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M UR October 2014

Lexington’s Fashion & Lifestyle Magazine


get readywww.dryartlex.com for fall! 309 N. Ashland, Ste.160 Lexington, Kentucky info@dryartlex.com 859.303.5364


table of contents

lexi says page 3 dear readers | page 4 lexstreet style page 5 trend hunting | page 6 through the lens of fall | page 7 watch and learn | page 18 mix it up | page 19 work it out | page 20 hot spot | page 21 gotta try it | page 22 coffee and a conversation | page 23

mour magazine, llc www.mourmagazine.com 1


THE TEAM FASHION & CONTENT: Editor In Chief: Tamra Graves Tamra Graves | tamra@mourmagazine.com

ADVERTISING & MARKETING: Maggie Christensen | maggie@mourmagazine.com

Art Director: Maggie Christensen Copy Editor: Jaime Shouldis

NEWSLETTER CONTENT: Jamie Hagood | assistant@mourmagazine.com

Newsletter Editor: Jamie Hagood

GENERAL QUESTIONS, COMMENTS OR SUBMISSIONS: Writers: Andrea Schurr & Jon Shouldis info@mourmagazine.com 2


Lexi Says: Blog About It Have a fall trend you’re currently coveting? We wanna hear - and see! - all about it! Not a blogger? No worries, we still want to see what styles have you head over heels. Send us a paragraph or two and a photo of you in said trend by November 1st for a chance to be featured on our blog, Gimme MOUR. Send submissions, with your name and the name of your trend, to info@mourmagazine.com with LEXI SAYS in the subject field. Photos alone are welcome.

MOURmagazine [DO T ] com: the blogs Are you keeping up with our chatter?

For You On The First Day Of Fall mourmagazine.com/2014/09/ firstoffall

The Ballet Yoga Blend mourmagazine.com/2014/09/ balletyogablend

Darling Dsquared2 mourmagazine.com/2014/09/ darlingdsquared2

C onnect with us! @mourmagazine 3


DEAR READERS,

Oct 10th - 12th thebourbonsocial.com

Happy October! A quintessential time for testing new waters: new trends, new hair, new events (ahem, The Bourbon Social anyone?), new people, new places... You get the idea. There’s just that little something about fall rolling in with its crisp and unusually fresh air, beautiful changing colors and scents only this time of year holds, that spark excitement for change. And change we did, this month, by offering a beautiful main spread (page 7) featuring submissions by area photographers whose talents you may have seen in past issues of MOUR and some who are new to our pages. We’re thrilled to have them all. We asked them each to share work that spoke fall and you will get that sense from each and every image. Perhaps this issue will inspire some sort of change within you. Be it the discovery of your next favorite make up look (page 18), accessorizing from the past (page 6) or your new runway inspired uniform (mourmagazine.com/gimmemour) – this time of year, beauty is everywhere.

XO, TAMRA 4

Through the Lens Page 7


MOUR FASHION

FIRST

SECOND

Lexstreet Style: Festival Latino de Lexington

Last month MOUR Founders, Tamra Graves & Maggie Christensen, were invited to assist in judging the Festival’s Dress Like Frida contest alongside Diane Kahlo (distant kin to the artist herself). The contest was created to honor Frida Kahlo, an iconic painter in Mexican culture, known best for her self portraits. Participants of all ages came in their Frida best, making the selection a tough call for the judges. Many thanks to the sponsors of the contest: Rodeo Western Wear, Park & Recreation Lexington, The Lexington Fashion Collaborative and FLACA.

TIED FOR THIRD

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TREND HUNTING

MOUR FASHION

THE STONE AGE Shop similar styles at AccessHERize:

Drop your gems for stones of another kind. Adorn yourself with tough accessories radiating ancient appeal and be sure to make a solid statement.

1555 East New Circle Road Suite 124 accessherizeme.com

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2 center gold chain & stone necklaces countryclubprep.com


MOUR FASHION

Through the Lens of Fall Spotlighting the autumn projects of talented, local fashion photographers

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THE PHOTOGRAPHER: Paul Bradley Photography www.paulbradleyphotography.com When approached by model, Grace Ann Hager, for this shoot, Paul wanted to offer a result unique to what already existed in her portfolio. Knowing Grace’s experience with whimsical roles, Paul was eager to pull a little edge into these images. He succeeded in creating a blend of soft yet tough images that read fall ready-to-wear so well. Paul Bradley is an up and coming, internationally published Fashion & Senior Photographer based out of Central Kentucky. 8

Photo by Paul Bradley


Photo by Paul Bradley

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Photo by Gary Barragan

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THE PHOTOGRAPHER:

Gary Barragan Photography

Gary Barragan is an accomplished photographer based in Louisville, Kentucky. He initially began photography as a hobby in 2001, casually shooting nature and other things that would stay still for him, but it was in 2011 when he first picked up a dSLR that provided a channel to explore his creativity. After, what seemed to him like, 17,520 hours of Googles searches and You-Tube videos, along with mentoring under several notable connoisseurs of Bourbon and Washington Apples who double as Jedi Masters of Light, he made the decision in 2013 to begin shooting professionally. While he primarily shoots portraiture and event photography, he is also highly active and passionate about working within the Louisville Art Scene. Whether he’s shooting a conceptual editorial, a beauty series or even assisting and capturing behind the scenes, you can always bet Gary is around working diligently within the creative community. His focused determination and signature monochrome style has helped carve out a reputable name for himself among his peers. His photography has been in publications such as The Voice of Louisville, The LEO, Imperial Magazine and Cigar Snob. Although he day dreams really big of exclusively shooting for Wayne Enterprises, he is content with the path his career is currently on. When Gary is not photographing or writing about himself in third person, he enjoys patio coffee dates with his wife and zombie movie nights with his son. He’s also addicted to Legos… especially the Original Star Wars sets… because all of them are awesome.

Photo by Gary Barragan

Dog Days Photographer | Gary Barragan Model | Crissa Candler of Heyman Talent HMUA | Brook Duvall Assistant | Lee Lorimor

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Photo by Jim Tincher

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THE PHOTOGRAPHER: Jim Tincher Photography Jim Tincher is a photographer from Frankfort, Kentucky and has been so most of his life. He bought his first 35mm camera as a teenager in the 70’s. He learned to develop negatives and photos in a darkroom he built in his mom’s laundry room. While serving in the US Navy Jim continued his photography. Today he focuses his efforts on fashion, seniors and model development.

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Photo by Jim Tincher


Photo by Cristy Elaine

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Photo by Cristy Elaine

THE PHOTOGRAPHER: Cristy Elaine Photography Cristy Elaine is an award winning, internationally published photographer specializing in fashion and conceptual work. She is known for her dramatic use of studio lighting both in studio and on location. Living around the world has given her work a unique edge, and she has been published both nationally and internationally. She has been featured on countless blogs and websites across the web and has a large and very active social media fan base. When she isn’t shooting fashion work for countless designers, boutiques and magazines, she shoots for Tressa Inc which is the leading hair supply company for high end salons for the last 45 years. Her recent work includes the 2014 and soon to be 2015 National Tressa hair campaigns and her book ‘Dream a little Dream’ a surreal fairytale book. Check out her work at Cristyelaine.com.

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The inspiration behind Gabi Wades fall fashion shoot, was NYC grunge. Fall fashion consists of wide hats, awesome boots, and of course my favorite- layers! Shot in a very natural way exclusively for MOUR, the shoot was downtown Lexington, KY outside of a local salon, Cha Chas using the landscape of Lexington as a backdrop.


www.fatestyling.com

Gotta Dance Studio THE LANSDOWNE SHOPPES 859.268.3382 | GOTTADANCELEX.ORG

CALL US TODAY TO ENROLL IN OUR FALL PROGRAMS!

BALLET | POINTE | TAP JAZZ | HIP HOP | ACROBATICS MUSICAL THEATRE | MODERN AGES TWO-ADULT | BOYS CLASS PRIVATE CLASSES


MOUR HEALTH & BEAUTY

Watch & Learn: 5 Fall Makeup Trends You must Try

A Call For Color | Kenzo

Does the thought of a completely naked face scare you a little? Try a pop of vibrant color on the eye or lip. With that as your only addition you can tackle two trends at once.

A Touch of Metallic | Rodarte

Select your shine with a deep metallic lip, over the top shawdow, shimmer liner or specs of glitter anywhere.

The MOUR Team Favorite! Back Lash | Gucci

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Doll like lashes of the past are back, think Twiggy - or should we say Grace, after all, she claims creation of this mod sensation. With lashes like these, they’re all you need.

Bare It All | Stella McCartney Luckily for the lazy, this season, less really is more. Don’t feel like putting on your face today? No worries, you’re right on trend.

Line Up | Nicole Miller

A classic application we’ll forever love. A smokey eye, whether heavy or light, or simple winged liner always wins.

Images via imaxtree.com


MOUR HEALTH & BEAUTY

You’ll need: 2 ORANGES 8 WHOLE CLOVES 6 CUPS APPLE JUICE 1 CINNAMON STICK 1/4 TEASPOON GROUND NUTMEG 1/4 CUP HONEY 3 TABLESPOONS LEMON JUICE 2 1/4 CUPS PINEAPPLE JUICE

Directions: 1) PREHEAT OVEN TO 350 DEGREES (175 DEGREES C). STUD THE WHOLE ORANGES WITH CLOVES, AND BAKE FOR 30 MINUTES. 2) IN A LARGE SAUCEPAN, COMBINE THE APPLE JUICE AND CINNAMON STICK. BRING TO A BOIL, REDUCE HEAT TO MEDIUM AND SIMMER 5 MINUTES. REMOVE FROM HEAT AND STIR IN THE NUTMEG, HONEY, LEMON JUICE AND PINEAPPLE JUICE. 3) SERVE HOT IN A PUNCH BOWL WITH THE 2 CLOVE-STUDDED BAKED ORANGES FLOATING ON TOP. *MAKES 16 - 4 OUNCE SERVINGS SPIKE YOUR PUNCH: ADD 1.5 CUPS OF YOUR FAVORITE DARK RUM

mix it up A Sip of Autumn Spice

By Jon Shouldis

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WORK IT OUT

MOUR HEALTH & BEAUTY

THE

#riseandshinemorningyoga

YOGI

wake up and shine with this fun morning routine

southern

CHILD’S POSE

DOWN DOG

COBRA

PIGEON

SLEEPING SWAN

DOLPHIN

FORWARD FOLD

WARRIOR ONE

COMPLETE ON LEFT, THEN RIGHT. REPEAT 4X PER SIDE! 20

Follow The Southern Yogi blog at www.mourmagazine.com


MOUR LIFE efferson Street has, in recent years, become Lexington’s hot spot for cozy and charming locally owned joints, and County Club, located caddy-corner to West Sixth Brewery, is no exception. County Club manages to turn a small, almost shack-like building into a rustic-meets-elegant, warm and inviting spot. It’s a great place to grab a quick bite to eat or put your feet up and relax withfriends, food and only the cream of the crop craft beers.

Upon entering the restaurant, the laid-back, yet refined décor, open kitchen and casual, welcoming demeanor of the staff makes you feel as if you are being invited into someone’s home rather than a restaurant. County Club exemplifies understated Southern hospitality at its finest, creating a cordial and sophisticated environment that somehow avoids being stuffy and ostentatious. The classic rock playlist and string lights only add to the ambiance. A patio spotted with rustic, wooden furniture is also made available for those looking for a romantic evening under the stars. The comforting feeling created by County Club is further continued once the food is served. A small and limited menu has allowed for every detail of every appetizer, entrée, and dessert to be scrutinized and perfected to the chef’s content. Their specialty, the poutine (a hearty plate, overflowing with fries and layered with cheese curds, thick, brown gravy and topped with succulent house smoked pork) epitomizes comfort food. Just make sure to loosen your belts a few notches before attempting to tackle the massive portion. For those looking for lighter fare, you won’t be disappointed. Soup, salad and cheese plate specials are hand written on a chalkboard that covers the east-facing wall. Options could include their unexpectedly refreshing

summer corn chowder with basil, the County Cobb salad with watercress, avocado, Roquefort and red wine vinaigrette, or Kenny’s Farmhouse cheese board with Norwood gruyere and Tomme de Nena. Sandwiches made with their famous house-smoked meats and fresh bread delivered daily from the local Sunrise Bakery on West Main Street offer patrons another high quality, yet pragmatic, meal option. If one of County Club’s delectable smoked meat options tickles your fancy, don’t forget to douse it in one of their three zesty house-made

barbeque sauces—a piquant, vinegary Dijon mustard sauce, a hot habanero sauce that packs some major punch, or a sweet, tomato-based red sauce. If you save enough room for dessert, County Club offers a unique, Southern twist on a traditionally Italian dessert with their buttermilk Panna Cotta. Topped with coconut prepared to have an infused smoky flavor, the panna cotta perfectly concludes any meal and ties the menu together in a nice uniformity of tastes. Along with satisfying your hunger, County Club strives to maintain awareness for tradition and their local impact, stating “County Club is a restaurant in Lexington, Kentucky committed to exploring and expanding the American tradition of smoking meats using hardwoods and low temperatures. It examines barbecue classics by utilizing responsibly raised Kentucky cow, hog, sheep, goat and chicken while applying flavor traditions from around the world.” So, you can come hungry and leave feeling good about being a guest of County Club.

By Andrea Schurr 21


MOUR LIFE

Gotta Try It: Adelé

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When Adelé’s tag line begs you to ‘live stylishly’, one’s immediate inclination is to find the quickest way to prove you are trying to do just that. In the way that a child desires to garner the loving approval of a parent; you’ll wish Adelé to beam with pride upon successfully inspiring another life with great taste. Every inch of the perfectly bedecked space felt alive. Vibrant color and playful patterns, luxe texture and classic - in the trendiest of ways. Not a single item is without beauty, therefore, not one feels unnecessary to life. Visit their beautiful store front at 445 South Ashland Avenue or shop online at www.adelelexington.com.


New York. Moscow. Los Angeles. Sao Palo. Miami. Rome. Lexington. It may seem like our great city of Lexington doesn’t quite fit in on that list. So, what, might you ask, do all these places have in common? They are all cities privileged enough to be home to one of world-famous artist, Eduardo Kobra’s, iconic murals. Even if you are not familiar with Kobra’s work around the world, chances are you have seen his colorful depiction of Lincoln on the back wall of the Kentucky Theatre as you’re driving down Vine Street-it is pretty hard to miss! Lexington has John and Jessica Winters and their passion project, PRHBTN, to thank for bringing Kobra’s unique and vivid street-art style to Lexington. Along with bringing world-famous artists to town, PRHBTN also showcases local street artists and helps pave the way for them to have more artistic opportunities. One thing is for sure, the streets of Lexington would be a whole lot duller without the help of PRHBTN! I sat down over coffee with John Winters at Cup of Commonwealth to discuss anything and everything related to PRHBTN, Kobra and street art. After our conversation, I can’t wait to see what else they have up their sleeves for us!

So, I showed the film to her and she went, ‘This is incredible. We should do a street art show.’ And I said, ‘sure,’ like joking and she was serious. So, PRHBTN started out as a way to just showcase a bunch of local artists. You know, a lot of artists who do work on the street don’t have an opportunity to put it in a gallery. We were able to give a lot of them a show for the first time and to display their work and put a spot light on it. It has kind of evolved because we really enjoy the local stuff and we were trying to get them murals and then we were trying to figure out if we can get bigger murals. Then, last year we just kind of went, ‘Who wants to come?’ We got lucky enough to get a bunch of local artist and it has turned into a combination of highlighting local art and guest artists. We’ll be showcasing local art in a gallery setting and also giving local art a mural. We’re working with a local business to coordinate that. Goals? We don’t really have any. We do it as a passion project. There’s no business behind it, no plan for world domination, or anything. We think it’s something neat to do and the community has been so receptive of it and, you know, people like it. We were like, ‘You know, well, if there are blank walls and they could have art on it, let’s put art on it if we can.’ But, we don’t plan on making it a big thing. I’ve told people repeatedly if I ever make a dime I don’t want to do it anymore. Which is weird, but I mean its more fun that way.

Can you explain a little bit about PRHBTN to our readers who may not know what it is? What are PRHBTN’s goals/visions/hopes?

How has PRHBTN grown since it formed? PRHBTN is four years old, correct?

So, my wife Jessica and I, when we were first dating, had one night we were trying to find a movie to watch and I said, ‘You need to see Exit Through the Gift Shop,’ which is the Banksy flick. It’s a street art movie. I grew up in the Northeast so I have always been taking trains into the city and seeing big burners on the side of trains and under overpasses. I was obsessed with street art as a kid.

Yeah. It really grew from an idea—and a dumb idea at that—that essentially was just a conversation over beers to what it is now. We never thought we’d do anything more than showcase local artists and have concerts—that’s it. And now it’s gotten to the point where every year I get so excited because I’m meeting idols and rock stars. These artists who I’ve seen their work on huge buildings in massive cities, I see it all the

time and I just love it, are going to be here. Like, I feel like I’m inviting rock stars to my house and it is very weird when they’re like, ‘Yeah sure we’ll come.’ It’s crazy, so we’re blown away. We hope it keeps going, so we’ll see. Why should people care about street art in Lexington? How is the street art scene important to Lexington specifically? That’s the thing, we never do anything because other people want us to do it or should care. I think it’s neat, especially with our local artists; we’ve got this whole crew of local artists who are operating completely out of the mainstream. I mean these aren’t people with MFA’s. These aren’t people who are doing big canvas pieces and working in their studio and trying to sell stuff for $40,000. I think it’s important because they’re people with a voice and they’re people with something to say and they’re doing it creatively. And I think it makes the streets more interesting. I mean, if you took a big, ugly electrical box sitting on the side of a building and you look at it, there’s nothing to it. You stick a sticker in the middle of it, regardless of what it says, it makes it a little more interesting. I mean call it vandalism, call it art, whatever you want to, you know it brightens up your day a little bit.

Coffee and a Conversation with John Winters 23


How is the street art being produced in Lexington representative of our city? How is it unique from other cities? I think a way that it is unique is, when you go to a lot of other cities in the states and even in Europe—big cities— you’re seeing a lot of tags. It’s a lot of someone writing their name over and over and over all over the city. And some people don’t see the art in that. I think it’s unique in Lexington that the artists don’t collectively have a name. You don’t see someone’s name everywhere. You don’t see the same thing written everywhere. It’s more of—especially with Hello Mona and DroneX—an image repeated and slightly changed. It makes it feel a little bit more playful and not as much as a status like, ‘I’m going to get up all over town,’ or whatever. As far as our voice, I’ve always thought that Lexington has a nice, fun, playful edge to it. If you look around, you see some of the more prominent pieces that have gone up over the years, like the Gatewood Galbraith ones, it seems like it’s got this little fun edge to it. It’s cool. I think it makes it a little bit more accessible. Tell us more about bringing Kobra here. A lot of people pass the Lincoln mural everyday, but they might not know anything about it. Can you give us more of an idea of the vision behind it for PRHBTN and insight into the backstory behind it? Essentially what I do every year is for about a month I research consistently all these artists and I make a big long list and I write down links and email addresses and contacts and try to figure out who all’s out there and what everybody’s doing. I take that list and I compile everything and I try to narrow it down to like ten artists that I think are my favorite currently working. And then I just email them. And I go, ‘Hey you should come to Lexington…’ So, literally, all I did was I said, ‘Hey we have this thing. It’s a lot of fun. We’d love for you to come.’ 24

MOUR LIFE And we said, ‘You would have complete artistic freedom. Do whatever you want to do. We’ll take care of you for the whole time you’re here and if you’d like to come that’d be awesome and if not please come next year.’ And we completely thought there was no way he was going to come. I was totally ok with that, but I figured I had to ask anyway. So it was just like a shot in the dark for you? Oh, completely. Like I said, it’s like emailing your favorite rock star, like emailing Jack White, and being like, ‘Hey would you mind, like, playing in Lexington for nothing? For free? I’ll buy your food?’ So, about a month and a half out we had already talked to our other artists and I had confirmed them, so we were all excited we had gotten these huge artists. Then, about a month and a half out, Kobra’s people email me and say, ‘We’d love to come,’ and I go, ‘Wha..wha…’ My first response was, ‘We can’t do this’ and Jessica just said, ‘No we have to. We’re going to make it work. We’ll figure out a way to do it. Just tell them we’re going do it and we’ll make it work.’ So, she’s really the reason why he came. We went, ‘Well how do we make this work?’ and, you know, we begged and borrowed and pleaded and raised a bunch of funds to, luckily, make it work. So, when he agreed to come we searched for big walls and talked to someone in the mayor’s office, who was amazing and was instrumental for all of it, and she essentially said, ‘Ok what about the back of the Kentucky Theatre’. We had never thought about it. We drove down vine and went, ‘That’s a big wall!’ I had never noticed that wall before. So, because it’s a city wall we had to have it approved. Kobra sent sketches, they approved it, we struggled to raise a whole bunch of money, and it worked out. The support was incredible. It was definitely a leap of faith. It was a complete over reach for us, but it worked out.

For the complete interview visit Mour’s blog at mourmagazine.com. Don’t miss PRHBTN’s fourth annual show, October 10th through 12th featuring How and Nosm, ROA, Andrew Hem, Bastardilla and a mystery artist.

By Andrea Schurr


Splurge, Save, Steal

Theory ‘Hanalee’ Genuine Fox Fur Vest Available at Nordstrom.com $1,495

Kristen Blake Two-Tone Faux Fur Vest Available at Nordstrom.com $138

Jolt Faux Fur Vest Available at Nordstrom.com $58

#localalert

From the September Issue of MOUR Available at Morton James

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The LEXSEWS project is designed to provide refugees and low-income participants with multidisciplinary educational and skill development opportunities that promote self-sufficiency through professional sewing courses which incorporate entrepreneurship.

Lexington Fashion Collaborative

Sign up for the LFC newsletter for updates on events and projects. www.lexingtonfashion.org

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MOUR Magazine | October 2014  

Copyright MOUR Magazine, LLC 2014

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