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Issue 8 - 2015

dive into the exciting world of surface pattern design!

expert advice competitions design inspiration reviews

The HOME Issue GO BEHIND THE SCENES ON A MAKE IT IN DESIGN P H O T O S H O O T !

PRI NT, PAT TERN, PAS SION 5 minutes with Sophie Robinson

runni n g a busi n ess

with Skinny laMinx

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Meet the maker! An interview with Mini Moderns

PLUS Top tips for creating colour harmony in the home


Welcome to issue 8 of MOYO - the home edition! With autumn almost here, we're not only rethinking our wardrobes, we're also wondering how to integrate new-season home trends into our interiors. Luckily help is at hand! This issue is packed with inspirational ideas and expert advice to help you style-up your house and make it truly feel like yours. We’re thrilled to bring you an interview with interior stylist Sophie Robinson. Sophie, our cover star, has been transforming homes for years and, as well as working on some of the biggest home interiors magazines, she is one half of the judging team on the BBC2’s Great Interior Design Challenge. We talk careers, creative processes, and colour trends and get her top tips for updating rooms quickly and easily on a budget. We also meet the super-talented people behind the successful creative brands Emily Burningham, What Kate Loves, Skinny laMinx and Mini Moderns. It’s fascinating to discover how they found their calling in the design world, what motivated them to start their own business, and what inspires their home collections. If all this is inspiring you to create, don’t miss our ‘Kitchen Crazy’ design brief, Bonnie Christine’s DIY guide to making a mouse pad, and advice for designing wallpaper from surface pattern pro Jess Hogarth. And speaking of walls, did you know that the colours you choose to paint yours could really affect your mood, behaviour and general wellbeing? In ‘Colour stories’ with Louise Gale you’ll learn how to play with colour and use different schemes to bring harmony to your home. As always, this issue we also go behind-the-scenes for fresh industry news and insider information. This time we have insights from award-winning illustrator and pattern designer Abigail Borg, who talks us through the process of preparing for a trade show, and from UK-based surface pattern design studio Surfacephilia, on the importance of good branding. Whatever stage you’re at in your design journey we hope you’ll find inspiration aplenty in this issue. And if you need help and support to make your career dreams come true, our groundbreaking set of online courses - The Art and Business of Surface Pattern Design - are made for you. Have fun and happy homemaking! Beth Kempton & Rachael Taylor Editors

Quote design by Rachael Taylor

Want more inspiration and advice? Find us here:

www.makeitindesign.com www.makeitindesign.com/blog/

TheArtandBusinessofSurfacePatternDesign

@MakeitinDesign @SurfacePatternD

@makeitindesign

www.linkedin.com/in/makeitindesign 1

May your walls know joy, may every room hold laughter, and every wi ndow open to great possi b i l i t y – Mary Anne Radmacher


PANTONE 715 C

PANTONE 2768 C

PANTONE 1787 C

PANTONE 7506 C

PANTONE 3125 C

PANTONE 172 C Photography by Beth Kempton © The Art and Business of Surface Pattern Design

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Page 1

Page 33

Letter From The Editors

Building a Brand with Surfacephilia

Page 2

Page 39

FREE Colour Palette from Make it in Design!

The Ceramic Process with What Kate Loves

Page 5

Page 45

Print, Pattern and Passion: 5 Minutes with Sophie Robinson

Design Tip: Designing for Wallpaper with Jess Hogarth

Page 9

Page 49

Shopping Heaven

Running a Global Brand and Business with Skinny laMinx

Page 11

Page 53

Life in Colour... with Emily Burningham

The MOYO Design Brief: Kitchen Crazy

Page 17

Page 55

Q&A with ACID UK

Meet The Maker: An Interview with Mini Moderns

Page 21

Page 59

Tricks of The Trade Show with Abigail Borg

Behind The Scenes of a Make it in Design Photoshoot!

Page 27

Page 65

DIY Mousepad with Bonnie Christine

Postcard from... Hanoi


Page 69

Page 97

Marrakech Dreams: Design and Colour Inspiration

Global Design Event Calendar

Page 73

Page 99

The Magic of Words with Libby McMullin

Student Showcase Module 2, April 2015

Page 77

Page 103

Colour Stories: Colour Harmony in The Home

Student Showcase Module 3, April 2015

Page 83

Page 107

MOYO Design Brief Results: Graffiti

Meet The MOYO Team

Page 85 Designer Diary from Laura Slater

Page 87 Postcard from... Big Bear

Page 89 Ask Rachael

Page 93 The Surface Pattern Design Lookbook Vol 1 - Preview! 4


PRINT, PATTERN & PASSION: 5 minutes with sophie robinson Sophie Robinson is an interior stylist for leading home magazines and a TV interior design expert. Most recently she has been one half of the judging team on BBC2 ’s Great Interior Design Challenge in the UK. MOYO caught up with the self-proclaimed ‘colour lover, pattern clasher and cushion hugger’ to find out more about her love of design.

1. When did you first discover your passion for interior design? When I was about 7-years-old. I was given the opportunity to choose the decor for my bedroom and I went with a multi-coloured rainbow theme. It was the eighties so I chose graph paper style wallpaper, a rainbow border and a matching duvet and curtain set. I still remember flicking through the wallpaper book and picking out a co-coordinating border – it had me hooked for life!

2. What do you enjoy most about the creative process? I like the fact that it’s always changing – you rarely do the same thing twice. There is always a new brief, new problems to solve, new collections being launched, and new designs to choose from. It’s a very exciting and stimulating area to work in. And then you get to be creative by putting your own spin on it.

4. What do you love most about your hometown of Brighton and how has it inspired you over the course of your life and career as a designer? Brighton was where I came to do my degree and it was an amazing city as a student. It has a large and successful art college so I had a great time meeting lots of creative people. After going to London to pursue my career I noticed that all my friends had stayed in Brighton – and they seemed to be enjoying a better quality of life! So eight years ago I moved back, met my husband and started a family. I love the creative energy here, the open-minded culture and the fact that it’s less than an hour into London by train.

3. How did you become an interior stylist and what have been the highlights of your career 5. We were thrilled to see The Great Interior to date? Design Challenge return to our screens for a I did a degree in furniture design and on graduating I was second series. How would you describe the struggling to think of a career. I had a friend from university show to anyone who hasn’t seen it? whose mum was an interior stylist and she worked on the Laura Ashley catalogues, so I became her assistant. I spent my days unpacking boxes, steaming curtains, and making lunch. It was a great insight into a whole vocation I’d never even heard about. I loved the quick turn around and working with a great team of professional creative people to create gorgeous photographs. So after assisting for a few years, I went out and started styling shopping pages for home and lifestyle magazines. 5

We’re now filming the third series so it’s a real testament to the popularity of interior design that the show has been so well received. The show pitches keen amateur designers against one another. They are given the task of designing someone’s room, to their brief, within 48 hours and with a budget of just £1,000. Each designer will have a builder and a decorator but they will also carry out a large


proportion of the work themselves. Due to the tight time scale and budget constraints you see people being really creative and thinking outside the box. The designers also have to show that they can adapt their style to suit the homeowner’s brief and practical requirements. Its not all tassels and tiebacks!

this requires confidence, charisma and insight. Finally, it’s important to be super organized, or at least make sure the people who work around you are!

A good interior designer, first and foremost, needs to be creative and artistic. I think this is the only way you get great designs, and inspirational schemes. Secondly, they need to be a good people person. Designing for people in their own homes requires excellent listening skills and the ability to understand a client’s needs. Without these things it’s difficult to create a design that reflects their personality and style. It’s definitely not a case of ‘all about me’. A good designer also needs to be empathetic and adaptable yet strong enough to steer a project in the right direction. All

Do use it, and don’t be afraid of it! I’m mad passionate about decorating with colour because it’s so powerfully transformational. Colour can set the theme, create a mood, even create the illusion of light and space. I like to paint the walls in a bold hue but you can easily inject some colour in your furnishings – on curtains, cushions, a rug or a collection of artwork. From a whisper of pale pink to deep dark indigo, you can use colour to express yourself and transform your home from dull to drab.

7. Colour is a fantastic tool for any designer to have in their kit. What are your top dos 6. What makes a good interior designer? What and don’ts when it comes to using it in your home? skills and qualities are essential?

8. What is colour blocking and why should we all have fun experimenting with it? Colour blocking is where you go full on with the colour but pull back on the pattern, thereby allowing the colour to be the main attraction within a decorating scheme. To get it to work you need to choose colours of a similar hue or saturation. Mid tone brights work very well together, but you can use a pastel palette or dark palette too. In my experience, to keep impact high, you should stick to a maximum of three colours. For example pick one colour for your walls, another for large items of furniture, such as a sofa or wardrobe, and use the third as the accent, on items like cushions or an occasional chair. This will give the room some pace and keep the scheme looking playful, rather than childish. Black, white and grey can appear as neutrals but the key is to go bold, or go home! Try and stay away from too much pattern, a large patterned rug or some bold artwork on the wall can add to the drama. Bold abstract prints or geometrics seem to work best, but avoid busy patterns as they just create too much chatter. Next have fun placing your colour blocks. For instance, rather than painting a feature wall, paint blocks of colour that bleed across corners or over alcoves. Cover a headboard in a shocking pink or upholster the sofa in canary yellow. This is fun look and a real celebration of the power that colour can punch into your home. 6


9. Which colours are hot this year? No one is talking about grey anymore! Dark hues continue to be a fashionable trend in interior design but we’re steering away from the dark gunmetal greys and towards intense inky indigos and blues, which look amazing teamed with gold. Dulux have touted Copper Blush as their colour of 2015, which is a lovely warm clay colour (reminiscent of Terra Rossa, circa 1995). Pantone, the colour experts, claimed Marsala theirs for 2015. This is a warm, deep red colour that looks lush with a hint of vivid yellow or lime green. In terms of hot trends for 2015, I see gold and brass being the new metallic, and replacing copper.

10. What role do you think pattern plays in people's homes these days? Pattern has always been popular in interior design, and different styles of pattern come and go. Recently geometrics have been in vogue – everything from contemporary abstract to the more classic Ikat and trellis designs. We have also seen a trend for bold colour schemes and so the prints have had to muscle up to that which is why I think bold geometrics will continue to be popular.

11. How can pattern bring a room to life? Pattern can bring real energy to a room, as it’s a wonderful way to keep the eye entertained. I love the way you can mix different patterns in unexpected ways to give a room a truly individual feel. Gone are the days of matching pelmets and borders. Today designers mix plains, florals, stripes and geometrics in a way that clashes and makes a statement. I especially enjoy using pattern on soft furnishings – it’s an easy way to ring the changes.

12. Tell us about your own home. What’s it like in terms of colour, style and decor? My own home is a large open plan loft apartment in the centre of Brighton. It’s a great space for family living and entertaining. The only downside is that it doesn’t have a garden. I’ve painted it all in neutral greys and added the interest with my collection of brightly coloured artwork and cushions. I have many, many cushions! Because the main living area is very light, I’ve decorated the bedrooms dark to contrast; our bedroom is a dark Pelt colour and my 4-year-old son’s is Black Railings, both by Farrow and Ball. 7

I like accessorising and I have lots of junk shop and car boot sale finds dotted around. I call myself a maximalist. My husband says I collect clutter.

13. Your husband is a builder and you plan to create your own dream family home together. What’s the big idea for your grand design? We have been living in Brighton for the past 8 years and now we’d like to move to the countryside, to somewhere we can have some more space. My husband really wants a shed, so now’s the time! Because of our passion for design and renovation we are looking for something with potential so we can do it up to suit the way we want to live. So we aren’t looking for anything Grade II listed, but perhaps an ugly house that we can smash around. We’ll have fun making it look gorgeous.

14. What are your top 10 styling tips for updating a room quickly and easily on a budget? 1

PAINT UNLOVED FURNITURE IN A NEW HUE. Try using Annie Sloane’s Chalk Paint.

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HANG A LARGE MIRROR, OR A COLLECTION OF MIRRORS. It makes the room feel larger.

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HANG A DESIGNER WALLPAPER. Try it in an alcove or behind a bookcase.

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INVEST IN A LARGE VASE OF FAUX FLOWERS. Blousy hydrangea look best.

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TREAT YOUR BED TO A FRESH NEW SET OF BED LINEN. Add a couple of signature cushions, the bigger the better!


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BUY A LARGE STATEMENT RUG. Try one in a bold design or pattern.

Where to find me:

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Website: www.sophierobinson.co.uk

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Facebook: www.facebook.com/sophierobinsonstylist

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Twitter: www.twitter.com/ssophierobinson

DE-CLUTTER. The cheapest way to improve the look of any room is to create more space. DO A SHELFIE! Style up your shelves by arranging the items in eyecatching displays. ARRANGE ITEMS YOU HAVE TO CREATE SYMMETRY. A pair of lamps, a pair of cushions or a set of artwork symmetrically displayed makes a room look put together.

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DON’T OVERLOOK THE SMALL DETAILS. For example a new set of handles to update cupboard doors – they really do make all the difference.

Instagram: www.instagram.com/sophierobinsonstylist Pinterest: www.pinterest.com/ssophierobinson

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Heaven

This issue we are embracing the fun, the colourful and the quirky. Inspired by the playful, laid back nature of summer, our pick of interiors and accessories are guaranteed to brighten your home and bring a little extra sunshine to your life.

1 ‘Giraffe’ by ClothKat, £3.00 www.clothkat.co.uk

Waiting on illustration from Robyn

2 ‘South’ by Three of the Possessed (for DENY Designs), $799.00 www.denydesigns.com/products/three-of-the-possessed-south-credenza 3 ‘Metal Effect Confetti Dots Wall Stickers’ by Nutmeg Wall Art, £18.00 www.nutmegwallartstickers.co.uk 4 ‘Sketchy Stems’ wallpaper from Milton & King, designed by Rachael Taylor, £98.00 www.uk.miltonandking.com 5 ‘Cactus Screen Print’ by Hector & Haddock, £25.00 www.hectorandhaddock.com

Illustration by Robyn Taylor

6 ‘Small hexagon shaped mirror’ by Posh Totty Designs Interiors, from £10.00 www.notonthehighstreet.com/poshtottydesignsinteriors

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LONDON

Paper ¦ Textiles ¦ Accessories www.emilyburningham.com


Q & A with Dids Macdonald CEO of ACID

Q. I’d love to design greetings cards or posters inspired by books or movies, like Star Wars. If I included a quote in my own typography and drew characters like C-3PO and R2-D2 by hand in my own style, would I be infringing copyright? Would my reinterpretation be illegal? And could I sell my work? Whenever you wish to use a copyright work as a basis for your own design you should always ask permission of the copyright holder. Assuming the work is still in term for copyright, you could be infringing if you reproduce it. An infringement will occur if the whole or a substantial part of the work is reproduced, in any material form, without the copyright owner’s permission. However, if reproducing the original artwork requires a degree of skill, such as the use of a mosaic technique, then you may find that you acquire a copyright yourself. There may then be issues as to whether your copyright is enforceable or whether you need to make terms with the copyright owner in order to sell your work.

Q. I recently created some cool geometric designs and motifs while playing around in Illustrator but it wouldn’t surprise me if someone else has already come up with similar things. Am I right in thinking that geometric shapes are impossible to copyright? Geometric shapes can fall under the ‘generic’ heading which means that their design cannot be claimed by an individual. However, when geometric shapes become part of a new and original design, there’s a chance that you’ll have created your own intellectual property. While you may have created rights in your new design you can’t stop anyone else using geometric shapes. Also, if your design has been created entirely independently, ie you haven’t copied it from anyone else, and you can prove that, you will have a defense if faced with any allegation of copying.

Q. How do you know if you are copying someone’s work or infringing copyright in a fairly simple design, for instance a coordinating 17

pattern like polka dots, which has been done many times before? How could you claim a design like this as your own? This is another example of using generic material, which may limit the intellectual property created within a design. There is nothing to stop someone using a generic item, but the design should be set out in an original way to ensure there is less risk of infringing someone else’s copyright. However, at present there is no central worldwide database of unregistered rights so it would be difficult to know if someone in another country has already produced the same design. Registered designs can be searched at UKIPO and OHIM and both websites offer excellent advice on this. It is a good idea to develop some kind of company policy for monitoring the market, and the Internet, for designs similar to yours.

Q. It can be tricky to take photos of certain motifs, like animals, so I typically look to source reference online or in books and then interpret the image in my own way. How does copyright work in this instance? Photographs are specifically protected as artistic works pursuant to the Copyright Designs and Patents Act 1988 which means that an infringement will occur if the whole or a substantial part of the photograph is reproduced, in any material form, without the copyright owner’s permission. It’s important to note that the original work could just have influenced a very small part of the new design, the key question is whether this constitutes using ‘a substantial’ part of the earlier work.

Q. When a company buys a design outright, does this mean they own the copyright? For example, if I sold one of my designs to a company, would I still be able to use it on products that I manufacture and sell myself? This question highlights why it’s so important to set out terms and conditions of your business from the start. It also raises the important issue of licence agreements


whereby you can choose to maintain ownership of your design but license or ‘rent‘ it out to other companies. In the terms of the licence agreement you can dictate specifics, such as the length of the rental term, the territories where products can be sold and also how your design can be used. For example if you produce floral artwork you may only wish to license use of your designs for ceramic ware and keep the rights to use them on fabric yourself. It’s vital that you choose the right licence – either sole or exclusive – depending on whether you wish to use the design or not. You’ll also need to decide whether to assign the IP rights of the design to the licensor for the term of the licence. Just be aware that whoever holds the rights to the design is responsible for dealing with any issues regarding infringement. ACID has a generic, reusable Licence/Royalty Agreement available online but we always recommend taking legal advice before entering into any business arrangement.

Q. When starting up on your own when would you recommend dealing with things like copyrighting your work, trade marking, and registering your business and as self-employed, etc.? To ensure that your designs are protected, we advise registering with Companies House if your company is to be Limited, and consider registering your trade mark or brand names before you start your business. However many small businesses start trading without doing these things. The reality is that without written terms and conditions in place conducting your business can be confusing and difficult and any disputes can be costly and time consuming to resolve. Having a set of terms and conditions clearly set out from the off makes life much easier in the long run. A generic agreement, such as the Standard Terms and Conditions template generic agreement offered by ACID, is a basic set of trading terms and conditions with additional clauses that can be added or taken out depending on your own business needs. The emphasis lies on ensuring any intellectual property issues are covered.

An agreement like this will allow you to clearly set out to customers the terms upon which you do business. For example, how long will a customer have to pay for the goods or services? What happens if they do not pay? What is the procedure for returns? Are you to retain ownership and title until payment is made? It is good policy to contact your local tax office too as they’ll be able to advise you on setting up your business to ensure that you understand all the issues surrounding for self-employment and VAT.

Q. I can’t decide what to call my surface pattern design company. Do you have any advice about choosing and registering a name and is it a good idea to use your own name as a brand? When choosing a business name it is best to check out registered trade marks first to ensure that you do not use an existing registered trade mark or brand name. You can do this at the UKIPO and OHIM websites in the same way that you can check for registered designs. You can also arrange official searches of these registered trade marks through one of ACID’s legal affiliate law firms. It is also worth checking the Companies House register for existing company names. This can be invaluable as it is both expensive and time consuming to have to change your trading name once you’ve started your business. It used to be quite difficult to register a personal name as a trade mark but that’s not the case so much anymore. If you plan to go down this route it’s a good idea to take advice from an intellectual property lawyer.

Q. I’ve been advised not to post my patterns on Pinterest and social media sites in case other companies copy them and get them into the market before I do. If I was an established designer with patterns and products out there I wouldn’t be as worried as people would recognise my style and know that I own the original work. However I’m just starting to build my brand so I do need to get my work out there as much as possible. How can I avoid being ripped off?

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THE PREMIER MARKET FOR TEXTILE & SURFACE DESIGN IN THE USA www.printsourcenewyork.com


diy MOUSEPAD GOINGHOMETOROOST.COM

SOMETIMES I FEEL I LIVE BY THE PHILOSOPHY: WHY DOES THAT HAVE TO BE SO BORING? I DON'T LIKE TO SETTLE FOR THE 'NORM', SO I END UP DOING THINGS LIKE PAINTING THIS, MAKING THAT, AND COVERING EVERYTHING IN FABRIC. IT JUST MAKES ME HAPPY, AND A PIMPED UP MOUSEPAD IS NO EXCEPTION! I HAVE MADE A FABRIC COVERED MOUSEPAD BEFORE, AND THOUGH IT LASTED A VERY LONG TIME, I THINK I'VE PERFECTED THE PROCESS! THIS TIME, INSTEAD OF COVERING AN EXISTING MOUSEPAD, I'VE CONSTRUCTED MY OWN - AND IT IS BETTER THAN ANY MOUSEPAD I'VE EVER PURCHASED. IT'S SLEEK, THIN, STAYS IN PLACE AND MAKES ME SMILE WHENEVER I LOOK AT IT. IT'S SUPER SIMPLE AND I MADE IT USING MATERIALS I ALREADY HAD IN MY SEWING ROOM. IT ONLY TOOK ABOUT 15 MINUTES TO MAKE! 27


HERE'S WHAT YOU'LL NEED: - ADHESIVE CORK - ALSO AVAILABLE AT YOUR LOCAL MART OR CRAFT STORE. - A 12" X 12" PIECE OF FABRIC - I USED EVERBLOOMING WILLOW FROM CULTIVATE. - A 10" X 12" PIECE OF FUSIBLE WEBBING - MY FAVOURITE IS LITE STEAM-A-SEAM 2. - 8" X 10" MATBOARD OR BACKING BOARD - YOU KNOW, THE THING THATS PLACED BEHIND AN ART PRINT WHEN PURCHASED OR SHIPPED TO YOU. - FRAY CHECK (OPTIONAL) - OTHER STANDARD SUPPLIES: IRON, SCISSORS, A PEN, A RULER & A ROTARY CUTTER.

STEP 1: FOLLOW THE PACKAGE DIRECTIONS FOR APPLYING THE FUSIBLE WEB TO THE WRONG SIDE OF YOUR FABRIC. GENERALLY, YOU'LL REMOVE A PIECE OF PAPER AND IRON THE FUSIBLE STICKY SIDE DOWN TO THE WRONG SIDE OF THE FABRIC. KEEP THE PAPER BACKING ON, AND CUT A PIECE OF FABRIC THAT'S EXACTLY 8" X 10".

STEP 2: REMOVE THE PAPER BACKING FROM YOUR 8" X 10" PIECE OF FABRIC YOU JUST CUT, EXPOSING THE NEWLY 'STICKY' BACK TO YOUR FABRIC. CAREFULLY PLACE THE FABRIC ON YOUR BACKING BOARD SO IT LINES UP WITH ALL OF THE EDGES. GENERALLY, YOUR FABRIC WILL BE TACKY AND REPOSITIONABLE UNTIL YOU IRON IT. THEN, IRON IN PLACE (AGAIN, REFER TO PACKAGE INSTRUCTIONS FOR HEAT DURATION), JUST BE SURE TO NOT USE STEAM, AS THIS COULD MAKE THE BACKING BOARD WARP.

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STEP 3: NEXT, CUT AN 8" X 10" PIECE OF ADHESIVE CORK. THIS WILL BE THE 'NON-SKID' BOTTOM TO YOUR MOUSEPAD. BEGIN REMOVING THE PAPER BACKING TO EXPOSE THE STICKY CORK. LINE ONE EDGE UP CAREFULLY WITH THE BOTTOM SIDE OF THE BACKING BOARD AND PEEL AWAY TO KEEP THINGS LINED UP PERFECTLY (SEE IMAGE ABOVE).

STEP 4: TAKE A LOOK AT ALL YOUR EDGES AND CLEAN THEM UP IF YOU NEED TO (A RULER AND ROTARY CUTTER IS HELPFUL FOR THIS!). TO GIVE YOUR NEW MOUSEPAD A REAL DESIGNER FEEL,, YOU MIGHT WANT TO ROUND THE EDGES. I GRABBED A VASE I HAD NEAR BY AND PLACED IT IN EACH CORNER, TRACED AROUND THE CURVE, AND CUT THE CORNERS OFF USING MY PEN LINE AS A GUIDE.

STEP 5: ALTERNATIVELY, IF YOU'D LIKE TO ENSURE YOUR EDGES STAY NICE AND CLEAN AND NEVER FRAY, YOU CAN RUN A THIN LINE OF FRAY CHECK AROUND THEM (I LOVE THIS STUFF!). BE CAREFUL NOT TO USE TOO MUCH, AND LET IT DRY BEFORE YOU USE YOUR MOUSEPAD.

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NOW YOU'RE ALL DONE! SEE HOW THIN AND SLEEK IT IS? I LOVE HOW IT FEELS AND MY MOUSE GLIDES OVER IT PERFECTLY. ABOVE IS A GLIMPSE OF MY WORKSTATION. I ALWAYS KEEP A HONEYCOMB COASTER BY MY COMPUTER AND I LOVE SIPPING TEA FROM MY WINGSPAN MUG! ALSO PICTURED ABOVE (RIGHT): - SHARE SOMETHING EVERY DAY BY HEIDI AHMED

BLOG: GOINGHOMETOROOST.COM

- NOTEBOOK BY KATIE DAISY

FACEBOOK: /GOINGHOMETOROOST

- CUSTOM FABRIC PAINTING BY EMILY JEFFORDS

INSTAGRAM: /GOINGHOMETOROOST

I HOPE YOU ENJOYED THIS LENGTHY YET EASY TUTORIAL! LET ME KNOW IF YOU MAKE A MOUSEPAD YOURSELF! - BONNIE XO

PINTEREST: /BONNIEFORKNER TWITTER: /GOHOMETOROOST

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A G BRAND N I D L I BU

Surfacephilia is a UK-based surface pattern design studio that creates luxurious bohemian patterns for the design industry. As well as working on commissioned illustrations and patterns for other brands, Surfacephilia manufactures its own collections of digitally printed wallpaper, luxury fabrics, cushions and china, selling online and through other studios and shops internationally. The signature style of a hand-rendered approach is created through experimental designs that are built up using layers of intricate drawings, paintings and textures that have been lifted directly from precious sketchbook pages. Good branding is important because it’s your promise to your customer. It elevates and differentiates you from your competitors and gives your customers a reason to choose your products and services over others. But there’s more to building a brand than creating your logo and coming up with a name and tagline. Of course these things are important, but ultimately successful branding starts with establishing what your business stands for and being clear about what you want to achieve.

EVERY GOOD BRAND SELLS AN ETHOS –– A CORE SET OF BELIEFS AND BEHAVIOURS –– AS WELL AS A PRODUCT OR SERVICE. People buy into businesses that share the same values as them - it’s what gives a product or service extra appeal. Good brands also sell an identity: a suggestion of a lifestyle or way of being that people can connect with or aspire to. Brand loyal customers choose the same products or services time and time again because they love the way they look or feel. Do you know what your business stands for? Is it ethically driven? Is it driven by style or trends? Is it led by innovation? Have you been inspired by your own personal experiences? Have you turned your hobby or passion into a business? Asking yourself these kinds of questions will help you better understand the kind of brand you’re trying to create. Remember your products or services are commodities of your ethos; it’s your branding that will communicate the bigger picture - your mission, vision, and unique selling points - to your target market.

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WHAT MUST YOU DO TO BECOME A BRAND?

1. BE CLEAR ABOUT YOUR MISSION:

4. UNDERSTAND YOUR BRAND VALUES:

This is your promise and commitment to deliver a particular approach, standard, style, quality of service/product each time you communicate with the wider world or make a sale. Businesses are built on first impressions, personal experiences and reputation so being consistent in your approach is key to gaining new 2. ESTABLISH YOUR UNIQUE SELLING POINT (USP): customers and also keeping the ones you have. How do customers see the product or service you offer? What This is the thing that sets you apart from other businesses, which may sell similar products or services. kind of feedback do you get? Are you delivering on your What can you offer people that other companies can’t? promises? What could you do differently, or better? It might involve your education and specialist training, 5. BUILD LONG-­TERM RELATIONSHIPS WITH your style of designing or a certain skill set, a unique CUSTOMERS: talent, or any past experience/s that you bring into your work. Make sure that all your USPs are clear in all With greater choice power and customer expectations higher than ever, businesses need to consider how they your marketing and communications. want people to feel when they buy their product or 3. CREATE YOUR OWN ETHOS: service. If they have a good experience, if they are made to feel special, if they enjoy benefits or get rewarded for Consider what your company stands for. What beliefs choosing you, they’ll probably come back. How will you and behaviours matter to you? How do these form the make sure you keep customers coming back? foundation of your business?

Your mission gives your business a purpose and a reason for existing. What’s your company’s purpose (beyond profitability)? What are you building and why is it important to you and, more importantly, to the world?

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6. MAKE IT PERSONAL:

7. HAVE A CLEAR

8. IDENTIFY YOUR TARGET MARKET:

Remember that you are an extension of your brand. How passionate are you about your brand? How do you present yourself to customers? How do you dress? How do you communicate with customers and potential customers? What does your workspace/retail space/meeting spaces say about you, and your business? Are these things a true representation of you and your brand?

BRAND STRATEGY:

Trying to sell a product or service without

Knowing what you want to achieve is the key to success in business. What are your short and long-term goals? What kind of time frames are you looking at? Make plans to achieve your goals and keep evaluating them to check that you’re on track.

understanding your ideal customers is like driving with your eyes closed. Knowing and understanding your target market is crucial when it comes to building your brand so do your research and create a few broad descriptions of your ideal customers. Who are these people? What kind of life do they lead? Where do they shop and how do they spend their money? What are their interests? What other brands do they like? Studying their full profiles will help you understand their needs. It will also help you to identify the kinds of places you’re likely to find them so you can target your marketing accordingly.

WHERE IS BRANDING IMPORTANT? EVERYWHERE! • • • •

On your website Across all printed literature On your e-mail signature strip In mail shots and newsletters

• • • • •

Within your office/ workspace/ retail outlet On stands at exhibitions, shows and networking events In presentations and on any meeting material Across all your advertising On social media and apps

WEBSITE: WWW.SURFACEPHILIA.CO.UK TWITTER: @SURFACEPHILIA

FACEBOOK: SURFACEPHILIA INSTAGRAM: @SURFACEPHILIA

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for the creative and curious

UPPERCASE MAGAZINE

.com

U PPE R CASE

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THE PRINTMAKING ISSUE

A QUARTERLY PRINT MAGAZINE FOR THE CREATIVE AND CURIOUS SIGN UP FOR FREE CONTENT EMAILED WEEKLY

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Meet  the  lovely  Kate  Thorburn:  a  Yorkshire-based  surface  pattern  designer  with  a  background  in  both   ceramic  and  card  design.  Kate  completed  her  MA  in  ceramic  design  at  Staffordshire  University  in  2007   and  successfully  launched  her  own  range  of  ceramics,  ‘What  Kate  Loves’,  at  Top  Drawer  in  2014.  All  her   ceramics  are  proudly  made  in  Stoke-on-Trent  at  The  Royal  Overhouse  Manufactory  for  Designers  at   Royal  S tafford.  Here  she  shares  more  about  her  life  and  loves…

Inspiration,  design  process  and  manufacturing  a  range… A  lot  of  the  inspiration  for  my  work  comes  from  nature.  I’ve  always  been  drawn  to  organic  forms  like  the  patina  on  stone  walls,   the  texture  of  old  wood,  and  the  patterns  on  leaves  and  wild  flowers.  Travel  is  also  very  important  to  me.  In  this  high-pressured,   fast-moving  world  we  need  to  make  time  to  get  out  and  explore.  When  I  was  little  my  parents  would  take  me  to  the  wilds  of  the   British  countryside,  and  I  still  love  to  roam  free  in  places  like  the  Yorkshire  Dales  and  the  Scottish  Highlands.  I  feel  such  a  sense  of   peace  there.  Sometimes  I’ll  spend  hours  just  walking  through  a  field  and  taking  endless  photos  of  plants  and  butterflies  along  the   way.  There’s  so  much  undisturbed  beauty  in  nature. I  studied  in  Stoke-on-Trent,  where  I  discovered  amazing  potteries  such  as  Burleigh  Pottery  in  Middleport  (www.burleigh.co.uk),   which  I  find  so  inspiring.  Unfortunately  Stoke  has  been  hit  hard  by  the  decline  of  British  manufacturing,  which  has  led  to  the   closure  of  mines,  steelworks  and  factories.  Although  much  of  the  town  is  now  boarded  up  I  have  faith  that  one  day  it  will  return   to  its  former  glory.  The  history  of  the  industry  is  really  important  to  me,  so  I’d  always  recommend  visiting  places  like  the   Wedgwood  Museum  (www.wedgwoodmuseum.org.uk)  where  you  can  learn  more  about  ceramic  traditions  and  heritage.  You  can   also  pick  up  great  bargains  at  Royal  Doulton  (www.royaldoulton.co.uk),  Portmeirion  (www.portmeiriongroupfactoryshops.co.uk)  and   Emma  Bridgewater  (www.emmabridgewater.co.uk)  factory  shops.  

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I’m  an  avid  collector  of  beautiful  and  interesting  objects,  from  ceramic  pieces  like  jugs  and  plates  to  old  postcards  and  natural   forms  like  shells  and  pinecones.  I  never  know  what  ideas  they’ll  spark.  I’m  also  a  huge  fan  of  Pinterest.  I  find  it’s  a  great  resource   for  gathering  images,  honing  my  style  and  organising  my  ideas.  Creating  boards  on  here  is  a  fun  and  fascinating  process.  Recently   one  of  my  boards  made  me  realise  how  much  I  love  the  colours  blue  and  white  together,  and  this  is  what  inspired  my  current   collection.  My  designs  always  start  with  a  sketch.  I  love  drawing  and  enjoy  experimenting  with  different  tools.  I  used  a  calligraphy   dip-nib  pen  for  the  majority  of  my  current  range,  but  I  like  to  use  a  variety  of  inks,  pens  and  even  sticks  to  create  interesting   lines.  I’ll  refer  to  Pinterest,  of  course,  and  also  my  mood  boards,  photographs,  vintage  books  and  illustrated  guides  for  inspiration.   I  then  bring  the  process  over  to  the  computer  and  combine  my  hand-drawings  with  digital  techniques.  The  result  is  a  vintageinspired  look,  which  has  a  clean  and  contemporary  edge.   I  think  about  every  new  product  I  create  very  carefully  as  each  brings  its  own  challenges.  With  tableware  for  example,  the   functionality  of  the  piece  is  very  important;  will  it  be  purely  decorative  (as  most  of  my  plates  are)  or  will  it  be  used  every  day?   Either  way,  it  needs  to  have  longevity,  as  ceramics  are  not  generally  throwaway  items.  Then  there  are  design  considerations.  All   ceramic  objects  have  boundaries  that  dictate  the  design,  and  so  they  tend  to  be  placement  pieces  rather  than  repeat  patterns.  On   something  like  a  mug  or  a  jug,  repeats  can  be  used,  but  the  curve  of  the  template  needs  to  be  incorporated  in  the  design,  unless   the  object  is  straight-sided.  I  find  it  useful  to  print  out  the  template  and  wrap  the  paper  around  the  object  to  make  sure  the   pattern  works  with  the  curve.    

My  favourite  product  in  my  current  range   is  the  statement  bowl. It’s  elegant  and  also  a  bit  of  a  showpiece   so  it  would  sit  perfectly  on  any  coffee  table.   I’ve  used  most  of  my  illustrated  floras  in   the  design,  as  well  as  some  small  crawly   creatures  (can  you  spot  the  snail?).  

In  my  work  I  aim  to  create  cherished  objects  of  the  future.  I  want  to  keep   the  tradition  of  this  craft  alive  by  producing  pieces  that  are  timeless,  beautiful,   and  of  the  highest  quality.  I’d  love  my  ceramics  to  mean  as  much  to  others  as   they  do  to  me.  I  hope  that  their  owners  will  treasure  them  for  years  to  come.   Looking  ahead,  I’m  hoping  to  launch  a  range  of  textiles  to  compliment  my   ceramics,  so  watch  this  space!

www.notonthehighstreet.com/whatkateloves www.whatkateloves.co.uk Facebook:  What-Kate-Loves Twitter:  whatkateloves Pinterest:  @katelate81 Instagram:  @katelate81

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JESSICA

HOGARTH

DESIGNS

@JESSHOGARTH /JESSICAHOGARTHDESIGNS @JESSICAHOGARTH

WWW.JESSICAHOGARTH.COM / INFO@JESSICAHOGARTH.COM

Jessica Hogarth is a surface pattern designer based in North Yorkshire, UK. Her designs are colourful, quirky and focused around her unique illustrative style. Jessica sell a range of products on a wholesale basis, as well as illustrating and creating patterns for a number of clients on a freelance basis.


running a global

brand and business by Heather Moore

Heather Moore is a self-taught illustrator and fabric designer from South Africa. She started her design label, Skinny laMinx, as a hobby in 2006 and it quickly grew into a successful online business, blog and shop.

In 2005, when I first started making screenprints for fun using paper stencils and other rudimentary techniques, I had no idea that in the not-too-distant future, I'd have rolls and rolls of fabric professionally printed with my designs, and a whole bunch of super-capable seamstresses, all ready to make up all manner of Skinny laMinx goods to sell in my shop. Even though my production method is quite different these days, everything still starts in my studio with a sketch, a cut paper design, or a print made from a cut lino block. And just as it was when I started out, I'm never quite sure whether the thing I've designed (which I think is rather nice!) will actually appeal to anyone else. Of course, nowadays the stakes are a little higher, as it's not just a single cushion cover or tea towel that we want to sell, it's yards of fabric and piles of pillows! 49


A human-sized business Despite the production quantities and techniques at Skinny laMinx having grown considerably in scope and scale over the past seven years, it is still important to us that the whole enterprise remains human-sized. For this reason, most of our fabric is screenprinted about 20 minutes away from our studio, and all the cutting and sewing is done in the studio above our shop at 201 Bree Street in Cape Town. www.skinnylaminx.com/shop Since opening our bricks and mortar store three years ago, Bree Street has grown into a focussed hub of design-centred retail, which suits us very well. The shop is a fairly discreet little place, with a black awning, and an ever-changing window display. Inside, the dark-painted walls show off the dizzying array of prints and products to excellent effect, and our shop manager, Arlene, is sure to point out our latest ideas, now showcased in store.

We encourage our customers to walk through the shop and into the bustling fabric studio, where we have our large fabric store, as well as our “cushion lab”, for putting together a great sofascape. In the stock room nearby, our wholesale and online team work hard to prepare orders for the postman to send to customers and stockists all over the world.

Production and retail as one Through our back door and up the fire escape you’ll find the Skinny laMinx design and production studio - it’s situated right above our shop. After having had a solely online business for a long time, we enjoy having our retail and production on the same premises, as it allows us to see how the designs and products work in the real world. I love it when one of our seamstresses is downstairs getting a cup of tea and she overhears a customer praising the quality of our work. 50


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The Moyo design brief Each issue we challenge you to create a set of three patterns inspired by imagery that we share here in the magazine. We will pick a winner and three runners up, and feature their designs in the next issue. The winner will also receive a set of Rachael Taylor studio’s tea towels. As this is the ‘home’ edition of MOYO, we’re encouraging you to find inspiration in the heart of your own home. This issue’s design brief is KITCHEN CRAZY and we can’t wait to see what you come up with. Your patterns must be kitchen-related and they must feature a ‘crazy’ element. Forget subdued and neutral, we’re looking for designs that are loud, bold, and fun - the more out there the better! You can choose a palette of three colours maximum - one of which must be a neon or very bright colour. You can also use tints and black and white too. So next time you’re making a cuppa, look around your kitchen with fresh eyes and let your mind run wild! ‘Fun Utensils’ design by Rachael Taylor

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Your kitchen-related inspiration could take the form of:

To enter please follow the submission guidelines carefully:

Utensils - wooden spoons, spatulas, scissors, whisks, etc.

Design a set of three patterns, which work together. Imagine your work will be used on fun fabric-based kitchen items such as oven mitts, tea towels and aprons.

Cooking pots, dishes, pans, teacups, toasters, etc. Baking equipment, such as aprons, tins, jelly moulds, cake stands, cookie cutters, rolling pin, etc. Fresh food - fruit, veg, meat, fish, etc. Home-cooked meals Food packaging White goods and furniture, such as a fridge, oven, hob, table, chairs, etc Events/celebrations that take place in the kitchen Hints at bringing the outdoors in Words related to kitchens

Your ‘crazy’ might come from: Your typography Your colour choices

Prepare each pattern as a 1000px wide jpeg (any height), at 300 dpi and label it with your name and the pattern (e.g. Rachael_Taylor_ kitchen1.jpg). Please do not send in Illustrator files or high res jpegs at this point. Images that don’t meet our submission guidelines won’t be considered. Send your images, along with your full name, website/blog address and country, to submissions@makeitindesign.com by Friday 4th December, 2015. By entering this challenge you give permission for your patterns and name/links to be shared in any future edition of MOYO magazine, on the blogs of Make it in Design, Rachael Taylor or Do What You Love, or for promotional purposes connected with the magazine. The competition is open to all and there is no fee to enter. No fee is payable for use of your image(s). You will retain the copyright and your images will be credited.

Textures Patterns Or anything else you like!

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Fun! Behind The Scenes:

Make it in Design Photoshoot

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In the meantime here’s a peek at what went on behind the scenes at the photoshoot…

Rachael Taylor’s experience of the day

play!

I had the pleasure of working with Holly Booth and her fabulous team on a live photoshoot. I loved every minute of it! The models were such a joy to work with and I had so much fun styling the props, furniture and directing the children. From confetti to playing dress up, it really was a day of laughter and play. We strive to deliver a high standard of resources for Make it in Design, so much thought, passion and preparation goes into everything we do and we can’t wait to release our innovative downloads area on the Make it in Design website. www.makeitindesign.com

At Make it in Design we are dedicated to providing our community with quality resources that are inspiring and useful, which is why we have just invested in a whole new area for our website. We will soon be offering a large range of stock photography and room set downloads through our brand new shop, together with fantastic deals and special bundles to help you create a professional portfolio that promises to wow any potential client.

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! E T U C SO

LET’S GET MESSY! 61


SMILEY, HAPPY, FACES!

Where  to  find  us: Website: www.makeitindesign.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/ TheArtandBusinessofSurface PatternDesign Twitter: @MakeitinDesign Instagram: @makeitindesign

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amazing new room sets which will soon be available on makeitindesign.com

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playful!

cheeky!

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Hanoi, VIETNAM

ela DuPasqu ich ie M r

A POSTCARD FROM

Xin Chao! Greetings from Hanoi – a city where you don’t have to dig deep to discover some of the most intriguing treasures of Asia. With its thousand-year history, its vibrant street life and French colonial heritage, inspiration can be found at every corner. Almost 15 years after a six-month trip that took me across Vietnam, who’d have thought I’d have built my nest here? Not me. It was in February 2010 that I packed up my things and left Switzerland with my husband to pursue his architectural projects. It was the best decision ever!

To do

To visit

Walking around Hoan Kiem Lake at dawn is probably the best way to feel the spirit of the city. You’ll spot Tai Chi practitioners and joggers relishing the moment and it’s the perfect time to cross the iconic red bridge to the Temple of the Jade Mountain.

Hanoi is surrounded by hundreds of craft villages, each one specialising in a particular trade. Quite popular with tourists are the pottery village of Bat Trang and the silk village of Van Phuc. If you fancy going off the beaten track, this is a useful guide.

Allow yourself to gest lost in the maze of the Old Quarter alleyways. The crumbling walls splattered with telephone numbers of local businesses is urban poetry.

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The Vietnam Museum of Ethnology www.vme.org.vn displays the amazing intricate patterns of the 54 Vietnamese ethnic groups. It’s pure eye candy and not to be missed!


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To shop

Michela DuPasquier

Silk linens, handcrafts, ethnic minority embroideries, propaganda posters… the list is endless – Hanoi has it all.

Studio: Dirty Monsoon (hand-screen printed linens & accessories) Lives: Hanoi, Vietnam

Pattern lovers will be excited by the gorgeous French-Vietnamese eco-chic label Metiseko (www.metiseko.com) on Hang Gai street. And if vibrant colour is your thing, head to Chula’s showroom www.chulafashion.com at the Northern end of West Lake.

www.dirtymonsoon.com www.facebook.com/dirtymonsoon instagram.com/michelainhanoi twitter.com/michelainhanoi

To eat Vietnamese cuisine is one of the healthiest and tastiest in the world. Don’t leave the city without eating bun cha: a traditional dish of grilled pork and noodles, served with dipping sauce and fresh herbs. If you have a sweet tooth, indulge yourself with a chè, a coconut milk soup served with crushed ice, sweet corn, beans and colorful jellies.

To drink Mingling with the locals is a must and what better way to do so than by sipping a brewed beer at one of the countless bia hoi around the city. Just pull up a plastic stool and watch the world go by. The cool and quirky style of the trendy café Công Caphe’s (www.congcaphe.com) makes it well worth a visit. Coffee lovers need to try all the delicious flavours of Vietnamese coffee, including coconut coffee – a truly unique experience!

My pattern I’m obsessed with birdcages. They’re a never-ending source of inspiration for my designs. In Vietnam you see them everywhere and it’s not unusual to come across bird singing competitions! 68


Marrakech Dreams

Design and colour inspiration from the Ochre City By Louise Gale Louise is a mixed media artist with a passion for colour, nature and energy. She creates in her Spanish art studio overlooking the sea with a view of Gibraltar Rock, tiny fishing boats and the Morrocan coastline in the distance. Louise also project manages MOYO and writes our colour stories column.

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Words of wisdom Pinterest is always a great source of wordy ideas and worldly inspiration for me but nothing touches my heart more than quotes from films, books and music.

Here are a few that mean something special to me...

and they’ve asked if they can pick my brain for new quotes too so writing everything down has definitely paid off. Words inspire images and images inspire words. They fit together like a jigsaw puzzle. As designers and artists we’re all blessed with a special gift: to communicate visually with the world, and make it a little bit better in our own unique way.

You’re never fully dressed without a smile from that classic film, Annie. This brings back fond memories of me as a little girl, dancing around my living room in my nightie and singing at the top of my voice. I make sure I wear one every day (a smile that is, not a nightie!) Happiness is only real when shared from the brilliant film Into the Wild. I remember encouraging everyone I knew to buy Eddie Vedder’s album that was written for it – a great album for listening to while you work. My favourite book right now, The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern is filled with circus imagery and the words are so magical and powerful that they take me to a completely different place. It’s a constant reminder that there’s no need to be scared of using words in design. Creative writing goes hand-in-hand with being an illustrator so I make up my own quotes a lot but I also love old proverbs. One of my favourites is a Russian proverb: The night hides a world, but reveals a universe – so thought provoking. I always keep a notebook or a quote journal to hand because I never know what I’m going to see or hear next! My friends joke that I have a quote for everything! I’m now licensing my illustrations to a German calendar company,

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Why does harmony matter? ‘Colour Stories’ is Moyo’s regular column to awaken your senses and The dictionary defines harmony as “a pleasing combination or arrangement of different things”. Whether connect you to the energy and ‘story’ we do it consciously or unconsciously, our brains are of colour. Colour stories are also used constantly searching for harmony, and colour is no in the fashion world, in a similar way exception. So when we do see it, we are forced to stop to moodboards, to convey a particular and pay attention. theme or mood. Each issue Louise Using colour tools to create harmony looks at a particular colour, or colour combination, and encourages you to There are a couple of useful techniques you can use to explore all the creative possibilities it ensure that the colours you choose are going to create brings. Louise also features colourful harmony and balance in your home. You can use these when you’re working with colour in any area of designs by students of The Art and your life as they’re a great way to build your colour Business of Surface Pattern Design confidence. e-course and takes inspiration from the beautiful world around us. Did you know that the colours you live with can have a profound effect on your emotions, mood, health and general wellbeing? Colours, and the way they are used throughout your home, really do have the power to make you feel happy and comfortable, or sad and disconnected, so it’s important that we surround ourselves with colours that feel right for us. But it can be tricky to get it right. You may love dark purple and bright pink but there’s no saying they’ll look good splashed all over your living room walls. So how do you know which colours look good with which, and which will work best in which space? Whether you’re looking to make over your home, or give your favourite room a facelift, here’s our guide to choosing the right colour schemes for you…

USEFUL TOOL 1: The colour wheel The colour wheel, first created by Sir Isaac Newton in 1666, is the most basic tool for combining colours. It is designed so that virtually any colours you pick from it will look good together. It’s an easy way to identify colours you like and see how you can combine them to create a harmonious space. So, how does it work?

Cool and warm colours Yellows, oranges, and reds are considered warm colours and opposite them – the greens, blues and purples – are considered cool colours. Interior designers tend to use warm vibrant colours in rooms that encourage energetic activity, play and socialising, such as living rooms, studios, hallways, dining rooms, and playrooms, as they stimulate our emotions. They are also a good choice for any room that sits in a cold or shady part of the house. Cool colours quieten our emotions and create a sense of peace and calm. They also sharpen our thoughts, boost our intellect and allow our minds to focus and do their best work, therefore they work well in private rooms, like bedrooms, offices, and nurseries. If there’s a room in your house that is constantly in the sun, painting it a cool colour will make it feel colder. Every colour has a warm and cool shade so when choosing colours, think about the way the colour makes you feel to ensure you are choosing the one that is right for you. To maintain balance in a room, add warm touches to a cool colour scheme and vice versa.

The colour wheel

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Monochromatic colours

The analogous colour scheme features three or more hues, which are positioned next to each other on the colour wheel. Generally the first colour used is the dominant one, the second is the supporting colour, and the third is the accent colour. Analogous colour schemes work because the colours flow into one another in a way that makes sense to our brains. Use this colour harmony when you want to use more than one colour, but you also want a sense of unity, ie, all the elements of your room to come together with a sense of purpose.

Complementary colours A simple way to create harmony in your home is to take any one of the twelve hues from the wheel and repeat it in various tints, shades and tones going from light to dark – like the four shown in green above. Monochromatic schemes look clean and elegant and they are an effective way to add interest to your room if you are using a lot of one colour. The lighter the shade the more airy, expansive and cheerful the space will feel. Light shades can be used in small, dark areas to open then up and make them feel bigger and brighter. Darker colours can have a real impact, and can create a really warm and cozy feel, especially in larger rooms.

These are colours that sit directly opposite on the colour wheel, for example, purple/yellow, blue/orange, etc. Complementary colours are powerful because they naturally play off each other and as our brains are automatically programmed to see opposites, these harmonies feel natural and they are easy for us to pick out. It’s best to use complementary colours when you want emphasis on an area/s, lots of contrast, or when you want to draw attention to multiple areas at the same time.

Use a monochrome scheme when you want a room to feel cohesive, especially if you have a lot of competing details that you’d like to bring together.

Analogous colours

USEFUL TOOL 2: Draw inspiration from nature

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If using colour feels a little daunting for you, try looking to nature for inspiration. Natural materials, like the ones on the next page, are very neutral and they create a sense of calm. Woodgrains in their lovely warm brown and beige shades will pair up nicely with any of your colour choices. The same goes for tones found on seashells, coral, pearl, stones, leaves and flowers.


Take a look in your local environment outside for inspiration. Natural found objects can offer a beautiful palette of neutrals and shades. The natural world is bursting with beautiful colour inspiration.

It’s also essential to have plenty of natural light, especially if you are unable to get outside everyday. Think about the colour story in your home. Are you living in harmony with your surroundings? Is your home neutral or bursting with colour? How does this make you feel? Why did you choose certain colour palettes? What changes, big or small, can you make to create more harmony and balance in your home? Note: Some images in this article also appear in the book: Create the Style You Crave on a Budget You Can Afford: The Sweet Spot Guide to Home Décor by Desha Peacock.

Top tip! Try to use a variety of colour throughout your home so that you absorb the full spectrum of colour energy that our bodies need to be healthy and balanced. Studies have shown that using too much of one colour can cause imbalance in our lives.

About Louise Louise is a mixed media artist, who is passionate about colour, pattern and energy. She is currently studying Colour Therapy and teaching others about the power of colour. She’s on a mission to help others create their own colour story in life.

‘Organic Retro Leaves’ wallpaper by Rachael Taylor for Milton & King

Learn more about Louise at www.louisegale.com and follow her colour story project at: www.facebook.com/createyourcolorstory

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DO WHAT YOU LOVE B E B R AV E . C O M E A L I V E . JOIN US FOR THE ONLINE EXPERIENCE OF A LIFETIME W I T H T H E D O W H AT YO U L OV E E - C O U R S E . F I N D Y O U R P A S S I O N A N D S T A R T L I V I N G I T T O D AY. W W W. D O W H A T Y O U L O V E F O R L I F E . C O M


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Laura Slater graduated from The Royal College of Art in 2007 and she now runs her own busy studio and print workshop in West Yorkshire. Laura translates her drawings and print textures to textiles to create unique and stylised designs for home interior products. Her work is inspired by drawing and the manipulation of colour, shapes and pattern, and our engagement with its ability to provoke and stimulate different responses from our environment.

This is a week in her life...

md This week I am preparing to exhibit at Hepworth Wakefield Print Fair, which takes place at the weekend. I have lots to do in addition to all my normal weekly tasks like getting orders out, working on commissions, and organising my stock, marketing materials and packaging. So Monday starts with me writing a list to prioritise my tasks and time. First up is packing an order for a new stockist in St Leonards-on-Sea, East Sussex, and chasing delivery times for stock with our seamstresses for the Print Fair. As it’s the beginning of the week, I also need to get a head start on my new commissions, four lampshades, which I start hand printing the fabric for.

tsy Today starts with checking emails and ordering some packaging online that I need for the print fair. Then I hop on to social media. A big chunk of my time each day is dedicated to this, posting on Facebook and Instagram, and writing tweets. Next I take work in progress shots of the prep work I’m doing and of the products I’ll be showcasing at the print fair and update my website to let people know what I’m up to at the moment.

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A POSTCARD FROM...

Big Bear, California

Bridgette Burton, Love Midge, Big Bear, USA Two hours away from bustling Los Angeles, nestled in the San Bernardino Mountains, lies Big Bear: a small resort town perfect for designers. If you love getting your inspiration from nature, this is your place! Grab your sketchbook, your day is about to get exciting... As you drive up the mountain towards Big Bear, you’ll be blown away by the beauty of the forest. You may see squirrels, dear, coyotes, and perhaps a bear or two. Go ahead and pull over to take some pictures for future designs! 87


DRINK Stop by Copper Q, www.copperq.com, for a nice cup of coffee and a piece of freshly made quiche.

Two horses by Ann Smith

DO Ride the sky chair to the top of Snow Summit, www.snowsummit.com/ski, to watch a mountain bike race and gather leaves, pinecones, pine needles, and acorns for mark making. You may even discover an arrowhead left by the Serrano Indians. From here, hike your way up Castle Rock to take in the stunning views of the valley while listening to the rustling trees. You can find great spots for picnics here among the wildlfowers. The great outdoors provides so many wonderful patterns: from the leaves, to the bark of the trees, to the veins in the granite.

Graffiti girl drawn by L.A. street artist Sand One

Hwy 38 photo by Tristan Courtney Photography

VISIT

SHOP

Kayak to China Islands and spark your creativity from all the different architectural homes on your way back. Then head out to Shay Meadows to sketch horses, chicks, pigs, and other barn animals for your next surface pattern design. Lie under a blossoming tree to watch the flocks of birds and the bald eagles.

While you are waiting for your table, head across the street to Craft to Treasure, www.facebook.com/CraftToTreasure, to paint all of the things that you discovered today.

EAT End your day at the Peppercorn Grille, www.peppercorngrille.com, for the best lasagne around.

www.lovemidge.com

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Q

a If you have a burning design question for Rachael Taylor, send it to submissions@makeitindesign.com with ‘Ask Rachael’ in the subject header, and you may get your question answered in a future issue. Alternatively, if you join one of our online classes you can ask Rachael any questions while the course is live. Find out more about our courses at www.makeitindesign.com

I am interested in producing a look book of my designs and wanted to mock several up as concepts to attract licensing. Is this ok to do even if you don't have any products to actually show? Would this annoy some clients or do you always get positive feedback when you offer such ideas? Also from what I have read is it true that when you sell designs outright through your agent, you often don't have an end product in mind? I have personally found that mock ups can really help pitch an idea to buyers, particularly at shows such as Printsource and Surtex. You may have a market area in mind for a specific design and therefore want to produce a single mock up, but what I would suggest is to always show the original digital print as you do not want to pigeon hole yourself and miss out on other opportunities. You could always look to create a couple of mock ups as these can really boost your commercial appeal. Over the years I have found that when I work spontaneously my artwork seems to be of a higher standard, however this isn’t always the case. A lot of designers struggle to work this way and have better success thinking about the end result during their design process. I would always advise playing to your own strengths.

Please note this column reflects Rachael’s personal opinion and other designers may offer different perspectives.

q

A

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When you submit a collection for consideration (to say a fabric company) how many coordinates should you have in that collection? Should you show the design in alternate color ways as well? If I was pitching to a fabric company this is usually between 6 – 12 designs. If my collection was made up of 8 designs, I would tend to have 4 – 5 key, main patterns with 3 – 4 suggestive coordinates. That way there is scope for mix and matching the designs. When pitching a collection buyers like to see a running theme – this may be the colour you use, the overall treatment and style or the subject matter. You could present alternate colourways to give them options but I wouldn’t do more than 2 or 3 different ideas as you don’t want to over complicate your pitch.

'Shape City' collection by Rachael Taylor

In our portfolio (physical and online), how many works/collections should we present? For me I just built up a good body of work that I felt was me and I was really proud of. I then decided to put a sample portfolio on my website (initially around 30 - 40 designs/4 – 5 collections). Then if people got in touch I had other designs to show them. I also built up a pattern archive so I was ready to go with any new design requests. I think the main thing is to be confident with your collections. Quality is more important than quantity.


wedding & party decorations!

.co.uk/shop

www.rachaeltaylordesigns


WANT TO BE A SURFACE PATTERN DESIGNER? WE WILL SHOW YOU THE WAY...

The Art and Business of Surface Pattern Design

If you have ever dreamt of seeing your designs on stationery, fabric, homewares or other products, sharing your art through pattern and monetising your designs, this groundbreaking course is for you!

‘The Art and Business of Surface Pattern Design’ is the definitive guide to becoming a surface pattern designer. Thriving surface pattern designer Rachael Taylor will guide you along this exciting path from developing your signature style to putting a collection together, and from protecting your work to monetising your designs. With a rich combination of design inspiration, practical advice, demonstrations, creative exercises, resources and interviews with leading industry practitioners, this is the go-to guide for anyone wanting to develop their design skills and break into the industry. Our alumni have been signed by leading design brands, won national competitions, been featured in design books and on major design blogs, and launched their own design studios. You could be next! The online course can be accessed from anywhere in the world and it includes valuable insights from experts plus examples of creative work from a host of flourishing designers. The course is split into four modules to turbo charge your design journey:

Module

1

The Art and Busine ss of

Surface Pattern Design

Module 1: Designing your way Module 1 contains everything you need to know to turn basic sketches into elements for pattern design. You’ll learn about colour and pattern, how to create moodboards and work towards developing your signature style. Along the way, there’ll be lots of opportunities to pick up top tips and tricks from industry insiders.

Module

2

The Art and Busine ss of

Surface Pattern Design

Module 2: Creating Your Professional Identity In Module 2 you will discover how to develop your brand image, put a collection together and start your own label. You will also learn how to understand and predict trends, how to get noticed and get press, and how to protect your work.

Classes run throughout the year. The four modules of this course can be taken individually or together to kickstart or boost your surface pattern design career. Each module builds on the previous one and the course is open to everyone.

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Module

3

The Art and Busine ss of

Surface Pattern Design

Module 3: Monestising Your Designs Module 3 guides you through the exciting process of making money from your designs. It includes valuable information on everything from freelancing and getting an agent to licensing, selling outright, manufacturing, and more. This module also includes a wealth of useful trend resources, plus our little black book of industry contacts!

The Art ss and Busine

Surface Pattern Design

in association with

of

The Ultimate Portfolio Builder This is an advanced seven-week online professional surface pattern design course which consists of an intense five-week class followed by two weeks of design reviews. In this powerful course you’ll get all the help, advice and tools you need to grow your body of commercially viable work, refine and strengthen your professional design portfolio and fast-track yourself to trade show success.

“Creative trainers and colleges better watch out some could learn a lot from this course’s customer service, structure and balance between technical and practical exercises.” Module 1 graduate

“It’s a dream come true. I have delayed exploring Photoshop and Illustrator because classes often centred on working with photographs or material that was not of interest to me. Your class holds my hand while offering instruction specific to my interests and goals.” Module 2 graduate

“Wow! UPB is a learning journey that will help you discover yourself and smash creative barriers beyond your imagination. An intense but incredibly well supported and professional course that you will never forget. It has been life-changing.” - UPB graduate

“This is an intense, incredible and inspiring course. It has reignited my love for pattern making and if anyone were to ask me if it were worth the financial investment... it would be a massive YES from me.” - UPB graduate

“LOVED IT! The course has empowered me to start my own business and I’m excited about what the future holds.” Module 3 graduate

Register now!

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We are thrilled to share a small selection of work which is the result of several weeks of fun designing from the Make it in Design Summer School 2014. You can view the whole stunning lookbook here. Our students, who joined us from over 30 countries, designed to a huge variety of trends from tribal patterns to feathers, using inspiration from predictions for Spring/Summer 2015. We were so amazed and blown away by the quality and beauty of the submissions that we just had to share them! You can also view all the work produced in our online galleries: www.makeitindesign.com/summer-school SIGN UP HERE to get on the waiting list for Summer School 2016. WATCH THIS SPACE FOR THE SURFACE PATTERN DESIGN LOOKBOOK VOLUME 2 FEATURING DESIGNS FROM SUMMER SCHOOL 2015!

Happy designing!

Just a little preview of the amazing talent showcased! 94


Want to join in the fun? get on the waiting list for summer school 2016!

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S EPTEMBER 10 0 %Design

September 23 - 26

London, UK

September 06 - 09

Bir mingham, UK

September 20 - 23

London, UK

September 19 - 27

London, UK

September 04 - 08

Par is, FR ANCE

September 01 - 03

Munich, GERMANY

September 15 - 17

Par is, FR ANCE

September 13 - 15

London, UK

T h e Ar t and Business of Sur face Pa t t er n Design - Module 1

September 21 - October 24

Onl ine

T h e Ar t and Business of Sur face Pa t t er n Design - Module 3

September 21 - October 24

Onl ine

T h e Ar t and Business of Sur face Pa t t er n Design - The Ultimate Po r t folio Builder

September 21 - October 24

Onl ine

I n t e riors Au t u mn Fair I n t e riors, Gif ts D e c o rex I n t e riors, Textiles/Sourcing L o n don Design Festival I n t e riors, Desi gn M a i s on & Objet I n t e riors M u n ich Fabric Star t Te x t iles/Sourcing P r e miere Vision Ya r n s/F ibers, Textiles/Sourcing To p Drawer I n t e riors, Gif ts

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O CTOBER Cersaie

September 28 - October 02

Bolo g n a , I TA LY

October 26 - 27

Cer n o b b i o , I TA LY

October 17 - 25

Ein d h o ve n , NET H E R L A N D S

October 14 - 17

Lon d o n , U K

October 15 - October 16

Lon d o n , U K

November 04 - 05

M端n i ch , G E R M A N Y

May 09 - November 22

Ven i c e , I TA LY

Interiors Comocrea P r i n t s , Te x t i l es/Sourcing D u t c h D e s i g n Week I n t e r i o r s , D e s ign F r i e z e A r t Fa ir Fe s t i v a l , A r t s /Culture Te x t i l e Fo r u m Te x t i l e s / S o u r cing

NOVEMBER Pe r fo r m a n c e Days Ac t i ve / St r e e t , Accessories, Ya r n s / F i b e r s , Textiles/Sourcing Ve n i c e A r t B i ennale Arts/Culture

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Showcasing the work of students of the Art and Business of Surface Pattern Design

Some students on the Art and Business of Surface Pattern Design course come to us having never designed a pattern before. Others are professional graphic designers wanting fresh inspiration. Whatever stage our students are at, they always throw themselves into the course and we are so proud of what they achieve. You can see some of their lovely work here.

Stephanie Davies A summary of my style: Very

detailed, feminine and inspired by florals and nature.

A summary of me as a designer: I am very much influenced by historical prints, particularly the Victorian era and 18th century French patterns. The V&A Museum is my ultimate playground! How the course has been valuable to me: The business advice has been so helpful,

especially the guidance for exhibiting at trade shows. Everything is explained so thoroughly, even down to which Pantone book is best for colour matching. I now feel confident to take my designs to the next level.

My design goals: My short-term goal is to get a stand to exhibit my greetings cards at a trade show in the near future, and long-term I’d like to have a pattern collection printed on a homeware range for a major retailer. Quirky information about me: I

sketch most of my drawings on a large surface using cheap biros! I find it gives a really nice consistency between ink pen and pencil and biros are really great for adding the finer details. 99

www.stephaniedavies.co.uk

Round 8 of Module 2 January 2015


Beth SchNeider designs are clean and fresh with a fun, playful twist. I see shapes in all types of everyday objects and love drawing them in my own way, whether it be hand drawn or geometric. I add texture, create repeats and then bring them to life with a modern colour palette.

A summary of me as a designer: With

a background in interior architecture, I drew CAD floor plans for about eight years before I finally decided that it was literally too black and white for me. I went back to school for graphic design and started designing stationery. I wandered over to Surtex one year when I was walking the National Stationery Show and realised that I needed to be on that side! Designing always makes me smile. I put on some loud tunes, open Illustrator, and I’m in my happy place! How the course has been valuable to me: It has forced me out of my comfort zone and

taught me to slow down and critique my own work. Running Elizabeth Victoria Designs with two little kids at home is a challenge and I’ve always felt I’m in a rush to complete projects. Now I realise how valuable it is to get feedback from other designers, as well as take a step back myself and look at my work with a fresh pair of eyes.

www.elizabethvictoria.com

A summary of my style: My

My design goals: I am planning to make my debut at Surtex 2016 and I’d love to license products in the home décor, wallpaper, fabric, and rug/carpet industries. I really want people to recognize my designs and be proud to say: “it’s an Elizabeth Victoria” when friends ask them who designed their beautiful curtain panel! Quirky information about me: I’m a radio not a TV person. I drink Pepsi not Coke. I like sun not snow. I choose flip flops over heels. I prefer nighttime to morning. And my favorite Illustrator shortcut is Cmd + Z!

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Tara Langlois work is a medley of abstract and organic forms, textures, and hand-drawn elements that have a bold, graphic quality to them. I’ve never been good at keeping inside the lines, so when it comes to colouring there is usually a healthy dose of imperfection too.

A summary of me as a designer: I have an undergraduate degree in visual communications, and have been running a successful mid-size design studio for the last 15 years. As a studio owner and art director, I spend my days juggling projects, clients and staff while pursuing illustration work and other creative endeavors. How the course has been valuable to me: It has given me a personal space to play and

experiment with my own art. I’ve reconnected with my muse! It is an amazing resource for industry information, and it has provided me with a positive and supportive community that has kept my motivation and momentum high – that’s so important when striving to achieve personal goals.

My design goals: Long-term my intention is to license my work and keep making art that people enjoy and want to surround themselves with – whether they want to wear it, wrap a gift in it, or hang it on their wall! Short-term the goal is to keep expanding my portfolio, and create a stronger online presence to help get my work out into the world. Quirky information about me: Possibly

the only thing I find more uncomfortable than talking about myself is reading what I’ve said about myself. 101

WWW.taralanglois.com

A summary of my style: My


Jane Kirkpatrick patterns are bold, colourful and abstract and I create them by combining graphic shapes, collage and expressive mark making techniques, including printmaking. This approach forms the basis for everything I design.

A summary of me as a designer: I have a background in fine art printmaking. One day, after printing a sketch onto fabric instead of paper, I became hooked on surface design. I now see endless possibilities for multi-surface designs in the drawings and patterns I make. How the course has been valuable to me: I loved, and made good use of, all aspects of

the course but what I found especially useful were Rachael’s creative drawing exercises. I re-visited these a lot because they helped me to build up a diverse range of marks and shapes for new patterns very quickly. The broad design briefs were challenging too. Designing for products, palettes and themes that I wouldn't necessarily have chosen myself has strengthened my pattern making skill set and boosted my confidence.

www.glasgowpattern.com

A summary of my style: My

My design goals: I am working on expanding my portfolio so that I can pursue a number of different surface pattern avenues. As well as making some products featuring my patterns to sell to small design shops, I’ll be looking to license my designs and get an agent. Then, when I have enough designs, I plan to have a stand at one of the big design shows like Surtex. My ultimate dream is to sell some designs to Marimekko… there’s no harm in thinking big! Quirky information about me: I

pickled vegetables.

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Siobhan Watt A summary of my style: It’s

fun, playful and nostalgic, and usually incorporates lots of hand-drawn elements, textures and techniques. I am inspired by everything from mid-century ceramics to textiles to children's illustration books from the 1960s.

A summary of me as a designer: I’ve

been working in fashion for 14 years where I have enjoyed designing prints and graphics for retailers such as H&M, Debenhams and Monsoon. I decided to start freelancing in 2013 because I wanted to broaden my experience and work across a more diverse range of product areas. How the course has been valuable to me: It has really highlighted the importance of

spending time on my personal development in order to cultivate my design style.

My design goals: My design goals are to license some of my designs and continue working towards launching a range of interior products. In the future I would love to attract international clients and explore exciting new surface pattern and illustration opportunities. Quirky information about me: I am the proud owner of a very mischievous miniature schnauzer called Archie. 103

www.siobhanwatt.com

Round 8 of Module 3 april 2015


Katherine Lenius sophisticated and classic. My designs have a hand drawn feel and I have a modern approach to layout and colour. I like my designs to be fresh but also warm and familiar. They have to make you want to take a second look.

A summary of me as a designer: I came to surface pattern design without prior experience and really found my passion. My hope is that my unique style and love of drawing comes through in all my designs. I love how surface pattern design brings beauty to the everyday. As a designer I’m always looking for new ways to translate the inspiration around me into a beautiful new pattern or design. How the course has been valuable to me: I came to the courses as a scholarship recipi-

ent runner-up and they have definitely put me on the right path to pursuing my career as a surface pattern designer. I went from not really knowing my style, or the industry, to feeling confident in my abilities and ready to take the next steps to launch my career in art and design. I also found a wonderful support network from around the globe.

WWW.katherinelenius.com

A summary of my style: It’s

My design goals: Now

that my portfolio is just about ready to show clients, I would love to break into the world of licensing and see my art appear on products. I’d also love to design a fabric collection because my love of textiles is what brought me to surface pattern design in the first place. In the meantime I hope to expand my own line of products in my Etsy shop, as well as in other local shops. Quirky information about me: I

am also a singer so music is my other great love and I’m constantly humming and singing to myself – half the time I don’t even realise I’m doing it!

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Tanya Paget quirky, contemporary pattern for individuals. I design for people who enjoy pattern and who want something a little different in their lives.

A summary of me as a designer: I travelled an indirect route to where I am now as a surface pattern designer. I trained as a fine artist, worked as a motion graphics designer and then as a graphic designer whilst being involved in the music industry. I’ve also been an art and design teacher for many years. These experiences add complexity and richness to my visual influences. I always begin new collections with pen and paper and some good tunes, and then once the imagery is flowing, I take it into a digital development stage. My designs reflect both sides of my character: the country girl who loves peace, quiet and spending time outdoors in the elements producing subtle marks, blurring imagery and being sensitive to the use of colour, and the more energetic, bold, playful me who is quite urban in style. How the course has been valuable to me: I took a financial leap of faith with Module 3

reducing the hours I spent doing my day job to give myself further studio time and develop my work through the course. I haven’t regretted it! The course has given me a great balance of structured creative briefs to spark off and invaluable industry insight. The online community has been inspiring and supportive. They’ve encouraged me to keep going - to keep working, reviewing and refining.

My design goals: By

the end of this year I hope to have secured further licensing agreements. My main areas of interest are wallpaper, homewares and textiles and it excites me to have my work out there in the world on products. By the end of next year I aim to have taken my designs into my own product lines, with wallpaper as an initial direction, and to have attended a trade show or two to promote the products. Eek - even writing that goal down is pretty scary! Quirky information about me: I

imperfection! 105

love

www.albaquirky.com

A summary of my style: It’s


A summary of my style: I

like a graphic, simple and Scandinavian style. At the moment, I mostly work with florals and geometric shapes. I usually start by sketching on paper before scanning in the drawings and adding colour in Illustrator.

A summary of me as a designer: I

am a French designer with Danish origins living in the Italian part of Switzerland. I studied graphic design in Paris, but what I really love is surface pattern design. During the time I lived in Boston, Massachusetts, I built my portfolio and started working as a freelance textile designer. How the course has been valuable to me: The course has given me knowledge and

www.annebomio.com

Anne Bomio

confidence. It is well structured and offers many practical tools to develop your style and get to know the surface pattern design world. It also allows you to connect with a large community of designers, which in invaluable.

My design goals: In

2015, I wish to create a website and build an online presence of my work. Quirky information about me: Until

August 2013, I used to hand paint all my designs using gouache or watercolour, spending hours on a single design! I then discovered Illustrator and, with the help of many tutorials and the ABSPD course, I learnt how to use it. I am fascinated by the way it allows you to play around with colour.

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MEET THE MOYO TEAM Beth Kempton – Editor and Founder Beth Nicholls is an award-winning entrepreneur, chosen as one of the UK’s 16 most exciting young female entrepreneurs. As founder of ‘Do What You Love’, she gives creative women tools and inspiration to do what they love, for life. This includes lifeenhancing retreats and e-courses which combine creativity, enterprise and community to help women develop and monetise their passion. Beth’s pioneering Do What You Love e-course, has been described as ‘life-changing’, ‘awe-inspiring’ and ‘transformational’. Beth has lived, worked and travelled in over 50 countries on every continent.

Rachael Taylor – Art Director and Co-Founder Rachael Taylor is a fun and energetic British surface pattern designer and illustrator who creates ‘patterns to make you happy’! Since graduating from university in 2005, Rachael has been lucky enough to work for a number of prestigious clients worldwide. Rachael also runs her own design label along with successfully licensing a number of global branded collections. Her designs feature on fashion, home decor, greetings, gadgets and ceramics. In addition Rachael is the sole author and designer for '20 Ways to Draw a Doodle' with Quarry Books! It is the perfect creative book and resource for illustrators, cartoonists, doodlers and anyone who loves to sketch. She is also co-founder of the groundbreaking e-course called 'The Art and Business of Surface Pattern Design' in which the esteemed designer teaches and shares her expertise and knowledge in surface pattern design. The success of the e-course lead the ventures 'Make it in Design' and ‘MOYO Magazine’. Rachael is also regularly hired to deliver seminars around the UK and USA.

Kelly Crossley – Creative Assistant and Layout Designer An eternal optimist and all round positive person, Kelly is constantly curious about the world around her. She gets to work daily in an industry that she loves as a designer for ‘Make it in Design’ and ‘The Art and Business of Surface Pattern Design’, as well as being the Studio Manager at ‘Rachael Taylor’ studio. Kelly also works as a designer for ‘Do What You Love’. Kelly is excited to be part of a thrilling, inspiring and growing industry that has such an amazing, encouraging commumnity of creative talent. She is looking forward to being part of even more wonderful developments with the companies she works for and watching them become the places to go to as hubs for creative individuals across the globe.

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Louise Gale – Project Manager and Colour Advisor Louise is the creator of the "Flower of Life Studio" which helps you connect to your true self through creativity, meditation and coaching tools. She also loves to get her hands dirty exploring mixed media techniques and has exhibited her work in New York City with a permanent art collection at the "Hoboken Historical Museum". Louise is currently following her passion to learn all about surface pattern design and exploring the natural patterns we find in our universe. Louise's meditations, kits and e-courses empower others to combine right brain creativity with left brain practical tools, helping to raise the positive energy of individuals and the world around us.

Robyn Taylor – Illustrator and Designer

Robyn is a freelance illustrator living and working in the UK, she recently graduated from Cleveland College of Art and Design with a BA (Hons) in Textiles and Surface design. She is currently working on her own clothing range, incorporating her unique illustrations with her quirky style. Robyn has been commissioned by several clients for her gorgeous portraits and currently has an online shop from which she is selling prints and greetings cards.

Patricia van den Akker - Director, The Design Trust & MOYO Business Advisor

Patricia has got design and entrepreneurship in her DNA. She grew up in the Netherlands where her mother ran an indie retail gift shop. She has worked for a variety of organisations, including the Crafts Council, Design Nation and CIDA. She has advised and trained hundreds of creative sole traders and freelancers. She finally took the plunge to start her own business by taking over The Design Trust. She writes regularly as The Design Doctor for the Crafts Council's Crafts Magazine, and design blog Confessions of a Design Geek. She lives with her family in North London.

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Libby McMullin – Typographic Artist and Illustrator Born in the sunshine of South Africa and educated in Devon, Libby McMullin is a designer, wordsmith and the founder of ‘Libby McMullin’ based in London. Her passion for design and seven years of experience within the greeting card and giftware industry has led her to recently launch her own publishing company. She is inspired by all things beautiful and thoughtful; with her personal credo being ‘without hard work, talent is not enough.’ She was a finalist in the ‘Most Promising Young Designer or Artist 2012’ (Henries Award) and can be found most weekends in Camden Lock selling her creations, laughing a lot and eating cake. ‘She believed she could, and so she did!’ Libby has embarked on the adventure of a lifetime and brings something a little unique to the design industry.

Sam Ford - Graphic Designer and Technical Geek Samantha is a Graphic Designer and Digital Artist specialising in contemporary typography and graphic illustration. She currently designs for one of the world’s leading greeting card publishers and has created numerous top-selling ranges for many of the UK’s major retailers. Trend spotter Marie Perkins has featured her work on the Print and Pattern blog on several occasions. Samantha also has a geeky side and loves nothing better than to discover new and innovative ways of working. She loves to get together with fellow geeks where she can share her ideas in training sessions. Her other passions include ‘The Smiths’, serious swimming, cats (of which she has three - Lennon, Lola and Louie), and hiking in the Yorkshire Dales.

Dids Macdonald - CEO and Co-Founder, ACID & MOYO IP Advisor

Originally a partner in a Chelsea interior design company and then a designer maker, Dids Macdonald started Anti-Copying in Design (ACID) because her work was copied so much. ACID aims are to create a safe trading environment where original design can be protected, valued and respected. 2013 will see the organisation’s focus turning to the creation of a safe trading portal to be a conduit for original design to attract design buyers. The UK has 350,000 designers producing £35 billion of products and services. ACID champions independent design, and campaigns for respect for IP and opportunities for growth and job security.

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Rachel Kempton - Assistant Editor Rachel Kempton is a loving wife and mum, creative writer and hippie at heart. She is motivated by peace, happiness, creativity and freedom and believes that true joy comes when we listen to ourselves, live in the moment and do what feels right. Rachel has been a journalist for over 10 years. She’s worked on numerous newspapers and magazines and edited her own glossy lifestyle magazine. She now writes for Do What You Love, which inspires and empowers people to do what they love for life. Rachel is passionate about beautiful things, from breathtaking views, inspirational art and soul touching quotes to flowers, fabrics and furniture. She can lose hours shopping for cool antiques, making vintage-inspired accessories and putting her own shabby chic style stamp on her home. When she’s not creating, scrapbooking or baking (and eating!) cakes, she can be found in her studio writing, editing, practising yoga or planning her next adventure abroad.

Bonnie Forkner - DIY Expert Born and raised in the beautiful mountains of North Carolina, Bonnie gathers endless amounts of inspiration from the natural world around her. Bonnie is a fabric and surface pattern designer with sunshine-y patterns making their way onto fabric, wallpaper, ribbon and more! She is the creator of the ‘Roost Tribe’, a premium creative membership to her blog, where members receive weekly materials to inspire their work and fuel their creative careers. Bonnie’s digital work, adobe illustrator tutorials and printables are available in her Etsy shop, Sweet Bonnie Christine. Join her on Going Home to Roost as she blogs to inspire the creative’s soul, and share all that she’s learned through being a surface pattern designer.

A BIG THANK YOU TO OUR ENTIRE TEAM FOR ANOTHER AMAZING ISSUE! ALSO THANK YOU TO ALL OF OUR READERS FOR YOUR WONDERFUL SUPPORT! 110


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The Art and Business of Surface Pattern Design

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the PRINTING BY HAND edition

Celebrating 4 years of The Art & Business of Surface Pattern Design

di s cover the wonderful world of #patternbombi n g An interview with Lotta Jansdotter Design inspiration, reviews & more pattern love!


Moyo Magazine Issue 8