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THE

TRENDS ISSUE

SUSTAINABLE MAKEOVERS

The trend toward environmentally friendly renovations

TILE TRENDS The latest tile styles for floors, walls and more

EVOKING EMOTION

GREEN REAL ESTATE

Buying and selling eco-friendly homes

GLORIOUS GREECE

Athens and Santorini beckon as a summer destination $7.99

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Scott MacKenzie’s landscape art taps into deep feelings

THIS SUMMER’S ASTROLOGICAL ACTIVITY

BARISTA-STYLE HOME COFFEE MACHINES


FACE THE MODERN TIMES!

Contact us to learn more about the different treatments and surgeries. FACIAL REJUVENATION: WHEN TO CHOOSE A FACELIFT OVER ‘INJECTABLES’ Aging is a fact of life. Depending on genetic, environmental and other factors, some of us age sooner than others. The day will come when you look in the mirror and decide that you need to ‘freshen up’ so that your appearance outside is more reflective of how vibrant you feel inside. The medical options can fall into 2 groups: surgery and injectable products.

E. Hashim, Plastic Surgeon

MD,CM, M.Sc, FRCS(C), FACS • First Prize in Surgery at McGill University • Diplomate of American Board of Plastic Surgery (United States) • Fellow in Plastic Surgery (Royal College of Surgeons Canada) FRCSC • Fellow in Plastic Surgery (American College of Surgeons, U.S) FACS • MSc.(Experimental Surgery) McGill University

A facelift procedure does exactly what that name says: it takes tissues that have sagged and lifts them to a more youthful, pleasing position. The position of the skin, muscles and fat can all be lifted at once, and can even be done using local anaesthesia in most cases. With a recovery time of about 2 weeks, it is a fantastic option to get a long-lasting result. Injectable options are not a replacement for a facelift procedure. Rather, they are complementary. Injectable options are used to create temporary local changes at the injection site. None of these, however, can actually lift a sagging neck or correct jowls the way a facelift can.

facelift | breast & silhouette | non surgical treatments 2381 Gouin West Blvd. (near l’Acadie) www.ccpmtl.com | www.surgeryclinic.ca | info@ccpmtl.com | Phone : 514 277-6644 |


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EDITOR’S LETTER

EVERYONE WANTS TO LIVE in a home that is visually pleasing as well as practical and functional. That’s why so many of us renovate. Overhauling a home allows us to create precisely the environment that suits our lifestyles and tastes. The trend toward renovating residential properties is a relatively recent one. During the Great Depression of the 1930s, for instance, homeowners were so focused on just getting by financially that they made do with the homes they had, if they hadn’t already lost their homes because of the catastrophic state of the economy. The post-war period saw an unprecedented housing boom that met the needs of the baby boom. So, the 1950s and 60s were decades of brand-new houses that didn’t need a lot of TLC. But by the 1970s and 80s, many of those postwar homes were in need of facelifts, and the renovation industry kicked into high gear. The trend toward improving residential properties does not seem to be abating. Think about the homeowners you know and consider how many of them have renovated their homes. While it can be cathartic to discard wornout old bathroom fixtures, kitchen cabinets, mouldy drywall and warped flooring in favour of newer, better materials and fixtures, there is an environmental price to pay for upgrading our homes. All of those discarded items have to go somewhere and, in the past, they’ve gone straight to landfill sites. The planet pays the price when we renovate.

That’s why I feel so sanguine about a trend that signals positive change. In this issue, writer Phillipa Rispin tells us about renovation companies that are guided by ecological values. From building to renovating, these companies implement environmentally sound principles to ensure that their footprints on Mother Earth are as light as possible. And they’re building or renovating houses that exert less pressure on the environment. Phillipa also interviewed Jennifer Lynn Walker, a Montreal real estate broker who is guided by the same environmental concerns. I hope that Jennifer’s eco-conscious approach to buying and selling homes is the beginning of a trend in her industry. Because this is our annual Trends issue, writer Susan Kelly looks at what’s new in tiles: ceramics, porcelain and natural stone. And Julie Gedeon tells us about colour trends. Hint: They’ve been getting increasingly vibrant in recent years. Julie interviewed colour expert Marie-Chantal Milette about colour’s impact on our moods and behaviours. It’s always interesting to watch trends develop. I fervently hope that the trend toward a new eco-consciousness will continue and that we’ll all embrace that change.

STEPHANIE WHITTAKER Editor-in-Chief stephanie@movatohome.com

There are several ways you can stay in touch with us: @movatohome @movatohome @movatohome

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CONTRIBUTORS

JULIE GEDEON Julie Gedeon, a seasoned writer, editor and writing instructor/coach, is grateful to colour expert Marie-Chantal Milette for helping her to see the world more vividly. “I notice all the different shades of foliage during hikes a lot more now, knowing that people see more kinds of green than any other colour,” Julie says in reference to the story she wrote after interviewing the founder of Kryptonie The Color Agency. “I also pay more attention to how colours might be influencing my thinking.” PHILLIPA RISPIN Writer/editor Phillipa Rispin had fun researching her stories about sustainable renovating and a “green” real estate broker. “It was interesting learning how four different sizes of business, in three Canadian metropolitan areas, approached the issue,” she says. “I could discern slight regional differences but, because the businesses are dedicated to the same basic philosophy of eco-consciousness, there were far more similarities. On the other hand, only one renovator told me about searching for a family’s cat lost in the ductwork. The quest ended happily; however, the telling of it ended with ‘I’ve found other things in walls I’d rather not mention.’ But that’s a story for another day.” NADINE THOMSON Nadine Thomson is an interior designer who began her career designing the stylish interiors of high-end private jets for members of the corporate elite. For the past 20 years, she has been the principal designer at Nadine Thomson Interior Design, specializing in residential and commercial spaces. She is also an instructor in interior design at a college in Montreal. For this issue, Nadine explains how she designed an ensuite bathroom for her clients and tells us how to get the look. SUSAN KELLY Trends have always fascinated frequent contributor Susan Kelly. “I’m always wondering why,” she says. “Why does a particular colour or style, out of all the myriad possibilities, appeal to our consciousness?” For this issue, Susan was glad to get some far-seeing answers about tile trends from industry insiders across the country. She also dons her astrologer chapeau for another feature story in which she muses how this summer’s celestial trends might influence our lives and home decor choices. Susan provides weekly forecasts via Facebook at Susan Kelly Astrology.

Volume 10, number 4, Trends Issue 2018 Date of Issue: July, 2018

6100 TransCanada Highway Suite 100, Pointe-Claire Quebec H9R 1B9

PUBLISHER Dr. Sharon Azrieli CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Stanley Kirsh EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Stephanie Whittaker ART DIRECTOR Randy Laybourne EDITORIAL COORDINATOR Carmen Lefebvre ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Neve Foltz CONTRIBUTORS Cheryl Cornacchia

Susan Kelly La Carmina Tracey MacKenzie Brenda O’Farrell

PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Wendy Loper CONTROLLER Jenny Marques DIRECTOR OF SALES - NATIONAL Kelly Chicoine FOUNDER Leah Lipkowitz LEGAL DEPOSIT issn

1920-1370 Montreal Home

magazine Inc. 2018. All rights reserved. Any copying or reproduction of content without

Phillipa Rispin

the written permission of Montreal

Karen Seidman

Home magazine is strictly prohibited.

Nadine Thomson PHOTOGRAPHERS Maxime Brouillet Guillermo Castro Dominique Filion Charles Lanteigne Valerie Wilcox STYLISTS Heather Lewis Jean Monet

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CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Matthew Azrieli

Julie Gedeon Elisabeth Kalbfuss

Angus McRitchie

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CONTENTS

26 ON THE COVER

Trends Special Feature

THE TREND TOWARD TREADING LIGHTLY Some Canadian renovation companies are offering environmentally sustainable services

COOL CANOPY

The spectacular design of a St. Sauveur home brings the verdant aesthetic of the outdoors inside

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HELLENIC HOLIDAY

Create your own Golden Age by vacationing in Athens and Santorini this summer

60 EVOCATIVE VIEWS

Artist Scott MacKenzie paints landscapes to inspire deep emotions in viewers

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TURNING VISIONS INTO REALITIES

4300 Cote de Liesse Mont Royal, Quebec H4N 2P7 514-345-0909 • www.loffice.com


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CONTENTS

A DREAM CONDO IN HOCKEY HEAVEN

A homeowner gives designer Eugenia Triandos free rein to create a beautiful condo in the Tour des Canadiens

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6 EDITOR’S LETTER 14 THIS JUST IN An array of new products for your home

34 Trends Special Feature GREEN REAL ESTATE Sustainability is a key value for this Montreal real estate broker

46 Trends Special Feature MOODY BLUES - AND GREENS AND REDS, TOO Colour has a strong impact on our psyches

54 GOOD THINGS IN SMALL SPACES A modest-sized garden is given all the elements of a backyard oasis

70 SUMMER STARS This season’s astrology is characterized by three eclipses and a retrograde planet

72 NATURAL HABITAT A condo is redesigned for a couple who move into the iconic Habitat 67 after downsizing

106 Trends Special Feature

DIAL UP THE STYLE WITH TILE

There are stunning choices in the new ceramic, porcelain and stone tiles on the market

80 Trends Special Feature FEAST YOUR EYES The newest restaurants are being designed to connect diners with the folks who prepare their meals

86 ITS ORIGINAL VOCATION A pair of 1920s row houses, converted to an auto-body shop, are restored to become a chic urban home

96 MONTREAL CALENDAR A round-up of what’s happening in the city now

124 WAKE UP! SMELL THE COFFEE! How to select the right barista-style coffee machine for your kitchen

126 SMALL SPACE, BIG IMPACT How a designer packed a lot of wow into a modest-sized bathroom

114 HAPPY HANG-OUT

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A redesigned Toronto home becomes a joyful magnet for neighbourhood children


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DESIGN

1. SOPHISTICATED STRIPES Transforming your bedroom with effortlessly sophisticated appeal, the Brady duvet cover features classic stripes in grey neutral tones with a highlight of denim blue. This textural woven jacquard features a geometric reverse printed on cotton. Linen Chest 1 2

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2. FABULOUS FLOAT The stylish Float line of acrylic bathroom accessories features a sleek modern look with transparent stripe details. Available in grey, white, black or purple to suit your decor. Linen Chest www.linenchest.com

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DESIGN

THE CANOPY INDOORS AND OUT

The design of a St. Sauveur home’s interiors reflects the tree branches that surround it outside BY KAREN SEIDMAN PHOTOGRAPHY: CHARLES LANTEIGNE

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DESIGN

ARCHITECTS LOUIS THELLEND AND LISA-MARIE FORTIN have appropriately named this magnificent mountaintop home The Canopy, as it is crowned by a vast wooden canopy on the inside which ref lects the larger wooden canopy provided by the branches of the Laurentian mountains. “It was inspired by the canopy of tree branches, the leaves and all the wood everywhere when we first saw the site,” says Fortin. “We knew first and foremost that we wanted to bring a bit of the forest inside.” And so they did, lining the soaring ceilings (18 feet high and up to 23 feet in places) with red cedar planks, which brought the exterior inside and achieved the goal of creating a treehouse effect. To offset the wood on the ceilings, the architects used poured concrete on the heated floors because the owners wanted something durable, along with a neutral canvas to showcase other design elements. After purchasing the property in a new development in St. Sauveur, the young homeowners commissioned the architects - a married couple who own the firm of Thellend Fortin Architects – to come up with something contemporary, featuring wide-open spaces and views of the spectacular scenery. •

The sprawling kitchen is a cook’s dream. Ample storage, top-of-the-line appliances, a 14-foot-long island, and a generous walk-in pantry make it highly functional, while the beauty of the surroundings, framed in a stunning 23-foot-high glass wall, make it a glorious space.

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DESIGN MONTREAL TRENDS 2018

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DESIGN

There were some criteria from the developer, including the sloped roof and certain exterior materials. But the developer was thinking of a more typical, Laurentian chalet-style home until Thellend and Fortin pushed the envelope with their contemporary interpretation of “haute rustic.” The architects left nothing to chance, ensuring cohesion by overseeing the architecture, interior design and landscaping. Even with their mandate to create open spaces in the sprawling 5,300-square-foot home, they strove to create defined spaces using corridors and cabinets, so the large home wouldn’t be too unwieldy, Thellend says. Their first thoughts were for a clean, contemporary look, and to have a mezzanine with a high wood-clad ceiling. “It is a most striking, interesting effect,” says Fortin. At one end of the main level, a soaring chimney defines the space for the fireplace and TV in the living room and, book-ended at the other end of the house, a similarly shaped glass wall brings light and drama to the kitchen. •

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DESIGN MONTREAL TRENDS 2018

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The clean, contemporary look of the home is on full display in the dramatic living room, with lots of glass and soaring ceilings. The sloped roof required by the developer becomes a stunning, defining feature of the room.

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DESIGN

Fortin admits to being more than a little envious of the gorgeous kitchen, with its walnut wood cabinetry and white quartz countertops. The 14-foot-long island means there is ample space for food preparation and a spacious, walk-in pantry is another luxury. Thellend says they wanted the house to “profit from the slope” of the mountain it was located on, so the configuration is inverted: the bedrooms are below the main level. Connecting all the levels, including the mezzanine, is a stunning staircase, which the architects say they conceived as a “floating” element.

The defining feature of the home is the ceilings, lined in red cedar planks and creating a “canopy” effect which mirrors the canopy provided by the trees of the Laurentian mountains surrounding the contemporary St. Sauveur home.

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DESIGN MONTREAL TRENDS 2018

“With the glass and the mesh, it looks really fluid and transparent,” says Fortin. The outside of the home is equally impressive. Thellend and Fortin used a mix of red cedar and opaque painted grey wood as a contrast, all of it under a dramatic sloped, gabled metal roof in a zinc colour. While most of the land was kept natural, the area around the swimming pool was landscaped. The home exploits its location and the gorgeous surroundings with both a large terrace and a spacious screened porch off the living room. “We really tried to work with the land and the landscape,” says Fortin.

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They both agree that what makes this home so spectacular and unique is the wood – both the wood surrounding it and the wood used to define the canopy indoors. Red cedar, they say, can be smelled and experienced, unlike engineered wood. “It’s more expensive but you try to convince the client it’s worth the price,” says Fortin. “Clients always ask for something cheaper that doesn’t require maintenance, but it never has the same effect. It’s used everywhere here and it’s what really brings the house together.” •

Architects Louis Thellend and Lisa-Marie Fortin oversaw the architecture, landscaping and interior design of the home to ensure it would be cohesive. The use of red cedar planks both on the interior and exterior “really brings the outdoors inside” – a goal of the project.

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DESIGN MONTREAL TRENDS 2018

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RETHINKING

RENOVAT IONS These Canadian companies offer environmentally responsible building and renovating BY PHILLIPA RISPIN

Photo: Craig Williams

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Photo: Craig Williams

DESIGN

CHRISTOPHER PHILLIPS HAS A MASTER’S DEGREE in philosophy and foreign aid. He has no driver’s licence and doesn’t own a car; he gets around Toronto by bicycle and public transit. He also has no cell phone. Would you hire this man to renovate your home? If you want to do things in an environmentally friendly way, you’d be smart to do so. Phillips (who, not incidentally, also has a master’s degree in building science from Ryerson University) is passionate about the environment. The philosophy of his company – Greening Homes – is an extension of his personal ethic. He’s not alone in this. In Montreal, Hisham Shakarchi – owner of Rénovert Solutions Inc. – is similarly driven. “I’m from Iraq, where resources are not as abundant,” he

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says. “There you learn to ration things and to appreciate the materials.” For Graeme Huguet, whose company My House Design/Build/Team has been serving Greater Vancouver and the Gulf Islands for more than 20 years, taking the green approach is practically second nature, “just part of who we are and what we do,” he says. “We educate clients to the extent that they want to be educated, but there’s a certain amount we naturally talk about. We guide them through, explain different building methods, and then let them make the choice.” All three companies operate in service to what Phillips calls the five pillars of responsible renovation: responsible waste management, informed selection of materials, efficient design and use of resources,

Renovation begins with demolition and responsible management of the waste stream. On this Greening Homes project, 87 per cent of the project waste was diverted from landfill.

healthy indoor environments, and responsible business practices. A renovation usually starts with some demolition, and managing the waste stream is an important part of the process. Some unwanted elements – kitchen cabinetry, for instance – can be carefully removed and given to such organizations as Habitat for Humanity’s ReStore for re-selling, or to places that rely on


DESIGN MONTREAL TRENDS 2018

Photo: Rénovert

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Rénovert Solutions worked on a daycare facility, stripping the interior down to the studs. The purple wall is BASF’s Walltite sprayed-on insulation and air barrier system. Hisham Shakarchi chose it over the traditional layers of vapour barrier and insulation (blown, batts, panels, etc.) because “it seals every nook and cranny,” and because it’s EcoLogo certified and Greenguard Children & Schools certified for indoor air quality, includes recycled plastic, and is applied with a zero ozone-depleting blowing agent.

donations. Huguet’s company, for example, donates items to halfway houses and group homes. “If we can repurpose something, it’s more green than dismantling it,” he says. With his degree in civil engineering from Concordia University in Montreal, Shakarchi is highly attuned to what’s salvageable and what should be recycled. “My approach is more practical and beneficial to the client,” he says. “For example, an old bathtub made of steel can be sold to scrap collectors. The copper in wiring also gets sold.” Much of the demolition debris can go to recycling centres for sorting and reuse; for example, wood from recycling centres is pulped and used to manufacture laminate flooring and MDF. In for med selec tion of mater ia ls is tricky. “Often, when choosing to do a green

renovation, it’s about trade-offs,” Phillips says. “There is no such thing as totally green. There’s usually an emphasis towards something; it could be health, it could be energy-efficiency. For example, someone wants to use reclaimed wood or reclaimed products, which makes a lot of sense from an environmental perspective, but if you have chemical sensitivities, that may not be appropriate, because reclaimed elements may have been exposed to something that could be hazardous or toxic. You could have something that’s sourced sustainably that’s being shipped from China – let’s say bamboo flooring – and it could have formaldehyde in the glue, and you’ve got a high [energy investment] in terms of shipping.” •

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DESIGN

Both Huguet’s and Phillips’s companies have invested in education and expertise to ensure efficient design and use of resources. My House Design/Build/Team is accredited by several organizations such as Built Green Canada, and it’s a National Association of Home Builders Certified Green Professional. Greening Homes belongs to the Ontario Natural Building Coalition and the Canada Green Building Council, among others. There’s plenty of validation of their efforts, including awards. Greening Homes is particularly proud of winning a Best Green Renovation award and a Best Renovation $300,000 to $500,000 award. My House Design/Build/Team has ranked high in Georgie Awards lists over the years, and the company won five 2018 awards, including Best Certified Whole House Renovation and the grand award: Residential Renovator of the Year. Shakarchi’s company is relatively small by comparison and hires only trusted sub-contractors to perform specific jobs. “I’m everything, from being the president to making a great cup of coffee,” Shakarchi jokes. He says that major accreditation programs don’t really serve the purpose of his specific business, but he has various awards and certifications that attest to his expertise: Réno-Maître accreditation from l’Association provinciale des constructeurs d’habitations du Québec (APCHQ), Approved Residential Supplier designation by CAA-Quebec, and City of Montreal suggested contractor for the city’s recently discontinued Residential Adaptation Assistance Program. Shakarchi won the 2015 Bronze Renovation award from the APCHQ for outstanding performance and service.

Eco-conscious strategies apply indoors and out. The kitchen (opposite) of this award-winning home by My House Design/Build/Team features energy-efficient Miele appliances. Outside, the joints of exterior pavers are not mortared, allowing favourable on-site drainage and reducing uncontrolled run-off into municipal storm sewer systems.

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Photos: Reuben Krabbe

DESIGN MONTREAL TRENDS 2018

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Ensuring a healthy environment could be said to start right in the individual home, and air quality is a major element in this. Avoiding materials (paint, drywall, glue, engineered flooring, carpeting) that off-gas or contain unhealthy substances is an important step. Assuring adequate, not excessive, air exchange is another. Renovators must have the skill to balance energy savings against quality of air. Phillips is particularly proud that the Canadian Green Building Award-winning retrofit home had fewer air changes per hour than a new-build passive house. Huguet considers energy efficiency “number one” in the scheme of things. “The goal is to develop a house that is Net Zero: what it consumes it also puts back,” he says. But clients worry about the cost of being eco-conscious, and might not enthusiastically embrace what initially seems to be more outlay for something so vital. “We have to

educate clients that an energy-efficient house is ultimately a less expensive house to run,” Huguet says. These renovators practise what they preach. To its employees, Greening Homes promotes the use of re-usable coffee cups and lunch containers onsite, and it restricts its projects (there seems to be no lack of them) to Toronto alone so that employees can use bicycles and public transit to get to work. Its offices use 100-per-cent renewable energy supplied by Bullfrog Power. “We also formally track our site waste diversion and provide a great amount of detail on how we achieve our environmental mandate across each project,” says Phillips. “And we provide a yearly bike maintenance and repair stipend during Bike Month, and regularly pay for formalized green building training for the team. I just sent three team members to Passive House training last month.” •

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DESIGN

Greening Homes won two 18th Annual BILD Renovation & Custom Home awards (Best Green Renovation, Best Renovation $300,000 to $500,000) for its work on this 100-year-old Victorian semi-detached home. All millwork, including that in the kitchen (before, right; after, above) was bench-built using 100 per cent FSC (Forest Stewardship Council) woods and sheet goods with no added urea formaldehyde.

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DESIGN MONTREAL TRENDS 2018

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Says Huguet: “My House Design/Build/Team has created a Web-based communication tool for clients and employees so that all documentation is accessible online.” The company owns its energy-efficient office, and the trucks it owns are fuel-efficient, being hybrids or using EcoBoost engines or green diesel. Shakarchi says, “I’m still a little old-school; I like to see pen on paper,” but he has mostly embraced the virtually paperless office concept and is pleased that many of his suppliers have gone digital. He also manages his resources and workflow efficiently. However, it’s not all roses on the Canadian environmental scene. Although awareness is

growing, eco-responsibility is not the highest item on most clients’ renovation wish lists; rather, Phillips says that many clients come to him because they like the transparent way that Greening Homes does business and the quality of the work. “Environmental desires of clients is a happy by-product of the way we do business,” he says. “Really committed individuals willing to pay to make things deep green are few and far between.” Shakarchi takes a slightly more optimistic view. He finds that clients often want to go green in specific areas rather than in every aspect but, as he says, “These baby steps make a big difference.” •

Photos: Craig Williams

This house had no insulation when it was built a century ago. Greening Homes insulated it to R20 below grade and R24 on the first floor. The drywall has 98 per cent recycled content, the flooring is FSC white oak, installed using zero VOC (volatile organic compound) glue, and the paint likewise is zero VOC.

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REAL ESTATE

THE GREENING OF HOME A Montreal-area real estate broker offers an eco-conscious approach to buying and selling houses BY PHILLIPA RISPIN

JE NNIF E R LY NN WA L K E R C A L L S HE R S E L F A N “ECO-REALTOR.” This Montreal real estate broker says she’s interested in “anything and everything to do with green (environmentally sound) real estate, homes, and lifestyles. I help people buy and sell homes with knowledge of the environment and the health of their families.” While Walker doesn’t have a specific certification in green real estate brokerage, she adds that she has integrated ecological principles into all of her work as an accredited broker. “It’s part of me. I’ve been doing it for 15 years as a broker.” Her greenness starts with her own business. “You get bare bones with me,” she says, citing such practices as giving clients materials that are printed on both sides and are not encased in a plastic binder. She recycles whatever she can, and she runs an office that is close to paperless. “Now everything’s stored in the cloud,” she says. When she’s with potential homebuyers, even for the first time, she’s proactive about getting the message across. “I’m always giving buyers options,” she says. “When we’re looking at houses, I immediately point things out that are green or not.”

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REAL ESTATE MONTREAL TRENDS 2018

If buyers want to renovate, Walker advises them on what to buy, where to buy it, and how to discard or recycle old materials, and she recommends eco-conscious contractors. She is quick to emphasize that a green home is not necessarily more expensive than other homes. For instance, she says, building or renovating with local timber products saves on the cost of transporting materials. Sometimes, health is an overwhelming concern for buyers. Walker went to great lengths to find a home for a client with a chemical sensitivity disorder. She called ahead to the sellers to ensure that there was nothing, such as potpourri, giving off a scent. She advised the sellers not to clean the

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house or do laundry less than a few days before the potential buyer’s visit. She ensured that the house did not have vinyl siding that might off-gas; that it hadn’t been renovated recently (relatively fresh glue and paint could still be off-gassing); that it didn’t have a basement (basements tend to have mould); that it was a certain distance away from airports and train tracks (sources of air pollution), golf courses (often with chemically treated grass and plants), bodies of water (which might harbour harmful organisms). “I eventually found a place way up north that was built as green as could be,” she says. “But even after they moved in, they discovered that the pine framing was still

off-gassing natural substances and it had to be removed.” The lengths that Walker went to are unusual, but they’re indicative of what elements she considers in promoting eco-consciousness to home buyers and sellers. And that consciousness is spreading: She’s starting to get more queries from such professionals as architects, designers, and engineers. “I was called once to sell a green home in Dollard des Ormeaux. But most of the buyers didn’t care or were oblivious to the fact,” she says with a laugh. That obliviousness may be about to change. •

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DESIGN

A DREAM PROJECT IN H  OCKE Y HE AV EN A designer is given free rein to create a beautiful downtown condo for her clients BY KAREN SEIDMAN PHOTOGRAPHY: GUILLERMO CASTRO STYLING: EUGENIA TRIANDOS AND KORINA KHAMIS

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DESIGN

THE CONDO THAT DESIGNER Eugenia Triandos worked on in the Tour des Canadiens building was as close as she’s ever come to a dream project. And not because she’s a hockey fan – she’s absolutely not. The overwhelmed (by her own admission) homeowner found herself struggling with the decor after purchasing a condo in the 50-storey tower in downtown Montreal, adjacent to the city’s Bell Centre, which represents the heart of this hockey-loving city. So when Triandos, co-owner of Hibou Design and Co., said she could outfit the condo with everything from dishes to towels, the homeowner was absolutely delighted.

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Triandos, who was equally delighted, was given a job that didn’t have the constraints of most projects: namely, the owners use the condo to stay downtown when there are hockey games, or to provide lodging to clients who are visiting. Because this was not going to be a full-time home for the owners, the question of creating storage space was not critical, as it generally is in condo renovations. Instead, the focus was on design. “This was a really fun project where we could choose the pieces that really spoke to us,” she says. The one condition from the homeowner was that the decor be a bit masculine.

What Triandos came up with is a modern, chic space that has the feel of a luxe hotel suite. All the leather she used – the tan leather armchairs, the leather dining chairs with baseball stitching from CB2 in Toronto, two area rugs in the entrance and master bedroom that are a mix of cowhide – really helped achieve that goal of creating a masculine look. “Because they were using it to entertain for hockey, I wanted to bring in a sports element,” says Triandos. “I used some hockey artwork throughout to bring in that feeling. It was like creating a sexy entertaining space.” •


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“Because they were using it to entertain for hockey, I wanted to bring in a sports element.�

Designer Eugenia Triandos set the sophisticated tone for the downtown condo in the entry hall. She used a jazzy geometric wallpaper, which is carried into the kitchen area. She also underscored the area with a similarly geometric-patterned rug, and created a funky wall piece with a console table, two lamps and some prints.

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She loved the look of neutral tones with just a few additions of colour, and with some carefully placed geometric wallpaper to provide pizzazz. The layering of various textures also gives the condo a richness – oiled wide-plank oak floors were the base for an interesting mix of leathers, linens, cowhide and marble. Some drama was provided by two oversized mirrors; one, strategically placed in the front hall, covers an electrical panel. “The mirror was so big it almost didn’t make it in the door,” says Triandos. “But it adds some light to the entrance because it’s quite dark.”

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She set the design tone for the condo in the wide entrance, using wallpaper that carries over into the kitchen area, and creating a funky and unusual wall display with a table, two lamps and artwork. Throughout the condo, Triandos says, she incorporated a mix of “splurge and save items.” It’s a tactic she finds effective because “you can’t tell at end of the day which is splurge and which is save.” One piece of furniture she splurged on was the dining room table, ordered online from Restoration Hardware in the U.S. With a marble top and a hammered-brass pedestal, it’s the showstopper piece. It’s also heavy, and took four men to carry it in. “Once you’ve seen it, you couldn’t look at anything else,” says the homeowner. “It’s that beautiful.” •

The marble-topped dining table from Restoration Hardware was a splurge item. Surrounded by leather dining chairs with baseball stitching, it’s a piece the homeowner loves. The neutral tones, textures and leather helped achieve the masculine look desired by the homeowner.

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Two oversized mirrors – one in the master bedroom and one in the entrance – bring light and drama to the condo. The black velvet chairs with brass legs make a hip sitting area in the master bedroom and are a contrast to the pale palette of the room.

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Oiled wide-plank oak floors run throughout the condo, which was designed as a pied-à-terre to use on hockey nights at the Bell Centre or to entertain out-of-town clients.

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The splurge-and-save tactic applied to the artwork throughout the condo as well. “A lot of it is inexpensive prints from Minted,” says Triandos. “My favourite piece is in the dining room and it’s from Citizen Atelier in Montreal, which has edgier pieces that are super unique.”

Triandos says the real “wow” effect of the overall result stems largely from having the owner’s confidence and free rein to choose pieces that really inspired her. As for the homeowner, she says that Triandos and her team “really worked their magic” and she is thrilled with the results. •

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NAVIGATING A COLOURFUL WORLD

Colour affects our moods and buying habits, but colour trends change yearly BY JULIE GEDEON

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Deneb Ultra Violet, available at www.lightcolorlive.com


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The Pantone 2018 colour of the year: “Ultra Violet”

WE ALL HAVE OUR FAVOURITE COLOURS, but how do they affect our moods? Marie-Chantal Milette has some answers. She knows that colour taps deeply into our brains to inspire us to feel upbeat or sad, calm or jumpy, wakeful or sleepy, and to influence the way we behave. Milette, the founder/owner of the Montreal-area Kryptonie The Color Agency, is among fewer than 100 colour experts worldwide, according to fellow colour expert Jean-Gabriel Causse, the author of L’étonnant pouvoir des couleurs. Milette claimed her rightful place on this stage by predicting a Pantone colour of the year. She confidently announced before anyone else that “Radiant Orchid” – a blend of fuchsia, purple and pink - would be Pantone’s colour of 2014.

“I analyzed the colours that were new but not yet trending at events that the media extensively covered in 2013, including the colour that would be called ‘Radiant Orchid,’ which was featured in Pantone’s spring-summer trend report,” she says. “The Duchess of Cambridge wore a radiant-orchid dress when she first stepped outside with the newly born Prince George; the Ravens who have a similar shade in their uniforms won the Super Bowl; former President Barack Obama’s oldest daughter, Malia, wore a radiant-orchid coat for his inauguration; while his wife, Michelle, had gloves, and singer Kelly Clarkson a scarf. Ford also came out with a radiant-orchid Mustang, and the upswing in the economy called for a crazier colour.” •

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Milette’s fascination with colours began in childhood when her DIY father took her to hardware stores. “Bored, I started examining the paint-chips and their names,” she recalls. “When I realized people were paid for naming colours, that’s what I wanted to do.” Her father being a financial planner, and her mother an accountant, worried about her artistic bent. “Dad arranged for me to visit the Ogilvy & Mather agency when I was 12 and I quite liked it,” she says. “So, I studied design and marketing at CEGEP.” She learned all the basics and became skilled with the latest software but didn’t believe she had gained the expertise to stand out. “I asked Philippe Meunier, a founder of the Sid Lee Agency, to list the world’s top 10 design schools,” she says. “When I visited the Creative Circus in Atlanta, I was blown away by the innovative atmosphere, but also knew the school would challenge me; only 38 per cent of those registering actually graduated, which I did.”

The vast majority of individuals (92.6 per cent of those surveyed in one study) put the most importance on visual factors when buying products, according to the Seoul International Color Expo secretariat’s research.

The Pantone 2014 colour of the year: “Radiant Orchid”

Ferrari has paid for the exclusive use of its signature red, so the colour’s ‘recipe’ was removed from the Pantone catalogue and can’t be copied by others. Tiffany & Co. trademarked its robin’segg-blue colour to prevent it from being used by other jewelers for gift packaging.

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The Pantone 2017 colour of the year, “Greenery,” was used for the Tiffany Damask Chair by Haute House, sold through Neiman Marcus


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Sgraffito II - Homage to Hiroshige by Michael Lentz, available at saatchiart.com

AJA by Justina Blakeney, available at Hygge and West

Her education landed her at a Montreal agency, but her desire to determine the best colours for people and their businesses persisted. “I was 23 when I started Kryptonie,” she says. Her colour agency helps businesses – everything from spas to restaurant chains – to choose the best colours for their environments. She read everything possible about colour but still wanted recognized expertise. So off she went to Bainbridge Island, near Seattle, to learn from Leatrice Eiseman, the executive director of the renowned Pantone Color Institute. Pantone Inc. has established global colour standardization with the coded fabric, plastic and print swatches within its Pantone Matching System. It assures that a company’s logo or product appears in the identical tone worldwide.

Milette is now called upon to determine the best colours for brands or spaces. When it comes to decor, she cautions against designing exclusively with favourite colours. “Look for a balance that ref lects your personality but also creates the mood you desire for each space,” she explains. “I love yellow, but I’m already hyper, so a bright yellow would push me over the edge.” Her place features neutral tones with pastel accents. Pastels create a relaxing effect but differ, too. Pink fosters calmness, while blue improves focus. Colour affects each of the sexes uniquely, too. Grey office cubicles work for men but often make women sad, even depressed, according to a University of Texas study. The same research established that men find it difficult to concentrate in orange or purple settings but many women find them inspiring. •

Photo by Valérie Milette

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Watercolours – Watercolour Tiles, available at www.newmore.com

While bright tones can energize lethargic individuals, too much of any colour is ill-advised. An intense red in a bedroom may spark a couple’s love life, but isn’t recommended for anyone with sleep issues. “You need to determine the most pressing issue … or have two bedrooms,” Milette says, laughing. “People who favour red already tend be passionate and intense. And red causes everyone’s heart to beat faster - even people who are colour-blind - because it has the longest electromagnetic wavelength of any colour, and it stimulates the brain to release hormones.” Yellow, orange and red stimulate appetite, so they’re good kitchen accents for finicky eaters but might not be the wisest choice for those who already love eating.

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“Greenery” (15-0343) was Pantone’s colour of 2017 and it lingers as people seek to reconnect with nature. “We’re on technology devices so much that we’re seeking to bring the outdoors into our homes,” Milette says. “Green can lower our blood pressure but it depends on the shade: it has the largest number of shades visible to the human eye so while lime green inspires energetic creativity, a deep emerald or forest green has an earthy, grounding effect.” Ultra Violet (18-3838), Pantone’s colour of the year for 2018, may reflect a subconscious desire to connect with our spiritual realm. The intense purple is often associated with a greater – even divine – power with its use in various religious ornamentation, as well as

representing the third-eye or “ajna” chakra, characterized by Eastern religions as one of the human body’s seven energy centres. “It makes sense that many of us are seeking to connect with a higher spiritual level during these very technologically dominated and somewhat unstable times,” Milette says. Clues to this year’s colour included the unexpected death of singer/guitarist Prince, whose favourite colour was the deep shade of purple, and Hillary Clinton wearing it to encourage a uniting of the Republican red and Democratic blue after her presidential defeat. “We also saw it on fashion runways and there was a Porsche and popular Jeep Wrangler featured in Ultra Violet last year,” Milette adds.


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The colour of the year is meant to tantalize people, encouraging them to enter a showroom. But once inside, most end up choosing grey for their sofa instead of the brighter new selection, according to colour expert Marie-Chantal Milette.

Cambridge sofa, available at Restoration Hardware

The Prince Estate and Pantone Color Institute unveiled a standardized purple hue last year, inspired by the late singer/songwriter’s custom-made Yamaha purple piano. The colour is respectfully identified in the Pantone Matching System by Prince’s “Love Symbol #2.”

Dearly Beloved We Are Gathered Here Today To Get Through This Thing Called Life by Angie Jones, available at saatchiart.com

She reminds us that every type of colour has influence. For instance, wine experts in a recent study ranked the same wines higher when they were served under red or blue lighting rather than green or yellow, according to research at the Institute of Psychology at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Germany. A good tip for wine cellars. “Earthy tones are associated with longevity, which is why darker brown is sought in finer furniture,” Milette adds. The white in many of our kitchens is to give our brains a reprieve from the day’s information overload, she says. Of the 23,000 to 35,000 decisions that adults make daily, according to psychologist Daniel Kahneman, author of the best-selling Thinking Fast and Slow, the first is often what to wear, which involves a conscious or unconscious choice of colour, Milette notes. Children, who make about 3,000 decisions a day, according to Kahneman, prefer brighter and lighter shades, Milette learned at the Pantone Color Institute. “When asked to rename orange in one study, many youngsters called it ‘awesome,’ ” she says. “A Schauss Pink (think bubble gum) can help to calm a child, and navy blue helps with focus, but a child should be able to pick out the colours for his or her room with a little parental guidance so they ref lect the youngster’s personality within reason, stimulate creativity and, most importantly, make the child happy.” •

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LANDSCAPE

GOOD THINGS IN SMALL SPACES A modest-size garden is given all the elements of a backyard oasis BY CHERYL CORNACCHIA PHOTOGRAPHY: DOMINIQUE FILION

THE BACK YARD WAS TYPICAL of those in this neighbourhood of Saint-Basile-le-Grand, a bedroom community on Montreal’s South Shore. An above-ground pool, lawn and gazebo characterized the small yard as middle-class suburban. Wanting something more from her property, the homeowner sought the help of a local landscape company. “She came in with quite a wish list,” recalls Johanne Filion of Services Paysagers Dominique Filion, which transformed the yard of the two-storey 1980s home. “It was quite a list for such a small space: a place for dinner, somewhere to lounge in the sun, flowers, a spa and an outdoor shower.” •

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The space was indeed small: 2,324 square feet. But over the course of two summers, the landscape was completely transformed. The above-ground pool was replaced by a 12-by-24-foot in-ground pool in a classic Mediterranean style, surrounded on three sides by a stone patio. However, no patio stones were installed at the far end of the pool, where the deep end is located. By limiting the size of the patio, more room was made available for the plantings that soften the hardscape: Japanese maple, hydrangea, coreopsis, sedums and Persicaria polymorpha, a flowering shrub with wispy white flowers. Additional potted plants warm up the stone patio even more. •

Dining al fresco is an intimate affair given the sense of enclosure that the garden affords.

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For lounging in the sun, an additional platform measuring almost eight-by-14 feet was built for two lounge chairs. The platform is made of exotic Brazilian ipe wood. And a second ipe wood deck was constructed right next to the house to give the homeowner easy access to the garden five steps down - as well as a spa and outdoor shower. “It was a challenge to keep all the elements balanced,” says Filion, “but the difference between the before and after is unbelievable.” •

With space at a premium, the pool was installed with its deep end abutting the far end of the garden. The pool is accessed from its shallow end where a small ipe-wood platform was built and now accommodates lounge chairs.

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Cedar hedges were installed on three sides of the backyard to provide privacy and a backdrop for showy plantings, such as the Japanese maple (Acer palmatum var. atropurpureum ‘Bloodgood’) and the giant fleece flower (Pesicaria polymorpha), the wispy white flowering shrub in the background.

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Artist Scott MacKenzie’s depictions of Canada’s spectacular geography inspire strong feelings BY BRENDA O’FARRELL

THE CANADIAN LANDSCAPE: How would you define it? How would you sum up its vastness? Its diversity? Its iconic qualities? Its ruggedness? Its uniqueness? Scott MacKenzie has, in fact, tried. And it is this attempt that has given him a key insight: what defines a Canadian landscape is not simply what is seen, but what we feel when we see it. He knows what he’s talking about. MacKenzie is a Canadian landscape artist whose images embody a sense of understanding. It is this emotional element that gives his interpretations of the Rockies their majesty, the prairies their strength, a stand of poplar trees a sense of safe shelter, and a row of wind turbines along an open ridge the promise of potential. A good painting for MacKenzie is about tapping into the emotional power of what is seen. •

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He’s well acquainted with this effect and believes it’s his mission to capture the rousing sentiments that draw viewers in. “I think what I keep coming back to is the sense of presence from iconic places – places and things that deserve respect when you see them,” MacKenzie says. “I want to give the viewer – and, ultimately, the buyer of the piece – something to come back to, something that commands their attention.”

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And the key to ensuring that there is a sense of reoccurring attraction, he says, is an undercurrent of strength. “I want to portray power,” he says. For this artist, that is the essence of every piece he commits to canvas. If it fails to meet that standard, he refuses to let anyone see it. “If it doesn’t have that sense of presence, I don’t release it,” MacKenzie says. “It has to convey a sense of purpose. It really has to stand out. I don’t want to add average works to the pile that is out there.” •


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“We are so lucky. Every region is lucky to have diverse landscapes all across Canada.”

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He characterizes himself as a representational landscape painter, or as he says: “My work is more figurative in style.” That figurative style is also evident in his renderings of people and animals. However, it is the landscape that holds him in thrall. MacKenzie grew up in northern Ontario, in an area that he describes as having a stark landscape. It is an area that contrasts with the city of Calgary, where he now makes his home. It is no coincidence that many of his works include images of the Rocky Mountains and their picturesque surroundings. “We are so lucky. Every region is lucky to have diverse landscapes all across Canada,” he says, describing what inspires the subjects of his paintings and the reason he gravitates to landscapes. “I try to see what it is trying to tell you,” he says of the views he paints. The 41-year-old married father of two young boys says most of his works in the past 10 years have been rendered in oils. But from an early age, he drew in charcoals and painted with watercolours. “I’ve been drawing since day one,” he explains.

He has little formal art training, but has travelled the world extensively, immersing himself in the work of great artists and artistic trends around the globe. He says his work is also influenced by the print-making style and strong sense of design he observed in Japan. It was there that he realized the power of having one focal point in an image, he says. In Australia, the aboriginal influence, characterized by the use of bold colours and a “basic representational look,” also shaped his approach to painting. •

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“There are no right answers. That is what makes it so great and so challenging.”

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Although his subjects cover a variety of outdoor scenes, he works exclusively in a studio. “I’m fairly methodical. I have a defined process,” MacKenzie says. He often finds himself working on between five and 10 pieces at a time. He produces about 10 to 15 works in a month, but only about two-thirds are actually brought to completion and put out for consumption. “I want my work to be really impactful,” he says. “I want (an image) with power and a sense of presence.” •

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That sense of presence is perhaps what makes his paintings stand out when placed in a well-designed home. But, he admits, it is difficult to predict how a piece will command attention once it’s on a wall. “The hardest thing is for people to visualize how it will affect a room,” he says, explaining that he suggests buyers try a painting in various locations until the appropriate setting is found. The right painting in the right spot combined with the emotional element he believes it must contain will “give you a reason to come back to it,” he says.

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When that happens, he adds, he has achieved his goal. MacKenzie’s work has been showcased in a number of group shows, including at Calgary’s Leighton Gallery and ROAM Gallery along with the Art Vancouver exhibition. He’s a member of the Federation of Canadian Artists. He admits that allotting time to promote his art through his website (www.scottmackenzieart.com) requires a disciplined approach.


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Painting, MacKenzie says, “is so open and there is so much you can do. There are no right answers. That is what makes it so great and so challenging.” The best part of the process, he adds, is recreating the feeling that is evoked by a view. But getting it right “is also the biggest challenge.” •

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LIFESTYLE

SUMMER: IN ALL ITS SWEETNESS, NOSTALGIA AND INTENSITY This season’s astrology is characterized by three eclipses … oh, and a retrograde planet BY SUSAN KELLY

IF PRESSED TO PICK A SYMBOL of one trend that sums up the astrology of summer 2018, I would select the pineapple. The jaunty motif seems to be everywhere and on everything – from cellphone cases to the white-and-gold ceramic candle I bought at Indigo, to light fixtures, to riotous repeat-pattern wallpaper in every sample book. Why it says summer 2018: The pineapple oozes nostalgic charm and is a traditional symbol of hospitality, two qualities of the summer sign of Cancer. It also has a luxe history as a popular motif with such monarchs as Louis XV and Catherine the Great. What could be more Leo, the regal sign that reigns over August? The pineapple exudes a stolid, sunny cheer and flair for creative reinvention, all of which I think fits the astrological zeitgeist.

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The summer pace is set by three eclipses. They won’t generate the hoopla of last August’s “eclipse of the century,” but they can have long-lasting impact. Eclipses tend to turn up the volume on the natural order of things. It all kicked off with the summer solstice plunging us into the affectionate and loving waters of Cancer. Memories of summers past take on a rosy hue. Home, family and roots are where it’s happening for this sign, and this is a time of reconnecting. Sentiment rules, and so the patio set inherited from Aunt Edna suddenly doesn’t look so shabby. With the first solar eclipse on July 13, it all becomes more intense. Cancer also signifies the foundation upon which we build our lives. This one is particularly potent for transformation, for becoming aligned with that which truly makes us feel alive, happy and content. I suggest hitting the hammock for some productive “me-time” during eclipses. Let your mind drift and see what bobs to the surface of your psyche. As English architect and designer Edwin Heathcote once mused in the Financial Times: “For Sigmund Freud, a dream of a house … symbolises ourselves not only to others but also inside our own heads. So, what exactly is going on inside?” What arises just might be symbolic of deeper change. An urge to upgrade the kitchen, for instance, might mean more self-nurturance is in order. If it’s the living room, you may need a wider social life, and so on.

The sun blazes into the dramatic and expressive sign of Leo on July 23, amplified by a full moon eclipse four days later. It could be a vacation season for the record books as it supercharges the sign’s usual pursuits: romance, recreation, socializing and creative expression. Just don’t take it too far. Changing all the fixtures and faucets from ho-hum brushed nickel to in-your-face shiny yellow gold might feel right now. But how will you feel come fall? If you didn’t fully get your Leo on, you get a second shot around the solar eclipse on August 11. Focus on your special talents, follow that creative urge down the rabbit hole; it just might lead somewhere unexpected and wonderful. Seek the perfect setting in which to shine and gain the applause you so richly deserve. There is a downside to eclipse seasons. They bring a heightened sense of urgency that prompts us to take action — just when the traditional advice is to avoid major moves. Around the time of an eclipse, it’s best to avoid signing a new mortgage or hiring a contractor to revamp the whole house, say. Be doubly cautious this year, because the planet Mercury is retrograde from July 26 to August 18. This busy-bee planet tends to toss a monkey wrench into things related to communications, such as emailed instructions to the decorator or the delivery slip on your drapes. Anyway, summer is meant to be enjoyed. And all in all, the astrological outlook is mainly sunny with trends that, like the pineapple, hold the sweet potential of gifts and richness within.

ARIES MARCH 21 – APRIL 19 Deal with family dramas early on, then make way for a playful and passionate summer season. Seek adventure. Find a new perspective on life.

LEO JULY 23 – AUGUST 22 Retreat to your lair and tune into your spiritual and intuitive side. In August, go and seek your place in the sun. It will pay off in a big way come fall.

SAGITTARIUS NOVEMBER 22 – DECEMBER 21 You’re propelled along a new travel vector, one that will take you far, far away. There’s also some serious inner transformation on tap and a new perspective on life.

TAURUS APRIL 20 – MAY 20 You become a trendsetter now as new forms of self-expression emerge. Follow that getaway impulse at summer’s end.

VIRGO AUGUST 23 – SEPTEMBER 22 Working the barbecue and terrace circuits builds momentum for future success. Summer goes out with a bang, and the one making all the noise is you.

CAPRICORN DECEMBER 22 – JANUARY 19 The eclipses could trigger a need to hold a metaphoric garage sale. Ditching the outmoded makes way for the new. Late summer is optimal for a vacation.

LIBRA SEPTEMBER 23 – OCTOBER 22 Spiff up that public image; a more polished presence will help you move up the ladder. Then get ready to give the social scene a whirl.

AQUARIUS JANUARY 20 – FEBRUARY 18 July trends favour getting in shape and working both harder and smarter. Expect a few inspired lightning bolts, electrifying your love and creative lives.

GEMINI MAY 21 – JUNE 20 Increase your earning power with the ultimate goal of greater freedom. A creative burst is due; learn new things and exchange ideas. CANCER JUNE 21 – JULY 22 Replace the shrinking-violet decor with what ref lects your vibrant new self-confidence. Increased self-worth soon brings tangible rewards, too.

SCORPIO OCTOBER 23 – NOVEMBER 21 Head off the beaten track, literally with a backpack or on a journey of the mind. The eclipses stoke your career, so get ready to see and be seen.

PISCES FEBRUARY 19 – MARCH 20 Early summer is one big party, also optimal for meeting (and/or keeping) your true love. And you’re ready to shed any habits and routines that hold you back.

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M A K ING A HOME IN  AN ICONIC BUILDING A REDESIGN OF A CONDO UNIT IN HABITAT 67 IS RESPECTFUL OF ITS HISTORY, LOCATION AND BEAUTY BY ELISABETH KALBFUSS • PHOTOGRAPHY: MAXIME BROUILLET STYLING: AUDE BRUN, LAMBERT RAINVILLE AND NICHOLAS SANGARÉ

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AT FIRST GLANCE, it seems a little out of place: the numbers 717 are scrawled once in blue, once in red on an exposed concrete wall in the middle of a newly renovated condo in Habitat 67. It’s at the junction of the two blocks that make up this unit in the iconic building and, when it was uncovered in the renovation, the owners and designers wanted to preserve that bit of its history. 
 “Habitat being Habitat, there’s a lot of heritage,” says Lambert Rainville, a partner in Rainville-Sangaré, the firm responsible for the redesign. “It’s from the 1960s; the numbers are chalk. It’s tough to take off, but at the same time it is fragile, and you don’t want to touch it too much. The whole apartment is structured around that doorway.” Like many visitors to Expo 67, the homeowner toured Habitat at the time and fell in love. “It took him 30, well, maybe 20 years to persuade his wife to move here,” Rainville says. But when the couple’s daughter moved out and it was time to downsize, he finally got his wish.

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The kitchen is compact, and structured around the window that has a view of the river. Rainville-Sangaré designed the light fixture in the dining room, as well as the others throughout the condo. The owners brought the walnut dining table, purchased from Kastella, from their previous home.

Designed in a T-shape, one building block contains two bedrooms and two bathrooms; the second houses the kitchen, dining and living rooms, giving the owners about 1,300 square feet of indoor living space. There are also two balconies, one off the guest bedroom, the other between the kitchen and dining areas. “That’s usually where the party is!” Rainville says. The first space visible upon entering the condo is the kitchen, and a view of the river. The window affording that view was important to the owners, and the challenge was to fit all the appliances and cabinetry around it, Rainville says. “The kitchen was made to frame the view.” •

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The front and side kitchen cabinets have a black oak veneer; the back cabinets along the outside wall are in lighter oak. In the living room, there’s another window that overlooks the river, built into a recessed wall. To highlight that architectural feature, Rainville-SangarÊ flanked it with built-in steel shelves on each side. The owners brought very little furniture with them into this new space: their previous dining set, a living room sofa and a guest room desk.

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Rainville-Sangaré designed all the built-in pieces, as well as bedroom furniture and lighting to match the Brutalist design. The living room’s back wall of raw steel shelves includes an acid etching on steel of the Victoria Bridge by Montreal artist James Kennedy, placed to hide the television. “The owner knew about the artist, and because we were going for a raw finish for the shelves, we thought he could do something interesting,” Rainville says. “He

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(Kennedy) made it on a special panel so it would slide. It’s folded over on the back and hooks into a rolling system.” Behind the shelves is a wall of mirrors. It’s not original to the condo; Rainville guesses it was most likely added some time in the 1980s. The mirror is glued to the wall, so removing it would have been expensive. Keeping it was a happy compromise as it reflects light and creates a sense of more space. •

Open, raw-steel shelves in the living room stretch the width of the room and back on to a mirrored wall, at one end of the condo. Similar steel shelving frames a recessed window along another wall.

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The bedrooms and bathrooms are around the corner from the kitchen in the unit’s second building block. It’s in the bathrooms that Rainville-Sangaré added colour. The owner’s hobby is calligraphy, so there’s a second blue sink in the guest bathroom in which to clean his tools and inks. Both bathrooms have dichroic film coating the shower glass, a product that adds colour to the minimalist palette. “When the light source is behind the film, you see one colour; when you start moving, you start seeing new shades,” Rainville says. Depending on the angle of light, it goes from blue to pink and green, then to orange. A recent product, it’s used mainly in commercial installations, he says.

In the bathrooms, the grey concrete tiles are brightened by light reflected from dichroic film, a 3M product applied to the shower glass. Colours change depending on the angle of light, and it comes in two versions: either a warm or cool colour palette. It took months to source the film through an industrial vendor, the designer says. The choice of blue sinks in the guest bathroom is inspired by the St. Lawrence River. The round clothing hook in the bathroom is designed to be gentle on clothes and prevent denting fabric. Made of powder-coated aluminum, it’s left over from Rainville’s days studying design in London.

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The master bedroom’s bed and side tables were custom designed and built in oak. The guest room has a Murphy bed. It’s also where the owner practices calligraphy.

With his background in product design, Rainville says, he’s always on the lookout for interesting materials to use in detailing and surfacing. “Every year, we want to implement a new material,” he says, adding that he doesn’t often use it again. “Unless someone begs us, we’re onto something else. We’re always looking for that little touch. You never know if it’s going to work. You need to have the right client.” •

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A FEAST FOR THE SENSES Visually pleasing interior design in restaurants aims to connect diners with the people who creatively prepare their meals BY BRENDA O’FARRELL

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CONNECTING CUSTOMERS WITH the creative workings in the kitchen: That is one of the themes in today’s restaurant design. Gone are the days when chefs toiled behind doors that would swing open and closed as the wait staff scurried back and forth, forging a detached link between cook and customer. The modern dining experience is a much more intimate affair. The trendiest restaurants today not only provide their guests with a table in a

highly designed setting, but also offer a spot from which to watch the culinary creations come to life. Being on-trend means immersing guests in the complete dining experience. Let’s take a look at how some of today’s avant-garde eating establishments blend form and function, providing a full menu for all of the senses.


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FIGO

Photos: Evan Dion

Figo is a perfect example of the new wave in restaurant design. Located in the heart of Toronto’s downtown core, it offers romantic Italian dining. The 4,200-square-foot establishment was conceived by Toronto’s award-winning Studio Munge. Among its most spectacular features is the graphic archway between the dining area and open kitchen. Made of 4,000 hand-placed tiles, the archway perfectly frames the action in the kitchen, allowing diners to watch as their artisanal dishes are created, as if they were viewing a live stage production.

The ceiling above the dining area at Figo also helps set the tone. Featuring a large custom floral application in light shimmering pastels, the surface above the entire seating area adds a touch of romance and charm, creating the impression that visitors are dining in a country village in Italy. The cathedral-style wine cabinet in the bar-lounge catches the eye, as well, contributing to the Old-World sophistication that permeates the space, while the curved custom-made glass tables and white marble bar provide a contemporary touch. Figo Toronto 295 Adelaide St. W, Toronto 647-748-3446 www.figotoronto.com

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HOOGAN ET BEAUFORT Hoogan et Beaufort is an upscale restaurant in Montreal’s Rosemont borough. Housed in a building that once served as a train-manufacturing facility in the former CPR Angus Shops, it has 28-foot ceilings and 2,700 square feet of space. It strikes a balance between contemporary and traditional styles, with an industrial vibe. Designed by the Montreal-based APPAREIL Architecture, the restaurant pays homage to its industrial past. In fact, its name, Hoogan et Beaufort, honours the two farmers who originally owned the land that was purchased to create the CPR Angus Shops in the late 1800s. The old wooden beams in the ceiling, along with custom-made refurbished finishings provide an unpretentious feel, while the open-flame kiln-like oven on full display provides an enchanting rustic charm. Hoogan et Beaufort 4095 Molson St., Montreal 514-903-1233 Photos: Felix Michaud

www.hooganetbeaufort.com

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KŌST AT BISHA Kōst is a rooftop restaurant that sits atop the Bisha Hotel in Toronto’s entertainment district. Its use of white Canadian oak gives the entire space a beach-house ambience. Wooden trellises clad the surface of the ceiling, while the use of the light-coloured wood extends to the walls, beams and tables. The look reflects the openness of the high-rise location. The restaurant, designed by Studio Munge, features custom seating, including oak bar stools with apricot-coloured velvet upholstery, woven rattan chairs, and banquettes finished in ivory and orange, while the light oak tables feature interlocking tile insets. The look is light and airy, while the layout allows guests to take in views of the city’s skyline as well as the action behind the bar or in the kitchen, visible just beyond a marble counter in peach, seafoam-green, and cream tones. Kōst 80 Blue Jays Way, 44th Floor, Toronto 437-800-5938

Photos: Maxime Bocken

www.kosttoronto.com

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FOIEGWA The open-kitchen concept is also at the centre of the hip new Montreal restaurant Foiegwa. This self-described “Americanized French diner” takes its name from the American pronunciation of “foie gras.” Designed by the gauleybrothers, the restaurant is located in a former Belle Province fast food outlet at the corner of Atwater Avenue and Notre Dame Street in the city’s St. Henri district. The open kitchen is framed by white tiled walls that are filled with sketches by local artist Marc Tremblay. The framed drawings are of famous Montrealers, much along the same line as those seen in the iconic New York City restaurant Sardi’s. In addition to the open kitchen, the use of wood and black marble imparts an upscale look. Although used sparingly, the natural wood accents frame the tile walls and coordinate with the tan-coloured banquettes and upholstered stool chairs. Foiegwa 3001 Notre Dame St. W., Montreal 438-387-4252 www.foiegwa.com

Photos: Mathieu Derome

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LE SUPER QUALITÉ Although considered a diner in every sense of the term, Le Super Qualité in Montreal’s Villeray district is on trend with its look that includes a view of the kitchen and the use of wood. Designed by architect David Dworkind, this Indian snack bar draws inspiration for its style from a few sources. The bright-blueand-yellow colour scheme is taken from the palette used on Indian commuter trains. Rough plank cladding in a blue-painted finish is also used along the base of the counters.

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Photos: David Dworkind

Wood is prominently used in the seating area, where the bright colours are balanced by the natural wood tabletops, while stainless-steel countertops and accents, such as custom lighting pendants, match the gleaming surfaces in the open kitchen. Le Super Qualité 1211 Rue Bélanger, Montreal 514-398-0184 www.lesuperqualite.com

Restaurant-goers, it seems, like to be connected with those who create their meals.

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A RETURN TO ITS

ROOTS

A 1920s home that was once converted into an auto-body shop is transformed back into an elegant urban home BY CHERYL CORNACCHIA PHOTOGRAPHY: ANGUS MCRITCHIE STYLING: JEAN MONET Floral arrangements: Le Marché aux Fleurs du Village

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ON A QUIET RESIDENTIAL STREET in Little Italy, not far from Montreal’s Jean Talon Market, a former pair of row houses turned auto-body shop is enjoying a renaissance as a private home once again. A major renovation stripped the building back to its 1920s roots and remade it into a chic two-bedroom living space. The highlight of the new 3,480-squarefoot home is a stunning second-floor atrium with exterior walls sheltering it from the street but no roof, so it is open to the sky and is a perfect place to enjoy summer evenings. The owners of the property met all regulatory requirements of the Conseil du patrimoine de Montréal by maintaining the building’s facade, roof line, brickwork,

size and shape of the windows, and other architectural heritage details. However, they managed to create an open-concept design to blend the kitchen and living and dining areas into the exterior space. The one vestige of the building’s former life as an auto body shop - and a fortunate one at that - is the ground floor mechanical bay with its garage door to the street on the front facade of the property. The setup was grand-fathered, and meant that the building’s new owners could turn the space into a garage of their own with direct access to and from the main street - a rarity almost unheard of in the inner city. •

High-quality finishings make this kitchen party-ready. Entertaining is easy thanks to the open-concept design. In summer, guests spill outside to the open-roofed atrium. 

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DESIGN

But there were challenges in the rebuild as is the case with most renovations. Daylight - and how to bring it indoors - was a major issue throughout the project. The 24-foot-wide townhouse is attached to properties on both sides. On top of that limitation, the existing building filled the entire lot and there were

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no front or back yards with which to work. Windows couldn’t be enlarged because of heritage restrictions. The staircase from the ground level of the house to the upper level was closed and dark, making for an inhospitable entranceway to the second floor, where most of the living space is located.


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But the owner of the house, who is an interior designer, was undaunted. She devised the idea of removing a wall at the top of the stairwell and installing a floor-to-ceiling lasercut filigree style screen to let in light from the large doors leading out into the atrium. She kept the colour palette of the entire space light and airy. There is only the odd dash here and there of an accent colour: a warm aubergine. To keep things clean and uncluttered, she used Brazilian chestnut as the flooring throughout the entire unit and added it to an accent/shelving wall in the main living space. The end result is a streamlined look. An especially nice touch is the two recessed shelves in the main living room. They display almost-matching his-and-her heirloom statues. Coincidentally, both members of the couple had inherited one from their families. •

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DESIGN

The home’s neutral colour palette extends to the bedroom as does the Brazilian hardwood flooring.

Soft lighting creates a warm ambience in the main living area. “The space is so sexy,” says the home’s owner. She says she especially loves the way the light plays on the Brazilian hardwood floors and custom wall unit.

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The owners considered putting a roof on the atrium. It would have enlarged their living space year-round. But ultimately, they opted for a room without a roof. They use the space from early spring until late fall. It is perfect for dining al fresco on a summer night, and for stargazing on clear nights.Â

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But as perfect as all the little details are and the decor impeccable, the stunner of the house remains the room without the roof. Other properties in the neighbourhood have used roofs to create inviting roof-top terraces, decorated with plants and patio lighting. However, the feeling of permanence that this outdoor space has, makes it an entirely different thing. The windows are stainless steel tilt-andturn models. The floors are heated so that snow melts and drains away. There are wood

beams from British Columbia extending from the front facade to the house and reinforcing the design. The lighting is permanent. It all makes for an outdoor space that can be used comfortably from April to late October. The only thing that is missing is a roof. And the owners of the house say they wanted it that way. The atrium has a season and a time all its own. And just like spring, they excitedly await the day when they can open all the doors and windows to the outdoor room and usher in the new season. •

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MONTREAL CALENDAR

OUT AND ABOUT There are plenty of fun activities in Montreal to get us out of the house this summer

SUMMER IS A PERFECT SEASON in which to go out and explore your own city. We’ve got an easy day trip to the Laurentians, plus two destinations right here in Montreal to keep you occupied during the dog days of summer.

1001 POTS Scheherazade took a 1,001 nights to enchant the king of ancient Persia, but these pots might beguile you immediately. The annual 1001 Pots, in Val David, is a unique outdoor gathering featuring the work of more than 100 potters of all kinds. Founded by Kinya Ishikawa, it offers the best of Quebec ceramists’ work in such genres as garden ornaments, kitchen equipment, table art, tea sets, children’s work, sculpture, jewelry, and collectibles. Several high-profile ceramists will be present: Kinya Ishikawa, Hugo Didier, Frederique Bonmatin, Pascale Girardin, Louise Bousquet, Wai-Yan Li and Weilbrener & Lebeau. The event offers a varied program for visitors, including demonstrations, courses, and introductory workshops for youth and adults. The schedule and more information is available at www.1001pots.com. This 30th edition of 1001 Pots, in Val David, runs from July 6 to August 12.

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Wai-Want Li

Poterie Weilbrenner et Lebeau


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NATURE IS YOUR SHELTER Imagine being able to literally step into the kinds of shelters built by mammals, birds and insects. Now it’s possible at the Montreal Botanical Garden’s Nature Is Your Shelter exhibit. Experts from the Biodome and the Insectarium have created a fascinating immersive experience featuring seven original structures built to human scale, inspired by Quebec wildlife. Visitors can squeeze into an eagle’s nest, visit a woodpecker’s home or take a seat in an insect cocoon. Nature Is Your Shelter shows us the many ways fauna, flora and other lifeforms – from tiny ants to us humans – inhabit the Earth. A fun immersive trail allows young visitors to run, crawl and climb, and the whole family will be dazzled by the ingenuity of the animal world. Educators are on hand every day to explain the fascinating strategies used by animals in designing their shelters. The Montreal Botanical Garden is a world-renowned site, and it’s right here in town, easily accessible by bus and Métro. More information is available at w w w. espacepourlavie.ca/en Nature Is Your Shelter runs until September 3, in the arboretum at the Montreal Botanical Garden.

Photo by Jimmy Hamelin

FASHION & DESIGN FESTIVAL The Fashion & Design Festival celebrates creativity and culture through a major outdoor event in the heart of downtown Montreal. In the Quartier des spectacles, well-known Canadian designers, retailers, up-and-coming creators and international fashion icons will share their art and vision with the public. Activities will include fashion shows, live creative sessions, design showcases and musical performances. The festival’s presence will also be felt around

the city with novel exhibits, original installations and unique experiences open to all. With 50 shows, as many as 300 participants and 550,000 visitors expected, the Fashion & Design Festival will offer an inside look at fashion, design, music, beauty and shopping trends. The complete program will be unveiled on July 25. More information is available at www.festivalmodedesign.com. The Fashion & Design Festival runs from August 20 to 25. •

Photo by Sebastien Roy

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TRAVEL

THE GLORY AND GREATNESS OF GREECE

A vacation in Athens and Santorini offers everything from history and culture to sun and sand BY LA CARMINA

GREECE IS A SUMMER TRAVEL DESTINATION that lives up to its postcard-perfect reputation. Picture this: crumbling white ruins, blue churches, and sunsets over the Aegean Sea. There’s a laid-back timelessness here that is certain to charm every type of traveller. If you visit both Athens and Santorini, you’ll be able to experience everything that makes Greece an enduring favourite. The myths come alive in the capital city, while the island is all about beach living: think sunset sails and patio dining. •

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Economics are currently in the traveller’s favour. Prices are low compared with the rest of Europe, so you get excellent value, particularly at luxury hotels and restaurants. Although Greece is still grappling with a financial crisis, vacationers aren’t affected, and all banks and ATMs are fully operational. Athens is the perfect starting point for a cultural odyssey. Named for Athena, the goddess of wisdom and war, this sprawling city has been inhabited for 5,000 years. No matter where you stroll, you’ll stumble upon impressive ruins from past civilizations. Howe ve r, At h e n s a l s o h a s a h ip ster side. The city has become a magnet for artists who hang out in coffee shops, cocktail bars, and galleries with live DJs. Every traveller should visit the Acropolis, the icon of Athens. To avoid the crowds, arrive as early as possible at the foot of Acropolis Hill, where you can purchase the $30 entrance ticket. Wear comfortable shoes, as there are about 100 stone steps to climb. At the top, I wandered around temples dating back to the Golden Age of Athens (460– 430 BCE). My favourite was the Erechtheion, with its “Porch of the Caryatids” – six columns carved like Greek maidens, balancing a roof on their heads.

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The star of the show is the Par thenon, the white-pillared symbol of Western democracy. Despite damage incurred throughout the centuries, these Doric columns stand strong. I felt in awe, standing beneath this wonder of classical architecture. The Acropolis Museum, which opened in 2009, is also worth a visit. The collection has artefacts from the Bronze Age to the Roman Empire and beyond. The top floor re-creates the frieze of the Parthenon. At sunset, it lights up with a 360-degree view of the Acropolis and mountains. •

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Athens’s contemporary street art is equally inspiring. I joined an Urban Adventures walking tour that took me to the city’s hippest neighbourhoods, including Exarchia, Plaka, Monastiraki and Gazi. These run-down corners have been rejuvenated with colourful murals, some with socio-political themes. Taking a cue from locals, I ate Greek food in cozy tavernas. My favourite was Seychelles, a home-style restaurant in the formerly industrial neighbourhood of Metaxourgeio. The grilled sardines with lemon, sea bass, and cabbage dolmades (rice and herb-filled wraps) were the best I’ve ever tried. I washed the meal down with ouzo (anise-flavoured liqueur) and orange cake (juicy layers of filo and Greek honey).

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Time to f ly one hour to Santorini, an island in the Aegean devastated by a volcanic eruption in the 16th century BCE. This is the place to relax under the sun. The islanders traditionally lived in cave homes, so why not stay in a modern version overlooking turquoise waters? I booked a vacation rental through Blue Villas Collection, which has more than 100 listings on the island. I settled into a luxurious white villa with a private pool and patio, and enjoyed my hand-delivered breakfast outdoors. When most people think of Santorini, they imagine the village of Oia, with its layers of pastel homes topped by an old sea windmill. Come in the afternoon to browse shops and meander through the cliff pathways. Then, find a quiet perch to watch the radiant sunset over the water. •

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The other main village, Fira, has equally dramatic viewpoints. Hike the Karavolades Stairs down the caldera; if the 588 steps are too daunting, you can ride the cable car. Fira also has some of the best dining options. Every morning, I bought a warm spanakopita (spinach feta pastry) from Svoronos Bakery. For dinner, try Tsipouradiko’s grilled fish and risotto, paired with tsipouro liquor. Another beautiful way to see Santorini is by boat. I took a day-trip on Sunset Oia’s catamaran, which sailed to rust-coloured Akrotiri Beach and other hidden coves. The passengers stopped to swim, then feasted on Greek barbecue while watching the sun dip into the sea.

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Don’t leave Santorini without a day at the beaches. Kamari is famous for its black pebbled sand and dark waves. My favourite was Perissa, with its casual beach bar and dramatic view of Mesa Vouno. This season, take a cue from Greek gods and goddesses and let the wine, festivities, and culture flow. There’s plenty to enjoy in Athens and Santorini, regardless of your travel style. Perhaps the philosopher Euripides put it best: “Experiences, travel, these are an education in themselves.” •

IF YOU GO: Getting There: Montreal and Toronto have direct routes to Athens on Air Canada and Air Transat, with a flight time of 9.5 hours. Vancouver departures must make at least one connection, which could be an opportunity to stop over in Paris, Amsterdam, London or Zurich. All ticket prices are $900-$1,300 CDN. In the summer, travellers can book a ferry ride of between five and eight hours from Athens to Santorini, for $30-$110 CDN. There are also many domestic flights to Santorini that take less than an hour, and cost between $70 and $200 for a round trip. Ground Travel: The easiest way to get around Athens is by Uber. Santorini does not have Uber, but hotels usually offer pickups for guests. To reach the island’s major sites, take the regularly scheduled buses for about $2.50 per ride. Accommodation: A central, four-star hotel in Athens costs about $150 CDN per night. A private ocean-front villa in Santorini begins at $575 CDN per night.

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DESIGN

DIAL UP THE STYLE WITH TILE Today’s tile trends: metallic, three-dimensional, stone-like and oversized

Photo courtesy of Groupe Norfab

BY SUSAN KELLY

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Photo courtesy of Canaroma

DESIGN MONTREAL TRENDS 2018

NEW TILE CAN INSTANTLY ELEVATE the look of a kitchen, bathroom or entryway. Yet it’s not a feature that homeowners want to update every year. Will the trend that is red-hot now keep its sizzle down the line? We asked some tile experts across Canada for their picks of the looks that will carry us into 2019 and beyond. When it comes to trends, tile insiders have a two-year jump on the rest of us, says Edward Saunders, international buyer at X-Tile, which

has three showroom locations in Ontario. “Most of us in the industry regularly attend big trade shows in the U.S. and Europe,” he says. “What we see there takes time to catch on here.” Saunders sees a trend toward reinventing classic looks with colour, texture or shine. A tried-and-true choice, white or grey porcelain subway tiles, for instance, takes on new punch if the familiar rectangular shape has a pronounced bevelled 3D finish. •

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Photo courtesy of X-Tile

Sometimes, a trend will catch on faster than anticipated. Last year, X-Tile’s designers used digital printing on porcelain to create a wall mural depicting a bank of white rocks in front of a tranquil turquoise sea. Originally available by custom order only, the look caught on so quickly that now the stores keep it in stock. Part of the appeal, Saunders says, is that it is equally striking on a feature wall or tucked in a nook. While texture is important in tiles now, another finish is coming on strong, according to Patricia Ee, sales and marketing director for Canaroma Bath & Tile in Woodbridge,

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Ontario. Her team is carving out more showroom space for tiles with metallic effects. “It’s a huge trend now, especially when combined with the 3D look,” she says. The most dramatic example features 13-by-40-inch tiles that, when applied, create a seamless, undulating gold or silver mirrored surface. Made of porcelain, these tiles look like hammered metal and liquid mercury. It’s a futuristic effect that works well in contemporary settings, she says. Most homeowners will apply them judiciously, perhaps as a wall feature, but the tiles could be used in the shower as well.


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Photo courtesy of Canaroma

If the mirror effect is too much for you, there are other metal finishes to choose from now. Also made of porcelain, they’re tiles that boast the easy upkeep of that material with the luxe look of real metal. Some tiles emulate blocks of gold, silver or bronze. Others take a trendy shade such as black, taupe or grey and add a slightly metallic sheen. “And mixing metallic tiles with natural stone or glass tiles can create very luxe and sophisticated effects,” Ee says. An old standby, mosaic tile, takes on new design impact with a metallic finish, says Claude Béland, representative for Groupe Nord-Fab, which has offices across Quebec. “When you add some sophisticated geometry, like a herringbone pattern, and a trendy shade like black, then you really have something,” he says. Patterned tiles of all kinds, from Moroccan fish scale to hexagonal, are a popular look now, and they’re often oversized. •

Photo courtesy of Canaroma

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But Claude Béland likes the look of micro herringbone mosaic tiles, such as the Gravity Arrow tiles from Porcelanosa, used to great effect by designers such as the late Iranian architect Zaha Hadid. The herringbone differs from the pattern of seasons past in that it has a broken zigzag design that looks asymmetrical and is linear. And thanks to advances in technology, tiles that emulate hardwoods are becoming an even bigger trend. It’s almost impossible to tell the difference between the real thing and the porcelain imitation, even after touching it, he says. Popular finishes include walnut or weathered driftwood-like grey stain. Most often used in planks on floors, smaller tile shapes are available, including hexagonal mosaics. “The play of small against large 11-by-72-inch planks can be very interesting,” Béland says.

Photo courtesy of Groupe Norfab

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Photo courtesy of Canaroma


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Photo courtesy of X-Tile

Colourful interiors are making a comeback, and tiles are following suit, says Alvin Luke, sales representative at Fontile Kitchen & Bath in Vancouver. “If you’re covering a wall or floor with them, you’ll probably still play it safe with neutral shades of grey, taupe or white,” he says. “But now, the more adventuresome are also using colour and in a bold way.” This could mean an accent wall or insert in a choice off the colour wheel. Any shade of blue, from navy to robin’s egg, is strongly on-trend, especially shades of aqua. It’s an approach that is very forward but also takes inspiration from the past, Luke says. Some homeowners, he says, will want to cover their bathroom walls or kitchen backsplashes in porcelain tiles rendered in pale pastel shades, such as pink, blue and lavender — something not seen since the 1970s. “Back and trending also are tiles that are six or eight inches square,” he says. Glazed terra cotta square tiles are popular again for their organic appeal. •

Photo courtesy of Fontile

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Photo courtesy of Ciot

Every expert we spoke to for this article named oversized or “XL” porcelain slabs as a noteworthy trend. “It’s just starting here in North America,” says Scott McDonald, sales manager at Julian Tile in Burnaby, B.C., “but growing quickly.” The most popular are those that mimic natural stone, especially marble. Some of the newest resemble concrete with a choice of textures, ideal for contemporary or industrial looks. Bonus: they are more durable and require less maintenance than the real thing. They come in four-by-eight or five-by-10-foot slabs, ideal for creating not only feature walls but also backsplashes and countertops without seams.

Photo courtesy of Canaroma

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Photo courtesy of Julian Tile

Photo courtesy of Ciot

The latest innovation is XL slabs made of glass. They come in a variety of on-trend colours and can also be found with metallic effects or patterns. “One version features metal foils or textiles inserted between glass slabs,” McDonald says. “The effects are very subtle yet striking.” Besides the bathroom or kitchen, they can also be used on feature walls or fireplace surrounds. No matter where you live in Canada or how short the summer, tiles are migrating outdoors as well, says Marie-Claude Fréchette,

Photo courtesy of Ciot

Photo courtesy of Julian Tile

marketing manager at Ciot, which has locations across Quebec and Ontario. Consider, for instance, marble, either the real thing or in a porcelain lookalike; it continues to be popular for kitchen counters, islands and backsplashes. “So much so, homeowners are carrying the look to the outdoor kitchen as well,” she says. The marble-look porcelain slabs are ideal for crafting luxe outdoor counters. And unlike real marble —or granite or limestone, if that’s the preferred look — porcelain is heat- and stain-resistant.

No matter how small the outdoor space, urban condo dwellers can add a distinctive touch to the flooring with tiles. Porcelain stoneware tiles are among the popular choices here. Homeowners with larger patios or decks may also opt to cover them with highly durable and low-maintenance porcelain tiles. “It’s all about a sophisticated look and seamless flow from the indoor living area to the outer,” Fréchette says. “It says a lot about how important outdoor living spaces are to us now.” •

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THE PLACE WHERE EVERYONE HANGS OUT A new home in The Beaches district of Toronto is the go-to place for the neighbourhood children BY BRENDA O’FARRELL PHOTOGRAPHY: VALERIE WILCOX STYLING: HEATHER LEWIS

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DESIGN

IF YOU GREW UP IN A NEIGHBOURHOOD where there were a lot of children, you may remember a house where everyone would hang out. You didn’t give it much thought. It was just the way it was. Everyone always ended up there. It was simply the place where it felt good to be. If you think back, you can remember all the good times you had there. But what was it about that house? What was it about the family who lived there? Whatever it was, that is what the owners of a small home in The Beaches area of Toronto wanted when they decided to build their dream home. They had bought the property eight years before and always had a plan to build an extension. But when the time came, and their family was growing, they decided to go big. They didn’t add on. They tore down and went back to the drawing board.

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“When people come over, I want them to feel good, to have that warm feeling,” says the co-owner and mother of three. So it was with that intangible and notquite-defined aim in mind that the couple set out to build what they envisioned as the home they had always wanted. One of the first people they turned to was Joe Sexton, the owner of Sexton Works, a home builder and renovation expert. “They wanted their dream home and they got it,” Sexton states simply. “Everyone wants to go to (their) place to sit on the front porch. That is what they wanted and that is what

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they got. Making your dreams come true is possible. They were looking for a great place for their kids to grow up in.” But they got more than just the right vibe. They also got a great look – a transitional-style home with a few eclectic twists that reflect the family’s personality. “It represents who they are,” explains Rania Ismail-Cherry, designer and owner of Fohr Design Studio, who planned the interior of the new home. “It’s definitely transitional with a huge play on old and new. It has a funky eclectic vibe, but more polished.” •

The colour blue plays a major role in the house, including in the living room, where classic furniture is mixed with contemporary pieces.

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DESIGN

The backsplash in the kitchen features white subway tiles with a crackled glazed finish; it extends up to the ceiling, including the bulkhead. The custom-made vinyl-covered stools at the island have a distressed leather look.

“She’s bubbly, fun,” Ismail-Cherry continues, referring to the homeowner. “And her kids are the same way. They have their own flavour.” And that flavour is exhibited throughout the house in how they used bold colours, mixed antiques with modern pieces, and created a few spectacular surprises. The dining room is a perfect example of unexpected gems. At first glance, the space appears to be oval in shape. But it’s not. It’s an illusion created by the coffered ceiling that features a circular design directly above a round table. “That’s a ‘wow’ room for sure,” says Sexton. “It turns your head.” •

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The quartzite counter on the island has a two-inch edge, giving it a “much more substantial” look, according to designer Rania Ismail-Cherry.


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The circular coffered ceiling in the dining room helps create the illusion of an oval space. The designer describes the wallpaper as “dramatic in terms of pattern, but neutral in terms of palette.”

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DESIGN

The design of the space, including the dramatic patterned wallpaper, “really took the room to another level,” Ismail-Cherry says. “It gave it a whole other dimension.” And the gold-coloured starburst pendant above the table adds the sparkle. The royal blue chairs were inspired by the owners’ taste. The couple had six of the chairs in their previous home. Ismail-Cherry had them reupholstered in a colourful fabric to go along with the blue theme that is seen throughout most of the house, and she had four more chairs custom-built to match.

A dramatic use of colour sets the tone in the main-floor powder room.

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DESIGN MONTREAL TRENDS 2018

The bold, dark feature wall in the son’s bedroom is brightened by a light fixture that bears his initials.

Ismail-Cherry’s favourite feature of the house is a unique glass and metal panel in the kitchen. Reaching to the ceiling from the top of a knee wall at the outer limit of the room, the panel plays both an aesthetic and functional role. The homeowner, who has strong traditional tendencies, wanted a separate kitchen, Ismail-Cherry says. That would have disrupted the flow of the layout of the home. “So we persuaded her to do this metal-glass partition. You can still see through it and it lets the light in. It’s a really awesome feature of the house.” •

Flamboyant flamingos hang out in the ensuite bathroom.

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DESIGN

A porcelain tile with a matte finish in the main entrance gives the floor a natural stone look, while the chevron pattern adds a contemporary twist.

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A bold use of colour dominates the living room, where the panelled walls are finished in the almost-black Benjamin Moore colour known as ‘Soot.’

As for the homeowner, her favourite space is the living room, also known as the music room. The panelled walls are painted a dramatic almost-black: a Benjamin Moore colour known as ‘Soot.’ The walls feature framed posters of concerts and events the couple have attended over the years. The furniture consists of a mix: a contemporary velvet blue sofa with classic vintage wood-framed upholstered armchairs. Also on display in the room is the old saxophone and clarinet, which once belonged to the owner’s father. “It’s not your typical formal living room,” the homeowner says. “It’s unexpected. I don’t want to be like everyone else. I try not to be, anyway. That is why I went with a dark living room.” Every room is different, yet the combination is harmonious. The home embraces old and new, traditional and edgy. No wonder everyone wants to hang out there. •

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DESIGN

WAKE UP AND SMELL THE COFFEE

Finding the right home coffee maker is the first step toward getting the perfect cup of java BY KAREN SEIDMAN

PEOPLE HAVE COME A LONG WAY from waking up to an ordinary cup of coffee. In a world with a Starbucks on every corner, and where a $5 cup of coffee seems to be no deterrent to enjoying the bean, the drink has become a national obsession. Whether you want it frothy, long-black, flat-white or as a macchiato, chances are that you head to your favourite coffee shop to indulge in a rich, aromatic cup of coffee often. And, increasingly, people want that same barista experience at home. “People really like to show off their coffee machines,” says Razvan Nitu, a manager for Linen Chest in Toronto who has sold many Nespresso and barista-style coffee makers. “Coffee isn’t just a drink – it’s an experience,” he says.

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DeLonghi Perfecta espresso and cappuccino machine

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Nespresso VertuoLine with Aeroccino 3 by Breville

Here are some things to consider when buying a coffee machine for your home: PRICE The entry level for a basic Nespresso machine is $180, while the elite Perfecta espresso and cappuccino machine by DeLonghi can cost as much as $2,000. In between, there’s the Breville Duo-Temp Pro Espresso machine, which costs about $400 without a grinder. The Breville Express Barista with a built-in grinder costs $799. There is also the cost of operation to consider, Nitu says. Nespresso,

for instance, at about $1 per cup for the capsules, is the most expensive. However, he adds, Linen Chest offers a compatible capsule for only 50 cents per unit. SIZE This is an important consideration for coffee machine buyers, says Nitu. In a small condo, some machines have a very large footprint that isn’t practical for them. Many people opt for a smaller machine for that reason.

THE WOW FACTOR How many bells and whistles do you want on your machine, and what type of coffee do you prefer? Some machines have built-in grinders, or built-in milk frothers. Some people want a more manual machine, such as the semi-automated Breville Barista because it allows them to control more features. By grinding your own beans, you can choose their coarseness. You can also choose the pressure of the water, which has a direct impact on the flavour. “A built-in precision dosing and precise temperature control allows you to increase or decrease the brew temperature so that you get that optimal temperature for your shot of espresso every time,” Nitu says.  The top-of-the line Perfecta features a patented “Direct-to-Brew” system, which grinds beans instantly and ensures a fresher beverage, he adds. “It also allows the froth to pour at the same time as the coffee and has a coffee warmer to make multiple cups. This is our Cadillac!” Nitu says. “When people come into the store, we walk them through the process and coach them. It’s all about how to start your day with an amazing cup of coffee.” •

Linen Chest www.linenchest.com

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DESIGN

1. The colour scheme is soft and creamy. I had the walls painted in Benjamin Moore’s Simply White, while the trim and ceiling are Oxford White. This palette is soft and fresh and it lightens up the space.

SMALL SPACE,

2. A bevelled mirror hangs over the vanity, extending from countertop to ceiling. Placing mirrors in small spaces reflects light and creates the illusion of longer sightlines. This is the first element seen by the homeowners when they enter the space.

BIG IMPACT

The redesign of this bathroom packed many elements into a modestly proportioned room 2

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BY NADINE THOMSON PHOTOGRAPHY: ROBERT COSTAIN

MY MANDATE WITH THIS PROJECT was to create an ensuite bathroom that would be “glamorous and contemporary” for my clients, Martin Martinez and Robyn Schwartz. This was the second house I was designing for Martin and Robyn, who had moved from an open loft on the Lachine Canal to a century-old house in Westmount to accommodate their growing family (now three boys under the age of five). As an interior designer, I have years of experience designing the inside of private jets. So, I’m familiar with small spaces. The bathroom I designed for my clients functions perfectly, and it looks and feels so much larger than the 72 square feet that it measures. The colour palette was kept monochromatic. And despite the modest dimensions of the space, we chose the maximum-width vanity allowable since it’s the focal point. By doing this, we created the illusion of grandeur. •

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3. The shower measures 36-by-36 inches but feels larger because there is no curb. Its glass walls are flush with the tile floor. We installed a gutter drain on the periphery of the shower to keep its floor free of any obstruction.

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4. Hexagonal Carrara-marble tiles were used on the floor throughout the bathroom and into the curbless shower. Each hexagon is finished randomly – waxed, polished or textured – to create visual interest.

5. The white Odeon vanity from Restoration Hardware is the room’s focal point.


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8. We removed the old hot-water radiators to free up space for the tub, and the room was given under-floor heating.

9. The Sheerweave window blinds from Altex ensure privacy while allowing light in. The tight weave is a contemporary look, and the colour of the blinds blends well with the wall colour for a continuous, unobstructed canvas.

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6. Mixing metals in a room is currently on-trend. The faucets are polished chrome. By contrast, the Thomas O’Brien sconces from Circa Lighting are a matte brass. They create warmth and visual interest in this otherwise monochromatic environment. We mounted them slightly beyond the vanity to widen the sense of the focal point.

7. The pocket doors have a two-inch header, so the ceiling runs into the space from the adjoining room, creating a continuous sightline.

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BUYERS’ GUIDE

LANDSCAPES THAT EVOKE DEEP EMOTION Scott MacKenzie Art www.scottmackenzieart.com 403-988-4983 A RETURN TO ITS ROOTS Le Marché aux Fleurs du Village www.fr-ca.facebook.com/marchefleurs www.lemarcheauxfleursduvillage.ca 450-672-5554 THE GREENING OF HOME Jennifer Lynn Walker, Real Estate Broker www.montreal-realestate.ca 514-402-8444 NAVIGATING A COLOURFUL WORLD Kryptonie The Color Agency www.kryptonie.com 514-267-6274 RETHINKING RENOVATIONS Greening Homes www.greeninghomes.com 416-532-6811 My House Design/Build/Team www.myhousedesignbuild.com 604-694-6873 RénoVert Solutions www.renovert.ca 514-653-8378 DIAL UP THE STYLE WITH TILE Groupe Nord-Fab www.groupenordfab.ca www.claudebeland.ca 514-523-2007 ~ 514-891-1721

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Ciot www.ciot.com Canaroma www.canaroma.com 905-856-7979 X-Tile www.x-tile.net 416-749-7111 ~ Toronto (North) 905-949-8453 ~ Mississauga 416-783-8453 ~ Toronto (Central) Julian Tile www.juliantile.com Fontile Kitchen & Bath www.fontile.com 604-683 9358 SMALL SPACE, BIG IMPACT Nadine Thomson Interior Design www.nadinethomson.com 514-775-2259 WAKE UP AND SMELL THE COFFEE Linen Chest www.linenchest.com A FEAST FOR THE SENSES Figo Toronto www.figotoronto.com 647-748-3446 Hoogan et Beaufort www.hooganetbeaufort.com 514-903-1233

Kōst www.kosttoronto.com 437-800-5938 Foiegwa www.foiegwa.com 438-387-4252 Le Super Qualité www.lesuperqualite.com 514-398-0184 GOOD THINGS IN SMALL SPACES Services Paysagers Dominique Filion www.dominiquefilion.ca 450-653-0000 ~ 514-722-9000 THE CANOPY INDOORS AND OUT Thellend Fortin Architects www.thellendfortin.com 514-903-3102 THE PLACE WHERE EVERYONE HANGS OUT Fohr Design Studio www.fohrdesign.com 416-670-3047 Sexton Works www.sextonworks.com 416-357-8008 MAKING A HOME IN AN ICONIC BUILDING Rainville-Sangaré www.rainville-sangare.com 514-289-6146 A DREAM PROJECT IN HOCKEY HEAVEN Hibou Design & Co. www.hiboudesignco.com 514-574-0015


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IN OUR NEXT ISSUE

If you’ve spent most of the summer outside, you may find yourself giving the interiors of your home some extra scrutiny when the cooler weather sends you back indoors. Such is the gift of autumn. It encourages us to really look around our homes and decide what design tweaks we can make during the cold months ahead. In our upcoming Autumn issue, we’ll help you by showing you some inspiring homes that will make your design and renovation decisions easy. On sale in early September.

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