTICS AUTOMATED WEAPONS AUTOMATED LABOR PIRACY COPYRIGHT TRADEMARK FAIR USE EDUCATION ROYALITIES MEDIA AND POLITICS TARGETING VOTERS FAKE NEWS SHARING ECONOMY PRIVATE PROPERTY LABOR RIGHTS DIGITAL CURRENCIES TRANSPARENCY VOLATILITY ACCESS TO MEANS INFRASTRUCTURES ECOLOGICAL IMPACT DECENTRALISATION INTERNET OF THINGS POLICY CLOUD SERVERS

The Aesthetics of Information Ethics discusses methodologies, strategies, and practices of art addressing the personal and societal spheres affected by information systems. Information Ethics is broadly defined as “the branch of ethics that focuses on the relationship between the creation, organization, dissemination, and use of information.”[1] The so-called information revolution brings us an increasing number of pressing ethical issues. Artists can be particularly sensitive to these issues and they are able to question ethics by proposing and challenging perceptions and scenarios beyond common understanding. Artworks can creatively discuss and play with distribution systems of sensitive information, ethereal economies, flexible labor and property, circulating bodies and goods, manipulated and monitored relationships, expanded public spaces, exploited opinion formation, and, generally, technological apparatuses affecting social systems. Nowadays, social contracts are fluid; they constantly reorganize society and produce new social conditions. These active spaces are where information ethics emerge and where artists intervene in questioning, revealing, and reassembling the agents and environments of their artworks. Ethics of Aesthetics concerns the ethical frameworks in arranging the sensibility of the audience and the subjects of the artworks. The aesthetic methodologies of intervention, discourse, and representation of information systems can include the production of critique, distress, fear, empathy, alienation, complicity, spectacle, confusion, awareness, and other artistic devices. The aesthetic qualities of the artworks can be called into question through the articulation of the ethical conditions of the works and their subjects. The responsibility and conscience of the artists - as well as of the art critics and curators - are integrated in the analysis and validation of the social and artistic efficacy of the artworks. Concurrently, the ethical and social relations created by these artworks produce aesthetic forms, which concerns the field of the Aesthetics of Ethics. Social fields and norms are increasingly interdependent with technological advancements of information

Ethics are negotiated, developed, and balanced through reflections on the consequences and intentions of human activity. Differentiating themselves from morals - which are often static and ideological - ethics are dynamic, reflexive, and evolving principles that must be

oriented to maximize and develop the common good within the notion of ethics as the making and understanding of a dignified existence for humans and the environment surrounding them.

The Ethics of Representation and information systems

As such, techniques like the exposure and appropriation of sensitive information as well as the manipulation and disruption of social relations should be balanced with the parameters of intentions, receptions, and outcomes of the artwork. In the Aesthetics of Information Ethics, context is main the principle from which we can assess the ethics of artworks. Meaning and impact vary based on the context of presentation, execution, and results. The context needs to account for all the properties of the information systems involved. These methodologies, techniques, and practices of art production and critique are ultimately

Questions from Aesthetics of Information Ethics’ polls.

Should fake news on social media be removed by Internet companies themselves?

Should the coders of algorithms with racial biases be legally accountable?

Should we be able to trace individuals who use digital currency, such as Bitcoin?

Should the documents leaked by Snowden be made available to everyone – not only journalists?

Should politicians be able to use fully cryptographed communications for work?

Should vulnerable individuals be protected online even if they are key to public debate?

Should electronic voting be completely avoided and analog systems restored?

Should we remunerate the open source code utilized by big corporations such as Google?

Can the hacking of political parties during election be justified?

Should Facebook delete posts concerning hate speech toward refugees?

Should public figures on TwiFer be given access to block other accounts?

Should voter profiling and databases being banned?

Should poli:cal spending for online ads be regulated like they are on TV?

Should ads managed by algorithms be considered physiologically manipulative advertising?

DIAGRAM Spatial and partecipatory mapping of the installation.

Presentation screen

Diagrams Yes No

Results

The ethics of the power of these information systems are directly embodied in artworks that use and address such power. The ethical inquiries and relations activated by art with information systems create aesthetic forms. This aesthetics is discussed by measuring, comparing, and evaluating the strategies, consequences, conditions, and circumstances of the works of art. Such analysis needs to take into account a broad social context, therefore integrating the distribution of the work, the mode of presentation within the site of execution, and ultimately the intended and unintended recipients, critiques, and results that the work generates.

constantly discussed and confronted. Art plays a central role in this process. Evolving cultural forms and critical art are essential instruments for sensing and signaling the forming of ethics.

Social transactions and contracts are discussed, created, rearranged, or accentuated by artists for making visible the complexity, contradictions, and complicity within such social relations activated by information systems. However, only an attentive examination of the effects, causes, and nature of such systems can fully address them. Thus, representations of social and technological systems should engage with the dialectics of the construction of ethical values. The integrity of the agenda pursued is a responsibility of the artist in relation to the system addressed, while the critical reception should assess the means and ends of the artworks within the whole spectrum of forms and contexts of presentation.

QUESTIONS

computation, sharing, and control. Information technology has become the heart of the social order. However, it can be understood not from a technological point of view, but rather through a constant reflexive examination of what it produces in the social sphere. The ethical discussion can’t be limited to technocrats, legislators, coders, and the opaque internal policies of private entities. Art can play a role in this process of creating awareness and reflection on difficult ethical questions by making them relevant and engaging. The material of these aesthetic examinations is not limited to the Internet, algorithms, big data, and other technologies. These technical elements are mutually influenced by the political, cultural, legal, and economic systems, as well as several other social fields and infrastructures. Information systems should be understood as interconnected networks of social systems in which reflection and intervention have the potential to reverberate throughout the whole web of networks, consequently impacting a variety of conventions, entities, and individuals which are inevitably connected.

SHOULD FAKE NEWS ON SOCIAL MEDIA BE REMOVED BY INTERNET COMPANIES THEMSELVES ?

14 QUESTIONS = 14 POLS

Feedback from the audience + Add new questions

No

Yes

87 NO

Question

Polarities in Ethics of Representation In the Aesthetics of Information Ethics, the appearances, perceptions, and sensations of reality created by artists should take into account the formation of polarities. Mystifications and oversimplifications about the social impacts of information systems are instances of the Ethics of Representation. As such, the creation of falsehoods, hype, confusion, anxiety, or fatalism sustained by the producers and reporters of information systems create polarities in understanding ever-changing technological apparatuses and their social impacts. The Aesthetics of Information Ethics is about breaking down polarities to offer a broader understanding of the conditions within these systems. Examples of problematic issues in Information Ethics The Aesthetics of Information Ethics can be applied to examining the liability of algorithms, responsibility in anonymous networks, exploitation of shared content and labor, censorship on social media, freedom of speech used to harass, public shaming to condemn, hacking to protest or leak, and micro-targeting for political campaigning. In order to inspire inquiry, the artist questions how to balance freedom, empathy, justice, and accountability. By Paolo Cirio. 2017. [1] Joan, Reitz M. “Information Ethics.” Online Dictionary For Library And Information Science. N.p., 2010.

tomorrow will be better.

It gets better, but it does take time. She’s always with you. You got this. You can do this.

Conne

PHOTOGRAPHS

PHOTOGRAPHS

Tactical Technology Collective instructing the audience on how to use their Data Detox Kit

Visitors exploring vistual reality at Callum Cooper’s VR installation about privacy.

SOURCE > HTTPS://TACTICALTECH.ORG/NEWS/ DATA-DETOX-KIT/

Detox your Digital Self THE 8-DAY DATA DETOX Do you feel like your digital self is slipping out of control? Have you let yourself install too many apps, clicked “I agree” a few too many times, lost track of how many accounts you’ve created? Perhaps you feel you’re not as in control of your digital life as you’d like to be.

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Don’t despair! This data detox is designed just for you. By the end of the 8-day program, you’ll be well on your way to a healthier and more in-control digital self. The Data Detox Kit was produced for The Glass Room NYC, presented by Mozilla and Tactical Technology Collective.

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

SHOULD POLITICIANS BE ABLE TO USE FULLY CRYPTOGRAPHED COMMUNICATIONS FOR WORK ?

57 YES

You are valuable. You don’t need to achieve + lead + be visible to others to be valuable + deserve consideration.

Deep breaths - water.

Remember the last time you faced a major change -> it turned out to be for the better. This will too.

User Responses

Don’t overthink, it will be fine. Just relax. Nothing is constant. Think about all the good that has happened.

Don’t worry you’re still pretty. Lin chiah pà bē? Everything is temporary

Project Description: although the construct of empathy is multidimensional in nature and difficult to measure, i hope to create an effective strategy for highlighting empathy that focus specifically on communication skills training. the open lab project will visually explore the mozilla festival’s community’s understanding of digital empathy through a survey in which users can answer a serious of questions by applying coloured stickers to a chart in an effort to reflect levels of understanding towards digital empathy, accessibility and inclusion. self-reflection is a useful method for addressing empathy. and as such self-reflection activities could theoretically prompt guests to question and examine their interactions in the online world. this self-examination process may potentially develop heightened online awareness and promote increased digital empathy. the means by which empathy is expressed is naturally evolving as the world and its forms of communications become increasingly digital and recognizing and addressing barriers to the expression of digital empathy is important. if we can sharpen the communication skills of traditional empathy, how can we then use those skills to address the greater discussion of digital empathy?

everyday is trying. I am with you. well done. I’m here… and I promise to never let you go.

Life has its ups & downs.

build grow heal love

Open Lab Session. Type of Project: Survey | Data Visualization

What is the worst that can happen? How likely is it to happen?

This too shall pass.

You have overcome so many other things already too

Digital Renders

You’re always trying so hard,

You are loved You are not alone! We are with you

If you’re just travelling when there’s sun, you’ll never get anywhere

TEXT > WEB LITERACY > KEY TERMS

A healthy Internet means everyone has the skills to thrive People everywhere should have the knowledge they need to tap into the full power of the Internet – and use it to make their lives and the world better. This means everyone needs to be able to read, write, and participate online. A healthy Internet is yours to master.depends on you. [...]

Trying makes a difference. Trying can be your victory.

Are you ok?

Spatial and partecipatory mapping of the installation.

Tsemppiä!

Aim to be comfortably lost

The pendulum will swing

DIAGRAM

You haven’t killed anyone… it’s ok!

This too shall pass

What is (realistically) the worst that could happen?

COLLABORATRIVE SPACE

WEB LITERACY

i found that certain understandings of definitions become very nuclear, contaminated and porous so what does it mean when i talk about technology in the context of vulnerability and who we are today.

Questioning the role of technology in the context of vulnerability

I got you load of Biscoff, all the music you like, a bluetooth speaker and also the people you are friend with are online. ? Do you want a hug? xx Take a break – I’ve got this! It’ll be alright. Trust me. You only live once =) It’s not the end of the world!!! A vide é muito curta. Aproveite! Be brilliant by your own standards. Not of others. Go on! Don’t let fear stop your explorations! You’ve made a difference in my life, what you do matters. You are enough! <3

i want to explore the daily trauma we undergo to earn the coveted badge of successful human existence that often negates notions of struggle, loneliness and deeper meanings of wounded-ness. a trauma that plays itself in sets and loops traveling by genome and bloodstream. we need to close, we need to fill this loop. so from that, i find the vulnerability of digital immersion. soaking myself in the frailties of others to wash away things gray. and sometimes in the immersion, i find that i might be required to live them. and from disenfranchised digital cultures i learn about the vulnerabilities of race and how it was only created to sustain a larger system of capitalism. error 404, page not found. i was invited here to speak about inclusion. but i think we should focus on loops, and loopholes and continuums. about closing the gaps and expanding our capacity to include more brokenness. from distorted views of linear utoipian w

27 — 29 OCT


MOZILLA FESTIVAL 2017

ARTIST OPEN STUDIO FOR ART AND DESIGN IN AN OPEN AND HEALTHY WEB

27 — 29 OCT

Ensuring the health of the internet requires a diversity of approaches and voices. The conversations shaped by Art and Design form some key aspects for relevant creative practice and critical thinking around an open and healthy web. Art and Design bring cross-connections between different disciplines, creating awareness in dynamic ways,opening up questions and engaging diverse audiences. Exploring Mozilla’s values of the open-web through art & design based approaches is important and relevant in order to invite in and work with new audiences; to share the healthy philosophies of the web, to empower new communities in an online and off-line reality. Reviewing the role of the web in society, we can critically engage with current art practices, creative academic communities, artists-in-residence programme, and public engagement of different kinds. What is the aesthetic of a healthy Internet? Under each of the spaces at MozFest 2017, we have invited an artist to imagine and visually represent the issues a healthy internet faces.

CO-CURATORS LUCA M DAMIANI Media Artist, Tate Digital Producer, Media Design Lecturer at University Arts London IRINI PAPADIMITRIOU Digital Programmes Manager, V&A and Head of New Media Arts Development, Watermans. ANGELA PLOHMAN Executive Vice President, Mozilla Foundation SARAH ALLEN MozFest Executive Director GRAPHIC DESIGN ON SITE VISUALISATION AND DATA COLLECTION ALESSIA ARCURI JOHN PHILIP SAGE

At last year’s MozFest, we presented an interactive exhibition called MozEx, designed as a collaboration between Digital Learning teams at Tate Gallery and the V&A. We’ve amped up this collaboration, bringing the Artist Open Studio to MozFest 2017. Selected artists have shared their practices and worked live on their pieces. The Artist Open Studio is a new approach we have mindmapped and shaped. The live creation during the festival challenged the role of the arts in technology and its voice in the web culture debate. We aimed to have a flow of creative practices that challenged the idea of what the Web is, opening questions rather than giving answers. We wanted the arts to create and disrupt.


X 9; Y 123

DIGITAL INCLUSION BROOKLYN J. PAKATHI

X 9; Y 98

WEB LITERACY AN XIAO MINA

X 9; Y 74

OPEN INNOVATION GRETTA LOUW

X 9; Y 51

DECENTRALISATION ARCHADA PRASAD AND SEAN BLAGSVEDT

X 9; Y 27

PRIVACY & SECURITY PAOLO CIRIO + TACTICAL TECH + CALLUM COOPER


vulnerability makes us human

D G TAL

Vulnerability

NCLUS ON BROOKLYN

today i want to talk about the vulnerabilities of being (digital and all) i don’t know if we ever truly interrogate what vulnerability is and what it means for us.

TEXT > DIGITAL INCLUSION > KEY TERMS

1

inc ca lus ex n’t ioa wi ist n em th ou pa t th y

as a tool to navigate the world

EMPATHY

Technology

01

Empathy is the capacity to understand or feel what another person is experiencing from within the other person’s frame of reference, i.e., the capacity to place oneself in another’s position. There are many definitions for empathy that encompass a broad range of emotional states. Types of empathy include cognitive empathy, emotional empathy, and somatic empathy.1

SELF-REFLECTION

Human self-reflection is the capacity of humans to exercise introspection and the willingness to learn more about their fundamental nature, purpose and essence. The earliest historical records demonstrate the great interest which humanity has had in itself.

Emotional labour

instead, let’s explore the vulnerabilities of being and it’s necessity to build connective collective empathy. the vulnerabilities of dreaming, in a world governed by homogeneous toxic misteachings of branded macho-ism. in a world that requires improvisation at every moment. so this is what we are exploring.

In order to create inclusive spaces, we need to create inclusive spaces

INCLUSIVITY

i want to explore the technologies we implore every day as tools to navigate all the things that exist in a very resilient selfdriven world.

Empathy

An intention or policy of including people who might otherwise be excluded or marginalized, such as those who are handicapped or learning-disabled, or racial and sexual minorities.3

BROOKLYN ASKS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Safe-space

3

04

AUDIENCE RESPONDS Come and join us!!

SAFE-SPACE

I’m so lost (I found a way)

In educational institutions, safe space (or safe-space), safer space, and positive space are terms that, as originally intended, were used to indicate that a teacher, educational institution, or student body did not tolerate anti-LGBT violence, harassment or hate speech, thereby creating a safe place for all LGBT students. The term safe space has been extended to refer to an autonomous space for individuals who feel marginalized to come together to communicate regarding their experiences with marginalization, typically on a university campus. Safe spaces exist in educational institutions of anglophone countries. The idea of safe spaces has seen criticism on the grounds that it stifles freedom of speech. Critics claim safe spaces hinder the exposure of sensitive material that needs to be discussed and explained in an educational environment.4 4

i’m rejecting the idea of vulnerability as a mode of disregarded weakness. our sense of vulnerability is in fact innately human.

The vulnerability of the individual

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-reflection

03

i’m not interested in sweeping statements of empathetic learning and building for the sole purpose of opportunist capital gain.

Feeling vulnerable online

Human self-reflection is related to the philosophy of consciousness, the topic of awareness, consciousness in general and the philosophy of mind. 2 2

today i want us to imagine, to dream, to question.

There is a necessity to build a collective connected emphathy

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Empathy

02

J PAKATH

TEXT > DIGITAL INCLUSION > PROJECT DESCRIPTION > BY BROOKLYN J. PAKATHI

This is my home Type of Project: Pixelated Digital Renderings | Poster Art | Public Art Project Description: this is my home, aimed at creating dialogues of empathy and diversity for a greater sense of digital inclusion, is a series of digital renderings representative of the spectrum of shades within human skin tone and overlaid with subtle and often gentle messages of understanding in hopes to promote a higher level of care and concern in digital communication and accessibility. the digital renderings will be produced as large posters and placed across the mozilla festival venue to act as a public service announcement to engage with guests in attendance, prompting viewers to feel considered in their contribution towards an open and diverse internet. Project Statement: empathy involves the inner experience of sharing in and comprehending the momentary psychological state of another person (schafer, 1959). what future do we envision, when we talk about digital inclusion? we

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Safe-space

DIGITAL INCLUSION

BROOKLYN J. PAKATHI

in searching for the connectors of cause, meaning and sense of resolve, brooklyn j’s work fundamentally speaks to the tragic vulnerability of romance he explores these themes of an existential nature, plagued by fragility, through video vignettes, digital observations, and photographic interrogations. making loneliness an art since 92’ often define inclusion as the ability of individuals and groups to access and use information and communication technologies. encompassing not only access to the internet but also the availability of hardware and software; relevant content and services; and training for the digital literacy skills required

for effective use of information and communication technologies. but in and of itself, digital inclusion can often overlook the necessity for creating and maintaining a dialogue of digital empathy. as with many other aspects of contemporary culture, rapid adoption of social and mobile technologies has altered society’s communication patterns and disrupted the expression of empathy, specifically in digital conversations. mobile and social media use has transformed when and how individuals interact with others. the ability to instantly share thoughts, feelings, and behaviors with the rest of society via digital channels can occur in mere seconds, often without the empathetic social filter that accompanies traditional communications. moreover, digital communications are devoid of many of the emotional signals and cues experienced in face-to-face settings, often leading to more impersonal interactions. creating and exploring digital empathy unlocks the digital communication of empathy, one of the core elements missing from how we currently communicate online. there are few ways to show a friend, a loved one, a group or a community as a whole that you feel empathetic towards their situation. the project, this is my home, tries to understand what it means to be digitally human taking into account the worlds of digital and non-digital are becoming more and more one in the same. the messages project empathy as enacted between a community and pay attention to someone else’s experience in a way that allows the other to realize that we all share and understand the essential quality of our digital experiences. the work aims to understand how other people feels and to be able to communicate this understanding in a way that is uniquely ‘human’. this physical and tangible work presented seemingly offline but still represented in a digital space reflects the present day failure of digital devices and online communications to facilitate the expression of empathy between people. the importance for the work to exist in and around the festival space works

accordingly to mozilla festival’s mandate and responsibility in creating an accessible and equally inclusive space for learning, growth, understanding, and diversity without any prerequisite or criteria to entry. Goals: • to create an opportunity for communities to explore communication of empathyand understanding • to build a digital culture of inclusivity without the use of active technology that can often negate individuals wants to experience digital • to create an environment that speaks to individuals main cause for fear and concern and offer safety and peace of mind

this is your home

it’s going to be okay

Embrace them. If you need a chat / walk / silent film, let me know

this is a safe space

Outcome

You are not alone and all will be well. It’s because of you, that I am still standing!! This will pass. You are fine. We are with you. Use this. Become better from experience.

Round table discussion cted

empat

hy

Safe space

[...] Making Web literacy meaningful for everyone Web literacy should mean all the skills we need to think, create, and thrive online. Many people hear the term Web literacy and think it means learning to code, or STEM (science, technology, engineering, maths) education. But Web literacy is much broader than that – it should include all the skills to be confident and competent online. To be empowered digital citizens, we all need to know how to navigate, how to share, what information to trust, and most importantly, how to expand the frontiers of our knowledge.

5

[...] Cultivating digital citizenship

Web literacy should be a foundational to education as reading, writing, and maths are – and it should be taught everywhere learning happens.

A fundamental part of Web literacy is understanding the forces that shape our lives online: the companies building our experiences, the politicians crafting and supporting government policies, and the power we hold as digital citizens to create the Internet we want. Having a say in our shared future on the Web means deciding which values are most important to us, and standing up for those values when they are threatened.

Protest Culture DIGITAL CULTURE

Digital Animal Memes by The Civic Beat (Jason Li and An Xiao Mina)

(A digital thing showing top into a physical thing.)

Variation

Cross geography connections in the memes.

Variation of a same meme

The process

IMAGES

Washington, DC

Washington, DC

Digital

#nastywoman

PHOTOGRAPHS

HASHTAG

Audience creating physical memes during the Meme Lab workshop

Digital memes

Physical

Product memes

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

We traditionally think of memes and internet culture as isolated to the internet, where digital literacy exists separately from traditional notions of cultural literacy. Recent years have seen a steady breakdown of that divide in popular discourse, whether talking about notions of privacy and surveillance, the role of government in regulating the internet, and, of course, in the rapid spread of meme culture in popular culture. In both the United States and the United Kingdom, memes have leapt from the internet in new and compelling ways. The iconic red Make America Great Again hat of the Trump campaign has inspired a number of digital remixes, like Make America Mexico Again and Make Racists Afraid Again, which in turn become physical hat remixes sold to fundraise for advocacy organizations. #RefugeesWelcome, a hashtag movement started in the UK in the face of the Syrian refugee crisis, has spread throughout Western Europe, with stickers, banners and marches around the theme. The online and the offline mix and intermix, crossing digital/physical barriers and leaping across the Atlantic Ocean.

Formal taxonomies can be developed from the folk taxonomy rendered machine-readable by the markup that hashtags provide; this process is called folksonomy.6 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hashtag

MATERIAL CULTURE

Material culture is the physical aspect of culture in the objects and architecture that surround people. It includes usage, consumption, creation and trade of objects, and the behaviors, norms and rituals these objects create or take part in. The term is commonly used in archaeological and anthropological studies, specifically focusing on the material evidence which can be attributed to culture, in the past or present. Material culture studies is an interdisciplinary field telling of relationships between people and their things: the making, history, preservation, and interpretation of objects. It draws on theory and practice from the social sciences and humanities such as art history, archaeology, anthropology, history, historic preservation, folklore, literary criticism and museum studies, among others. Anything from buildings and architectural elements to books, jewelry, or toothbrushes can be considered material culture.7

For the Mozilla Festival residency, I propose #MemeLab: an installation and workshop that looks at these themes and engages attendees in co-creating the installation. The installation will take the form of a scientific laboratory, with walls covered in chalk paint, as we try to diagram meme culture in both its online and offline manifestations. This might include a world map, to help emphasize the global-ness of meme culture. We will pre-install a few diagrams, including #RefugeesWelcome, #NastyWoman, #CatsAgainstBrexit, #Covfefe and a few others in other languages. These diagrams will start with a meme sparking event, with hashtags drawn in chalk, digital memes printed out and taped to the wall, product examples, and selfies in a loop on a digital screen. Attendees will be invited to create diagrams of their own, starting with a meme sparking event, whether in politics or general life. They will then be walked through a few key exercises: Hashtag station: Select a strip of paper from a test tube and write out a hashtag. Printing station: create a simple meme,

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Material_culture

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Digital again

Selfies memes TEXT > WEB LITERACY > PROJECT DESCRIPTION > AN XIAO IN COLLABORATION WITH JASON LI

Because of its widespread use, hashtag was added to the Oxford English Dictionary in June 2014. The term hashtag can also refer to the hash symbol itself when used in the context of a hashtag.

6

Washington, DC

San Jose, CA

Someone says something (‘She is a nasty woiman)

Pussycat vs. Redhat

Users create and use hashtags by placing the number sign or pound sign # (also known as the hash character) in front of a string of alphanumeric characters, usually a word or unspaced phrase, in or at the end of a message. The hashtag may contain letters, digits, and underscores. Searching for that hashtag will yield each message that has been tagged with it. A hashtag archive is consequently collected into a single stream under the same hashtag. For example, on the photosharing service Instagram, the hashtag #bluesky allows users to find all the posts that have been tagged using that hashtag.

07

Washington, DC

Washington, DC

Images from An Xiao Mina’s presentation.

A thing from internet gets remixed, goes to physical world and back to digital.

A hashtag is a type of metadata tag used on social networks such as Twitter and other microblogging services, allowing users to apply dynamic, user-generated tagging that makes it possible for others to easily find messages with a specific theme or content; it allows easy, informal markup of folk taxonomy without need of any formal taxonomy or markup language.

7

ARTWORK

# on manifestation boards

Internet Culture

https://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/Digital_culture

06

[...] Teaching Web literacy effectively

Learning Web literacy is like any other essential skill: we learn best by doing. And in the digital world, learning happens not just with teachers in the classroom, but everywhere there’s an Internet connection. We need all kinds of educators to have the knowledge and resources to teach Web literacy the way kids learn it best. And we need to make sure every student grows up not just on the Web, but fluent in the way it works.

05

Digital Culture stands for the contemporary phase of communication technologies, one that follows 19th century print culture and 20th century electronic broadcast culture, and that is deeply amplified and accelerated by the popularity of networked computers, personalised technologies and digital images. The emergence of digital culture is usually associated with a set of practices based on the ever more intensive use of communication technologies. These uses imply more participatory behaviors on the user side, an ever more visually riched environment and connection features that excell personal dimensions. Digital culture stands first of all for the changes brought about by the emergence of digital, networked and personalised media in our society and the passing from communication phases centred on print and broadcast media, to more personalised and networked media, that use digital compressing and processing capacities at their core. The consequences of such processes in societal terms and the means via which media technologies transform our modes of interaction and representation, broadly constitute what is called “digital culture”.5

HTTPS://CYBER.HARVARD.EDU/PEOPLE/AXMINA

WEB LITERACY

AN XIAO MINA IN COLLABORATION WITH JASON LI An Xiao” Mina is a technologist and writer who looks at issues of the global internet and networked creativity. As a Berkman Klein Fellow, she will study the impact of language barriers in our technology stack as the internet extends into diverse communities around the world, and she will continue her ongoing research on global internet meme culture. Mina leads the product team at Meedan, where they are building digital tools for journalists and translators, and she is co-founder of The Civic Beat, a research collective focused on the creative side of civic technology. She serves as a contributing editor to Civicist, an advisory editor to Hyperallergic, and a governing board member at China Residencies.

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Hashtag wall

Make a bag

Recently a 2016 Knight Visiting Nieman Fellow, where she studied online language barriers and their impact on journalism, Mina is currently working on a book about internet memes and global social movements (working title: “Memes to Movements”), to be published by Beacon Press.

using a meme template, of the hashtag and print it out. Making station: create a button, sticker, paper sign and/or canvas bag inspired by the hashtag. Selfie station: take a photo of yourself with the hashtag, printed meme, and object. Attach the hashtag and objects to the wall and draw chalk lines connecting them to each other and to others to which they have a thematic relationship. Since long before the internet, social movements have relied on a vast repertoire of creative actions and media to represent what they stand for: buttons, bumper stickers, paper signs, hats. Creative culture has leaned on street art, hip hop and dance to generate cultures of remix and performance. These same media actions are still utilized frequently in movements and marketing, but now, in the age of smartphones and the internet, they quickly intersect with the online world. Objects of meme culture get printed out and placed on t-shirts. People carrying clever signs watch their signs get photographed and then go viral on the

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

DIAGRAM Spatial and participatory mapping of the installation/workshop

She has spoken at venues like the Personal Democracy Forum, ACM SIGCHI, Creative Mornings, the Aspen Institute, RightsCon and the Institute for the Future, and she has contributed writing to publications like the Los Angeles Review of Books, Fusion, the New Inquiry, Nieman Journalism Lab, Places Journal and others.

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Create a hashtag

internet. The digital and the physical are deeply intertwined, and this workshop will help visitors see the process. The installation and workshop will build on themes from “The Things of the Internet,” a lecture I gave at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University. In this talk, I explored the online-offline. I adapted the talk for a lecture at the University of Hong Kong’s Journalism and Media Studies Centre, where I developed a workshop format that proved to be quite successful and engaging with undergraduates from the University of Hong Kong and Fudan University (Shanghai). It also builds on Grotte de l’Internetz, a workshop and installation at SOMArts in San Francisco, where the artist invited participants to create Stone Age art of animal memes in the spirit of the Grotte Chauvet; as well as the World Animal Meme Map and photo exhibition, shown at the Victoria and Albert Museum’s Friday Late program this past summer.

TAKE A SELFIE

AN XIAO MINA

TEXT > WEB LITERACY > INTRO > SOURCE > ALL FROM HTTPS://WWW.MOZILLA.ORG/EN-GB/INTERNETHEALTH/WEB-LITERACY/

Make a emoji

Make a poster Use an existing Hashtag

Make a cap

OPEN NNOVAT ON

GRETTA LOUW

TEXT > DECENTRALISATION > KEY TERMS

ARCHANA PRASAD AND SEAN BLAGSVEDT

11

ADAO CURRENCY NOTE Each grantee will receive a currency note, personalized with their photo

CRYPTOCURRENCY

DECENTRAL SAT ON

A cryptocurrency (or crypto currency) is a digital asset designed to work as a medium of exchange that uses cryptography to secure its transactions, to control the creation of additional units, and to verify the transfer of assets. Cryptocurrencies are classified as a subset of digital currencies and are also classified as a subset of alternative currencies and virtual currencies.

Decentralisation is outside of control of one specific autority, distributing for many form of conentration...

Bitcoin, created in 2009, was the first decentralized cryptocurrency. Since then, numerous cryptocurrencies have been created. These are frequently called altcoins, as a blend of bitcoin alternative. Bitcoin and its derivatives use decentralized control as opposed to centralized electronic money/central banking systems. The decentralized control is related to the use of bitcoin’s blockchain transaction database in the role of a distributed ledger.11 11

Decentralisation

Distribution of power from concentration? power=money? Decision making? actions? Federation? Choices? Diversity?

Visibility of a transaction chain

Traces of this transaction

Decentralisation: brings the problems of lack of trust

Value comes with trust.

Accountability means taking integrity on an action

DIAGRAM Spatial and participatory mapping of the installation/workshop

Much of the recent sociological debate about power revolves around the issue of its means to enable – in other words, power as a means to make social actions possible as much as it may constrain or prevent them. The philosopher Michel Foucault saw power as a structural expression of “a complex strategic situation in a given social setting” that requires both constraint and enablement.12

TEXT > DECENTRALISATION > PROJECT DESCRIPTION > ARCHANA PRASAD AND SEAN BLAGSVEDT

What is the ADAO? The ADAO stands for Altruistic Democratic Autonomous Organization and offers ada coins as a normative currency with 30% of token supply allocated to form an endowment. Borrowing from Ethereum’s DAO, currency holders in the ADAO will be able to vote on which socially beneficial projects are funded from the endowment. As the value of the currency pool grows, the endowment will grow with it, with the ultimate goal of creating one of the world’s largest democratically run philanthropy funds.

ACCOUNTABILITY

In ethics and governance, accountability is answerability, blameworthiness, liability, and the expectation of account-giving. As an aspect of governance, it has been central to discussions related to problems in the public sector, nonprofit and private (corporate) and individual contexts. In leadership roles, accountability is the acknowledgment and assumption of responsibility for actions, products, decisions, and policies including the administration, governance, and implementation within the scope of the role or employment position and encompassing the obligation to report, explain and be answerable for resulting consequences.

How does it work? A significant share of the currency will form an endowment to support SDG focused artists and social organizations worldwide, with governance and decisions over who gets funded controlled by the community of adacoin holders via Ethereum smart contracts. To raise funds, we will accept donations in other crypto-currencies directly such as ETH and Bitcoin. The ADAO organization will help aid recipients navigate local jurisdiction issues such that they can legally and efficiently convert crypto-donations into local currencies. We will also encourage everyone, but especially artists, developers and social organizations to accept payments in ada coins and to provide services and artifacts that can be bought in ada coins. In doing so, we will fund the greatest democratically governed social/art endowment fund in the world and ultimately monetarily encourage acts of social value.

In governance, accountability has expanded beyond the basic definition of “being called to account for one’s actions”. It is frequently described as an account-giving relationship between individuals, e.g. “A is accountable to B when A is obliged to inform B about A’s (past or future) actions and decisions, to justify them, and to suffer punishment in the case of eventual misconduct”. Accountability cannot exist without proper accounting practices; in other words, an absence of accounting means an absence of accountability.

This installation-performance will speak in the aesthetic, language and mode of a modern bank. Blurring satire with reality, participants can apply for actual grants to be paid in ADAO coins, which will be tradable for traditional currencies on crypto-currency markets. The ADAO Bank will award grants, loans and saving schemes to people interested in working on the SDG’s. It will provide investment and

Accountability is an element of a RACI to indicate who is ultimately answerable for the correct and thorough completion of the deliverable or task, and the one who delegates the work to those responsible. There are various reasons (legitimate or excuses) why accountability fails.13 13

[...] User Control: Deciding who can collect your data We should all be able to choose – with clarity and confidence – what information we share with what companies, understanding the trade-offs we’re making when we do. Right now, we all lack meaningful choice online – privacy policies are often miles long and hard to read, we don’t understand what information we’re sharing or when, and opting out is seldom on the menu.

[...] Cyber Security: Locking down your sensitive information We should all have the ability to protect our online identity. At this point, it feels like we’ve all been victims of a cyberattack somewhere, somehow. Data breaches can lay bare the passwords of millions of people, often going undiscovered for years. Which means your identity may be at risk of theft without you even knowing it.

[...] Government Surveillance: Keeping prying eyes and ears out of your business We should all have the freedom to be ourselves — online and off – without surveillance, judgement and imposed societal bias. You wouldn’t want the government following your every move in real life – there’s no reason they should be shadowing you on the Internet. The Edward Snowden disclosures showed that even democracies can and do take liberties with your privacy.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accountability

Fill out a form

Interview

Take a photo

Get tokens

Get currency note

ARCHANA PRASAD AND SEAN BLAGSVEDT IN COLLABORATION WITH FREEMAN MURRAY Round Table

Archana Prasad, is an artist from Bangalore, India. Her work is a particular conjunction of visual art, technology and urban community art, ste wed in design and research methodologies. As Founder of Jaaga.in, Archana has a unique artist-activist role. Sean Blagsvedt is a technologist and entrepreneur. His recent company babajob provided job information to 10 million blue collar workers across India. Archana and Sean are concerned about the unjust assignment of value, thus currency, that tilts towards mechanisms of successful acquisition based models and stockpiling capital, rather than rewarding innovation and creation, especially around work that fulfills important societal goals but do not create large profits.

philanthropic options for those interested in growing their crypto-currency assets. The ADAO Bank booth provides MozFest participants human connections and conversations about the coin, the bank, its goals and objectives. Additionally the “employees” at the ADAO booth have discretionary power to award a limited number of coins to deserving participants from MozFest. Interaction Model: Participants fill out a form at the booth. Similar to a loan application, they will be invited to describe their own pledges to support the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals. Two tellers - the artists, will interview applicants, take their photo and given a limited number of token grants. Each grantee will receive a currency note, personalized with their photo.

currency, with the needed crypto-graphic keys printed on it such that the participant can claim the ADAO token online). Our Vision What do we want to accomplish? 1. To Take Back Crypto-currency and money itself for 2. Creativity = Wealth Currency is a Choice of: Ethics Models Value Alignment A sustainable futur Politics

(The rendering of the note is a Deep Learning based Style filter of the participant’s photo and a traditional

DIAGRAMS

14

POLARIZATION (POLITICS)

In politics, polarization (or polarisation) can refer to the divergence of political attitudes to ideological extremes. Polarization can refer to such divergence like public opinion or even to such divergence within certain groups. Almost all discussions of polarization in political science consider polarization in the context of political parties and democratic systems of government. When polarization occurs in a two-party system, like the United States, moderate voices often lose power and influence.14 14

Polarization creates

Questions polarised by the (geographical) context

Yes or No

Bringing tension to the debate by polarising the responses (he doesn’t’ believe in polarisation so that is his way of questioning it)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polarization_(politics)

INFORMATION ETHICS

The term information ethics was first coined by Robert Hauptman and used in the book Ethical challenges in librarianship. It examines the morality that comes from information as a resource, a product, or as a target. It provides a critical framework for considering moral issues concerning informational privacy, moral agency (e.g. whether artificial agents may be moral), new environmental issues (especially how agents should behave in the infosphere), problems arising from the life-cycle (creation, collection, recording, distribution, processing, etc.) of information (especially ownership and copyright, digital divide, and digital rights). It is very vital to understand that librarians, archivists, information professionals among others, really understand the importance of knowing how to disseminate proper information as well as being responsible with their actions when addressing information.15 15

By Paolo Cirio. Source > http://globaldirect.today

Experiment about liberation: people all agree if they can access the same information

TEXT > PRIVACY AND SECURITY > KEY TERMS

15 TEXT > WEB LITERACY > INTRO > SOURCE > ALL FROM HTTPS:// WWW.MOZILLA.ORG/EN-GB/ INTERNET-HEALTH/PRIVACYSECURITY/

HTTPS://THEADAO.ORG

DECENTRALISATION

The ADAO is a philanthropic cryptocurrency that supports creatives who advance the Sustainable Development Goals, representing an entirely new way to fund social and creative revolutionaries.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_(social_and_ political)

13

Decentralisation is related with lack of accountability

Accountability= integrity of action? trust?

The use of power need not involve force or the threat of force (coercion). At one extreme, it closely resembles what an English-speaking person might term “influence”, although some authors distinguish “influence” as a means by which power is used. One such example is soft power, as compared to hard power.

A Healthy Internet is Secure and Private The Internet only stays healthy if we trust it as a safe place – to explore, transact, connect, and create. Our privacy and security online is under constant threat. But there’s something you can do about it: get informed, protect yourself, and make your voice heard. A healthy Internet depends on you. [...]

PHOTOGRAPHS Audience interacting at the Adao Bank installation

POWER

12

PRIVACY & SECURITY PAOLO CIRIO

Decentralisation feedback mechanism in economical transactions

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cryptocurrency

12

In social science and politics, power is the ability to influence or outright control the behaviour of people. The term “authority” is often used for power perceived as legitimate by the social structure. Power can be seen as evil or unjust, but the exercise of power is accepted as endemic to humans as social beings. In business, power is often expressed as being “upward” or “downward”. With downward power, a company’s superior influences subordinates. When a company exerts upward power, it is the subordinates who influence the decisions of their leader or leaders.

Politics

PHOTOGRAPHS Participatory installation set up and audience interacting with polls part of Aesthetics of Information Ethics.

Information ethics How to represent sensible information (and the aesthetics derived from it)

Information Ecology

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Information_ethics Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

16

DELIBERATION

Deliberation is a process of thoughtfully weighing options, usually prior to voting. Deliberation emphasizes the use of logic and reason as opposed to power-struggle, creativity, or dialog. Group decisions are generally made after deliberation through a vote or consensus of those involved.

VS PARTICIPATION EMANCIPATION FREEDOM

In legal settings a jury famously uses deliberation because it is given specific options, like guilty or not guilty, along with information and arguments to evaluate. In “deliberative democracy”, the aim is for both elected officials and the general public to use deliberation rather than power-struggle as the basis for their vote.16 16

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

HTTPS://PAOLOCIRIO.NET/PRESS/TEXTS/AESTHETICS-INFORMATION-ETHICS.PHP

MISLEADING POLARITIES IN INFORMATION ETHICS

INCLUSION ACCESS COMMONS

EXPLOITATION CONTROL WITHHOLDING PROPERTY

PRIVATE

PUBLIC

OPACITY

TRANSPARENCY

PRIVACY OBSCURITY EMPATHY ANONYMITY

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deliberation

COERCION

EXCLUSION

RESPONSIBILITY

SURVEILLANCE EXPOSURE HUMILIATION ACCOUNTABILITY IMPUNITY

REPUTATION

SCORING

AUTONOMY

MANIPULATION

EDUCATING

MISINFORMING

QUANTIFIABLE SIMPLICITY

UNDETECTABLE COMPLEXITY

HTTPS://CYBER.HARVARD.EDU/PEOPLE/AXMINA

PRIVACY & SECURITY

PAOLO CIRIO

Paolo Cirio works with legal, economic and semiotic systems of the information society. He investigates social fields impacted by the Internet, such as privacy, copyright, democracy, and finance. He shows his research and intervention-based works through artifacts, photos, installations, videos, and public art. Cirio has exhibited in international museums and institutions and has won numerous prestigious art awards. His artworks have been covered by hundreds of media outlets worldwide and he regularly gives public lectures and workshops at leading universities.

SOME PROBLEMATIC ISSUES CONCERNING INFORMATION ETHICS: SEARCH ENGINES & SOCIAL MEDIA MODERATION HATE SPEECH HARRASSMENT TROLLING BULLYING BLACKMAIL STIGMAS SOCIAL PROFILING SOCIAL SCORE & BIAS CONSUMER PROFILING SEX OFFENDERS CRIMINAL RECORDS PREDICTIVE POLICING RACIAL PROFILING PRIVACY & SURVEILLANCE STATE AND CORPORATE SURVEILLANCE CRYPTOGRAPHY FOR POWER STRUCTURES CRYPTOGRAPHY FOR INDIVIDUALS PUBLIC SHAMING BLOCKCHAIN, DEEPWEB AND DARKNET ANONYMITY TRUST PRIVACY FRAUD HATE SPEECH CRUELTY ALGORITHMS ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE CONTROL ACCOUNTABILITY OF CODERS ROBOTICS AUTOMATED WEAPONS AUTOMATED LABOR PIRACY COPYRIGHT TRADEMARK FAIR USE EDUCATION ROYALITIES MEDIA AND POLITICS TARGETING VOTERS FAKE NEWS SHARING ECONOMY PRIVATE PROPERTY LABOR RIGHTS DIGITAL CURRENCIES TRANSPARENCY VOLATILITY ACCESS TO MEANS INFRASTRUCTURES ECOLOGICAL IMPACT DECENTRALISATION INTERNET OF THINGS POLICY CLOUD SERVERS

The Aesthetics of Information Ethics discusses methodologies, strategies, and practices of art addressing the personal and societal spheres affected by information systems. Information Ethics is broadly defined as “the branch of ethics that focuses on the relationship between the creation, organization, dissemination, and use of information.”[1] The so-called information revolution brings us an increasing number of pressing ethical issues. Artists can be particularly sensitive to these issues and they are able to question ethics by proposing and challenging perceptions and scenarios beyond common understanding. Artworks can creatively discuss and play with distribution systems of sensitive information, ethereal economies, flexible labor and property, circulating bodies and goods, manipulated and monitored relationships, expanded public spaces, exploited opinion formation, and, generally, technological apparatuses affecting social systems. Nowadays, social contracts are fluid; they constantly reorganize society and produce new social conditions. These active spaces are where information ethics emerge and where artists intervene in questioning, revealing, and reassembling the agents and environments of their artworks. Ethics of Aesthetics concerns the ethical frameworks in arranging the sensibility of the audience and the subjects of the artworks. The aesthetic methodologies of intervention, discourse, and representation of information systems can include the production of critique, distress, fear, empathy, alienation, complicity, spectacle, confusion, awareness, and other artistic devices. The aesthetic qualities of the artworks can be called into question through the articulation of the ethical conditions of the works and their subjects. The responsibility and conscience of the artists - as well as of the art critics and curators - are integrated in the analysis and validation of the social and artistic efficacy of the artworks. Concurrently, the ethical and social relations created by these artworks produce aesthetic forms, which concerns the field of the Aesthetics of Ethics. Social fields and norms are increasingly interdependent with technological advancements of information

Ethics are negotiated, developed, and balanced through reflections on the consequences and intentions of human activity. Differentiating themselves from morals - which are often static and ideological - ethics are dynamic, reflexive, and evolving principles that must be

oriented to maximize and develop the common good within the notion of ethics as the making and understanding of a dignified existence for humans and the environment surrounding them.

The Ethics of Representation and information systems

As such, techniques like the exposure and appropriation of sensitive information as well as the manipulation and disruption of social relations should be balanced with the parameters of intentions, receptions, and outcomes of the artwork. In the Aesthetics of Information Ethics, context is main the principle from which we can assess the ethics of artworks. Meaning and impact vary based on the context of presentation, execution, and results. The context needs to account for all the properties of the information systems involved. These methodologies, techniques, and practices of art production and critique are ultimately

Questions from Aesthetics of Information Ethics’ polls.

Should fake news on social media be removed by Internet companies themselves?

Should the coders of algorithms with racial biases be legally accountable?

Should we be able to trace individuals who use digital currency, such as Bitcoin?

Should the documents leaked by Snowden be made available to everyone – not only journalists?

Should politicians be able to use fully cryptographed communications for work?

Should vulnerable individuals be protected online even if they are key to public debate?

Should electronic voting be completely avoided and analog systems restored?

Should we remunerate the open source code utilized by big corporations such as Google?

Can the hacking of political parties during election be justified?

Should Facebook delete posts concerning hate speech toward refugees?

Should public figures on TwiFer be given access to block other accounts?

Should voter profiling and databases being banned?

Should poli:cal spending for online ads be regulated like they are on TV?

Should ads managed by algorithms be considered physiologically manipulative advertising?

DIAGRAM Spatial and partecipatory mapping of the installation.

Presentation screen

Diagrams Yes No

Results

The ethics of the power of these information systems are directly embodied in artworks that use and address such power. The ethical inquiries and relations activated by art with information systems create aesthetic forms. This aesthetics is discussed by measuring, comparing, and evaluating the strategies, consequences, conditions, and circumstances of the works of art. Such analysis needs to take into account a broad social context, therefore integrating the distribution of the work, the mode of presentation within the site of execution, and ultimately the intended and unintended recipients, critiques, and results that the work generates.

constantly discussed and confronted. Art plays a central role in this process. Evolving cultural forms and critical art are essential instruments for sensing and signaling the forming of ethics.

Social transactions and contracts are discussed, created, rearranged, or accentuated by artists for making visible the complexity, contradictions, and complicity within such social relations activated by information systems. However, only an attentive examination of the effects, causes, and nature of such systems can fully address them. Thus, representations of social and technological systems should engage with the dialectics of the construction of ethical values. The integrity of the agenda pursued is a responsibility of the artist in relation to the system addressed, while the critical reception should assess the means and ends of the artworks within the whole spectrum of forms and contexts of presentation.

QUESTIONS

computation, sharing, and control. Information technology has become the heart of the social order. However, it can be understood not from a technological point of view, but rather through a constant reflexive examination of what it produces in the social sphere. The ethical discussion can’t be limited to technocrats, legislators, coders, and the opaque internal policies of private entities. Art can play a role in this process of creating awareness and reflection on difficult ethical questions by making them relevant and engaging. The material of these aesthetic examinations is not limited to the Internet, algorithms, big data, and other technologies. These technical elements are mutually influenced by the political, cultural, legal, and economic systems, as well as several other social fields and infrastructures. Information systems should be understood as interconnected networks of social systems in which reflection and intervention have the potential to reverberate throughout the whole web of networks, consequently impacting a variety of conventions, entities, and individuals which are inevitably connected.

SHOULD FAKE NEWS ON SOCIAL MEDIA BE REMOVED BY INTERNET COMPANIES THEMSELVES ?

14 QUESTIONS = 14 POLS

Feedback from the audience + Add new questions

No

Yes

87 NO

Question

Polarities in Ethics of Representation In the Aesthetics of Information Ethics, the appearances, perceptions, and sensations of reality created by artists should take into account the formation of polarities. Mystifications and oversimplifications about the social impacts of information systems are instances of the Ethics of Representation. As such, the creation of falsehoods, hype, confusion, anxiety, or fatalism sustained by the producers and reporters of information systems create polarities in understanding ever-changing technological apparatuses and their social impacts. The Aesthetics of Information Ethics is about breaking down polarities to offer a broader understanding of the conditions within these systems. Examples of problematic issues in Information Ethics The Aesthetics of Information Ethics can be applied to examining the liability of algorithms, responsibility in anonymous networks, exploitation of shared content and labor, censorship on social media, freedom of speech used to harass, public shaming to condemn, hacking to protest or leak, and micro-targeting for political campaigning. In order to inspire inquiry, the artist questions how to balance freedom, empathy, justice, and accountability. By Paolo Cirio. 2017. [1] Joan, Reitz M. “Information Ethics.” Online Dictionary For Library And Information Science. N.p., 2010.

tomorrow will be better.

It gets better, but it does take time. She’s always with you. You got this. You can do this.

Conne

PHOTOGRAPHS

PHOTOGRAPHS

Tactical Technology Collective instructing the audience on how to use their Data Detox Kit

Visitors exploring vistual reality at Callum Cooper’s VR installation about privacy.

SOURCE > HTTPS://TACTICALTECH.ORG/NEWS/ DATA-DETOX-KIT/

Detox your Digital Self THE 8-DAY DATA DETOX Do you feel like your digital self is slipping out of control? Have you let yourself install too many apps, clicked “I agree” a few too many times, lost track of how many accounts you’ve created? Perhaps you feel you’re not as in control of your digital life as you’d like to be.

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Don’t despair! This data detox is designed just for you. By the end of the 8-day program, you’ll be well on your way to a healthier and more in-control digital self. The Data Detox Kit was produced for The Glass Room NYC, presented by Mozilla and Tactical Technology Collective.

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

SHOULD POLITICIANS BE ABLE TO USE FULLY CRYPTOGRAPHED COMMUNICATIONS FOR WORK ?

57 YES

You are valuable. You don’t need to achieve + lead + be visible to others to be valuable + deserve consideration.

Deep breaths - water.

Remember the last time you faced a major change -> it turned out to be for the better. This will too.

User Responses

Don’t overthink, it will be fine. Just relax. Nothing is constant. Think about all the good that has happened.

Don’t worry you’re still pretty. Lin chiah pà bē? Everything is temporary

Project Description: although the construct of empathy is multidimensional in nature and difficult to measure, i hope to create an effective strategy for highlighting empathy that focus specifically on communication skills training. the open lab project will visually explore the mozilla festival’s community’s understanding of digital empathy through a survey in which users can answer a serious of questions by applying coloured stickers to a chart in an effort to reflect levels of understanding towards digital empathy, accessibility and inclusion. self-reflection is a useful method for addressing empathy. and as such self-reflection activities could theoretically prompt guests to question and examine their interactions in the online world. this self-examination process may potentially develop heightened online awareness and promote increased digital empathy. the means by which empathy is expressed is naturally evolving as the world and its forms of communications become increasingly digital and recognizing and addressing barriers to the expression of digital empathy is important. if we can sharpen the communication skills of traditional empathy, how can we then use those skills to address the greater discussion of digital empathy?

everyday is trying. I am with you. well done. I’m here… and I promise to never let you go.

Life has its ups & downs.

build grow heal love

Open Lab Session. Type of Project: Survey | Data Visualization

What is the worst that can happen? How likely is it to happen?

This too shall pass.

You have overcome so many other things already too

Digital Renders

You’re always trying so hard,

You are loved You are not alone! We are with you

If you’re just travelling when there’s sun, you’ll never get anywhere

TEXT > WEB LITERACY > KEY TERMS

A healthy Internet means everyone has the skills to thrive People everywhere should have the knowledge they need to tap into the full power of the Internet – and use it to make their lives and the world better. This means everyone needs to be able to read, write, and participate online. A healthy Internet is yours to master.depends on you. [...]

Trying makes a difference. Trying can be your victory.

Are you ok?

Spatial and partecipatory mapping of the installation.

Tsemppiä!

Aim to be comfortably lost

The pendulum will swing

DIAGRAM

You haven’t killed anyone… it’s ok!

This too shall pass

What is (realistically) the worst that could happen?

COLLABORATRIVE SPACE

WEB LITERACY

i found that certain understandings of definitions become very nuclear, contaminated and porous so what does it mean when i talk about technology in the context of vulnerability and who we are today.

Questioning the role of technology in the context of vulnerability

I got you load of Biscoff, all the music you like, a bluetooth speaker and also the people you are friend with are online. ? Do you want a hug? xx Take a break – I’ve got this! It’ll be alright. Trust me. You only live once =) It’s not the end of the world!!! A vide é muito curta. Aproveite! Be brilliant by your own standards. Not of others. Go on! Don’t let fear stop your explorations! You’ve made a difference in my life, what you do matters. You are enough! <3

i want to explore the daily trauma we undergo to earn the coveted badge of successful human existence that often negates notions of struggle, loneliness and deeper meanings of wounded-ness. a trauma that plays itself in sets and loops traveling by genome and bloodstream. we need to close, we need to fill this loop. so from that, i find the vulnerability of digital immersion. soaking myself in the frailties of others to wash away things gray. and sometimes in the immersion, i find that i might be required to live them. and from disenfranchised digital cultures i learn about the vulnerabilities of race and how it was only created to sustain a larger system of capitalism. error 404, page not found. i was invited here to speak about inclusion. but i think we should focus on loops, and loopholes and continuums. about closing the gaps and expanding our capacity to include more brokenness. from distorted views of linear utoipian w


DIGITAL

INCLUSION BROOKLYN

J. PAKATHI


Digital Inclusion means promoting diversity For the Internet to fulfil its greatest promise, it must reflect the diversity and experience of all people, everywhere. As inclusive as the Web can seem, it’s not yet an equal playing field. More than half the world is still without it; emerging economies and marginalised communities are often the last to gain access. Far fewer women are using the Internet than men. And without diversity among its creators, the Web itself will reflect unconscious biases, while personalising algorithms can reinforce our own. [...]

T

TEXT > WEB LITERACY > INTRO > SOURCE > ALL FROM HTTPS://WWW.MOZILLA.ORG/ENUS/INTERNET-HEALTH/DIGITAL-INCLUSION/

[...] Digital Inclusion means practising respect

[...] Digital Inclusion means supporting universal access to the whole Internet

We should all have the ability to participate fully on the Internet, without threat to our reputations, our confidence, or our safety.

We should all have affordable, highquality, unrestricted access to the whole Web, so the whole world can benefit.

We’ve all seen our share of nasty comments sections. At times, the Web can feel like a very unfriendly place – particularly for women, minorities, and members of marginalised communities. By discouraging people from getting online, cyberbullying and cyber violence threaten not just individuals, but the Internet itself.

To participate online, you have to be able to get online. Programs have emerged that offer free or subsidised Internet access, but it is often slow or restricted, creating a ‘poor Internet for poor people.’ At its most extreme, governments worldwide are turning off all or parts of the Internet to serve their own agendas, which can threaten human rights and even the health of the global economy.

X 9; Y 123

DIGITAL INCLUSION


b

at

h

TEXT > DIGITAL INCLUSION > KEY TERMS

01

EMPATHY

Empathy is the capacity to understand or feel what another person is experiencing from within the other personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s frame of reference, i.e., the capacity to place oneself in anotherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s position. There are many definitions for empathy that encompass a broad range of emotional states. Types of empathy include cognitive empathy, emotional empathy, and somatic empathy.1 1

as a tool to navigate the world

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Empathy

02

SELF-REFLECTION

Human self-reflection is the capacity of humans to exercise introspection and the willingness to learn more about their fundamental nature, purpose and essence. The earliest historical records demonstrate the great interest which humanity has had in itself. Human self-reflection is related to the philosophy of consciousness, the topic of awareness, consciousness in general and the philosophy of mind. 2 2

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-reflection

03

INCLUSIVITY

An intention or policy of including people who might otherwise be excluded or marginalized, such as those who are handicapped or learning-disabled, or racial and sexual minorities.3 3

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Safe-space

In order to create inclusive spaces, we need to create inclusive spaces


Questioning the role of technology in the context of vulnerability

Technology

in ca clu e nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; si w xis t oan em ith t o pa ut th y

Vulnerability

vulnerability makes us human

There is a necessity to build a collective connected emphathy

Emotional labour

Feeling vulnerable online

The vulnerability of the individual

Empathy X 23; Y 121

DIGITAL INCLUSION


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Safe-space

04

SAFE-SPACE

In educational institutions, safe space (or safe-space), safer space, and positive space are terms that, as originally intended, were used to indicate that a teacher, educational institution, or student body did not tolerate anti-LGBT violence, harassment or hate speech, thereby creating a safe place for all LGBT students. The term safe space has been extended to refer to an autonomous space for individuals who feel marginalized to come together to communicate regarding their experiences with marginalization, typically on a university campus. Safe spaces exist in educational institutions of anglophone countries. The idea of safe spaces has seen criticism on the grounds that it stifles freedom of speech. Critics claim safe spaces hinder the exposure of sensitive material that needs to be discussed and explained in an educational environment.4 4

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Safe-space

TEXT > DIGITAL INCLUSION > PROJECT DESCRIPTION > BY BROOKLYN J. PAKATHI

This is my home Type of Project: Pixelated Digital Renderings | Poster Art | Public Art Project Description: this is my home, aimed at creating dialogues of empathy and diversity for a greater sense of digital inclusion, is a series of digital renderings representative of the spectrum of shades within human skin tone and overlaid with subtle and often gentle messages of understanding in hopes to promote a higher level of care and concern in digital communication and accessibility. the digital renderings will be produced as large posters and placed across the mozilla festival venue to act as a public service announcement to engage with guests in attendance, prompting viewers to feel considered in their contribution towards an open and diverse internet. Project Statement: empathy involves the inner experience of sharing in and comprehending the momentary psychological state of another person (schafer, 1959). what future do we envision, when we talk about digital inclusion? we

DIGITAL INCLUSION

BROOKLYN J. PAKATHI

in searching for the connectors of cause, meaning and sense of resolve, brooklyn jâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work fundamentally speaks to the tragic vulnerability of romance he explores these themes of an existential nature, plagued by fragility, through video vignettes, digital observations, and photographic interrogations. making loneliness an art since 92â&#x20AC;&#x2122; often define inclusion as the ability of individuals and groups to access and use information and communication technologies. encompassing not only access to the internet but also the availability of hardware and software; relevant content and services; and training for the digital literacy skills required

TEXT > WEB LITERACY > KEY TERMS


for effective use of information and communication technologies. but in and of itself, digital inclusion can often overlook the necessity for creating and maintaining a dialogue of digital empathy. as with many other aspects of contemporary culture, rapid adoption of social and mobile technologies has altered society’s communication patterns and disrupted the expression of empathy, specifically in digital conversations. mobile and social media use has transformed when and how individuals interact with others. the ability to instantly share thoughts, feelings, and behaviors with the rest of society via digital channels can occur in mere seconds, often without the empathetic social filter that accompanies traditional communications. moreover, digital communications are devoid of many of the emotional signals and cues experienced in face-to-face settings, often leading to more impersonal interactions. creating and exploring digital empathy unlocks the digital communication of empathy, one of the core elements missing from how we currently communicate online. there are few ways to show a friend, a loved one, a group or a community as a whole that you feel empathetic towards their situation. the project, this is my home, tries to understand what it means to be digitally human taking into account the worlds of digital and non-digital are becoming more and more one in the same. the messages project empathy as enacted between a community and pay attention to someone else’s experience in a way that allows the other to realize that we all share and understand the essential quality of our digital experiences. the work aims to understand how other people feels and to be able to communicate this understanding in a way that is uniquely ‘human’. this physical and tangible work presented seemingly offline but still represented in a digital space reflects the present day failure of digital devices and online communications to facilitate the expression of empathy between people. the importance for the work to exist in and around the festival space works

accordingly to mozilla festival’s mandate and responsibility in creating an accessible and equally inclusive space for learning, growth, understanding, and diversity without any prerequisite or criteria to entry. Goals: • to create an opportunity for communities to explore communication of empathyand understanding • to build a digital culture of inclusivity without the use of active technology that can often negate individuals wants to experience digital • to create an environment that speaks to individuals main cause for fear and concern and offer safety and peace of mind Open Lab Session. Type of Project: Survey | Data Visualization Project Description: although the construct of empathy is multidimensional in nature and difficult to measure, i hope to create an effective strategy for highlighting empathy that focus specifically on communication skills training. the open lab project will visually explore the mozilla festival’s community’s understanding of digital empathy through a survey in which users can answer a serious of questions by applying coloured stickers to a chart in an effort to reflect levels of understanding towards digital empathy, accessibility and inclusion. self-reflection is a useful method for addressing empathy. and as such self-reflection activities could theoretically prompt guests to question and examine their interactions in the online world. this self-examination process may potentially develop heightened online awareness and promote increased digital empathy. the means by which empathy is expressed is naturally evolving as the world and its forms of communications become increasingly digital and recognizing and addressing barriers to the expression of digital empathy is important. if we can sharpen the communication skills of traditional empathy, how can we then use those skills to address the greater discussion of digital empathy?

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DIGITAL INCLUSION


digital posters

g ace

on

hat

s

DIAGRAM Spatial and partecipatory mapping of the installation.

ation

struct ure ate

n zilla of hich ns rt in ding and ethod

cally ne his ally and e d

nd

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Safe space


Digital Renders

build grow heal love

this is your home

itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be okay

this is a safe space

Conn

Round table discussion ected

empa

thy

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DIGITAL INCLUSION


STILLS Stills from Brooklyn J. Pakathi This is your home digital animation

PHOTOGRAPHS Audience interacting with This is my home and roundtable discussion

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

ARTWORKS Brooklyn J. Pakathi This is my home digital posters


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DIGITAL INCLUSION


X50

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DIGITAL INCLUSION


X50


X60

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DIGITAL INCLUSION


AUDIENCE RESPONDS


THE VULNERABILITIES OF BEING Brooklyn J. Pakathi i found that certain understandings of definitions become very nuclear, contaminated and porous so what does it mean when i talk about technology in the context of vulnerability and who we are today.

i want to explore the daily trauma we undergo to earn the coveted badge of successful human existence that often negates notions of struggle, loneliness and deeper meanings of wounded-ness.

today i want to talk about the vulnerabilities of being (digital and all) i don’t know if we ever truly interrogate what vulnerability is and what it means for us.

a trauma that plays itself in sets and loops traveling by genome and bloodstream.

today i want us to imagine, to dream, to question. i’m not interested in sweeping statements of empathetic learning and building for the sole purpose of opportunist capital gain. i’m rejecting the idea of vulnerability as a mode of disregarded weakness. our sense of vulnerability is in fact innately human. instead, let’s explore the vulnerabilities of being and it’s necessity to build connective collective empathy. the vulnerabilities of dreaming, in a world governed by homogeneous toxic misteachings of branded macho-ism. in a world that requires improvisation at every moment. so this is what we are exploring. i want to explore the technologies we implore every day as tools to navigate all the things that exist in a very resilient selfdriven world.

we need to close, we need to fill this loop. so from that, i find the vulnerability of digital immersion. soaking myself in the frailties of others to wash away things gray. and sometimes in the immersion, i find that i might be required to live them. and from disenfranchised digital cultures i learn about the vulnerabilities of race and how it was only created to sustain a larger system of capitalism. error 404, page not found. i was invited here to speak about inclusion. but i think we should focus on loops, and loopholes and continuums. about closing the gaps and expanding our capacity to include more brokenness. from distorted views of linear utoipian worlds, i learn about the vulnerabilities of perfection and how they create perpetuated ignorance of insecure common experiences.

from insecurity, i observe the vulnerabilities of insignificance. taking shot after shot from the bottle of our humanity i’m drunk with our intersectional identities. our words slur not because we fail to understand each other but our communication channels have crossed lines and our frequencies have purposefully been corrupted to create hierarchical structures of power that seek to keep us out of tune with what’s real. i look to the vulnerabilities of technology and hope that the codes of societal normativeness are disrupted, that the work we do now topple over the networks of disempowerment and unequal injustice. there are loops and loopholes in the continuum of our existence. i learn about the vulnerabilities of humanization and that the fragments of our broken bodies serve to preserve our being. being present. being alive. being here. i learn about the vulnerabilities of our flaws, that the damage inflicted on us by ourselves and by the invisible hands of others has no reflection on who we are. i learn about the vulnerabilities of being.

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DIGITAL INCLUSION


BROOKLYN ASKS

User Responses


improvis moment

so this is exploring

i want to technolo every da navigate exist in a driven wo

AUDIENCE RESPONDS Come and join us!!

You haven’t killed anyone… it’s ok!

I’m so lost (I found a way)

Tsemppiä!

Aim to be comfortably lost

Trying makes a difference.

This too shall pass

Trying can be your victory.

The pendulum will swing

What is the worst that can happen? How likely is it to happen?

What is (realistically) the worst that could happen?

You’re always trying so hard,

Are you ok?

everyday is trying. I am with you. well done.

You are loved

I’m here… and I promise to never let you go.

You are not alone! We are with you

This too shall pass.

You have overcome so many other things already too

Don’t overthink, it will be fine.

If you’re just travelling when there’s sun, you’ll never get anywhere Life has its ups & downs.

Just relax. Nothing is constant. Think about all the good that has happened.

Embrace them. If you need a chat / walk / silent film, let me know

You are valuable. You don’t need to achieve + lead + be visible to others to be valuable + deserve consideration.

Don’t worry you’re still pretty.

tomorrow will be better.

Lin chiah pà bē?

Deep breaths - water.

Everything is temporary

I got you load of Biscoff, all the music you like, a bluetooth speaker and also the people you are friend with are online.

Remember the last time you faced a major change -> it turned out to be for the better. This will too. It gets better, but it does take time. She’s always with you. You got this. You can do this. You are not alone and all will be well.

? Do you want a hug? xx Take a break – I’ve got this! It’ll be alright. Trust me. You only live once =) It’s not the end of the world!!!

It’s because of you, that I am still standing!!

A vide é muito curta. Aproveite!

This will pass.

Be brilliant by your own standards. Not of others.

You are fine. We are with you. Use this. Become better from experience.

Go on! Don’t let fear stop your explorations! You’ve made a difference in my life, what you do matters. You are enough! <3

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DIGITAL INCLUSION


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DIGITAL INCLUSION BROOKLYN J. PAKATHI

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WEB LITERACY AN XIAO MINA

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OPEN INNOVATION GRETTA LOUW

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DECENTRALISATION ARCHADA PRASAD AND SEAN BLAGSVEDT

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PRIVACY & SECURITY PAOLO CIRIO + TACTICAL TECH + CALLUM COOPER


vulnerability makes us human

D G TAL

Vulnerability

NCLUS ON BROOKLYN

today i want to talk about the vulnerabilities of being (digital and all) i don’t know if we ever truly interrogate what vulnerability is and what it means for us.

TEXT > DIGITAL INCLUSION > KEY TERMS

1

inc ca lus ex n’t ioa wi ist n em th ou pa t th y

as a tool to navigate the world

EMPATHY

Technology

01

Empathy is the capacity to understand or feel what another person is experiencing from within the other person’s frame of reference, i.e., the capacity to place oneself in another’s position. There are many definitions for empathy that encompass a broad range of emotional states. Types of empathy include cognitive empathy, emotional empathy, and somatic empathy.1

SELF-REFLECTION

Human self-reflection is the capacity of humans to exercise introspection and the willingness to learn more about their fundamental nature, purpose and essence. The earliest historical records demonstrate the great interest which humanity has had in itself.

Emotional labour

instead, let’s explore the vulnerabilities of being and it’s necessity to build connective collective empathy. the vulnerabilities of dreaming, in a world governed by homogeneous toxic misteachings of branded macho-ism. in a world that requires improvisation at every moment. so this is what we are exploring.

In order to create inclusive spaces, we need to create inclusive spaces

INCLUSIVITY

i want to explore the technologies we implore every day as tools to navigate all the things that exist in a very resilient selfdriven world.

Empathy

An intention or policy of including people who might otherwise be excluded or marginalized, such as those who are handicapped or learning-disabled, or racial and sexual minorities.3

BROOKLYN ASKS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Safe-space

3

04

AUDIENCE RESPONDS Come and join us!!

SAFE-SPACE

I’m so lost (I found a way)

In educational institutions, safe space (or safe-space), safer space, and positive space are terms that, as originally intended, were used to indicate that a teacher, educational institution, or student body did not tolerate anti-LGBT violence, harassment or hate speech, thereby creating a safe place for all LGBT students. The term safe space has been extended to refer to an autonomous space for individuals who feel marginalized to come together to communicate regarding their experiences with marginalization, typically on a university campus. Safe spaces exist in educational institutions of anglophone countries. The idea of safe spaces has seen criticism on the grounds that it stifles freedom of speech. Critics claim safe spaces hinder the exposure of sensitive material that needs to be discussed and explained in an educational environment.4 4

i’m rejecting the idea of vulnerability as a mode of disregarded weakness. our sense of vulnerability is in fact innately human.

The vulnerability of the individual

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-reflection

03

i’m not interested in sweeping statements of empathetic learning and building for the sole purpose of opportunist capital gain.

Feeling vulnerable online

Human self-reflection is related to the philosophy of consciousness, the topic of awareness, consciousness in general and the philosophy of mind. 2 2

today i want us to imagine, to dream, to question.

There is a necessity to build a collective connected emphathy

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Empathy

02

J PAKATH

TEXT > DIGITAL INCLUSION > PROJECT DESCRIPTION > BY BROOKLYN J. PAKATHI

This is my home Type of Project: Pixelated Digital Renderings | Poster Art | Public Art Project Description: this is my home, aimed at creating dialogues of empathy and diversity for a greater sense of digital inclusion, is a series of digital renderings representative of the spectrum of shades within human skin tone and overlaid with subtle and often gentle messages of understanding in hopes to promote a higher level of care and concern in digital communication and accessibility. the digital renderings will be produced as large posters and placed across the mozilla festival venue to act as a public service announcement to engage with guests in attendance, prompting viewers to feel considered in their contribution towards an open and diverse internet. Project Statement: empathy involves the inner experience of sharing in and comprehending the momentary psychological state of another person (schafer, 1959). what future do we envision, when we talk about digital inclusion? we

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Safe-space

DIGITAL INCLUSION

BROOKLYN J. PAKATHI

in searching for the connectors of cause, meaning and sense of resolve, brooklyn j’s work fundamentally speaks to the tragic vulnerability of romance he explores these themes of an existential nature, plagued by fragility, through video vignettes, digital observations, and photographic interrogations. making loneliness an art since 92’ often define inclusion as the ability of individuals and groups to access and use information and communication technologies. encompassing not only access to the internet but also the availability of hardware and software; relevant content and services; and training for the digital literacy skills required

for effective use of information and communication technologies. but in and of itself, digital inclusion can often overlook the necessity for creating and maintaining a dialogue of digital empathy. as with many other aspects of contemporary culture, rapid adoption of social and mobile technologies has altered society’s communication patterns and disrupted the expression of empathy, specifically in digital conversations. mobile and social media use has transformed when and how individuals interact with others. the ability to instantly share thoughts, feelings, and behaviors with the rest of society via digital channels can occur in mere seconds, often without the empathetic social filter that accompanies traditional communications. moreover, digital communications are devoid of many of the emotional signals and cues experienced in face-to-face settings, often leading to more impersonal interactions. creating and exploring digital empathy unlocks the digital communication of empathy, one of the core elements missing from how we currently communicate online. there are few ways to show a friend, a loved one, a group or a community as a whole that you feel empathetic towards their situation. the project, this is my home, tries to understand what it means to be digitally human taking into account the worlds of digital and non-digital are becoming more and more one in the same. the messages project empathy as enacted between a community and pay attention to someone else’s experience in a way that allows the other to realize that we all share and understand the essential quality of our digital experiences. the work aims to understand how other people feels and to be able to communicate this understanding in a way that is uniquely ‘human’. this physical and tangible work presented seemingly offline but still represented in a digital space reflects the present day failure of digital devices and online communications to facilitate the expression of empathy between people. the importance for the work to exist in and around the festival space works

accordingly to mozilla festival’s mandate and responsibility in creating an accessible and equally inclusive space for learning, growth, understanding, and diversity without any prerequisite or criteria to entry. Goals: • to create an opportunity for communities to explore communication of empathyand understanding • to build a digital culture of inclusivity without the use of active technology that can often negate individuals wants to experience digital • to create an environment that speaks to individuals main cause for fear and concern and offer safety and peace of mind

this is your home

it’s going to be okay

Embrace them. If you need a chat / walk / silent film, let me know

this is a safe space

Outcome

You are not alone and all will be well. It’s because of you, that I am still standing!! This will pass. You are fine. We are with you. Use this. Become better from experience.

Round table discussion cted

empat

hy

Safe space

[...] Making Web literacy meaningful for everyone Web literacy should mean all the skills we need to think, create, and thrive online. Many people hear the term Web literacy and think it means learning to code, or STEM (science, technology, engineering, maths) education. But Web literacy is much broader than that – it should include all the skills to be confident and competent online. To be empowered digital citizens, we all need to know how to navigate, how to share, what information to trust, and most importantly, how to expand the frontiers of our knowledge.

5

[...] Cultivating digital citizenship

Web literacy should be a foundational to education as reading, writing, and maths are – and it should be taught everywhere learning happens.

A fundamental part of Web literacy is understanding the forces that shape our lives online: the companies building our experiences, the politicians crafting and supporting government policies, and the power we hold as digital citizens to create the Internet we want. Having a say in our shared future on the Web means deciding which values are most important to us, and standing up for those values when they are threatened.

Protest Culture DIGITAL CULTURE

Digital Animal Memes by The Civic Beat (Jason Li and An Xiao Mina)

(A digital thing showing top into a physical thing.)

Variation

Cross geography connections in the memes.

Variation of a same meme

The process

IMAGES

Washington, DC

Washington, DC

Digital

#nastywoman

PHOTOGRAPHS

HASHTAG

Audience creating physical memes during the Meme Lab workshop

Digital memes

Physical

Product memes

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

We traditionally think of memes and internet culture as isolated to the internet, where digital literacy exists separately from traditional notions of cultural literacy. Recent years have seen a steady breakdown of that divide in popular discourse, whether talking about notions of privacy and surveillance, the role of government in regulating the internet, and, of course, in the rapid spread of meme culture in popular culture. In both the United States and the United Kingdom, memes have leapt from the internet in new and compelling ways. The iconic red Make America Great Again hat of the Trump campaign has inspired a number of digital remixes, like Make America Mexico Again and Make Racists Afraid Again, which in turn become physical hat remixes sold to fundraise for advocacy organizations. #RefugeesWelcome, a hashtag movement started in the UK in the face of the Syrian refugee crisis, has spread throughout Western Europe, with stickers, banners and marches around the theme. The online and the offline mix and intermix, crossing digital/physical barriers and leaping across the Atlantic Ocean.

Formal taxonomies can be developed from the folk taxonomy rendered machine-readable by the markup that hashtags provide; this process is called folksonomy.6 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hashtag

MATERIAL CULTURE

Material culture is the physical aspect of culture in the objects and architecture that surround people. It includes usage, consumption, creation and trade of objects, and the behaviors, norms and rituals these objects create or take part in. The term is commonly used in archaeological and anthropological studies, specifically focusing on the material evidence which can be attributed to culture, in the past or present. Material culture studies is an interdisciplinary field telling of relationships between people and their things: the making, history, preservation, and interpretation of objects. It draws on theory and practice from the social sciences and humanities such as art history, archaeology, anthropology, history, historic preservation, folklore, literary criticism and museum studies, among others. Anything from buildings and architectural elements to books, jewelry, or toothbrushes can be considered material culture.7

For the Mozilla Festival residency, I propose #MemeLab: an installation and workshop that looks at these themes and engages attendees in co-creating the installation. The installation will take the form of a scientific laboratory, with walls covered in chalk paint, as we try to diagram meme culture in both its online and offline manifestations. This might include a world map, to help emphasize the global-ness of meme culture. We will pre-install a few diagrams, including #RefugeesWelcome, #NastyWoman, #CatsAgainstBrexit, #Covfefe and a few others in other languages. These diagrams will start with a meme sparking event, with hashtags drawn in chalk, digital memes printed out and taped to the wall, product examples, and selfies in a loop on a digital screen. Attendees will be invited to create diagrams of their own, starting with a meme sparking event, whether in politics or general life. They will then be walked through a few key exercises: Hashtag station: Select a strip of paper from a test tube and write out a hashtag. Printing station: create a simple meme,

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Material_culture

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Digital again

Selfies memes TEXT > WEB LITERACY > PROJECT DESCRIPTION > AN XIAO IN COLLABORATION WITH JASON LI

Because of its widespread use, hashtag was added to the Oxford English Dictionary in June 2014. The term hashtag can also refer to the hash symbol itself when used in the context of a hashtag.

6

Washington, DC

San Jose, CA

Someone says something (‘She is a nasty woiman)

Pussycat vs. Redhat

Users create and use hashtags by placing the number sign or pound sign # (also known as the hash character) in front of a string of alphanumeric characters, usually a word or unspaced phrase, in or at the end of a message. The hashtag may contain letters, digits, and underscores. Searching for that hashtag will yield each message that has been tagged with it. A hashtag archive is consequently collected into a single stream under the same hashtag. For example, on the photosharing service Instagram, the hashtag #bluesky allows users to find all the posts that have been tagged using that hashtag.

07

Washington, DC

Washington, DC

Images from An Xiao Mina’s presentation.

A thing from internet gets remixed, goes to physical world and back to digital.

A hashtag is a type of metadata tag used on social networks such as Twitter and other microblogging services, allowing users to apply dynamic, user-generated tagging that makes it possible for others to easily find messages with a specific theme or content; it allows easy, informal markup of folk taxonomy without need of any formal taxonomy or markup language.

7

ARTWORK

# on manifestation boards

Internet Culture

https://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/Digital_culture

06

[...] Teaching Web literacy effectively

Learning Web literacy is like any other essential skill: we learn best by doing. And in the digital world, learning happens not just with teachers in the classroom, but everywhere there’s an Internet connection. We need all kinds of educators to have the knowledge and resources to teach Web literacy the way kids learn it best. And we need to make sure every student grows up not just on the Web, but fluent in the way it works.

05

Digital Culture stands for the contemporary phase of communication technologies, one that follows 19th century print culture and 20th century electronic broadcast culture, and that is deeply amplified and accelerated by the popularity of networked computers, personalised technologies and digital images. The emergence of digital culture is usually associated with a set of practices based on the ever more intensive use of communication technologies. These uses imply more participatory behaviors on the user side, an ever more visually riched environment and connection features that excell personal dimensions. Digital culture stands first of all for the changes brought about by the emergence of digital, networked and personalised media in our society and the passing from communication phases centred on print and broadcast media, to more personalised and networked media, that use digital compressing and processing capacities at their core. The consequences of such processes in societal terms and the means via which media technologies transform our modes of interaction and representation, broadly constitute what is called “digital culture”.5

HTTPS://CYBER.HARVARD.EDU/PEOPLE/AXMINA

WEB LITERACY

AN XIAO MINA IN COLLABORATION WITH JASON LI An Xiao” Mina is a technologist and writer who looks at issues of the global internet and networked creativity. As a Berkman Klein Fellow, she will study the impact of language barriers in our technology stack as the internet extends into diverse communities around the world, and she will continue her ongoing research on global internet meme culture. Mina leads the product team at Meedan, where they are building digital tools for journalists and translators, and she is co-founder of The Civic Beat, a research collective focused on the creative side of civic technology. She serves as a contributing editor to Civicist, an advisory editor to Hyperallergic, and a governing board member at China Residencies.

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Hashtag wall

Make a bag

Recently a 2016 Knight Visiting Nieman Fellow, where she studied online language barriers and their impact on journalism, Mina is currently working on a book about internet memes and global social movements (working title: “Memes to Movements”), to be published by Beacon Press.

using a meme template, of the hashtag and print it out. Making station: create a button, sticker, paper sign and/or canvas bag inspired by the hashtag. Selfie station: take a photo of yourself with the hashtag, printed meme, and object. Attach the hashtag and objects to the wall and draw chalk lines connecting them to each other and to others to which they have a thematic relationship. Since long before the internet, social movements have relied on a vast repertoire of creative actions and media to represent what they stand for: buttons, bumper stickers, paper signs, hats. Creative culture has leaned on street art, hip hop and dance to generate cultures of remix and performance. These same media actions are still utilized frequently in movements and marketing, but now, in the age of smartphones and the internet, they quickly intersect with the online world. Objects of meme culture get printed out and placed on t-shirts. People carrying clever signs watch their signs get photographed and then go viral on the

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

DIAGRAM Spatial and participatory mapping of the installation/workshop

She has spoken at venues like the Personal Democracy Forum, ACM SIGCHI, Creative Mornings, the Aspen Institute, RightsCon and the Institute for the Future, and she has contributed writing to publications like the Los Angeles Review of Books, Fusion, the New Inquiry, Nieman Journalism Lab, Places Journal and others.

Make a badge

Create a hashtag

internet. The digital and the physical are deeply intertwined, and this workshop will help visitors see the process. The installation and workshop will build on themes from “The Things of the Internet,” a lecture I gave at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University. In this talk, I explored the online-offline. I adapted the talk for a lecture at the University of Hong Kong’s Journalism and Media Studies Centre, where I developed a workshop format that proved to be quite successful and engaging with undergraduates from the University of Hong Kong and Fudan University (Shanghai). It also builds on Grotte de l’Internetz, a workshop and installation at SOMArts in San Francisco, where the artist invited participants to create Stone Age art of animal memes in the spirit of the Grotte Chauvet; as well as the World Animal Meme Map and photo exhibition, shown at the Victoria and Albert Museum’s Friday Late program this past summer.

TAKE A SELFIE

AN XIAO MINA

TEXT > WEB LITERACY > INTRO > SOURCE > ALL FROM HTTPS://WWW.MOZILLA.ORG/EN-GB/INTERNETHEALTH/WEB-LITERACY/

Make a emoji

Make a poster Use an existing Hashtag

Make a cap

OPEN NNOVAT ON

GRETTA LOUW

TEXT > DECENTRALISATION > KEY TERMS

ARCHANA PRASAD AND SEAN BLAGSVEDT

11

ADAO CURRENCY NOTE Each grantee will receive a currency note, personalized with their photo

CRYPTOCURRENCY

DECENTRAL SAT ON

A cryptocurrency (or crypto currency) is a digital asset designed to work as a medium of exchange that uses cryptography to secure its transactions, to control the creation of additional units, and to verify the transfer of assets. Cryptocurrencies are classified as a subset of digital currencies and are also classified as a subset of alternative currencies and virtual currencies.

Decentralisation is outside of control of one specific autority, distributing for many form of conentration...

Bitcoin, created in 2009, was the first decentralized cryptocurrency. Since then, numerous cryptocurrencies have been created. These are frequently called altcoins, as a blend of bitcoin alternative. Bitcoin and its derivatives use decentralized control as opposed to centralized electronic money/central banking systems. The decentralized control is related to the use of bitcoin’s blockchain transaction database in the role of a distributed ledger.11 11

Decentralisation

Distribution of power from concentration? power=money? Decision making? actions? Federation? Choices? Diversity?

Visibility of a transaction chain

Traces of this transaction

Decentralisation: brings the problems of lack of trust

Value comes with trust.

Accountability means taking integrity on an action

DIAGRAM Spatial and participatory mapping of the installation/workshop

Much of the recent sociological debate about power revolves around the issue of its means to enable – in other words, power as a means to make social actions possible as much as it may constrain or prevent them. The philosopher Michel Foucault saw power as a structural expression of “a complex strategic situation in a given social setting” that requires both constraint and enablement.12

TEXT > DECENTRALISATION > PROJECT DESCRIPTION > ARCHANA PRASAD AND SEAN BLAGSVEDT

What is the ADAO? The ADAO stands for Altruistic Democratic Autonomous Organization and offers ada coins as a normative currency with 30% of token supply allocated to form an endowment. Borrowing from Ethereum’s DAO, currency holders in the ADAO will be able to vote on which socially beneficial projects are funded from the endowment. As the value of the currency pool grows, the endowment will grow with it, with the ultimate goal of creating one of the world’s largest democratically run philanthropy funds.

ACCOUNTABILITY

In ethics and governance, accountability is answerability, blameworthiness, liability, and the expectation of account-giving. As an aspect of governance, it has been central to discussions related to problems in the public sector, nonprofit and private (corporate) and individual contexts. In leadership roles, accountability is the acknowledgment and assumption of responsibility for actions, products, decisions, and policies including the administration, governance, and implementation within the scope of the role or employment position and encompassing the obligation to report, explain and be answerable for resulting consequences.

How does it work? A significant share of the currency will form an endowment to support SDG focused artists and social organizations worldwide, with governance and decisions over who gets funded controlled by the community of adacoin holders via Ethereum smart contracts. To raise funds, we will accept donations in other crypto-currencies directly such as ETH and Bitcoin. The ADAO organization will help aid recipients navigate local jurisdiction issues such that they can legally and efficiently convert crypto-donations into local currencies. We will also encourage everyone, but especially artists, developers and social organizations to accept payments in ada coins and to provide services and artifacts that can be bought in ada coins. In doing so, we will fund the greatest democratically governed social/art endowment fund in the world and ultimately monetarily encourage acts of social value.

In governance, accountability has expanded beyond the basic definition of “being called to account for one’s actions”. It is frequently described as an account-giving relationship between individuals, e.g. “A is accountable to B when A is obliged to inform B about A’s (past or future) actions and decisions, to justify them, and to suffer punishment in the case of eventual misconduct”. Accountability cannot exist without proper accounting practices; in other words, an absence of accounting means an absence of accountability.

This installation-performance will speak in the aesthetic, language and mode of a modern bank. Blurring satire with reality, participants can apply for actual grants to be paid in ADAO coins, which will be tradable for traditional currencies on crypto-currency markets. The ADAO Bank will award grants, loans and saving schemes to people interested in working on the SDG’s. It will provide investment and

Accountability is an element of a RACI to indicate who is ultimately answerable for the correct and thorough completion of the deliverable or task, and the one who delegates the work to those responsible. There are various reasons (legitimate or excuses) why accountability fails.13 13

[...] User Control: Deciding who can collect your data We should all be able to choose – with clarity and confidence – what information we share with what companies, understanding the trade-offs we’re making when we do. Right now, we all lack meaningful choice online – privacy policies are often miles long and hard to read, we don’t understand what information we’re sharing or when, and opting out is seldom on the menu.

[...] Cyber Security: Locking down your sensitive information We should all have the ability to protect our online identity. At this point, it feels like we’ve all been victims of a cyberattack somewhere, somehow. Data breaches can lay bare the passwords of millions of people, often going undiscovered for years. Which means your identity may be at risk of theft without you even knowing it.

[...] Government Surveillance: Keeping prying eyes and ears out of your business We should all have the freedom to be ourselves — online and off – without surveillance, judgement and imposed societal bias. You wouldn’t want the government following your every move in real life – there’s no reason they should be shadowing you on the Internet. The Edward Snowden disclosures showed that even democracies can and do take liberties with your privacy.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accountability

Fill out a form

Interview

Take a photo

Get tokens

Get currency note

ARCHANA PRASAD AND SEAN BLAGSVEDT IN COLLABORATION WITH FREEMAN MURRAY Round Table

Archana Prasad, is an artist from Bangalore, India. Her work is a particular conjunction of visual art, technology and urban community art, ste wed in design and research methodologies. As Founder of Jaaga.in, Archana has a unique artist-activist role. Sean Blagsvedt is a technologist and entrepreneur. His recent company babajob provided job information to 10 million blue collar workers across India. Archana and Sean are concerned about the unjust assignment of value, thus currency, that tilts towards mechanisms of successful acquisition based models and stockpiling capital, rather than rewarding innovation and creation, especially around work that fulfills important societal goals but do not create large profits.

philanthropic options for those interested in growing their crypto-currency assets. The ADAO Bank booth provides MozFest participants human connections and conversations about the coin, the bank, its goals and objectives. Additionally the “employees” at the ADAO booth have discretionary power to award a limited number of coins to deserving participants from MozFest. Interaction Model: Participants fill out a form at the booth. Similar to a loan application, they will be invited to describe their own pledges to support the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals. Two tellers - the artists, will interview applicants, take their photo and given a limited number of token grants. Each grantee will receive a currency note, personalized with their photo.

currency, with the needed crypto-graphic keys printed on it such that the participant can claim the ADAO token online). Our Vision What do we want to accomplish? 1. To Take Back Crypto-currency and money itself for 2. Creativity = Wealth Currency is a Choice of: Ethics Models Value Alignment A sustainable futur Politics

(The rendering of the note is a Deep Learning based Style filter of the participant’s photo and a traditional

DIAGRAMS

14

POLARIZATION (POLITICS)

In politics, polarization (or polarisation) can refer to the divergence of political attitudes to ideological extremes. Polarization can refer to such divergence like public opinion or even to such divergence within certain groups. Almost all discussions of polarization in political science consider polarization in the context of political parties and democratic systems of government. When polarization occurs in a two-party system, like the United States, moderate voices often lose power and influence.14 14

Polarization creates

Questions polarised by the (geographical) context

Yes or No

Bringing tension to the debate by polarising the responses (he doesn’t’ believe in polarisation so that is his way of questioning it)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polarization_(politics)

INFORMATION ETHICS

The term information ethics was first coined by Robert Hauptman and used in the book Ethical challenges in librarianship. It examines the morality that comes from information as a resource, a product, or as a target. It provides a critical framework for considering moral issues concerning informational privacy, moral agency (e.g. whether artificial agents may be moral), new environmental issues (especially how agents should behave in the infosphere), problems arising from the life-cycle (creation, collection, recording, distribution, processing, etc.) of information (especially ownership and copyright, digital divide, and digital rights). It is very vital to understand that librarians, archivists, information professionals among others, really understand the importance of knowing how to disseminate proper information as well as being responsible with their actions when addressing information.15 15

By Paolo Cirio. Source > http://globaldirect.today

Experiment about liberation: people all agree if they can access the same information

TEXT > PRIVACY AND SECURITY > KEY TERMS

15 TEXT > WEB LITERACY > INTRO > SOURCE > ALL FROM HTTPS:// WWW.MOZILLA.ORG/EN-GB/ INTERNET-HEALTH/PRIVACYSECURITY/

HTTPS://THEADAO.ORG

DECENTRALISATION

The ADAO is a philanthropic cryptocurrency that supports creatives who advance the Sustainable Development Goals, representing an entirely new way to fund social and creative revolutionaries.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_(social_and_ political)

13

Decentralisation is related with lack of accountability

Accountability= integrity of action? trust?

The use of power need not involve force or the threat of force (coercion). At one extreme, it closely resembles what an English-speaking person might term “influence”, although some authors distinguish “influence” as a means by which power is used. One such example is soft power, as compared to hard power.

A Healthy Internet is Secure and Private The Internet only stays healthy if we trust it as a safe place – to explore, transact, connect, and create. Our privacy and security online is under constant threat. But there’s something you can do about it: get informed, protect yourself, and make your voice heard. A healthy Internet depends on you. [...]

PHOTOGRAPHS Audience interacting at the Adao Bank installation

POWER

12

PRIVACY & SECURITY PAOLO CIRIO

Decentralisation feedback mechanism in economical transactions

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cryptocurrency

12

In social science and politics, power is the ability to influence or outright control the behaviour of people. The term “authority” is often used for power perceived as legitimate by the social structure. Power can be seen as evil or unjust, but the exercise of power is accepted as endemic to humans as social beings. In business, power is often expressed as being “upward” or “downward”. With downward power, a company’s superior influences subordinates. When a company exerts upward power, it is the subordinates who influence the decisions of their leader or leaders.

Politics

PHOTOGRAPHS Participatory installation set up and audience interacting with polls part of Aesthetics of Information Ethics.

Information ethics How to represent sensible information (and the aesthetics derived from it)

Information Ecology

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Information_ethics Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

16

DELIBERATION

Deliberation is a process of thoughtfully weighing options, usually prior to voting. Deliberation emphasizes the use of logic and reason as opposed to power-struggle, creativity, or dialog. Group decisions are generally made after deliberation through a vote or consensus of those involved.

VS PARTICIPATION EMANCIPATION FREEDOM

In legal settings a jury famously uses deliberation because it is given specific options, like guilty or not guilty, along with information and arguments to evaluate. In “deliberative democracy”, the aim is for both elected officials and the general public to use deliberation rather than power-struggle as the basis for their vote.16 16

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

HTTPS://PAOLOCIRIO.NET/PRESS/TEXTS/AESTHETICS-INFORMATION-ETHICS.PHP

MISLEADING POLARITIES IN INFORMATION ETHICS

INCLUSION ACCESS COMMONS

EXPLOITATION CONTROL WITHHOLDING PROPERTY

PRIVATE

PUBLIC

OPACITY

TRANSPARENCY

PRIVACY OBSCURITY EMPATHY ANONYMITY

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deliberation

COERCION

EXCLUSION

RESPONSIBILITY

SURVEILLANCE EXPOSURE HUMILIATION ACCOUNTABILITY IMPUNITY

REPUTATION

SCORING

AUTONOMY

MANIPULATION

EDUCATING

MISINFORMING

QUANTIFIABLE SIMPLICITY

UNDETECTABLE COMPLEXITY

HTTPS://CYBER.HARVARD.EDU/PEOPLE/AXMINA

PRIVACY & SECURITY

PAOLO CIRIO

Paolo Cirio works with legal, economic and semiotic systems of the information society. He investigates social fields impacted by the Internet, such as privacy, copyright, democracy, and finance. He shows his research and intervention-based works through artifacts, photos, installations, videos, and public art. Cirio has exhibited in international museums and institutions and has won numerous prestigious art awards. His artworks have been covered by hundreds of media outlets worldwide and he regularly gives public lectures and workshops at leading universities.

SOME PROBLEMATIC ISSUES CONCERNING INFORMATION ETHICS: SEARCH ENGINES & SOCIAL MEDIA MODERATION HATE SPEECH HARRASSMENT TROLLING BULLYING BLACKMAIL STIGMAS SOCIAL PROFILING SOCIAL SCORE & BIAS CONSUMER PROFILING SEX OFFENDERS CRIMINAL RECORDS PREDICTIVE POLICING RACIAL PROFILING PRIVACY & SURVEILLANCE STATE AND CORPORATE SURVEILLANCE CRYPTOGRAPHY FOR POWER STRUCTURES CRYPTOGRAPHY FOR INDIVIDUALS PUBLIC SHAMING BLOCKCHAIN, DEEPWEB AND DARKNET ANONYMITY TRUST PRIVACY FRAUD HATE SPEECH CRUELTY ALGORITHMS ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE CONTROL ACCOUNTABILITY OF CODERS ROBOTICS AUTOMATED WEAPONS AUTOMATED LABOR PIRACY COPYRIGHT TRADEMARK FAIR USE EDUCATION ROYALITIES MEDIA AND POLITICS TARGETING VOTERS FAKE NEWS SHARING ECONOMY PRIVATE PROPERTY LABOR RIGHTS DIGITAL CURRENCIES TRANSPARENCY VOLATILITY ACCESS TO MEANS INFRASTRUCTURES ECOLOGICAL IMPACT DECENTRALISATION INTERNET OF THINGS POLICY CLOUD SERVERS

The Aesthetics of Information Ethics discusses methodologies, strategies, and practices of art addressing the personal and societal spheres affected by information systems. Information Ethics is broadly defined as “the branch of ethics that focuses on the relationship between the creation, organization, dissemination, and use of information.”[1] The so-called information revolution brings us an increasing number of pressing ethical issues. Artists can be particularly sensitive to these issues and they are able to question ethics by proposing and challenging perceptions and scenarios beyond common understanding. Artworks can creatively discuss and play with distribution systems of sensitive information, ethereal economies, flexible labor and property, circulating bodies and goods, manipulated and monitored relationships, expanded public spaces, exploited opinion formation, and, generally, technological apparatuses affecting social systems. Nowadays, social contracts are fluid; they constantly reorganize society and produce new social conditions. These active spaces are where information ethics emerge and where artists intervene in questioning, revealing, and reassembling the agents and environments of their artworks. Ethics of Aesthetics concerns the ethical frameworks in arranging the sensibility of the audience and the subjects of the artworks. The aesthetic methodologies of intervention, discourse, and representation of information systems can include the production of critique, distress, fear, empathy, alienation, complicity, spectacle, confusion, awareness, and other artistic devices. The aesthetic qualities of the artworks can be called into question through the articulation of the ethical conditions of the works and their subjects. The responsibility and conscience of the artists - as well as of the art critics and curators - are integrated in the analysis and validation of the social and artistic efficacy of the artworks. Concurrently, the ethical and social relations created by these artworks produce aesthetic forms, which concerns the field of the Aesthetics of Ethics. Social fields and norms are increasingly interdependent with technological advancements of information

Ethics are negotiated, developed, and balanced through reflections on the consequences and intentions of human activity. Differentiating themselves from morals - which are often static and ideological - ethics are dynamic, reflexive, and evolving principles that must be

oriented to maximize and develop the common good within the notion of ethics as the making and understanding of a dignified existence for humans and the environment surrounding them.

The Ethics of Representation and information systems

As such, techniques like the exposure and appropriation of sensitive information as well as the manipulation and disruption of social relations should be balanced with the parameters of intentions, receptions, and outcomes of the artwork. In the Aesthetics of Information Ethics, context is main the principle from which we can assess the ethics of artworks. Meaning and impact vary based on the context of presentation, execution, and results. The context needs to account for all the properties of the information systems involved. These methodologies, techniques, and practices of art production and critique are ultimately

Questions from Aesthetics of Information Ethics’ polls.

Should fake news on social media be removed by Internet companies themselves?

Should the coders of algorithms with racial biases be legally accountable?

Should we be able to trace individuals who use digital currency, such as Bitcoin?

Should the documents leaked by Snowden be made available to everyone – not only journalists?

Should politicians be able to use fully cryptographed communications for work?

Should vulnerable individuals be protected online even if they are key to public debate?

Should electronic voting be completely avoided and analog systems restored?

Should we remunerate the open source code utilized by big corporations such as Google?

Can the hacking of political parties during election be justified?

Should Facebook delete posts concerning hate speech toward refugees?

Should public figures on TwiFer be given access to block other accounts?

Should voter profiling and databases being banned?

Should poli:cal spending for online ads be regulated like they are on TV?

Should ads managed by algorithms be considered physiologically manipulative advertising?

DIAGRAM Spatial and partecipatory mapping of the installation.

Presentation screen

Diagrams Yes No

Results

The ethics of the power of these information systems are directly embodied in artworks that use and address such power. The ethical inquiries and relations activated by art with information systems create aesthetic forms. This aesthetics is discussed by measuring, comparing, and evaluating the strategies, consequences, conditions, and circumstances of the works of art. Such analysis needs to take into account a broad social context, therefore integrating the distribution of the work, the mode of presentation within the site of execution, and ultimately the intended and unintended recipients, critiques, and results that the work generates.

constantly discussed and confronted. Art plays a central role in this process. Evolving cultural forms and critical art are essential instruments for sensing and signaling the forming of ethics.

Social transactions and contracts are discussed, created, rearranged, or accentuated by artists for making visible the complexity, contradictions, and complicity within such social relations activated by information systems. However, only an attentive examination of the effects, causes, and nature of such systems can fully address them. Thus, representations of social and technological systems should engage with the dialectics of the construction of ethical values. The integrity of the agenda pursued is a responsibility of the artist in relation to the system addressed, while the critical reception should assess the means and ends of the artworks within the whole spectrum of forms and contexts of presentation.

QUESTIONS

computation, sharing, and control. Information technology has become the heart of the social order. However, it can be understood not from a technological point of view, but rather through a constant reflexive examination of what it produces in the social sphere. The ethical discussion can’t be limited to technocrats, legislators, coders, and the opaque internal policies of private entities. Art can play a role in this process of creating awareness and reflection on difficult ethical questions by making them relevant and engaging. The material of these aesthetic examinations is not limited to the Internet, algorithms, big data, and other technologies. These technical elements are mutually influenced by the political, cultural, legal, and economic systems, as well as several other social fields and infrastructures. Information systems should be understood as interconnected networks of social systems in which reflection and intervention have the potential to reverberate throughout the whole web of networks, consequently impacting a variety of conventions, entities, and individuals which are inevitably connected.

SHOULD FAKE NEWS ON SOCIAL MEDIA BE REMOVED BY INTERNET COMPANIES THEMSELVES ?

14 QUESTIONS = 14 POLS

Feedback from the audience + Add new questions

No

Yes

87 NO

Question

Polarities in Ethics of Representation In the Aesthetics of Information Ethics, the appearances, perceptions, and sensations of reality created by artists should take into account the formation of polarities. Mystifications and oversimplifications about the social impacts of information systems are instances of the Ethics of Representation. As such, the creation of falsehoods, hype, confusion, anxiety, or fatalism sustained by the producers and reporters of information systems create polarities in understanding ever-changing technological apparatuses and their social impacts. The Aesthetics of Information Ethics is about breaking down polarities to offer a broader understanding of the conditions within these systems. Examples of problematic issues in Information Ethics The Aesthetics of Information Ethics can be applied to examining the liability of algorithms, responsibility in anonymous networks, exploitation of shared content and labor, censorship on social media, freedom of speech used to harass, public shaming to condemn, hacking to protest or leak, and micro-targeting for political campaigning. In order to inspire inquiry, the artist questions how to balance freedom, empathy, justice, and accountability. By Paolo Cirio. 2017. [1] Joan, Reitz M. “Information Ethics.” Online Dictionary For Library And Information Science. N.p., 2010.

tomorrow will be better.

It gets better, but it does take time. She’s always with you. You got this. You can do this.

Conne

PHOTOGRAPHS

PHOTOGRAPHS

Tactical Technology Collective instructing the audience on how to use their Data Detox Kit

Visitors exploring vistual reality at Callum Cooper’s VR installation about privacy.

SOURCE > HTTPS://TACTICALTECH.ORG/NEWS/ DATA-DETOX-KIT/

Detox your Digital Self THE 8-DAY DATA DETOX Do you feel like your digital self is slipping out of control? Have you let yourself install too many apps, clicked “I agree” a few too many times, lost track of how many accounts you’ve created? Perhaps you feel you’re not as in control of your digital life as you’d like to be.

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Don’t despair! This data detox is designed just for you. By the end of the 8-day program, you’ll be well on your way to a healthier and more in-control digital self. The Data Detox Kit was produced for The Glass Room NYC, presented by Mozilla and Tactical Technology Collective.

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

SHOULD POLITICIANS BE ABLE TO USE FULLY CRYPTOGRAPHED COMMUNICATIONS FOR WORK ?

57 YES

You are valuable. You don’t need to achieve + lead + be visible to others to be valuable + deserve consideration.

Deep breaths - water.

Remember the last time you faced a major change -> it turned out to be for the better. This will too.

User Responses

Don’t overthink, it will be fine. Just relax. Nothing is constant. Think about all the good that has happened.

Don’t worry you’re still pretty. Lin chiah pà bē? Everything is temporary

Project Description: although the construct of empathy is multidimensional in nature and difficult to measure, i hope to create an effective strategy for highlighting empathy that focus specifically on communication skills training. the open lab project will visually explore the mozilla festival’s community’s understanding of digital empathy through a survey in which users can answer a serious of questions by applying coloured stickers to a chart in an effort to reflect levels of understanding towards digital empathy, accessibility and inclusion. self-reflection is a useful method for addressing empathy. and as such self-reflection activities could theoretically prompt guests to question and examine their interactions in the online world. this self-examination process may potentially develop heightened online awareness and promote increased digital empathy. the means by which empathy is expressed is naturally evolving as the world and its forms of communications become increasingly digital and recognizing and addressing barriers to the expression of digital empathy is important. if we can sharpen the communication skills of traditional empathy, how can we then use those skills to address the greater discussion of digital empathy?

everyday is trying. I am with you. well done. I’m here… and I promise to never let you go.

Life has its ups & downs.

build grow heal love

Open Lab Session. Type of Project: Survey | Data Visualization

What is the worst that can happen? How likely is it to happen?

This too shall pass.

You have overcome so many other things already too

Digital Renders

You’re always trying so hard,

You are loved You are not alone! We are with you

If you’re just travelling when there’s sun, you’ll never get anywhere

TEXT > WEB LITERACY > KEY TERMS

A healthy Internet means everyone has the skills to thrive People everywhere should have the knowledge they need to tap into the full power of the Internet – and use it to make their lives and the world better. This means everyone needs to be able to read, write, and participate online. A healthy Internet is yours to master.depends on you. [...]

Trying makes a difference. Trying can be your victory.

Are you ok?

Spatial and partecipatory mapping of the installation.

Tsemppiä!

Aim to be comfortably lost

The pendulum will swing

DIAGRAM

You haven’t killed anyone… it’s ok!

This too shall pass

What is (realistically) the worst that could happen?

COLLABORATRIVE SPACE

WEB LITERACY

i found that certain understandings of definitions become very nuclear, contaminated and porous so what does it mean when i talk about technology in the context of vulnerability and who we are today.

Questioning the role of technology in the context of vulnerability

I got you load of Biscoff, all the music you like, a bluetooth speaker and also the people you are friend with are online. ? Do you want a hug? xx Take a break – I’ve got this! It’ll be alright. Trust me. You only live once =) It’s not the end of the world!!! A vide é muito curta. Aproveite! Be brilliant by your own standards. Not of others. Go on! Don’t let fear stop your explorations! You’ve made a difference in my life, what you do matters. You are enough! <3

i want to explore the daily trauma we undergo to earn the coveted badge of successful human existence that often negates notions of struggle, loneliness and deeper meanings of wounded-ness. a trauma that plays itself in sets and loops traveling by genome and bloodstream. we need to close, we need to fill this loop. so from that, i find the vulnerability of digital immersion. soaking myself in the frailties of others to wash away things gray. and sometimes in the immersion, i find that i might be required to live them. and from disenfranchised digital cultures i learn about the vulnerabilities of race and how it was only created to sustain a larger system of capitalism. error 404, page not found. i was invited here to speak about inclusion. but i think we should focus on loops, and loopholes and continuums. about closing the gaps and expanding our capacity to include more brokenness. from distorted views of linear utoipian w


WEB LITERAC

A healthy Internet means everyone has the skills to thrive People everywhere should have the knowledge they need to tap into the full power of the Internet â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and use it to make their lives and the world better. This means everyone needs to be able to read, write, and participate online. A healthy Internet is yours to master.depends on you. [...]

AN XIAO MINA


TEXT > WEB LITERACY > INTRO > SOURCE > ALL FROM HTTPS://WWW.MOZILLA.ORG/EN-GB/INTERNETHEALTH/WEB-LITERACY/

[...] Making Web literacy meaningful for everyone Web literacy should mean all the skills we need to think, create, and thrive online. Many people hear the term Web literacy and think it means learning to code, or STEM (science, technology, engineering, maths) education. But Web literacy is much broader than that – it should include all the skills to be confident and competent online. To be empowered digital citizens, we all need to know how to navigate, how to share, what information to trust, and most importantly, how to expand the frontiers of our knowledge.

D t c t a c a n t e a b u T b m a p s b d m f o m m a c p m t r i

5

0

[...] Teaching Web literacy effectively

[...] Cultivating digital citizenship

Web literacy should be a foundational to education as reading, writing, and maths are – and it should be taught everywhere learning happens.

A fundamental part of Web literacy is understanding the forces that shape our lives online: the companies building our experiences, the politicians crafting and supporting government policies, and the power we hold as digital citizens to create the Internet we want. Having a say in our shared future on the Web means deciding which values are most important to us, and standing up for those values when they are threatened.

Learning Web literacy is like any other essential skill: we learn best by doing. And in the digital world, learning happens not just with teachers in the classroom, but everywhere there’s an Internet connection. We need all kinds of educators to have the knowledge and resources to teach Web literacy the way kids learn it best. And we need to make sure every student grows up not just on the Web, but fluent in the way it works.

0

X 9; Y 98

WEB LITERACY

A t a s d t e t i w o

U p s c a a a m u h h a


g

TEXT > WEB LITERACY > KEY TERMS

05

DIGITAL CULTURE

Digital Culture stands for the contemporary phase of communication technologies, one that follows 19th century print culture and 20th century electronic broadcast culture, and that is deeply amplified and accelerated by the popularity of networked computers, personalised technologies and digital images. The emergence of digital culture is usually associated with a set of practices based on the ever more intensive use of communication technologies. These uses imply more participatory behaviors on the user side, an ever more visually riched environment and connection features that excell personal dimensions. Digital culture stands first of all for the changes brought about by the emergence of digital, networked and personalised media in our society and the passing from communication phases centred on print and broadcast media, to more personalised and networked media, that use digital compressing and processing capacities at their core. The consequences of such processes in societal terms and the means via which media technologies transform our modes of interaction and representation, broadly constitute what is called â&#x20AC;&#x153;digital cultureâ&#x20AC;?.5 5

Internet Culture Variation

Variation of a same meme

https://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/Digital_culture

06

HASHTAG

A hashtag is a type of metadata tag used on social networks such as Twitter and other microblogging services, allowing users to apply dynamic, user-generated tagging that makes it possible for others to easily find messages with a specific theme or content; it allows easy, informal markup of folk taxonomy without need of any formal taxonomy or markup language. Users create and use hashtags by placing the number sign or pound sign # (also known as the hash character) in front of a string of alphanumeric characters, usually a word or unspaced phrase, in or at the end of a message. The hashtag

TEXT > WEB LITERACY > PROJECT DESCRIPTION > AN XIAO IN COLLABORATION WITH JASON LI

We traditionally think of memes and


Protest Culture

# on manifestation boards

(A digital thing showing top into a physical thing.)

Cross geography connections in the memes.

The process A thing from internet gets remixed, goes to physical world and back to digital.

Someone says something (â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;She is a nasty woiman)

Pussycat vs. Redhat #nastywoman

Digital

Digital memes

Product memes

Selfies memes HTTPS://CYBER.HARVARD.EDU/PEOPLE/AXMINA

WEB LITERACY

Physical

Digital again

X 24; Y 98

WEB LITERACY


character) in front of a string of alphanumeric characters, usually a word or unspaced phrase, in or at the end of a message. The hashtag may contain letters, digits, and underscores. Searching for that hashtag will yield each message that has been tagged with it. A hashtag archive is consequently collected into a single stream under the same hashtag. For example, on the photosharing service Instagram, the hashtag #bluesky allows users to find all the posts that have been tagged using that hashtag. Because of its widespread use, hashtag was added to the Oxford English Dictionary in June 2014. The term hashtag can also refer to the hash symbol itself when used in the context of a hashtag. Formal taxonomies can be developed from the folk taxonomy rendered machine-readable by the markup that hashtags provide; this process is called folksonomy.6 6

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hashtag

07

MATERIAL CULTURE

Material culture is the physical aspect of culture in the objects and architecture that surround people. It includes usage, consumption, creation and trade of objects, and the behaviors, norms and rituals these objects create or take part in. The term is commonly used in archaeological and anthropological studies, specifically focusing on the material evidence which can be attributed to culture, in the past or present. Material culture studies is an interdisciplinary field telling of relationships between people and their things: the making, history, preservation, and interpretation of objects. It draws on theory and practice from the social sciences and humanities such as art history, archaeology, anthropology, history, historic preservation, folklore, literary criticism and museum studies, among others. Anything from buildings and architectural elements to books, jewelry, or toothbrushes can be considered material culture.7 7

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Material_culture

TEXT > WEB LITERACY > PROJECT DESCRIPTION > AN XIAO IN COLLABORATION WITH JASON LI

We traditionally think of memes and internet culture as isolated to the internet, where digital literacy exists separately from traditional notions of cultural literacy. Recent years have seen a steady breakdown of that divide in popular discourse, whether talking about notions of privacy and surveillance, the role of government in regulating the internet, and, of course, in the rapid spread of meme culture in popular culture. In both the United States and the United Kingdom, memes have leapt from the internet in new and compelling ways. The iconic red Make America Great Again hat of the Trump campaign has inspired a number of digital remixes, like Make America Mexico Again and Make Racists Afraid Again, which in turn become physical hat remixes sold to fundraise for advocacy organizations. #RefugeesWelcome, a hashtag movement started in the UK in the face of the Syrian refugee crisis, has spread throughout Western Europe, with stickers, banners and marches around the theme. The online and the offline mix and intermix, crossing digital/physical barriers and leaping across the Atlantic Ocean. For the Mozilla Festival residency, I propose #MemeLab: an installation and workshop that looks at these themes and engages attendees in co-creating the installation. The installation will take the form of a scientific laboratory, with walls covered in chalk paint, as we try to diagram meme culture in both its online and offline manifestations. This might include a world map, to help emphasize the global-ness of meme culture. We will pre-install a few diagrams, including #RefugeesWelcome, #NastyWoman, #CatsAgainstBrexit, #Covfefe and a few others in other languages. These diagrams will start with a meme sparking event, with hashtags drawn in chalk, digital memes printed out and taped to the wall, product examples, and selfies in a loop on a digital screen. Attendees will be invited to create diagrams of their own, starting with a meme sparking event, whether in politics or general life. They will then be walked through a few key exercises: Hashtag station: Select a strip of paper from a test tube and write out a hashtag. Printing station: create a simple meme,


Selfies memes HTTPS://CYBER.HARVARD.EDU/PEOPLE/AXMINA

WEB LITERACY

AN XIAO MINA IN COLLABORATION WITH JASON LI An Xiao” Mina is a technologist and writer who looks at issues of the global internet and networked creativity. As a Berkman Klein Fellow, she will study the impact of language barriers in our technology stack as the internet extends into diverse communities around the world, and she will continue her ongoing research on global internet meme culture. Mina leads the product team at Meedan, where they are building digital tools for journalists and translators, and she is co-founder of The Civic Beat, a research collective focused on the creative side of civic technology. She serves as a contributing editor to Civicist, an advisory editor to Hyperallergic, and a governing board member at China Residencies. She has spoken at venues like the Personal Democracy Forum, ACM SIGCHI, Creative Mornings, the Aspen Institute, RightsCon and the Institute for the Future, and she has contributed writing to publications like the Los Angeles Review of Books, Fusion, the New Inquiry, Nieman Journalism Lab, Places Journal and others. Recently a 2016 Knight Visiting Nieman Fellow, where she studied online language barriers and their impact on journalism, Mina is currently working on a book about internet memes and global social movements (working title: “Memes to Movements”), to be published by Beacon Press.

using a meme template, of the hashtag and print it out. Making station: create a button, sticker, paper sign and/or canvas bag inspired by the hashtag. Selfie station: take a photo of yourself with the hashtag, printed meme, and object. Attach the hashtag and objects to the wall and draw chalk lines connecting them to each other and to others to which they have a thematic relationship. Since long before the internet, social movements have relied on a vast repertoire of creative actions and media to represent what they stand for: buttons, bumper stickers, paper signs, hats. Creative culture has leaned on street art, hip hop and dance to generate cultures of remix and performance. These same media actions are still utilized frequently in movements and marketing, but now, in the age of smartphones and the internet, they quickly intersect with the online world. Objects of meme culture get printed out and placed on t-shirts. People carrying clever signs watch their signs get photographed and then go viral on the

internet. The digital and the physical are deeply intertwined, and this workshop will help visitors see the process. The installation and workshop will build on themes from “The Things of the Internet,” a lecture I gave at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University. In this talk, I explored the online-offline. I adapted the talk for a lecture at the University of Hong Kong’s Journalism and Media Studies Centre, where I developed a workshop format that proved to be quite successful and engaging with undergraduates from the University of Hong Kong and Fudan University (Shanghai). It also builds on Grotte de l’Internetz, a workshop and installation at SOMArts in San Francisco, where the artist invited participants to create Stone Age art of animal memes in the spirit of the Grotte Chauvet; as well as the World Animal Meme Map and photo exhibition, shown at the Victoria and Albert Museum’s Friday Late program this past summer.

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WEB LITERACY


DIAGRAM Spatial and participatory mapping of the installation/workshop

Hashtag wall

Create a hashtag

Use an existing Hashtag


Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Make a emoji

Make a cap

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WEB LITERACY

COLLABORATRIVE SPACE

Make a poster

Make a badge

TAKE A SELFIE

Make a bag

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra


ARTWORK Digital Animal Memes by The Civic Beat (Jason Li and An Xiao Mina)

IMAGES

Washington, DC

Images from An Xiao Minaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s presentation.

PHOTOGRAPHS Audience creating physical memes during the Meme Lab workshop

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra


Washington, DC

San Jose, CA

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

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Washington, DC

San Jose, CA

Washington, DC

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra


Washington, DC

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WEB LITERACY


Washington, DC


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WEB LITERACY


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WEB LITERACY


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DIGITAL INCLUSION BROOKLYN J. PAKATHI

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WEB LITERACY AN XIAO MINA

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OPEN INNOVATION GRETTA LOUW

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DECENTRALISATION ARCHADA PRASAD AND SEAN BLAGSVEDT

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PRIVACY & SECURITY PAOLO CIRIO + TACTICAL TECH + CALLUM COOPER


vulnerability makes us human

D G TAL

Vulnerability

NCLUS ON BROOKLYN

today i want to talk about the vulnerabilities of being (digital and all) i don’t know if we ever truly interrogate what vulnerability is and what it means for us.

TEXT > DIGITAL INCLUSION > KEY TERMS

1

inc ca lus ex n’t ioa wi ist n em th ou pa t th y

as a tool to navigate the world

EMPATHY

Technology

01

Empathy is the capacity to understand or feel what another person is experiencing from within the other person’s frame of reference, i.e., the capacity to place oneself in another’s position. There are many definitions for empathy that encompass a broad range of emotional states. Types of empathy include cognitive empathy, emotional empathy, and somatic empathy.1

SELF-REFLECTION

Human self-reflection is the capacity of humans to exercise introspection and the willingness to learn more about their fundamental nature, purpose and essence. The earliest historical records demonstrate the great interest which humanity has had in itself.

Emotional labour

instead, let’s explore the vulnerabilities of being and it’s necessity to build connective collective empathy. the vulnerabilities of dreaming, in a world governed by homogeneous toxic misteachings of branded macho-ism. in a world that requires improvisation at every moment. so this is what we are exploring.

In order to create inclusive spaces, we need to create inclusive spaces

INCLUSIVITY

i want to explore the technologies we implore every day as tools to navigate all the things that exist in a very resilient selfdriven world.

Empathy

An intention or policy of including people who might otherwise be excluded or marginalized, such as those who are handicapped or learning-disabled, or racial and sexual minorities.3

BROOKLYN ASKS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Safe-space

3

04

AUDIENCE RESPONDS Come and join us!!

SAFE-SPACE

I’m so lost (I found a way)

In educational institutions, safe space (or safe-space), safer space, and positive space are terms that, as originally intended, were used to indicate that a teacher, educational institution, or student body did not tolerate anti-LGBT violence, harassment or hate speech, thereby creating a safe place for all LGBT students. The term safe space has been extended to refer to an autonomous space for individuals who feel marginalized to come together to communicate regarding their experiences with marginalization, typically on a university campus. Safe spaces exist in educational institutions of anglophone countries. The idea of safe spaces has seen criticism on the grounds that it stifles freedom of speech. Critics claim safe spaces hinder the exposure of sensitive material that needs to be discussed and explained in an educational environment.4 4

i’m rejecting the idea of vulnerability as a mode of disregarded weakness. our sense of vulnerability is in fact innately human.

The vulnerability of the individual

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-reflection

03

i’m not interested in sweeping statements of empathetic learning and building for the sole purpose of opportunist capital gain.

Feeling vulnerable online

Human self-reflection is related to the philosophy of consciousness, the topic of awareness, consciousness in general and the philosophy of mind. 2 2

today i want us to imagine, to dream, to question.

There is a necessity to build a collective connected emphathy

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Empathy

02

J PAKATH

TEXT > DIGITAL INCLUSION > PROJECT DESCRIPTION > BY BROOKLYN J. PAKATHI

This is my home Type of Project: Pixelated Digital Renderings | Poster Art | Public Art Project Description: this is my home, aimed at creating dialogues of empathy and diversity for a greater sense of digital inclusion, is a series of digital renderings representative of the spectrum of shades within human skin tone and overlaid with subtle and often gentle messages of understanding in hopes to promote a higher level of care and concern in digital communication and accessibility. the digital renderings will be produced as large posters and placed across the mozilla festival venue to act as a public service announcement to engage with guests in attendance, prompting viewers to feel considered in their contribution towards an open and diverse internet. Project Statement: empathy involves the inner experience of sharing in and comprehending the momentary psychological state of another person (schafer, 1959). what future do we envision, when we talk about digital inclusion? we

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Safe-space

DIGITAL INCLUSION

BROOKLYN J. PAKATHI

in searching for the connectors of cause, meaning and sense of resolve, brooklyn j’s work fundamentally speaks to the tragic vulnerability of romance he explores these themes of an existential nature, plagued by fragility, through video vignettes, digital observations, and photographic interrogations. making loneliness an art since 92’ often define inclusion as the ability of individuals and groups to access and use information and communication technologies. encompassing not only access to the internet but also the availability of hardware and software; relevant content and services; and training for the digital literacy skills required

for effective use of information and communication technologies. but in and of itself, digital inclusion can often overlook the necessity for creating and maintaining a dialogue of digital empathy. as with many other aspects of contemporary culture, rapid adoption of social and mobile technologies has altered society’s communication patterns and disrupted the expression of empathy, specifically in digital conversations. mobile and social media use has transformed when and how individuals interact with others. the ability to instantly share thoughts, feelings, and behaviors with the rest of society via digital channels can occur in mere seconds, often without the empathetic social filter that accompanies traditional communications. moreover, digital communications are devoid of many of the emotional signals and cues experienced in face-to-face settings, often leading to more impersonal interactions. creating and exploring digital empathy unlocks the digital communication of empathy, one of the core elements missing from how we currently communicate online. there are few ways to show a friend, a loved one, a group or a community as a whole that you feel empathetic towards their situation. the project, this is my home, tries to understand what it means to be digitally human taking into account the worlds of digital and non-digital are becoming more and more one in the same. the messages project empathy as enacted between a community and pay attention to someone else’s experience in a way that allows the other to realize that we all share and understand the essential quality of our digital experiences. the work aims to understand how other people feels and to be able to communicate this understanding in a way that is uniquely ‘human’. this physical and tangible work presented seemingly offline but still represented in a digital space reflects the present day failure of digital devices and online communications to facilitate the expression of empathy between people. the importance for the work to exist in and around the festival space works

accordingly to mozilla festival’s mandate and responsibility in creating an accessible and equally inclusive space for learning, growth, understanding, and diversity without any prerequisite or criteria to entry. Goals: • to create an opportunity for communities to explore communication of empathyand understanding • to build a digital culture of inclusivity without the use of active technology that can often negate individuals wants to experience digital • to create an environment that speaks to individuals main cause for fear and concern and offer safety and peace of mind

this is your home

it’s going to be okay

Embrace them. If you need a chat / walk / silent film, let me know

this is a safe space

Outcome

You are not alone and all will be well. It’s because of you, that I am still standing!! This will pass. You are fine. We are with you. Use this. Become better from experience.

Round table discussion cted

empat

hy

Safe space

[...] Making Web literacy meaningful for everyone Web literacy should mean all the skills we need to think, create, and thrive online. Many people hear the term Web literacy and think it means learning to code, or STEM (science, technology, engineering, maths) education. But Web literacy is much broader than that – it should include all the skills to be confident and competent online. To be empowered digital citizens, we all need to know how to navigate, how to share, what information to trust, and most importantly, how to expand the frontiers of our knowledge.

5

[...] Cultivating digital citizenship

Web literacy should be a foundational to education as reading, writing, and maths are – and it should be taught everywhere learning happens.

A fundamental part of Web literacy is understanding the forces that shape our lives online: the companies building our experiences, the politicians crafting and supporting government policies, and the power we hold as digital citizens to create the Internet we want. Having a say in our shared future on the Web means deciding which values are most important to us, and standing up for those values when they are threatened.

Protest Culture DIGITAL CULTURE

Digital Animal Memes by The Civic Beat (Jason Li and An Xiao Mina)

(A digital thing showing top into a physical thing.)

Variation

Cross geography connections in the memes.

Variation of a same meme

The process

IMAGES

Washington, DC

Washington, DC

Digital

#nastywoman

PHOTOGRAPHS

HASHTAG

Audience creating physical memes during the Meme Lab workshop

Digital memes

Physical

Product memes

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

We traditionally think of memes and internet culture as isolated to the internet, where digital literacy exists separately from traditional notions of cultural literacy. Recent years have seen a steady breakdown of that divide in popular discourse, whether talking about notions of privacy and surveillance, the role of government in regulating the internet, and, of course, in the rapid spread of meme culture in popular culture. In both the United States and the United Kingdom, memes have leapt from the internet in new and compelling ways. The iconic red Make America Great Again hat of the Trump campaign has inspired a number of digital remixes, like Make America Mexico Again and Make Racists Afraid Again, which in turn become physical hat remixes sold to fundraise for advocacy organizations. #RefugeesWelcome, a hashtag movement started in the UK in the face of the Syrian refugee crisis, has spread throughout Western Europe, with stickers, banners and marches around the theme. The online and the offline mix and intermix, crossing digital/physical barriers and leaping across the Atlantic Ocean.

Formal taxonomies can be developed from the folk taxonomy rendered machine-readable by the markup that hashtags provide; this process is called folksonomy.6 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hashtag

MATERIAL CULTURE

Material culture is the physical aspect of culture in the objects and architecture that surround people. It includes usage, consumption, creation and trade of objects, and the behaviors, norms and rituals these objects create or take part in. The term is commonly used in archaeological and anthropological studies, specifically focusing on the material evidence which can be attributed to culture, in the past or present. Material culture studies is an interdisciplinary field telling of relationships between people and their things: the making, history, preservation, and interpretation of objects. It draws on theory and practice from the social sciences and humanities such as art history, archaeology, anthropology, history, historic preservation, folklore, literary criticism and museum studies, among others. Anything from buildings and architectural elements to books, jewelry, or toothbrushes can be considered material culture.7

For the Mozilla Festival residency, I propose #MemeLab: an installation and workshop that looks at these themes and engages attendees in co-creating the installation. The installation will take the form of a scientific laboratory, with walls covered in chalk paint, as we try to diagram meme culture in both its online and offline manifestations. This might include a world map, to help emphasize the global-ness of meme culture. We will pre-install a few diagrams, including #RefugeesWelcome, #NastyWoman, #CatsAgainstBrexit, #Covfefe and a few others in other languages. These diagrams will start with a meme sparking event, with hashtags drawn in chalk, digital memes printed out and taped to the wall, product examples, and selfies in a loop on a digital screen. Attendees will be invited to create diagrams of their own, starting with a meme sparking event, whether in politics or general life. They will then be walked through a few key exercises: Hashtag station: Select a strip of paper from a test tube and write out a hashtag. Printing station: create a simple meme,

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Material_culture

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Digital again

Selfies memes TEXT > WEB LITERACY > PROJECT DESCRIPTION > AN XIAO IN COLLABORATION WITH JASON LI

Because of its widespread use, hashtag was added to the Oxford English Dictionary in June 2014. The term hashtag can also refer to the hash symbol itself when used in the context of a hashtag.

6

Washington, DC

San Jose, CA

Someone says something (‘She is a nasty woiman)

Pussycat vs. Redhat

Users create and use hashtags by placing the number sign or pound sign # (also known as the hash character) in front of a string of alphanumeric characters, usually a word or unspaced phrase, in or at the end of a message. The hashtag may contain letters, digits, and underscores. Searching for that hashtag will yield each message that has been tagged with it. A hashtag archive is consequently collected into a single stream under the same hashtag. For example, on the photosharing service Instagram, the hashtag #bluesky allows users to find all the posts that have been tagged using that hashtag.

07

Washington, DC

Washington, DC

Images from An Xiao Mina’s presentation.

A thing from internet gets remixed, goes to physical world and back to digital.

A hashtag is a type of metadata tag used on social networks such as Twitter and other microblogging services, allowing users to apply dynamic, user-generated tagging that makes it possible for others to easily find messages with a specific theme or content; it allows easy, informal markup of folk taxonomy without need of any formal taxonomy or markup language.

7

ARTWORK

# on manifestation boards

Internet Culture

https://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/Digital_culture

06

[...] Teaching Web literacy effectively

Learning Web literacy is like any other essential skill: we learn best by doing. And in the digital world, learning happens not just with teachers in the classroom, but everywhere there’s an Internet connection. We need all kinds of educators to have the knowledge and resources to teach Web literacy the way kids learn it best. And we need to make sure every student grows up not just on the Web, but fluent in the way it works.

05

Digital Culture stands for the contemporary phase of communication technologies, one that follows 19th century print culture and 20th century electronic broadcast culture, and that is deeply amplified and accelerated by the popularity of networked computers, personalised technologies and digital images. The emergence of digital culture is usually associated with a set of practices based on the ever more intensive use of communication technologies. These uses imply more participatory behaviors on the user side, an ever more visually riched environment and connection features that excell personal dimensions. Digital culture stands first of all for the changes brought about by the emergence of digital, networked and personalised media in our society and the passing from communication phases centred on print and broadcast media, to more personalised and networked media, that use digital compressing and processing capacities at their core. The consequences of such processes in societal terms and the means via which media technologies transform our modes of interaction and representation, broadly constitute what is called “digital culture”.5

HTTPS://CYBER.HARVARD.EDU/PEOPLE/AXMINA

WEB LITERACY

AN XIAO MINA IN COLLABORATION WITH JASON LI An Xiao” Mina is a technologist and writer who looks at issues of the global internet and networked creativity. As a Berkman Klein Fellow, she will study the impact of language barriers in our technology stack as the internet extends into diverse communities around the world, and she will continue her ongoing research on global internet meme culture. Mina leads the product team at Meedan, where they are building digital tools for journalists and translators, and she is co-founder of The Civic Beat, a research collective focused on the creative side of civic technology. She serves as a contributing editor to Civicist, an advisory editor to Hyperallergic, and a governing board member at China Residencies.

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Hashtag wall

Make a bag

Recently a 2016 Knight Visiting Nieman Fellow, where she studied online language barriers and their impact on journalism, Mina is currently working on a book about internet memes and global social movements (working title: “Memes to Movements”), to be published by Beacon Press.

using a meme template, of the hashtag and print it out. Making station: create a button, sticker, paper sign and/or canvas bag inspired by the hashtag. Selfie station: take a photo of yourself with the hashtag, printed meme, and object. Attach the hashtag and objects to the wall and draw chalk lines connecting them to each other and to others to which they have a thematic relationship. Since long before the internet, social movements have relied on a vast repertoire of creative actions and media to represent what they stand for: buttons, bumper stickers, paper signs, hats. Creative culture has leaned on street art, hip hop and dance to generate cultures of remix and performance. These same media actions are still utilized frequently in movements and marketing, but now, in the age of smartphones and the internet, they quickly intersect with the online world. Objects of meme culture get printed out and placed on t-shirts. People carrying clever signs watch their signs get photographed and then go viral on the

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

DIAGRAM Spatial and participatory mapping of the installation/workshop

She has spoken at venues like the Personal Democracy Forum, ACM SIGCHI, Creative Mornings, the Aspen Institute, RightsCon and the Institute for the Future, and she has contributed writing to publications like the Los Angeles Review of Books, Fusion, the New Inquiry, Nieman Journalism Lab, Places Journal and others.

Make a badge

Create a hashtag

internet. The digital and the physical are deeply intertwined, and this workshop will help visitors see the process. The installation and workshop will build on themes from “The Things of the Internet,” a lecture I gave at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University. In this talk, I explored the online-offline. I adapted the talk for a lecture at the University of Hong Kong’s Journalism and Media Studies Centre, where I developed a workshop format that proved to be quite successful and engaging with undergraduates from the University of Hong Kong and Fudan University (Shanghai). It also builds on Grotte de l’Internetz, a workshop and installation at SOMArts in San Francisco, where the artist invited participants to create Stone Age art of animal memes in the spirit of the Grotte Chauvet; as well as the World Animal Meme Map and photo exhibition, shown at the Victoria and Albert Museum’s Friday Late program this past summer.

TAKE A SELFIE

AN XIAO MINA

TEXT > WEB LITERACY > INTRO > SOURCE > ALL FROM HTTPS://WWW.MOZILLA.ORG/EN-GB/INTERNETHEALTH/WEB-LITERACY/

Make a emoji

Make a poster Use an existing Hashtag

Make a cap

OPEN NNOVAT ON

GRETTA LOUW

TEXT > DECENTRALISATION > KEY TERMS

ARCHANA PRASAD AND SEAN BLAGSVEDT

11

ADAO CURRENCY NOTE Each grantee will receive a currency note, personalized with their photo

CRYPTOCURRENCY

DECENTRAL SAT ON

A cryptocurrency (or crypto currency) is a digital asset designed to work as a medium of exchange that uses cryptography to secure its transactions, to control the creation of additional units, and to verify the transfer of assets. Cryptocurrencies are classified as a subset of digital currencies and are also classified as a subset of alternative currencies and virtual currencies.

Decentralisation is outside of control of one specific autority, distributing for many form of conentration...

Bitcoin, created in 2009, was the first decentralized cryptocurrency. Since then, numerous cryptocurrencies have been created. These are frequently called altcoins, as a blend of bitcoin alternative. Bitcoin and its derivatives use decentralized control as opposed to centralized electronic money/central banking systems. The decentralized control is related to the use of bitcoin’s blockchain transaction database in the role of a distributed ledger.11 11

Decentralisation

Distribution of power from concentration? power=money? Decision making? actions? Federation? Choices? Diversity?

Visibility of a transaction chain

Traces of this transaction

Decentralisation: brings the problems of lack of trust

Value comes with trust.

Accountability means taking integrity on an action

DIAGRAM Spatial and participatory mapping of the installation/workshop

Much of the recent sociological debate about power revolves around the issue of its means to enable – in other words, power as a means to make social actions possible as much as it may constrain or prevent them. The philosopher Michel Foucault saw power as a structural expression of “a complex strategic situation in a given social setting” that requires both constraint and enablement.12

TEXT > DECENTRALISATION > PROJECT DESCRIPTION > ARCHANA PRASAD AND SEAN BLAGSVEDT

What is the ADAO? The ADAO stands for Altruistic Democratic Autonomous Organization and offers ada coins as a normative currency with 30% of token supply allocated to form an endowment. Borrowing from Ethereum’s DAO, currency holders in the ADAO will be able to vote on which socially beneficial projects are funded from the endowment. As the value of the currency pool grows, the endowment will grow with it, with the ultimate goal of creating one of the world’s largest democratically run philanthropy funds.

ACCOUNTABILITY

In ethics and governance, accountability is answerability, blameworthiness, liability, and the expectation of account-giving. As an aspect of governance, it has been central to discussions related to problems in the public sector, nonprofit and private (corporate) and individual contexts. In leadership roles, accountability is the acknowledgment and assumption of responsibility for actions, products, decisions, and policies including the administration, governance, and implementation within the scope of the role or employment position and encompassing the obligation to report, explain and be answerable for resulting consequences.

How does it work? A significant share of the currency will form an endowment to support SDG focused artists and social organizations worldwide, with governance and decisions over who gets funded controlled by the community of adacoin holders via Ethereum smart contracts. To raise funds, we will accept donations in other crypto-currencies directly such as ETH and Bitcoin. The ADAO organization will help aid recipients navigate local jurisdiction issues such that they can legally and efficiently convert crypto-donations into local currencies. We will also encourage everyone, but especially artists, developers and social organizations to accept payments in ada coins and to provide services and artifacts that can be bought in ada coins. In doing so, we will fund the greatest democratically governed social/art endowment fund in the world and ultimately monetarily encourage acts of social value.

In governance, accountability has expanded beyond the basic definition of “being called to account for one’s actions”. It is frequently described as an account-giving relationship between individuals, e.g. “A is accountable to B when A is obliged to inform B about A’s (past or future) actions and decisions, to justify them, and to suffer punishment in the case of eventual misconduct”. Accountability cannot exist without proper accounting practices; in other words, an absence of accounting means an absence of accountability.

This installation-performance will speak in the aesthetic, language and mode of a modern bank. Blurring satire with reality, participants can apply for actual grants to be paid in ADAO coins, which will be tradable for traditional currencies on crypto-currency markets. The ADAO Bank will award grants, loans and saving schemes to people interested in working on the SDG’s. It will provide investment and

Accountability is an element of a RACI to indicate who is ultimately answerable for the correct and thorough completion of the deliverable or task, and the one who delegates the work to those responsible. There are various reasons (legitimate or excuses) why accountability fails.13 13

[...] User Control: Deciding who can collect your data We should all be able to choose – with clarity and confidence – what information we share with what companies, understanding the trade-offs we’re making when we do. Right now, we all lack meaningful choice online – privacy policies are often miles long and hard to read, we don’t understand what information we’re sharing or when, and opting out is seldom on the menu.

[...] Cyber Security: Locking down your sensitive information We should all have the ability to protect our online identity. At this point, it feels like we’ve all been victims of a cyberattack somewhere, somehow. Data breaches can lay bare the passwords of millions of people, often going undiscovered for years. Which means your identity may be at risk of theft without you even knowing it.

[...] Government Surveillance: Keeping prying eyes and ears out of your business We should all have the freedom to be ourselves — online and off – without surveillance, judgement and imposed societal bias. You wouldn’t want the government following your every move in real life – there’s no reason they should be shadowing you on the Internet. The Edward Snowden disclosures showed that even democracies can and do take liberties with your privacy.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accountability

Fill out a form

Interview

Take a photo

Get tokens

Get currency note

ARCHANA PRASAD AND SEAN BLAGSVEDT IN COLLABORATION WITH FREEMAN MURRAY Round Table

Archana Prasad, is an artist from Bangalore, India. Her work is a particular conjunction of visual art, technology and urban community art, ste wed in design and research methodologies. As Founder of Jaaga.in, Archana has a unique artist-activist role. Sean Blagsvedt is a technologist and entrepreneur. His recent company babajob provided job information to 10 million blue collar workers across India. Archana and Sean are concerned about the unjust assignment of value, thus currency, that tilts towards mechanisms of successful acquisition based models and stockpiling capital, rather than rewarding innovation and creation, especially around work that fulfills important societal goals but do not create large profits.

philanthropic options for those interested in growing their crypto-currency assets. The ADAO Bank booth provides MozFest participants human connections and conversations about the coin, the bank, its goals and objectives. Additionally the “employees” at the ADAO booth have discretionary power to award a limited number of coins to deserving participants from MozFest. Interaction Model: Participants fill out a form at the booth. Similar to a loan application, they will be invited to describe their own pledges to support the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals. Two tellers - the artists, will interview applicants, take their photo and given a limited number of token grants. Each grantee will receive a currency note, personalized with their photo.

currency, with the needed crypto-graphic keys printed on it such that the participant can claim the ADAO token online). Our Vision What do we want to accomplish? 1. To Take Back Crypto-currency and money itself for 2. Creativity = Wealth Currency is a Choice of: Ethics Models Value Alignment A sustainable futur Politics

(The rendering of the note is a Deep Learning based Style filter of the participant’s photo and a traditional

DIAGRAMS

14

POLARIZATION (POLITICS)

In politics, polarization (or polarisation) can refer to the divergence of political attitudes to ideological extremes. Polarization can refer to such divergence like public opinion or even to such divergence within certain groups. Almost all discussions of polarization in political science consider polarization in the context of political parties and democratic systems of government. When polarization occurs in a two-party system, like the United States, moderate voices often lose power and influence.14 14

Polarization creates

Questions polarised by the (geographical) context

Yes or No

Bringing tension to the debate by polarising the responses (he doesn’t’ believe in polarisation so that is his way of questioning it)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polarization_(politics)

INFORMATION ETHICS

The term information ethics was first coined by Robert Hauptman and used in the book Ethical challenges in librarianship. It examines the morality that comes from information as a resource, a product, or as a target. It provides a critical framework for considering moral issues concerning informational privacy, moral agency (e.g. whether artificial agents may be moral), new environmental issues (especially how agents should behave in the infosphere), problems arising from the life-cycle (creation, collection, recording, distribution, processing, etc.) of information (especially ownership and copyright, digital divide, and digital rights). It is very vital to understand that librarians, archivists, information professionals among others, really understand the importance of knowing how to disseminate proper information as well as being responsible with their actions when addressing information.15 15

By Paolo Cirio. Source > http://globaldirect.today

Experiment about liberation: people all agree if they can access the same information

TEXT > PRIVACY AND SECURITY > KEY TERMS

15 TEXT > WEB LITERACY > INTRO > SOURCE > ALL FROM HTTPS:// WWW.MOZILLA.ORG/EN-GB/ INTERNET-HEALTH/PRIVACYSECURITY/

HTTPS://THEADAO.ORG

DECENTRALISATION

The ADAO is a philanthropic cryptocurrency that supports creatives who advance the Sustainable Development Goals, representing an entirely new way to fund social and creative revolutionaries.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_(social_and_ political)

13

Decentralisation is related with lack of accountability

Accountability= integrity of action? trust?

The use of power need not involve force or the threat of force (coercion). At one extreme, it closely resembles what an English-speaking person might term “influence”, although some authors distinguish “influence” as a means by which power is used. One such example is soft power, as compared to hard power.

A Healthy Internet is Secure and Private The Internet only stays healthy if we trust it as a safe place – to explore, transact, connect, and create. Our privacy and security online is under constant threat. But there’s something you can do about it: get informed, protect yourself, and make your voice heard. A healthy Internet depends on you. [...]

PHOTOGRAPHS Audience interacting at the Adao Bank installation

POWER

12

PRIVACY & SECURITY PAOLO CIRIO

Decentralisation feedback mechanism in economical transactions

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cryptocurrency

12

In social science and politics, power is the ability to influence or outright control the behaviour of people. The term “authority” is often used for power perceived as legitimate by the social structure. Power can be seen as evil or unjust, but the exercise of power is accepted as endemic to humans as social beings. In business, power is often expressed as being “upward” or “downward”. With downward power, a company’s superior influences subordinates. When a company exerts upward power, it is the subordinates who influence the decisions of their leader or leaders.

Politics

PHOTOGRAPHS Participatory installation set up and audience interacting with polls part of Aesthetics of Information Ethics.

Information ethics How to represent sensible information (and the aesthetics derived from it)

Information Ecology

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Information_ethics Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

16

DELIBERATION

Deliberation is a process of thoughtfully weighing options, usually prior to voting. Deliberation emphasizes the use of logic and reason as opposed to power-struggle, creativity, or dialog. Group decisions are generally made after deliberation through a vote or consensus of those involved.

VS PARTICIPATION EMANCIPATION FREEDOM

In legal settings a jury famously uses deliberation because it is given specific options, like guilty or not guilty, along with information and arguments to evaluate. In “deliberative democracy”, the aim is for both elected officials and the general public to use deliberation rather than power-struggle as the basis for their vote.16 16

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

HTTPS://PAOLOCIRIO.NET/PRESS/TEXTS/AESTHETICS-INFORMATION-ETHICS.PHP

MISLEADING POLARITIES IN INFORMATION ETHICS

INCLUSION ACCESS COMMONS

EXPLOITATION CONTROL WITHHOLDING PROPERTY

PRIVATE

PUBLIC

OPACITY

TRANSPARENCY

PRIVACY OBSCURITY EMPATHY ANONYMITY

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deliberation

COERCION

EXCLUSION

RESPONSIBILITY

SURVEILLANCE EXPOSURE HUMILIATION ACCOUNTABILITY IMPUNITY

REPUTATION

SCORING

AUTONOMY

MANIPULATION

EDUCATING

MISINFORMING

QUANTIFIABLE SIMPLICITY

UNDETECTABLE COMPLEXITY

HTTPS://CYBER.HARVARD.EDU/PEOPLE/AXMINA

PRIVACY & SECURITY

PAOLO CIRIO

Paolo Cirio works with legal, economic and semiotic systems of the information society. He investigates social fields impacted by the Internet, such as privacy, copyright, democracy, and finance. He shows his research and intervention-based works through artifacts, photos, installations, videos, and public art. Cirio has exhibited in international museums and institutions and has won numerous prestigious art awards. His artworks have been covered by hundreds of media outlets worldwide and he regularly gives public lectures and workshops at leading universities.

SOME PROBLEMATIC ISSUES CONCERNING INFORMATION ETHICS: SEARCH ENGINES & SOCIAL MEDIA MODERATION HATE SPEECH HARRASSMENT TROLLING BULLYING BLACKMAIL STIGMAS SOCIAL PROFILING SOCIAL SCORE & BIAS CONSUMER PROFILING SEX OFFENDERS CRIMINAL RECORDS PREDICTIVE POLICING RACIAL PROFILING PRIVACY & SURVEILLANCE STATE AND CORPORATE SURVEILLANCE CRYPTOGRAPHY FOR POWER STRUCTURES CRYPTOGRAPHY FOR INDIVIDUALS PUBLIC SHAMING BLOCKCHAIN, DEEPWEB AND DARKNET ANONYMITY TRUST PRIVACY FRAUD HATE SPEECH CRUELTY ALGORITHMS ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE CONTROL ACCOUNTABILITY OF CODERS ROBOTICS AUTOMATED WEAPONS AUTOMATED LABOR PIRACY COPYRIGHT TRADEMARK FAIR USE EDUCATION ROYALITIES MEDIA AND POLITICS TARGETING VOTERS FAKE NEWS SHARING ECONOMY PRIVATE PROPERTY LABOR RIGHTS DIGITAL CURRENCIES TRANSPARENCY VOLATILITY ACCESS TO MEANS INFRASTRUCTURES ECOLOGICAL IMPACT DECENTRALISATION INTERNET OF THINGS POLICY CLOUD SERVERS

The Aesthetics of Information Ethics discusses methodologies, strategies, and practices of art addressing the personal and societal spheres affected by information systems. Information Ethics is broadly defined as “the branch of ethics that focuses on the relationship between the creation, organization, dissemination, and use of information.”[1] The so-called information revolution brings us an increasing number of pressing ethical issues. Artists can be particularly sensitive to these issues and they are able to question ethics by proposing and challenging perceptions and scenarios beyond common understanding. Artworks can creatively discuss and play with distribution systems of sensitive information, ethereal economies, flexible labor and property, circulating bodies and goods, manipulated and monitored relationships, expanded public spaces, exploited opinion formation, and, generally, technological apparatuses affecting social systems. Nowadays, social contracts are fluid; they constantly reorganize society and produce new social conditions. These active spaces are where information ethics emerge and where artists intervene in questioning, revealing, and reassembling the agents and environments of their artworks. Ethics of Aesthetics concerns the ethical frameworks in arranging the sensibility of the audience and the subjects of the artworks. The aesthetic methodologies of intervention, discourse, and representation of information systems can include the production of critique, distress, fear, empathy, alienation, complicity, spectacle, confusion, awareness, and other artistic devices. The aesthetic qualities of the artworks can be called into question through the articulation of the ethical conditions of the works and their subjects. The responsibility and conscience of the artists - as well as of the art critics and curators - are integrated in the analysis and validation of the social and artistic efficacy of the artworks. Concurrently, the ethical and social relations created by these artworks produce aesthetic forms, which concerns the field of the Aesthetics of Ethics. Social fields and norms are increasingly interdependent with technological advancements of information

Ethics are negotiated, developed, and balanced through reflections on the consequences and intentions of human activity. Differentiating themselves from morals - which are often static and ideological - ethics are dynamic, reflexive, and evolving principles that must be

oriented to maximize and develop the common good within the notion of ethics as the making and understanding of a dignified existence for humans and the environment surrounding them.

The Ethics of Representation and information systems

As such, techniques like the exposure and appropriation of sensitive information as well as the manipulation and disruption of social relations should be balanced with the parameters of intentions, receptions, and outcomes of the artwork. In the Aesthetics of Information Ethics, context is main the principle from which we can assess the ethics of artworks. Meaning and impact vary based on the context of presentation, execution, and results. The context needs to account for all the properties of the information systems involved. These methodologies, techniques, and practices of art production and critique are ultimately

Questions from Aesthetics of Information Ethics’ polls.

Should fake news on social media be removed by Internet companies themselves?

Should the coders of algorithms with racial biases be legally accountable?

Should we be able to trace individuals who use digital currency, such as Bitcoin?

Should the documents leaked by Snowden be made available to everyone – not only journalists?

Should politicians be able to use fully cryptographed communications for work?

Should vulnerable individuals be protected online even if they are key to public debate?

Should electronic voting be completely avoided and analog systems restored?

Should we remunerate the open source code utilized by big corporations such as Google?

Can the hacking of political parties during election be justified?

Should Facebook delete posts concerning hate speech toward refugees?

Should public figures on TwiFer be given access to block other accounts?

Should voter profiling and databases being banned?

Should poli:cal spending for online ads be regulated like they are on TV?

Should ads managed by algorithms be considered physiologically manipulative advertising?

DIAGRAM Spatial and partecipatory mapping of the installation.

Presentation screen

Diagrams Yes No

Results

The ethics of the power of these information systems are directly embodied in artworks that use and address such power. The ethical inquiries and relations activated by art with information systems create aesthetic forms. This aesthetics is discussed by measuring, comparing, and evaluating the strategies, consequences, conditions, and circumstances of the works of art. Such analysis needs to take into account a broad social context, therefore integrating the distribution of the work, the mode of presentation within the site of execution, and ultimately the intended and unintended recipients, critiques, and results that the work generates.

constantly discussed and confronted. Art plays a central role in this process. Evolving cultural forms and critical art are essential instruments for sensing and signaling the forming of ethics.

Social transactions and contracts are discussed, created, rearranged, or accentuated by artists for making visible the complexity, contradictions, and complicity within such social relations activated by information systems. However, only an attentive examination of the effects, causes, and nature of such systems can fully address them. Thus, representations of social and technological systems should engage with the dialectics of the construction of ethical values. The integrity of the agenda pursued is a responsibility of the artist in relation to the system addressed, while the critical reception should assess the means and ends of the artworks within the whole spectrum of forms and contexts of presentation.

QUESTIONS

computation, sharing, and control. Information technology has become the heart of the social order. However, it can be understood not from a technological point of view, but rather through a constant reflexive examination of what it produces in the social sphere. The ethical discussion can’t be limited to technocrats, legislators, coders, and the opaque internal policies of private entities. Art can play a role in this process of creating awareness and reflection on difficult ethical questions by making them relevant and engaging. The material of these aesthetic examinations is not limited to the Internet, algorithms, big data, and other technologies. These technical elements are mutually influenced by the political, cultural, legal, and economic systems, as well as several other social fields and infrastructures. Information systems should be understood as interconnected networks of social systems in which reflection and intervention have the potential to reverberate throughout the whole web of networks, consequently impacting a variety of conventions, entities, and individuals which are inevitably connected.

SHOULD FAKE NEWS ON SOCIAL MEDIA BE REMOVED BY INTERNET COMPANIES THEMSELVES ?

14 QUESTIONS = 14 POLS

Feedback from the audience + Add new questions

No

Yes

87 NO

Question

Polarities in Ethics of Representation In the Aesthetics of Information Ethics, the appearances, perceptions, and sensations of reality created by artists should take into account the formation of polarities. Mystifications and oversimplifications about the social impacts of information systems are instances of the Ethics of Representation. As such, the creation of falsehoods, hype, confusion, anxiety, or fatalism sustained by the producers and reporters of information systems create polarities in understanding ever-changing technological apparatuses and their social impacts. The Aesthetics of Information Ethics is about breaking down polarities to offer a broader understanding of the conditions within these systems. Examples of problematic issues in Information Ethics The Aesthetics of Information Ethics can be applied to examining the liability of algorithms, responsibility in anonymous networks, exploitation of shared content and labor, censorship on social media, freedom of speech used to harass, public shaming to condemn, hacking to protest or leak, and micro-targeting for political campaigning. In order to inspire inquiry, the artist questions how to balance freedom, empathy, justice, and accountability. By Paolo Cirio. 2017. [1] Joan, Reitz M. “Information Ethics.” Online Dictionary For Library And Information Science. N.p., 2010.

tomorrow will be better.

It gets better, but it does take time. She’s always with you. You got this. You can do this.

Conne

PHOTOGRAPHS

PHOTOGRAPHS

Tactical Technology Collective instructing the audience on how to use their Data Detox Kit

Visitors exploring vistual reality at Callum Cooper’s VR installation about privacy.

SOURCE > HTTPS://TACTICALTECH.ORG/NEWS/ DATA-DETOX-KIT/

Detox your Digital Self THE 8-DAY DATA DETOX Do you feel like your digital self is slipping out of control? Have you let yourself install too many apps, clicked “I agree” a few too many times, lost track of how many accounts you’ve created? Perhaps you feel you’re not as in control of your digital life as you’d like to be.

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Don’t despair! This data detox is designed just for you. By the end of the 8-day program, you’ll be well on your way to a healthier and more in-control digital self. The Data Detox Kit was produced for The Glass Room NYC, presented by Mozilla and Tactical Technology Collective.

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

SHOULD POLITICIANS BE ABLE TO USE FULLY CRYPTOGRAPHED COMMUNICATIONS FOR WORK ?

57 YES

You are valuable. You don’t need to achieve + lead + be visible to others to be valuable + deserve consideration.

Deep breaths - water.

Remember the last time you faced a major change -> it turned out to be for the better. This will too.

User Responses

Don’t overthink, it will be fine. Just relax. Nothing is constant. Think about all the good that has happened.

Don’t worry you’re still pretty. Lin chiah pà bē? Everything is temporary

Project Description: although the construct of empathy is multidimensional in nature and difficult to measure, i hope to create an effective strategy for highlighting empathy that focus specifically on communication skills training. the open lab project will visually explore the mozilla festival’s community’s understanding of digital empathy through a survey in which users can answer a serious of questions by applying coloured stickers to a chart in an effort to reflect levels of understanding towards digital empathy, accessibility and inclusion. self-reflection is a useful method for addressing empathy. and as such self-reflection activities could theoretically prompt guests to question and examine their interactions in the online world. this self-examination process may potentially develop heightened online awareness and promote increased digital empathy. the means by which empathy is expressed is naturally evolving as the world and its forms of communications become increasingly digital and recognizing and addressing barriers to the expression of digital empathy is important. if we can sharpen the communication skills of traditional empathy, how can we then use those skills to address the greater discussion of digital empathy?

everyday is trying. I am with you. well done. I’m here… and I promise to never let you go.

Life has its ups & downs.

build grow heal love

Open Lab Session. Type of Project: Survey | Data Visualization

What is the worst that can happen? How likely is it to happen?

This too shall pass.

You have overcome so many other things already too

Digital Renders

You’re always trying so hard,

You are loved You are not alone! We are with you

If you’re just travelling when there’s sun, you’ll never get anywhere

TEXT > WEB LITERACY > KEY TERMS

A healthy Internet means everyone has the skills to thrive People everywhere should have the knowledge they need to tap into the full power of the Internet – and use it to make their lives and the world better. This means everyone needs to be able to read, write, and participate online. A healthy Internet is yours to master.depends on you. [...]

Trying makes a difference. Trying can be your victory.

Are you ok?

Spatial and partecipatory mapping of the installation.

Tsemppiä!

Aim to be comfortably lost

The pendulum will swing

DIAGRAM

You haven’t killed anyone… it’s ok!

This too shall pass

What is (realistically) the worst that could happen?

COLLABORATRIVE SPACE

WEB LITERACY

i found that certain understandings of definitions become very nuclear, contaminated and porous so what does it mean when i talk about technology in the context of vulnerability and who we are today.

Questioning the role of technology in the context of vulnerability

I got you load of Biscoff, all the music you like, a bluetooth speaker and also the people you are friend with are online. ? Do you want a hug? xx Take a break – I’ve got this! It’ll be alright. Trust me. You only live once =) It’s not the end of the world!!! A vide é muito curta. Aproveite! Be brilliant by your own standards. Not of others. Go on! Don’t let fear stop your explorations! You’ve made a difference in my life, what you do matters. You are enough! <3

i want to explore the daily trauma we undergo to earn the coveted badge of successful human existence that often negates notions of struggle, loneliness and deeper meanings of wounded-ness. a trauma that plays itself in sets and loops traveling by genome and bloodstream. we need to close, we need to fill this loop. so from that, i find the vulnerability of digital immersion. soaking myself in the frailties of others to wash away things gray. and sometimes in the immersion, i find that i might be required to live them. and from disenfranchised digital cultures i learn about the vulnerabilities of race and how it was only created to sustain a larger system of capitalism. error 404, page not found. i was invited here to speak about inclusion. but i think we should focus on loops, and loopholes and continuums. about closing the gaps and expanding our capacity to include more brokenness. from distorted views of linear utoipian w


OPEN INNOVATION

GRETTA LOUW

A healthy Internet is open for innovation The Internet was built on the promise that any one of us might create the next big thing. But in order to keep creating, imagining, and reinventing our future online, the building blocks of the Web must be open to all. And together, we need to make sure the policies and laws that govern those building blocks are fair and functional. A healthy Internet is created by you. [...]


[...] Open Source: Keeping the building blocks of the Web open for creativity Open source should continue to be the heart of the Internet, so we can all see, verify, and contribute to its future. Open source software – technology built with code that is open for view, use, and modification – is the engine that powers a huge amount of the Internet, from servers to operating systems to the bots that fetch your search results. It’s the infrastructure that makes the Web a truly public resource: transparent, trustworthy, and collaborative, so that anyone with an idea can contribute. But much like our IRL infrastructure, we have to commit the attention and resources to maintain it.

[...] Copyright: Reforming laws for our digital reality We should all be able to share, reuse and reinterpret the creativity that inspires us on the Internet. Intellectual Property (IP) rights were designed as a practical solution to advance creativity in all its forms: arts, science, business, and technology. In order for IP to continue sowing seeds for the future of the Web, our laws need to support the speed and spirit of collaboration that defines our digital world.

[...] Patents: Building a system that encourages innovation Our patent system should work with and for open innovation, not against it. Patents were designed to create incentive for innovation. But the patent system and software development don’t always get along so well. Software patents are often written so broadly that they’re open to misinterpretation, and exclusive rights can far outlive the shelf life of the software itself. All of which creates obstacles and uncertainty for innovators, and leaves the door open for patent trolls and endless litigation. TEXT > OPEN INNOVATION > INTRO > SOURCE > ALL FROM HTTPS://WWW.MOZILLA.ORG/EN-GB/INTERNETHEALTH/OPEN-INNOVATION/

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OPEN INNOVATION


7

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Material_culture

TEXT > OPEN INNOVATION > KEY TERMS

08

SEMIOTICS

Semiotics (also called semiotic studies) is the study of meaningmaking, the study of sign process (semiosis) and meaningful communication. It is not to be confused with the Saussurean tradition called semiology which is a subset of semiotics.This includes the study of signs and sign processes, indication, designation, likeness, analogy, allegory, metonymy, metaphor, symbolism, signification, and communication. The semiotic tradition explores the study of signs and symbols as a significant part of communications. As different from linguistics, however, semiotics also studies non-linguistic sign systems. Semiotics is frequently seen as having important anthropological dimensions; for example, the Italian semiotician and novelist Umberto Eco proposed that every cultural phenomenon may be studied as communication. Some semioticians focus on the logical dimensions of the science, however. They examine areas belonging also to the life sciencesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;such as how organisms make predictions about, and adapt to, their semiotic niche in the world (see semiosis). In general, semiotic theories take signs or sign systems as their object of study: the communication of information in living organisms is covered in biosemiotics (including zoosemiotics)8 8

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semiotics

09

INTERNET OF THINGS

The Internet of things (IoT) is the network of physical devices, vehicles, home appliances, and other items embedded with electronics, software, sensors, actuators, and network connectivity which enable these objects to connect and exchange data. Each thing is uniquely identifiable through its embedded computing system but is able to interoperate within the existing Internet infrastructure. Experts estimate that

from a test tube and write out a hashtag. Printing station: create a simple meme,


carrying clever signs watch their signs get photographed and then go viral on the

Visual Language The Cloud

Jellysifh

Dislocates the understanding of the technology that it needs, the Labour, the environmental impact. False Advertising

Where is the cloud? How does it looks like?

(Organic messiness) The physical traces

Jellyfish grow because of pollution Reference to Donna Haraway.

Alternative Visual Language

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OPEN INNOVATION


objects to connect and exchange data. Each thing is uniquely identifiable through its embedded computing system but is able to interoperate within the existing Internet infrastructure. Experts estimate that the IoT will consist of about 30 billion objects by 2020. It is also estimated that the global market value of IoT will reach $7.1 trillion by 2020. The IoT allows objects to be sensed or controlled remotely across existing network infrastructure, creating opportunities for more direct integration of the physical world into computer-based systems, and resulting in improved efficiency, accuracy and economic benefit in addition to reduced human intervention. When IoT is augmented with sensors and actuators, the technology becomes an instance of the more general class of cyberphysical systems, which also encompasses technologies such as smart grids, virtual power plants, smart homes, intelligent transportation and smart cities. “Things”, in the IoT sense, can refer to a wide variety of devices such as heart monitoring implants, biochip transponders on farm animals, cameras streaming live feeds of wild animals in coastal waters, automobiles with built-in sensors, DNA analysis devices for environmental/food/ pathogen monitoring, or field operation devices that assist firefighters in search and rescue operations. Legal scholars suggest regarding “things” as an “inextricable mixture of hardware, software, data and service”. These devices collect useful data with the help of various existing technologies and then autonomously flow the data between other devices. The term “the Internet of things” was coined by Kevin Ashton of Procter & Gamble, later MIT’s Auto-ID Center, in 1999.)9 9

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_of_things

10

FLOATING SIGNIFIER

In semiotics and discourse analysis, floating signifiers are signifiers without referents, such as a word that doesn’t point to any actual object and has no agreed upon meaning.10 10

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floating_signifier

TEXT > OPEN INNOVATION > PROJECT DESCRIPTION > BY GRETTA LOUW

A participatory action which will attempt to create a sort of dispersed physical data cloud during the MozFest within the venue. A stand will be set up at which visitors can pick up a custom printed helium balloon (printed with the Colonise the Cloud: Icon). Each balloon will contain a unique scannable QR code that will give the visitor access to one piece of my digital history; a piece of data detritus. In order to get a balloon and participate in the intervention, the visitor will need to discuss, sign, make a pledge to further open innovation on the web. There will be some talking points available to the assistants and they and myself will also work with visitors to create a list of specific actions that ‘we’ as a tech community can do ourselves to encourage open innovation. During the weekend and after the festival concludes I will work on bringing the outcomes of these discussions together into some sort of collated format.


HTTPS://EN.WIKIPEDIA.ORG/WIKI/GRETTA_LOUW

OPEN INNOVATION

GRETTA LOUW

Gretta Louw is a multi-disciplinary artist working predominantly with digital media and networked performance. She lives and works in Germany and Australia. Her artistic practice explores the potential of art as a means of investigating psychological phenomena, particularly in relation to new technologies and the internet. Her focus is on how new digital technologies are shaping contemporary experience.

X 24; Y 65

OPEN INNOVATION


Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

DIAGRAM Spatial and participatory mapping of the installation/workshop

Large format Wall painting

Series of animated gifs


Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Responses

Physical Data Cloud

PARTICIPATORY ACTION NO.2

Create a list of specific actions to encourage open innovation

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OPEN INNOVATION


Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Responses

Physical Data Cloud

ATORY

Create a list of specific actions to encourage open innovation


PARTICIPATORY ACTION NO.1

BALLONS WITH QR CODE INSIDE

Visual impact: pieces of a cloud in the building: installation

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OPEN INNOVATION


ARTWORK Stills from ‘Colonise the Cloud’ gifs by Gretta Louw

PHOTOGRAPHS Audience interacting with the ‘Colonise the cloud’ installation

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

DIAGRAM


Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

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OPEN INNOVATION

Responses


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OPEN INNOVATION

RESPONSES


RESPONSES


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PARTICIPATORY ACTION NO.1

BALLONS WITH QR CODE INSIDE

Visual impact: pieces of a cloud in the building: installation


RESPONSES We’re supporting and funding creators to keep up their great work online. Flattr

Write patche

Connect stu source cont

Make dank coding memes

Have a real c 1 person abo startup be a

Make award open badges I don’t know much but I’m here to learn

I want to tea code.

Teach my grandma how to use emails I do my best that ppl are free to share online Teaching others how to work openly so they can innovate in the open

Proprietary S improvemen

Open source my code

@techvolunt in Coventry Arduino to y

Make content accessible across intersections. Write/code doe everyone, not elites

Gave a frien show her to

Raise awareness/ expectations towards digital reporting methods

I advocate la who code m

I teach a class about product design for open source project

Make new tech tods (such as VR) more accessible to all groups of people, not just the tech community itg. make it ‘user friendly’ Community builder, diversity and inclusion program manager.

How we perc social media how we wan

Helped wom them to lear

Help people innovate through open badges. Anna DMS Promote open source, 3d printed prosthetics. Collaborate with someone to contribute something creative and weird to the web.

I built a web codes or co codeofcond

Make space and lift up voices of people who are not being represented

Explain secu more people

Teach. Processing.org

I work with s camps and r citizenship t minecraft

Develop more simple computer language future! Easier than Python Give talks to inspire people

Open source pad

Motivate university student on social initiatives to help the less fortunate on digital inclusion

Simplon.co Be transparent in data analysis and visualization, show the full methodology, making it simple to understand.

School for u refugees, ha how to beco

Sharing artwork online for people to see

Host a mine

If I do make any software I would make it open source

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OPEN INNOVATION


at work

n the open

Write patches Connect students with open source contribution opportunities Have a real conversation with 1 person about how to help a startup be a startup I want to teach people how to code. Proprietary SW. Innovation and improvements ol existing sw

ct

@techvolunteers go to schools in Coventry to teach Scratch and Arduino to year 7-9 students

doe

Gave a friend a phone Need to show her to use it

ethods

I advocate largely for the girls who code movement

oups of dlyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

er.

e and weird

an Python

ess

How we perceive ourselves on social media - is this in line with how we want to be recruited? Helped women be mentoring them to learn how to code I built a web app for building codes or conduct http:// codeofconduct.io Explain security and privacy to more people! I work with students in code camps and relate digital citizenship to real life and minecraft Open source den on IPFS/peers pad

Educate illustrators on which open tools + open platforms they can share their work on. I give grants for education using the gigabit internet Building a python European coe market scraper! Github: anouchk/ ETSscraper SIMPCON.CO Brings diversity in tech by teaching code to everyone I run a code club every week @ rpi_stuff I support + facilitate grants and academic collaboration + open source communities Open platform for personal data Organic analogue sharing and collaboration in studios I fund raise for IO I teach tech speakers to teach memotezbier (?) @ techspeakersldn Bringing an individual to mozfest and showing them my love for tech Share groups + knowledge about diverse people in the open web space Sharing resources, training and tipswith learners and educators Volunteer at coderdojo

Simplon.co

Stop using google maps + start using open street map

School for unemployed people, refugees, handicapped people how to become developers

Developing an auto print techniques for ultimaRers - so you can 3d print in your sleep

Host a minecraft server

But a phone for my grandma and

full


teach her how to use it. So we can communicate Mentor more at codedojo I would like to make a website where kids can learn to code Make spaces in companies eg banking/finance/pharmaceuticals, public sector Coded gushion to inspire more women worldwide Live stream music production Makings my parents aware of communication so they can let friends at their age know. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not just for young people Create websites that donated to 3rd world countries To help them to talk about it - search it up together working with stemmeter to encourage more girls into stem I teach kids to code Open science research Unblock coolmathgames.com please Teach aien (?) to code a) Make a coloring book on women in open. Kelsey Mesklay Teaching people to code I teach the next generation Tell people to edit Create a forum on which you can learn to code and to talk to coders to gain tips Teaching people to code games Write coding blog/vlog Teach people! Get people to mozfest Teach other people/friends how to code for a game.

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DIGITAL INCLUSION BROOKLYN J. PAKATHI

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WEB LITERACY AN XIAO MINA

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OPEN INNOVATION GRETTA LOUW

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DECENTRALISATION ARCHADA PRASAD AND SEAN BLAGSVEDT

X 9; Y 27

PRIVACY & SECURITY PAOLO CIRIO + TACTICAL TECH + CALLUM COOPER


vulnerability makes us human

D G TAL

Vulnerability

NCLUS ON BROOKLYN

today i want to talk about the vulnerabilities of being (digital and all) i don’t know if we ever truly interrogate what vulnerability is and what it means for us.

TEXT > DIGITAL INCLUSION > KEY TERMS

1

inc ca lus ex n’t ioa wi ist n em th ou pa t th y

as a tool to navigate the world

EMPATHY

Technology

01

Empathy is the capacity to understand or feel what another person is experiencing from within the other person’s frame of reference, i.e., the capacity to place oneself in another’s position. There are many definitions for empathy that encompass a broad range of emotional states. Types of empathy include cognitive empathy, emotional empathy, and somatic empathy.1

SELF-REFLECTION

Human self-reflection is the capacity of humans to exercise introspection and the willingness to learn more about their fundamental nature, purpose and essence. The earliest historical records demonstrate the great interest which humanity has had in itself.

Emotional labour

instead, let’s explore the vulnerabilities of being and it’s necessity to build connective collective empathy. the vulnerabilities of dreaming, in a world governed by homogeneous toxic misteachings of branded macho-ism. in a world that requires improvisation at every moment. so this is what we are exploring.

In order to create inclusive spaces, we need to create inclusive spaces

INCLUSIVITY

i want to explore the technologies we implore every day as tools to navigate all the things that exist in a very resilient selfdriven world.

Empathy

An intention or policy of including people who might otherwise be excluded or marginalized, such as those who are handicapped or learning-disabled, or racial and sexual minorities.3

BROOKLYN ASKS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Safe-space

3

04

AUDIENCE RESPONDS Come and join us!!

SAFE-SPACE

I’m so lost (I found a way)

In educational institutions, safe space (or safe-space), safer space, and positive space are terms that, as originally intended, were used to indicate that a teacher, educational institution, or student body did not tolerate anti-LGBT violence, harassment or hate speech, thereby creating a safe place for all LGBT students. The term safe space has been extended to refer to an autonomous space for individuals who feel marginalized to come together to communicate regarding their experiences with marginalization, typically on a university campus. Safe spaces exist in educational institutions of anglophone countries. The idea of safe spaces has seen criticism on the grounds that it stifles freedom of speech. Critics claim safe spaces hinder the exposure of sensitive material that needs to be discussed and explained in an educational environment.4 4

i’m rejecting the idea of vulnerability as a mode of disregarded weakness. our sense of vulnerability is in fact innately human.

The vulnerability of the individual

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-reflection

03

i’m not interested in sweeping statements of empathetic learning and building for the sole purpose of opportunist capital gain.

Feeling vulnerable online

Human self-reflection is related to the philosophy of consciousness, the topic of awareness, consciousness in general and the philosophy of mind. 2 2

today i want us to imagine, to dream, to question.

There is a necessity to build a collective connected emphathy

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Empathy

02

J PAKATH

TEXT > DIGITAL INCLUSION > PROJECT DESCRIPTION > BY BROOKLYN J. PAKATHI

This is my home Type of Project: Pixelated Digital Renderings | Poster Art | Public Art Project Description: this is my home, aimed at creating dialogues of empathy and diversity for a greater sense of digital inclusion, is a series of digital renderings representative of the spectrum of shades within human skin tone and overlaid with subtle and often gentle messages of understanding in hopes to promote a higher level of care and concern in digital communication and accessibility. the digital renderings will be produced as large posters and placed across the mozilla festival venue to act as a public service announcement to engage with guests in attendance, prompting viewers to feel considered in their contribution towards an open and diverse internet. Project Statement: empathy involves the inner experience of sharing in and comprehending the momentary psychological state of another person (schafer, 1959). what future do we envision, when we talk about digital inclusion? we

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Safe-space

DIGITAL INCLUSION

BROOKLYN J. PAKATHI

in searching for the connectors of cause, meaning and sense of resolve, brooklyn j’s work fundamentally speaks to the tragic vulnerability of romance he explores these themes of an existential nature, plagued by fragility, through video vignettes, digital observations, and photographic interrogations. making loneliness an art since 92’ often define inclusion as the ability of individuals and groups to access and use information and communication technologies. encompassing not only access to the internet but also the availability of hardware and software; relevant content and services; and training for the digital literacy skills required

for effective use of information and communication technologies. but in and of itself, digital inclusion can often overlook the necessity for creating and maintaining a dialogue of digital empathy. as with many other aspects of contemporary culture, rapid adoption of social and mobile technologies has altered society’s communication patterns and disrupted the expression of empathy, specifically in digital conversations. mobile and social media use has transformed when and how individuals interact with others. the ability to instantly share thoughts, feelings, and behaviors with the rest of society via digital channels can occur in mere seconds, often without the empathetic social filter that accompanies traditional communications. moreover, digital communications are devoid of many of the emotional signals and cues experienced in face-to-face settings, often leading to more impersonal interactions. creating and exploring digital empathy unlocks the digital communication of empathy, one of the core elements missing from how we currently communicate online. there are few ways to show a friend, a loved one, a group or a community as a whole that you feel empathetic towards their situation. the project, this is my home, tries to understand what it means to be digitally human taking into account the worlds of digital and non-digital are becoming more and more one in the same. the messages project empathy as enacted between a community and pay attention to someone else’s experience in a way that allows the other to realize that we all share and understand the essential quality of our digital experiences. the work aims to understand how other people feels and to be able to communicate this understanding in a way that is uniquely ‘human’. this physical and tangible work presented seemingly offline but still represented in a digital space reflects the present day failure of digital devices and online communications to facilitate the expression of empathy between people. the importance for the work to exist in and around the festival space works

accordingly to mozilla festival’s mandate and responsibility in creating an accessible and equally inclusive space for learning, growth, understanding, and diversity without any prerequisite or criteria to entry. Goals: • to create an opportunity for communities to explore communication of empathyand understanding • to build a digital culture of inclusivity without the use of active technology that can often negate individuals wants to experience digital • to create an environment that speaks to individuals main cause for fear and concern and offer safety and peace of mind

this is your home

it’s going to be okay

Embrace them. If you need a chat / walk / silent film, let me know

this is a safe space

Outcome

You are not alone and all will be well. It’s because of you, that I am still standing!! This will pass. You are fine. We are with you. Use this. Become better from experience.

Round table discussion cted

empat

hy

Safe space

[...] Making Web literacy meaningful for everyone Web literacy should mean all the skills we need to think, create, and thrive online. Many people hear the term Web literacy and think it means learning to code, or STEM (science, technology, engineering, maths) education. But Web literacy is much broader than that – it should include all the skills to be confident and competent online. To be empowered digital citizens, we all need to know how to navigate, how to share, what information to trust, and most importantly, how to expand the frontiers of our knowledge.

5

[...] Cultivating digital citizenship

Web literacy should be a foundational to education as reading, writing, and maths are – and it should be taught everywhere learning happens.

A fundamental part of Web literacy is understanding the forces that shape our lives online: the companies building our experiences, the politicians crafting and supporting government policies, and the power we hold as digital citizens to create the Internet we want. Having a say in our shared future on the Web means deciding which values are most important to us, and standing up for those values when they are threatened.

Protest Culture DIGITAL CULTURE

Digital Animal Memes by The Civic Beat (Jason Li and An Xiao Mina)

(A digital thing showing top into a physical thing.)

Variation

Cross geography connections in the memes.

Variation of a same meme

The process

IMAGES

Washington, DC

Washington, DC

Digital

#nastywoman

PHOTOGRAPHS

HASHTAG

Audience creating physical memes during the Meme Lab workshop

Digital memes

Physical

Product memes

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

We traditionally think of memes and internet culture as isolated to the internet, where digital literacy exists separately from traditional notions of cultural literacy. Recent years have seen a steady breakdown of that divide in popular discourse, whether talking about notions of privacy and surveillance, the role of government in regulating the internet, and, of course, in the rapid spread of meme culture in popular culture. In both the United States and the United Kingdom, memes have leapt from the internet in new and compelling ways. The iconic red Make America Great Again hat of the Trump campaign has inspired a number of digital remixes, like Make America Mexico Again and Make Racists Afraid Again, which in turn become physical hat remixes sold to fundraise for advocacy organizations. #RefugeesWelcome, a hashtag movement started in the UK in the face of the Syrian refugee crisis, has spread throughout Western Europe, with stickers, banners and marches around the theme. The online and the offline mix and intermix, crossing digital/physical barriers and leaping across the Atlantic Ocean.

Formal taxonomies can be developed from the folk taxonomy rendered machine-readable by the markup that hashtags provide; this process is called folksonomy.6 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hashtag

MATERIAL CULTURE

Material culture is the physical aspect of culture in the objects and architecture that surround people. It includes usage, consumption, creation and trade of objects, and the behaviors, norms and rituals these objects create or take part in. The term is commonly used in archaeological and anthropological studies, specifically focusing on the material evidence which can be attributed to culture, in the past or present. Material culture studies is an interdisciplinary field telling of relationships between people and their things: the making, history, preservation, and interpretation of objects. It draws on theory and practice from the social sciences and humanities such as art history, archaeology, anthropology, history, historic preservation, folklore, literary criticism and museum studies, among others. Anything from buildings and architectural elements to books, jewelry, or toothbrushes can be considered material culture.7

For the Mozilla Festival residency, I propose #MemeLab: an installation and workshop that looks at these themes and engages attendees in co-creating the installation. The installation will take the form of a scientific laboratory, with walls covered in chalk paint, as we try to diagram meme culture in both its online and offline manifestations. This might include a world map, to help emphasize the global-ness of meme culture. We will pre-install a few diagrams, including #RefugeesWelcome, #NastyWoman, #CatsAgainstBrexit, #Covfefe and a few others in other languages. These diagrams will start with a meme sparking event, with hashtags drawn in chalk, digital memes printed out and taped to the wall, product examples, and selfies in a loop on a digital screen. Attendees will be invited to create diagrams of their own, starting with a meme sparking event, whether in politics or general life. They will then be walked through a few key exercises: Hashtag station: Select a strip of paper from a test tube and write out a hashtag. Printing station: create a simple meme,

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Material_culture

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Digital again

Selfies memes TEXT > WEB LITERACY > PROJECT DESCRIPTION > AN XIAO IN COLLABORATION WITH JASON LI

Because of its widespread use, hashtag was added to the Oxford English Dictionary in June 2014. The term hashtag can also refer to the hash symbol itself when used in the context of a hashtag.

6

Washington, DC

San Jose, CA

Someone says something (‘She is a nasty woiman)

Pussycat vs. Redhat

Users create and use hashtags by placing the number sign or pound sign # (also known as the hash character) in front of a string of alphanumeric characters, usually a word or unspaced phrase, in or at the end of a message. The hashtag may contain letters, digits, and underscores. Searching for that hashtag will yield each message that has been tagged with it. A hashtag archive is consequently collected into a single stream under the same hashtag. For example, on the photosharing service Instagram, the hashtag #bluesky allows users to find all the posts that have been tagged using that hashtag.

07

Washington, DC

Washington, DC

Images from An Xiao Mina’s presentation.

A thing from internet gets remixed, goes to physical world and back to digital.

A hashtag is a type of metadata tag used on social networks such as Twitter and other microblogging services, allowing users to apply dynamic, user-generated tagging that makes it possible for others to easily find messages with a specific theme or content; it allows easy, informal markup of folk taxonomy without need of any formal taxonomy or markup language.

7

ARTWORK

# on manifestation boards

Internet Culture

https://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/Digital_culture

06

[...] Teaching Web literacy effectively

Learning Web literacy is like any other essential skill: we learn best by doing. And in the digital world, learning happens not just with teachers in the classroom, but everywhere there’s an Internet connection. We need all kinds of educators to have the knowledge and resources to teach Web literacy the way kids learn it best. And we need to make sure every student grows up not just on the Web, but fluent in the way it works.

05

Digital Culture stands for the contemporary phase of communication technologies, one that follows 19th century print culture and 20th century electronic broadcast culture, and that is deeply amplified and accelerated by the popularity of networked computers, personalised technologies and digital images. The emergence of digital culture is usually associated with a set of practices based on the ever more intensive use of communication technologies. These uses imply more participatory behaviors on the user side, an ever more visually riched environment and connection features that excell personal dimensions. Digital culture stands first of all for the changes brought about by the emergence of digital, networked and personalised media in our society and the passing from communication phases centred on print and broadcast media, to more personalised and networked media, that use digital compressing and processing capacities at their core. The consequences of such processes in societal terms and the means via which media technologies transform our modes of interaction and representation, broadly constitute what is called “digital culture”.5

HTTPS://CYBER.HARVARD.EDU/PEOPLE/AXMINA

WEB LITERACY

AN XIAO MINA IN COLLABORATION WITH JASON LI An Xiao” Mina is a technologist and writer who looks at issues of the global internet and networked creativity. As a Berkman Klein Fellow, she will study the impact of language barriers in our technology stack as the internet extends into diverse communities around the world, and she will continue her ongoing research on global internet meme culture. Mina leads the product team at Meedan, where they are building digital tools for journalists and translators, and she is co-founder of The Civic Beat, a research collective focused on the creative side of civic technology. She serves as a contributing editor to Civicist, an advisory editor to Hyperallergic, and a governing board member at China Residencies.

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Hashtag wall

Make a bag

Recently a 2016 Knight Visiting Nieman Fellow, where she studied online language barriers and their impact on journalism, Mina is currently working on a book about internet memes and global social movements (working title: “Memes to Movements”), to be published by Beacon Press.

using a meme template, of the hashtag and print it out. Making station: create a button, sticker, paper sign and/or canvas bag inspired by the hashtag. Selfie station: take a photo of yourself with the hashtag, printed meme, and object. Attach the hashtag and objects to the wall and draw chalk lines connecting them to each other and to others to which they have a thematic relationship. Since long before the internet, social movements have relied on a vast repertoire of creative actions and media to represent what they stand for: buttons, bumper stickers, paper signs, hats. Creative culture has leaned on street art, hip hop and dance to generate cultures of remix and performance. These same media actions are still utilized frequently in movements and marketing, but now, in the age of smartphones and the internet, they quickly intersect with the online world. Objects of meme culture get printed out and placed on t-shirts. People carrying clever signs watch their signs get photographed and then go viral on the

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

DIAGRAM Spatial and participatory mapping of the installation/workshop

She has spoken at venues like the Personal Democracy Forum, ACM SIGCHI, Creative Mornings, the Aspen Institute, RightsCon and the Institute for the Future, and she has contributed writing to publications like the Los Angeles Review of Books, Fusion, the New Inquiry, Nieman Journalism Lab, Places Journal and others.

Make a badge

Create a hashtag

internet. The digital and the physical are deeply intertwined, and this workshop will help visitors see the process. The installation and workshop will build on themes from “The Things of the Internet,” a lecture I gave at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University. In this talk, I explored the online-offline. I adapted the talk for a lecture at the University of Hong Kong’s Journalism and Media Studies Centre, where I developed a workshop format that proved to be quite successful and engaging with undergraduates from the University of Hong Kong and Fudan University (Shanghai). It also builds on Grotte de l’Internetz, a workshop and installation at SOMArts in San Francisco, where the artist invited participants to create Stone Age art of animal memes in the spirit of the Grotte Chauvet; as well as the World Animal Meme Map and photo exhibition, shown at the Victoria and Albert Museum’s Friday Late program this past summer.

TAKE A SELFIE

AN XIAO MINA

TEXT > WEB LITERACY > INTRO > SOURCE > ALL FROM HTTPS://WWW.MOZILLA.ORG/EN-GB/INTERNETHEALTH/WEB-LITERACY/

Make a emoji

Make a poster Use an existing Hashtag

Make a cap

OPEN NNOVAT ON

GRETTA LOUW

TEXT > DECENTRALISATION > KEY TERMS

ARCHANA PRASAD AND SEAN BLAGSVEDT

11

ADAO CURRENCY NOTE Each grantee will receive a currency note, personalized with their photo

CRYPTOCURRENCY

DECENTRAL SAT ON

A cryptocurrency (or crypto currency) is a digital asset designed to work as a medium of exchange that uses cryptography to secure its transactions, to control the creation of additional units, and to verify the transfer of assets. Cryptocurrencies are classified as a subset of digital currencies and are also classified as a subset of alternative currencies and virtual currencies.

Decentralisation is outside of control of one specific autority, distributing for many form of conentration...

Bitcoin, created in 2009, was the first decentralized cryptocurrency. Since then, numerous cryptocurrencies have been created. These are frequently called altcoins, as a blend of bitcoin alternative. Bitcoin and its derivatives use decentralized control as opposed to centralized electronic money/central banking systems. The decentralized control is related to the use of bitcoin’s blockchain transaction database in the role of a distributed ledger.11 11

Decentralisation

Distribution of power from concentration? power=money? Decision making? actions? Federation? Choices? Diversity?

Visibility of a transaction chain

Traces of this transaction

Decentralisation: brings the problems of lack of trust

Value comes with trust.

Accountability means taking integrity on an action

DIAGRAM Spatial and participatory mapping of the installation/workshop

Much of the recent sociological debate about power revolves around the issue of its means to enable – in other words, power as a means to make social actions possible as much as it may constrain or prevent them. The philosopher Michel Foucault saw power as a structural expression of “a complex strategic situation in a given social setting” that requires both constraint and enablement.12

TEXT > DECENTRALISATION > PROJECT DESCRIPTION > ARCHANA PRASAD AND SEAN BLAGSVEDT

What is the ADAO? The ADAO stands for Altruistic Democratic Autonomous Organization and offers ada coins as a normative currency with 30% of token supply allocated to form an endowment. Borrowing from Ethereum’s DAO, currency holders in the ADAO will be able to vote on which socially beneficial projects are funded from the endowment. As the value of the currency pool grows, the endowment will grow with it, with the ultimate goal of creating one of the world’s largest democratically run philanthropy funds.

ACCOUNTABILITY

In ethics and governance, accountability is answerability, blameworthiness, liability, and the expectation of account-giving. As an aspect of governance, it has been central to discussions related to problems in the public sector, nonprofit and private (corporate) and individual contexts. In leadership roles, accountability is the acknowledgment and assumption of responsibility for actions, products, decisions, and policies including the administration, governance, and implementation within the scope of the role or employment position and encompassing the obligation to report, explain and be answerable for resulting consequences.

How does it work? A significant share of the currency will form an endowment to support SDG focused artists and social organizations worldwide, with governance and decisions over who gets funded controlled by the community of adacoin holders via Ethereum smart contracts. To raise funds, we will accept donations in other crypto-currencies directly such as ETH and Bitcoin. The ADAO organization will help aid recipients navigate local jurisdiction issues such that they can legally and efficiently convert crypto-donations into local currencies. We will also encourage everyone, but especially artists, developers and social organizations to accept payments in ada coins and to provide services and artifacts that can be bought in ada coins. In doing so, we will fund the greatest democratically governed social/art endowment fund in the world and ultimately monetarily encourage acts of social value.

In governance, accountability has expanded beyond the basic definition of “being called to account for one’s actions”. It is frequently described as an account-giving relationship between individuals, e.g. “A is accountable to B when A is obliged to inform B about A’s (past or future) actions and decisions, to justify them, and to suffer punishment in the case of eventual misconduct”. Accountability cannot exist without proper accounting practices; in other words, an absence of accounting means an absence of accountability.

This installation-performance will speak in the aesthetic, language and mode of a modern bank. Blurring satire with reality, participants can apply for actual grants to be paid in ADAO coins, which will be tradable for traditional currencies on crypto-currency markets. The ADAO Bank will award grants, loans and saving schemes to people interested in working on the SDG’s. It will provide investment and

Accountability is an element of a RACI to indicate who is ultimately answerable for the correct and thorough completion of the deliverable or task, and the one who delegates the work to those responsible. There are various reasons (legitimate or excuses) why accountability fails.13 13

[...] User Control: Deciding who can collect your data We should all be able to choose – with clarity and confidence – what information we share with what companies, understanding the trade-offs we’re making when we do. Right now, we all lack meaningful choice online – privacy policies are often miles long and hard to read, we don’t understand what information we’re sharing or when, and opting out is seldom on the menu.

[...] Cyber Security: Locking down your sensitive information We should all have the ability to protect our online identity. At this point, it feels like we’ve all been victims of a cyberattack somewhere, somehow. Data breaches can lay bare the passwords of millions of people, often going undiscovered for years. Which means your identity may be at risk of theft without you even knowing it.

[...] Government Surveillance: Keeping prying eyes and ears out of your business We should all have the freedom to be ourselves — online and off – without surveillance, judgement and imposed societal bias. You wouldn’t want the government following your every move in real life – there’s no reason they should be shadowing you on the Internet. The Edward Snowden disclosures showed that even democracies can and do take liberties with your privacy.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accountability

Fill out a form

Interview

Take a photo

Get tokens

Get currency note

ARCHANA PRASAD AND SEAN BLAGSVEDT IN COLLABORATION WITH FREEMAN MURRAY Round Table

Archana Prasad, is an artist from Bangalore, India. Her work is a particular conjunction of visual art, technology and urban community art, ste wed in design and research methodologies. As Founder of Jaaga.in, Archana has a unique artist-activist role. Sean Blagsvedt is a technologist and entrepreneur. His recent company babajob provided job information to 10 million blue collar workers across India. Archana and Sean are concerned about the unjust assignment of value, thus currency, that tilts towards mechanisms of successful acquisition based models and stockpiling capital, rather than rewarding innovation and creation, especially around work that fulfills important societal goals but do not create large profits.

philanthropic options for those interested in growing their crypto-currency assets. The ADAO Bank booth provides MozFest participants human connections and conversations about the coin, the bank, its goals and objectives. Additionally the “employees” at the ADAO booth have discretionary power to award a limited number of coins to deserving participants from MozFest. Interaction Model: Participants fill out a form at the booth. Similar to a loan application, they will be invited to describe their own pledges to support the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals. Two tellers - the artists, will interview applicants, take their photo and given a limited number of token grants. Each grantee will receive a currency note, personalized with their photo.

currency, with the needed crypto-graphic keys printed on it such that the participant can claim the ADAO token online). Our Vision What do we want to accomplish? 1. To Take Back Crypto-currency and money itself for 2. Creativity = Wealth Currency is a Choice of: Ethics Models Value Alignment A sustainable futur Politics

(The rendering of the note is a Deep Learning based Style filter of the participant’s photo and a traditional

DIAGRAMS

14

POLARIZATION (POLITICS)

In politics, polarization (or polarisation) can refer to the divergence of political attitudes to ideological extremes. Polarization can refer to such divergence like public opinion or even to such divergence within certain groups. Almost all discussions of polarization in political science consider polarization in the context of political parties and democratic systems of government. When polarization occurs in a two-party system, like the United States, moderate voices often lose power and influence.14 14

Polarization creates

Questions polarised by the (geographical) context

Yes or No

Bringing tension to the debate by polarising the responses (he doesn’t’ believe in polarisation so that is his way of questioning it)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polarization_(politics)

INFORMATION ETHICS

The term information ethics was first coined by Robert Hauptman and used in the book Ethical challenges in librarianship. It examines the morality that comes from information as a resource, a product, or as a target. It provides a critical framework for considering moral issues concerning informational privacy, moral agency (e.g. whether artificial agents may be moral), new environmental issues (especially how agents should behave in the infosphere), problems arising from the life-cycle (creation, collection, recording, distribution, processing, etc.) of information (especially ownership and copyright, digital divide, and digital rights). It is very vital to understand that librarians, archivists, information professionals among others, really understand the importance of knowing how to disseminate proper information as well as being responsible with their actions when addressing information.15 15

By Paolo Cirio. Source > http://globaldirect.today

Experiment about liberation: people all agree if they can access the same information

TEXT > PRIVACY AND SECURITY > KEY TERMS

15 TEXT > WEB LITERACY > INTRO > SOURCE > ALL FROM HTTPS:// WWW.MOZILLA.ORG/EN-GB/ INTERNET-HEALTH/PRIVACYSECURITY/

HTTPS://THEADAO.ORG

DECENTRALISATION

The ADAO is a philanthropic cryptocurrency that supports creatives who advance the Sustainable Development Goals, representing an entirely new way to fund social and creative revolutionaries.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_(social_and_ political)

13

Decentralisation is related with lack of accountability

Accountability= integrity of action? trust?

The use of power need not involve force or the threat of force (coercion). At one extreme, it closely resembles what an English-speaking person might term “influence”, although some authors distinguish “influence” as a means by which power is used. One such example is soft power, as compared to hard power.

A Healthy Internet is Secure and Private The Internet only stays healthy if we trust it as a safe place – to explore, transact, connect, and create. Our privacy and security online is under constant threat. But there’s something you can do about it: get informed, protect yourself, and make your voice heard. A healthy Internet depends on you. [...]

PHOTOGRAPHS Audience interacting at the Adao Bank installation

POWER

12

PRIVACY & SECURITY PAOLO CIRIO

Decentralisation feedback mechanism in economical transactions

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cryptocurrency

12

In social science and politics, power is the ability to influence or outright control the behaviour of people. The term “authority” is often used for power perceived as legitimate by the social structure. Power can be seen as evil or unjust, but the exercise of power is accepted as endemic to humans as social beings. In business, power is often expressed as being “upward” or “downward”. With downward power, a company’s superior influences subordinates. When a company exerts upward power, it is the subordinates who influence the decisions of their leader or leaders.

Politics

PHOTOGRAPHS Participatory installation set up and audience interacting with polls part of Aesthetics of Information Ethics.

Information ethics How to represent sensible information (and the aesthetics derived from it)

Information Ecology

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Information_ethics Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

16

DELIBERATION

Deliberation is a process of thoughtfully weighing options, usually prior to voting. Deliberation emphasizes the use of logic and reason as opposed to power-struggle, creativity, or dialog. Group decisions are generally made after deliberation through a vote or consensus of those involved.

VS PARTICIPATION EMANCIPATION FREEDOM

In legal settings a jury famously uses deliberation because it is given specific options, like guilty or not guilty, along with information and arguments to evaluate. In “deliberative democracy”, the aim is for both elected officials and the general public to use deliberation rather than power-struggle as the basis for their vote.16 16

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

HTTPS://PAOLOCIRIO.NET/PRESS/TEXTS/AESTHETICS-INFORMATION-ETHICS.PHP

MISLEADING POLARITIES IN INFORMATION ETHICS

INCLUSION ACCESS COMMONS

EXPLOITATION CONTROL WITHHOLDING PROPERTY

PRIVATE

PUBLIC

OPACITY

TRANSPARENCY

PRIVACY OBSCURITY EMPATHY ANONYMITY

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deliberation

COERCION

EXCLUSION

RESPONSIBILITY

SURVEILLANCE EXPOSURE HUMILIATION ACCOUNTABILITY IMPUNITY

REPUTATION

SCORING

AUTONOMY

MANIPULATION

EDUCATING

MISINFORMING

QUANTIFIABLE SIMPLICITY

UNDETECTABLE COMPLEXITY

HTTPS://CYBER.HARVARD.EDU/PEOPLE/AXMINA

PRIVACY & SECURITY

PAOLO CIRIO

Paolo Cirio works with legal, economic and semiotic systems of the information society. He investigates social fields impacted by the Internet, such as privacy, copyright, democracy, and finance. He shows his research and intervention-based works through artifacts, photos, installations, videos, and public art. Cirio has exhibited in international museums and institutions and has won numerous prestigious art awards. His artworks have been covered by hundreds of media outlets worldwide and he regularly gives public lectures and workshops at leading universities.

SOME PROBLEMATIC ISSUES CONCERNING INFORMATION ETHICS: SEARCH ENGINES & SOCIAL MEDIA MODERATION HATE SPEECH HARRASSMENT TROLLING BULLYING BLACKMAIL STIGMAS SOCIAL PROFILING SOCIAL SCORE & BIAS CONSUMER PROFILING SEX OFFENDERS CRIMINAL RECORDS PREDICTIVE POLICING RACIAL PROFILING PRIVACY & SURVEILLANCE STATE AND CORPORATE SURVEILLANCE CRYPTOGRAPHY FOR POWER STRUCTURES CRYPTOGRAPHY FOR INDIVIDUALS PUBLIC SHAMING BLOCKCHAIN, DEEPWEB AND DARKNET ANONYMITY TRUST PRIVACY FRAUD HATE SPEECH CRUELTY ALGORITHMS ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE CONTROL ACCOUNTABILITY OF CODERS ROBOTICS AUTOMATED WEAPONS AUTOMATED LABOR PIRACY COPYRIGHT TRADEMARK FAIR USE EDUCATION ROYALITIES MEDIA AND POLITICS TARGETING VOTERS FAKE NEWS SHARING ECONOMY PRIVATE PROPERTY LABOR RIGHTS DIGITAL CURRENCIES TRANSPARENCY VOLATILITY ACCESS TO MEANS INFRASTRUCTURES ECOLOGICAL IMPACT DECENTRALISATION INTERNET OF THINGS POLICY CLOUD SERVERS

The Aesthetics of Information Ethics discusses methodologies, strategies, and practices of art addressing the personal and societal spheres affected by information systems. Information Ethics is broadly defined as “the branch of ethics that focuses on the relationship between the creation, organization, dissemination, and use of information.”[1] The so-called information revolution brings us an increasing number of pressing ethical issues. Artists can be particularly sensitive to these issues and they are able to question ethics by proposing and challenging perceptions and scenarios beyond common understanding. Artworks can creatively discuss and play with distribution systems of sensitive information, ethereal economies, flexible labor and property, circulating bodies and goods, manipulated and monitored relationships, expanded public spaces, exploited opinion formation, and, generally, technological apparatuses affecting social systems. Nowadays, social contracts are fluid; they constantly reorganize society and produce new social conditions. These active spaces are where information ethics emerge and where artists intervene in questioning, revealing, and reassembling the agents and environments of their artworks. Ethics of Aesthetics concerns the ethical frameworks in arranging the sensibility of the audience and the subjects of the artworks. The aesthetic methodologies of intervention, discourse, and representation of information systems can include the production of critique, distress, fear, empathy, alienation, complicity, spectacle, confusion, awareness, and other artistic devices. The aesthetic qualities of the artworks can be called into question through the articulation of the ethical conditions of the works and their subjects. The responsibility and conscience of the artists - as well as of the art critics and curators - are integrated in the analysis and validation of the social and artistic efficacy of the artworks. Concurrently, the ethical and social relations created by these artworks produce aesthetic forms, which concerns the field of the Aesthetics of Ethics. Social fields and norms are increasingly interdependent with technological advancements of information

Ethics are negotiated, developed, and balanced through reflections on the consequences and intentions of human activity. Differentiating themselves from morals - which are often static and ideological - ethics are dynamic, reflexive, and evolving principles that must be

oriented to maximize and develop the common good within the notion of ethics as the making and understanding of a dignified existence for humans and the environment surrounding them.

The Ethics of Representation and information systems

As such, techniques like the exposure and appropriation of sensitive information as well as the manipulation and disruption of social relations should be balanced with the parameters of intentions, receptions, and outcomes of the artwork. In the Aesthetics of Information Ethics, context is main the principle from which we can assess the ethics of artworks. Meaning and impact vary based on the context of presentation, execution, and results. The context needs to account for all the properties of the information systems involved. These methodologies, techniques, and practices of art production and critique are ultimately

Questions from Aesthetics of Information Ethics’ polls.

Should fake news on social media be removed by Internet companies themselves?

Should the coders of algorithms with racial biases be legally accountable?

Should we be able to trace individuals who use digital currency, such as Bitcoin?

Should the documents leaked by Snowden be made available to everyone – not only journalists?

Should politicians be able to use fully cryptographed communications for work?

Should vulnerable individuals be protected online even if they are key to public debate?

Should electronic voting be completely avoided and analog systems restored?

Should we remunerate the open source code utilized by big corporations such as Google?

Can the hacking of political parties during election be justified?

Should Facebook delete posts concerning hate speech toward refugees?

Should public figures on TwiFer be given access to block other accounts?

Should voter profiling and databases being banned?

Should poli:cal spending for online ads be regulated like they are on TV?

Should ads managed by algorithms be considered physiologically manipulative advertising?

DIAGRAM Spatial and partecipatory mapping of the installation.

Presentation screen

Diagrams Yes No

Results

The ethics of the power of these information systems are directly embodied in artworks that use and address such power. The ethical inquiries and relations activated by art with information systems create aesthetic forms. This aesthetics is discussed by measuring, comparing, and evaluating the strategies, consequences, conditions, and circumstances of the works of art. Such analysis needs to take into account a broad social context, therefore integrating the distribution of the work, the mode of presentation within the site of execution, and ultimately the intended and unintended recipients, critiques, and results that the work generates.

constantly discussed and confronted. Art plays a central role in this process. Evolving cultural forms and critical art are essential instruments for sensing and signaling the forming of ethics.

Social transactions and contracts are discussed, created, rearranged, or accentuated by artists for making visible the complexity, contradictions, and complicity within such social relations activated by information systems. However, only an attentive examination of the effects, causes, and nature of such systems can fully address them. Thus, representations of social and technological systems should engage with the dialectics of the construction of ethical values. The integrity of the agenda pursued is a responsibility of the artist in relation to the system addressed, while the critical reception should assess the means and ends of the artworks within the whole spectrum of forms and contexts of presentation.

QUESTIONS

computation, sharing, and control. Information technology has become the heart of the social order. However, it can be understood not from a technological point of view, but rather through a constant reflexive examination of what it produces in the social sphere. The ethical discussion can’t be limited to technocrats, legislators, coders, and the opaque internal policies of private entities. Art can play a role in this process of creating awareness and reflection on difficult ethical questions by making them relevant and engaging. The material of these aesthetic examinations is not limited to the Internet, algorithms, big data, and other technologies. These technical elements are mutually influenced by the political, cultural, legal, and economic systems, as well as several other social fields and infrastructures. Information systems should be understood as interconnected networks of social systems in which reflection and intervention have the potential to reverberate throughout the whole web of networks, consequently impacting a variety of conventions, entities, and individuals which are inevitably connected.

SHOULD FAKE NEWS ON SOCIAL MEDIA BE REMOVED BY INTERNET COMPANIES THEMSELVES ?

14 QUESTIONS = 14 POLS

Feedback from the audience + Add new questions

No

Yes

87 NO

Question

Polarities in Ethics of Representation In the Aesthetics of Information Ethics, the appearances, perceptions, and sensations of reality created by artists should take into account the formation of polarities. Mystifications and oversimplifications about the social impacts of information systems are instances of the Ethics of Representation. As such, the creation of falsehoods, hype, confusion, anxiety, or fatalism sustained by the producers and reporters of information systems create polarities in understanding ever-changing technological apparatuses and their social impacts. The Aesthetics of Information Ethics is about breaking down polarities to offer a broader understanding of the conditions within these systems. Examples of problematic issues in Information Ethics The Aesthetics of Information Ethics can be applied to examining the liability of algorithms, responsibility in anonymous networks, exploitation of shared content and labor, censorship on social media, freedom of speech used to harass, public shaming to condemn, hacking to protest or leak, and micro-targeting for political campaigning. In order to inspire inquiry, the artist questions how to balance freedom, empathy, justice, and accountability. By Paolo Cirio. 2017. [1] Joan, Reitz M. “Information Ethics.” Online Dictionary For Library And Information Science. N.p., 2010.

tomorrow will be better.

It gets better, but it does take time. She’s always with you. You got this. You can do this.

Conne

PHOTOGRAPHS

PHOTOGRAPHS

Tactical Technology Collective instructing the audience on how to use their Data Detox Kit

Visitors exploring vistual reality at Callum Cooper’s VR installation about privacy.

SOURCE > HTTPS://TACTICALTECH.ORG/NEWS/ DATA-DETOX-KIT/

Detox your Digital Self THE 8-DAY DATA DETOX Do you feel like your digital self is slipping out of control? Have you let yourself install too many apps, clicked “I agree” a few too many times, lost track of how many accounts you’ve created? Perhaps you feel you’re not as in control of your digital life as you’d like to be.

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Don’t despair! This data detox is designed just for you. By the end of the 8-day program, you’ll be well on your way to a healthier and more in-control digital self. The Data Detox Kit was produced for The Glass Room NYC, presented by Mozilla and Tactical Technology Collective.

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

SHOULD POLITICIANS BE ABLE TO USE FULLY CRYPTOGRAPHED COMMUNICATIONS FOR WORK ?

57 YES

You are valuable. You don’t need to achieve + lead + be visible to others to be valuable + deserve consideration.

Deep breaths - water.

Remember the last time you faced a major change -> it turned out to be for the better. This will too.

User Responses

Don’t overthink, it will be fine. Just relax. Nothing is constant. Think about all the good that has happened.

Don’t worry you’re still pretty. Lin chiah pà bē? Everything is temporary

Project Description: although the construct of empathy is multidimensional in nature and difficult to measure, i hope to create an effective strategy for highlighting empathy that focus specifically on communication skills training. the open lab project will visually explore the mozilla festival’s community’s understanding of digital empathy through a survey in which users can answer a serious of questions by applying coloured stickers to a chart in an effort to reflect levels of understanding towards digital empathy, accessibility and inclusion. self-reflection is a useful method for addressing empathy. and as such self-reflection activities could theoretically prompt guests to question and examine their interactions in the online world. this self-examination process may potentially develop heightened online awareness and promote increased digital empathy. the means by which empathy is expressed is naturally evolving as the world and its forms of communications become increasingly digital and recognizing and addressing barriers to the expression of digital empathy is important. if we can sharpen the communication skills of traditional empathy, how can we then use those skills to address the greater discussion of digital empathy?

everyday is trying. I am with you. well done. I’m here… and I promise to never let you go.

Life has its ups & downs.

build grow heal love

Open Lab Session. Type of Project: Survey | Data Visualization

What is the worst that can happen? How likely is it to happen?

This too shall pass.

You have overcome so many other things already too

Digital Renders

You’re always trying so hard,

You are loved You are not alone! We are with you

If you’re just travelling when there’s sun, you’ll never get anywhere

TEXT > WEB LITERACY > KEY TERMS

A healthy Internet means everyone has the skills to thrive People everywhere should have the knowledge they need to tap into the full power of the Internet – and use it to make their lives and the world better. This means everyone needs to be able to read, write, and participate online. A healthy Internet is yours to master.depends on you. [...]

Trying makes a difference. Trying can be your victory.

Are you ok?

Spatial and partecipatory mapping of the installation.

Tsemppiä!

Aim to be comfortably lost

The pendulum will swing

DIAGRAM

You haven’t killed anyone… it’s ok!

This too shall pass

What is (realistically) the worst that could happen?

COLLABORATRIVE SPACE

WEB LITERACY

i found that certain understandings of definitions become very nuclear, contaminated and porous so what does it mean when i talk about technology in the context of vulnerability and who we are today.

Questioning the role of technology in the context of vulnerability

I got you load of Biscoff, all the music you like, a bluetooth speaker and also the people you are friend with are online. ? Do you want a hug? xx Take a break – I’ve got this! It’ll be alright. Trust me. You only live once =) It’s not the end of the world!!! A vide é muito curta. Aproveite! Be brilliant by your own standards. Not of others. Go on! Don’t let fear stop your explorations! You’ve made a difference in my life, what you do matters. You are enough! <3

i want to explore the daily trauma we undergo to earn the coveted badge of successful human existence that often negates notions of struggle, loneliness and deeper meanings of wounded-ness. a trauma that plays itself in sets and loops traveling by genome and bloodstream. we need to close, we need to fill this loop. so from that, i find the vulnerability of digital immersion. soaking myself in the frailties of others to wash away things gray. and sometimes in the immersion, i find that i might be required to live them. and from disenfranchised digital cultures i learn about the vulnerabilities of race and how it was only created to sustain a larger system of capitalism. error 404, page not found. i was invited here to speak about inclusion. but i think we should focus on loops, and loopholes and continuums. about closing the gaps and expanding our capacity to include more brokenness. from distorted views of linear utoipian w


ECENTRALISATION

ARCHANA PRASAD AND SEAN BLAGSVEDT IN COLLABORATION WITH FREEMAN MURR AY

A healthy Internet is created and owned by us all The Internet owes much of its success to openness: its open, shared structure has made it easy for everyone to build, surf, and thrive on it. But a few big companies are closing in, closing doors, and creating walled gardens that concentrate their ownership and control of the Web. Together, we can fight to make sure no one limits our Internet access, experience, or creation. A healthy Internet belongs to you. [...]


1 [...] Decentralisation means Competition and Choice

TEXT > DECENTRALISATION > INTRO > SOURCE > ALL FROM MOZZILLA.ORG

The Internet should continue to foster healthy competition among companies, opportunity for entrepreneurs, and meaningful choices for users. A personalized Internet is an exciting prospect. But more and more, that means opting into a single company’s ecosystem – which streamlines your experience right now, but may seriously limit your choices in the future. Competitors will be reduced to those few companies who can offer the whole enchilada, thus consolidating the power of existing tech giants and making it much harder for entrepreneurs to disrupt the market with great ideas.

B d t b c a u t b c b r

[...] Decentralisation means Net Neutrality

11

No one should be able to restrict our access to the Web for their own gain.

1

We rely on network providers – telcos and cable companies – for access to the Internet. Which puts them in a position to restrict that access for their own business objectives, favouring their own products, blocking sites or brands, or charging different prices and offering different speeds depending on content type. Net neutrality prohibits network providers from discriminating based on content, so everyone has equal access.

[...] Decentralisation means Interoperability

[...] Decentralisation means Local Contribution

The Web should remain open and interoperable, so we can keep our experience consistent, transparent, and full of possibility.

We should all be able to contribute to the Web, so it reflects and serves all of its users.

Interoperability is a big word with a simple result: your Web experience is basically the same across browsers, hardware, and operating systems because it was designed that way – and built with the open standards to support it. Open standards also allow anyone to invent new ways to make your Web experience better. But interoperability is losing ground to closed systems – and we’re losing transparency, participation, and innovation along with it.

A is a u t o t a c a v

Today 3 billion people all over the world use the Internet to learn, work, play, and connect. But not everyone is able to contribute to it equally. Which means the Web doesn’t reflect the full diversity of its users, doesn’t work as well for some people as others, and can even marginalise certain communities and individuals.

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DECENTRALISATION

In is c t p s o a s o o a s u w le

T f A w m s a O c

M a o in m a T p


TEXT > DECENTRALISATION > KEY TERMS

11

CRYPTOCURRENCY

A cryptocurrency (or crypto currency) is a digital asset designed to work as a medium of exchange that uses cryptography to secure its transactions, to control the creation of additional units, and to verify the transfer of assets. Cryptocurrencies are classified as a subset of digital currencies and are also classified as a subset of alternative currencies and virtual currencies. Bitcoin, created in 2009, was the first decentralized cryptocurrency. Since then, numerous cryptocurrencies have been created. These are frequently called altcoins, as a blend of bitcoin alternative. Bitcoin and its derivatives use decentralized control as opposed to centralized electronic money/central banking systems. The decentralized control is related to the use of bitcoin’s blockchain transaction database in the role of a distributed ledger.11 11

Decentralisation

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cryptocurrency

12

POWER

In social science and politics, power is the ability to influence or outright control the behaviour of people. The term “authority” is often used for power perceived as legitimate by the social structure. Power can be seen as evil or unjust, but the exercise of power is accepted as endemic to humans as social beings. In business, power is often expressed as being “upward” or “downward”. With downward power, a company’s superior influences subordinates. When a company exerts upward power, it is the subordinates who influence the decisions of their leader or leaders.

Visibility of a transaction chain

The use of power need not involve force or the threat of force (coercion). At one extreme, it closely resembles what an English-speaking person might term “influence”, although some authors distinguish “influence” as a means by which power is used. One such example is soft power, as compared to hard power. Much of the recent sociological debate about power revolves around the issue of its means to enable – in other words, power as a means to

TEXT > DECENTRALISATION > PROJECT DESCRIPTION >


A

E n

Decentralisation is outside of control of one specific autority, distributing for many form of conentration...

Decentralisation feedback mechanism in economical transactions

Traces of this transaction

Value comes with trust.

Distribution of power from concentration? power=money? Decision making? actions? Federation? Choices? Diversity?

Decentralisation: brings the problems of lack of trust

P

A B

Decentralisation is related with lack of accountability

Accountability= integrity of action? trust? Accountability means taking integrity on an action

D

S t

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DECENTRALISATION

HTTPS://THEADAO.ORG


Much of the recent sociological debate about power revolves around the issue of its means to enable – in other words, power as a means to make social actions possible as much as it may constrain or prevent them. The philosopher Michel Foucault saw power as a structural expression of “a complex strategic situation in a given social setting” that requires both constraint and enablement.12 12 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_(social_and_ political)

13

ACCOUNTABILITY

In ethics and governance, accountability is answerability, blameworthiness, liability, and the expectation of account-giving. As an aspect of governance, it has been central to discussions related to problems in the public sector, nonprofit and private (corporate) and individual contexts. In leadership roles, accountability is the acknowledgment and assumption of responsibility for actions, products, decisions, and policies including the administration, governance, and implementation within the scope of the role or employment position and encompassing the obligation to report, explain and be answerable for resulting consequences. In governance, accountability has expanded beyond the basic definition of “being called to account for one’s actions”. It is frequently described as an account-giving relationship between individuals, e.g. “A is accountable to B when A is obliged to inform B about A’s (past or future) actions and decisions, to justify them, and to suffer punishment in the case of eventual misconduct”. Accountability cannot exist without proper accounting practices; in other words, an absence of accounting means an absence of accountability. Accountability is an element of a RACI to indicate who is ultimately answerable for the correct and thorough completion of the deliverable or task, and the one who delegates the work to those responsible. There are various reasons (legitimate or excuses) why accountability fails.13 13

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accountability

TEXT > DECENTRALISATION > PROJECT DESCRIPTION > ARCHANA PRASAD AND SEAN BLAGSVEDT

The ADAO is a philanthropic cryptocurrency that supports creatives who advance the Sustainable Development Goals, representing an entirely new way to fund social and creative revolutionaries. What is the ADAO? The ADAO stands for Altruistic Democratic Autonomous Organization and offers ada coins as a normative currency with 30% of token supply allocated to form an endowment. Borrowing from Ethereum’s DAO, currency holders in the ADAO will be able to vote on which socially beneficial projects are funded from the endowment. As the value of the currency pool grows, the endowment will grow with it, with the ultimate goal of creating one of the world’s largest democratically run philanthropy funds. How does it work? A significant share of the currency will form an endowment to support SDG focused artists and social organizations worldwide, with governance and decisions over who gets funded controlled by the community of adacoin holders via Ethereum smart contracts. To raise funds, we will accept donations in other crypto-currencies directly such as ETH and Bitcoin. The ADAO organization will help aid recipients navigate local jurisdiction issues such that they can legally and efficiently convert crypto-donations into local currencies. We will also encourage everyone, but especially artists, developers and social organizations to accept payments in ada coins and to provide services and artifacts that can be bought in ada coins. In doing so, we will fund the greatest democratically governed social/art endowment fund in the world and ultimately monetarily encourage acts of social value. This installation-performance will speak in the aesthetic, language and mode of a modern bank. Blurring satire with reality, participants can apply for actual grants to be paid in ADAO coins, which will be tradable for traditional currencies on crypto-currency markets. The ADAO Bank will award grants, loans and saving schemes to people interested in working on the SDG’s. It will provide investment and


HTTPS://THEADAO.ORG

DECENTRALISATION

ARCHANA PRASAD AND SEAN BLAGSVEDT IN COLLABORATION WITH FREEMAN MURRAY Archana Prasad, is an artist from Bangalore, India. Her work is a particular conjunction of visual art, technology and urban community art, ste wed in design and research methodologies. As Founder of Jaaga.in, Archana has a unique artist-activist role. Sean Blagsvedt is a technologist and entrepreneur. His recent company babajob provided job information to 10 million blue collar workers across India. Archana and Sean are concerned about the unjust assignment of value, thus currency, that tilts towards mechanisms of successful acquisition based models and stockpiling capital, rather than rewarding innovation and creation, especially around work that fulfills important societal goals but do not create large profits.

philanthropic options for those interested in growing their crypto-currency assets. The ADAO Bank booth provides MozFest participants human connections and conversations about the coin, the bank, its goals and objectives. Additionally the “employees” at the ADAO booth have discretionary power to award a limited number of coins to deserving participants from MozFest. Interaction Model: Participants fill out a form at the booth. Similar to a loan application, they will be invited to describe their own pledges to support the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals. Two tellers - the artists, will interview applicants, take their photo and given a limited number of token grants. Each grantee will receive a currency note, personalized with their photo. (The rendering of the note is a Deep Learning based Style filter of the participant’s photo and a traditional

currency, with the needed crypto-graphic keys printed on it such that the participant can claim the ADAO token online). Our Vision What do we want to accomplish? 1. To Take Back Crypto-currency and money itself for 2. Creativity = Wealth Currency is a Choice of: Ethics Models Value Alignment A sustainable futur Politics

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DIAGRAM Spatial and participatory mapping of the installation/workshop

Fill out a form

Interview


Take a photo

Get tokens

Get currency note

Round Table

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DECENTRALISATION


ADAO CURRENCY NOTE Each grantee will receive a currency note, personalized with their photo

PHOTOGRAPHS Audience interacting at the Adao Bank installation

DIAGRAM Spatial and participatory mapping of the installation/workshop


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DECENTRALISATION


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DECENTRALISATION


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DIGITAL INCLUSION BROOKLYN J. PAKATHI

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WEB LITERACY AN XIAO MINA

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OPEN INNOVATION GRETTA LOUW

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DECENTRALISATION ARCHADA PRASAD AND SEAN BLAGSVEDT

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PRIVACY & SECURITY PAOLO CIRIO + TACTICAL TECH + CALLUM COOPER


vulnerability makes us human

D G TAL

Vulnerability

NCLUS ON BROOKLYN

today i want to talk about the vulnerabilities of being (digital and all) i don’t know if we ever truly interrogate what vulnerability is and what it means for us.

TEXT > DIGITAL INCLUSION > KEY TERMS

1

inc ca lus ex n’t ioa wi ist n em th ou pa t th y

as a tool to navigate the world

EMPATHY

Technology

01

Empathy is the capacity to understand or feel what another person is experiencing from within the other person’s frame of reference, i.e., the capacity to place oneself in another’s position. There are many definitions for empathy that encompass a broad range of emotional states. Types of empathy include cognitive empathy, emotional empathy, and somatic empathy.1

SELF-REFLECTION

Human self-reflection is the capacity of humans to exercise introspection and the willingness to learn more about their fundamental nature, purpose and essence. The earliest historical records demonstrate the great interest which humanity has had in itself.

Emotional labour

instead, let’s explore the vulnerabilities of being and it’s necessity to build connective collective empathy. the vulnerabilities of dreaming, in a world governed by homogeneous toxic misteachings of branded macho-ism. in a world that requires improvisation at every moment. so this is what we are exploring.

In order to create inclusive spaces, we need to create inclusive spaces

INCLUSIVITY

i want to explore the technologies we implore every day as tools to navigate all the things that exist in a very resilient selfdriven world.

Empathy

An intention or policy of including people who might otherwise be excluded or marginalized, such as those who are handicapped or learning-disabled, or racial and sexual minorities.3

BROOKLYN ASKS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Safe-space

3

04

AUDIENCE RESPONDS Come and join us!!

SAFE-SPACE

I’m so lost (I found a way)

In educational institutions, safe space (or safe-space), safer space, and positive space are terms that, as originally intended, were used to indicate that a teacher, educational institution, or student body did not tolerate anti-LGBT violence, harassment or hate speech, thereby creating a safe place for all LGBT students. The term safe space has been extended to refer to an autonomous space for individuals who feel marginalized to come together to communicate regarding their experiences with marginalization, typically on a university campus. Safe spaces exist in educational institutions of anglophone countries. The idea of safe spaces has seen criticism on the grounds that it stifles freedom of speech. Critics claim safe spaces hinder the exposure of sensitive material that needs to be discussed and explained in an educational environment.4 4

i’m rejecting the idea of vulnerability as a mode of disregarded weakness. our sense of vulnerability is in fact innately human.

The vulnerability of the individual

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-reflection

03

i’m not interested in sweeping statements of empathetic learning and building for the sole purpose of opportunist capital gain.

Feeling vulnerable online

Human self-reflection is related to the philosophy of consciousness, the topic of awareness, consciousness in general and the philosophy of mind. 2 2

today i want us to imagine, to dream, to question.

There is a necessity to build a collective connected emphathy

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Empathy

02

J PAKATH

TEXT > DIGITAL INCLUSION > PROJECT DESCRIPTION > BY BROOKLYN J. PAKATHI

This is my home Type of Project: Pixelated Digital Renderings | Poster Art | Public Art Project Description: this is my home, aimed at creating dialogues of empathy and diversity for a greater sense of digital inclusion, is a series of digital renderings representative of the spectrum of shades within human skin tone and overlaid with subtle and often gentle messages of understanding in hopes to promote a higher level of care and concern in digital communication and accessibility. the digital renderings will be produced as large posters and placed across the mozilla festival venue to act as a public service announcement to engage with guests in attendance, prompting viewers to feel considered in their contribution towards an open and diverse internet. Project Statement: empathy involves the inner experience of sharing in and comprehending the momentary psychological state of another person (schafer, 1959). what future do we envision, when we talk about digital inclusion? we

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Safe-space

DIGITAL INCLUSION

BROOKLYN J. PAKATHI

in searching for the connectors of cause, meaning and sense of resolve, brooklyn j’s work fundamentally speaks to the tragic vulnerability of romance he explores these themes of an existential nature, plagued by fragility, through video vignettes, digital observations, and photographic interrogations. making loneliness an art since 92’ often define inclusion as the ability of individuals and groups to access and use information and communication technologies. encompassing not only access to the internet but also the availability of hardware and software; relevant content and services; and training for the digital literacy skills required

for effective use of information and communication technologies. but in and of itself, digital inclusion can often overlook the necessity for creating and maintaining a dialogue of digital empathy. as with many other aspects of contemporary culture, rapid adoption of social and mobile technologies has altered society’s communication patterns and disrupted the expression of empathy, specifically in digital conversations. mobile and social media use has transformed when and how individuals interact with others. the ability to instantly share thoughts, feelings, and behaviors with the rest of society via digital channels can occur in mere seconds, often without the empathetic social filter that accompanies traditional communications. moreover, digital communications are devoid of many of the emotional signals and cues experienced in face-to-face settings, often leading to more impersonal interactions. creating and exploring digital empathy unlocks the digital communication of empathy, one of the core elements missing from how we currently communicate online. there are few ways to show a friend, a loved one, a group or a community as a whole that you feel empathetic towards their situation. the project, this is my home, tries to understand what it means to be digitally human taking into account the worlds of digital and non-digital are becoming more and more one in the same. the messages project empathy as enacted between a community and pay attention to someone else’s experience in a way that allows the other to realize that we all share and understand the essential quality of our digital experiences. the work aims to understand how other people feels and to be able to communicate this understanding in a way that is uniquely ‘human’. this physical and tangible work presented seemingly offline but still represented in a digital space reflects the present day failure of digital devices and online communications to facilitate the expression of empathy between people. the importance for the work to exist in and around the festival space works

accordingly to mozilla festival’s mandate and responsibility in creating an accessible and equally inclusive space for learning, growth, understanding, and diversity without any prerequisite or criteria to entry. Goals: • to create an opportunity for communities to explore communication of empathyand understanding • to build a digital culture of inclusivity without the use of active technology that can often negate individuals wants to experience digital • to create an environment that speaks to individuals main cause for fear and concern and offer safety and peace of mind

this is your home

it’s going to be okay

Embrace them. If you need a chat / walk / silent film, let me know

this is a safe space

Outcome

You are not alone and all will be well. It’s because of you, that I am still standing!! This will pass. You are fine. We are with you. Use this. Become better from experience.

Round table discussion cted

empat

hy

Safe space

[...] Making Web literacy meaningful for everyone Web literacy should mean all the skills we need to think, create, and thrive online. Many people hear the term Web literacy and think it means learning to code, or STEM (science, technology, engineering, maths) education. But Web literacy is much broader than that – it should include all the skills to be confident and competent online. To be empowered digital citizens, we all need to know how to navigate, how to share, what information to trust, and most importantly, how to expand the frontiers of our knowledge.

5

[...] Cultivating digital citizenship

Web literacy should be a foundational to education as reading, writing, and maths are – and it should be taught everywhere learning happens.

A fundamental part of Web literacy is understanding the forces that shape our lives online: the companies building our experiences, the politicians crafting and supporting government policies, and the power we hold as digital citizens to create the Internet we want. Having a say in our shared future on the Web means deciding which values are most important to us, and standing up for those values when they are threatened.

Protest Culture DIGITAL CULTURE

Digital Animal Memes by The Civic Beat (Jason Li and An Xiao Mina)

(A digital thing showing top into a physical thing.)

Variation

Cross geography connections in the memes.

Variation of a same meme

The process

IMAGES

Washington, DC

Washington, DC

Digital

#nastywoman

PHOTOGRAPHS

HASHTAG

Audience creating physical memes during the Meme Lab workshop

Digital memes

Physical

Product memes

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

We traditionally think of memes and internet culture as isolated to the internet, where digital literacy exists separately from traditional notions of cultural literacy. Recent years have seen a steady breakdown of that divide in popular discourse, whether talking about notions of privacy and surveillance, the role of government in regulating the internet, and, of course, in the rapid spread of meme culture in popular culture. In both the United States and the United Kingdom, memes have leapt from the internet in new and compelling ways. The iconic red Make America Great Again hat of the Trump campaign has inspired a number of digital remixes, like Make America Mexico Again and Make Racists Afraid Again, which in turn become physical hat remixes sold to fundraise for advocacy organizations. #RefugeesWelcome, a hashtag movement started in the UK in the face of the Syrian refugee crisis, has spread throughout Western Europe, with stickers, banners and marches around the theme. The online and the offline mix and intermix, crossing digital/physical barriers and leaping across the Atlantic Ocean.

Formal taxonomies can be developed from the folk taxonomy rendered machine-readable by the markup that hashtags provide; this process is called folksonomy.6 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hashtag

MATERIAL CULTURE

Material culture is the physical aspect of culture in the objects and architecture that surround people. It includes usage, consumption, creation and trade of objects, and the behaviors, norms and rituals these objects create or take part in. The term is commonly used in archaeological and anthropological studies, specifically focusing on the material evidence which can be attributed to culture, in the past or present. Material culture studies is an interdisciplinary field telling of relationships between people and their things: the making, history, preservation, and interpretation of objects. It draws on theory and practice from the social sciences and humanities such as art history, archaeology, anthropology, history, historic preservation, folklore, literary criticism and museum studies, among others. Anything from buildings and architectural elements to books, jewelry, or toothbrushes can be considered material culture.7

For the Mozilla Festival residency, I propose #MemeLab: an installation and workshop that looks at these themes and engages attendees in co-creating the installation. The installation will take the form of a scientific laboratory, with walls covered in chalk paint, as we try to diagram meme culture in both its online and offline manifestations. This might include a world map, to help emphasize the global-ness of meme culture. We will pre-install a few diagrams, including #RefugeesWelcome, #NastyWoman, #CatsAgainstBrexit, #Covfefe and a few others in other languages. These diagrams will start with a meme sparking event, with hashtags drawn in chalk, digital memes printed out and taped to the wall, product examples, and selfies in a loop on a digital screen. Attendees will be invited to create diagrams of their own, starting with a meme sparking event, whether in politics or general life. They will then be walked through a few key exercises: Hashtag station: Select a strip of paper from a test tube and write out a hashtag. Printing station: create a simple meme,

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Material_culture

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Digital again

Selfies memes TEXT > WEB LITERACY > PROJECT DESCRIPTION > AN XIAO IN COLLABORATION WITH JASON LI

Because of its widespread use, hashtag was added to the Oxford English Dictionary in June 2014. The term hashtag can also refer to the hash symbol itself when used in the context of a hashtag.

6

Washington, DC

San Jose, CA

Someone says something (‘She is a nasty woiman)

Pussycat vs. Redhat

Users create and use hashtags by placing the number sign or pound sign # (also known as the hash character) in front of a string of alphanumeric characters, usually a word or unspaced phrase, in or at the end of a message. The hashtag may contain letters, digits, and underscores. Searching for that hashtag will yield each message that has been tagged with it. A hashtag archive is consequently collected into a single stream under the same hashtag. For example, on the photosharing service Instagram, the hashtag #bluesky allows users to find all the posts that have been tagged using that hashtag.

07

Washington, DC

Washington, DC

Images from An Xiao Mina’s presentation.

A thing from internet gets remixed, goes to physical world and back to digital.

A hashtag is a type of metadata tag used on social networks such as Twitter and other microblogging services, allowing users to apply dynamic, user-generated tagging that makes it possible for others to easily find messages with a specific theme or content; it allows easy, informal markup of folk taxonomy without need of any formal taxonomy or markup language.

7

ARTWORK

# on manifestation boards

Internet Culture

https://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/Digital_culture

06

[...] Teaching Web literacy effectively

Learning Web literacy is like any other essential skill: we learn best by doing. And in the digital world, learning happens not just with teachers in the classroom, but everywhere there’s an Internet connection. We need all kinds of educators to have the knowledge and resources to teach Web literacy the way kids learn it best. And we need to make sure every student grows up not just on the Web, but fluent in the way it works.

05

Digital Culture stands for the contemporary phase of communication technologies, one that follows 19th century print culture and 20th century electronic broadcast culture, and that is deeply amplified and accelerated by the popularity of networked computers, personalised technologies and digital images. The emergence of digital culture is usually associated with a set of practices based on the ever more intensive use of communication technologies. These uses imply more participatory behaviors on the user side, an ever more visually riched environment and connection features that excell personal dimensions. Digital culture stands first of all for the changes brought about by the emergence of digital, networked and personalised media in our society and the passing from communication phases centred on print and broadcast media, to more personalised and networked media, that use digital compressing and processing capacities at their core. The consequences of such processes in societal terms and the means via which media technologies transform our modes of interaction and representation, broadly constitute what is called “digital culture”.5

HTTPS://CYBER.HARVARD.EDU/PEOPLE/AXMINA

WEB LITERACY

AN XIAO MINA IN COLLABORATION WITH JASON LI An Xiao” Mina is a technologist and writer who looks at issues of the global internet and networked creativity. As a Berkman Klein Fellow, she will study the impact of language barriers in our technology stack as the internet extends into diverse communities around the world, and she will continue her ongoing research on global internet meme culture. Mina leads the product team at Meedan, where they are building digital tools for journalists and translators, and she is co-founder of The Civic Beat, a research collective focused on the creative side of civic technology. She serves as a contributing editor to Civicist, an advisory editor to Hyperallergic, and a governing board member at China Residencies.

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Hashtag wall

Make a bag

Recently a 2016 Knight Visiting Nieman Fellow, where she studied online language barriers and their impact on journalism, Mina is currently working on a book about internet memes and global social movements (working title: “Memes to Movements”), to be published by Beacon Press.

using a meme template, of the hashtag and print it out. Making station: create a button, sticker, paper sign and/or canvas bag inspired by the hashtag. Selfie station: take a photo of yourself with the hashtag, printed meme, and object. Attach the hashtag and objects to the wall and draw chalk lines connecting them to each other and to others to which they have a thematic relationship. Since long before the internet, social movements have relied on a vast repertoire of creative actions and media to represent what they stand for: buttons, bumper stickers, paper signs, hats. Creative culture has leaned on street art, hip hop and dance to generate cultures of remix and performance. These same media actions are still utilized frequently in movements and marketing, but now, in the age of smartphones and the internet, they quickly intersect with the online world. Objects of meme culture get printed out and placed on t-shirts. People carrying clever signs watch their signs get photographed and then go viral on the

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

DIAGRAM Spatial and participatory mapping of the installation/workshop

She has spoken at venues like the Personal Democracy Forum, ACM SIGCHI, Creative Mornings, the Aspen Institute, RightsCon and the Institute for the Future, and she has contributed writing to publications like the Los Angeles Review of Books, Fusion, the New Inquiry, Nieman Journalism Lab, Places Journal and others.

Make a badge

Create a hashtag

internet. The digital and the physical are deeply intertwined, and this workshop will help visitors see the process. The installation and workshop will build on themes from “The Things of the Internet,” a lecture I gave at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University. In this talk, I explored the online-offline. I adapted the talk for a lecture at the University of Hong Kong’s Journalism and Media Studies Centre, where I developed a workshop format that proved to be quite successful and engaging with undergraduates from the University of Hong Kong and Fudan University (Shanghai). It also builds on Grotte de l’Internetz, a workshop and installation at SOMArts in San Francisco, where the artist invited participants to create Stone Age art of animal memes in the spirit of the Grotte Chauvet; as well as the World Animal Meme Map and photo exhibition, shown at the Victoria and Albert Museum’s Friday Late program this past summer.

TAKE A SELFIE

AN XIAO MINA

TEXT > WEB LITERACY > INTRO > SOURCE > ALL FROM HTTPS://WWW.MOZILLA.ORG/EN-GB/INTERNETHEALTH/WEB-LITERACY/

Make a emoji

Make a poster Use an existing Hashtag

Make a cap

OPEN NNOVAT ON

GRETTA LOUW

TEXT > DECENTRALISATION > KEY TERMS

ARCHANA PRASAD AND SEAN BLAGSVEDT

11

ADAO CURRENCY NOTE Each grantee will receive a currency note, personalized with their photo

CRYPTOCURRENCY

DECENTRAL SAT ON

A cryptocurrency (or crypto currency) is a digital asset designed to work as a medium of exchange that uses cryptography to secure its transactions, to control the creation of additional units, and to verify the transfer of assets. Cryptocurrencies are classified as a subset of digital currencies and are also classified as a subset of alternative currencies and virtual currencies.

Decentralisation is outside of control of one specific autority, distributing for many form of conentration...

Bitcoin, created in 2009, was the first decentralized cryptocurrency. Since then, numerous cryptocurrencies have been created. These are frequently called altcoins, as a blend of bitcoin alternative. Bitcoin and its derivatives use decentralized control as opposed to centralized electronic money/central banking systems. The decentralized control is related to the use of bitcoin’s blockchain transaction database in the role of a distributed ledger.11 11

Decentralisation

Distribution of power from concentration? power=money? Decision making? actions? Federation? Choices? Diversity?

Visibility of a transaction chain

Traces of this transaction

Decentralisation: brings the problems of lack of trust

Value comes with trust.

Accountability means taking integrity on an action

DIAGRAM Spatial and participatory mapping of the installation/workshop

Much of the recent sociological debate about power revolves around the issue of its means to enable – in other words, power as a means to make social actions possible as much as it may constrain or prevent them. The philosopher Michel Foucault saw power as a structural expression of “a complex strategic situation in a given social setting” that requires both constraint and enablement.12

TEXT > DECENTRALISATION > PROJECT DESCRIPTION > ARCHANA PRASAD AND SEAN BLAGSVEDT

What is the ADAO? The ADAO stands for Altruistic Democratic Autonomous Organization and offers ada coins as a normative currency with 30% of token supply allocated to form an endowment. Borrowing from Ethereum’s DAO, currency holders in the ADAO will be able to vote on which socially beneficial projects are funded from the endowment. As the value of the currency pool grows, the endowment will grow with it, with the ultimate goal of creating one of the world’s largest democratically run philanthropy funds.

ACCOUNTABILITY

In ethics and governance, accountability is answerability, blameworthiness, liability, and the expectation of account-giving. As an aspect of governance, it has been central to discussions related to problems in the public sector, nonprofit and private (corporate) and individual contexts. In leadership roles, accountability is the acknowledgment and assumption of responsibility for actions, products, decisions, and policies including the administration, governance, and implementation within the scope of the role or employment position and encompassing the obligation to report, explain and be answerable for resulting consequences.

How does it work? A significant share of the currency will form an endowment to support SDG focused artists and social organizations worldwide, with governance and decisions over who gets funded controlled by the community of adacoin holders via Ethereum smart contracts. To raise funds, we will accept donations in other crypto-currencies directly such as ETH and Bitcoin. The ADAO organization will help aid recipients navigate local jurisdiction issues such that they can legally and efficiently convert crypto-donations into local currencies. We will also encourage everyone, but especially artists, developers and social organizations to accept payments in ada coins and to provide services and artifacts that can be bought in ada coins. In doing so, we will fund the greatest democratically governed social/art endowment fund in the world and ultimately monetarily encourage acts of social value.

In governance, accountability has expanded beyond the basic definition of “being called to account for one’s actions”. It is frequently described as an account-giving relationship between individuals, e.g. “A is accountable to B when A is obliged to inform B about A’s (past or future) actions and decisions, to justify them, and to suffer punishment in the case of eventual misconduct”. Accountability cannot exist without proper accounting practices; in other words, an absence of accounting means an absence of accountability.

This installation-performance will speak in the aesthetic, language and mode of a modern bank. Blurring satire with reality, participants can apply for actual grants to be paid in ADAO coins, which will be tradable for traditional currencies on crypto-currency markets. The ADAO Bank will award grants, loans and saving schemes to people interested in working on the SDG’s. It will provide investment and

Accountability is an element of a RACI to indicate who is ultimately answerable for the correct and thorough completion of the deliverable or task, and the one who delegates the work to those responsible. There are various reasons (legitimate or excuses) why accountability fails.13 13

[...] User Control: Deciding who can collect your data We should all be able to choose – with clarity and confidence – what information we share with what companies, understanding the trade-offs we’re making when we do. Right now, we all lack meaningful choice online – privacy policies are often miles long and hard to read, we don’t understand what information we’re sharing or when, and opting out is seldom on the menu.

[...] Cyber Security: Locking down your sensitive information We should all have the ability to protect our online identity. At this point, it feels like we’ve all been victims of a cyberattack somewhere, somehow. Data breaches can lay bare the passwords of millions of people, often going undiscovered for years. Which means your identity may be at risk of theft without you even knowing it.

[...] Government Surveillance: Keeping prying eyes and ears out of your business We should all have the freedom to be ourselves — online and off – without surveillance, judgement and imposed societal bias. You wouldn’t want the government following your every move in real life – there’s no reason they should be shadowing you on the Internet. The Edward Snowden disclosures showed that even democracies can and do take liberties with your privacy.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accountability

Fill out a form

Interview

Take a photo

Get tokens

Get currency note

ARCHANA PRASAD AND SEAN BLAGSVEDT IN COLLABORATION WITH FREEMAN MURRAY Round Table

Archana Prasad, is an artist from Bangalore, India. Her work is a particular conjunction of visual art, technology and urban community art, ste wed in design and research methodologies. As Founder of Jaaga.in, Archana has a unique artist-activist role. Sean Blagsvedt is a technologist and entrepreneur. His recent company babajob provided job information to 10 million blue collar workers across India. Archana and Sean are concerned about the unjust assignment of value, thus currency, that tilts towards mechanisms of successful acquisition based models and stockpiling capital, rather than rewarding innovation and creation, especially around work that fulfills important societal goals but do not create large profits.

philanthropic options for those interested in growing their crypto-currency assets. The ADAO Bank booth provides MozFest participants human connections and conversations about the coin, the bank, its goals and objectives. Additionally the “employees” at the ADAO booth have discretionary power to award a limited number of coins to deserving participants from MozFest. Interaction Model: Participants fill out a form at the booth. Similar to a loan application, they will be invited to describe their own pledges to support the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals. Two tellers - the artists, will interview applicants, take their photo and given a limited number of token grants. Each grantee will receive a currency note, personalized with their photo.

currency, with the needed crypto-graphic keys printed on it such that the participant can claim the ADAO token online). Our Vision What do we want to accomplish? 1. To Take Back Crypto-currency and money itself for 2. Creativity = Wealth Currency is a Choice of: Ethics Models Value Alignment A sustainable futur Politics

(The rendering of the note is a Deep Learning based Style filter of the participant’s photo and a traditional

DIAGRAMS

14

POLARIZATION (POLITICS)

In politics, polarization (or polarisation) can refer to the divergence of political attitudes to ideological extremes. Polarization can refer to such divergence like public opinion or even to such divergence within certain groups. Almost all discussions of polarization in political science consider polarization in the context of political parties and democratic systems of government. When polarization occurs in a two-party system, like the United States, moderate voices often lose power and influence.14 14

Polarization creates

Questions polarised by the (geographical) context

Yes or No

Bringing tension to the debate by polarising the responses (he doesn’t’ believe in polarisation so that is his way of questioning it)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polarization_(politics)

INFORMATION ETHICS

The term information ethics was first coined by Robert Hauptman and used in the book Ethical challenges in librarianship. It examines the morality that comes from information as a resource, a product, or as a target. It provides a critical framework for considering moral issues concerning informational privacy, moral agency (e.g. whether artificial agents may be moral), new environmental issues (especially how agents should behave in the infosphere), problems arising from the life-cycle (creation, collection, recording, distribution, processing, etc.) of information (especially ownership and copyright, digital divide, and digital rights). It is very vital to understand that librarians, archivists, information professionals among others, really understand the importance of knowing how to disseminate proper information as well as being responsible with their actions when addressing information.15 15

By Paolo Cirio. Source > http://globaldirect.today

Experiment about liberation: people all agree if they can access the same information

TEXT > PRIVACY AND SECURITY > KEY TERMS

15 TEXT > WEB LITERACY > INTRO > SOURCE > ALL FROM HTTPS:// WWW.MOZILLA.ORG/EN-GB/ INTERNET-HEALTH/PRIVACYSECURITY/

HTTPS://THEADAO.ORG

DECENTRALISATION

The ADAO is a philanthropic cryptocurrency that supports creatives who advance the Sustainable Development Goals, representing an entirely new way to fund social and creative revolutionaries.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_(social_and_ political)

13

Decentralisation is related with lack of accountability

Accountability= integrity of action? trust?

The use of power need not involve force or the threat of force (coercion). At one extreme, it closely resembles what an English-speaking person might term “influence”, although some authors distinguish “influence” as a means by which power is used. One such example is soft power, as compared to hard power.

A Healthy Internet is Secure and Private The Internet only stays healthy if we trust it as a safe place – to explore, transact, connect, and create. Our privacy and security online is under constant threat. But there’s something you can do about it: get informed, protect yourself, and make your voice heard. A healthy Internet depends on you. [...]

PHOTOGRAPHS Audience interacting at the Adao Bank installation

POWER

12

PRIVACY & SECURITY PAOLO CIRIO

Decentralisation feedback mechanism in economical transactions

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cryptocurrency

12

In social science and politics, power is the ability to influence or outright control the behaviour of people. The term “authority” is often used for power perceived as legitimate by the social structure. Power can be seen as evil or unjust, but the exercise of power is accepted as endemic to humans as social beings. In business, power is often expressed as being “upward” or “downward”. With downward power, a company’s superior influences subordinates. When a company exerts upward power, it is the subordinates who influence the decisions of their leader or leaders.

Politics

PHOTOGRAPHS Participatory installation set up and audience interacting with polls part of Aesthetics of Information Ethics.

Information ethics How to represent sensible information (and the aesthetics derived from it)

Information Ecology

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Information_ethics Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

16

DELIBERATION

Deliberation is a process of thoughtfully weighing options, usually prior to voting. Deliberation emphasizes the use of logic and reason as opposed to power-struggle, creativity, or dialog. Group decisions are generally made after deliberation through a vote or consensus of those involved.

VS PARTICIPATION EMANCIPATION FREEDOM

In legal settings a jury famously uses deliberation because it is given specific options, like guilty or not guilty, along with information and arguments to evaluate. In “deliberative democracy”, the aim is for both elected officials and the general public to use deliberation rather than power-struggle as the basis for their vote.16 16

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

HTTPS://PAOLOCIRIO.NET/PRESS/TEXTS/AESTHETICS-INFORMATION-ETHICS.PHP

MISLEADING POLARITIES IN INFORMATION ETHICS

INCLUSION ACCESS COMMONS

EXPLOITATION CONTROL WITHHOLDING PROPERTY

PRIVATE

PUBLIC

OPACITY

TRANSPARENCY

PRIVACY OBSCURITY EMPATHY ANONYMITY

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deliberation

COERCION

EXCLUSION

RESPONSIBILITY

SURVEILLANCE EXPOSURE HUMILIATION ACCOUNTABILITY IMPUNITY

REPUTATION

SCORING

AUTONOMY

MANIPULATION

EDUCATING

MISINFORMING

QUANTIFIABLE SIMPLICITY

UNDETECTABLE COMPLEXITY

HTTPS://CYBER.HARVARD.EDU/PEOPLE/AXMINA

PRIVACY & SECURITY

PAOLO CIRIO

Paolo Cirio works with legal, economic and semiotic systems of the information society. He investigates social fields impacted by the Internet, such as privacy, copyright, democracy, and finance. He shows his research and intervention-based works through artifacts, photos, installations, videos, and public art. Cirio has exhibited in international museums and institutions and has won numerous prestigious art awards. His artworks have been covered by hundreds of media outlets worldwide and he regularly gives public lectures and workshops at leading universities.

SOME PROBLEMATIC ISSUES CONCERNING INFORMATION ETHICS: SEARCH ENGINES & SOCIAL MEDIA MODERATION HATE SPEECH HARRASSMENT TROLLING BULLYING BLACKMAIL STIGMAS SOCIAL PROFILING SOCIAL SCORE & BIAS CONSUMER PROFILING SEX OFFENDERS CRIMINAL RECORDS PREDICTIVE POLICING RACIAL PROFILING PRIVACY & SURVEILLANCE STATE AND CORPORATE SURVEILLANCE CRYPTOGRAPHY FOR POWER STRUCTURES CRYPTOGRAPHY FOR INDIVIDUALS PUBLIC SHAMING BLOCKCHAIN, DEEPWEB AND DARKNET ANONYMITY TRUST PRIVACY FRAUD HATE SPEECH CRUELTY ALGORITHMS ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE CONTROL ACCOUNTABILITY OF CODERS ROBOTICS AUTOMATED WEAPONS AUTOMATED LABOR PIRACY COPYRIGHT TRADEMARK FAIR USE EDUCATION ROYALITIES MEDIA AND POLITICS TARGETING VOTERS FAKE NEWS SHARING ECONOMY PRIVATE PROPERTY LABOR RIGHTS DIGITAL CURRENCIES TRANSPARENCY VOLATILITY ACCESS TO MEANS INFRASTRUCTURES ECOLOGICAL IMPACT DECENTRALISATION INTERNET OF THINGS POLICY CLOUD SERVERS

The Aesthetics of Information Ethics discusses methodologies, strategies, and practices of art addressing the personal and societal spheres affected by information systems. Information Ethics is broadly defined as “the branch of ethics that focuses on the relationship between the creation, organization, dissemination, and use of information.”[1] The so-called information revolution brings us an increasing number of pressing ethical issues. Artists can be particularly sensitive to these issues and they are able to question ethics by proposing and challenging perceptions and scenarios beyond common understanding. Artworks can creatively discuss and play with distribution systems of sensitive information, ethereal economies, flexible labor and property, circulating bodies and goods, manipulated and monitored relationships, expanded public spaces, exploited opinion formation, and, generally, technological apparatuses affecting social systems. Nowadays, social contracts are fluid; they constantly reorganize society and produce new social conditions. These active spaces are where information ethics emerge and where artists intervene in questioning, revealing, and reassembling the agents and environments of their artworks. Ethics of Aesthetics concerns the ethical frameworks in arranging the sensibility of the audience and the subjects of the artworks. The aesthetic methodologies of intervention, discourse, and representation of information systems can include the production of critique, distress, fear, empathy, alienation, complicity, spectacle, confusion, awareness, and other artistic devices. The aesthetic qualities of the artworks can be called into question through the articulation of the ethical conditions of the works and their subjects. The responsibility and conscience of the artists - as well as of the art critics and curators - are integrated in the analysis and validation of the social and artistic efficacy of the artworks. Concurrently, the ethical and social relations created by these artworks produce aesthetic forms, which concerns the field of the Aesthetics of Ethics. Social fields and norms are increasingly interdependent with technological advancements of information

Ethics are negotiated, developed, and balanced through reflections on the consequences and intentions of human activity. Differentiating themselves from morals - which are often static and ideological - ethics are dynamic, reflexive, and evolving principles that must be

oriented to maximize and develop the common good within the notion of ethics as the making and understanding of a dignified existence for humans and the environment surrounding them.

The Ethics of Representation and information systems

As such, techniques like the exposure and appropriation of sensitive information as well as the manipulation and disruption of social relations should be balanced with the parameters of intentions, receptions, and outcomes of the artwork. In the Aesthetics of Information Ethics, context is main the principle from which we can assess the ethics of artworks. Meaning and impact vary based on the context of presentation, execution, and results. The context needs to account for all the properties of the information systems involved. These methodologies, techniques, and practices of art production and critique are ultimately

Questions from Aesthetics of Information Ethics’ polls.

Should fake news on social media be removed by Internet companies themselves?

Should the coders of algorithms with racial biases be legally accountable?

Should we be able to trace individuals who use digital currency, such as Bitcoin?

Should the documents leaked by Snowden be made available to everyone – not only journalists?

Should politicians be able to use fully cryptographed communications for work?

Should vulnerable individuals be protected online even if they are key to public debate?

Should electronic voting be completely avoided and analog systems restored?

Should we remunerate the open source code utilized by big corporations such as Google?

Can the hacking of political parties during election be justified?

Should Facebook delete posts concerning hate speech toward refugees?

Should public figures on TwiFer be given access to block other accounts?

Should voter profiling and databases being banned?

Should poli:cal spending for online ads be regulated like they are on TV?

Should ads managed by algorithms be considered physiologically manipulative advertising?

DIAGRAM Spatial and partecipatory mapping of the installation.

Presentation screen

Diagrams Yes No

Results

The ethics of the power of these information systems are directly embodied in artworks that use and address such power. The ethical inquiries and relations activated by art with information systems create aesthetic forms. This aesthetics is discussed by measuring, comparing, and evaluating the strategies, consequences, conditions, and circumstances of the works of art. Such analysis needs to take into account a broad social context, therefore integrating the distribution of the work, the mode of presentation within the site of execution, and ultimately the intended and unintended recipients, critiques, and results that the work generates.

constantly discussed and confronted. Art plays a central role in this process. Evolving cultural forms and critical art are essential instruments for sensing and signaling the forming of ethics.

Social transactions and contracts are discussed, created, rearranged, or accentuated by artists for making visible the complexity, contradictions, and complicity within such social relations activated by information systems. However, only an attentive examination of the effects, causes, and nature of such systems can fully address them. Thus, representations of social and technological systems should engage with the dialectics of the construction of ethical values. The integrity of the agenda pursued is a responsibility of the artist in relation to the system addressed, while the critical reception should assess the means and ends of the artworks within the whole spectrum of forms and contexts of presentation.

QUESTIONS

computation, sharing, and control. Information technology has become the heart of the social order. However, it can be understood not from a technological point of view, but rather through a constant reflexive examination of what it produces in the social sphere. The ethical discussion can’t be limited to technocrats, legislators, coders, and the opaque internal policies of private entities. Art can play a role in this process of creating awareness and reflection on difficult ethical questions by making them relevant and engaging. The material of these aesthetic examinations is not limited to the Internet, algorithms, big data, and other technologies. These technical elements are mutually influenced by the political, cultural, legal, and economic systems, as well as several other social fields and infrastructures. Information systems should be understood as interconnected networks of social systems in which reflection and intervention have the potential to reverberate throughout the whole web of networks, consequently impacting a variety of conventions, entities, and individuals which are inevitably connected.

SHOULD FAKE NEWS ON SOCIAL MEDIA BE REMOVED BY INTERNET COMPANIES THEMSELVES ?

14 QUESTIONS = 14 POLS

Feedback from the audience + Add new questions

No

Yes

87 NO

Question

Polarities in Ethics of Representation In the Aesthetics of Information Ethics, the appearances, perceptions, and sensations of reality created by artists should take into account the formation of polarities. Mystifications and oversimplifications about the social impacts of information systems are instances of the Ethics of Representation. As such, the creation of falsehoods, hype, confusion, anxiety, or fatalism sustained by the producers and reporters of information systems create polarities in understanding ever-changing technological apparatuses and their social impacts. The Aesthetics of Information Ethics is about breaking down polarities to offer a broader understanding of the conditions within these systems. Examples of problematic issues in Information Ethics The Aesthetics of Information Ethics can be applied to examining the liability of algorithms, responsibility in anonymous networks, exploitation of shared content and labor, censorship on social media, freedom of speech used to harass, public shaming to condemn, hacking to protest or leak, and micro-targeting for political campaigning. In order to inspire inquiry, the artist questions how to balance freedom, empathy, justice, and accountability. By Paolo Cirio. 2017. [1] Joan, Reitz M. “Information Ethics.” Online Dictionary For Library And Information Science. N.p., 2010.

tomorrow will be better.

It gets better, but it does take time. She’s always with you. You got this. You can do this.

Conne

PHOTOGRAPHS

PHOTOGRAPHS

Tactical Technology Collective instructing the audience on how to use their Data Detox Kit

Visitors exploring vistual reality at Callum Cooper’s VR installation about privacy.

SOURCE > HTTPS://TACTICALTECH.ORG/NEWS/ DATA-DETOX-KIT/

Detox your Digital Self THE 8-DAY DATA DETOX Do you feel like your digital self is slipping out of control? Have you let yourself install too many apps, clicked “I agree” a few too many times, lost track of how many accounts you’ve created? Perhaps you feel you’re not as in control of your digital life as you’d like to be.

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Don’t despair! This data detox is designed just for you. By the end of the 8-day program, you’ll be well on your way to a healthier and more in-control digital self. The Data Detox Kit was produced for The Glass Room NYC, presented by Mozilla and Tactical Technology Collective.

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

SHOULD POLITICIANS BE ABLE TO USE FULLY CRYPTOGRAPHED COMMUNICATIONS FOR WORK ?

57 YES

You are valuable. You don’t need to achieve + lead + be visible to others to be valuable + deserve consideration.

Deep breaths - water.

Remember the last time you faced a major change -> it turned out to be for the better. This will too.

User Responses

Don’t overthink, it will be fine. Just relax. Nothing is constant. Think about all the good that has happened.

Don’t worry you’re still pretty. Lin chiah pà bē? Everything is temporary

Project Description: although the construct of empathy is multidimensional in nature and difficult to measure, i hope to create an effective strategy for highlighting empathy that focus specifically on communication skills training. the open lab project will visually explore the mozilla festival’s community’s understanding of digital empathy through a survey in which users can answer a serious of questions by applying coloured stickers to a chart in an effort to reflect levels of understanding towards digital empathy, accessibility and inclusion. self-reflection is a useful method for addressing empathy. and as such self-reflection activities could theoretically prompt guests to question and examine their interactions in the online world. this self-examination process may potentially develop heightened online awareness and promote increased digital empathy. the means by which empathy is expressed is naturally evolving as the world and its forms of communications become increasingly digital and recognizing and addressing barriers to the expression of digital empathy is important. if we can sharpen the communication skills of traditional empathy, how can we then use those skills to address the greater discussion of digital empathy?

everyday is trying. I am with you. well done. I’m here… and I promise to never let you go.

Life has its ups & downs.

build grow heal love

Open Lab Session. Type of Project: Survey | Data Visualization

What is the worst that can happen? How likely is it to happen?

This too shall pass.

You have overcome so many other things already too

Digital Renders

You’re always trying so hard,

You are loved You are not alone! We are with you

If you’re just travelling when there’s sun, you’ll never get anywhere

TEXT > WEB LITERACY > KEY TERMS

A healthy Internet means everyone has the skills to thrive People everywhere should have the knowledge they need to tap into the full power of the Internet – and use it to make their lives and the world better. This means everyone needs to be able to read, write, and participate online. A healthy Internet is yours to master.depends on you. [...]

Trying makes a difference. Trying can be your victory.

Are you ok?

Spatial and partecipatory mapping of the installation.

Tsemppiä!

Aim to be comfortably lost

The pendulum will swing

DIAGRAM

You haven’t killed anyone… it’s ok!

This too shall pass

What is (realistically) the worst that could happen?

COLLABORATRIVE SPACE

WEB LITERACY

i found that certain understandings of definitions become very nuclear, contaminated and porous so what does it mean when i talk about technology in the context of vulnerability and who we are today.

Questioning the role of technology in the context of vulnerability

I got you load of Biscoff, all the music you like, a bluetooth speaker and also the people you are friend with are online. ? Do you want a hug? xx Take a break – I’ve got this! It’ll be alright. Trust me. You only live once =) It’s not the end of the world!!! A vide é muito curta. Aproveite! Be brilliant by your own standards. Not of others. Go on! Don’t let fear stop your explorations! You’ve made a difference in my life, what you do matters. You are enough! <3

i want to explore the daily trauma we undergo to earn the coveted badge of successful human existence that often negates notions of struggle, loneliness and deeper meanings of wounded-ness. a trauma that plays itself in sets and loops traveling by genome and bloodstream. we need to close, we need to fill this loop. so from that, i find the vulnerability of digital immersion. soaking myself in the frailties of others to wash away things gray. and sometimes in the immersion, i find that i might be required to live them. and from disenfranchised digital cultures i learn about the vulnerabilities of race and how it was only created to sustain a larger system of capitalism. error 404, page not found. i was invited here to speak about inclusion. but i think we should focus on loops, and loopholes and continuums. about closing the gaps and expanding our capacity to include more brokenness. from distorted views of linear utoipian w


PRIVACY & SECURITY PAOLO CIRIO


A Healthy Internet is Secure and Private The Internet only stays healthy if we trust it as a safe place – to explore, transact, connect, and create. Our privacy and security online is under constant threat. But there’s something you can do about it: get informed, protect yourself, and make your voice heard. A healthy Internet depends on you. [...]

[...] User Control: Deciding who can collect your data We should all be able to choose – with clarity and confidence – what information we share with what companies, understanding the trade-offs we’re making when we do. Right now, we all lack meaningful choice online – privacy policies are often miles long and hard to read, we don’t understand what information we’re sharing or when, and opting out is seldom on the menu.

TEXT > WEB LITERACY > INTRO > SOURCE > ALL FROM HTTPS:// WWW.MOZILLA.ORG/EN-GB/ INTERNET-HEALTH/PRIVACYSECURITY/

[...] Cyber Security: Locking down your sensitive information We should all have the ability to protect our online identity. At this point, it feels like we’ve all been victims of a cyberattack somewhere, somehow. Data breaches can lay bare the passwords of millions of people, often going undiscovered for years. Which means your identity may be at risk of theft without you even knowing it.

[...] Government Surveillance: Keeping prying eyes and ears out of your business We should all have the freedom to be ourselves — online and off – without surveillance, judgement and imposed societal bias. You wouldn’t want the government following your every move in real life – there’s no reason they should be shadowing you on the Internet. The Edward Snowden disclosures showed that even democracies can and do take liberties with your privacy.

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T


TEXT > PRIVACY AND SECURITY > KEY TERMS

14

POLARIZATION (POLITICS)

In politics, polarization (or polarisation) can refer to the divergence of political attitudes to ideological extremes. Polarization can refer to such divergence like public opinion or even to such divergence within certain groups. Almost all discussions of polarization in political science consider polarization in the context of political parties and democratic systems of government. When polarization occurs in a two-party system, like the United States, moderate voices often lose power and influence.14 14

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polarization_(politics)

15

INFORMATION ETHICS

The term information ethics was first coined by Robert Hauptman and used in the book Ethical challenges in librarianship. It examines the morality that comes from information as a resource, a product, or as a target. It provides a critical framework for considering moral issues concerning informational privacy, moral agency (e.g. whether artificial agents may be moral), new environmental issues (especially how agents should behave in the infosphere), problems arising from the life-cycle (creation, collection, recording, distribution, processing, etc.) of information (especially ownership and copyright, digital divide, and digital rights). It is very vital to understand that librarians, archivists, information professionals among others, really understand the importance of knowing how to disseminate proper information as well as being responsible with their actions when addressing information.15 15

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Information_ethics

16

DELIBERATION

Deliberation is a process of thoughtfully weighing options, usually prior to voting. Deliberation emphasizes the use of logic and reason as opposed to power-struggle, creativity, or dialog.

MISLEADING POLARITIES IN INFORMATION ETHICS VS


Experiment about liberation: people all agree if they can access the same information

Polarization creates

Questions polarised by the (geographical) context

Yes or No

Bringing tension to the debate by polarising the responses (he doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; believe in polarisation so that is his way of questioning it)

Politics

Information ethics How to represent sensible information (and the aesthetics derived from it)

Information Ecology

HTTPS://PAOLOCIRIO.NET/PRESS/TEXTS/AESTHETICS-INFORMATION-ETHICS.PHP

The Aesthetics of Information Ethics discusses methodologies, strategies, X 24; Y and practices of art addressing the personal and societal spheres affected by27 PRIVACY AND SECURITY information systems. Information Ethics is broadly defined

computation, sharing, and control.


16

DELIBERATION

Deliberation is a process of thoughtfully weighing options, usually prior to voting. Deliberation emphasizes the use of logic and reason as opposed to power-struggle, creativity, or dialog. Group decisions are generally made after deliberation through a vote or consensus of those involved.

MISLEADING POLARITIES IN INFORMATION ETHICS VS PARTICIPATION

COERCION

EMANCIPATION

EXPLOITATION

FREEDOM

In legal settings a jury famously uses deliberation because it is given specific options, like guilty or not guilty, along with information and arguments to evaluate. In “deliberative democracy”, the aim is for both elected officials and the general public to use deliberation rather than power-struggle as the basis for their vote.16 16

INCLUSION ACCESS COMMONS

WITHHOLDING PROPERTY

PRIVATE

PUBLIC

OPACITY

TRANSPARENCY

PRIVACY

SURVEILLANCE

OBSCURITY EMPATHY ANONYMITY

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deliberation

CONTROL EXCLUSION

EXPOSURE HUMILIATION ACCOUNTABILITY

RESPONSIBILITY

IMPUNITY

REPUTATION

SCORING

AUTONOMY

MANIPULATION

EDUCATING

MISINFORMING

QUANTIFIABLE

UNDETECTABLE

SIMPLICITY

COMPLEXITY

HTTPS://CYBER.HARVARD.EDU/PEOPLE/AXMINA

PRIVACY & SECURITY

PAOLO CIRIO

Paolo Cirio works with legal, economic and semiotic systems of the information society. He investigates social fields impacted by the Internet, such as privacy, copyright, democracy, and finance. He shows his research and intervention-based works through artifacts, photos, installations, videos, and public art. Cirio has exhibited in international museums and institutions and has won numerous prestigious art awards. His artworks have been covered by hundreds of media outlets worldwide and he regularly gives public lectures and workshops at leading universities.

SOME PROBLEMATIC ISSUES


HTTPS://PAOLOCIRIO.NET/PRESS/TEXTS/AESTHETICS-INFORMATION-ETHICS.PHP

The Aesthetics of Information Ethics discusses methodologies, strategies, and practices of art addressing the personal and societal spheres affected by information systems. Information Ethics is broadly defined as “the branch of ethics that focuses on the relationship between the creation, organization, dissemination, and use of information.”[1] The so-called information revolution brings us an increasing number of pressing ethical issues. Artists can be particularly sensitive to these issues and they are able to question ethics by proposing and challenging perceptions and scenarios beyond common understanding. Artworks can creatively discuss and play with distribution systems of sensitive information, ethereal economies, flexible labor and property, circulating bodies and goods, manipulated and monitored relationships, expanded public spaces, exploited opinion formation, and, generally, technological apparatuses affecting social systems. Nowadays, social contracts are fluid; they constantly reorganize society and produce new social conditions. These active spaces are where information ethics emerge and where artists intervene in questioning, revealing, and reassembling the agents and environments of their artworks. Ethics of Aesthetics concerns the ethical frameworks in arranging the sensibility of the audience and the subjects of the artworks. The aesthetic methodologies of intervention, discourse, and representation of information systems can include the production of critique, distress, fear, empathy, alienation, complicity, spectacle, confusion, awareness, and other artistic devices. The aesthetic qualities of the artworks can be called into question through the articulation of the ethical conditions of the works and their subjects. The responsibility and conscience of the artists - as well as of the art critics and curators - are integrated in the analysis and validation of the social and artistic efficacy of the artworks. Concurrently, the ethical and social relations created by these artworks produce aesthetic forms, which concerns the field of the Aesthetics of Ethics. Social fields and norms are increasingly interdependent with technological advancements of information

computation, sharing, and control. Information technology has become the heart of the social order. However, it can be understood not from a technological point of view, but rather through a constant reflexive examination of what it produces in the social sphere. The ethical discussion can’t be limited to technocrats, legislators, coders, and the opaque internal policies of private entities. Art can play a role in this process of creating awareness and reflection on difficult ethical questions by making them relevant and engaging. The material of these aesthetic examinations is not limited to the Internet, algorithms, big data, and other technologies. These technical elements are mutually influenced by the political, cultural, legal, and economic systems, as well as several other social fields and infrastructures. Information systems should be understood as interconnected networks of social systems in which reflection and intervention have the potential to reverberate throughout the whole web of networks, consequently impacting a variety of conventions, entities, and individuals which are inevitably connected. The ethics of the power of these information systems are directly embodied in artworks that use and address such power. The ethical inquiries and relations activated by art with information systems create aesthetic forms. This aesthetics is discussed by measuring, comparing, and evaluating the strategies, consequences, conditions, and circumstances of the works of art. Such analysis needs to take into account a broad social context, therefore integrating the distribution of the work, the mode of presentation within the site of execution, and ultimately the intended and unintended recipients, critiques, and results that the work generates. Ethics are negotiated, developed, and balanced through reflections on the consequences and intentions of human activity. Differentiating themselves from morals - which are often static and ideological - ethics are dynamic, reflexive, and evolving principles that must be

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SOME PROBLEMATIC ISSUES CONCERNING INFORMATION ETHICS: SEARCH ENGINES & SOCIAL MEDIA MODERATION HATE SPEECH HARRASSMENT TROLLING BULLYING BLACKMAIL STIGMAS SOCIAL PROFILING SOCIAL SCORE & BIAS CONSUMER PROFILING SEX OFFENDERS CRIMINAL RECORDS PREDICTIVE POLICING RACIAL PROFILING PRIVACY & SURVEILLANCE STATE AND CORPORATE SURVEILLANCE CRYPTOGRAPHY FOR POWER STRUCTURES CRYPTOGRAPHY FOR INDIVIDUALS PUBLIC SHAMING BLOCKCHAIN, DEEPWEB AND DARKNET ANONYMITY TRUST PRIVACY FRAUD HATE SPEECH CRUELTY ALGORITHMS ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE CONTROL ACCOUNTABILITY OF CODERS ROBOTICS AUTOMATED WEAPONS AUTOMATED LABOR PIRACY COPYRIGHT TRADEMARK FAIR USE EDUCATION ROYALITIES MEDIA AND POLITICS TARGETING VOTERS FAKE NEWS SHARING ECONOMY PRIVATE PROPERTY LABOR RIGHTS DIGITAL CURRENCIES TRANSPARENCY VOLATILITY ACCESS TO MEANS INFRASTRUCTURES ECOLOGICAL IMPACT DECENTRALISATION INTERNET OF THINGS POLICY CLOUD SERVERS

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constantly discussed and confronted. Art plays a central role in this process. Evolving cultural forms and critical art are essential instruments for sensing and signaling the forming of ethics.

oriented to maximize and develop the common good within the notion of ethics as the making and understanding of a dignified existence for humans and the environment surrounding them.

The Ethics of Representation and information systems

Polarities in Ethics of Representation

Social transactions and contracts are discussed, created, rearranged, or accentuated by artists for making visible the complexity, contradictions, and complicity within such social relations activated by information systems. However, only an attentive examination of the effects, causes, and nature of such systems can fully address them. Thus, representations of social and technological systems should engage with the dialectics of the construction of ethical values. The integrity of the agenda pursued is a responsibility of the artist in relation to the system addressed, while the critical reception should assess the means and ends of the artworks within the whole spectrum of forms and contexts of presentation. As such, techniques like the exposure and appropriation of sensitive information as well as the manipulation and disruption of social relations should be balanced with the parameters of intentions, receptions, and outcomes of the artwork. In the Aesthetics of Information Ethics, context is main the principle from which we can assess the ethics of artworks. Meaning and impact vary based on the context of presentation, execution, and results. The context needs to account for all the properties of the information systems involved. These methodologies, techniques, and practices of art production and critique are ultimately

In the Aesthetics of Information Ethics, the appearances, perceptions, and sensations of reality created by artists should take into account the formation of polarities. Mystifications and oversimplifications about the social impacts of information systems are instances of the Ethics of Representation. As such, the creation of falsehoods, hype, confusion, anxiety, or fatalism sustained by the producers and reporters of information systems create polarities in understanding ever-changing technological apparatuses and their social impacts. The Aesthetics of Information Ethics is about breaking down polarities to offer a broader understanding of the conditions within these systems.

PH

Ta in us

SO DA

D T D s le c ti a yo yo

Examples of problematic issues in Information Ethics The Aesthetics of Information Ethics can be applied to examining the liability of algorithms, responsibility in anonymous networks, exploitation of shared content and labor, censorship on social media, freedom of speech used to harass, public shaming to condemn, hacking to protest or leak, and micro-targeting for political campaigning. In order to inspire inquiry, the artist questions how to balance freedom, empathy, justice, and accountability.

D d th o in

Th Ro Te

By Paolo Cirio. 2017. [1] Joan, Reitz M. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Information Ethics.â&#x20AC;? Online Dictionary For Library And Information Science. N.p., 2010.

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DIAGRAMS By Paolo Cirio. Source > http://globaldirect.today

PHOTOGRAPHS Participatory installation set up and audience interacting with polls part of Aesthetics of Information Ethics.

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

QUESTIONS Questions from Aesthetics of Information Ethicsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; polls.

Should fake news on social media be removed by Internet companies

Should the coders of algorithms with racial biases be legally accountable?


Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Should we be able to trace individuals who use digital currency, such as Bitcoin?

Should the documents leaked by Snowden be made available to

Should politicians be able to use fully cryptographed communications for

X 38; Y 27 Should vulnera PRIVACY AND SECURITY individuals be protected onlin if they are key t


ble to s who ncy, ?

Should the documents leaked by Snowden be made available to

Should politicians be able to use fully cryptographed communications for

Should vulnerable individuals be protected online even if they are key to

Sh vot avo sys


Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

hould electronic ting be completely oided and analog stems restored?

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

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Photo courtesy of Erik Westra


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QUESTIONS Questions from Aesthetics of Information Ethicsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; polls.

Should fake news on social media be removed by Internet companies themselves?

Should the coders of algorithms with racial biases be legally accountable?

Should we remunerate the open source code utilized by big corporations such as Google?

Can the hacking of political parties during election be justified?

DIAGRAM Spatial and partecipatory mapping of the installation.

Presentation screen

14 QUESTIONS = 14 POLS

Feedback from the audience + Add new questions


Should we be able to trace individuals who use digital currency, such as Bitcoin?

Should the documents leaked by Snowden be made available to everyone â&#x20AC;&#x201C; not only journalists?

Should politicians be able to use fully cryptographed communications for work?

Should vulne individuals be protected on if they are key public debate

Should Facebook delete posts concerning hate speech toward refugees?

Should public figures on TwiFer be given access to block other accounts?

Should voter profiling and databases being banned?

Should poli:c spending for ads be regula they are on T

Diagrams

Results

Yes

Que

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d politicians be use fully graphed unications for

Should vulnerable individuals be protected online even if they are key to public debate?

Should electronic voting be completely avoided and analog systems restored?

d voter profiling tabases being d?

Should poli:cal spending for online ads be regulated like they are on TV?

Should ads managed by algorithms be considered physiologically manipulative advertising?

Yes No

esults

No

Yes Question


SHOULD FAKE NEWS ON SOCIAL MEDIA BE REMOVED BY INTERNET COMPANIES THEMSELVES ?

87 NO

SHOULD POLITICIANS BE ABLE TO USE FULLY CRYPTOGRAPHED COMMUNICATIONS FOR WORK ?

57 YES X 50; Y 16

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of ethics g of a nd the

ntation

thics, nd rtists mation

PHOTOGRAPHS Tactical Technology Collective instructing the audience on how to use their Data Detox Kit

cial are entation. ds, hype, stained by formation rstanding aratuses thetics aking r within

SOURCE > HTTPS://TACTICALTECH.ORG/NEWS/ DATA-DETOX-KIT/

Detox your Digital Self THE 8-DAY DATA DETOX Do you feel like your digital self is slipping out of control? Have you let yourself install too many apps, clicked “I agree” a few too many times, lost track of how many accounts you’ve created? Perhaps you feel you’re not as in control of your digital life as you’d like to be.

es in

ics iability onymous content media, ss, public protest olitical nquiry, the reedom, lity.

Don’t despair! This data detox is designed just for you. By the end of the 8-day program, you’ll be well on your way to a healthier and more in-control digital self. The Data Detox Kit was produced for The Glass Room NYC, presented by Mozilla and Tactical Technology Collective.

cience.

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Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

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Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

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PHOTOGRAPHS Visitors exploring vistual reality at Callum Cooperâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s VR installation about privacy. SOURCE > HTTPS://GITHUB.COM/ MOZILLAFOUNDATION/MOZFESTPROGRAM-2017/ISSUES/838

Exploring privacy in virtual reality: Porton Down This project by Callum Cooper will put the user into a sensationalist Virtual Reality game where their intimate data is not only presented but used against them.The participant is encouraged to do a series of cognitive tests. Once the the first series of cognitive tests is completed the benevolent voice congratulates the subject/ player and announces the next level. The subject repeats each test but now the VR systems manipulates their perception. This manipulation is hallucinatory in itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nature. The user/players senses are increasingly distorted. By the final level, the tests descend into absurdity where the user/player is unable to achieve what should be a simple task.

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

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Y00 X80

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vulnerability makes us human

D G TAL

Vulnerability

NCLUS ON BROOKLYN

today i want to talk about the vulnerabilities of being (digital and all) i don’t know if we ever truly interrogate what vulnerability is and what it means for us.

TEXT > DIGITAL INCLUSION > KEY TERMS

1

inc ca lus ex n’t ioa wi ist n em th ou pa t th y

as a tool to navigate the world

EMPATHY

Technology

01

Empathy is the capacity to understand or feel what another person is experiencing from within the other person’s frame of reference, i.e., the capacity to place oneself in another’s position. There are many definitions for empathy that encompass a broad range of emotional states. Types of empathy include cognitive empathy, emotional empathy, and somatic empathy.1

SELF-REFLECTION

Human self-reflection is the capacity of humans to exercise introspection and the willingness to learn more about their fundamental nature, purpose and essence. The earliest historical records demonstrate the great interest which humanity has had in itself.

Emotional labour

instead, let’s explore the vulnerabilities of being and it’s necessity to build connective collective empathy. the vulnerabilities of dreaming, in a world governed by homogeneous toxic misteachings of branded macho-ism. in a world that requires improvisation at every moment. so this is what we are exploring.

In order to create inclusive spaces, we need to create inclusive spaces

INCLUSIVITY

i want to explore the technologies we implore every day as tools to navigate all the things that exist in a very resilient selfdriven world.

Empathy

An intention or policy of including people who might otherwise be excluded or marginalized, such as those who are handicapped or learning-disabled, or racial and sexual minorities.3

BROOKLYN ASKS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Safe-space

3

04

AUDIENCE RESPONDS Come and join us!!

SAFE-SPACE

I’m so lost (I found a way)

In educational institutions, safe space (or safe-space), safer space, and positive space are terms that, as originally intended, were used to indicate that a teacher, educational institution, or student body did not tolerate anti-LGBT violence, harassment or hate speech, thereby creating a safe place for all LGBT students. The term safe space has been extended to refer to an autonomous space for individuals who feel marginalized to come together to communicate regarding their experiences with marginalization, typically on a university campus. Safe spaces exist in educational institutions of anglophone countries. The idea of safe spaces has seen criticism on the grounds that it stifles freedom of speech. Critics claim safe spaces hinder the exposure of sensitive material that needs to be discussed and explained in an educational environment.4 4

i’m rejecting the idea of vulnerability as a mode of disregarded weakness. our sense of vulnerability is in fact innately human.

The vulnerability of the individual

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-reflection

03

i’m not interested in sweeping statements of empathetic learning and building for the sole purpose of opportunist capital gain.

Feeling vulnerable online

Human self-reflection is related to the philosophy of consciousness, the topic of awareness, consciousness in general and the philosophy of mind. 2 2

today i want us to imagine, to dream, to question.

There is a necessity to build a collective connected emphathy

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Empathy

02

J PAKATH

TEXT > DIGITAL INCLUSION > PROJECT DESCRIPTION > BY BROOKLYN J. PAKATHI

This is my home Type of Project: Pixelated Digital Renderings | Poster Art | Public Art Project Description: this is my home, aimed at creating dialogues of empathy and diversity for a greater sense of digital inclusion, is a series of digital renderings representative of the spectrum of shades within human skin tone and overlaid with subtle and often gentle messages of understanding in hopes to promote a higher level of care and concern in digital communication and accessibility. the digital renderings will be produced as large posters and placed across the mozilla festival venue to act as a public service announcement to engage with guests in attendance, prompting viewers to feel considered in their contribution towards an open and diverse internet. Project Statement: empathy involves the inner experience of sharing in and comprehending the momentary psychological state of another person (schafer, 1959). what future do we envision, when we talk about digital inclusion? we

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Safe-space

DIGITAL INCLUSION

BROOKLYN J. PAKATHI

in searching for the connectors of cause, meaning and sense of resolve, brooklyn j’s work fundamentally speaks to the tragic vulnerability of romance he explores these themes of an existential nature, plagued by fragility, through video vignettes, digital observations, and photographic interrogations. making loneliness an art since 92’ often define inclusion as the ability of individuals and groups to access and use information and communication technologies. encompassing not only access to the internet but also the availability of hardware and software; relevant content and services; and training for the digital literacy skills required

for effective use of information and communication technologies. but in and of itself, digital inclusion can often overlook the necessity for creating and maintaining a dialogue of digital empathy. as with many other aspects of contemporary culture, rapid adoption of social and mobile technologies has altered society’s communication patterns and disrupted the expression of empathy, specifically in digital conversations. mobile and social media use has transformed when and how individuals interact with others. the ability to instantly share thoughts, feelings, and behaviors with the rest of society via digital channels can occur in mere seconds, often without the empathetic social filter that accompanies traditional communications. moreover, digital communications are devoid of many of the emotional signals and cues experienced in face-to-face settings, often leading to more impersonal interactions. creating and exploring digital empathy unlocks the digital communication of empathy, one of the core elements missing from how we currently communicate online. there are few ways to show a friend, a loved one, a group or a community as a whole that you feel empathetic towards their situation. the project, this is my home, tries to understand what it means to be digitally human taking into account the worlds of digital and non-digital are becoming more and more one in the same. the messages project empathy as enacted between a community and pay attention to someone else’s experience in a way that allows the other to realize that we all share and understand the essential quality of our digital experiences. the work aims to understand how other people feels and to be able to communicate this understanding in a way that is uniquely ‘human’. this physical and tangible work presented seemingly offline but still represented in a digital space reflects the present day failure of digital devices and online communications to facilitate the expression of empathy between people. the importance for the work to exist in and around the festival space works

accordingly to mozilla festival’s mandate and responsibility in creating an accessible and equally inclusive space for learning, growth, understanding, and diversity without any prerequisite or criteria to entry. Goals: • to create an opportunity for communities to explore communication of empathyand understanding • to build a digital culture of inclusivity without the use of active technology that can often negate individuals wants to experience digital • to create an environment that speaks to individuals main cause for fear and concern and offer safety and peace of mind

this is your home

it’s going to be okay

Embrace them. If you need a chat / walk / silent film, let me know

this is a safe space

Outcome

You are not alone and all will be well. It’s because of you, that I am still standing!! This will pass. You are fine. We are with you. Use this. Become better from experience.

Round table discussion cted

empat

hy

Safe space

[...] Making Web literacy meaningful for everyone Web literacy should mean all the skills we need to think, create, and thrive online. Many people hear the term Web literacy and think it means learning to code, or STEM (science, technology, engineering, maths) education. But Web literacy is much broader than that – it should include all the skills to be confident and competent online. To be empowered digital citizens, we all need to know how to navigate, how to share, what information to trust, and most importantly, how to expand the frontiers of our knowledge.

5

[...] Cultivating digital citizenship

Web literacy should be a foundational to education as reading, writing, and maths are – and it should be taught everywhere learning happens.

A fundamental part of Web literacy is understanding the forces that shape our lives online: the companies building our experiences, the politicians crafting and supporting government policies, and the power we hold as digital citizens to create the Internet we want. Having a say in our shared future on the Web means deciding which values are most important to us, and standing up for those values when they are threatened.

Protest Culture DIGITAL CULTURE

Digital Animal Memes by The Civic Beat (Jason Li and An Xiao Mina)

(A digital thing showing top into a physical thing.)

Variation

Cross geography connections in the memes.

Variation of a same meme

The process

IMAGES

Washington, DC

Washington, DC

Digital

#nastywoman

PHOTOGRAPHS

HASHTAG

Audience creating physical memes during the Meme Lab workshop

Digital memes

Physical

Product memes

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

We traditionally think of memes and internet culture as isolated to the internet, where digital literacy exists separately from traditional notions of cultural literacy. Recent years have seen a steady breakdown of that divide in popular discourse, whether talking about notions of privacy and surveillance, the role of government in regulating the internet, and, of course, in the rapid spread of meme culture in popular culture. In both the United States and the United Kingdom, memes have leapt from the internet in new and compelling ways. The iconic red Make America Great Again hat of the Trump campaign has inspired a number of digital remixes, like Make America Mexico Again and Make Racists Afraid Again, which in turn become physical hat remixes sold to fundraise for advocacy organizations. #RefugeesWelcome, a hashtag movement started in the UK in the face of the Syrian refugee crisis, has spread throughout Western Europe, with stickers, banners and marches around the theme. The online and the offline mix and intermix, crossing digital/physical barriers and leaping across the Atlantic Ocean.

Formal taxonomies can be developed from the folk taxonomy rendered machine-readable by the markup that hashtags provide; this process is called folksonomy.6 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hashtag

MATERIAL CULTURE

Material culture is the physical aspect of culture in the objects and architecture that surround people. It includes usage, consumption, creation and trade of objects, and the behaviors, norms and rituals these objects create or take part in. The term is commonly used in archaeological and anthropological studies, specifically focusing on the material evidence which can be attributed to culture, in the past or present. Material culture studies is an interdisciplinary field telling of relationships between people and their things: the making, history, preservation, and interpretation of objects. It draws on theory and practice from the social sciences and humanities such as art history, archaeology, anthropology, history, historic preservation, folklore, literary criticism and museum studies, among others. Anything from buildings and architectural elements to books, jewelry, or toothbrushes can be considered material culture.7

For the Mozilla Festival residency, I propose #MemeLab: an installation and workshop that looks at these themes and engages attendees in co-creating the installation. The installation will take the form of a scientific laboratory, with walls covered in chalk paint, as we try to diagram meme culture in both its online and offline manifestations. This might include a world map, to help emphasize the global-ness of meme culture. We will pre-install a few diagrams, including #RefugeesWelcome, #NastyWoman, #CatsAgainstBrexit, #Covfefe and a few others in other languages. These diagrams will start with a meme sparking event, with hashtags drawn in chalk, digital memes printed out and taped to the wall, product examples, and selfies in a loop on a digital screen. Attendees will be invited to create diagrams of their own, starting with a meme sparking event, whether in politics or general life. They will then be walked through a few key exercises: Hashtag station: Select a strip of paper from a test tube and write out a hashtag. Printing station: create a simple meme,

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Material_culture

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Digital again

Selfies memes TEXT > WEB LITERACY > PROJECT DESCRIPTION > AN XIAO IN COLLABORATION WITH JASON LI

Because of its widespread use, hashtag was added to the Oxford English Dictionary in June 2014. The term hashtag can also refer to the hash symbol itself when used in the context of a hashtag.

6

Washington, DC

San Jose, CA

Someone says something (‘She is a nasty woiman)

Pussycat vs. Redhat

Users create and use hashtags by placing the number sign or pound sign # (also known as the hash character) in front of a string of alphanumeric characters, usually a word or unspaced phrase, in or at the end of a message. The hashtag may contain letters, digits, and underscores. Searching for that hashtag will yield each message that has been tagged with it. A hashtag archive is consequently collected into a single stream under the same hashtag. For example, on the photosharing service Instagram, the hashtag #bluesky allows users to find all the posts that have been tagged using that hashtag.

07

Washington, DC

Washington, DC

Images from An Xiao Mina’s presentation.

A thing from internet gets remixed, goes to physical world and back to digital.

A hashtag is a type of metadata tag used on social networks such as Twitter and other microblogging services, allowing users to apply dynamic, user-generated tagging that makes it possible for others to easily find messages with a specific theme or content; it allows easy, informal markup of folk taxonomy without need of any formal taxonomy or markup language.

7

ARTWORK

# on manifestation boards

Internet Culture

https://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/Digital_culture

06

[...] Teaching Web literacy effectively

Learning Web literacy is like any other essential skill: we learn best by doing. And in the digital world, learning happens not just with teachers in the classroom, but everywhere there’s an Internet connection. We need all kinds of educators to have the knowledge and resources to teach Web literacy the way kids learn it best. And we need to make sure every student grows up not just on the Web, but fluent in the way it works.

05

Digital Culture stands for the contemporary phase of communication technologies, one that follows 19th century print culture and 20th century electronic broadcast culture, and that is deeply amplified and accelerated by the popularity of networked computers, personalised technologies and digital images. The emergence of digital culture is usually associated with a set of practices based on the ever more intensive use of communication technologies. These uses imply more participatory behaviors on the user side, an ever more visually riched environment and connection features that excell personal dimensions. Digital culture stands first of all for the changes brought about by the emergence of digital, networked and personalised media in our society and the passing from communication phases centred on print and broadcast media, to more personalised and networked media, that use digital compressing and processing capacities at their core. The consequences of such processes in societal terms and the means via which media technologies transform our modes of interaction and representation, broadly constitute what is called “digital culture”.5

HTTPS://CYBER.HARVARD.EDU/PEOPLE/AXMINA

WEB LITERACY

AN XIAO MINA IN COLLABORATION WITH JASON LI An Xiao” Mina is a technologist and writer who looks at issues of the global internet and networked creativity. As a Berkman Klein Fellow, she will study the impact of language barriers in our technology stack as the internet extends into diverse communities around the world, and she will continue her ongoing research on global internet meme culture. Mina leads the product team at Meedan, where they are building digital tools for journalists and translators, and she is co-founder of The Civic Beat, a research collective focused on the creative side of civic technology. She serves as a contributing editor to Civicist, an advisory editor to Hyperallergic, and a governing board member at China Residencies.

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Hashtag wall

Make a bag

Recently a 2016 Knight Visiting Nieman Fellow, where she studied online language barriers and their impact on journalism, Mina is currently working on a book about internet memes and global social movements (working title: “Memes to Movements”), to be published by Beacon Press.

using a meme template, of the hashtag and print it out. Making station: create a button, sticker, paper sign and/or canvas bag inspired by the hashtag. Selfie station: take a photo of yourself with the hashtag, printed meme, and object. Attach the hashtag and objects to the wall and draw chalk lines connecting them to each other and to others to which they have a thematic relationship. Since long before the internet, social movements have relied on a vast repertoire of creative actions and media to represent what they stand for: buttons, bumper stickers, paper signs, hats. Creative culture has leaned on street art, hip hop and dance to generate cultures of remix and performance. These same media actions are still utilized frequently in movements and marketing, but now, in the age of smartphones and the internet, they quickly intersect with the online world. Objects of meme culture get printed out and placed on t-shirts. People carrying clever signs watch their signs get photographed and then go viral on the

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

DIAGRAM Spatial and participatory mapping of the installation/workshop

She has spoken at venues like the Personal Democracy Forum, ACM SIGCHI, Creative Mornings, the Aspen Institute, RightsCon and the Institute for the Future, and she has contributed writing to publications like the Los Angeles Review of Books, Fusion, the New Inquiry, Nieman Journalism Lab, Places Journal and others.

Make a badge

Create a hashtag

internet. The digital and the physical are deeply intertwined, and this workshop will help visitors see the process. The installation and workshop will build on themes from “The Things of the Internet,” a lecture I gave at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University. In this talk, I explored the online-offline. I adapted the talk for a lecture at the University of Hong Kong’s Journalism and Media Studies Centre, where I developed a workshop format that proved to be quite successful and engaging with undergraduates from the University of Hong Kong and Fudan University (Shanghai). It also builds on Grotte de l’Internetz, a workshop and installation at SOMArts in San Francisco, where the artist invited participants to create Stone Age art of animal memes in the spirit of the Grotte Chauvet; as well as the World Animal Meme Map and photo exhibition, shown at the Victoria and Albert Museum’s Friday Late program this past summer.

TAKE A SELFIE

AN XIAO X AO MINA M NA

TEXT > WEB LITERACY > INTRO > SOURCE > ALL FROM HTTPS://WWW.MOZILLA.ORG/EN-GB/INTERNETHEALTH/WEB-LITERACY/

Make a emoji

Make a poster Use an existing Hashtag

Make a cap

OPEN NNOVAT ON

GRETTA LOUW

TEXT > DECENTRALISATION > KEY TERMS

ARCHANA PRASAD AND SEAN BLAGSVEDT

11

ADAO CURRENCY NOTE Each grantee will receive a currency note, personalized with their photo

CRYPTOCURRENCY

DECENTRAL SAT ON

A cryptocurrency (or crypto currency) is a digital asset designed to work as a medium of exchange that uses cryptography to secure its transactions, to control the creation of additional units, and to verify the transfer of assets. Cryptocurrencies are classified as a subset of digital currencies and are also classified as a subset of alternative currencies and virtual currencies.

Decentralisation is outside of control of one specific autority, distributing for many form of conentration...

Bitcoin, created in 2009, was the first decentralized cryptocurrency. Since then, numerous cryptocurrencies have been created. These are frequently called altcoins, as a blend of bitcoin alternative. Bitcoin and its derivatives use decentralized control as opposed to centralized electronic money/central banking systems. The decentralized control is related to the use of bitcoin’s blockchain transaction database in the role of a distributed ledger.11 11

Decentralisation

Distribution of power from concentration? power=money? Decision making? actions? Federation? Choices? Diversity?

Visibility of a transaction chain

Traces of this transaction

Decentralisation: brings the problems of lack of trust

Value comes with trust.

Accountability means taking integrity on an action

DIAGRAM Spatial and participatory mapping of the installation/workshop

Much of the recent sociological debate about power revolves around the issue of its means to enable – in other words, power as a means to make social actions possible as much as it may constrain or prevent them. The philosopher Michel Foucault saw power as a structural expression of “a complex strategic situation in a given social setting” that requires both constraint and enablement.12

TEXT > DECENTRALISATION > PROJECT DESCRIPTION > ARCHANA PRASAD AND SEAN BLAGSVEDT

What is the ADAO? The ADAO stands for Altruistic Democratic Autonomous Organization and offers ada coins as a normative currency with 30% of token supply allocated to form an endowment. Borrowing from Ethereum’s DAO, currency holders in the ADAO will be able to vote on which socially beneficial projects are funded from the endowment. As the value of the currency pool grows, the endowment will grow with it, with the ultimate goal of creating one of the world’s largest democratically run philanthropy funds.

ACCOUNTABILITY

In ethics and governance, accountability is answerability, blameworthiness, liability, and the expectation of account-giving. As an aspect of governance, it has been central to discussions related to problems in the public sector, nonprofit and private (corporate) and individual contexts. In leadership roles, accountability is the acknowledgment and assumption of responsibility for actions, products, decisions, and policies including the administration, governance, and implementation within the scope of the role or employment position and encompassing the obligation to report, explain and be answerable for resulting consequences.

How does it work? A significant share of the currency will form an endowment to support SDG focused artists and social organizations worldwide, with governance and decisions over who gets funded controlled by the community of adacoin holders via Ethereum smart contracts. To raise funds, we will accept donations in other crypto-currencies directly such as ETH and Bitcoin. The ADAO organization will help aid recipients navigate local jurisdiction issues such that they can legally and efficiently convert crypto-donations into local currencies. We will also encourage everyone, but especially artists, developers and social organizations to accept payments in ada coins and to provide services and artifacts that can be bought in ada coins. In doing so, we will fund the greatest democratically governed social/art endowment fund in the world and ultimately monetarily encourage acts of social value.

In governance, accountability has expanded beyond the basic definition of “being called to account for one’s actions”. It is frequently described as an account-giving relationship between individuals, e.g. “A is accountable to B when A is obliged to inform B about A’s (past or future) actions and decisions, to justify them, and to suffer punishment in the case of eventual misconduct”. Accountability cannot exist without proper accounting practices; in other words, an absence of accounting means an absence of accountability.

This installation-performance will speak in the aesthetic, language and mode of a modern bank. Blurring satire with reality, participants can apply for actual grants to be paid in ADAO coins, which will be tradable for traditional currencies on crypto-currency markets. The ADAO Bank will award grants, loans and saving schemes to people interested in working on the SDG’s. It will provide investment and

Accountability is an element of a RACI to indicate who is ultimately answerable for the correct and thorough completion of the deliverable or task, and the one who delegates the work to those responsible. There are various reasons (legitimate or excuses) why accountability fails.13 13

[...] User Control: Deciding who can collect your data We should all be able to choose – with clarity and confidence – what information we share with what companies, understanding the trade-offs we’re making when we do. Right now, we all lack meaningful choice online – privacy policies are often miles long and hard to read, we don’t understand what information we’re sharing or when, and opting out is seldom on the menu.

[...] Cyber Security: Locking down your sensitive information We should all have the ability to protect our online identity. At this point, it feels like we’ve all been victims of a cyberattack somewhere, somehow. Data breaches can lay bare the passwords of millions of people, often going undiscovered for years. Which means your identity may be at risk of theft without you even knowing it.

[...] Government Surveillance: Keeping prying eyes and ears out of your business We should all have the freedom to be ourselves — online and off – without surveillance, judgement and imposed societal bias. You wouldn’t want the government following your every move in real life – there’s no reason they should be shadowing you on the Internet. The Edward Snowden disclosures showed that even democracies can and do take liberties with your privacy.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accountability

Fill out a form

Interview

Take a photo

Get tokens

Get currency note

ARCHANA PRASAD AND SEAN BLAGSVEDT IN COLLABORATION WITH FREEMAN MURRAY Round Table

Archana Prasad, is an artist from Bangalore, India. Her work is a particular conjunction of visual art, technology and urban community art, ste wed in design and research methodologies. As Founder of Jaaga.in, Archana has a unique artist-activist role. Sean Blagsvedt is a technologist and entrepreneur. His recent company babajob provided job information to 10 million blue collar workers across India. Archana and Sean are concerned about the unjust assignment of value, thus currency, that tilts towards mechanisms of successful acquisition based models and stockpiling capital, rather than rewarding innovation and creation, especially around work that fulfills important societal goals but do not create large profits.

philanthropic options for those interested in growing their crypto-currency assets. The ADAO Bank booth provides MozFest participants human connections and conversations about the coin, the bank, its goals and objectives. Additionally the “employees” at the ADAO booth have discretionary power to award a limited number of coins to deserving participants from MozFest. Interaction Model: Participants fill out a form at the booth. Similar to a loan application, they will be invited to describe their own pledges to support the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals. Two tellers - the artists, will interview applicants, take their photo and given a limited number of token grants. Each grantee will receive a currency note, personalized with their photo.

currency, with the needed crypto-graphic keys printed on it such that the participant can claim the ADAO token online). Our Vision What do we want to accomplish? 1. To Take Back Crypto-currency and money itself for 2. Creativity = Wealth Currency is a Choice of: Ethics Models Value Alignment A sustainable futur Politics

(The rendering of the note is a Deep Learning based Style filter of the participant’s photo and a traditional

DIAGRAMS

14

POLARIZATION (POLITICS)

In politics, polarization (or polarisation) can refer to the divergence of political attitudes to ideological extremes. Polarization can refer to such divergence like public opinion or even to such divergence within certain groups. Almost all discussions of polarization in political science consider polarization in the context of political parties and democratic systems of government. When polarization occurs in a two-party system, like the United States, moderate voices often lose power and influence.14 14

Polarization creates

Questions polarised by the (geographical) context

Yes or No

Bringing tension to the debate by polarising the responses (he doesn’t’ believe in polarisation so that is his way of questioning it)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polarization_(politics)

INFORMATION ETHICS

The term information ethics was first coined by Robert Hauptman and used in the book Ethical challenges in librarianship. It examines the morality that comes from information as a resource, a product, or as a target. It provides a critical framework for considering moral issues concerning informational privacy, moral agency (e.g. whether artificial agents may be moral), new environmental issues (especially how agents should behave in the infosphere), problems arising from the life-cycle (creation, collection, recording, distribution, processing, etc.) of information (especially ownership and copyright, digital divide, and digital rights). It is very vital to understand that librarians, archivists, information professionals among others, really understand the importance of knowing how to disseminate proper information as well as being responsible with their actions when addressing information.15 15

By Paolo Cirio. Source > http://globaldirect.today

Experiment about liberation: people all agree if they can access the same information

TEXT > PRIVACY AND SECURITY > KEY TERMS

15 TEXT > WEB LITERACY > INTRO > SOURCE > ALL FROM HTTPS:// WWW.MOZILLA.ORG/EN-GB/ INTERNET-HEALTH/PRIVACYSECURITY/

HTTPS://THEADAO.ORG

DECENTRALISATION

The ADAO is a philanthropic cryptocurrency that supports creatives who advance the Sustainable Development Goals, representing an entirely new way to fund social and creative revolutionaries.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_(social_and_ political)

13

Decentralisation is related with lack of accountability

Accountability= integrity of action? trust?

The use of power need not involve force or the threat of force (coercion). At one extreme, it closely resembles what an English-speaking person might term “influence”, although some authors distinguish “influence” as a means by which power is used. One such example is soft power, as compared to hard power.

A Healthy Internet is Secure and Private The Internet only stays healthy if we trust it as a safe place – to explore, transact, connect, and create. Our privacy and security online is under constant threat. But there’s something you can do about it: get informed, protect yourself, and make your voice heard. A healthy Internet depends on you. [...]

PHOTOGRAPHS Audience interacting at the Adao Bank installation

POWER

12

PR VACY PRIVACY & SECUR SECURITY TY PAOLO CIRIO C RO

Decentralisation feedback mechanism in economical transactions

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cryptocurrency

12

In social science and politics, power is the ability to influence or outright control the behaviour of people. The term “authority” is often used for power perceived as legitimate by the social structure. Power can be seen as evil or unjust, but the exercise of power is accepted as endemic to humans as social beings. In business, power is often expressed as being “upward” or “downward”. With downward power, a company’s superior influences subordinates. When a company exerts upward power, it is the subordinates who influence the decisions of their leader or leaders.

Politics

PHOTOGRAPHS Participatory installation set up and audience interacting with polls part of Aesthetics of Information Ethics.

Information ethics How to represent sensible information (and the aesthetics derived from it)

Information Ecology

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Information_ethics Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

16

DELIBERATION

Deliberation is a process of thoughtfully weighing options, usually prior to voting. Deliberation emphasizes the use of logic and reason as opposed to power-struggle, creativity, or dialog. Group decisions are generally made after deliberation through a vote or consensus of those involved.

VS PARTICIPATION EMANCIPATION FREEDOM

In legal settings a jury famously uses deliberation because it is given specific options, like guilty or not guilty, along with information and arguments to evaluate. In “deliberative democracy”, the aim is for both elected officials and the general public to use deliberation rather than power-struggle as the basis for their vote.16 16

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

HTTPS://PAOLOCIRIO.NET/PRESS/TEXTS/AESTHETICS-INFORMATION-ETHICS.PHP

MISLEADING POLARITIES IN INFORMATION ETHICS

INCLUSION ACCESS COMMONS

EXPLOITATION CONTROL WITHHOLDING PROPERTY

PRIVATE

PUBLIC

OPACITY

TRANSPARENCY

PRIVACY OBSCURITY EMPATHY ANONYMITY

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deliberation

COERCION

EXCLUSION

RESPONSIBILITY

SURVEILLANCE EXPOSURE HUMILIATION ACCOUNTABILITY IMPUNITY

REPUTATION

SCORING

AUTONOMY

MANIPULATION

EDUCATING

MISINFORMING

QUANTIFIABLE SIMPLICITY

UNDETECTABLE COMPLEXITY

HTTPS://CYBER.HARVARD.EDU/PEOPLE/AXMINA

PRIVACY & SECURITY

PAOLO CIRIO

Paolo Cirio works with legal, economic and semiotic systems of the information society. He investigates social fields impacted by the Internet, such as privacy, copyright, democracy, and finance. He shows his research and intervention-based works through artifacts, photos, installations, videos, and public art. Cirio has exhibited in international museums and institutions and has won numerous prestigious art awards. His artworks have been covered by hundreds of media outlets worldwide and he regularly gives public lectures and workshops at leading universities.

SOME PROBLEMATIC ISSUES CONCERNING INFORMATION ETHICS: SEARCH ENGINES & SOCIAL MEDIA MODERATION HATE SPEECH HARRASSMENT TROLLING BULLYING BLACKMAIL STIGMAS SOCIAL PROFILING SOCIAL SCORE & BIAS CONSUMER PROFILING SEX OFFENDERS CRIMINAL RECORDS PREDICTIVE POLICING RACIAL PROFILING PRIVACY & SURVEILLANCE STATE AND CORPORATE SURVEILLANCE CRYPTOGRAPHY FOR POWER STRUCTURES CRYPTOGRAPHY FOR INDIVIDUALS PUBLIC SHAMING BLOCKCHAIN, DEEPWEB AND DARKNET ANONYMITY TRUST PRIVACY FRAUD HATE SPEECH CRUELTY ALGORITHMS ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE CONTROL ACCOUNTABILITY OF CODERS ROBOTICS AUTOMATED WEAPONS AUTOMATED LABOR PIRACY COPYRIGHT TRADEMARK FAIR USE EDUCATION ROYALITIES MEDIA AND POLITICS TARGETING VOTERS FAKE NEWS SHARING ECONOMY PRIVATE PROPERTY LABOR RIGHTS DIGITAL CURRENCIES TRANSPARENCY VOLATILITY ACCESS TO MEANS INFRASTRUCTURES ECOLOGICAL IMPACT DECENTRALISATION INTERNET OF THINGS POLICY CLOUD SERVERS

The Aesthetics of Information Ethics discusses methodologies, strategies, and practices of art addressing the personal and societal spheres affected by information systems. Information Ethics is broadly defined as “the branch of ethics that focuses on the relationship between the creation, organization, dissemination, and use of information.”[1] The so-called information revolution brings us an increasing number of pressing ethical issues. Artists can be particularly sensitive to these issues and they are able to question ethics by proposing and challenging perceptions and scenarios beyond common understanding. Artworks can creatively discuss and play with distribution systems of sensitive information, ethereal economies, flexible labor and property, circulating bodies and goods, manipulated and monitored relationships, expanded public spaces, exploited opinion formation, and, generally, technological apparatuses affecting social systems. Nowadays, social contracts are fluid; they constantly reorganize society and produce new social conditions. These active spaces are where information ethics emerge and where artists intervene in questioning, revealing, and reassembling the agents and environments of their artworks. Ethics of Aesthetics concerns the ethical frameworks in arranging the sensibility of the audience and the subjects of the artworks. The aesthetic methodologies of intervention, discourse, and representation of information systems can include the production of critique, distress, fear, empathy, alienation, complicity, spectacle, confusion, awareness, and other artistic devices. The aesthetic qualities of the artworks can be called into question through the articulation of the ethical conditions of the works and their subjects. The responsibility and conscience of the artists - as well as of the art critics and curators - are integrated in the analysis and validation of the social and artistic efficacy of the artworks. Concurrently, the ethical and social relations created by these artworks produce aesthetic forms, which concerns the field of the Aesthetics of Ethics. Social fields and norms are increasingly interdependent with technological advancements of information

Ethics are negotiated, developed, and balanced through reflections on the consequences and intentions of human activity. Differentiating themselves from morals - which are often static and ideological - ethics are dynamic, reflexive, and evolving principles that must be

oriented to maximize and develop the common good within the notion of ethics as the making and understanding of a dignified existence for humans and the environment surrounding them.

The Ethics of Representation and information systems

As such, techniques like the exposure and appropriation of sensitive information as well as the manipulation and disruption of social relations should be balanced with the parameters of intentions, receptions, and outcomes of the artwork. In the Aesthetics of Information Ethics, context is main the principle from which we can assess the ethics of artworks. Meaning and impact vary based on the context of presentation, execution, and results. The context needs to account for all the properties of the information systems involved. These methodologies, techniques, and practices of art production and critique are ultimately

Questions from Aesthetics of Information Ethics’ polls.

Should fake news on social media be removed by Internet companies themselves?

Should the coders of algorithms with racial biases be legally accountable?

Should we be able to trace individuals who use digital currency, such as Bitcoin?

Should the documents leaked by Snowden be made available to everyone – not only journalists?

Should politicians be able to use fully cryptographed communications for work?

Should vulnerable individuals be protected online even if they are key to public debate?

Should electronic voting be completely avoided and analog systems restored?

Should we remunerate the open source code utilized by big corporations such as Google?

Can the hacking of political parties during election be justified?

Should Facebook delete posts concerning hate speech toward refugees?

Should public figures on TwiFer be given access to block other accounts?

Should voter profiling and databases being banned?

Should poli:cal spending for online ads be regulated like they are on TV?

Should ads managed by algorithms be considered physiologically manipulative advertising?

DIAGRAM Spatial and partecipatory mapping of the installation.

Presentation screen

Diagrams Yes No

Results

The ethics of the power of these information systems are directly embodied in artworks that use and address such power. The ethical inquiries and relations activated by art with information systems create aesthetic forms. This aesthetics is discussed by measuring, comparing, and evaluating the strategies, consequences, conditions, and circumstances of the works of art. Such analysis needs to take into account a broad social context, therefore integrating the distribution of the work, the mode of presentation within the site of execution, and ultimately the intended and unintended recipients, critiques, and results that the work generates.

constantly discussed and confronted. Art plays a central role in this process. Evolving cultural forms and critical art are essential instruments for sensing and signaling the forming of ethics.

Social transactions and contracts are discussed, created, rearranged, or accentuated by artists for making visible the complexity, contradictions, and complicity within such social relations activated by information systems. However, only an attentive examination of the effects, causes, and nature of such systems can fully address them. Thus, representations of social and technological systems should engage with the dialectics of the construction of ethical values. The integrity of the agenda pursued is a responsibility of the artist in relation to the system addressed, while the critical reception should assess the means and ends of the artworks within the whole spectrum of forms and contexts of presentation.

QUESTIONS

computation, sharing, and control. Information technology has become the heart of the social order. However, it can be understood not from a technological point of view, but rather through a constant reflexive examination of what it produces in the social sphere. The ethical discussion can’t be limited to technocrats, legislators, coders, and the opaque internal policies of private entities. Art can play a role in this process of creating awareness and reflection on difficult ethical questions by making them relevant and engaging. The material of these aesthetic examinations is not limited to the Internet, algorithms, big data, and other technologies. These technical elements are mutually influenced by the political, cultural, legal, and economic systems, as well as several other social fields and infrastructures. Information systems should be understood as interconnected networks of social systems in which reflection and intervention have the potential to reverberate throughout the whole web of networks, consequently impacting a variety of conventions, entities, and individuals which are inevitably connected.

SHOULD FAKE NEWS ON SOCIAL MEDIA BE REMOVED BY INTERNET COMPANIES THEMSELVES ?

14 QUESTIONS = 14 POLS

Feedback from the audience + Add new questions

No

Yes

8 87 NO

Question

Polarities in Ethics of Representation In the Aesthetics of Information Ethics, the appearances, perceptions, and sensations of reality created by artists should take into account the formation of polarities. Mystifications and oversimplifications about the social impacts of information systems are instances of the Ethics of Representation. As such, the creation of falsehoods, hype, confusion, anxiety, or fatalism sustained by the producers and reporters of information systems create polarities in understanding ever-changing technological apparatuses and their social impacts. The Aesthetics of Information Ethics is about breaking down polarities to offer a broader understanding of the conditions within these systems. Examples of problematic issues in Information Ethics The Aesthetics of Information Ethics can be applied to examining the liability of algorithms, responsibility in anonymous networks, exploitation of shared content and labor, censorship on social media, freedom of speech used to harass, public shaming to condemn, hacking to protest or leak, and micro-targeting for political campaigning. In order to inspire inquiry, the artist questions how to balance freedom, empathy, justice, and accountability. By Paolo Cirio. 2017. [1] Joan, Reitz M. “Information Ethics.” Online Dictionary For Library And Information Science. N.p., 2010.

tomorrow will be better.

It gets better, but it does take time. She’s always with you. You got this. You can do this.

Conne

PHOTOGRAPHS

PHOTOGRAPHS

Tactical Technology Collective instructing the audience on how to use their Data Detox Kit

Visitors exploring vistual reality at Callum Cooper’s VR installation about privacy.

SOURCE > HTTPS://TACTICALTECH.ORG/NEWS/ DATA-DETOX-KIT/

Detox your Digital Self THE 8-DAY DATA DETOX Do you feel like your digital self is slipping out of control? Have you let yourself install too many apps, clicked “I agree” a few too many times, lost track of how many accounts you’ve created? Perhaps you feel you’re not as in control of your digital life as you’d like to be.

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

Don’t despair! This data detox is designed just for you. By the end of the 8-day program, you’ll be well on your way to a healthier and more in-control digital self. The Data Detox Kit was produced for The Glass Room NYC, presented by Mozilla and Tactical Technology Collective.

Photo courtesy of Erik Westra

SHOULD POLITICIANS BE ABLE TO USE FULLY CRYPTOGRAPHED COMMUNICATIONS FOR WORK ?

5 57 YES

You are valuable. You don’t need to achieve + lead + be visible to others to be valuable + deserve consideration.

Deep breaths - water.

Remember the last time you faced a major change -> it turned out to be for the better. This will too.

User Responses

Don’t overthink, it will be fine. Just relax. Nothing is constant. Think about all the good that has happened.

Don’t worry you’re still pretty. Lin chiah pà bē? Everything is temporary

Project Description: although the construct of empathy is multidimensional in nature and difficult to measure, i hope to create an effective strategy for highlighting empathy that focus specifically on communication skills training. the open lab project will visually explore the mozilla festival’s community’s understanding of digital empathy through a survey in which users can answer a serious of questions by applying coloured stickers to a chart in an effort to reflect levels of understanding towards digital empathy, accessibility and inclusion. self-reflection is a useful method for addressing empathy. and as such self-reflection activities could theoretically prompt guests to question and examine their interactions in the online world. this self-examination process may potentially develop heightened online awareness and promote increased digital empathy. the means by which empathy is expressed is naturally evolving as the world and its forms of communications become increasingly digital and recognizing and addressing barriers to the expression of digital empathy is important. if we can sharpen the communication skills of traditional empathy, how can we then use those skills to address the greater discussion of digital empathy?

everyday is trying. I am with you. well done. I’m here… and I promise to never let you go.

Life has its ups & downs.

build grow heal love

Open Lab Session. Type of Project: Survey | Data Visualization

What is the worst that can happen? How likely is it to happen?

This too shall pass.

You have overcome so many other things already too

Digital Renders

You’re always trying so hard,

You are loved You are not alone! We are with you

If you’re just travelling when there’s sun, you’ll never get anywhere

TEXT > WEB LITERACY > KEY TERMS

A healthy Internet means everyone has the skills to thrive People everywhere should have the knowledge they need to tap into the full power of the Internet – and use it to make their lives and the world better. This means everyone needs to be able to read, write, and participate online. A healthy Internet is yours to master.depends on you. [...]

Trying makes a difference. Trying can be your victory.

Are you ok?

Spatial and partecipatory mapping of the installation.

Tsemppiä!

Aim to be comfortably lost

The pendulum will swing

DIAGRAM

You haven’t killed anyone… it’s ok!

This too shall pass

What is (realistically) the worst that could happen?

COLLABORATRIVE SPACE

WEB L LITERACY TERACY

i found that certain understandings of definitions become very nuclear, contaminated and porous so what does it mean when i talk about technology in the context of vulnerability and who we are today.

Questioning the role of technology in the context of vulnerability

I got you load of Biscoff, all the music you like, a bluetooth speaker and also the people you are friend with are online. ? Do you want a hug? xx Take a break – I’ve got this! It’ll be alright. Trust me. You only live once =) It’s not the end of the world!!! A vide é muito curta. Aproveite! Be brilliant by your own standards. Not of others. Go on! Don’t let fear stop your explorations! You’ve made a difference in my life, what you do matters. You are enough! <3

i want to explore the daily trauma we undergo to earn the coveted badge of successful human existence that often negates notions of struggle, loneliness and deeper meanings of wounded-ness. a trauma that plays itself in sets and loops traveling by genome and bloodstream. we need to close, we need to fill this loop. so from that, i find the vulnerability of digital immersion. soaking myself in the frailties of others to wash away things gray. and sometimes in the immersion, i find that i might be required to live them. and from disenfranchised digital cultures i learn about the vulnerabilities of race and how it was only created to sustain a larger system of capitalism. error 404, page not found. i was invited here to speak about inclusion. but i think we should focus on loops, and loopholes and continuums. about closing the gaps and expanding our capacity to include more brokenness. from distorted views of linear utoipian w

Artists Open Studios  

An art and design intervention during MozFest 2017.

Artists Open Studios  

An art and design intervention during MozFest 2017.

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