__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

THE

WINTER ISSUE

GIVE GENEROUSLY Our annual holiday gift guide

UNDER COVERS

SOCIAL COMMENTARY

Beds, linens and bedroom design

Lesley Hampton uses her fashion designs to make strong statements

HOLIDAY IN HAVANA Beyond Cuba’s all-inclusive resorts

LIGHTING GUIDE

From pendants to chandeliers and more $5.95

WINDOW TRENDS

POWDER ROOM BEFORE AND AFTER

www.movatohome.com

YIN ASTROLOGY


“Great design will forever change your perspective...” – Michael Pourvakil, President

Weavers Art has curated a collection of ten artistic designs with a twist! The movement, patterns and versatile colour palette, offers a new perspective of sophisticated rugs suitable for transitional and contemporary living spaces. These designs are hand-knotted in the finest silk & wool fibers by our expert team of weavers. I would like to personally invite you to our showroom to view this collection and many other designer rugs that have been artistically envisioned.


Top left to bottom right Amalfi 3 Northern Glacier Zenith Glacier II Sicily Canali Highstreet Crossroads Upper Manhattan Granite 25 Bachtiari 03

Special Offer for Toronto Home Subscribers! Mention this ad and pay no taxes on your purchase.

1400 Castlefield Avenue

Toronto, ON

416.929.7929

www.weaversart.com


movatohome.com

PUBLISHER’S LETTER

Gentle Readers, I am happy and proud to introduce myself as the new publisher of Toronto Home. We have inspiring news! Early in 2019, this magazine will become part of an exciting new national publication. We will reach a much wider audience. Rest assured; we will continue our traditional distribution to Toronto and Montreal. We will also embrace the Maritimes, the Prairies and all of the wonderful “Wild West.” We will cover the whole of this glorious land and will reach as many of our wonderful citizens as possible. Each issue will feature the stories about interior design, gardening, art and lifestyle that you have grown to love, in addition to plenty of new content! We will cover such diverse subjects as commercial design, up-and-coming designers and indigenous culture and its particular design aesthetic. I have enjoyed my trips to Europe to discover new trends in design, and will venture far afield to find many other topics in design and architecture heretofore unexplored. Our web platform will also be much larger and more interactive as we expand across the country. Dear readers, please be assured that I am open to your comments and ideas. Do write to me if you would like to see a story about a particular subject that is relevant to Canadian design. I cannot promise to publish, but I will consider it.  I also promise that you will continue to receive the high quality of journalism and photography you have enjoyed on these pages. Our team will stay in place; Stephanie Whittaker, our brilliant editor-in-chief, will continue to be at the helm. Please write to us both with your comments and ideas. I am confident and happy to begin this journey with you to a bright and forward-looking future for this beautiful magazine. SHARON AZRIELI Publisher

8

THE WINTER ISSUE


Z6

A world first: P.E.P.® from JURA Pulse Extraction Process produces the perfect espresso For the Pulse Extraction Process (P.E.P.®), innovation leader JURA took its inspiration from the world’s best baristas. The result is a revolutionary technology that optimizes the extraction time, allowing even short specialty coffees like ristretto and espresso to be prepared with an intensity and breadth of aromas like never before.

672 Dupont Street Toronto, ON M6G 1Z6 - Toll Free 877.323.6226 TORONTO -SHERWAY GARDENS - VAUGHAN - MISSISSAUGA - HAMILTON

faema.ca


movatohome.com

EDITOR’S LETTER

EVERYTHING THAT IS DESIGNED – from furniture and footwear to clothing and cars – morphs and evolves according to our tastes and technological advancements. Even the food we eat changes and is subject to the whim of our evolving palates. Consider some of the mainstream food trends we’ve witnessed in the past few decades: veganism, raw food, raw fish, blackened fish, gluten-free, fat-free, sugar-free, salt-free, dairy-free, free-range, sushi, sliders, smoothies, paleo, ovo-lacto vegetarianism, pescetarianism, avocado toast, bone broth, cupcakes, quinoa and kale chips. I could go on, but you get the idea. Food trends come and go. Yesterday’s Spam quiche is – shudder! – today’s bacon maple ice cream. Isn’t it wonderful that soup, one of the oldest foods in the human diet, is always … well, soup? Of course, this beloved food changes over time as savvy cooks experiment with recipes. But soup is one of the staples that we associate with stability, warmth, comfort and care. What’s the first thing we crave when we’re fighting a cold? Soup. What’s the best accompaniment to a grilled cheese sandwich? Soup. It’s also one of the best foods we can eat during the winter in Canada where it’s just too darn cold for a raw-food diet. Our bodies need warmth and soup does the job so well.

In this issue, writer Julie Gedeon tells us all about soup and the role it plays as our perfect winter panacea. She spoke with soup chefs across the country for their take on how we can cook and eat soup that not only nourishes, but heals, too. And because this is the Winter issue, we show you how to create the kind of bedroom that nourishes the soul. As the light levels decrease in the winter and our bodies crave more sleep, we have a strong desire to rest in a well-appointed bedroom with beautiful bed linens to warm us. Writers Susan Kelly and Cheryl Cornacchia show us how to create a welcoming space for sweet repose. If warmer climates beckon to you, do read La Carmina’s feature about Cuba. Forget the all-inclusive resorts, she advises, and head to Havana for the culture, music, history, architecture, and food. Yes, the food. “People often complain about bland food in Cuba,” this globe-trotting writer told me, “but I ate really great food in Havana.” Her story is on page 80. The holidays are almost here so we give you our annual holiday gift guide. And, as always, we profile many spectacular homes to inspire you as you cocoon this winter. Hey, it’s cold out there. Hunker down, cook a pot of soup and enjoy this issue of Toronto Home.

STEPHANIE WHITTAKER Editor-in-Chief stephanie@movatohome.com There are several ways you can stay in touch with us: @movatohome @movatohome @movatohome

10

THE WINTER ISSUE


Expression of excellence

WHEN INTRODUCING THE "X" FACTOR INTO A PREDOMINANT "Y" BUSINESS WORLD, THE RESULTS ARE BOUNDLESS. The build is no longer just a build. It is a creation that is born with endless possibilities. All senses are considered. All possibilities are taken and the true essence of your vision is born.

"I take pride in being a strong woman in a traditionally male dominated industry." C: (416) 723.9984 | barroso@bell.net

barrosohomes.com


CONTRIBUTORS

JULIE GEDEON Seasoned writer Julie Gedeon lives in a household where soup makes everyone cheerier. She’s glad to see that many notable eateries across Canada are offering innovative soups as a nutritious, affordable choice for meals, and she appreciated having the opportunity to speak with leading nutritionist Julie Daniluk whose books occupy a convenient shelf in her home. ELISABETH KALBFUSS Toronto: The city’s frenetic housing market has sent many would-be buyers retreating back to the home they already have. Veteran news reporter and editor Elisabeth Kalbfuss profiles how designer Michelle Berwick reimagined a North York townhouse for her clients, the Tsen family, when they gave up on finding a new, bigger home. From the black and yellow drama of the master bedroom to the minty kitchen cabinets, the designer’s bold colour palettes were exactly what they owners wanted, Elisabeth says. As Cindy Tsen says, “I was not afraid of using colour.”

PHILLIPA RISPIN Writer-editor Phillipa Rispin got a good look at the several varieties of home while working on this issue. There’s a modest home in Calgary in the owners’ favourite neighbourhood, which they were loath to leave when they needed more space. There’s a larger home in Oakville whose owners were not quite sure what to do with when they moved in, finding it large and impersonal. And there’s a huge double apartment in Thane, not far from Mumbai in India, that is shared by three generations of a family and works as home, office, and local gathering place. “It might be clichéd to say this, but home truly is where the heart is,” Phillipa says. SUSAN KELLY As days grow cooler, thoughts turn inward and to a warm duvet. What lies beneath (and overtop): a lot of style, as writer Susan Kelly discovered. It’s all about artful expression, she learned in talking to experts across Canada about the latest trends in bedroom design. Gazing upwards, in her regular astrology column Susan examines the astral influences that make winter 2018-2019 an especially yin season and drive our decor choices. She also profiles Lesley Hampton, a Toronto fashion designer whose work is heating up the runways. “Lesley combines social awareness with couture in a way that is truly inspired and inspiring,” she says. “And her latest collection is breathtaking.” Susan is a frequent contributor who specializes in writing about style and decor.

Volume 8, Number 6, Winter Issue 2018-2019 Date of Issue: November, 2018

6100 TransCanada Highway Suite 100, Pointe-Claire Quebec H9R 1B9

PUBLISHER Dr. Sharon Azrieli CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Stanley Kirsh

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Stephanie Whittaker ART DIRECTOR Randy Laybourne EDITORIAL COORDINATOR Carmen Lefebvre ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Neve Foltz CONTRIBUTORS Cheryl Cornacchia Julie Gedeon Wendy Helfenbaum Sarah B. Hood Elisabeth Kalbfuss Tracey MacKenzie Susan Kelly La Carmina Phillipa Rispin Nadine Thomson PHOTOGRAPHY Larry Arnal Prashant Bhat Stephani Buchman Jason Hartog Kim Jeffery Adrien Ozimek Ema Peter Martin Tessler Laura Tonopa STYLING Michelle Berwick Carly Nemtean Dvira Ovadia Sylvia Porter Nicole Sjostedt Sarah Townson

12

THE WINTER ISSUE

Call 1-866-846-1640 movatohome.com sales@movatohome.com

CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Matthew Azrieli PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Wendy Loper CONTROLLER Jenny Marques DIRECTOR OF SALES - NATIONAL Kelly Chicoine DIRECTOR OF REGIONAL SALES - ONTARIO Grant Wells For sales inquiries, please email Grant Wells: gwells@movatohome.com

LEGAL DEPOSIT 1927-324x Toronto Home Magazine Inc. 2018. All rights reserved. Any copying or reproduction of content without the written permission of Toronto Home Magazine is strictly prohibited. issn


movatohome.com

CONTENTS

32 ON THE COVER A MEETING OF MINDS By conferring with their architect and designer, a couple create the home of their dreams

NEW COUNTRY, NEW HOME

After immigrating from Britain, an Oakville family gets the interior design they’ve always wanted

44

HELLO, HAVANA!

Skip the all-inclusive vacation this winter and check out Cuba’s capital city for its culture and cool cars

80

114 INTO THE PRESENT

A 1942 Kingsway Village home is updated for today’s lifestyle

14

THE WINTER ISSUE


movatohome.com

CONTENTS

DOWNSIZING FOR AN UPSCALE LIFE

Designer Juli Hodgson creates an elegant beach house for her family

68 8

PUBLISHER’S LETTER

10

EDITOR’S LETTER

18

THIS JUST IN A selection of new items for your home

56

GO FOR THE GIFTS Our annual gift guide helps you spoil those you love

64

YIN-STYLE COMFORT The astrological outlook for the season of cocooning

92

SIMPLE PLAN A modest intention to repair some tile grout evolves into a whole-home renovation

104

CLOTHED IN COMMENTARY Fashion designer Lesley Hampton uses her work to make social and cultural statements

126

PITCHING IN TO HELP Friends and family work toward maximizing a Calgary bungalow’s liveability

152

UPDATE AND UPGRADE Changing the decor of a home needn’t be expensive or intensive

156

COMFY, COZY AND ECLECTIC A new trend in bedroom design embraces a non-matching approach to linens and furnishings

164

FUNKY REPOSE A Toronto couple create a bedroom sanctuary for themselves and a cool space for their son

168

WINDOW TRENDS Residential windows have evolved in design, shape, colour and security

170

SOUP’S ON Winter is blissful when it’s warmed by a bowl of delicious soup

178

POWDER ROOM BEFORE AND AFTER Interior designer Nadine Thomson uses dramatic design on this makeover

180

HAPPY COLOURS A Mumbai apartment is designed in strong hues and a mix of traditional and contemporary furnishings

190

WORTH THE DRIVE An Acton store that specializes in leather is an attraction for shoppers throughout the GTA

16

THE WINTER ISSUE

136 ALL LIT UP

A guide to the best lighting fixtures on the market now

FAREWELL TO THE SIXTIES

Homeowners breathe new life into a 1964 bungalow that hasn’t been changed in decades

146


Designer Screen Shades with Powerview ® Motorization

drapery, blinds, carpet, upholstery, bedding, wallpaper

Nantucket ™ with LiteRise ®

Silhouette ® Bon Soir ™

Designer Banded Shades with Powerview ® Motorization

8481 Keele St. Concord 905.660.7290 & 12967 Keele St. King City 905.833.5464 mapledrapery.com


movatohome.com

DESIGN

1. COCONUT CREATIVITY Drawing inspiration from the beauty in natural materials, this pendant light is all about organic design. Blending the rich textures of strung coconut shells with a modern silhouette, it exudes an exotic and botanical look. Each shell is dyed a rich black, individually cut, and hand-strung onto a wire frame. It’s finished with wide hoop links that are wrapped in smaller coconut beads, dyed to complement the shade. 40 inches high and 30 inches in diameter. $4,899. Accents for Living 8 Brock Rd. N., Guelph ~ 519-822-2929 85 Navy St., Oakville ~ 905-849-8537 www.accentsforliving.ca 1 2

3

3. MARBLED MARVEL The design of this rug, called Marble by Rachel is part of a collaboration between Weavers Art and the OCAD University’s talented alumna, Rachel Babineau. The allure of this rug is its subtle yet dynamic fluidity of design, inspired by Earth’s natural stones. Weavers Art 1400 Castlefield Ave., Toronto ~ 416-929-7929 255 Bass Pro Mills Dr., Vaughan ~ 905-660-7929 www.weaversart.com

2. FUN UNDER THE SUN This cantilevered umbrella boasts a powder-coated aluminum frame and a canopy in Sunbrella material. Available in black, driftwood and bronze-coloured frame finishes, it also comes in 10 canopy colours, rotates 360 degrees, and tilts left, right and back to 54 degrees. General Products 160 East Beaver Creek Rd., Richmond Hill 905-709-1162 www.gppatio.com

18

THE WINTER ISSUE


movatohome.com

DESIGN

1. FUN WITH FONDUE This digital three-in-one fondue set by Ricardo features exclusive new technology for precise temperature control. Each function is programmed to maintain the ideal temperature for all fondue selections. Impress your dinner guests with this ingenious fondue pot with automatic functions for broth, cheese and chocolate. Available at Linen Chest. Linen Chest www.linenchest.com

1 2

3

3. TRUE BLUE This wool and silk rug from Pakistan is hand-knotted and measures 10´3˝ by 8´1˝. A part of Imperial Rug’s Mamlouk collection, it recently won the award for Best Transitional Design at the Domotex international rug show in Hannover, Germany. Imperial Rug Galleries 232 King St. E., Toronto ~ 416-777-0304 346 Lakeshore Rd. E., Oakville ~ 905-845-1305 www.imperialrug.ca

2. CLEAN AND CONVENIENT Accessorize your living space with this stylish and practical accent table that has a lift-off tray for easy serving and a smooth surface for easy cleaning. Its curved edge keeps objects from falling off. Place a few around the room to create a contemporary look. Features include chrome-finished hardware and a sturdy X base. Available in black and white. 17.75˝D X 20˝H. Linen Chest www.linenchest.com

20

THE WINTER ISSUE


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/19

movatohome.com

5. ROYAL PURPLE Imperial Rug’s Modern Art collection features this handknotted rug from Pakistan that is woven of fine wool and silk. It measures 10´ by 6´5˝. Imperial Rug Galleries 232 King St. E., Toronto ~ 416-777-0304 346 Lakeshore Rd. E., Oakville ~ 905-845-1305 www.imperialrug.ca

4. A NIGHT AT THE OPERA You’ll want to sing the praises of the Opera chandelier, which is crafted of brass and glass and has a diameter of 28.35 inches and a height of 15.75 inches. Available at Import Temptations. Import Temptations 188 Bentworth Ave., Toronto 416-256-3150 www.import-temptations.com 4

5

6

7

6. CURL UP AND RELAX This generously scaled poof is perfect for curling up or lounging with a friend. The snow-coloured basket-weave linen and cognac-coloured leather buckles create easy versatility. 17˝H X 60˝D. $4,699. Accents for Living 8 Brock Rd. N., Guelph ~ 519-822-2929 85 Navy St., Oakville ~ 905-849-8537 www.accentsforliving.ca

7. SLENDER SPLENDOUR These spike-shaped earrings from Mark Lash bestow an air of willowy beauty. They’re made of 18kt rose gold and 1.49ct of diamonds. Perfect for an evening out or any occasion. Mark Lash 480 Eglinton Ave. W., Toronto ~ 416-256-5229 9033 Leslie St., Richmond Hill ~ 905-881-5229 www.marklash.com

THE WINTER ISSUE

21


movatohome.com

DESIGN

1. DANGLE A BEAUTIFUL BANGLE The wrist that wears this elegant bracelet, made of 14kt yellow gold and 0.62ct of round diamonds, will be instantly beautified. Available at Mark Lash. Mark Lash 480 Eglinton Ave. W., Toronto ~ 416-256-5229 9033 Leslie St., Richmond Hill ~ 905-881-5229 www.marklash.com

2. HEAVEN ON EARTH The Cloud swing daybed has a powder-coated aluminum frame with a Textilene roof and is upholstered in Sunbrella material. Available in brushed slate and brushed mahogany finishes, and 300 Sunbrella upholstery choices. The roof is capable of opening and closing. General Products 160 East Beaver Creek Rd., Richmond Hill 905-709-1162 www.gppatio.com 1

2 3

3. TRADITIONAL STYLE, CONTEMPORARY FUNCTIONALITY Nothing complements classic architectural styles better than inswing French casement windows with traditional-style hardware to add a flash of historical flair. Opening inward to a full 180 degrees, and with aluminumclad exteriors, these windows transform a space into a modern masterpiece. Chateau Window & Door Systems 90 Tycos Dr., Suite 1, Toronto 416-783-3916 www.chateauwindows.com

22

THE WINTER ISSUE


Modern + Handcrafted + Tradition

New Vintage Reserve Collection – Wool & Silk King East Design District

Downtown Oakville

232 King Street East Toronto, ON, M5A 1K1 (416) 777-0304

346 Lakeshore Road East Oakville, ON, L6J 1J6 (905) 845-1305

imperialrug.ca


movatohome.com

DESIGN

2. EASY TO BE GREEN From the Verde Collection, Doves by Doron Paloma is an 18kt yellow-gold pendant paired with an 18kt yellow-gold chain. The pendant contains 0.36ct of diamonds, 2.41ct of black onyx, and 10.68ct of green malachite. Doves by Doron Paloma and other pieces from the Verde Collection and are available at Damiani Jewellers. Damiani Jewellers 15 Jevlan Dr., Unit B, Woodbridge 905-850-4653 www.damianijewellers.com

1. SIT BACK AND RELAX The Speakeasy is a comfortable swivel chair that boasts updated frame style and is upholstered to the floor. Available in a range of fabrics. Cocoon Furnishings 2695 Bristol Cir., Unit 2, Oakville 905-829-2780 www.cocoonfurnishings.ca 1

2

3

4

3. SAFELY AND NEATLY STOWED Jewelry drawers allow you to store earrings, rings, necklaces, bracelets and other accessories conveniently. They also ensure that everything is easy to find. Available from Simply Closets. Simply Closets 71 Marycroft Ave., Unit 27, Woodbridge 416-385-8855 www.simplyclosets.ca

4. CANYON COMFORT Step outside of your comfort zone

Allan Rug Co.

and go beyond neutral. Create a

103 Miranda Ave., Toronto

lively yet casual ambience in your

416-639-2545

home with the Canyon Ridge rug.

www.allanrug.com

It’s a hand-tufted, loop-pile carpet that is constructed of 100-per-cent pure wool, making it durable, resilient, naturally stain-resistant and easy to care for. Canyon Ridge is available as wall-to-wall or area rugs.

24

THE WINTER ISSUE


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/19

movatohome.com

5. GO FOR THE GLAM Add some glamour to your home with the fashion-forward Estate sofa. Featuring a slender frame, comfortable seating, and an on-trend channeltufted back, this sofa is a head-turner that will take your decor to the next level. Multiple fabric options available. Decorium

6. OFF THE WALL

363 Supertest Rd., North York

This free-standing etagere has

416-736-6120

cantilevered shelves that allow

www.decorium.com

you to create beautiful displays. Available in more than 80 finishes. Cocoon Furnishings 2695 Bristol Cir., Unit 2, Oakville 905-829-2780 www.cocoonfurnishings.ca

5

6

7

8

7. MAKE A STATEMENT

8. WARM AND WELCOMING

Reminiscent of gleaming

Finer than cashmere and warmer than wool, these beautiful alpaca

water, Liquid Chrome is

throws from Pokoloko are available in an array of beautiful colours

the name of this silver-leaf

to suit any home decor. Perfect to curl up with on a cold day, they’re

artwork, which is printed

available at The Hide House.

on hardboard. Measuring 48.25 inches wide and 80.25

Hide House

inches high, it makes a strong

49 Eastern Ave., Acton

contemporary statement in

519-853-1031 ~ 877-453-2843

any decor.

www.hidehouse.ca

Import Temptations 188 Bentworth Ave., Toronto 416-256-3150 www.import-temptations.com

THE WINTER ISSUE

25


movatohome.com

DESIGN

1. WALL FEATURE The Luna medicine cabinet by Fleurco is available in various sizes and configurations, including single view, bi-view and tri-view. It features a copper-free mirror on the inside and outside, Blum hinges, eight-millimetre tempered-glass shelves, and softclose doors. Edges are available as flat or bevelled, and the unit can be wall-mounted or recessed. Fleurco Products Inc. 4574 Poirier Blvd., Montreal 514-326-2222 ~ 1-800-993-0033 www.fleurco.com

1 2

3

3. CLEAR AS GLASS The Industria LT series of custom glass showers includes a matte-black three-quarter-inch polymer plastic. This plastic is affixed around the border of the shower panels, giving the impression of a hard-framed black industrial window.  Doors and More 225 Bradwick Dr., Unit 6-7, Concord 416-820-0210

2. BEAUTIFUL SLUMBER The Dylan duvet cover bedding collection will complement your decor with its warm and chic design accented with faux-leather details. This set includes one duvet cover and two pillow shams (one sham with the twin set). Also available: sham, euro sham, breakfast and square cushions. Available at Linen Chest. Linen Chest www.linenchest.com

26

THE WINTER ISSUE

www.doorsandmore.ca


movatohome.com

DESIGN

1. SLEEP WELL The Joanna bed in king and queen

Decorium

sizes features a dynamic geometric

363 Supertest Rd., North York

pattern that adds contemporary

416-736-6120

flair to a bedroom. The headboard,

www.decorium.com

framed with stainless steel, completes the look.

2. COASTAL CRUISE Inspired by the mesmerizing view of Italy’s Amalfi coastline, this rug, called Amalfi, bears a serene colour palette chosen to convey a light-hearted feel. Its high-low texture is also delightful to touch. Weavers Art 1400 Castlefield Ave., Toronto ~ 416–929-7929 255 Bass Pro Mills Dr., Vaughan ~ 905-660-7929 www.weaversart.com 1

2

3

4

3. STONE-SOFT “Granite by Rachel” is the name of

Weavers Art

this rug, which has a sophisticated

1400 Castlefield Ave.,

palette chosen to interpret the

Toronto ~ 416–929-7929

look of stone. It’s hand-knotted

255 Bass Pro Mills Dr.,

with finest-quality silk and

Vaughan ~ 905-660-7929

Tibetan highland wool by Weavers

www.weaversart.com

Art’s expert team of weavers.

4. RING AROUND THE DIAMONDS Feel stylish and chic in these diamond stacking bands. They’re made of 14kt yellow gold, and each band has .89ct baguette and round diamonds.  Mark Lash 480 Eglinton Ave. W., Toronto ~ 416-256-5229 9033 Leslie St., Richmond Hill ~ 905-881-5229 www.marklash.com

28

THE WINTER ISSUE


Closets • Doors • Cabinets Glass Partition Walls

Call or visit our website for information on our new European Acoustic Wall System.

FACTORY SHOWROOM 863 Rangeview Rd., Mississauga 905-766-0880 | 1-877-541-3667 IMPROVE CANADA SHOWROOM 7250 Keele Street #87, Vaughan 905-636-1968 www.komandor.ca


www.komandor.ca


movatohome.com

DESIGN

A ME TING OF MINDS A couple work with their architect and designer to create the home of their dreams BY SUSAN KELLY • PHOTOGRAPHY: EMA PETER

32

THE WINTER ISSUE


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

THE WINTER ISSUE

33


movatohome.com

DESIGN

THE “TWO HEADS ARE BETTER THAN ONE” effect doubled when it came to the design of this striking newly built home in the coveted Deep Cove area of North Vancouver, B.C. The owners – David Evans, a retired real estate developer, and Susan Kagan, a legal assistant and part-time artist – played a big role in designing their 4,100-square-foot home. And they worked closely with another couple who are partners in life and work: Lynda and Curtis Krahn, co-principals of Synthesis Design. They headed up the design of the house both inside and out.

34

THE WINTER ISSUE

“David was a long-time client we designed 10 model homes in Russia for and who later became a friend,” says Lynda Krahn. “He and Susan like our aesthetic and felt we could help them create a home that would express them as a couple.” David and Susan each have two adult children from previous relationships, and were ready to create a space just for themselves. And both possess keen eyes for design, says Lynda, along with a sense of fun. They also wanted to showcase the metal sculptures made by Susan and pieces from her art collection.


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

“As well, David and Susan are unassuming people who wanted the house to blend in with the environment,” says Curtis Krahn. The effortless grace of the finished project’s architecture belies what was to prove a very difficult birth. David had fallen in love with a waterfront site with an exceptionally steep slope. It would take more than twice as long as usual — well over two years — to devise a plan that would be approved by city council. That meant calling in structural and environmental engineers, as well as wildfire experts and slope hazard specialists.

movatohome.com

The Synthesis Design team included Kevin Li, director of design, and Slavica Paulic, senior interior designer. The project contractor was Naikoon Construction Ltd. With a 108-foot drop from the road above to the water below, there was the issue of getting building materials to the site. Many were shipped in via barge, and a tram was later installed to transport them. It remains in place for the use of residents and visitors who don’t want to brave the stairway’s 101 steps leading to the front door. •

Synthesis Design co-principal Curtis Krahn designed the home to be as striking when viewed from the street level above as from the dock below. A green roof helps it blend into the surrounding greenery.

THE WINTER ISSUE

35


DESIGN

Eventually, the home was built on three levels, with three bedrooms and master ensuite on top, living areas and home office on the second floor, and laundry and golf simulator at water level. David was especially keen that the house be situated close to the water. Being sociable by nature, he wanted to be able to interact with the many kayakers who use the bay. “As well, this placement made the roof a very important design element, because it is all you see when looking down on the house from the road above,� says Curtis Krahn.

The staircase, co-designed by the homeowners, is complemented by the wood sculpture mounted on the wall. Sculpture: Celebration by Federico Mendez-Castro; staircase: Marcon Metalfab.

36

THE WINTER ISSUE

movatohome.com


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

In the end, a green roof was decided upon, an attractive option that also helps insulate the home and reduces air pollutants. A modern flat-roof design with offsetting shed roofs was used. And for David, an avid golfer, the plantings in two areas are configured to mimic Pebble Beach golf greens. Susan also has an area designed just for her, a studio under the garage that juts from the cliff. The first thing that is apparent from the front entry is an ornate metal staircase co-designed by the homeowners. Susan was inspired to employ her metal-working skills to give the steel a special rusted finish. David chose the organic-looking design and drew sketches of each panel, meticulously ensuring

movatohome.com

that they were placed correctly. “It really is one-of-a-kind,” says Curtis. “And when light from the windows strikes it, beautiful patterned shadows are cast on the stair treads.” The front door faces the back of the large fireplace feature, which is clad in deep-grey porcelain tiles with a metallic sheen. Curtis Krahn says he used a technique employed in classical Italian gardens of placing an obstacle, thereby enticing people to choose a path around it and explore. On each side of the imposing structure are glimpsed tantalizing and spectacular views of the bay, afforded by the 40 feet of windows beyond. On the other side lie the dining area and kitchen that lead into the living room with adjacent deck area. •

“We also brought the outdoors in by incorporating lots of wood and natural stone into the interior design.”

The massive fireplace feature helps define the kitchen and dining area, creating a sense of intimacy without sacrificing the open-concept look. Fireplace cladding: Metallo glazed porcelain tiles in Inox by Stone Tile.

THE WINTER ISSUE

37


DESIGN

movatohome.com

The kitchen’s minimal design functions beautifully on family nights and when the homeowners entertain. Recessed and pendant lighting creates ambience at night. Appliances: Miele; island pendant lights: Firefrost in red translucent Murano glass by Tech Lighting.

38

THE WINTER ISSUE


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

Sliding patio doors create a seamless flow to a covered deck off the living room. Small metal sculptures: by homeowner and artist Susan Kagan; custom cabinetry: Duke Custom Kitchens and Architectural Millwork; cabinetry material: prefinished wood panels in Ivory Oak by Shinnoki.

THE WINTER ISSUE

39


movatohome.com

DESIGN

The custom kitchen was designed to keep the look as minimal as possible, says Lynda Krahn. “As with the rest of the home, it was designed to highlight the architecture and the owners’ artwork.” Three floating shelves hold ornamental items; everything else is tidily hidden behind closed doors. A pantry off to the side holds small appliances – a coffeemaker and so forth – so counters can be kept clear and uncluttered.

40

THE WINTER ISSUE

The cabinetry is one of the home’s star features. It is crafted of pale oak prefinished wood panels with vertical striation that creates a distinctive texture. In addition to being used in the kitchen, it appears in the master bathroom and powder room cabinets. As well, it covers the wall of built-in shelving in the living room, with sliding doors that hide the seldom-used television.

Light floods the study (above) and the secondfloor open hallway leading to the three bedrooms (opposite, below). An ample skylight sets off the ceiling, which is clad with hemlock.


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

The subdued soft grey-and-white colour palette was continued into the master bedroom. Colour is used judiciously throughout the home, as in the main floor powder room’s cerulean-blue vessel sink. Sink: Irruption by Kraus.

“We also brought the outdoors in by incorporating lots of wood and natural stone into the interior design, which also helped create the warmth that this couple wanted,” says Lynda Krahn. Exterior soffits were faced with hemlock, and the feature extended into the master bedroom and the ceiling over the main stairwell. The front door is made of natural fir played against medium-toned engineered oak flooring that runs throughout the home. In the bathrooms, natural limestone forms a counterpoint to the pale-oak contemporary cabinetry. “Susan and David continue to be pleased with the end result,” says the designer. “It’s them — a home that’s relaxed, upscale and unique, architectural but also artistic.” •

THE WINTER ISSUE

41


NEW

2 SIDED SHOWER DOOR ALSO FEATURING: LUNA SUNRIZE LIGHTED MIRROR / LUNA MERIDIAN PETITE VANITY

A WORLD OF POSSIBILITIES FOR YOUR BATHROOM

www.fleurco.com


movatohome.com

DESIGN

FEELS LIKE HOME

Oakville family finally gets the interior they’ve always wanted BY PHILLIPA RISPIN PHOTOGRAPHY: KIM JEFFERY STYLING: SYLVIA PORTER

HERE’S AN UNUSUAL DILEMMA: people not needing a larger home and not looking to downsize, finding a place that’s modest by Canadian standards, and wondering “How are we going to fill this?” The fact that Rebecca Travis and Tim Prince and their young son were coming to Oakville from England explains it: affordable dwellings in London and environs tend to be much smaller than their counterparts in Canada. The family arrived from London, with no furniture, in 2012. They looked around and found this property, with a builder-basic interior, in the West Oak Trails area. •

44

THE WINTER ISSUE


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

THE WINTER ISSUE

45


DESIGN

“We couldn’t find exactly our style, so we chose a place with a good footprint and good light,” says Rebecca. “My husband really loved the living room with its double-height ceiling. I loved the light. The layout was great in terms of open concept, and I like the dining room to be somewhat closed up [as it already was]. The plan was to save and then make it feel like ours.” With two storeys, and a finished basement, it was most definitely larger than what they had been used to in London. They settled in, bought some furniture, had a second son and started putting down roots in the community, but the house was, as predicted, never quite the home they wanted.

(This page, right, and preceding pages) A corner fireplace was removed and replaced by a centred one. A reclaimed-wood beam for a mantel makes a rustic, warm statement amid the calm decor, which is punctuated by an intensely green armchair that hints of the dining room’s teal ceiling. Tiles on hearth: Saltillo.

46

THE WINTER ISSUE

movatohome.com


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

By 2016, Rebecca and Tim were ready to start planning a renovation. “All the years we had lived here, it didn’t feel like us,” Rebecca recounts. “I had lots of ideas but not a lot of knowledge of where to find things. I didn’t know where to begin. I like a clean, almost Scandinavian style, but we have kids and don’t want to live in a museum. We wanted it to feel homey.” Through a common acquaintance, they were referred to interior designer Erika McCarthy of Baudit Interior Design. Along with designer Sylvia Porter, McCarthy and Rebecca and Tim discussed the possibilities. •

movatohome.com

“We have kids and don’t want to live in a museum. We wanted it to feel homey.”

THE WINTER ISSUE

47


DESIGN

Substantial baseboards and window casings, wide-plank engineered European oak flooring, an eye-catching teal ceiling (colour chosen by homeowner Rebecca) and a modern take on a classic chandelier give the dining room a comfortable interplay between traditional and contemporary styles.

48

THE WINTER ISSUE

movatohome.com


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

The cramped, dark foyer was brightened considerably when it was expanded and its double entrance doors were replaced with a single door, a transom and side lites. A handsome tile floor gives the space presence. Porcelain floor tiles: Saltillo.

movatohome.com

The renovation began in 2017, with McCarthy having identified several necessary changes. “The foyer was small and there was a larger open space off it and outside the dining room,” she says. “This space was impractical and not well used. We enlarged the foyer and created an office nook. “The living room was unimposing, with a poorly placed fireplace. Also, the dining room had dark wallpaper, and a wall with a cut-out facing the stair. We opened the wall entirely where the cut out was.”

Upstairs, McCarthy noticed that the master bathroom had a “tiny corner shower and a huge corner tub.” The bedroom lacked adequate closet space. The reno involved strategic demolition work. In the foyer, the Baudit team blew out the closets, a knee wall and a decorative column. They added a custom built-in closet and extended a side wall to separate the desk area/den from the foyer. The front entrance configuration was changed from double doors to a single door with side lites and a transom, letting more light into the space. •

THE WINTER ISSUE

49


movatohome.com

DESIGN

The ensuite master bathroom gained more space when it was expanded into the former walk-in closet. This allowed generously sized fixtures to replace the dinky shower and corner tub. In the master bedroom (opposite) a wall of built-in closets was added.

In the dining area they opened the cut-out to shorten the wall, removed the dark wallpaper, added crown molding and painted the ceiling a rich teal. “The green in the dining room was my idea,” Rebecca says. “I wanted something bold.” In the living room, they removed an awkward corner fireplace and installed a new, centred gas one with a mantle. The designers

50

THE WINTER ISSUE

built out the wall above it to create a dramatic but calm over-mantle with white shiplap. The shiplap and white bricks are separated by a rustic reclaimed-wood beam, hand-picked by McCarthy and Porter, which adds a touch of Canadiana and a warm accent to the room. Built-ins on both sides of the fireplace take care of toy storage.


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

The master bathroom saw a major change, too, with both a good-sized bathtub and a generous shower enclosure. The bedroom’s walk-in closet was removed and its space was added to the new ensuite bathroom. “We lost a walk-in closet but added built-ins along the master bedroom wall,” says McCarthy. Adds Rebecca: “I was willing to give up a bathtub for a great shower, but ultimately we went with a bathtub and I’m so glad we did. It’s my little oasis.” She has fond memories of the fully-dressed McCarthy in the proposed bathtub, reaching up to make sure that it was sited correctly so that she could easily deposit the imaginary wine glass in her hand onto the wall ledge above. •

THE WINTER ISSUE

51


movatohome.com

DESIGN

In the bedroom, the wall of built-in closets occupy space, but it was nearly all compensated for by changing the orientation of the bed. Changes large and small were made throughout: new furniture and rugs, engineered European oak hardwood floors, handsome tiles in the foyer and on the hearth, updated lighting, new wall colours, scrapedoff popcorn ceilings, new window and door casings and the larger, English-style baseboards that Rebecca so missed. The designers sourced each piece of artwork and furniture and all accessories. “We pulled everything together, which was an important part of the

52

THE WINTER ISSUE

project for Becca and Tim,” says McCarthy. She is pleased that the home’s interior now looks integrated rather than a mishmash of items and rooms. “The living room ties into everything else, and it looks like a fully finished, thought-out space,” she says. “[It’s] not overdesigned; it’s thoughtful and it makes sense and it’s practical. It’s a very comfortable space.” Rebecca agrees with her designer: “We love when we come home,” she says. “We turn onto the street, and come in, and it feels 100-per-cent us.” •

After browsing online for stairway ideas, Rebecca became determined to have solid hardwood stairs. However, she was concerned that the treads would be too slippery for little children. More online browsing turned up this striking animalprint runner reminiscent of a fawn.


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

Calvin has his own doggy nook in the den’s built-in desk and shelves. Rebecca appreciates the designers’ attention to such details. “Something about Erika and Sylvia that worked well for us is that they’re mums,” she says. “They got the [need for] functionality.” THE WINTER ISSUE

53


movatohome.com

LIFESTYLE

HOW TO FIND GREAT GIFTS Let our holiday gift guide lead you to the best presents ever BY TRACEY MACKENZIE

YOU WANT TO GET IT JUST RIGHT. You want to find the perfect gift but you have little time to shop and you’re just not sure about what would please them. Read on for our best suggestions for the holiday season.

56

THE WINTER ISSUE


LIFESTYLE TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

GI F T GU I DE

RETRO RADIO The InstaBox i90 Wooden Digital Multi-Functional Speaker with Bluetooth FM Radio may have a retro look but it offers modern connectivity. Connect your devices via Bluetooth or AUX cord, or plug and play a USB, Micro SD or TF Card preloaded with MP3s. A new remote control allows for a two-metre range, and an upgraded internal chip has improved signal and sound quality. Available at Amazon. www.amazon.ca

NOBLE NECKLACE This 14kt white gold diamond necklace is a luxurious adornment to be paired with your favorite gown. Available at Mark Lash. www.marklash.com

FABULOUS FAUX FUR This Brown Bear luxury faux fur cushion is a warm addition to a sofa or armchair. Soft and snuggly, it can be combined with a matching throw or bed runner. Cushion size is 20 inches square. Available at Linen Chest. www.linenchest.com

CAST-IRON CASSEROLE Compatible with all cooking surfaces, the Ricardo red enameled cast-iron Dutch oven will add colour to your kitchen while ensuring that dinner is delicious. Ridges on the inner surface of the lid make for optimal steam circulation and continuous basting of food for great results. Capacity: five quarts. Available at Linen Chest. www.linenchest.com

THE WINTER ISSUE

57


movatohome.com

LIFESTYLE

GI F T GU I DE

OFF THE CUFF The Entwined rose-gold-plated cuff from the Sanctum collection, designed by Claire Vessot, is as alluring as it is mesmerizing. For day or evening wear, it has an intertwining design that is both romantic and modern. Available at Vessot Design. www.vessotdesign.com

PORTABLE PLAYTIME The new Bose Soundlink Revolve portable, wireless, Bluetooth speaker will immerse you in 360-degree sound. Water-resistant, it features voice prompts for access to Siri or Google, a rechargeable lithium-ion battery and a wireless range of up to nine metres. Available at Best Buy Canada, The Source, Bose Canada, and Amazon. www.bestbuy.ca, www.thesource.ca, www.bose.ca, www amazon.ca

SAY CHEESE! Slicing cheese is made simple with this set of four cheese serving utensils. Packaged in an elegant book-style gift box, each is made of stainless steel with a gold finish. Available at Linen Chest. www.linenchest.com

58

THE WINTER ISSUE


LIFESTYLE TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

GI F T GU I DE

TURN OVER A NEW LEAF These leaf-shaped 14kt white gold earrings are as versatile as they are exquisite. Perfect for a lunch with friends or an evening out, the combination of baguette and round diamonds is divine. Available at Mark Lash. www.marklash.com

UNCOMMON SCENTS Inspired by the British coastline, these candles by Laboratory Perfumes are made with natural oils to obtain clean, gender-neutral fragrances. Housed in a glass laboratory beaker and wrapped in simple brown packaging, they make excellent hostess gifts. Available at Anthropologie. www.anthropologie.com

SNAP TO IT The Fujifilm Instax Mini 9 instant camera makes picturetaking a snap. A new selfie mirror, macro lens adapter for closeups and an automatic exposure measurement are a few of its attributes. Perfect for portraits, this camera comes in a variety of colours. Available at Indigo Books & Music. www.chapters.indigo.ca

YOU’VE BEEN SERVED With more than 125 recipes, Plated makes dinner a pleasure. Regardless of how much or how little time you have, this cookbook’s step-by-step instructions and clear menu ideas are created to make meal preparation stress-free. From dinner à deux to backyard barbecues, this book offers it all. Available at Amazon. www.amazon.ca

THE WINTER ISSUE

59


movatohome.com

LIFESTYLE

GI F T GU I DE

TAKE A STAND Made of fine china, the Penguin cake stand from the Sara Miller holiday serveware collection by Portmeirion will delight both young and old with its adorable depiction of penguins. Combine it with matching forks and dessert plates for a complete set. Available at Linen Chest. www.linenchest.com

GOOD EGG Cristofle’s MOOD set of six espresso spoons in 18-kt rose gold features an egg-shaped case with a walnut interior. Excellent for coffee service at parties, these spoons are ideal for demitasse cups, and move entertaining up to the next level. Available at Cristofle. www.cristofle.com

STUNNING STUDS The saying “diamonds are a girl’s best friend” is best illustrated by these versatile stud earrings. A combination of 18kt white gold and baguette and round diamonds will make your ears sparkle. Available at Mark Lash. www.marklash.com

60

THE WINTER ISSUE


LIFESTYLE TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

GI F T GU I DE

PEN PAL The Meisterstück Geometry Solitaire midsize ballpoint pen in champagne gold by Montblanc puts an elegant twist on a classic design. Engraved with a three-dimensional geometric pattern with optical effect, this pen makes writing a beautiful exercise. Available at Damiani Jewellers. www.damianijewellers.com

CARRIED AWAY The AWAY Carry-On suitcase has an unbreakable polycarbonate shell and a TSA (Transportation Security Administration)-approved combination lock. Perfect for a business trip or a quick out-of-town jaunt, this luggage has an ejectable battery that charges your phone, 360-degree Hinomoto wheels, and a hidden laundry bag. Available at Away Travel. www.awaytravel.com

BANGLE BEAUTY Add some wow to your wardrobe this holiday season with this beautiful 14kt white gold bangle, half of which is studded with diamonds. It’s topped with a design of baguette and round diamonds. Available at Mark Lash. www.marklash.com

COLOURFUL KETTLE Dolce & Gabbana have teamed up with Smeg, and the result is this stunning multicoloured kettle. Decorated with motifs and patterns that embody a Mediterranean look, this kettle has anti-slip feet, a built-in cord wrap, and an auto shut-off at 100 degrees Celsius/212 degrees Fahrenheit. Available at Hudson’s Bay. www.thebay.com

THE WINTER ISSUE

61


movatohome.com

LIFESTYLE

GI F T GU I DE

GORGEOUS GOBLETS These Graphik crystal water glasses in blue will add an elegant touch to your table this holiday season. Ideal for cocktails, they come in a set of two and a variety of colours. Available at Cristofle. www.cristofle.com

TRADITIONAL TOWELS These Hammam-style cotton hand towels are colour-blocked with the Hudson’s Bay design and trimmed with a fringe. Lightweight and highly absorbent, they add a touch of Canadian tradition to the bathroom. Available at Hudson’s Bay. www.thebay.com

WHIMSICAL WILDLIFE These Lilibet side plates, designed by Londoner Yvonne Ellen, are sure to appeal to the animal lover in you or someone you love. Reflecting the designer’s passion for vintage bone china and quirky illustrations, they’re made to add whimsy to a table. Available at Anthropologie. www.anthropologie.com

PERFECTLY BREWED The Bodum Eileen eight-cup French press coffee maker in copper will make your old coffee maker obsolete. A three-part stainless-steel mesh filter allows for the extraction of the coffee’s aromatic oils and flavours to render each cup of java delicious. No paper coffee filters necessary. Available at Amazon. www.amazon.ca

62

THE WINTER ISSUE


LIFESTYLE TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

GI F T GU I DE

VEGAN VARIETY Famed chocolatier Brandon Olsen and artist Sarah Keenlyside have combined forces to share their love of food and art in their chocolate confections. This year, they have made their first nineflavour vegan bonbon collection, which includes such flavours as cherry/almond, cinnamon/rose/chili and blackcurrant/ violet. Available at CXBO Chocolates. www.cxbo.ca

GEOMETRIC GLAMOUR Featuring a quarter carat of sparkling round, white diamonds, the Longest Line diamond earrings from the Bravura collection, designed by Claire Vessot, bestows glamour on any outfit you choose. Geometric shapes combined with a double chain fringe make a bold statement when combined with a little black dress. Available at Vessot Design. www.vessotdesign.com

DREAMY DIFFUSER Made of handcrafted stone in a black-matte finish, the Vitruvi diffuser is a piece of functional decor. A high-quality BPA-free plastic water reservoir, three-hour non-stop or seven-hour-30-second interval running time, and an auto shutoff are just a few of its attributes. It is available in white and black. Available at Vitruvi. www.vitruvi.ca

THE WINTER ISSUE

63


movatohome.com

LIFESTYLE

HUNKER DOWN FOR COMFORT AT HOME Winter is a season of “yin” energy and a time for us to slow down and take stock

BY SUSAN KELLY

IT HAPPENS EVERY YEAR: one sharp nip in the air brings a visceral urge to cocoon. But as 2018 winds down, there is greater urgency as the planets align to make this a mega-yin season. In astrology, as in the ancient Chinese practice of feng shui, yin energy, which is associated with the moon, is considered feminine, that which impels inward seeking and a sense of calm and balance. By contrast, yang energy, which is active, outward-seeking masculine energy, is associated with the sun. As the yang energy of summer gives way to its yin counterpart of winter, we have an opportunity to slow down.

64

THE WINTER ISSUE

And of the planets and other astronomical points used in astrology, 70 per cent are nestled in yin signs through the end of December. Predominating now are the earth-element signs of Taurus and Capricorn, and Cancer, Scorpio and Pisces of the water element. Yin is all about softness, and right now snuggly shapes and textures have never been more in. “Soft” is the buzzword in fashion and home furnishings, as we curl up in oversized chunky knits, furs, any tactile textile that takes a doux approach. Even colour palettes have softened into palest pastels and winter whites. The need to feather our nests takes a literal

turn, too, with plushy down-filled pillows, seating and comforters. This season, we might further appease the style gods through other trends, such as the addition of blue and turquoise for the water element. Or a new steam shower with marble surround or statement-making freestanding bathtub. And the earth-sign contingent may be why adding nature to our homes is trending so strongly now. There are so many ways to incorporate such natural elements as concrete, stone, woods, wicker and so on. Bonus: water and earth are healing and calming elements.


LIFESTYLE TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

Taking a long view, cocooning is a major and far-reaching trend some trendwatchers see taking us into 2020. Futurist Faith Popcorn, accredited with coining the term, says we’ve now moved into “bunkering.” As she sees it, we find it more imperative than ever to insulate ourselves from a turbulent and often-harsh reality by retreating to the seclusion of our homes. This rings true for me due to November’s shift in the lunar nodes. They are the two opposing points that mark the Moon’s orbit as it crosses the Sun’s apparent path in the sky. For millennia, esoteric astrologers have found they point to areas of collective karma and growth. They have a practical side, too. I have found them to be indicators of decor trends we resonate with on a deep level. For the next 18 months, they take on the Cancer-Capricorn polarity. The North Node in Cancer encourages us to create a shell in which to embrace and nurture our softer side. And to create positive and more meaningful rapports with the people we let into our circle. Home as a metaphor for our selves may become a bigger issue. We need to avoid becoming overly insular and protective of what we perceive as ours, a failing of the Capricorn end. Many world designers seem to be working this axis. At the Paris Design Week’s Maison & Objet show, comfiness in furniture was the big news for winter 2018. Furnishings were down-filled and

overstuffed, hard edges knocked off in lieu of curvy and inviting lines. A sublime balance was struck in Patricia Urquiola’s Beam sofa system for Cassina. The designer placed soft cushions (Cancerian snugliness) over a support beam (Capricorn good structure) to create “architectural rigour in a warm embrace.” In any event, this is no time to impulsively move a supporting wall or radically change the colour scheme. Venus, which rules decor and aesthetics in general, backtracks until mid-November, making it difficult to distinguish needs from wants. That’s when Mercury decides to go retrograde, too, which usually brings delays and confusion to projects. Expect a lot of dithering and scattered energies. There are just so many great design choices available! It is a good time to sort through our choices and to review the beliefs and true needs that lie behind them. The best use of this oh-so-yin season: get some rest and recharge. Use the lull to reconnect with what makes you feel whole, completed, fulfilled. Tie up loose ends, such as maybe finally switching out that backsplash or repainting the hallway. It’s a time of both clearing out and gathering forces. Because ahead lies a dynamic 2019, packed with dynamic and scope-widening trends along with a new sense of freedom and adventure. A guide to making the most of this yin season:

ARIES (MARCH 21 - APRIL 19) Carve out a me-zone. In 2019 your horizons are about to widen just when all your past career efforts begin to pay off. Hunker down and practice self-care now so you can later hit the ground running.

LEO (JULY 23 - AUGUST 22) Do what you love. Hit the refresh button and surround yourself only with people and things that make your heart sing. Show your physical self some love, too, with a new wellness routine.

TAURUS (APRIL 20 - MAY 20) Rearrange the furniture. Give your closet a mega clearout or the decor a feng shui-like shuffle. Creative change (oh, how you hate that word!) is in the air, and this will roll out the welcome mat.

VIRGO (AUGUST 23 - SEPTEMBER 22) Practice positivism. Newfound confidence is at your disposal. A major expansion is on tap, of your residence or attitudes or both. For now, get your finances in order.

GEMINI (MAY 21 - JUNE 20) Take a social media fast. Your love of chitchat and being where the buzz is sometimes overloads your circuits. To revive your spirit, focus on forging stronger one-on-one connections, new and old. CANCER (JUNE 21 - JULY 22) Be more outgoing. Much as you love to nest, work that holiday party circuit. Think of it as a practice run for the social skills you’ll need in 2019. Build a strong contact base of rock-solid, reliable people.

LIBRA (SEPTEMBER 23 - OCTOBER 22) Think long term. Big changes are in the works around home base. But that major upgrade you crave will take some planning. Be strategic and make decisions with future happiness in mind. SCORPIO (OCTOBER 23 - NOVEMBER 21) Open wide. The universe is about to show you the money. But financial opportunities may not take a form you expect. Meanwhile, your charisma is off the charts. Use this power wisely.

SAGITTARIUS (NOVEMBER 22 - DECEMBER 21) Hit the road. It’s time to take the steering wheel and put yourself on the road to success. But first, learn new money-management strategies so you can finance your big dreams. CAPRICORN (DECEMBER 22 - JANUARY 19) Get real(er). You’re poised for gung-ho pursuit of success in 2019. For now, rest up, tune in and set the groundwork. Set up a space in which to explore your spiritual side. AQUARIUS (JANUARY 20 - FEBRUARY 18) Pay it forward. You’re in a nice career bubble and a rise in income is possible. Look for new ways to give back and contribute to the community. You can make important connections, too. PISCES (FEBRUARY 19 - MARCH 20) Get a makeover. Revamp your image through a new wardrobe or decor. In the now, it will be fun and diverting. And it will send the message that “I’m so worth it,” which will pay off down the line.

THE WINTER ISSUE

65


Nordic Collection

Worship the ground you walk on

Khayeriflooring.com

Copenhagen Collection

AVAIL ABLE AT


Cold Outside... Warm Inside New in Electric, the Toasty Comfort of Runtal Radiators Can Now Be Enjoyed by All!

Wall Panels

Towel Radiators

Baseboards

has long been world-renowned as the premium manufacturer of Euro-style radiators for hot water and steam heating systems. We are pleased to introduce a Runtal Electric line that includes Wall Panel, Towel Radiator and Baseboard designs. Suitable for both retro-fit and new construction, Runtal Electric products provide a very efficient and comfortable radiant heat. They are an excellent source of primary or supplemental heat and a problem-solver for areas needing additional heat. They are attractive (available in over 100 colors), durable, quiet and easy to install. To view Runtal’s complete line of heating products, please visit our showroom in Oakville, Ontario Canada; M-F 9-5 or by appointment and online at: www.runtalnorthamerica.com.

Our Showroom is located at: 2861 Sherwood Heights Drive, Unit 21, Oakville, Ontario Canada. Tel: 905-829-4943


DESIGN

68

THE WINTER ISSUE

movatohome.com


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

DOWNSIZING

FOR

AN UPSCALE LIFE

Designer Juli Hodgson creates an elegant all-white beach house for her family BY WENDY HELFENBAUM PHOTOGRAPHY: MARTIN TESSLER & MARTIN KNOWLES STYLING: NICOLE SJOSTEDT

THE WINTER ISSUE

69


movatohome.com

DESIGN

SOMETIMES, THE BEST LAID PLANS shift and morph into something even better. Parents to six children – two still living at home and four transitioning in and out of the family home – designer Juli Hodgson and her husband opted to sell their 5,000-squarefoot property in the Shaughnessy Heights neighbourhood of Vancouver and begin their next chapter. In the spring of 2015, the couple purchased what they thought would be a temporary home on a sloped corner lot in laid-back Kitsilano, steps from the water. “Originally, I was going to renovate the house and move in while I looked for a more long-term situation, but there were some 70

THE WINTER ISSUE

intrinsic qualities that made it a more interesting project,” says Juli, president of Hodgson Design Associates in Vancouver. At first, the plan involved renovating the existing house, but after discovering old radiant heating, insufficient insulation, leaks and rot, Juli had it torn down so she could start afresh. The lack of trees on the small corner lot made the property feel larger, and presented no restrictions from the city. Juli would be free to use every usable inch of the 3,960-square-foot lot to design a family home that would add a modern twist to Kitsilano’s beach community.

Juli Hodgson’s dog Pearl takes full advantage of the warm back deck, crafted from ipe (Brazilian walnut) wood, a dense hardwood that stands up to the elements.


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

“I had been designing mostly pure modern houses, and I had a hankering to do something more beachy with a modern look,” she says. “I’ve designed modern beach houses for other people and I really wanted one.” Juli says that while building her previous home, she compromised on details that she really wanted in order to cut costs. This time around, she would get her dream finishings. “I realized that when I didn’t do exactly what I wanted to do, I ended up regretting it, so it just ballooned into this new project.” Completed in 2018, the 2,560-squarefoot home is clad in white cedar shingles and boasts vast expanses of windows, which proved challenging to include. • Passersby routinely stop and take photos of Juli’s allwhite contemporary beach house, which is just steps from the water. Its contemporary design fits into the context of the neighbourhood but is sufficiently different to inspire photographs and conversation.

THE WINTER ISSUE

71


DESIGN

“I had to fight to get windows that size, because that doesn’t fit the context of the neighborhood, so the city planning department was really against it,” Juli recalls. “They want that typical house you draw in grade one with two windows and a roof. Yet I had overwhelming support from the neighbors; they loved the design, and eventually, the director of planning intervened and told the planning department to let me do it. It took over six months to get a building permit.” Because of her early design training with Calgary’s Coco Cran, her stint learning the construction side of the business with Victoria builder Bill Patterson, and 28 years running her own successful design firm, Juli sees every project from many perspectives. Known for her clean, neutral yet dramatic design, she chose to reorient the home’s entrance. By putting the front door on the 120-foot side of the lot rather than where it was on the 33-foot side, the main floor opens up into one large space with no hallways.

72

THE WINTER ISSUE

movatohome.com


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

Reconfiguring the entrance also enabled Juli to design a generous, air y kitchen equipped with all her must-haves: a Gaggenau oven, a steam oven, fridge and freezer drawers, a coffee station, and two dishwashers to accommodate the many large dinners she hosts. An oversized rectangular island crafted from French oak matches the Italian dining room table and all flooring throughout the home. “We flipped the kitchen from one side to the other three times before I finally decided it was going to go on the south side because on the north side, the grade is lower, so you have to actually walk downstairs to get into the backyard,” Juli explains. “But on the south side you’re right at grade, so even though that’s technically considered the front yard, I created a courtyard

by planting a 10-foot hedge around, while having direct access out to the front to my barbecue and seating area.” Sixteen-foot-high disappearing sliding glass doors on the front and back sides of the house allow abundant natural light and cross-ventilation into the kitchen and main living area while integrating the indoor and outdoor space seamlessly. Juli chose durable white Corian for the kitchen cabinet door facades, and an expansive Calacatta Oro marble surround for the cooktop area. “I like it because it’s seammatched, not book-matched,” she says. “With book-matched, you get those funky patterns where you cut it, whereas when you veinmatch it, it has a continuous vein. It looks like it’s all been cut out of the same piece.” •

THE WINTER ISSUE

73


DESIGN

74

THE WINTER ISSUE

movatohome.com


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

The adjacent living room features a gas fireplace, B&B Italia furniture and two husk armchairs by Juli’s favorite designer, Patricia Urquiola. Downstairs, there’s a rec room, wine cellar, small office and extra bathroom. Large window wells in the front bring in lots of sunlight. An open wood staircase leads to the second floor, where soaring 20-foot vaulted ceilings dotted with skylights and one-by-six

tongue-and-groove panelling evoke classic beach house style. “Because everything’s open, you can get heat gain on the second floor; the skylights open so that any warm air that gathers up there can escape. It’s basically like passive air conditioning,” Juli says. “You open the two big doors off the master bedroom and the skylights and your house feels like it’s air conditioned.” •

THE WINTER ISSUE

75


DESIGN

76

THE WINTER ISSUE

movatohome.com


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

Large sliding glass doors lead out to the back deck and plunge pool.

With two bedrooms above the kitchen and the master bedroom overlooking the plunge pool out back, Juli’s house is the perfect size for her family’s needs today. “Kitsilano is friendly and young, with lots of people with dogs. It’s a lot more vibrant, which I wanted, plus you can walk and ride your bike everywhere,” she says. “I’m happy we ended up staying here.” •

THE WINTER ISSUE

77


Clockwise from left: Andersen® 400 Series awning, casement and picture windows with prefinished White interiors; Pictured at right (top and bottom): Architectural Collection E-Series picture and transom windows with painted White interiors; 400 Series awning and picture windows with prefinished Black interiors

Create Distinction. Turn every window and door into a design opportunity with dramatic sizes, dynamic shapes, unlimited colors and exotic woods.

Explore the possibilities at andersenwindows.com “Andersen” and all other marks where denoted are trademarks of Andersen Corporation. ©2018 Andersen Corporation. All rights reserved. MS1807_0409

2354 Wyecroft Rd., Unit 23 Oakville, ON L6L 6L8 905.847.2071

muskokawindowanddoor.com

2113 Dundas Street West Toronto, Ontario M6R 1X1 416.534.4593


movatohome.com

TRAVEL

CUBA

LIBRE!

Free yourself from an all-inclusive resort vacation and go instead to Havana for the culture, colonial architecture and really cool cars BY LA CARMINA

80

THE WINTER ISSUE


TRAVEL TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

THE WINTER ISSUE

81


movatohome.com

TRAVEL

IN T HIS HE C T IC SM A R T PHONE AGE , I sometimes find myself feeling nostalgic for a si mpler ti me. I dayd rea m of u nplugging my devices and escaping to a place that’s warm and has the vintage glamour of old Hollywood. Is there such a place? Havana, Cuba is as close as I’ve got to experiencing my mid-century reveries. Fidel Castro’s communist government assumed power in the Caribbean country in 1959, leading to trade isolation from the U.S. and other nations. As a result, time appears to have stood still in this friendly nation, where hot rods still rule the cobblestone roads.

(Right) The charming plaza in front of the yellow church of Santo Angel Custodio is shown here from a balcony. This location inspired celebrated Cuban author Cirilo Villaverde to write his novel “Cecilia Valdés.”

Cuba is an excellent cold-weather getaway for Canadians, as flights are quick and inexpensive, especially from the eastern part of the country. During the winter, temperatures in Havana range from 18 to 27 degrees Celsius: perfect for sitting outdoors at a café with a mojito. Unlike American travellers, who still face complex entry regulations, Canadians merely have to fill out a “visa on arrival” and pay $20 USD to get in. Tourists tend to book vacation packages for all-inclusive resorts in Varadero, Cayo Coco and Holguin. However, if you adore culture and romance, I recommend you spend your time in Havana. Cuba’s rich history is especially vivid in the capital city, which is characterized by pastel colonial architecture and smiling street musicians.

(Left) A steel outline of Camilo Cienfuegos, one of the four leaders of the Cuban Revolution, towers over Plaza de la Revolución. His words “Vas bien, Fidel” became a slogan of the people.

82

THE WINTER ISSUE


TRAVEL TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

I encourage you to stay in a casa particular to get immersed in local life. In communist Cuba, all hotels are at least partially owned by the government. However, since 1997, the state has permitted citizens to rent out rooms in their homes. Staying in one of these cozy casas particulares lets travellers support Cubans, and learn first-hand about their culture. I booked a private air-conditioned room with bathroom at Prado Colonial, a group of three bed-and-breakfasts run by a family. The common areas are a retro lover’s dream: stained glass windows, neoclassical f loors, and a balcony view of an 18th century cathedral. I enjoyed getting to know the hosts over strong coffee and breakfast each morning. The Internet isn’t readily available in Havana unless you purchase a WiFi card, so I took this opportunity to get offline. •

Staying in a casa particular lets you experience the daily life of a Cuban family. Prado Colonial’s rooms are filled with portraits and heirlooms passed down through generations.

THE WINTER ISSUE

83


movatohome.com

TRAVEL

Every day, I spent hours wandering Old Havana and taking in the eclectic sights. I saw elderly locals hanging out on doorsteps with cigars in hand, and a parade of stilt-walkers f lanked by fortune tellers in headwraps. I browsed art galleries and flea markets, where I found revolutionary posters and rumba records. Perhaps my favourite stroll was along the Malecón,

Havana’s iconic seawall, which stretches for eight kilometres along the waterfront. I loved photographing the slick, vintage automobiles that are a Havana signature. Cubans have been unable to import cars from the U.S. since the 1959 sanctions. As a result, most of the cars on the road are Fords, Buicks and Cadillacs from the James Dean era – and they’re a joy to ride in.

Cheerful locals, brightly painted homes, classic cars, and the glittering water by the Malecón: that’s the laid-back spirit of Old Havana.

84

THE WINTER ISSUE


TRAVEL TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

You can rent one of these antique taxis, or book a classic car tour as I did. My guide drove me from Old Havana to Miramar in a cherryred convertible, pointing out such historic sites as the sprawling Colon Cemetery. We cruised through modern Vedado and stopped in Havana Forest, where I was surprised to find an urban grove by the river. The final drive was my favourite: speeding along the Malecón as the sun set over the ocean, with music blasting and wind blowing through my hair. Cuba’s political history is unlike that of any of its Caribbean neighbours. I visited the Museum of the Revolution to learn about the communist takeover from a Cuban perspective. The artefacts on display included rare black-and-white photos, and Fidel Castro’s military tank. I also visited the impressive Revolution Square, which honours the four leaders (Fidel and Raul Castro, Camilo Cienfuegos, and Che Guevara). • Feel the grandeur of Cuba’s past at the Hotel Nacional de Cuba. In the 1930s, this palatial hotel was the favourite hangout of American gangsters and silver screen stars.

THE WINTER ISSUE

85


TRAVEL

Many locals practice an Afro-Cuban religion known as Santeria. I joined an Urban Adventures tour to learn about their rituals. The day began at Callejón de Hamel, a community space covered in scrap-object sculptures and paintings. The artist, Salvador Gonzáles Escalona, started this project in 1990 to create a welcoming place for practitioners. I learned that Santeria originated in the indigenous spirituality of West Africa, and became syncretised with Roman Catholicism during colonial times. I met Salvador, a babalawo or priest, who has an important role as a spiritual adviser. Then I entered his home, where I saw his family’s personal shrines to the orishas or gods, surrounded by offerings.

In colonial times, Africans taken to Cuba were forbidden from practicing their tribal faiths. However, they secretly worshipped their gods by associating them with Catholic saints, resulting in Santeria.

86

THE WINTER ISSUE


TRAVEL TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

Music lies at the heart of Cuban culture, and the sounds of jazz, salsa and rhumba pulse through the streets of Old Havana. No matter where you wander, you’ll encounter live bands with remarkable talent and energy. At night, take a taxi to Fabrica de Arte Cubano, a former warehouse that has become the hippest venue for performers. Take in the contemporary art exhibitions, and then dance the night away to everything from traditional call-and-response music to pounding reggaeton. •

Old Havana is brimming with live musical performers: from a marching band in a festival, to a guitarist strumming on a doorstep, to an outdoor bar with an Afro-Cuban jazz troupe.

THE WINTER ISSUE

87


TRAVEL

Cuba has a reputation for serving bland food. To my delight, I found this to be untrue. I dined on f lavourful tapas and mojitos all over the city. At my casa, I took a cooking lesson to learn more about local cuisine. My host showed me how to make ropas viejas, or shredded beef and seasoned vegetables. We also prepared taro chips, rice and beans, and fried green and yellow bananas: a spectacular home-style feast.

Cuba’s famous slow-cooked beef stew, flavoured with rich spices and vegetables, is a must-try. The ladies shared their family recipes in a cooking lesson, followed by dinner on the rooftop.

88

THE WINTER ISSUE

movatohome.com


TRAVEL TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

On my last night, I ate at La Guarida, a restaurant set in a palatial home. This paladar, or local-run eater y, is famous for being featured in a ground-breaking Cuban LGBT film, “Strawberry and Chocolate.” Surrounded by elegant sculptures, I enjoyed smoked-marlin tacos, and delicate snapper ceviche – followed by braised beef cheek, and filet mignon, served three ways. Even in the 21st century, Havana retains its pulsing, mid-century charisma. If the idea of sipping rum cocktails to the sound of live jazz calls to you, then let Cuba be your escape this winter. •

IF YOU GO: Getting There: Several Canadian airlines fly to Havana from Montreal and Toronto. Flying time from Toronto is 3.5 hours; flying time from Montreal is 4.25 hours. Ground Travel: Most visitors travel by taxi around Havana, as there are no ride-sharing apps such as Uber. Research rates from the airport to your accommodations in advance, and be prepared to bargain. You can also ask your hotel to call taxis for you, and negotiate a flat fee. Public transport is the best bet for certain destinations, such as the T3 bus from downtown Havana to Playas del Este beach for $4 CDN.

Hidden in an unassuming row of buildings, Restaurant La Guarida surprises visitors with a majestic marble staircase and chandeliers. The creative “New Cuban” menu is consistently named one of the best in Havana.

Accommodation: For a culturally immersive stay, book a casa particular, or family-run bed and breakfast. In Old Havana, these rooms generally cost between $30 and $50 CDN, with either shared or private bathrooms. A more luxurious casa such as Prado Colonial costs $100 CDN per night.

THE WINTER ISSUE

89


FURNITURE & DESIGN

85 Navy Street, Oakville 905.849.8537 8 Brock Road, Guelph 519.822.2929 accentsforliving.ca


Canada’s Ultimate Destination

Today’s Finest Contemporary & Most Up-to-Date Collections

B E D D I N G • B AT H • D E C O R • K I T C H E N • G I F T S • E L E C T R I C S • TA B L E T O P • G L A S S & B A R W A R E • M AT T R E S S

29 stores

linenchest.com

Canadian owned

Leaside Village (Toronto) 416-425-0533 • Richmond (Toronto) 416-260-2158 • Stockyards (Toronto) 416-760-9704 • Erin Mills Power Centre (Mississauga) 905-828-4449 Heartland Town Centre (Mississauga) 905-502-5399 • Colossus Power Centre (Vaughan) 905-856-6430 • Westwood Power Center (London) 519-680-2615


movatohome.com

DESIGN

SIMPLE PLAN A modest intention to repair some tile grout evolves into a full-fledged renovation BY ELISABETH KALBFUSS PHOTOGRAPHY: LARRY ARNAL STYLING: MICHELLE BERWICK

92

THE WINTER ISSUE


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

THE WINTER ISSUE

93


movatohome.com

DESIGN

IT STARTED WITH A PLAN to get rid of the discoloured tile grout in the master ensuite bathroom - and turned into a complete renovation of all four storeys of Alex and Cindy Tsen’s North York townhouse. “We wanted to retile it, then said we might as well do the whole floor,” says Alex. From there, the idea snowballed from room to room, floor to floor. “Then we thought we might as well move out for two months and do it all.” The couple bought the 1,500-square-foot home 10 years ago, but with two daughters now aged 5 and 8, decided they were outgrowing it. They had been hunting for a larger home but, daunted by the high cost of detached houses in their neighbourhood, they gave up. Instead, they decided to stay and turn the house they had into their dream home.

Storage was added to the entry foyer with new closet space. The living room was given shelving and a built-in space for a television. Front entry tiles: Saltillo Tiles; custom drapery and ottomans: Tonic Living.

94

THE WINTER ISSUE


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

The lower cabinets are finished in a minty green colour, which is a favourite of homeowner Cindy Tsen. The table was a piece the Tsen family already owned; it was transformed into a pedestal table. Chairs: Wayfair; pendant lights: Elte MKT.

On the practical side, that meant creating storage, lots of it, to maximize space. On the design side, it meant having fun with colour. “I didn’t want just white,” says Cindy. “I was not afraid of using colour.” Her favourite is one that her interior designer, Michelle Berwick, the owner and principal designer of Michelle Berwick Design, calls “minty sage green.” It can be seen all through the open-concept main floor kitchen and living area, starting with the front door and patterned tiles in the entryway. The same colour was carried into the kitchen for the lower

cabinets. It was Berwick’s idea, and is a choice Cindy loves, but doesn’t think she would have been brave enough to use on cabinetry, or even would have thought of using it there, on her own. On the top f loor, the master bedroom level, Berwick proposed painting the wall behind the bed black, and adding a yellow barn door to the ensuite bathroom. “She gave us visuals. It helped make the decisions easier when she showed us a black wall with the kind and colour of headboard we were looking at, and with a yellow door,” says Cindy. •

THE WINTER ISSUE

95


DESIGN

Designer Michelle Berwick granted Cindy Tsen her request for a romantic space by selecting the crystal lighting and the headboard. She met Alex Tsen’s request that it be sleek and contemporary by choosing black for the wall and adding a barn door. Bedroom and bathroom lights: Matteo Lighting from Niche DÊcor; headboard: Elte MKT.

96

THE WINTER ISSUE

movatohome.com


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

Berwick says she creates those vision boards for all her clients, and it helps them understand how the different design elements will fit together. As for the bold colour proposals, she says, “I suggest stuff like this all the time, and 90 per cent of the time it gets shot down. I had assumed they would do the same, but

they were going for everything.” The other big change on the master-suite floor was the creation of an office area for Alex, who works at home. Previously, he says, the room was dark and dingy, his work space small and cramped. •

THE WINTER ISSUE

97


DESIGN

Contractor Kim Cordeiro says she and Berwick worked closely with the couple to ensure that all the pieces they designed would best use the available space, but that it was especially important when it came to that office for Alex. “He likes everything out of the way, doesn’t like clutter. We worked hard to get the functionality just right,” says Cordeiro, a partner in Lavida Contracting. The second floor is the children’s space. Previously, there were two bedrooms and a bathroom, but Cordeiro removed a closet from one bedroom to fit two beds so the girls share sleeping quarters. She turned the second into a playroom, with storage and a built-in desk and homework space. If, as the girls get older, they decide that each wants her own space back, it would be easy to rebuild a closet, Cordeiro says. •

98

THE WINTER ISSUE

movatohome.com


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

THE WINTER ISSUE

99


DESIGN

Their mother says that for now they love their new play space and sharing a room. While it’s brought them closer, there is a downside, Cindy says. After they get tucked in, and their parents turn off the light and close the door, the girls often talk and play together long after they should be sleeping. “It helps with sister bonding, but it definitely makes for much later nights.” The other positive side is that it gives both the adults and children separate places to entertain their friends.

100

THE WINTER ISSUE

movatohome.com


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

Eliminating one bedroom to create a play space isn’t a typical move, but the Tsen girls were keen to share. The play space includes lots of built-ins for storage. Theatre tent and rug: Crate & Barrel.

The basement floor leads to the garage and has a laundry room, but its main function is as a storage area, with built-in cabinets through most of the space. Berwick created a loft area over the storage, where the children can watch television. “It’s like living in a fantasy hotel,” says Alex. “Everything is new; you can’t complain about anything.” •

THE WINTER ISSUE

101


FASHION

104

THE WINTER ISSUE

movatohome.com


FASHION TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

CLOTHED IN COMMENTARY Fashion designer Lesley Hampton uses her work to make social and cultural statements BY SUSAN KELLY

Photos: Marc Aitken HMUA House of Bendy Shot on Location at Lesley Hampton’s high school Alma mater, ACS Hillingdon International School, London England

THE WINTER ISSUE

105


movatohome.com

FASHION

VOGUE MAGAZINE EDITOR ANNA WINTOUR once wrote, “the content of fashion does not materialize spontaneously but … emerges from the fabric of our times.” Emerging Canadian fashion designer Lesley Hampton purposefully weaves timely and socially relevant themes into her work. “I always start with a concept, something I feel needs to have a light shone on it,” Hampton says. “I want people seeing my shows to have an experience, to feel and think.” For her spring-summer 2018 collection, called Sticks and Stones, Hampton sent models from various cultural backgrounds, wearing sizes ranging from two to 24, down the Toronto Fashion Week catwalk. Among them was Adrianne Haslet, a survivor of the Boston Marathon bombing, who walked the runway on a prosthetic leg. Not only was it a strong statement about resilience, but Flare magazine’s reviewer said the designer had “set a new bar for runway diversity.”

The fall-winter 2018 collection that followed, called Lithium, was intended to raise awareness about mental health in the fashion industry and society. The designer’s special focus was bipolar disorder, which affects some of her friends and colleagues. She employed a mélange of vibrant offbeat colours to reference its mania aspect played against stark black, then finishing with silver ref lective materials to represent balance and hope. The thought-provoking themes Hampton embraces are uncomfortable for many. Yet the clothes themselves are meant to be

106

THE WINTER ISSUE

anything but. “With every piece I design, I want people to feel comfortable in their skin and empowered,” she says. “Feeling and looking your best can be transformative, especially for women with body-image issues.” The eveningwear and “after 5 p.m.” clothing sold through www.lesleyhampton.com are cut to enhance any woman’s natural curves, and the designer takes custom orders. There are also go-anywhere pieces, such as a quilted-sweater version of the classic little black dress, and an athleisure line, called Robust, in sizes XS to 5XL.


movatohome.com

“I use my fashion to encourage diversity and make everyone feel welcome and included.”

At the tender age of 24, Hampton has sent six collections down runways and garnered rave reviews for them. Celebrities who name her label when asked “whom are you wearing?” include ET Canada host Cheryl Hickey who has rocked her curve-enhancing evening dresses on several red-carpet occasions. So have luminaries as diverse as Real Housewives of Toronto’s Roxy Earle, competitive swimmer Penny Oleksiak, Toronto electronic music group Dragonette, and Margaret Trudeau. Hampton says she strives through her work to make everyone feel welcome and accepted. “I also have an open mind when it comes to cultural differences, I think, because we moved around so much when I was a kid,” she says. The Newfoundland-born designer reckons her family changed country every four years or so. Her father worked in the mining industry and was posted in such far-flung places as the Northwest Territories, New Caledonia, Australia, Indonesia, and England. •

Photos: Ted Belton Models: Ellyn Jade KLA Management/The Industry NY and Karyn Inder BNM Models Hair and Makeup: Michelle Silverstein

THE WINTER ISSUE

107


FASHION

It was her mother, an avid quilter, who first introduced her to a sewing machine at age four. Not all of her early efforts were successful, such as the “most fabulous teddy bear ever” she tried to make for her older brother that ended up looking like “a flat, brown duck.” But her sewing skills steadily improved. Her mother continues to provide moral support and also serves as driver and accountant when times are stressful. Hampton studied art at the University of Toronto. Before completing year one, though, she realized fashion was what she really wanted to study. She fast-tracked the honours bachelor of arts degree so she could perfect the technical skills of her craft, including patternmaking and draping, at George Brown College. This period also marked an important step in reconnecting with a part of her heritage; her mother is from the Temagami First Nation of northern Ontario.

108

THE WINTER ISSUE

movatohome.com


FASHION TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

Hampton now proudly identifies as a First Nations designer. Even before the diploma was issued, she released her first collection, City Warriors. It was accepted as part of a 2016 runway show called Fashion Art Toronto, a first step for many new designers. She worked feverishly at night after classes for four months to assemble 13 original pieces. “That collection was based on the Native American jingle dress,” she says. “It is worn during powwow ceremonies to uplift an audience and make them feel powerful, and I wanted to reinterpret it for every modern-day woman.” •

Photos: Che Rosales Shoe sponsor: Tanya Heath Paris Accessories: Helen Oro Designs

THE WINTER ISSUE

109


movatohome.com

DESIGN

“That so many people resonate with my message is reflected in the community I’m creating.”

For the past year, Hampton has worked out of a studio in the Toronto Fashion Incubator, the non-profit centre that is home to so many of Canada’s rising industry stars, including Sid Neigum. “It’s nice to have my own space so I can put in a full 10-hour day surrounded by creative people who are all pushing for the same thing I am,” she says. I n S ep t emb er, she packe d up her spring-summer 2019 collection, called Foyer de la Vice, and headed across the pond. It was showcased as part of a London Fashion Week show featuring Toronto Fashion Incubuator designers at Canada House. She then headed back to Toronto to participate in CES Presents, a Canadian fashion gala in October that supports Boost for Kids. She will also show her work in the Toronto Plus Size Fashion Show in November.

Photos: Ted Belton Models: Ellyn Jade KLA Management/The Industry NY Hair and Makeup: Michelle Silverstein

110

THE WINTER ISSUE


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

The Foyer de la Vice collection was inspired by the work of French Impressionist painter Edgar Degas and the ballet he depicted in his art. “It is conceptually inspired by notions around perfectionism and what is deemed as perfect,” Hampton says. “The garments’ compositions embody the essence of a negligee and stage wear unified to convey the ballerina’s conflict between her internal self and external pressures. The relentless pursuit of perfectionism often precedes vices, to achieve perfection or to deal with the pressures of the unobtainable.” Hampton has forged a community of friends she affectionately calls her Wolf Pack. She’s not sure where the name came from, only that she wanted to surround herself with people who uplift one another. The gang embraces the fashion crowd, but she encourages any like-minded person to join via her website. “I use my fashion to encourage diversity and make everyone feel welcome and included,” she says. “That so many people resonate with my message is reflected in the community I’m creating.” •

Lesley Hampton Photo: Marc Aitken

THE WINTER ISSUE

111


movatohome.com

DESIGN

INTO THE PRESENT A 1942 Kingsway Village home is updated for the 21st century BY SARAH B. HOOD PHOTOGRAPHY: ADRIAN OZIMEK STYLING: SARAH TOWNSON

114

THE WINTER ISSUE

TORONTO’S WEST-END KINGSWAY VILLAGE neighbourhood is a district of quiet streets, wide lawns and mature trees. It was there that Julie and Tom Fluelling found themselves captivated by a building from the past: a 1942-vintage home. “When we bought the house, it had been with the previous owner for 40 years,” says Julie. •


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

THE WINTER ISSUE

115


movatohome.com

DESIGN

She and Tom lived with its charms and drawbacks for about five years before deciding to transport their living space forward in time to match their 21st-century lifestyle. Among the plusses: they loved the stonework on the exterior, the unusual arched front doorway and the functional fireplace. Drawbacks included a ground floor without sightlines between rooms (a challenge for parents of two young children) and dark, narrow oak flooring — not to mention outdated latheand-plaster walls, knob-and-tube wiring and antiquated radiators.

116

THE WINTER ISSUE

“We had to do a full gut,” Julie says. Although the family had to move out for six months, “we’re just thrilled; it was so worth it,” she says, adding that “we had a fantastic contractor, Taylor Day from Day Custom Homes.” Architect Richard De Oliveira of Re:Placement Design Inc. and interior designer Sarah Townson of DXT Studio pulled the home into the present day with a two-storey rear addition that created a new master bedroom and a series of seamless transitions between living room, dining room and kitchen.

The Mara pendant lamp from Arteriors above the table and Lewis Dolin hardware on the kitchen cabinetry warm up the cool background in the newly combined cooking-and-dining area, while such subtle details as the herringbone marble backsplash add interest.


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

“What’s nice about that is that it’s an open plan and it’s a family-friendly space, but there’s still a little space reserved for privacy in the den,” says Townson, referring to a shared home office at the front of the ground floor. In the kitchen, Julie loves her new appliance garages. “We wanted to be able to tuck everything away: the toaster, the coffeemaker, the Soda Stream. The appliances were a big deal for my husband; he cooks a lot. I was really excited about the garbage organizer: garbage, recycling, green bins and bags — all in one drawer!” •

Versatile and durable, new white oak hardwood flooring from Grebian Flooring Solutions lifts the look of the previously dark interior throughout the ground floor and complements the pale walls. Light now floods the ground floor from windows in the extended rear of the home.

THE WINTER ISSUE

117


movatohome.com

DESIGN

The wartime years of the 1940s were an era of sharing resources, taking turns and making do — a spirit that’s evident in the Spartan bathroom design of the period. When the Fluellings moved in, their home had two bathrooms: one in the basement and one on the second floor to serve the occupants of three bedrooms. To bring the domestic arrangements up to 21st-century standards, a new master ensuite

118

THE WINTER ISSUE

bathroom was added to the second floor, and a powder room was tucked behind the office just off the front living room. The basement bathroom was also updated. The original upstairs bathroom, conveniently located at the top of the stairs, was reimagined for the children and occasional guests with two quartz-topped sinks that look ahead to the time when toddlers have become teenagers.

Distinctly grownup Llagostera Gris tiles from Mettro Source give the flooring extra character. “I’ve used one of the other tiles in that line and I loved it so well I really wanted to use this one, too,” Townson says. To give the master bathroom a streamlined gleam, she added a luxurious steam shower with bevelled tiles on the walls and Marmoker’s Bardiglio Imperiale porcelain tile on the floor. •


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

For a family with young children, capacious custom built-ins provide for quick tidying-up of toys and books. Personal treasures displayed in symmetrical shelving that flanks the wood-framed fireplace are illuminated by Circa Lighting’s dignified antique brass picture lights from Elte.

THE WINTER ISSUE

119


DESIGN

120

THE WINTER ISSUE

movatohome.com


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

The master bathroom is an exercise in understated luxury, with its subway-tiled steam shower, heated floors and custom-made walnut double vanity. Unexpected floor treatments, such as the stair runner from Grebian Flooring Solutions, work well with neutrals.

THE WINTER ISSUE

121


movatohome.com

DESIGN

The children’s bedrooms are likewise a far cry from what they might have looked like when the home was built. Airy and bright, with minimal window treatments and sturdy but lightweight furniture, they accommodate childish play now, yet also offer space to grow in the future.

122

THE WINTER ISSUE


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

Playful bed linens, candy-coloured carpets and of course the toys are the only clues that these paired bedrooms are for children. Later, the classic colour schemes and understated light fixtures will transition easily into suitable spaces for teenagers and young adults.

movatohome.com

The rooms mirror one another, but are distinctive in their decor. “Where the ceiling is sloped, we did a built-in desk for each of them,” says Townson. A wide dado in the boy’s room is a sedate blue (Benjamin Moore Hale Navy), while the girl’s room features a narrower band of a dreamy and delicate lilac (Benjamin Moore Porcelain). “As she grows, she’s hopefully going to like that colour for years to come, because it is so subtle, but at the same time it can be really fun. It’s almost like making purple a neutral.”

Ultimately, the seven-decade time jump has been a big success. “We loved working with Sarah right away, when she was presenting us with her vision of the space. As much as we went open-concept, it’s still very cozy,” says Julie. “Before, it was very much a traditional family home. This feels a lot more modern and a lot more our style: we don’t plan on moving anytime soon.” •

THE WINTER ISSUE

123


We’ve all asked that question before at some point when walking by a street kid. Why can’t they just get off the street? Why can’t they grow up and take some responsibility by going to school and getting a job? Well, imagine being that street kid for a second. Getting a life is not a simple snap of the fingers. It isn’t easy to just get a job or an education. And they can’t always just go home. For street kids, every day is survival. Their life is based on simply getting through it. Finding food and shelter is their job, and even overcoming that doesn’t put them in any kind of position to find stability in their lives. Getting off the street is just the beginning. So let’s start from the beginning. We’ll call this kid Steve. Steve’s day starts at sunrise in a public park. The sun hits him dead in the eye and he wakes up shivering. Steve springs up from the bench that he slept on to make sure his stuff is still under it. It’s almost nothing, a backpack with a couple of sweaters and a thermos in it, but two nights ago he almost got beat up for it. He was walking through a different park across town when three guys sitting on a bench asked him if he had a cigarette. Steve ignored them and kept walking, but he knew they weren’t through with him yet. After verbally harassing him, they stood up and moved to surround Steve. He began to shake with fear. Steve told them again that he didn’t have anything, but they didn’t care anymore. They weren’t going to leave without something. They began to step closer to Steve. And closer. One pulled out a knife from his back pocket. Just as another guy tried to grab Steve’s backpack, Steve darted through an opening just out of their reach. They chased him for a few steps, but Steve was already far away, his backpack still in his possession. This morning, Steve’s exhausted and he needs to get out of the wind. He picks up his backpack and spends the next two hours looking for an alleyway. Hopefully he can find one that’s quiet, and, if possible, has boxes or newspapers that he can use to protect himself from the biting chill. Steve scours the alleyways in his area and finally settles on one. It seems perfect and he can’t remember why he doesn’t sleep there more often. He finds a spot, puts his head down and begins to doze off. The sounds of the city fade. He falls asleep. He dreams. In this fleeting moment, everything is OK. He’s in his old home, in a warm bed, everyone’s calm and there’s breakfast waiting for him when he decides to – “Get up, kid,” says the police officer standing over Steve. Steve opens his eyes as the officer informs him that he needs to clear out immediately. Steve rubs his eyes. Now he remembers the problem with this alleyway. He stands, picks up his things and starts his day again. Steve can’t stop thinking about his dream. But that’s all it was. Nothing like his actual life at home. He can still feel the pain from his father’s fists. Hear his mother’s screams. Things had been getting worse and worse at home since his father lost his job. It all started when his father came home drunk from the bar one night. Steve remembers the red mark on his mother’s face the next morning and refusing to believe what was unfolding around him. But that refusal only made things worse, because Steve could never convince his father that he needed help. So it continued, one incident after another until one night, it wasn’t just Steve’s mother that was on the receiving end of it. It was him. His mother screamed louder when Steve was being beaten than when she was, and those are the sounds that haunt Steve every single day. The bruises are gone now, but the mental scarring never will be. Steve manages to snap back into reality, but reality isn’t any better. Steve has not only had very little sleep in the past couple days, but also very little food. He really doesn’t feel like rummaging through a garbage can this morning. That means it’s time to go onto the street and beg for change. He’ll never get used to doing this, but he’s had to learn fast. Having to decide which street corner to sit on and beg strangers for change isn’t something he ever envisioned doing. He decides on a busy corner downtown and begins the hike in that direction. He hopes that the long walk is worth the extra money he’ll receive for being in a busier area. At least it isn’t winter yet. The very thought of spending all winter on the street sends chills down Steve’s spine. He’s felt a Canadian winter before. He can’t still be out here by then…can he? When Steve finally arrives, he sits down on the street corner and takes off his toque. He eyes the people walking by and begins to beg. “Change please?” is what he usually says, but today he’s a little more desperate. He’s painfully hungry and it shows in the anguish in his voice. Steve always tries his best to not worry about what other people are thinking, but it’s hard. He can see the way they look at him. People are either scared of him, disgusted by him or they ignore him altogether. He’s not sure which one is worse, but sometimes it feels like everyone hates him for one reason or another. Today, one person in particular is very aggressive when Steve asks him for change. He tells him that he’s a loser and that he should get a job. After a few hours and thousands of passersby later, Steve has $7.24, just enough for a burger combo. After waiting for a few moments, Steve slowly picks up the change in his toque. He stares at it, scared of what he might do with it. It takes him all the strength he has to not use the money for something else. Two weeks ago, someone else on the street started giving him free “samples.” When you’re in a dark enough place, sometimes you’ll do whatever people tell you will make you feel better. It doesn’t matter who that person is. It doesn’t matter if deep down you know that what they’re offering isn’t a way out at all, but another anchor to keep you drowning. On these dark days, hope is replaced by distraction. Steve is constantly tempted to just let go and get away, but today he somehow fights that temptation off. He gets up and makes his way towards the restaurant. When he gets to the front of the line, Steve dumps the change on the counter before ordering. The annoyed cashier counts it as the people in line behind start to get restless. Steve tries to recall the last time he didn’t have to pay for something in change, but can’t. It’s always embarrassing, especially when the line is as long as this. He asks the cashier if she can unlock the bathroom for him and she hesitates. Steve is rarely allowed to use a public bathroom, even as a paying customer. But today, the cashier doesn’t want to keep the other customers waiting so she unlocks the door. Steve splashes water onto his dirty face inside the bathroom. He studies his reflection in the mirror. How long can he keep doing this for? When will this nightmare end? No kid should have to live like this. As he rinses, he begins to daydream. He thinks about the feeling of having a nice, long shower in a real bathroom. He steps out onto the cool floor and dries himself off with a soft, fresh towel. Steve is snapped out of his daydream by the sound of a knock. He opens the door to find the manager. He has to leave now. Steve puts his head down, grabs his food and heads outside. Later, with his hunger temporarily gone, Steve is back in his only home – the street. Back where he has no hope. There have been days when the shame has been too much, when Steve tried to find a way out. Steve recalls a time a few months earlier when he first started living on the street. He had woken up with a sense of hope that day he never felt before. He had slept in an abandoned warehouse another guy told him about and managed to split some breakfast with someone else staying there. That day, Steve was allowed to have something on his mind besides finding food, finding somewhere to sleep and trying not to get mugged. So, he wanted to do what so many strangers have told him to do before – get a job. Steve was walking down the street when he noticed a convenience store with a “Help Wanted” sign in front of it. Steve took a deep breath and walked into the store. He went straight to the cashier at the front and asked about the sign. But all he got back were insults. The owner told Steve that he sees him on the streets every day. He told him his clothes were a mess. That he must have been insane to think anyone would hire a stupid, lazy homeless kid. Steve slunk out and glanced back behind him at the “Help Wanted” sign. This had happened before. He didn’t understand why no one would give him a chance. He doubted himself to the point where he began to wonder if he would even be able to trust the person who did. That was the day that Steve realized that the hill he had to climb was actually a mountain. Steve hears a car’s honk that snaps him back to an all too familiar reality. He’s out of money again. He has no place to go. He feels physically and mentally beaten. And soon it will be nightfall. Soon he’ll be back at the bottom of the mountain once again. This is just a glimpse into Steve’s struggle and the struggle that so many homeless youth face. There is no living, only surviving. And when you’re trying to survive on the street, every little thing is an obstacle. Every time you beg for change, every time you go to the bathroom, every time you want to sleep, eat or drink – nothing comes easy. For many kids like Steve who want a way out, the struggle to meet basic needs is only the beginning. The coming days, weeks and months provide hurdles even harder to overcome. The physical pain may lessen in leaving the street behind but the mental anguish is constant when trying to forge a new life. Getting an education, applying for a job, admitting that you need counselling – these are hard for anyone. When you have to do all these things from scratch, the frustration can mount as fast as the confidence can fade. From learning how to stay warm in that first winter on the street, to the first day back at school, from deciding whether to steal food or pass out from hunger, to deciding where to get a shirt to wear for that first job interview, there are endless obstacles for homeless youth.

It’s also why we exist. Please visit CovenantHouseToronto.ca to donate.


PERSONALIZED DESIGNS

WORLD CLASS CRAFTSMANSHIP

Zeyko Flybridge | Woodline.one & Forum Stucco

NEW SHOWROOM LOCATION 130 Queens Quay E, #1016, Toronto, ON, M5A 3Y5 647-499-1150 | By appointment only www.onixdesigns.ca


DESIGN

126

THE WINTER ISSUE

movatohome.com


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

WITH A LITTLE HELP FROM MY FRIENDS Friends and family maximize a Calgary bungalow’s liveability BY PHILLIPA RISPIN PHOTOGRAPHY AND STYLING: LAURA TONOPA

THE WINTER ISSUE

127


movatohome.com

DESIGN

JANELLE SCALISE AND LAURA TONOPA became friends after living parallel lives in childhood. Although they grew up in the same community – Virden, Manitoba – and attended the same school, before moving to Calgary after graduation, they weren’t good friends. It’s probably no surprise, however, that when they did eventually meet again years later, they instantly clicked. “We connected when we had children, about eight or nine years later,” says homeowner Janelle, who lives with her family in this bungalow in the North Haven neighbourhood. “We already had our relationship

128

THE WINTER ISSUE

established when my husband and I started renovating our home. It was easy to confide in her. She understood my style.” Tonopa, the founder and principal designer of LT Interiors, jumped into Janelle’s project. “Janelle and I have been friends for years,” she says. “‘Janelle is super-chic and fashion-forward. We collaborated on the big ideas, such as furniture and styling. It was fun to work with her. We both have young kids, born two weeks apart from one another, so I understand her need for practical, functional living solutions.”

Janelle’s parents had a great deal to do with the renovation’s success. In the kitchen, they removed the cabinetry and then reassembled it into a more functional layout. Perhaps the biggest change is over the sink: two mismatched windows have been connected and shaped into one large three-paned window, creating a more open feeling.


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

Janelle and her husband, Mike, had bought the nearly 1,100-square-foot bungalow in 2010. They now had the two children (and a dog) and were feeling cramped in their home, and so began seeking a larger place. “We wanted to be inner city,” Janelle says, “but there were not a lot of options.” After house-hunting and realizing that they could find what they wanted only outside of North Haven, the couple decided that they would stay put and renovate their home, making it more spacious without changing the footprint. Apart from being pragmatic (and probably economically advantageous), this decision was in line with their ethos. “We’re mindful of waste and the environment, and we repurposed as much as we could,” Janelle says. “In a small space, you have to maximize every square inch.” •

THE WINTER ISSUE

129


movatohome.com

DESIGN

The dining area illustrates how stylish a room can be with repurposed furniture and items from big-box stores. The Breuer-style chairs were bought through Kijiji, the tulip table is from Ikea, and the pendant light fixture is from HomeSense.

130

THE WINTER ISSUE

“Everything had to be functional and practical,” Tonopa notes. “A lot of thought went into decisions – for instance, having washable, durable fabrics because of the children. There’s a casual element to the space for easy living. Janelle’s aesthetic is bohemian with a chic twist. We blended function with the sort of style she gravitated towards. “Being friends made it easy and natural because we have so much in common,” she adds. “If Janelle came with a design dilemma, it was easy for me to guide her. I knew what she would love because we have similar tastes and live parallel lives.”

(Opposite) The wall unit built by Janelle’s parents takes pride of place in the low-key but smart living room. Other attractive elements include a jute rug underlay from Pottery Barn, a washed Persian rug from HomeSense and a sofa from Ikea. The brushed-nickel floor lamp was found online and spray-painted by Tonopa for a brass look. The solid sheesham coffee table was sourced through her company, LT Interiors.


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

Janelle and Tonopa had walls removed and intrusive fireplaces ripped out. They delegated spaces for family needs and made ingenious use of inexpensive materials. Tonopa was thrilled to see the DIY custom built-in bookcase constructed by Janelle’s parents. It is a wall unit along one side of the living room that affords space for a television, shelves to display favourite accessories, and a lower layer of closed cupboards to store children’s toys and other items. Tonopa says of the DIY installation: “The decorating process can take longer when you’re trying to find cost-saving alternatives to ideas you have. When you do it yourself it takes longer, but the payoff is bigger. You can get great looks for significantly less.” •

THE WINTER ISSUE

131


movatohome.com

DESIGN

Like the rest of the house, the bedrooms contain some new items and some old ones to suit Janelle’s and Mike’s desire to repurpose attractive items. The grey “big-boy” bed in their young son’s bedroom is a vintage find, as is the brown spindle headboard in their daughter’s bedroom. The “goodnight” on the wall in the master bedroom epitomizes Tonopa’s characterization of the room as “simple, serene, relaxing.”

Both Janelle and Tonopa cite the kitchen makeover as their favourite part of the reno, and Janelle emphasizes the vital role her parents played in its success. “My parents did the demolishing, and my mum redesigned the layout,” she says. The k itchen had felt closed-in a nd cramped, with corner cabinets using up space in an inefficient way. Down came the corner cabinets. Out came the rest of the cabinets, to be shuffled around and reinstalled in a more

132

THE WINTER ISSUE

efficient pattern. There was space for a new fridge, with some of the old cabinetry moved next to it and reconfigured into a built-in glass-fronted unit atop drawers. The kitchen window was “our biggest move,” says Tonopa. “The back wall used to have two smaller, mismatched windows. We replaced them with one larger window. It opened up the space and brought in a lot of light, making it a real focal point.”


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

Janelle’s parents worked similar magic in the bathroom. They re-used the original cabinets but changed the hardware. They also removed a large, dominating wall mirror and replaced it with smaller mirrors, surmounted by sconces, over the two sinks. The smallest change can have the biggest impact, Janelle notes, adding that “we love it here. Even if our family grows, we won’t move. We love our community, and we will compromise on space to live in this area.” •

THE WINTER ISSUE

133


Introducing

by doors and more

THE REVOLUTIONARY IS NOW AVAILABLE IN MATTE BLACK


movatohome.com

DESIGN

LIGHT THE WAY

There are plenty of fixtures on the market that make home a welcoming place during the dark days of winter BY TRACEY MACKENZIE

C

old and dark. To Canadians, that about sums up winter. As the months leading to the winter solstice are characterized by decreasing light levels, many of us compensate by ensuring that our homes are light-filled and inviting. If you’re in need of new light fixtures to brighten up your rooms, read on. Our guide to the latest in lighting might just be the cure for darkness.

136

THE WINTER ISSUE


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

CALL OF THE WILD A dramatic focal point for a den or study, the Aspen Antler chandelier recalls the wildlife of the American West. It’s cast of lightweight, durable resin from naturally shed antlers, and painted by hand to replicate their texture and markings. Shown in the Bleach finish, this chandelier is also available in Natural. Available at Restoration Hardware. www.restorationhardware.com

FLOWER POWER Add a touch of whimsy to your child’s bedroom with this porcelain-flower chandelier with gold-leafing detail. Reminiscent of 1960s pop art, it’s a cheerful reminder that spring arrives after winter leaves. Available at Anthropologie. www.anthropologie.com

YES, GRASSHOPPER Designed in 1948 by Greta Grossman, the Grasshopper floor lamp has a thin frame and elongated shade, which can be rotated to direct light where it’s wanted. Produced by Gubi in Denmark, this authentic Grossman lamp is manufactured to the designer’s original specifications. Available at Design Within Reach. www.dwr.com

ART FORM Like a piece of suspended art, this chandelier is evocative of sculpture. Twenty LEDs light up the fixture, which is made of aged brass. 72˝L X 19˝H. Available at Union Lighting & Furnishings. www.unionlightingandfurnishings.com

L I G H T I N G G U I D E 2018 / 2019 THE WINTER ISSUE

137


movatohome.com

DESIGN

SPACE AGE The Nelson Saucer pendant lamp designed by George Nelson and produced by Herman Miller was inspired by Nelson’s first bubble lamp, created in 1952 by spinning a skeleton of steel wires on a turntable and shooting it with translucent plastic until it was covered in a smooth, washable film. Available in Ball, Cigar, Lantern, Pear or Saucer colours at Design Within Reach. www.dwr.com

GRAB THE BRASS RING The Halo series of lights designed by Matthew McCormick may be hung in various combinations. Conceived as a graphical interpretation of effervescence, the soft glow of each halo gently illuminates a space. Available in brass, copper, nickel and 24-kt gold. Available at South Hill Home. www.southhillhome.com

GEOMETRIC GLOW Geometry combines with luminosity in the Tetra floor light by Hollis + Morris. A hearth for modern times, this light is also sculptural art. Available at Hollis + Morris. www.hollismorris.com

L I G H T I N G G U I D E 2018 / 2019 138

THE WINTER ISSUE


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

ON THE FRINGE The Oahu Fringe pendant, shown here in mint, evokes memories of the sea. The fringes are held together on a brushed glass frame, to add a tropical vibe to your living room or dining room. Available at Anthropologie. www.anthropologie.com

THREE’S COMPANY The Bodalla kitchen island pendant is cheerfully colourful. Distinctive in red, it features three bowl-shaped shades with a metallic finish. Available in various colours and a two-bowl version. Available at Wayfair. www.wayfair.ca

BALANCE BEAM The Beam light has clean lines and a retro vibe that is reminiscent of midcentury offices. Available in sophisticated neutrals or bright colors, it’s more than just pretty; it offers task lighting for evening work. Customize your Beam’s light by pivoting the head, tilting the pole or adjusting the height of the stand. Shown here in Mint. Available at Article. www.article.com

NO ORDINARY ORB A solid concrete base and a see-through glass casing highlights an oversized Edison bulb in the Orb light. With its distinct yet not overpowering shape, it gently lights a dark winter night. Bulb included. Available at Article. www.article.com

L I G H T I N G G U I D E 2018 / 2019 THE WINTER ISSUE

139


movatohome.com

DESIGN

LINEAR LIGHTING The Line lights designed by Matthew McCormick are precision CNC-milled and hand-finished to showcase the natural grain of the wood. May be used as a stand-alone pendant or arranged into multiple configurations. Available in walnut, white ash and oak. Available at South Hill Home. www.southhillhome.com

TALL, DARK AND HANDSOME The Treo light has a metallic tripod base with a matte finish and is topped with a linen shade. It stands a stately five feet high. Available at Article. www.article.com

TWO-TONED RETRO Paying tribute to mid-century Italian chandeliers, the Stella uses cast brass cones and blackened brass to get its aesthetic across. Perfect for any room that needs a retro vibe, this chandelier is also available in an oval shape for large tables. Available at Lightmaker Studio. www.lightmakerstudio.com

L I G H T I N G G U I D E 2018 / 2019 140

THE WINTER ISSUE


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

FLUID AND FLUTED The elegant Davenport round chandelier is characterized by a fluted rim. It’s available in various sizes and three finishes: lacquered burnished brass, bronze, and polished nickel. Available at Restoration Hardware. www.restorationhardware.com

ROSY GLOW The rose gold Geo wire-caged pendant light can be suspended above a kitchen island, bathroom vanity or bedroom night table as a minimalist-style statement. Available at West Hemlock. www.etsy.com/ca/shop/westhemlock

SCULPTURAL SCONCE This is not your grandmother’s wall sconce. The Zig-Zag light can be wall-mounted or ceilingmounted. With its sculptural shape, the wall mounted Zig-Zag becomes a work of art and provides lighting that is superior to a traditional sconce. The low profile also allows a ceilingmounted Zig-Zag to be used in both passageways and rooms. Finishes: vintage brass and satin steel. Available at Lightmaker Studio. www.lightmakerstudio.com

L I G H T I N G G U I D E 2018 / 2019 THE WINTER ISSUE

141


movatohome.com

DESIGN

TIERED TAPERS White-washed agar wood twigs seem to flow upwards from iron stems like the unopened buds of a flower. Elegant and understated, this chandelier confers a touch of the past to any room. Assembly not included. Available at Anthropologie. www.anthropologie.com

BUBBLE BEAUTY Contemporary and colourful, the Chroma Bubble pendant light adds sparkle and originality to a room. Perfect for above the kitchen island, this trio of iridescent bubbles is a conversation starter. Available at Anthropologie. www.anthropologie.com

RISE AND SHINE The Rise sconce, designed by Hollis + Morris, has a brushed metal backdrop, wood top and LED light. As beautiful during the day as it is at night, the rich glow of the LED light is reminiscent of that magical hour when the day is just beginning. Welcome to your own personal sunrise. Available at Hollis + Morris. www.hollismorris.com

L I G H T I N G G U I D E 2018 / 2019 142

THE WINTER ISSUE


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

CROSS JUNCTION This linear fixture projects light and incorporates it into a sculpture of criss-crossing rods. 60˝L X 24˝W X 16-18˝H. Available at Union Lighting & Furnishings in several finishes: plated polished nickel, satin brass and satin copper. www.unionlightingandfurnishings.com

CYLINDRICAL STYLE Metal bands hold the slender glass cylinders in place in the Ravelle Chandelier. Designed by Ian K. Fowler, this Art Deco-inspired light has been reimagined with a contemporary and minimalist design. It comes in three finishes: lacquered burnished brass, bronze, and polished nickel. Shown here in bronze. Available at Restoration Hardware. www.restorationhardware.com

NO STILTED STYLE HERE The elegant Stilt floor lamp with its slender base and fabric shade illuminates a room without taking up too much visual space. Available at Article. www.article.com

BRASS BEAUTY Available for the first time in brass, the Orbiter II table lamp features LED lighting and a counterpoised boom arm that rotates on its arc to direct light wherever it is needed. Originally designed in 1967, the iconic Orbiter floor lamp is an American classic that will fit in any decor. Available at Restoration Hardware. www.restorationhardware.com

L I G H T I N G G U I D E 2018 / 2019 THE WINTER ISSUE

143


®


INTERIOR | EXTERIOR | KITCHENS | BATHROOMS | FULL HOME ARCHITECTURE | DESIGN

insideout

architecture Yorkville Village | Toronto, 87 Avenue Road | 416 . 922 . 6620 | www.yorkvilledesigncentre.ca


movatohome.com

DESIGN

FAREWELL T O

T H E

S I X T I ES

A couple breathe new life into a 1964 bungalow BY ELISABETH KALBFUSS PHOTOGRAPHY: STEPHANI BUCHMAN STYLING: CARLY NEMTEAN

THE BUNGALOW THAT GAETANO COLACCI AND HIS WIFE, Stephanie, bought in Richview looked pretty much as it did when it was built in 1964. “It had pink carpet everywhere, layers of wallpaper in some rooms,” Gaetano says, not to mention those classic ’60s pink tiles and a pink vanity sink in the master bathroom. The recently married couple were looking for a house in which they could start a family, and knew they could turn this one into a home they could love, especially since the location was perfect: on a quiet street near parks, somewhere between his work in Vaughan and hers in Oakville. They weren’t daunted by the prospect of a large renovation: he owns a furniture company that builds custom pieces and planned to do all the millwork himself. •

146

THE WINTER ISSUE


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

THE WINTER ISSUE

147


DESIGN

148

THE WINTER ISSUE


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

“It was an opportunity to add something that had life and its own character into the space.”

Instead of cutting the entryway and kitchen tiles in a straight line, designer Carly Nemtean used the corners of the hexagonal tile to gradually shift the floor from ceramic to hardwood. Esagona hexagonal tiles: Ciot.

(Opposite) Homeowner Gaetano Colacci’s furniture business, Alta Moda Furniture, makes custom pieces for clients; he crafted the home’s kitchen cabinets and island. Countertop and backsplash: Caesarstone’s Alpine Mist; cabinet handles: Upper Canada Specialty Hardware; runner: www.overstock.ca.

The big gest st r uc t u ra l cha nge to the three-bedroom, 1,250-square-foot home was the raising of the ceiling height in the kitchen, living and dining rooms to 10 feet from eight. Because of the home’s gabled roof, with a little re-engineering of the rafters, they were able to go up and use some of the attic space. That extra height helped open the principal rooms. “Gaetano’s pretty tall,” says their designer Carly Nemtean. “And so is his wife, Stephanie.” In a small space, with an open-concept floor plan, it can be tempting to run hardwood throughout all the rooms, including the kitchen, says Nemtean, co-owner and

principal designer at Carriage Lane Design-Build Inc. Since Gaetano was determined to have a ceramic floor in the kitchen and because he likes geometric designs, she suggested a hexagonal tile, with the hardwood cut around the sides of the tiles. That way it wouldn’t create an obvious, visually jarring transition strip on the dining room side or between the entry and the living room. “I can’t just put hardwood everywhere; I’m Italian,” Gaetano explains. “We have to put ceramic in the kitchen.” He loves the solution Nemtean devised and how it flows into the dining and entry areas. “It looks great, and people love it.” •

THE WINTER ISSUE

149


movatohome.com

DESIGN

“That was a difficult aspect, to make sure that cuts in the hardwood were clean and precise and it was all properly installed,” Nemtean says. “It was an opportunity to add something that had life and its own character into the space.” Also important to the homeowners was having enough pantry space in the cabinets to hide their small appliances, including their microwave oven and two coffeemakers. Size was important when it came to designing the kitchen island, which is long but fairly narrow. “Everyone wants to build these monster islands, but you have to look at the space you have; you can’t force it,” Gaetano says. He used white oak for the top, the same wood he chose for the extra-tall doors in the entryway. Nemtean’s other challenge was to incorporate elements of Gaetano’s style: Mid-century

Modern, with a preference for rich, dark colours, with Stephanie’s: more white, clean and feminine. The result is definitely mid-century, but with clean lines and a contemporary feel. By eliminating a closet in an adjacent room, the homeowners had space to create a shower in the master bathroom. “It’s a long but narrow space; we wanted to keep it as light as possible,” says Nemtean. “Visually, we wanted it to feel vast and open and airy.” She chose a white marble herringbone tile for the walls with contrasting black counters, a large black hexagonal tile for the floor, and a smaller black version for the shower floor to give the room a minimalistic ambience. In the family bathroom, she chose a patterned floor tile. “That was more for her (Stephanie),” the designer says. “It’s a little more feminine, something fun and flirty.” •

Designer Carly Nemtean chose an oversized white marble herringbone tile for the walls in the master bathroom, and contrasting black hexagonal tiles in different sizes for the shower and floor. Gaetano made both the white vanity for the master bath, as well as the vanity in the family bath. Countertop in master bathroom: Caesarstone’s Pietra Gray.

150

THE WINTER ISSUE


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

THE WINTER ISSUE

151


movatohome.com

DESIGN

HOW TO UPDATE AND UPGRADE Changing the decor of a home needn’t be expensive or intensive

152

THE WINTER ISSUE

Have you ever wanted to change your home’s design style without resorting to a major overhaul that involves costly renovation work? It can be done, says Shiva Khalilnia, owner of Import Temptations in Toronto, whose store offers its customers complimentary design services when they purchase furnishings. Here is her advice on how you can change and upgrade your home’s design. QUESTION: Shiva, how can homeowners determine their preferred design style? ANSWER: During the initial introductory meeting I have with clients, I ask them how they would like their home to look and feel. As a first step, we walk through the showroom and see what furniture pieces resonate with them. From there, we begin the technical process of placing the items into a floor plan of their space to give them perspective of the scale and layout of the room. Then, we get more detailed and choose items, colours, textures, and metals to customize the choices to meet their unique

tastes. It is always important to recognize that what may be the latest trends in home design and decor may not suit the clients’ tastes. Home trends are similar to fashion trends. What is in today, may not be in next year. Clients have to be true to themselves, and honest with what feels right. Q: Where does one start in the process of transforming the interiors of one’s home? A: It begins with deciding what the level and scope of the transformation will be. Is it a matter of just changing furniture, or a more extensive process of renovating to bring the home to meet the clients’ current needs? Once this has been decided, I propose multiple options reflecting their needs and tastes. I often find that clients come in to meet me with a picture or a colour they have fallen in love with. This inspiration is usually our starting point in designing the space.


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

Q: Help! My tastes have changed since I last decorated my home. How can I redecorate to reflect that change without incurring high financial costs? A: The easiest and most cost-effective way is to purchase accessories and accent pieces, such as lamps, throw pillows, and wall decor. If you’re looking to make more of a statement, buying a more sustainable piece such as a coffee table or piece of art can help you achieve a refreshed look, without the large price tag. Q: How much can such a transformation cost? A: The costs ultimately depend on how far a client wishes to go. It can be as little or as much as they want. They should have a budget in mind that they feel comfortable spending. Q: How does colour affect the redesign of a home? A: In Toronto, I don’t see much use of strong colours, whereas in Europe, colour is a very important aspect of the design elements. It

movatohome.com

sets the tone and feel for a room. With trends constantly changing, I always recommend clients not to be married to one colour. I’d rather they introduce colour by way of upholstery and art versus wall paint, because fabrics are much more luxurious and elegant. Q: How can a homeowner go about transforming a traditional design ambience to one that is contemporary? A: How to transform a traditional design to a contemporary one is a question that gets asked often. Traditional home design and decor is quite timeless. Currently, the furniture markets are dominated by contemporary and modern design. Clients who want to incorporate new styles can do so with modern paintings, a new rug, or a coffee table with metal or marble accents. Accessories can also go a long way toward creating a contemporary look. •

Import Temptations 188 Bentworth Ave., Toronto, 416-256-3150 www.import-temptations.com

THE WINTER ISSUE

153


DESIGN VANCOUVER KITCHENS 2017

movatohome.com

FOLLOW • SHARE • LIKE

Facebook: facebook.com/movatohome

Instagram: @movatohome

Twitter: @movatohome

www.movatohome.com THE KITCHEN ISSUE

1


movatohome.com

DESIGN

COMFY, COZY AND ECLECTIC A new trend in bedroom design embraces a non-matching approach to linens and furnishings BY SUSAN KELLY

THE BEDROOM: THE ULTIMATE COMFORT ZONE, a cozy retreat that is all our own. At this time of year, along with craving warm layers, we want to add some style. Which trends will we warm up to? We asked experts across the country for their take on those that will appeal heading into 2019 and beyond. It’s all about setting the right mood, says Lauren Persson, creative director at Fino Lino, a Vancouver store that specializes in fine linens. “Heading into 2019, the biggest trend is toward a kind of subdued, sensuous glamour,” she says. It starts with a colour story on the sombre side. Colours once relegated to the living room now invade the sleeping quarters. Navy, deep teal and emerald are showing strong in bedding and accessories along with dark grey and even black. The bold will paint walls or buy linens in these shades while the more hesitant may settle for one deep-toned velvet

156

THE WINTER ISSUE

throw. On a lighter note, the deeper colours might be played against linens in classic neutral shades shot with metallic threads — a major trend, Persson says — giving them an opulent sheen. As with furniture of all types, headboards have curved shapes now. But this is not the Hollywood Regency rococo-ness of years past. This time, it’s more about a subtle arch upwards or a downward dip on a non-embellished headboard, likely upholstered. While referencing the past, this transitional look is very much of today. “It’s also part of a new feminine direction in design,” she adds. “And we see it in the way pink and mauve have become such strong colours.” So much so, many standard neutrals — grey, white, taupe — now have undertones of these shades. On their own, Persson finds them particularly of the moment when paired with navy. •


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

Photo courtesy of Fabricville

THE WINTER ISSUE

157


DESIGN

When it comes to the bed, many of us are taking great care to make it look as if we don’t care, says André Michel, home decor senior buyer for Fabricville stores in Canada. “The thoughtfully messy look is one of the top bedding trends now,” he says. “It’s a big departure from the buttoned-up bedrooms of the past.” No more perfectly pressed sheets topped with crisp pillows and shams. Today’s beds have that lived-in look.

Photos courtesy of Fabricville

158

THE WINTER ISSUE

To get the right layered effect, mix it up with abandon. Think carelessly tossed throws, mismatched pillowcases. No more buying bedding in sets; with this approach, you might pair mismatched top and bottom sheets with a duvet of another style. And mixing textures is a must, especially such soft and cozy fabrics as knits, wool, velvets and faux fur. Don’t forget a dash of the tactile fabric du jour, velvet, in a pillow or duvet cover. It’s also time to go over the top with prints. Geometric patterns have given way to florals, the bigger the better, he says. Many are supersized versions of classic English florals from textiles or wallpaper, often with a dark background. “Other prints are an evolution of the Bohemian trend of a while back,” says Michel. “But with such intense colours and large scale, I call it the Boho look on speed.” Opt for either one or two eye-catching pieces, such as throw blankets and pillowcases, or layer patterns on patterns to create an eclectic look.


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

Under the layers of linens, the latest trend in bedroom furniture is moving away from the upholstered bed that has been in vogue for many years, says Glyn Austin, director of design and co-owner of Cocoon Furnishings in Oakville, Ontario. “As part of the health trend, there is a major return to organic materials in the bedroom,” she says. “And perhaps for that reason, beds with wooden frames are back.” The trend is slowly gaining momentum, and she believes wood-framed beds – transitional or contemporary – soon will have the edge. Those who wish to keep their upholstered versions, she suggests, might panel the wall behind with the wood of their choice: anything from pale oak to rich walnut. The movement has also brought other natural materials back into the bedroom, especially woven ones. Modern versions of wicker chairs, tables and bedframes are streamlined for a sophisticated edge. Austin sees a lot of buzz around Vienna straw, that classic hexagonal-weave material once so ubiquitous, as an insert in wood furniture. Prominent international designers such as Jaime Hayon and Patricia Urquiola have given it a contemporary spin. Shagreen is another natural material she likes for its distinctive texture. “In our custom line, CASE, we can create inserts for bedframes and other furniture out of this very luxe material,” Austin says. •

Photos courtesy of Cocoon Furnishings

THE WINTER ISSUE

159


Environmental awareness now influences our choice of bed linen fabric, says Stan Leibner, co-owner of The Linen Chest, which has stores in Quebec, Ontario and the Maritimes. Take bamboo, a natural fibre made from what is technically a grass and so is easy to produce in a sustainable manner. “It is one of our best-selling materials for bed linens,” Leibner says, “and with good reason.” Environmental considerations aside, bamboo linens are soft and, like cotton, they breathe, this expert says. “They’re possibly the most comfortable set of sheets you will ever sleep on,” he says. As well, it is possible to find duvets and pillows that are bamboo-filled. But Leibner advises buyers to read the label carefully as many contain only a small fraction of this natural filling.

160

THE WINTER ISSUE

movatohome.com

Photos courtesy of Linen Chest

DESIGN


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

In a counter-trend, synthetic materials are favoured by those who crave the proper temperature as they go off to dreamland. This accounts for the rise in sales of gel-filled mattress toppers and pillows, constructed to help air circulate and keep you cool and dry as you sleep, he says. Whatever material bed linens are made of, we still like the look of white-on-white, and monochromatic shades of ivory, taupe and grey, Leibner finds. For the fashion-forward, colours now trending are navy, blush, and shades of coral. But pretty much any shade found on the fashion runways makes its way quickly to bedding. “The bonus is that these new shades are universally appealing and easy to coordinate with rugs and window treatments,” he says. •

THE WINTER ISSUE

161


DESIGN

162

THE WINTER ISSUE

movatohome.com


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

As with the latest trend in linens, bedroom furniture in matched sets should be banished, says Linda Dolman-Weddel, owner of Accents for Living, which has stores in Guelph and Oakville, Ontario. “The matchy-matchy look of the traditional bedroom suite is out,” she says. “What’s in is choosing pieces that have different finishes but still work together.” She suggests starting with a standout upholstered headboard, then selecting chests of drawers and night tables that appeal to you, whether they’re of stained or painted wood or with a mirrored surface. Just don’t overdo it, she cautions, lest the eye has too much to take in. The fewer pieces of furniture there are, the greater the feeling of openness and tranquility. Finally, don’t forget what lies beneath — and above. Very few homes have broadloom in the bedroom anymore, but hardwood floors can be chilly. Placing an area rug under the bed will add warmth underfoot as well as pattern and interest to the decor. If you have enough space, do find a spot for a cozy reading chair, floor lamp and ottoman. Consider multiple light sources in your bedroom including recessed lights, bedside table lamps, and a decorative ceiling fixture, all on dimmer switches. If you have the ceiling height, consider a dramatic chandelier. “So often, people consider lighting an afterthought in the bedroom,” says Dolman-Weddel. “But it really is so important when it comes to setting the mood.” • Photos courtesy of Accents for Living

THE WINTER ISSUE

163


movatohome.com

DESIGN

STYLE FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY

A Toronto couple create a bedroom sanctuary for themselves and a funky space for their son BY CHERYL CORNACCHIA PHOTOGRAPHY: JASON HARTOG STYLING: DVIRA OVADIA

164

THE WINTER ISSUE


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

THE COUPLE WANTED A BEDROOM in which they could relax and watch a movie on their own. Their nine-year-old son needed a bedroom where he could feel grown up and independent. Toronto interior designer Dvira Ovadia managed to meet both sets of the family’s needs by creating unique bedroom decors around powerful statement walls. Installing a wall-to-wall floral mural in the parents’ master bedroom helped transform it into a luxurious retreat with a romantic, bohemian ambience.

movatohome.com

Covering one wall in the boy’s bedroom in bold, black and white animal-print wallpaper rendered it a cool, edgy space, perfect for a young boy on the cusp of adolescence. “A statement wall can make a big difference, especially in a bedroom,” says Ovadia, owner of the eponymously named design firm Dvira Interiors. “Bedrooms are a place to create something unique and have a little fun.” And compared to bathrooms, she adds, they are relatively inexpensive to decorate. •

THE WINTER ISSUE

165


movatohome.com

DESIGN

“It has become a retreat, a place where mom and dad can get away.” The couple in this case had recently remodelled their 1920s downtown Toronto row house into a contemporary space, and they had built an addition where the master bedroom is located. They wanted their new bedroom to match the overall contemporary style of the house but at the same time to stand apart and elicit a bit of a “wow.” The floral mural, Ovadia says, creates a romantic mood. The Anewall mural features oversized, stylized begonias in blush tones. Ovadia used those blush and nude tones as a starting point and replicated them in the furnishings, linens and accent pieces. The addition of a pretty chandelier and translucent glass lamps on the mirror-rimmed night

166

THE WINTER ISSUE

tables carry through the romantic mood. It could all be a little too feminine if it were not for the fact that other than the mural, the room was really a blank slate. The bedroom walls were all painted in Benjamin Moore’s Paper White (OC-55), a subtle, soothing white with grey tones; the trim and ceiling were painted Oxford White. The oak floors were white-washed and the built-in floor-to-ceiling cabinet was finished in matte white. “The room has a very calm feel,” says Ovadia. “It has become a retreat, a place where mom and dad can get away.” The cabinet holds a linear fireplace and f lat-screen television to help make that possible.


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

When it came to their son’s bedroom, Ovadia says, she took a similar approach. The room was also a blank slate. As in the master bedroom, the walls here were painted in Benjamin Moore’s Paper White, the oak floors were white-washed, and the built-in cabinets were finished in a matte white. Once again, Ovadia says, it came down to finding a unique wall covering to make the room’s focal point. “We were looking for something the child could grow into, a room with a bit of a lifespan.” For this room, she says, a hand-painted Aimee Wilder designer paper featuring black and white tigers was a perfect choice. It gave

the space an edgy feel. And, she adds, by adding a cowhide rug and distressed leather headboard, the room became even cooler and more grown up. A charcoal-grey metal trunk from Restoration Hardware and a suspended metal shelf finished the room with a dash of industrial chic. “The key when doing a bedroom for a young person is to invest in a few key pieces that will last 20 to 25 years and then some,” says Ovadia, noting how the metal trunk could easily become a keeper. “The only thing that would date this room is the wallpaper and you could change that out.” •

THE WINTER ISSUE

167


movatohome.com

DESIGN

A WINDOW ON THE LATEST TRENDS Residential windows have undergone a wonderful evolution in design, shape, colour and security

The materials and design elements that we use to build and renovate our homes evolve over time. Windows are no exception. We asked Edgar Sigal, owner of Chateau Window & Door Systems, to give us a look at the current trends in windows, spanning colour, size and shape. QUESTION: Edgar, what are the latest trends in window design? ANSWER: The trend has been to have windows complement modern architectural designs. This has meant bigger windows with more glass and sleek lines with sharper edges. Q: In recent years, we’ve seen a preference for black exterior window frames. Is there a change in the colour of exterior window frames that homeowners are choosing for their homes? A: Black has certainly been a very popular colour because it provides for sharp contrast that highlights the edges of windows against a building. However, we are now seeing a trend toward colours that are a bit softer than a true black. “Iron Ore” and “Graphite” are some of these dark grey tones that accent the windows but are less harsh than black.

168

THE WINTER ISSUE

Q: We’ve seen a shift in recent years to large expanses of fenestration, particularly on contemporary homes. Why is this? And how large are the outsized windows being installed now? A: I believe the shift is really a combination of things. First, maximizing the natural light that flows into a home creates a brighter and more energetic space; and second, being able to see the outdoors with an unobstructed view provides for a more open, less enclosed feeling.

In Canada, we spend so much time in our homes, and the larger windows connect us to the outdoors. I believe these elements combine to make the home a healthier space. Q: In addition to large windows, we’ve also noticed a trend toward large windowed door systems, the ones that can open an entire wall to the outdoors. What are you seeing in this regard and where do you think this trend is heading?


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

A: I think this is an extension of modern design elements and the outdoor connection. We have a number of solutions that allow us to offer door systems that make the outdoor area an extension of a home. Bi-fold doors, multi-slide doors, and lift-slide doors are able to deliver on this with various levels of functionality and usage of space. I believe this trend will continue because it’s really about lifestyle. When I meet with clients, we always talk about how they will use their space, and inevitably we discuss entertaining guests. The desire to have a great venue for a gathering of friends is something that is innate in all of us, and I’m sure it will continue. Q: With such large expanses of glass, it’s natural that homeowners might be concerned about security. How can these concerns be addressed? A: One way in which we address security is to use security glass in areas that are more vulnerable to break-ins. Typically, this means the use of laminated glass, which can withstand greater forces before breaking. And if laminated glass breaks,

it holds together to prevent any would-be thief from gaining entry. A nice side-effect of laminated glass is that it lowers sound transmission, which reduces noise from the exterior. •

Chateau Window & Door Systems 90 Tycos Dr., Suite 1, North York 416-783-3916 www.chateauwindows.com

THE WINTER ISSUE

169


LIFESTYLE

170

THE WINTER ISSUE

movatohome.com


LIFESTYLE TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

ALL SOUPED UP Winter’s cold is tamed by bowls of health-giving broths, chowders and other servings of goodness BY JULIE GEDEON

Lemon lentil soup at Café Santropol

NOVELIST ISABEL ALLENDE CONTENDS that “real soup is to the body what peace is to the soul.” It’s the perfect food on a cold winter’s day, as these experts readily attest. “It warms the heart,” says Mary Lynn Munro, head chef at Montreal’s Café Santropol. “A good bowl with bread and cheese makes a wonderful meal.” Santropol’s kitchen switches to robust flavours in the autumn with root vegetables and such hearty seasonings as coriander, sage and paprika. It’s also time for beef or vegetable-barley. Curry is another winter favourite with sweet potato and almond butter, or cauliflower and lentils. “Our palates are so worldly nowadays,” Munro says. “People travel and taste extensively, and exotic ingredients are readily available at local stores.” •

THE WINTER ISSUE

171


movatohome.com

LIFESTYLE

Black bean soup at Café Santropol

Good soups are made in stages, she says. “The base – onions, celery and garlic – must first be cooked well,” she explains. “Then include the spices and, after that, build up the stock, adding vegetables and/or meat depending on how they cook so they don’t become mush.” Aroma is key. “It sparks good memories for most of us,” Munro says. “It also encourages appetite in people not feeling their best.” Leading nutritionist Julie Daniluk can’t say enough about soup’s healing qualities. She credits soup for playing a major role in her recovery from post-infectious colitis and joint pain. “Anyone with digestive issues should consider switching to soups and stews,” she says. “And many vegetable nutrients become more bio-accessible when cooked.”

Mary Lynn Munro, head chef at Montreal’s Café Santropol

172

THE WINTER ISSUE


LIFESTYLE TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

“Taking soup to an ailing friend is usually the best gift.” – Julie Daniluk

movatohome.com

Daniluk’s Hot Detox approach incorporates traditional Chinese wisdom of warming energetically cooler food, such as tomatoes, so that the stomach easily processes it. “There’s been a shift toward raw food because of its higher enzymes but that approach comes from warmer places like Florida and California,” Toronto-based Daniluk explains. “We need a diet suited to our climate: salads and fruit in summer but leaning into soups come winter.” Enjoying a cornucopia of colours is a nutritious practice. “Vitamin A foods tend to be orange, vitamin B is found in greens, while vitamin C foods are often red, such as a red pepper soup,” Daniluk says. “In order to maintain water-soluble nutrients, it is important to not overcook the soup.” Ginger, turmeric and other spices not only heat things up but have anti-inflammatory benefits. “And science is now finding that bone broth provides amino acids that may nourish our digestive lining to heal us faster,”

she says. “That’s why taking soup to an ailing friend is usually the best gift.” Bone broth may have been sipped as far back as the Neanderthal days, some 200,000 to 28,000 years ago, according to archeologist John Speth, professor emeritus of anthropology at the University of Michigan. Soups as we more commonly know them probably came into existence between 5,000 to 20,000 years ago, once leak-proof containers could be fashioned. Over recent centuries, soups have been a great equalizer with both rich and poor having the means to cook them or buy a bowl. The first restaurant, according to Larousse Gastronomique, opened in Paris circa 1765 when a soup salesman named Boulanger allegedly posted a sign reading, Boulanger débite des restaurants divins (Boulanger sells restoratives fit for the gods). His claim led to the word ‘restaurant’ being derived from restaurer – to restore – in reference to the broths he considered capable of rejuvenation. •

Corn chowder soup at Café Santropol

THE WINTER ISSUE

173


LIFESTYLE

movatohome.com

Offering nutritious food at affordable prices is why Carly Murray and Avi Lugassy run Soupa Café in Victoria. “It’s a way for us to do what we love in service to the community,” Lugassy says. The couple inherited about 100 recipes from the souperie’s previous owners, and Murray has concocted another dozen. The chicken stew, Boston clam chowder and cream of broccoli are winter favourites. Murray roasts and spices vegetables to intensify their flavour before they are boiled. Daily vegan, dairy-free and gluten-free options have her being quite creative, something that began while she was vegetarian for several years. “Our African peanut soup is another winter favourite, with yams, tomatoes, peanut butter and peanuts, coconut milk, curry and a touch of cayenne,” she says. “So is the red lentil mulligatawny.” While it might not be as cold in Victoria as in other parts of Canada, Soupa Café’s locations are packed on rainy days. “People want something to warm them up and remind them of home,” Lugassy says. “We’ve had some customers declare that no one makes soup better than their mom and then change their mind once they’ve tasted ours but, no worries, we won’t tell on them.”

Photos: Soupa Café

174

THE WINTER ISSUE


LIFESTYLE TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

Chicken curry soup, Kitskitchen

Tomato chicken soup, Kitskitchen

Of course, it always depends on the mom. Joni Lind gives her mother, Wendy, full credit for making soup integral to her life. “I grew up on her delicious soups,” says the co-owner of Kitskitchen in Vancouver. “It’s her recipes we use.” When Lind returned from London, England, not feeling well, her mother, who also takes a Traditional Chinese Medicine approach to balancing food, suggested incorporating more soup into her meals. “I almost immediately had an easier time digesting, regained my energy, and even moderated my weight,” Lind recalls.

Joni Lind and Amy Kaye, Kitskitchen

When her former coworkers smelled the soups she took to work for lunch and saw how great she felt, they left money on her desk to ensure she cooked enough for their lunches, too. “That’s when I asked my long-time friend, Amy Kaye, to help me to sell these soups to stores,” Lind says. The butternut squash with a spicy ginger kick is a big winter seller, as is the yam and coconut with chili, garlic and lime. “I love a splash of citrus,” Lind says. “It gives the soup a fuller taste all the way to the back of your mouth.”

Potato leek, Kitskitchen

Lind prefers simmering to boiling whenever possible to give the ingredients’ flavours an opportunity to combine. “The ingredients used makes the biggest difference,” she says. She follows in her mother’s habit of cooking soup every Sunday at home to fill the house with aromas and to eat well all week. “When you’re not feeling your best for whatever reason, soup is the ultimate comfort food,” she says. “There’s an emotional connection to every family’s traditions and that warm goodness.” •

THE WINTER ISSUE

175


LIFESTYLE

RECIPES Soupa Café’s Leek and Potato Soup INGREDIENTS: 1 tbsp butter 4-5 stalks of asparagus 2 cups of peeled diced potatoes 2 stalks of diced leeks and greens 1/2 bunch of diced kale Salt should be added to taste White and black pepper to taste 8.5 cups of water

DIRECTIONS: Melt butter in pot and sweat leeks and greens and asparagus until tender, add a pinch of salt during this process. Next add the water, diced potatoes, salt, white pepper and black pepper and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer until the potatoes are tender, then add kale and remove from heat, once kale is tender, serve and enjoy.

Kitskitchen’s Hearty Chicken Curry Soup (Dairy-free, wheat-free, serves 6)

INGREDIENTS:

DIRECTIONS:

1 tsp cooking oil 2.5 cups chopped yellow onion (big chop) 3.5 cups chopped potatoes (big chop) 2 cups diced carrots, bite size 1.5 tbsp dill, fresh or dried 1.5 tbsp mint, fresh, chopped 0.75 tbsp curry powder 0.75 tbsp – masala powder 0.5 tbsp – sea salt 7 cups – distilled water 1.5-2 cups – brown rice, cooked 2 cooked & shredded chicken breasts

• Sauté onions and potatoes, mixing in all spices and salt. • Add the water, cover and bring to a boil. Using an immersion blender or countertop blender, blend this mixture to create a puree. • Sautee the carrots, seasoning with a small amount of salt, until they’re soft. Transfer the blended mix back into a pot and add the carrots and herbs to the blended mix. • Combine the brown rice and shredded chicken breast to the puree mix. Add salt and pepper to taste.

Kitskitchen’s Cracked Pepper and Mushroom Soup (Wheat-free, vegan, serves 6)

176

THE WINTER ISSUE

INGREDIENTS:

DIRECTIONS:

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

• Combine ingredients #3 - #9 in a large pot over medium heat. Stir until onions are transparent, between 5-10 minutes. • Add potatoes and water. Cover, and increase heat. • Once potatoes are soft (check by piercing one with a fork), blend with immersion blender or transfer to a blender (tip: cool the mixture slightly before blending). Blend ingredients until a smooth consistency is achieved. • If blended in a blender and not an immersion blender, transfer contents back into pot. • Fold in ingredients #1 and #2 and stir. Add salt and pepper to taste.

1.5 cups cooked buckwheat 2.5 cups Cremini mushrooms, sautéed 1 tsp cooking oil 2.5 cups chopped yellow onion (large chop) 1.75 tbsp pressed garlic 2.5 tsp fresh thyme 3 tsp sea salt 1.5 tsp cracked pepper (we like fresh, strong pepper) 2.25 cups chopped mushrooms 3.5 cups chopped yellow potato 7 cups distilled water


LIFESTYLE TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

Julie Daniluk’s Hot Detox Butternut Squash Soup

Kitskitchen’s Simple Dairy-Free Potato Leek Soup

Both traditional Chinese medicine and Ayurveda promote quashing your sweet cravings by adding naturally sweet, highly nutritious orange foods to a recipe. Butternut squash is a great example, with its deep-orange-coloured flesh and sweet flavour. It’s filled with alphaand beta-carotene, powerful antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents.

(Wheat-free, serves 6)

INGREDIENTS: 7.5 cups chopped leeks 1 tsp olive oil or butter 5 cups chopped yellow potatoes 8 cups chicken broth (option to split this: 4 cups chicken broth and 4 cups water), or vegetable broth for a vegan version 1.5 tsp sea salt

DIRECTIONS:

INGREDIENTS:

• Combine oil/butter and chopped leeks in a large pot. Stir over medium heat until leeks are wilted. Sprinkle in the salt, and stir again. • Add the potatoes, chicken broth (and water, if split). • Cover and increase the heat. Bring to a light boil until potatoes are soft. • Use an immersion blender to blend until smooth. If you do not have an immersion blender, use a blender (let the mixture cool before blending if using a counter top blender). • Salt to taste.

1 2 tbsp 1/2 tsp 1 tsp 1 tsp 1⁄8 tsp 1 tsp 1 tsp 1 cup 1 1⁄2 cups

Kitskitchen’s Spicy Tomato and Chicken Soup (Wheat-free, dairy-free, serves 6)

INGREDIENTS:

DIRECTIONS:

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

• Combine ingredients #1- #12 in a large pot over medium heat. Cover and bring to a boil, then turn the heat down to a simmer and cook the vegetables until they’re soft. • Using either an immersion blender or countertop blender (ensure the mix has cooled slightly to prevent blender explosions), blend this mixture to create a puree/base. • Combine the pureed mixture with the last two ingredients; add salt and pepper to taste.

1 cup chopped red pepper (about 1 whole) 2 cups chopped yellow onion (big chop) 2 tbsp pressed garlic 1.5 cups chopped carrot 5 cups chopped tomatoes (big chop); (we like ripe, local field tomatoes) 5 tbsp fresh basil 1.5 tsp fennel seed 0.5 tsp chili flakes 4 tsp sea salt 1.5 tsp crushed black pepper 1 tsp dried thyme 4 cups distilled water 1.5 cups cooked buckwheat (or rice or quinoa) 2 cooked & shredded chicken breasts

large butternut squash (about 6 cups) coconut oil pink rock or grey sea salt organic lemon zest organic lemon juice ground cinnamon coconut nectar or honey pure vanilla extract bone or vegan broth organic coconut milk

DIRECTIONS: 1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. 2. Halve the squash lengthwise, and remove the seeds and stringy matter. Rub the insides and cut surface with coconut oil, and season with salt. 3. Place cut side up in a roasting pan, and bake for 1 hour or until fork-tender. 4.  Remove the squash from the oven. Scoop out the flesh and place in a food processor. 5.  Add the lemon zest, lemon juice and coconut oil, and coconut nectar and vanilla if using. Puree until smooth. 6.  Add the cinnamon, and more salt to taste, and pulse a few times to mix well. Serve as a puree. 7.  To make this into a soup, place the puree in a saucepan. Stir in broth and coconut milk, and heat until simmering. Makes 4 cups puree or 10 cups soup. Keeps in the fridge for up to 1 week. Recipe reprinted with permission by Julie Daniluk RHN and Harper Collins Canada

THE WINTER ISSUE

177


movatohome.com

DESIGN

CREATING A WOW! EFFECT

Interior designer Nadine Thomson bestows dramatic design on this Baie d’Urfé powder room

1

BY NADINE THOMSON PHOTOGRAPHY: LUISA GONZALEZ

THIS HOUSE IN BAIE D’URFÉ, A QUAINT suburb of Montreal, offers beautiful views of Lake St. Louis. And when Gene and Mary Tsartolias bought it in 1990, they saw a diamond in the rough. Eighteen years ago, the couple did a largescale renovation on the house, followed by a more modest “refresh” in 2012. Fast forward to 2018 and the now empty-nesters have braved yet another renovation starting with this ground-floor powder room. As is typical of many homes, this one has a powder room that is a small, high-traffic space used by everyone, including guests. My clients asked me to create a spectacular showcase space that would reflect their personalities; they’re willing to take design risks while keeping a strong focus on durable materials and high functionality. They also wished to keep a few of the room’s existing elements to ensure continuity between the new space and the rest of the home’s details and craftmanship. At 55 by 61 inches (approximately 23 square feet), this space was definitely a challenge to design because of its modest dimensions. Since powder rooms are meant for quick visits, a dramatic look works well. This was a perfect opportunity to create a wow factor, which we did by installing a contemporary piece of furniture as the vanity. We also used various shades of warm gold and shimmering black through wallpaper and wainscotting. The result? A space that was transformed from a humdrum utilitarian room into a pièce de résistance. •

178

THE WINTER ISSUE

1. The original powder room’s solid oak moldings and door were preserved along with the crystal knobs with brass detailing and matching solid-brass hinges. The original colour and finish of the outside of the door was kept, but the inside was painted the same colour as the wainscot (Benjamin Moore Jet Black 2120-10) with a high-gloss finish. Don’t let the name fool you; this is actually a very warm black with a strong undertone of brown and it has a soft-black feeling. There’s nothing harsh about it.

2

2. The clients loved the idea of a marble floor. However, they were concerned about the maintenance and performance of such a delicate material in a high-traffic area. Instead, they opted for a high-gloss-finish porcelain tile that replicates marble but is more durable. Ciot cut the 24-by-24-inch porcelain tiles down to three-quarters of an inch by three inches for a classic herringbone pattern; they were placed on a mesh for easy installation.

Before

3. The Hudson Metal Single Washstand, fitted with a Lugarno faucet with aged-brass finish, is from Restoration Hardware. It has a Caesarstone counter in Pure White and occupies approximately half of the floor space. However, because it has an open bottom, this piece of furniture does not feel obtrusive, and it affords the homeowners much-needed counterspace that they didn’t have with their previous pedestal sink. The countertop is extremely durable.


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

4. We repurposed a vanity mirror that, against the contrast of the wallpaper, was reinvigorated with new life; it doesn’t even look like the same mirror.

4

5. A point to consider with an open-bottom vanity is the plumbing. Drains and water-intake valves are visible, so they should be beautiful and finished in the same metal that is being used throughout the space. In this case, the metal is aged brass, which added a significant cost to the project as well as some headaches: we had to locate the supplier from Restoration Hardware whose plating is the same as that on the legs and faucet. Whatever finish you are working with in your bathroom renovation, the challenge is to find the exact colour among the various suppliers. For instance, Restoration Hardware’s aged brass is not the same as that of other companies. At one point, we had to let go of trying to find exact matches and realized that having all the metals in the same tone and warmth was more than sufficient. This creates a curated environment and allowed us to dispense with our obsession for the perfect match. In the end, everything works together in harmony.

5

3 6

6. The wainscotting sits slightly higher than standard to create a significant backsplash for the vanity. The top of the panelling is 40 inches from the floor to provide the vanity with a 6-inch backsplash. We also installed raised panels in the wainscot and lined up the top of the one above the toilet with the top of the vanity to create a continuous horizontal line around the room. By doing so, we also created a generous space between the top of the panel and the chair rail that allowed us to install a glass shelving unit above the toilet. It added elegance as well as needed storage space.

THE WINTER ISSUE

179


DESIGN

180

THE WINTER ISSUE

movatohome.com


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

HAPPY COLOURS An apartment near Mumbai is designed in strong hues and a mix of traditional and contemporary furnishings BY PHILLIPA RISPIN PHOTOGRAPHY: PRASHANT BHAT

THE WINTER ISSUE

181


movatohome.com

DESIGN

THE EXPRESSIONS working from home and home office carry different meanings for different people. For some, it means having a laptop and a favourite space on the sofa, or a table or desk in a corner of the living room. Some are lucky enough to have an entire room. This apartment in Thane, a city near Mumbai, India, has not one but two offices. It’s a very large home and business space, made out of two mirror-image adjoining apartments. The common wall shared by the

182

THE WINTER ISSUE

two living rooms was demolished, giving the new apartment a total of 7,300 square feet. It’s owned by a man and his son, who are in business together, and it also accommodates the son’s wife and two daughters. The elder businessman is not just a captain of industry; he’s also a prominent person in his community. He and his family need space for work, space for formally receiving members of the community, and space for private family life and entertaining.

(Preceding pages) Two apartments combined into one make for an enormous formal seating area, with expanses of walls broken up by dimensional treatments. (Above) The two combined apartments are home to three generations of one family: the paterfamilias, his son, and the son’s wife and two daughters. In the son’s office, an artificial turf floor offers a vibrant contrast against the dark walnut furnishings with their hint of traditional Asian design.


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

The father’s office has a more contemporary aesthetic of clean lines. Colours are mostly subdued, but his favourite, orange, is subtly featured in a tabletop sculpture.

The main person behind the interiors is Manish Dikshit, a partner and design principal in AUM Architects. He and designers Sonali Pandit and Nachiket Borawake had their work cut out for them, adapting the combined apartments’ decor and layouts to make distinct areas within a cohesive whole. They did this by demolishing only a few walls; instead, they used dividers, colour, and dimensional ceiling and wall treatments to signify the changes in function. •

THE WINTER ISSUE

183


movatohome.com

DESIGN

“The ceiling height is not the best; it’s 9.75 feet high,” Dikshit says. “It’s a critical element. In the apartment’s elongated spaces, we added lots of vertical elements to give a sense of height. All of the areas have been very distinctly done; however, we have tried to smooth the transition from one space to another. The boundaries have been created in a way so that it’s a subtle conversation between any two spaces. At the same time, one is surprised at the metamorphosis. “Because it’s a big apartment, we recommended that they should not have one big living space,” he continues. “They need different zones so that they can enjoy the space but it’s not monotonous.”

One end of the huge main living area is dedicated to dining. A curved wall partitions it from the main entrance to provide “a little bit of suspense for visitors,” says design principal Manish Dikshit.

184

THE WINTER ISSUE


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

Apart from wanting to make each room different for aesthetic reasons, Dikshit and colleagues used the many spaces to accommodate two distinct tastes in decor. The paterfamilias, who is almost 60 years old, has somewhat contemporary tastes, and he also loves the colour orange. “He wears only orange clothing,” Dikshit says. “He told us that no matter what happens, ‘I need orange in my room, but use it in a subtle way.’ ” The 35-year-old son’s taste runs more to classic Indian style. “He lived in Germany for four years, and feels that the difference between continents is colours,” Dikshit explains. “He said that greys and blacks appear so often in Europe, and that ‘I want colour

movatohome.com

in my house,’ so we gave him colour but, to remind him of his time abroad, in one room (a guest room) we gave him one black wall.” Even there, however, there are large warm elements introduced through wood furniture. A noticeable feature of the apartment is the use of dimensional ceiling and wall treatments. Perhaps the most striking is in the prayer room, dedicated to Lord Krishna. The walls and floor are pale colours and mostly unadorned, but rising behind the altar and across the ceiling is a sophisticated treatment of closely spaced slats of wood that cause interesting patterns of light. They give a warm, organic effect in a space of quiet, non-distracting decor. •

(Above) The family members are devotees of Lord Krishna. Their prayer room is sparely decorated, and lighting design creates interesting patterns on the wood slats covering the ceiling and one wall. (Left) The informal seating area is divided from the formal living room by a geometric openwork screen.

THE WINTER ISSUE

185


DESIGN

The formal living room is a large space and makes full use of wall treatments to make it feel more intimate and to emphasize various areas. Its feature wall comprises turquoise textured expanses, which flank a custom-made two-dimensional marble panel that forms a focal point, and a wooden partition overlapping the textured wall at one end. “Since the seating extends beyond the feature wall, we used this wooden partition to give more length to the seating arrangement, and also this partition is the divider between the formal seating and informal seating on the other side,” Dikshit says. •

(Above) The master bedroom used by the son and his wife features intricate detail and plush textures. (Right) There are three guest bedrooms in the home. This one’s geometric headboard and blue tones make subtle reference to the living area’s decor.

186

THE WINTER ISSUE

movatohome.com


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

The late editor-in-chief of Vogue magazine Diana Vreeland famously said that “pink is the navy blue of India.” The girls’ bedroom and playroom make good use of a vibrant “navy blue.” (Bottom left) In a guest bedroom, a chartreuse headboard glows against a wall of “navy blue” softened to a more millennial pink shade.

THE WINTER ISSUE

187


DESIGN

The paterfamilias’s bedroom reflects his love of the colour orange and preference for contemporary and Mid-century Modern styles.

188

THE WINTER ISSUE

movatohome.com


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

movatohome.com

The home’s melding of two apartments into one provides two enormous balconies offering wide views of the Thane skyline.

The informal seating area decor shows an Asian influence, which is also expressed in several other parts of the apartment. In this seating area, wallpaper in subtle shades of gold forms the background against which Asian minimalist furniture has been placed. Private areas such as bedrooms and guest rooms all have their own strong personalities. “The concept is that people get bored if they see the same thing again and again, so every room is completely different,” Dikshit says. “There’s a surprise element. Every room has dramatic decor but blends well together.” •

THE WINTER ISSUE

189


movatohome.com

DESIGN

WORTH THE DRIVE

An Acton store that specializes in leather is an attraction for shoppers throughout the GTA BY SUSAN KELLY

GENERATIONS OF TORONTO-AREA SHOPPERS remember The Olde Hide House’s slogan: “It’s worth the drive to Acton.” The 30,000-square-foot store opened in 1980 and it quickly grew to become a destination retailer of all things made of leather. The store features leather,

190

THE WINTER ISSUE

suede and shearling coats, along with leather accessories and furniture. Now called simply The Hide House, the store still attracts those seeking fine leather furniture. “For many people, our Lifetime Furniture Gallery is the first stop,” says general manager Melissa Massey. After 38 years in the business, they know their leather here. The store is a landmark in Acton, nicknamed “Leathertown” for its long history associated with the industry. The Hide House in a previous incarnation once enjoyed a link to what once was the biggest leather tannery in the British Empire. The historic warehouse building is an attraction: visitors come from across Canada and some 40 other countries each year to pass through the imposing wood doors.

Some are loyal fans of the store’s furniture, crafted of top-grain leather — the only kind found here. Customers come more out of desire for a style update than out of necessity, says Massey. That’s because the leather furniture they purchased some 30 years ago often is still in good condition; the upholstery material is four times more durable than fabric. “The beauty of genuine leather is that it just gets better with age,” she says. As for first-time buyers, they appreciate that Hide House’s expert staff is ready to help with all aspects of the buying process, from style to choosing leather grades and colours. Have your heart set on a deep-burgundy tufted leather ottoman? “We likely can get it for you,” Massey says. “Our suppliers have


DESIGN TORONTO WINTER 2018/2019

a multitude of colours and leather grades to suit everyone’s needs.” To complement the fine leather furniture, there are also stylish table lamps, wood occasional tables and sideboards, plus a large selection of hair-on-hide rugs that are so on-trend now. Unsure which coffee table will look best in front of your new leather sofa? A design consultant on staff can help put together the perfect look. The styles on view in the showroom are selected to have timeless appeal and suit the transitional style currently favoured by

movatohome.com

homeowners. “The majority of our leather furniture is manufactured in North America,” Massey explains, “and we like to highlight our Canadian manufacturer.” The brand featured here includes the award-winning designs of Toronto-based LeatherCraft Furniture. The company’s chairs, recliners, sofas and suites are manufactured locally, individually hand-cut, and custom-upholstered. And there are wellknown U.S. manufacturers of leather chairs and sofas, including Bradington-Young, Our House Design and Comfort Design.

“These are just some of the reasons why it’s always worth the drive to Acton,” Massey says. •

The Hide House 49 Eastern Ave., Acton 519-853-1031 ~ 877-453-2843 www.hidehouse.ca

THE WINTER ISSUE

191


BUYERS’ GUIDE

A WINDOW ON THE LATEST TRENDS Chateau Window & Door Systems www.chateauwindows.com 416-783-3916

FEELS LIKE HOME Baudit Interior Design www.baudit.ca 905-335-9828

ALL SOUPED UP kitskitchen www.kitskitchen.ca 778-968-1987 ~ 778-855-0841

HOW TO UPDATE AND UPGRADE Import Temptations www.import-temptations.com 416-256-3150

WORTH THE DRIVE The Hide House www.hidehouse.ca 519-853-1031 ~ 877-453-2843

Café Santropol www.santropol.com 514-842-3110

CREATING A WOW! EFFECT Nadine Thomson Interior Design www.nadinethomson.com 514-775-2259

HAPPY COLOURS AUM Architects www.aumarchitects.in +91-22-2418-3633

FAREWELL TO THE SIXTIES Carriage Lane Interior Design and Custom Build www.carriagelanedesigns.com 905-625-1444

DOWNSIZING FOR AN UPSCALE LIFE Hodgson Design Associates www.hodgsondesignassociates.com 604-264-7011

STYLE FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY Dvira Interiors www.dvira.com 416-457-8827

A MEETING OF MINDS Synthesis Design www.synthesisdesign.ca 604-980-2087

SIMPLE PLAN Michelle Berwick Design www.michelleberwickdesign.com

CLOTHED IN COMMENTARY Lesley Hampton www.lesleyhampton.com 647-225-1373

Lavida Contracting 416-728-2390 INTO THE PRESENT DXT Studio www.dxtstudio.com 416-774-6867

192

THE WINTER ISSUE

WITH A LITTLE HELP FROM MY FRIENDS LT Interiors www.ltinteriors.ca 403-991-1263

Soupa Café www.soupacafe.com 250-380-0856 Julie Daniluk www.juliedaniluk.com COMFY, COZY AND ECLECTIC Accents for Living www.accentsforliving.ca 519-822-2929 Cocoon Furnishings www.cocoonfurnishings.ca 905-829-2780   Linen Chest www.linenchest.com   Fino Lino www.finolino.net  604-736-1828   Fabricville  www.fabricville.com


AD LIST 90

Accents for Living

102

ACO Systems

155

Allan Rug

11

Barroso Homes

13

Barrymore

113

Binns

27

Bloomsbury Fine Cabinetry

112

Chateau Windows and Doors

79 103

Cheney/Dundas/Muskoka Ciot

78

Cocoon Furnishings

15

Damiani Jewellers

135 66

Doors & More European Flooring

9

Faema

42

Fleurco

194 43

General Products Hicks Design

54

Hide House

23

Imperial Rug

6 196

Import Temptations Kolbe Gallery

30

Komandor Closets

91

Linen Chest

17

Maple Drapery

134 19 125

Mark Lash MUTI Kitchen & Bath O.NIX Design

29

Papro Consulting

67

Runtal North America

4

Simply Closets

2

Weavers Art

55 145

X-Tile Yorkville Design

NEXT ISSUE

Kitchens and bathrooms. They’re functional rooms that we all need in order to have comfortable lives. And when they’re well designed, they also please us with their beauty as well as their functionality. In our next issue – Kitchen and Bath Trends – we’ll show you everything from great design to high functionality. Whether you’re thinking of adding a spectacular island to your kitchen as a gathering place for your family or adding a steam shower to your master ensuite as an end-of-day sanctuary, you’ll find the issue full of useful profiles and information. Moreover, Kitchen and Bath Trends will officially launch our transformation into an exciting new national magazine. Be sure to get your copy. THE WINTER ISSUE

193


WELCOME TO YOUR NEW BACKYARDâ„¢


CELEBRATING

39 Years

160 East Beaver Creek Rd., #26, Richmond Hill, On. L4B 3L4

www.gppatio.com 905-709-1162


Toronto Home - Winter 2018/2019