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OUR 24TH YEAR OF WEE KLY INDEPE NDE NT NEWS, ARTS & EVE NTS FOR WESTE RN NORTH CAROLINA VOL. 24 NO. 4 AUG. 16 - 22, 2017

Look Up Solar eclipse events around WNC

part two! EATS & DRINKS OUTDOORS FARM & GARDEN MEDIA WORK & BUSINESS PETS

SMALL TOWNS: SWANNANOA/BLACK MOUNTAIN MARSHALL/MARS HILL WEAVERVILLE/WOODFIN HOT SPRINGS WAYNESVILLE


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C O NT E NT S OUR 24TH YEAR OF WEEKLY INDEPENDENT NEWS, ARTS & EVENTS FOR WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA VOL. 24 NO. 4 AUG. 16 - 22, 2017

LOCAL TUESDAYS

PAGE 33 DARK CITY

Look Up Solar eclipse events around WNC

part two! EATS & DRINKS OUTDOORS FARM & GARDEN MEDIA WORK & BUSINESS PETS

SMALL TOWNS: SWANNANOA/BLACK MOUNTAIN MARSHALL/MARS HILL WEAVERVILLE/WOODFIN HOT SPRINGS WAYNESVILLE

Asheville’s Solar Eclipse Festival, on Monday, Aug. 21, is part of the Carolina Solar Eclipse Parties initiative, which includes events within the path of totality. On the cover: Members of the UNC Asheville Bulldogs women’s soccer team get ready for the eclipse. COVER PHOTO Cindy Kunst COVER DESIGN Scott Southwick

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FEATURES

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NEWS

10 A REGION DIVIDED Exploring WNC’s mixed role in the Civil War

WELLNESS

22 EMBODYING CHANGE West Asheville Yoga purchases One Center Yoga to become The Embodiment Center

GREEN

24 OF GRIME AND THE RIVER Communities along Upper French Broad work to restore water quality

FOOD

27 A SOUTHERN TRADITION Pimento cheese was born in the North, but Asheville has made it its own

A&E

35 TAKE WHAT YOU HAVE WRES honors its co-founder, mission and 16 years of broadcasting

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38 MODERN HIEROGLYPHICS Symbolism and color theory mark Joshua Spiceland’s latest collection

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5 LETTERS 5 CARTOON: MOLTON 7 CARTOON: BRENT BROWN 8 COMMENTARY 16 COMMUNITY CALENDAR 18 CONSCIOUS PARTY 22 WELLNESS 24 GREEN SCENE 26 FARM & GARDEN 27 FOOD 29 SMALL BITES 31 BEER SCOUT 33 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT 39 THEATER PREVIEW 40 SMART BETS 44 CLUBLAND 50 MOVIES 52 SCREEN SCENE 53 CLASSIFIEDS 54 ASHEVILLE DISCLAIMER 54 FREEWILL ASTROLOGY 55 NY TIMES CROSSWORD

Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. Mountain Xpress is available free throughout Western North Carolina. Limit one copy per person. Additional copies may be purchased for $1 payable at the Xpress office in advance. No person may, without prior written permission of Xpress, take more than one copy of each issue. To subscribe to Mountain Xpress, send check or money order to: Subscription Department, PO Box 144, Asheville NC 28802. First class delivery. One year (52 issues) $130 / Six months (26 issues) $70. We accept Mastercard & Visa.

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OPINION

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Brevard Road, an unattended speedway, part 2

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Thank you, Mr. [Steven M.] Howard, for writing this important letter to the editor in the Mountain Xpress [“Brevard Road, an Unattended Speedway,” July 26], I think you were right on target. Asheville citizens have the right to request a speed test, and the city frequently complies with these requests. These tests basically are two pressure-sensitive strips that are placed across the road and accurately measure vehicle speed. I requested one for Brevard Road a few months ago and was shocked to learn that there are approximately 8,685 vehicles/day and that the 85th percentile was 37mph. By my reckoning, that means there were about 579 cars/day (or 15 percent) clearly exceeding the posted speed limit of 30 mph. My internal Doppler isn’t all that accurate, but I suspect that many of these vehicles are in excess of 45-50 mph. Many of the speeders are city vehicles (recycle trucks and ART buses). The “Slow Down Asheville” placards dozens of neighbors put on Brevard Road I think encouraged the less conscientious drivers to actually speed up. I see most of them are gone now.

It was encouraging to note the APD public information officer’s response to Mr. Howard’s letter to the editor saying that the Asheville Police Department is first of all responsible for traffic enforcement along Brevard Road and routinely provides police services to our neighborhood. But in the nearly three years since moving to Brevard Road, I have never seen a single enforcement action taken against speeders. Also, I suspect that many of the drivers on Brevard Road after a big night on Haywood Road may be over the legal limit. One other point: Siri tells me that an 18-wheeled truck without the trailer weighs around 20,000 pounds. At the bottom of Brevard Road near I-240, there is a sign that clearly states that trucks over 13,000 pounds are not allowed. Yet, I see or feel them shake my house, almost every day. Stoplights or speed bumps along Brevard Road are probably not an option. I can appreciate and respect rapid emergency response; these EMTs are doing a great job. However, our rapid-response vehicles frequently use Haywood Road to access I-240 as well, and there are five stoplights from the fire station on Haywood to I-240 (Vermont, Brevard, Louisiana, State and the light, or two lights if you’re going westbound, at I-240). There are a lot of things that don’t make sense these days, but is this argument appropriate? Why does an

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Asheville’s Paddle Shop

OPINION

Send your letters to the editor to letters@mountainx.com.

EMT vehicle negotiate five stoplights along a business corridor versus Brevard Road within one of Asheville’s neighborhoods and no stoplights? It’s the 21st century — perhaps an option is the installation of a speed camera near Davenport Road (straight stretch of Brevard Road) or at least a flashing sign that records your speed limit (similar to the one at the Asheville airport). I would hope that if a driver saw that he/she was going 50 mph in a 25 mph school zone (at Francine Delany) it would at least get their attention. — Dave Penrose Asheville

Williams, a voice for Asheville’s young people I’ve lived in Asheville for three years now, since graduating from Clemson. I’m 25 years old, work as a tutor and live with my mother. My friends mostly live in group houses, with parents or with roommates in order to afford the high rents. In the past year, I’ve witnessed an exodus of young people from Asheville to places like Colorado and RaleighDurham. Most are leaving because the rents are so high, the hordes of tourists make it difficult to enjoy living here, and there are few livablewage jobs. For a lot of young people, Asheville does not feel like a place where we have a future, and it seems only a matter of time before we give up and move on. Dee Williams speaks to that. She knows and understands the burdens of young adults in our community, and she proposes ways of making Asheville affordable for all of us, such as building business incubators, creating community land trusts and making community-benefit agreements with businesses

so that they will pay workers a livable wage. She also has a long history of succeeding in these projects, such as Ban the Box, because she has been working on them for a long time and she is a determined negotiator. Based on her past successes and her current platform, Dee Williams best represents the needs of young people in this election. I encourage all who read this to listen to her speak and to visit her website, www.dee4avl.com, to learn more about her. — Camille McCarthy Asheville Editor’s note: McCarthy reports that she is a volunteer with Dee Williams’ campaign.

CORRECTION Xpress regrets that the photo on the cover of last week’s Best of WNC supplement was misattributed. The photographer was Emma Grace Moon.

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What a great sold-out show. A packed crowd and dozens more at the box office hoping to get tickets to the The Lost Chord, a Moody Blues tribute band July 22 at the Altamont Theater, downtown Asheville. A packed house was ecstatic over the renditions of Asheville’s very own talented musicians and equally as talented vocalists. This band truly nailed it! Kudos to a smashing night, well done. You knocked our socks off. Cannot wait till your next show. You can do the very same show, but at a much larger venue, so we can all move and dance to a rocking, out-of-the-ballpark band, The Lost Chord. — Lo Hoffner Weaverville

Reading “Growing the Next Generation of Farmers” from the Mountain Xpress’ July 19 paper once again left me perplexed over the apparent emotional disconnect of those who raise animals and then kill them. I looked at the photo of [two farmers] gently holding two of their chickens for a long time. They look warm and openhearted. It all appears quite innocent. Yet, the full picture should also show them cutting off the heads of those very chickens they are holding or the slaughtering of the other animals they are raising. I ask the reader to pause for a moment and reflect on the reality of what is going on. This behavior has been so normalized most people do not pause or even blink when seeing such an article. When humans take the lives of other human beings, we are horrified. Why is it acceptable, and even photographed as cute, when human beings take the lives of animals? I ask the reader to pause and also reflect on their health. The American Heart Association states, “Many studies have shown that vegetarians seem

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AUG. 16 - 22, 2017

Kudos to The Lost Chord band

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to have a lower risk of obesity, coronary artery disease, high blood pressure, diabetes and some forms of cancer.” The American Heart Association and the American Diabetic Association are also great resources for recipes and support for undertaking a plant-based diet. My hope is that these words kindle our minds to reflect on our actions, our healthy bodies and how we can move forward on the planet in a harmonious way that includes animals in this harmony. — Miriam Hard Asheville


C A RT O O N B Y B R E NT B R O W N

MOUNTAINX.COM

AUG. 16 - 22, 2017

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OPI N I ON

Send your letters to the editor to letters@mountainx.com.

Appalachian orchids Hidden gems of the mountain forests BY TAL GALTON A summer orchid hunt in the woods of Western North Carolina is an exercise in discernment. Many of these precious mountain wildflowers are a shade of rusty maroon, perfectly blending into the backdrop of leaf litter. Others grow in the shadows of rhododendron. Even orchids that aren’t rare and aren’t camouflaged can be hard to find. For instance, you need keen eyes and perfect timing to spot the elusive three birds orchid (Triphora trianthophora). To find this flower, wait until the first spell of cool nights in August. Seek out an undisturbed rhododendron thicket, and with attentive study of the forest floor, you may spot this tiny pink and white jewel of a flower rising 8 inches off the ground on a nearly featureless stalk. Each flower is only open for a day, so become a rhodieroaming regular if you want to catch a glimpse of this rare spectacle. Orchid flowers are renowned for their fragile beauty. Tropical orchids are popular houseplants and are widely known for their exotic flowers. Most folks don’t realize that native orchids are a common but elusive feature of our temperate mountain forests. The orchid family is among the most diverse families of flowering plants, with nearly 30,000 species. While most of these species live in the tropics, at least 50 species are found in the Southern Appalachians. For an in-depth look, check out the best field guide on our local orchids, Native Orchids of the Southern Appalachian Mountains by Stanley Bentley. Native orchids are remarkable little plants, and you don’t need to be an expert botanist to learn the common ones; in my little corner of WNC, I have observed at least half of the varieties featured in the book. On an orchid walk, the first thing thing I tell people is that orchids are extremely tight with the local fungi population. In ecology, this is known as a mycorrhizal relationship (“myco” means fungus, and “rhiz” means root; it’s pronounced “mike-o-rise-al”). Most tropical orchids are epiphytes. They live on tree branches and have no direct contact with the forest floor, so they don’t get nutrition from soil; recent research shows that epiphytic 8

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TAL GALTON orchids are assisted by fungi. Our local (temperate) orchids are not epiphytes, but they often live in plant communities that have notoriously poor and acidic soil. Some varieties — coralroot orchids, for example — don’t even have chlorophyll for photosynthesis because they get all of their energy from their fungal partners. Even orchids with green leaves depend on fungi for a range of plant functions, starting with germination. One feature common to orchids is their tiny seed size. Orchid seeds are dustlike specks that are simple plant embryos — they lack the endosperm that serves as baby food for most plant seedlings. An orchid seed must meet up with its preferred species of fungus in order to obtain the necessary nutrients for germination. The network of partnerships between plants and fungi is a hot topic in forest ecology. Some scientists and science writers refer to this mycorrhizal network as the “Wood Wide Web.“ We are learning that many plant species in the forest, from trees to orchids, plug into the underground network of fungi for supplemental


nutrition and for a means of communication. The more we learn about life on our own planet, the less far-fetched is the neurally networked ecosystem of the (fictional) moon Pandora in John Cameron’s film Avatar. The orchids of the Blue Ridge are a window into this underground network of fungi-plant relationships. The orchidfungus relationship is a big reason why orchids rarely survive transplanting and prompts the No. 1 rule of orchid hunters: don’t dig orchids! Simply enjoy them where they are and photograph them all you want. It appears that each species of orchid has particular fungal partners, so a forest’s selection of orchids mirrors the diversity and health of its fungal community. Since the mycelia of fungi provide much of the underground communications and transportation infrastructure in a forest, an abundance of orchids may be viewed as an indicator for good soil health and biotic diversity. The mid- and late-summer orchids that are expertly camouflaged against

the forest floor are coralroots, twayblades and cranefly orchids, but we do have several showy and brightly colored varieties as well. The popular ones bloom in the spring: the showy orchis and the pink and yellow lady’s slippers. This time of year, we have the spectacular yellow fringed, the graceful ladies’ tresses and the fleeting three birds orchids. I recently learned about a syndrome suffered by some fans of Avatar. Apparently, some viewers were so taken by the depiction of life on Pandora that they fell into a depression, let down by their own mundane surroundings on Earth. If you suffered from that malady, you should know that you needn’t wait for Avatar 2. Go on an Appalachian orchid hunt. As you gaze into the little mountain masterpieces, marvel at the astounding connective tissue of the forest under your feet. Burnsville resident Tal Galton is a naturalist who loves introducing people to wild places. He runs Snakeroot Ecotours in Yancey County.  X

WOODLAND BEAUTY: The spectacular yellow fringed orchid blooms in August. It and other orchids of the Blue Ridge depend on fungi for a range of plant functions, including germination. Some scientists and science writers refer to the network of partnerships between plants and fungi as the “Wood Wide Web.” Photo by Tal Galton MOUNTAINX.COM

AUG. 16 - 22, 2017

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NEWS

A REGION DIVIDED Exploring WNC’s mixed role in the Civil War BY THOMAS CALDER tcalder@mountainx.com Our understanding of the Shelton Laurel Massacre, the most infamous incident in the Civil War in Western North Carolina, may be reshaped by a new exhibit coming to Mars Hill University. The Civil War in the Southern Highlands: A Human Perspective, the latest exhibit at The Rural Heritage Museum at Mars Hill University, features stories of starvation, propaganda and deception, along with new evidence that shifts blame for the massacre away from the man long perceived as the villain. Les Reker, the museum’s director says the most groundbreaking component of the exhibit is the never-before -published letters of Confederate Lt. Col.  James A. Keith. Keith gained local infamy during the war for his assumed role in the Shelton Laurel Massacre. Reker declares that Keith’s recently acquired missives, along with contradictory reports, possible ulterior motives of individuals involved and inaccurate claims, “cast new light on the events.” According to filmmaker Ryan Phillips, who conducted research for the exhibit, in addition to producing the show’s 15-minute introductory video, Madison County functions as a microcosm of the region’s overall divided allegiance. In his opinion, the Shelton Laurel massacre was a manifestation of this division. Whereas the area’s townspeople tended to support the Confederacy, most of its rural residents opposed leaving the Union. Such tension, says Phillips, often resulted in violence. “War brings out the worst in people,” he explains. On May 13, 1861, the town sheriff, Ransom P. Merrill, shot and wounded local Unionist Elisha Tweed. Later that day, Tweed’s father exacted revenge on Merrill, killing the proConfederate sheriff. Merrill’s death, notes Phillips, was a harbinger of far worse things to come. “There were a lot of little people that were caught up in [the Civil War],” says Reker. “They really did not have an opinion one way or another for the reasons why the South seceded and they certainly didn’t want to go to war about it.” 10

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ALWAYS IN THE MAKING: “This is a very important story for our region,” says Les Reker, right, director of The Rural Heritage Museum, with filmmaker Ryan Phillips. “The way the war started and the way it was fought by the people of not only Madison County, but Yancey, Haywood, Buncombe and East Tennessee — it’s not the traditional story you hear about the Civil War.” Photo by Chris Whitten Reker points to the 1862 Conscription Act as a case in point. It required men ages 18-35 to serve in the Rebel army. Because of this, many women hid their husbands from the Rebel Home Guards. “Many women were beaten terribly. Older women were beaten with whips for conspiring with the Linconites [a term used to describe Southerners who supported the Union],” Reker explains. In one unique case, Watauga County resident Sarah Malinda Pritchard Blalock did not hide her husband but rather joined him in battle. “She pretended to be his brother,” Reker explains. Blalock is the state’s only known female Civil War soldier. The Blalocks’ service with the Confederate army was short-lived. The couple would return to their farm, near Grandfather Mountain, and later join a guerrilla band of Union sympathizers. Hostility within the region continued to escalate throughout the war

years, leading to the eventual Shelton Laurel Massacre. Local Union sympathizers often shot at Rebel Home Guards, leading the Confederates to attempt to disarm residents. When the measure failed, Confederate authorities found other ways to punish the Shelton Laurel community, including the withholding of salt, which was used to preserve meats. Hunger ensued. Because of this, on Jan. 8, 1863, residents of Shelton Laurel raided homes and business in nearby Marshall. They were in search of food, clothing and much-needed salt. Among the pillaged properties was the domicile of Confederate Col. Lawrence Allen, commander of the 64th North Carolina. Within two weeks, 16 people were taken prisoner for their participation in the raid. Their ages ranged from 13 to 60. The accused were told they’d stand trial in Knoxville, Tenn. Plans,


however, changed, and on Monday, Jan. 19, they were executed by a firing squad and buried in shallow graves. Popular opinion at the time placed responsibility for the massacre on Lt. Col. James A. Keith. In 1867, he was arrested but would later escape from the Buncombe County jail. Augustus Merrimon and Zebulon Vance played a crucial role in promulgating claims against Keith. Such early accusations, combined with centuries of oral tradition, have all but cemented Keith’s fate as guilty. The Civil War in the Southern Highlands: A Human Perspective raises questions concerning this nearly 155-year-old atrocity — namely, the role, if any, that Keith played. The exhibit highlights that Merrimon may have had ulterior motives for casting Keith in an unfavorable light. Likewise, many of the early accounts concerning Keith’s whereabouts during the war have since been proved false. But the greatest evidence, says Phillips, lies within the museum’s acquisition of Keith’s own letters. “These new papers are as rare as a winning lottery ticket,” Phillips says. “Their existence is almost impossible. For us to get our hands on it is even more rare.”

Along with the Shelton Laurel Massacre and the controversy surrounding Keith’s involvement, the exhibit will spotlight the Battle of Warm Springs and the Battle of Asheville. Bushwackers, bridge burners and brothers battling brothers will also be highlighted, as will the issue of slavery within WNC. “Most people that haven’t studied [the Civil War] assume that anybody that lived in Western North Carolina during that time period was pro-Confederate,” says Dan Slagle, local historian and genealogist who assisted The Rural Heritage Museum with its latest exhibit. “But that is not true. … Your average citizen in Western North Carolina didn’t want any part of this war. But they were forced into it one way or another. And a lot of the soldiers that came from here didn’t have to go off to war. The war came to them.” In Slagle’s opinion, scrutiny of the region’s history and its citizens’ roles within the war is among the many goals of The Civil War in the Southern Highlands: A Human Perspective. Slagle adds that such scrutiny is an essential component in the overall examination of our country’s past.

“If we study history and dig deep enough — and most of us don’t do that — but if you really want to know the truth, you’ve got to dig deeper and don’t stop researching when you find one book that agrees with your theory of what any one thing was. … There’s always a different side to every story.”  X

WHAT The Rural Heritage Museum at Mars Hill University’s The Civil War in the Southern Highlands: A Human Perspective WHERE 80 Cascade St. Mars Hill mhu.edu/museum WHEN Exhibit opening runs 1-5 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 19, and will continue through Sunday, March 4. Free

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AUG. 16 - 22, 2017

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NEWS

by Leslie Boyd

leslie.boyd@gmail.com

TAKING A STAND When Rich Lee heard about the stabbing of three men who tried to intervene in the harassment of a young Muslim woman and her friend on a train in Portland, Ore., in May, he wondered whether there might be a safer way

Group trains bystanders to intervene in troublesome situations

to advocate for people who are being bullied. “Two of those three men died,” Lee said. “I wondered what I would have done in that situation and whether there might have been a better way to intervene.”

SEE SOMETHING, SAY SOMETHING: Bystander intervention training begins with participants introducing themselves and stating one thing they hope to take away from the day. Photo by Leslie Boyd That musing led to a workshop on July 29, attended by about 50 people who wanted answers to the same questions Lee was asking. His research turned up bystander intervention training offered by Ready the Ground in Durham. The three-hour class is intended to help people understand situations where intervention is appropriate and to help them decide how to intervene. The group keeps a low profile on the internet because of threats, but can be contacted via its Facebook page, avl.mx/40p. Lee, a candidate for Asheville City Council, said he wondered how he would react if someone were threatening an innocent person in public, and it occurred to him that he might get killed defending someone. “There’s no doubt that hate speakers feel emboldened right now, and we need to be able to deal with that in a safe way,” he said. Asheville real estate agent Alan Rosenthal attended because he wanted to arm himself with information. “We live in an interesting time,” Rosenthal said. “People aren’t working hand in hand anymore, 12

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and I want to find ways to encourage us to do so.” Laurie Johnson of Fairview said she tends to jump into situations that could be dangerous, and she wants to be more aware of the proper way to intervene when she sees trouble. “I still want to jump in, but I want to do so with less risk,” she said. The workshop helped participants from across North Carolina and eastern Tennessee understand when and how to help people who are being attacked or bullied. Maju Rajendran, who with Catherine Berman facilitated the workshop, told participants that intervention is not something best done alone, but that people who intervene should seek partners, both to be safer and to work with someone who might complement one’s own strengths. “This is about a shift toward the idea that we’re all in this together, which is a bit radical in this society right now,” she said. “We want to do this because it is not OK for us to be OK with the status quo right now.” If you hope to intervene in a troublesome situation, it’s important to know


your motives, your strengths and your weaknesses, Rajendran said. Consider how you react to trouble — fighting, fleeing or appeasing — and, based on those reactions, how you can best center yourself in various situations. If you know these things about yourself and your reactions, you’re more likely to choose the proper role and be effective. For example, if you’re someone who reacts with anger, it might be better for you to allow someone else to address the perpetrator directly while you work to calm people nearby or call for more help. Twins Christel and Ruby Schober Colburn, 12, said they came because they want to be able to help people in trouble. They learned they can work as a team to help keep each other calm, and since most incidents of bullying happen in schools and on college campuses, they figure they’re as likely to encounter it as anyone. Berman advised participants to assess the situation to be sure it meets the definition of “trouble,” in that it interferes with someone’s safe passage or sends a message of threat or hostility, and to intervene in ways that help the targeted person or people feel empowered to speak for themselves. Also: • Try to stay positive and keep a welcoming attitude toward other witnesses and thank them if they assist in any way. • Maintain a calm voice and do not threaten or use violence. Always make sure the person you’re trying to calm has an escape route. • Intervention can be as simple as beginning a conversation with a perpetrator and walking with that person in an effort to distract and defuse. • Practice active listening, repeating the person’s points to them: “I understand you want …” “I see you’re really upset …”

Once the person realizes you’re listening, he or she may feel less frustrated. • Remember that your body language can speak as clearly as your words. Your hands should be unclenched, palms up, your head slightly tilted. Never point or shake a finger, and never touch someone you haven’t met before. Keep your voice low and calm. Asked to provide a law enforcement perspective on citizen interventions in tense situations, Asheville Police Chief Tammy Hooper says she welcomes inquiries from organizations and groups interested in serving the community in this role. “Typically these organizations coordinate with law enforcement agencies in order to be effective when responding to a scene,” Hooper says. Coordination is crucial so that “law enforcement are aware of the organization and their purpose/goal in providing on-scene response,” Hooper continues. The Police Department also provides training about where bystanders can be on a scene, “since preservation of a crime scene is of the utmost importance.” Hooper didn’t speak to how individuals should respond to situations they encounter during the course of daily life. “We encourage any organization, or team, wishing to provide crisis response to reach out to the Asheville Police Department so that we can work together to coordinate and clearly define expectations,” she says. Rosenthal said he left the training feeling more capable of stepping in when he witnesses trouble. “I see myself as someone who will step in,” he said. “Now I see myself as someone in a larger community of people willing to do the same.”  X

Tips for bystander intervention Workshop facilitator Catherine Berman uses the acronym WITTY to describe the roles of bystanders in situations where intervention might be appropriate: Welcome: To create an atmosphere of welcome and inclusion, a climate where an act of violence would be really out of place. Information: To offer good and reliable information. This includes information on where people can turn for additional help or resources, or a safe exit route from the trouble. Tone: Set the tone for the moment by being an anchor of support so that the person or people most impacted can feel empowered. Model productive participation for other witnesses and recruit them to helpful roles. Trouble: Intervene in cases of trouble, defined as behaviors that we don’t want, such as interference with someone’s safe passage or something that sends a message of threat or hostility. Yes: Form alliances with others. Always try to work in teams and try to stay within arm’s reach of each other.

North Asheville Food

Truck

Festival Saturday, Sept. 16 11am - 5pm

FOOD

BEER

MUSIC

Free Admission for All

VIT $20

(Very Important Taster) • • • • •

Eat in air conditioned comfort Get $1 OFF beer purchases Visit the FREE dessert bar One ticket to each hourly 50/50 raffle Enjoy FREE non-alcoholic beverages

Tickets at ashevillecatholic.org

Kids Zone!

Premium Parking Pass

$5

Limited passes available

First come, First served

Inflatables, Ice Cream, Face Painting, and more!

Guest Judges

Jason Boyer from WLOS Chef Joe Scully from The Corner Kitchen and Chestnut Chef Sam Etheridge from Ambrozia Vote for your favorite food truck through our People’s Choice Award!

Live Music

Dancing with DJ.5

Come taste what some of Asheville’s most popular food trucks are cooking up! Asheville Catholic School

12 Culvern Street, Asheville, NC 28804 MOUNTAINX.COM

AUG. 16 - 22, 2017

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B A C K T O S C H O O L

B U N C O M B E B E AT

sale

Duke’s no-coal goal moves forward Students save 10% Sa l e e n d s Au g u st 3 1 st

S ims’ Fu to n G a l l e r y | 1 6 7 Patton Ave. Downtow n As h evi l l e | 8 2 8 .252. 9449

COAL CUTTERS: The Buncombe County Board of Adjustment gave the go-ahead to a conditional use permit that will allow Duke Energy to begin construction on its natural gas facility. Duke says it plans to eliminate its Arden-based coal-fired operation by the end of 2019. Photo courtesy of MountainTrue The Buncombe County Board of Adjustment gave its blessing Aug. 9 to Duke Energy’s conditional use permit application to build a natural gas facility in Arden, home of its current coal-fired plant. “Locally, we will not be burning coal by the end of 2019,” said Jason Walls, the utility’s local representative, who said the region’s growth could bring a 17 percent increase in power needs over the next decade. “I get asked a lot about why we are doing this. We are investing in a different energy future than we have today. There was a time we did these projects without individual outreach to customers, and that has changed, and hopefully, you’ll see that with this project,” Walls said en route to touting Duke’s community collaboration. He said the utility will alter construction traffic routes for minimal disturbance, provide visual buffers and even offer car wash coupons for adjacent neighbors who might find their cars lacking that showroom shine due to the dust. And that construction is set to begin soon, with contractors starting underground infrastructure installation, and has a completion target date of November 2019. The project will use about 700 people, and Duke officials said they’re looking to contract and hire locally, having held a vendor fair, and are 14

AUG. 16 - 22, 2017

MOUNTAINX.COM

working on opening a local recruiting office for the project. Duke’s expansion isn’t without its concerns, as two people showed up to ask questions and raise objections. Xavier Boatright, a nearby resident and cleanwater advocate, expressed concerns about coal ash leaching into nearby well water and noted some residents use only bottled water. “We and other neighbors live with the uncertainty of well water. Duke has offered minimum in regard to water mitigation. The impacted neighbors ask Buncombe County to halt the application until we aren’t on bottled water and have a safe water supply provided by the company,” he said. Board Chair George Lycan said he hopes the issue “is being attended to” but noted it’s not within the board’s purview. Walls added: “Those residents are represented by legal counsel and engaged with our legal team. We’ve done an investigation about how our operations have a direct impact; a lot of those studies continue to be inconclusive.” Hendersonville Road resident Brenda Smith feared property values of nearby homes are being diminished and asked about where the natural gas would come from. Walls responded that it comes from the Transco (short for Transcontinental)


NEWS BRIEFS BU NCOM B E B EAT H Q To read all of Mountain Xpress’ coverage of city and county news, visit Buncombe Beat online at avl.mx/3b5. There you’ll find detailed recaps of government meetings the day after they happen, along with previews, indepth stories and key information to help you stay on top of the latest city and county news.  X

pipeline, a source that was the subject of in-depth Xpress article, “Duke Energy’s planned power plant tied to fracking” (avl.mx/40a). After the two residents voiced their concerns, the board seemed pleased with the presentation. However, Lycan noted that traffic for the project will wreak havoc in the area, especially during peak commute times. “I think you would get some good publicity if you alter the [traffic] flow during the bad time of the afternoon. It’s going to get worse before it gets better. Would you be willing to consider that?” Lycan asked, with County Planner Debbie Truempy immediately interrupting with a point of order. “This is truly not a factor as far as the application goes,” she advised. With that, the board unanimously approved the permit. In other BOA agenda items: • The Biltmore Co. received a conditional use permit to build a new event center. Rick Conard, vice president of operations for Biltmore, said the 26,000-square-foot facility will operate as a conference center and be located next to the Deer Park restaurant. • The city of Asheville had a variance and a conditional use permit approved for a water tank at 705 Charlotte Highway in Fairview. A city representative said it will add redundancy to Fairview’s water distribution and improve water access for firefighters. • Commissioners approved a variance for minimum lot setback in the midst of property line disputes. At issue were two neighbors stating the applicant was using a recent and incorrect survey that would have construction encroach on their properties. However, Lycan said the board couldn’t take those issues into consideration. “Our focus with the board is to be strictly reviewing the variance that pertains to the front of structure and setback. We are not allowed to take property line disputes into consideration. You have a valid concern,” he noted right before the variance was unanimously approved. After the meeting, Xpress asked county staff if the concerned property owners could get a moratori-

by Max Hunt | mhunt@mountainx.com CITY OF ASHEVILLE BREAKS GROUND ON RADTIP After seven years of planning, the city of Asheville will break ground on the River Arts District Transportation Improvement Project during an official ceremony Wednesday, Aug. 23, at Jean Webb Park, beginning at 9 a.m. Mayor Esther Manheimer will be in attendance, along with federal, state and local government officials, and members of the community. Refreshments will be served. RADTIP improvements include a 2.2-mile stretch of the Wilma Dykeman Riverway, pedestrian and cyclist infrastructure, a new greenway and recreation amenities along Asheville’s waterfront. Construction is scheduled to continue over the next several years. More info: http://avl. mx/40g ASHEVILLE CITY COUNCIL MEETS AUG. 22 Asheville City Council will hold its next formal meeting Tuesday, Aug. 22. Items on Council’s public hearings agenda include: Stoneyard Apartments, a proposed 133-unit apartment complex at 175 Lyman St. in the River Arts District; 21 singlefamily houses being developed by Mountain Housing Opportunities in the Shiloh neighborhood; a proposed five-story, 103-room hotel at 49 Tunnel Road; and an amendment to city zoning ordinances that would reduce minimum required lot width and increase opportunities for developing neighborhood-scale

multifamily housing (such as duplexes and triplexes). A previously scheduled hearing on a zoning amendment to establish screening requirements for utility substations will be continued to Sept. 26; the hearing on this issue has been rescheduled many times. Asheville City Council meets at City Hall, 70 Court Plaza, at 5 p.m. in Council chambers on the second floor. The full meeting agenda is usually available by the Thursday afternoon before the meeting. Meeting agenda and more info: http://avl.mx/3xb NCWORKS, AARP PARTNER FOR JOB FAIR AUG. 17 The NCWorks Career Center Asheville and AARP will host the second annual Experience Works! Job Fair on Thursday, Aug. 17, from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. at NCWorks’ facility at 48 Grove St., Asheville. The event offers career opportunities to experienced job seekers ages 50 or older. Participating companies include A-B Tech, Arvato, Biltmore Farms, HomeTrust Bank and more. A job fair preparation session will be held before the event from 9-10 a.m. More info: 828-251-6200 LGBTQ HEALTH INITIATIVE LAUNCHES IN ASHEVILLE AUG. 17 A new LGBTQ Health Initiative will be launched in Asheville at a press conference on Thursday, Aug. 17, at the Minnie Jones Clinic at 257 Biltmore Ave., beginning at 9 a.m.

um on construction until the property lines issues are settled. Staff noted that’s not possible, and construction could move forward with the caveat a court might order the building

The initiative comes through a $10,000 grant from the Campaign for Southern Equality to Western NC Community Health Services and will focus on innovation and improving access to primary care for LGBTQ individuals living in WNC. The press conference will feature speeches from Dr. Todd Wallenius, WNCCHS medical director, and the Rev. Jasmine Beach-Ferrara, Buncombe County commissioner and executive director of CSE,  among others. CSE will also run a series of free clinics for LGBTQ clients throughout the fall. More info: wncchs.org or southernequality.org RALLY FOR PRISONERS’ HUMAN RIGHTS SLATED FOR AUG. 19

In Person Psychic Life Readings • Spotlighted by: • The New York Times • Huffington Post • ABC & NBC news

charleycastex.com 828-251-5043

A public rally calling on Congress to address prisoners’ human rights will take place Saturday, Aug. 19, at Pack Square Park in Asheville beginning at 11:30 a.m. Organized by Asheville Black Lives Matter, Blue Ridge Anarchist Black Cross and Zamani Refuge African Cultural Center, the rally will be held in conjunction with the national Millions for Prisoners Human Rights March on Washington, D.C. Organizers hope to call attention to inherent issues in the 13th Amendment of the Constitution, which allows for “slavery [and] involuntary servitude” to be meted out as punishment to convicted persons. The rally is free and open to the public. More info: avl.mx/3zzX

to be torn down if it’s found to be encroaching over its property line. The Board of Adjustment next meets on Wednesday, Sept. 13. — Dan Hesse  X MOUNTAINX.COM

AUG. 16 - 22, 2017

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COMMUNITY CALENDAR AUGUST 16 - 24, 2017

EMPYREAN ARTS CLASSES (PD.) BEGINNING POLE weekly on Sundays 5:45pm, Tuesdays 5:15pm, Wednesdays 5:30pm, and Thursdays 11:00am. POLE DANCE weekly on Mondays 7:45pm and Saturdays 11:30am. FLEXIBILITYCONTORTION weekly on Sundays 7:00pm, Tuesdays 8:00pm, and Thursdays 1:00pm. BREAKDANCE weekly on Fridays 6:00pm. FLOOR THEORY weekly on Wednesdays 8:00pm. BEGINNING AERIAL ARTS weekly on Mondays 6:30pm, Tuesdays 11:00am, and Wednesdays 11:00am. For details & sign up go to empyreanarts.org or call/text us at 828.782.3321.

CALENDAR GUIDELINES For a full list of community calendar guidelines, please visit mountainx. com/calendar. For questions about free listings, call 251-1333, ext. 137. For questions about paid calendar listings, please call 251-1333, ext. 320.

SOLAR ECLIPSE EVENTS FOR A FULL LISTING OF SOLAR ECLIPSE EVENTS IN THE REGION SEE PAGE _ BUNCOMBE COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARIES buncombecounty.org/ governing/depts/library • TH (8/17), 1pm - “What’s So Special About the Eclipse?” Presentation about the upcoming solar eclipse. Free. Held at Black Mountain Public Library, 105 N. Dougherty St., Black Mountain CITY OF ASHEVILLE 828-251-1122, ashevillenc.gov • MO (8/21), noon - Asheville Museum of Science (AMOS), Buncombe County Schools, UNC Asheville, Asheville City Schools, Mix 96.5, and The 828 host the Asheville’s Solar Eclipse Festival with music, food and hands-on eclipse related activities. Eyewear for safe eclipse viewing will be available and distributed until supplies run out. Free. Held at Pack Square Park, 121 College St. DOWNTOWN SYLVA ASSOCIATION 828-586-1577, info@downtownsylva.org • MO (8/21), 11am-4pm - “Sylva Eclipse Festival,” solar eclipse event featuring live music, food vendors, shuttles and children’s activities. Free. Held at Bridge Park, 76 Railroad Ave., Sylva GORGES STATE PARK 976 Grassy Creek Road, Sapphire, 828-966-9099 • MO (8/21), 5am-4pm - Solar eclipse viewing event with live music, food vendors and safety glasses. Free. HANDS ON! A CHILDREN’S GALLERY 318 N. Main St., Hendersonville, 828-697-8333 • Through FR (8/18), 10am3:30pm - “Orbiting Objects!” Solar eclipse oriented activities for all ages. Admission fees apply. HENDERSON COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 301 N. Washington St., Hendersonville, 828-697-4725 • MO (8/21), 1-3pm - “Mad Scientists on Wheels,” solar eclipse viewing and activities with kids. Information: 828-6974725. Free. SPRING CREEK COMMUNITY CENTER Pisgah National Forest, 13075 NC-209, Hot Springs • MO (8/21), 10am - Proceeds from supplies for the solar eclipse, bag lunches, view-

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AUG. 16 - 22, 2017

ing glasses and water benefit the Spring Creek Community Center. Prices vary. STECOAH VALLEY CULTURAL ARTS CENTER 121 School House Rd, Robbinsville, 479-3364, stecoahvalleycenter.com • MO (8/21), 11am-3pm - Solar eclipse viewing event with free glasses, food vendors, educational activities and live music. $5 per car. THE VILLAGE GREEN Intersection of Highways 64 &107, Cashiers • MO (8/21), noon-4pm - “Cashiers Solar Eclipse Festival,” eclipse viewing event with food vendors, children’s activities and live music. Free to attend.

ELK IN WNC: Join Friends of the Smokies at the Wedge Brewing Co. for an educational pint night Thursday, Aug. 17, at 6 p.m., when Esther Blakely, owner of Cataloochee Valley Tours and interpretive presenter for the national park, will give a presentation about elk in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. In 2001, elk were reintroduced to the park, and since then, the herd has grown to be more than 150 strong. Sales of WitBier during the event, and all of August, benefit critical projects and programs in the national park. Local artist Lucy Reiser’s Smokies-inspired mountain landscapes will be on display. For more information, visit friendsofthesmokies.org. Photo courtesy of Friends of the Smokies (p. 20)

ANIMALS ASHEVILLE HUMANE SOCIETY 14 Forever Friend Lane, 828761-2001, ashevillehumane.org • TU (8/19), 3:30pm - Volunteer and foster information session. Free.

BENEFITS ORVIS DOG DAYS OF SUMMER (PD.) SAT 8/19: 11AM-4PM. During the Dog Days of Summer, Orvis customers are invited to participate in our store’s Paw Print Program. Customers can purchase a paper paw print, write their dog’s name on the paw, and display it in the Orvis store. Proceeds will benefit the Morris Animal Foundation Golden Retriever Lifetime Study. 828-989-2759. 29 Schenck Pkwy #150, Asheville 28803. morrisanimalfoundation.org APPALACHIAN SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE PROJECT 828-236-1282, asapconnections. org, robin@asapconnections.org • TH (8/24), 6-9pm - Proceeds from The Local Food Experience casual dining event featuring farmers, chefs, and artisans serving small bites and complimentary beverages as well as a silent auction, raffle and door prizes benefit the Appalachian Sustainable Agriculture Project. $25. Held at New Belgium Brewery, 21 Craven St. COMMUNITY FOUNDATION OF HENDERSON COUNTY 828-697-6224, cfhcforever.org • Registration through TH (8/17) - Proceeds from this luncheon "An Everlasting Story: The Power of Giving," with keynote speakers, international

MOUNTAINX.COM

filmmakers and story-tellers Will and Deni McIntyre benefit The Community Foundation of Henderson County. Takes place TH (8/24), noon-1:30pm. $35/$135 patron. Held at Kenmure Country Club, 100 Clubhouse Drive, Flat Rock HISTORIC MARION TAILGATE MARKET 58 Depot St., Marion, 828-6522215, marionnc.org/farmers • SA (8/19), 6:30pm - Proceeds from the "From Farm to Table" community potluck benefit local food pantries is McDowell County. Registration required: 828-652-8104 or Molly_ Sandfoss@ncsu.edu. $10/Bring a poluck dish to share. PIANO LAB BENEFIT piano-lab.com • SU (8/20), 3-4:30pm - Proceeds from this piano concert featuring members of the Piano Lab faculty and Kimberly Cann benefit The Piano Lab Scholarship Fund. $10/$5 children. Held at Lipinsky Auditorium at UNC Asheville, 300 Library Lane PISGAH LEGAL SERVICES 828-253-0406, pisgahlegal.org • TU (8/22), 6pm - Proceeds from this family style farm-tohome dinner with John Fleer of Rhubarb and Tandy Wilson of City House in Nashville benefit Pisgah Legal Services. Registration: 828-210-3405 or bit.ly/PLSDownHome. $125. Held at Rhubarb, 7 SW Pack Square THE HAVEN BENEFIT havenoftc.org • SA (8/19), 5:30-10pm Proceeds from this cocktail reception, dinner, dance and live auction benefit The Haven Homeless Shelter. Registration: 828-877-2040. $65. Held at the

Connestee Falls Clubhouse, 98 Overlook Clubhouse Drive, Brevard THE JEEP CREW thejeepcrew.org • TH (8/17), 6pm - Donations at this “Bring Your Jeep and Show it Off,” event for jeep enthusiasts benefit The Jeep Crew. Free to attend. Held at Steak N’ Shake, 11 Bett Stroud Road, Weaverville VETERANS HEALING FARM veteranshealingfarm.org • TH (8/24), 5:30-9pm - Proceeds from this five-course meal benefit the Veterans Healing Farm. Registration: postero-hvl.com. $85. Held at Postero, 401 N. Main St., Hendersonville VOLLEYBALL BENEFIT facebook.com/ events/749994195184156 • SU (8/20), 1-6pm - Proceeds from this live music event and volleyball tournament with the Asheville Sport & Social Club and the Asheville Tourists benefit Ki Spicer, a young boy battling inoperable brain cancer. Free to attend/$10 tournament participation. Held at Sweeten Creek Brewing, 1127 Sweeten Creek Road

BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY CITY OF ASHEVILLE 828-251-1122, ashevillenc.gov • Through TH (8/17) - "Five Tips You 'Gotta' Know and Use if You're 'Gonna' Grow," workshop sponsored by the Western Women's Business Center. Takes place Wednesday, (8/23), 9-11am. Registration: 828-633-5065 x. 101 or jhanks@

carolinasmallbusiness.org. Free. Held at Lenoir Rhyne Center for Graduate Studies, 36 Montford Ave. FLETCHER AREA BUSINESS ASSOCIATION jim@extraordinarycopywriter. com • 4th TUESDAYS, 11:30am-1pm Educational monthly meeting for local business leaders to present and discuss topics relevant and helpful to businesses today. Free. Held at YMCA Mission Pardee Health Campus, 2775 Hendersonville Road, Arden • 4th THURSDAYS, 11:30-noon - General meeting. Free. Held at YMCA Mission Pardee Health Campus, 2775 Hendersonville Road, Arden G&W INVESTMENT CLUB klcount@aol.com • 3rd WEDNESDAYS, 11:45am - General meeting. Free to attend. Held at Black Forest Restaurant, 2155 Hendersonville Road, Arden HATCH ASHEVILLE hatchavl.org • WE (8/16), noon-1pm "Ideation and Validating an Idea," business idea workshop. Free. Held at HatchWorks, 45 S. French Broad

CLASSES, MEETINGS & EVENTS BEAD ALL ABOUT IT! (PD.) Join LA Bourgeois to play with beads and incorporate them into your knitting. Friday, August 25, 10:30am-12:30pm. $50, beads included. • Reservations: The Knitting Diva (828) 247-0344 divasknitting.com

ORGANIC GROWERS SCHOOL'S 4TH ANNUAL HARVEST CONFERENCE (PD.) 9/8-9/9 at Warren Wilson College. 20+ classes on fall & winter growing, fermentation, homesteading & self reliance. Friday, pre-conference, all-day, workshops. $45 by 8/6, $50 after. organicgrowersschool.org. ASHEVILLE DOWNTOWN ASSOCIATION 828-251-9973, ashevilledowntown.org • WE (8/16), 6pm - Re-launch initiative of the Asheville Urban Trail’s new visual identity and logo and educational materials. Free. Held at The Collider, 1 Haywood St. Suite 401 ASHEVILLE POLICE DEPARTMENT 828-259-5881, ashevillenc.gov/ Departments/Police • Through TH (9/7) - Open registration for the Asheville Police Department’s Fall Citizens Police Academy. Registration: bit.ly/2uVozmf. Free. BUNCOMBE COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARIES buncombecounty.org/ governing/depts/library • MO (8/21), 10am - "Itch to Stitch," knitting and needlework group for all skill levels. Free. Held at Weaverville Public Library, 41 N. Main St., Weaverville • 4th TUESDAYS, 6-8pm - "Sitn-Stitch," informal, self-guided gathering for knitters and crocheters. Held at North Asheville Library, 1030 Merrimon Ave. • WEDNESDAYS (8/23), (9/6) & (9/13) - Spanish conversation group. Registration required. Free. Held at Pack Memorial Library, 67 Haywood St. ETHICAL HUMANIST SOCIETY OF ASHEVILLE 828-687-7759, aeu.org • SU (8/20), 2-3:30pm - “Ethics in Journalism,” presentation by Larry Blunt. Free. Held at Asheville Friends Meetinghouse, 227 Edgewood Road HENDERSON COUNTY LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS lwvhcnc.org • 3rd THURSDAYS, 4-6pm General meeting. Free. Held at Hendersonville Chamber of Commerce, 204 Kanuga Road, Hendersonville HOMINY VALLEY RECREATION PARK 25 Twin Lakes Drive, Candler, 828-242-8998, hvrpsports.com


• 3rd THURSDAYS, 7pm - Hominy Valley board meeting. Free. IKENOBO IKEBANA SOCIETY 828-696-4103, blueridgeikebana.com • TH (8/17), 10am - Monthly meeting with presentation by Stephanie English regarding wiring plant materials. Free. Held at First Congregational UCC of Hendersonville, 1735 5th Ave. W., Hendersonville LEICESTER COMMUNITY CENTER 2979 New Leicester Highway, Leicester, 828-774-3000, facebook.com/ Leicester.Community. Center • 3rd THURSDAYS, 7pm - The Leicester History Gathering, general meeting. Free. TRANZMISSION PRISON PROJECT tranzmissionprisonproject. yolasite.com • Fourth THURSDAYS, 6pm - General meeting. Free to attend. Held at Firestorm Cafe and Books, 610 Haywood Road WNC PHYSICIANS FOR SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY wncpsr.org • 3rd FRIDAYS, noon-2pm - Monthly meeting. BYO lunch. Free. Held at First Congregational UCC of Asheville, 20 Oak St.

DANCE COUNTRY DANCE SOCIAL • THIS SATURDAY (PD.) August 19, 7-10:30pm, Asheville Jewish Community Center, 236 Charlotte Street. (Parking and entrance in back) Inclusive, No partner necessary. • 1 hour Two-step lesson from 7-8. • Open dancing 8-10:30pm. Dance to Two-Step, Waltz, Swing, Chacha, Triple-two and Nightclub. Dance $10/ Lesson $5 • Dance and Lesson package: $15. Contact Richard for information: 828333-0715, naturalrichard@mac. com • Preregister at: www.DanceForLife. net DANCE WORKSHOP • LEARN TRIPLETWO (LEVEL 2) (PD.) This Saturday, August 19, 1-3pm, All Souls Cathedral, Biltmore Village. 2 hour Workshop with Richard and Sue

Cicchetti. 828-3330715, $15 preregister at www.danceforlife. net • $20 at door. naturalrichard@mac. com

Sunday 11am Yoga Wkt • $13 for 60 minute classes, Wkt $6. 90 1/2 N. Lexington Avenue. www.studiozahiya.com :: 828.242.7595

EXPERIENCE ECSTATIC DANCE! (PD.) Dance waves hosted by Asheville Movement Collective. Fun and personal/ community transformation. • Fridays, 7pm, Terpsicorps Studios, 1501 Patton Avenue. • Sundays, 8:30am and 10:30am, JCC, 236 Charlotte Street. Sliding scale fee. Information: ashevillemovementcollective.org

THIS FRIDAY/ SATURDAY • HICKORY NUT GAP FARM (PD.) Friday, August 18, Barn Dance and Dinner w/ the Saylor Brothers, 6pm-9pm. $6 Admission for dance. Kids 4 and under free. • Saturday, August 19: Renaissance Fest at the Farm,

12pm-4pm advance tickets $12/adults, $6/ children 5-12 years, children 4 and under free. Door day of event: $14/adults, $8/children 5-12 years, children 4 and under free. SENIOR OPPORTUNITY CENTER 36 Grove St., Asheville • TUESDAYS, 8am Zumba dance exercise class. $8.

SOUTHERN LIGHTS SQUARE AND ROUND DANCE CLUB 828-697-7732, southernlights.org • SA (8/19), 6pm - “Ice Cream Social” themed dance. Advanced dance at 6pm. Early rounds at 7pm. Squares and rounds at 7:30pm. Free. Held at Whitmire Activity Center, 310 Lily Pond Road, Hendersonville

FOOD & BEER ASHEVILLE WINE & FOOD FESTIVAL (PD.) Savor the mountains like never before... at the Asheville Wine & Food Festival right downtown in Pack Square Park on Friday Aug 18 & Saturday Aug 19. Tickets & info: www. ashevillewineandfood. com

APPALACHIAN SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE PROJECT 828-236-1282, asapconnections.org, robin@asapconnections. org • TH (8/24), 6-9pm Proceeds from “The Local Food Experience” casual dining event featuring farmers, chefs, and artisans serving small bites and complimentary beverages as well as a silent auction, raffle and door prizes ben-

efit the Appalachian Sustainable Agriculture Project. $25. Held at New Belgium Brewery, 21 Craven St. ASHEVILLE VEGAN SOCIETY meetup.com/TheAsheville-Vegan-Society/ • 1st TUESDAYS & Third SATURDAYS, 10am - Social meeting. Free to attend. Held at Firestorm Cafe and Books, 610 Haywood Road

POLE FITNESS AND DANCE CLASSES AT DANCECLUB ASHEVILLE (PD.) Pole Dance, Burlesque, Jazz/Funk, Flashmobs! Drop in for a class or sign up for a series:• Monday: 5:15-Adv. Beg. Spin Pole, 6:30-Sexy Chair Series, 6:30-Stretchy Flexy, 7:30-Adv. Beg. Pole• Tuesday: 12PM-Pole $10, 5:30Pole, 6:30-Jazz/Funk Series, 7:30-Pole• Wednesday: 5:30Pole, 6:30-Pole Tricks, 7:30-Pole• Thursday: 5:30-Jazz/Funk Series, 6:30-Exotic Poleography, 7:30Beg. Spin Pole• Friday: 11-Open Pole, 12-Floor Play• Saturday: 1:30-Intro/ Beg. Pole $15Visit the website to learn more: DanceclubAsheville. com 828-275-8628 Right down the street from UNCA - 9 Old Burnsville Hill Rd., #3 STUDIO ZAHIYA, DOWNTOWN DANCE CLASSES (PD.) Monday 9am Yoga Wkt 12pm Barre Wkt 4pm Dance and Define Wkt 5pm Bellydance Drills 6pm Hip Hop Wkt 6pm Bellydance Special Topics 7pm Classical Ballet Series 8pm Tribal Bellydance Series 8pm Lyrical Series • Tuesday 9am Hip Hop Wkt 12pm Sculpt-Beats Wkt 5pm Modern Movement 6pm Intro to Bellydance 7pm Bellydance 2 8pm Advanced Bellydance • Wednesday 5pm Hip Hop Wkt 5pm Bollywood 6pm Bhangra Series 7pm Tahitian Series 8pm Jazz Series • Thursday 9am Hip Hop Wkt 12pm Sculpt-beats Wkt 4pm Girls Hip Hop 5pm Teens Hip Hop 6pm Bellydance Drills 7pm Advanced Contemporary 8pm West Coast Swing Series • Saturday 9:30am Hip Hop Wkt 10:45 Buti Yoga Wkt •

MOUNTAINX.COM

AUG. 16 - 22, 2017

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Magical Offerings 8/17: Circle Round: Carving, Reading, Binding & Kenning Rune Lore, presented by P.B. Owl 7-9pm, Donations 8/19: Hillfolks’ Hoodoo w/ Bryon Ballard 6-8pm, $20 Cash Please 8/21: TOTA L SOLA R ECLIPSE NEW MOON in LEO Astrologer: Spiritsong 1-6pm 8/22: SUN in VIRGO Tarot Reader: Byron Ballard 1-5pm

C O N S C I O U S PA R T Y by Edwin Arnaudin | earnaudin@mountainx.com

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BASKET BALL: Arial Vanator and fellow ABSFest performers conduct a festive basket raffle for the ACLU at The Orange Peel in May. The burlesque and sideshow festival’s Speakeasy Allstars return to the venue on Aug. 19 for a performance that includes another raffle to benefit the nonprofit. Photo by Isaac Harrell WHAT: A burlesque and circus arts show with raffle to benefit the ACLU WHEN: Saturday, Aug. 19, 8 p.m. WHERE: The Orange Peel, 101 Biltmore Ave. WHY: Between silk aerials, acrobats and burlesque acts, Madame Onça O’Leary’s Asheville shows feature a raffle within the event for baskets of items donated by local businesses and the performers themselves. Past nonprofit beneficiaries have typically been groups focusing on women’s rights (Our VOICE) or helping disenfranchised populations (Western North Carolina AIDS Project), but for May 2017’s ABSFest, O’Leary chose the American Civil Liberties Union. “With the tone of the radical changes that are trying to sweep the country right now, we felt like it was time to open our lens to something that was really more about addressing the whole system rather than a specific part of the problems facing this country,” she says. 18

AUG. 16 - 22, 2017

MOUNTAINX.COM

“And of course North Carolina has a terrible reputation across the country right now for being a hotbed of injustice, and I really wanted to make sure that we were using out platform to address that. Our event is committed specifically to empowerment, to letting people have a good time while engaging in activism.” The ACLU will again receive proceeds from the raffle during the ABSFest Speakeasy Allstars’ Saturday night show. While enjoying the talents of the likes of eight-piece Virginia mountain swing band The Judy Chops, Dance Club Asheville burlesque starlet Boo Velvet, Charlotte acrobatic aerial bellydance duo Satarah and Madame Onça herself, raffle tickets will go for, in O’Leary’s words, “$2 each, 3 for $5, 10 for $10 or $20 for the length of a leg.” ABSFest Speakeasy Allstars will perform at 8 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 19, at The Orange Peel. Tickets are $20 general admission, $35 VIP seated (includes gift bag and photo with performers) and may be purchased at the door and online at www. theorangepeel.net.˜X


C OMMU N IT Y CA L EN D AR DOWNTOWN WELCOME TABLE haywoodstreet. org/2010/07/ the-welcome-table/ • SUNDAYS, 4:30pm - Community meal. Free. Held at Haywood Street Congregation, 297 Haywood St. FAIRVIEW WELCOME TABLE fairviewwelcometable. com • THURSDAYS, 11:30am-1pm - Community lunch. Admission by donation. Held at Fairview Christian Fellowship, 596 Old Us Highway 74, Fairview LEICESTER COMMUNITY CENTER 2979 New Leicester Highway, Leicester, 828-774-3000, facebook.com/ Leicester.Community. Center • WEDNESDAYS, 11:30am-1pm Welcome Table meal. Free. LIVING WEB FARMS 828-891-4497, livingwebfarms.org • TH (8/24), 6pm "Sauces to Elevate Your Cooking," sauce-making class. $10. Held at French Broad Food Co-op, 90 Biltmore Ave. MALAPROP'S BOOKSTORE AND CAFE 55 Haywood St., 828254-6734, malaprops.com • TH (8/17), 3pm Harry Rosenblum presents his book, Vinegar Revival: Artisanal Recipes for Brightening Dishes and Drinks with Homemade Vinegars. Free to attend. • SA (8/19), 7pm Author Carrie Schloss and Asheville Bee Charmer owners Jillian Kelly and Kim Allen present, The Asheville Bee Charmer Cookbook. Free to attend. • WE (8/23), 7pm- Ken Haedrich presents, The Harvest Baker: 150 Sweet & Savory Recipes Celebrating the Fresh-Picked Flavors of Fruits, Herbs & Vegetables. Free to attend. N.C. ARBORETUM 100 Frederick Law Olmsted Way, 828-6652492, ncarboretum.org • 3rd THURSDAYS, 6-8pm - Proceeds from "Wine in the Garden" wine tasting and music series benefit the N.C. Arboretum. $30/$27 members.

by Abigail Griffin

FESTIVALS TRIANGLE PARK 70 S. Market St. • SA (8/19), noon-8pm - "Heal the Ville," event featuring soul food vendors, live music and entertainment including Christian Soldiers, Mars Hill radio Theatre and Virtuous. Free to attend.

GOVERNMENT & POLITICS ACLU OF WNC acluwnc.wordpress.com • TU (8/22), 7:30pm - Community conversation with Jasmine Beach-Ferrara of the Campaign for Southern Equality and presentation by the ACLU of NC's legal director Chris Brook about their new federal lawsuit challenging HB 142, the anti-LGBTQ law that replaced HB 2. Free. Held at First Congregational UCC of Asheville, 20 Oak St. BUNCOMBE COUNTY DEMOCRATIC PARTY buncombedems.org • FR (8/18), 6:30-8pm - Democratic Precinct 22.2 meeting. Free. Held at North Asheville Library, 1030 Merrimon Ave. CITY OF ASHEVILLE 828-251-1122, ashevillenc.gov • TU (8/22), 5pm Asheville City Council public hearing. Free. Held at Asheville City Hall, 70 Court Plaza PACK SQUARE PARK 121 College St. • SA (8/19), 11:30am - Public solidarity rally with the Millions for Prisoners Human Rights March on Washington DC. Free.

KIDS ABYSA abysa.org • Through TU (9/5) Open registration for the ABYSA fall children’s soccer leagues. Registration: online or 828-299-7277 x. 304. $20. BUNCOMBE COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARIES buncombecounty.org/ governing/depts/library • TH (8/17), 11am "EcoExplore BUGS!" Outdoor bug hunt for kids with the WNC Arboretum. Free. Held at Swannanoa Library, 101 West Charleston St., Swannanoa • MONDAYS, 10:30am - "Mother Goose Time," storytime for 4-18 month olds. Free. Held at Skyland/South

Buncombe Library, 260 Overlook Road • MONDAYS, 10:30am - Spanish story time for children of all ages. Free. Held at EnkaCandler Library, 1404 Sandhill Road, Candler • 4th TUESDAYS, 1pm - Homeschoolers' book club. Held at North Asheville Library, 1030 Merrimon Ave. FIRESTORM CAFE AND BOOKS 610 Haywood Road, 828-255-8115 • SATURDAYS 10:30am & 11:30am - Weekly drop-in Spanish classes for kids. Class for 3-5 year olds at 10:30am. Class for 6-10 year olds at 11:30am. $10. A portion of proceeds benefit the Buncombe Partnership for Children. FLETCHER LIBRARY 120 Library Road, Fletcher, 828-687-1218, library.hendersoncountync.org • WEDNESDAYS, 10:30am - Family story time. Free. HANDS ON! A CHILDREN'S GALLERY 318 N. Main St., Hendersonville, 828697-8333 • TU (8/22) through FR (8/25), 10am-4pm - "Gone Fishing!" Kids activities to learn about fish habitat, colors and counting. Admission fees apply. MALAPROP'S BOOKSTORE AND CAFE 55 Haywood St., 828254-6734, malaprops. com • WEDNESDAYS, 10am - Miss Malaprop's Story Time for ages 3-9. Free to attend.

OUTDOORS

1928 Little River Road, Flat Rock

New Season of Classes starting Tuesday, August 22nd!

ASHEVILLE DOWNTOWN ASSOCIATION 828-251-9973, ashevilledowntown.org • Tuesdays through (8/29), 5:30-7:30pm "Asheville Hoop Jam," outdoor event hosted by Asheville Hoops, featuring hula hooping and music. Bring your own hula or borrow a demo. Free. Held at Pritchard Park, 4 College St. ASHEVILLE OUTLETS 800 Brevard Road, shopashevilleoutlets. com • WEDNESDAYS through (9/17), 7:309am - Healthy Hikers Walkers Club. Free. BLUE RIDGE PARKWAY HIKES 828-298-5330, nps.gov • FR (8/18), 10am - Blue Ridge Parkway Hike of the Week: “The Stories of Pisgah,” ranger-led, moderate, 1.5 mile round trip hike on the Mount Pisgah Trail. Free. Meet at the Mount Pisgah Parking Area, MP 407.6 • SA (8/19) & SA (8/26), 9am - Ranger-guided walk and history presentation around Bass Lake. Free. Held at Cone Manor, MP 294, Blue Ridge Parkway BLUE RIDGE PARKWAY RANGER PROGRAMS 828-295-3782, ggapio@gmail.com • SA (8/19), 10am Ranger presentation about bears. Free. Meets at MP 302 • SA (8/19), 7pm "The Civil War in the Mountains," presentation with historian and author Michael Hardy. Free. Held at Linville Falls Campground Amphitheater, MP 316

CHIMNEY ROCK STATE PARK (PD.) Enjoy breathtaking views of Lake Lure, trails for all levels of hikers, an Animal Discovery Den and 404-foot waterfall. Plan your adventure at chimneyrockpark.com

CITY LIGHTS BOOKSTORE 3 E. Jackson St., Sylva, 828-586-9499, citylightsnc.com • SA (8/19), 3pm - Bob Plott presents his book, Strike and Stay: The Story of the Plott Hound. Free to attend.

INLINE HOCKEY REGISTRATION (PD.) Sign ups open for fall season of Inline Hockey at Carrier Park. Free registration for new youth players. New division created in adult league. Information at www.ashevillehockey. org

DAVIDSON'S FORT HISTORIC PARK Lackey Town Road, Old Fort, 828-668-4831, davidsonsfort.com • SA (8/19) & SU (8/20), 10am-4pm - Historical event with live enactments commemorating the Cherokee attack on Davidson's Fort. $5.

ASHEVILLE AMBLERS WALKING CLUB ashevilleamblers.com • SA (8/19), 7:30am Group walk. All levels welcome. Free. Held at Carl Sandburg Home,

DEFENDERS OF WILDLIFE southeastoffice@ defenders.org • SA (8/19), 9amnoon - “Wild Waters of WNC: Walkabout,”

We offer Dance Instruction for students of ALL ages, Tiny Tots to Senior Citizens. And for ALL ability levels from Beginner to Pre-professional in a variety of disciplines. Ballet & Pointe • Contemporary • Tap • Jazz/Hip Hop/Funk Fusion Broadway & Classical Jazz • Creative Movement & Improvisation

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828-277-4010

3726 Sweeten Creek Road, Arden, NC 28704 MOUNTAINX.COM

AUG. 16 - 22, 2017

19


C OMMU N IT Y CA L EN D AR

guided walkabout to explore the waters of South Mills River with aquatic biologist Jim Herrig. Registration required: southeastoffice@defenders.org. Free.

by Abigail Griffin

• TH (8/24), 6-8pm "Grandfather Presents: Tom Earnhardt," lecture by the host of public television’s “Exploring North Carolina.” Admission fees apply. PISGAH CENTER FOR WILDLIFE EDUCATION 1401 Fish Hatchery Road, Pisgah Forest, 828-877-4423 • SA (8/19), 9am-noon - "Fly Tying: Level II," workshop for ages 12 and up. Registration required. Free.

DUPONT STATE RECREATIONAL FOREST 1400 Staton Road, Cedar Mountain, 828877-6527, dupontforest.com • SU (8/19), 10am-noon - Smokey The Bear’s birthday celebration. Free.

SENIOR OPPORTUNITY CENTER 36 Grove St. • WEDNESDAYS, 8am - Walking club for adults of all ages. Information: 828-3502062. Free.

FRIENDS OF THE SMOKIES 828-452-0720, friendsofthesmokies.org, outreach.nc@friendsofthesmokies.org • TH (8/17), 6pm - "Elk in WNC," presentation by Esther Blakely, owner of Cataloochee Valley Tours and interpretive presenter for the national park. Portion of proceeds from beer sales benefit the Friends of the Smokies. Free to attend. Held at Wedge Brewing Co., 125 B Roberts St. • TH (8/24), 6pm "Salamander Capital of the World," presentation about salamanders. Portion of proceeds from beer sales benefit the Friends of the Smokies. Free to attend. Held at Wedge Brewing Co., 125 B Roberts St.

PARENTING HOPE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 2443 Spartanburg Highway, East Flat Rock • Through WE (9/27) - Open registration for a foster parent training class with the Henderson County Department of Social Services. Training begins on Wednesday, Sept. 27, 6-9pm. Registration: 828-6946252 or families4kids@ hendersoncountydss. org. YOUTH OUTRIGHT 866-881-3721, youthoutright.org • 3rd SATURDAYS, 11am - Middle school discussion group. Free. Held at First

GRANDFATHER MOUNTAIN 2050 Blowing Rock Highway Linville, 828733-4337, grandfather. com

Congregational UCC of Asheville, 20 Oak St.

PUBLIC LECTURES BLACK MOUNTAIN COLLEGE MUSEUM & ARTS CENTER 56 Broadway, 828-3508484, blackmountaincollege. org • TH (8/24), 7pm - UNC Asheville Professor of Philosophy Brian Butler presents his book, The Democratic Constitution: Experimentalism and Interpretation. Free. BUNCOMBE COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARIES buncombecounty.org/ governing/depts/library • WE (8/23), 6pm "Asheville's History in Postcards," presentation by Terry Taylor. Free. Held at North Asheville Library, 1030 Merrimon Ave. CAROLINA PUBLIC PRESS carolinapublicpress.org • TH (8/24), 8:3010:30am - "Domestic Violence Issues Facing Western North Carolina," panel discussion and public forum with Buncombe County Sheriff Van Duncan, SAFE Inc., Meridian Behavioral Health Services, N.C. Council for Women and the N.C. Batterer Intervention Program. Registration required: carolinapublicpress.org or 828-774-5290. Free. Held at Lenoir Rhyne Center for Graduate Studies, 36 Montford Ave.

Send your event listings to calendar@mountainx.com LEADERSHIP ASHEVILLE SUMMER BREAKFAST SERIES 828-255-7100, leadershipasheville.org • WE (8/23), 7:309:15am - Leadership Asheville Buzz Breakfast: Breakfast and panel discussion with business leaders on Asheville's future growth. $20. Held at Crowne Plaza Expo Center, 1 Resort Drive

SENIORS ASHEVILLE NEW FRIENDS (PD.) Offers active senior residents opportunities to make new friends and explore new interests. Activities include hiking, golf, book clubs, dining-out, special events, and more. Visit ashevillenewfriends. org JEWISH FAMILY SERVICES OF WNC, INC. 2 Doctors Park, Suite E, • TUESDAYS & THURSDAYS, 11am2pm - The Asheville Elder Club group respite program for individuals with memory challenges and people of all faiths. Registration required: 828-253-2900. $30. UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CONGREGATION OF ASHEVILLE 1 Edwin Place, 828-2546001, uuasheville.org • WEDNESDAYS through (8/30), 2pm - Informal community singing for those with short term memory

loss, Parkinson's Disease and/or interested in exploring song. Free.

SPIRITUALITY 2017 WNC COPTIC CONFERENCE (PD.) Embracing Inner Peace, A Gathering of Light Workers. August 25, 2pm-8pm; August 26, 8:30am-5:30pm. Join us for the 2017 Coptic Conference at Blue Ridge Community College. • On Friday August 26, 2pm-8pm, Personal Service Providers will be available for healing services and readings and there will be a bookstore, gift shop. • On Saturday, August 26, 8:30am-5:30pm, conference presenters will include James Twyman, New York Times best-selling author, musician and "Peace Troubadour", Victoria Johnson, international shamanic arts practitioner, teacher and facilitator, Rob Wergin, nationally recognized clairvoyant, clairsentient, clairaudient and healer, Barb and Bob Huttinga, Coptic Ministers, author, counselors, educators, facilitators and healers, John Davis, esoteric psychologist, Egyptologist, author, numerologist, director of Coptic Fellowship International and president of Spiritual Unity of Nations. A catered lunch will be available on Saturday. • To register go to www. copticwnc2017.com or call Lori France at (828) 676- 2977. Everyone

welcome! Love offering. ABOUT THE TRANSCENDENTAL MEDITATION TECHNIQUE • FREE INTRODUCTORY TALK (PD.) The authentic TM technique, rooted in the ancient yoga tradition—for settling mind and body and accessing hidden inner reserves of energy, peace and happiness. Learn how TM is different from mindfulness, watching your breath, common mantra meditation and everything else. Evidence-based: The only meditation technique recommended for heart health by the American Heart Association. NIHsponsored research shows deep revitalizing rest, reduced stress and anxiety, improved brain functioning and heightened well-being. Thursday, 6:30-7:30pm, Asheville TM Center, 165 E. Chestnut. 828254-4350. TM.org or MeditationAsheville. org ASHEVILLE INSIGHT MEDITATION (PD.) Introduction to Mindfulness Meditation. Learn how to get a Mindfulness Meditation practice started. 1st & 3rd Mondays. 7pm – 8:30. Asheville Insight Meditation, 175 Weaverville Road, Suite H, ASHEVILLE, NC, (828) 808-4444, ashevillemeditation. com.

ASTRO-COUNSELING (PD.) Licensed counselor and accredited professional astrologer uses your chart when counseling for additional insight into yourself, your relationships and life directions. Readings also available. Christy Gunther, MA, LPC. (828) 258-3229. FAMILY MEDITATION (PD.) Children and adult(s) practice mindfulness meditation, discuss principles, and engage in fun games. The 3rd Saturday monthly. 10:30am – 11:30. Asheville Insight Meditation, 175 Weaverville Road, Asheville, 828-8084444, ashevillemeditation. com. OPEN HEART MEDITATION (PD.) Now at 70 Woodfin Place, Suite 212. Tuesdays 7-8pm. Experience the stillness and beauty of connecting to your heart and the Divine within you. Suggested $5 donation. OpenHeartMeditation. com SHAMBHALA MEDITATION CENTER (PD.) Wednesdays, 10pmmidnight • Thursdays, 7-8:30pm and Sundays, 10-noon • Meditation and community. By donation. 60 N. Merrimon Ave., #113, (828) 200-5120. asheville.shambhala.org

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CENTER FOR ART & SPIRIT AT ST. GEORGE 1 School Road, 828258-0211 • 3rd SATURDAYS, 7:30-9:30pm - "Dances of Universal Peace," spiritual group dances that blend chanting, live music and movement. No experience necessary. Admission by donation. GRACE LUTHERAN CHURCH 1245 6th Ave W, Hendersonville, 828693-4890, gracelutherannc.com • WE (8/16), 5:30pm - Cross-generational potluck supper and worship. Bring a dish to share. Free. GREAT TREE ZEN TEMPLE 679 Lower Flat Creek, Alexander, 828-6452085, greattreetemple.org • 3rd SATURDAYS, 4-5:30pm - Women’s zen practice circle with meditation, discussion, study, creative expression and building community. Admission by donation. KAIROS WEST COMMUNITY CENTER 604 Haywood Road, 828-367-6360, kairoswest.wordpress. com • 3rd SUNDAYS, 11am12:30pm - Introduction to Buddhism meeting. Sponsored by Soka Gakkai International Asheville. Free.


SHAMBHALA MEDITATION CENTER 60 N Merrimon Ave., #113, 828-200-5120, asheville.shambhala.org • 3rd SUNDAYS, 10am-6pm - Full day of meditation practice (Nyinthun). Admission by donation. UR LIGHT CENTER 2196 N.C. Highway 9, Black Mountain, 6696845, urlight.org • SU (8/20), 2-4pm - "Sound Healing Journeywork," group toning, intention setting and sound journey guided by Ben Carroll. $20.

BUNCOMBE COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARIES buncombecounty.org/ governing/depts/library • TH (8/17), 7pm - "WORD with Sheila Arnold Jones: Folktales, Fairy Tales and Social Justice," storytelling event. Free. Held at Pack Memorial Library, 67 Haywood St. FIRESTORM CAFE AND BOOKS 610 Haywood Road, 828255-8115 • 3rd THURSDAYS, 6:30pm - Queer Women's Book Club. Free to attend.

SPOKEN & WRITTEN WORD ACORNS BOUTIQUE 465 Main St. Highlands, 828-787-1877, oldedwardsinn.com/ shopping/acorns-boutique • FR (8/18), 1pm - Keith Summerour presents his book, Creating Home. Free to attend. ASHEVILLE STORYTELLING CIRCLE ashevillestorycircle.org • SU (8/20), 5pm “Storytelling tell-off,” outdoor storytelling event sponsored by the Asheville Storytelling Circle. Free. Held in West Asheville Park, South end of Vermont Ave. BLUE RIDGE BOOKS 152 S. Main St., Waynesville • Through TH (8/24) Authors accepted for vending spots at the Home Grown Author Fair. Information: kolsen@haywoodnc.net.

HABITAT TAVERN & COMMONS 174 Broadway St., habitatbrewing.com • FR (8/18), 7pm Storyteller David Joe Miller presents "WORD!" featuring storytellers Sheila Arnold Jones and Adam Booth. Registration: bit. ly/2vqCD82. $18. MALAPROP'S BOOKSTORE AND CAFE 55 Haywood St., 828-2546734, malaprops.com • WE (8/16), 6pm - "TeachIn," event with author Nancy Maclean discussing her book, Democracy in Chains: The Deep History of the Radical Right's Stealth Plan for America. Free to attend. • TH (8/17), 7pm - Dawn Reno Langley presents her book, The Mourning Parade. Free to attend. • FR (8/18), 7pm - Authors Kathleen Glasgow and Jeff Zentner present their respective books, Girl in Pieces and The Serpent King. Free to attend. • SU (8/20), 3pm - Frances Figart presents her book, Season of Letting Go: Most Of What I Know About Truly Living I Learned By

Helping Someone Die. Free to attend. • TH (8/24), 7pm - Devyn Benson presents their book, Antiracism in Cuba: The Unfinished Revolution. Free to attend. THE WRITER'S WORKSHOP 387 Beaucatcher Road, 828254-8111, twwoa.org • Through WE (8/30) Submissions accepted for the Literary Fiction Contest. Contact for full guidelines. TRYON ARTS AND CRAFTS SCHOOL 373 Harmon Field Road, Tryon, 828-859-8323 • Through FR (9/1) Submissions accepted for the "Apparitionist-National Ghost Story Competition." Contact for full guidelines.

VOLUNTEERING AURORA STUDIO & GALLERY 828-335-1038, aurorastudio-gallery.com • TH (8/17), 6:30pm Volunteer orientation for the Aurora Studio & Gallery. Registration: aurorastudio@hotmail.com. Held at West Asheville Community Center, 970 Haywood Road BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS OF WNC 50 S. French Broad Ave. Suite #213., 828-253-1470, bbbswnc.org • TH (8/24), noon - Information session for those interested in volunteering to share their interests twice a month with a young person from a single-parent home or to mentor one-hour a week

in elementary schools and after-school sites. EAST COAST MIGRANT HEAD START 2 Sugarhill Drive, Hendersonville • TUESDAYS through (10/3), 5-7:30pm Volunteers needed to assist with watching children while Latino parents learn English. Registration: leah. charbonneau@dpi.nc.gov. GRACE LUTHERAN CHURCH 1245 6th Ave W, Hendersonville, 828-6934890, gracelutherannc.com • Fourth TUESDAYS, 10am - Volunteer to knit or crochet prayer shawls for community members in need. Free. HANDS ON ASHEVILLEBUNCOMBE 2-1-1, handsonasheville.org • SA (8/19), 2-5pm Volunteer to help accept donations at a nonprofit re-store. • SU (8/20), 1-2:30pm Volunteer to help knit baby and adult hats to be delivered to those in need. • TU (8/22), 4-6pm Volunteer to assist with unpacking and pricing in a nonprofit, fair-trade retail store. Registration required. • TH (8/24), 11am-12:30pm - Volunteer to cook and serve a homemade lunch to the men staying at the ABCCM Veteran's Restoration Quarters. Registration required.

ing to end homelessness and how the public can help. Registration required: tours@homewardboundwnc.org. Free. LITERACY COUNCIL OF BUNCOMBE COUNTY 31 College Pl., Suite B-221 • WE (8/23), 5:30pm & TH (8/24), 9am Information session for those interested in volunteering two hours per week with adults who want to improve reading, writing, spelling, and English language skills.

MOUNTAINTRUE 828-258-8737, mountaintrue.org • SA (8/19), 1pm - "Pick, Paddle and Party," river cleanup and float along the Swannanoa and French Broad Rivers followed by beers. Volunteers receive a free beer, raffle ticket and sunglasses. Registration required. Held at New Belgium Brewery, 21 Craven St. ORGANICFEST organicfest.org

• Through SU (8/27) Volunteers needed for this outdoor festival taking place on Sunday, August 27, 2017. Registration: celebrate@ organicfest.org or Organicfest.org. Held at Pack Square Park, 121 College St. TRAUMA INTERVENTION PROGRAM OF WNC 828-513-0498, tipofwnc.org • Through TH (9/28) Open registration for a ten-day training academy

For more volunteering opportunities visit mountainx.com/ volunteering

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HOMEWARD BOUND OF WNC 218 Patton Ave., 828-2581695, homewardboundwnc.org • THURSDAYS, 11am "Welcome Home Tour," tours to find out how Homeward Bound is work-

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21


WELLNESS

EMBODYING CHANGE

West Asheville Yoga purchases One Center Yoga to become The Embodiment Center

BY KATE LUNDQUIST kvlundo@gmail.com Cat Matlock, owner of West Asheville Yoga, had been looking for a new space for the past three years in order to expand her offerings. Twice, she came close to finding a space, but each time, she says, the deal fell through due to the high cost of real estate in Asheville. Meanwhile, One Center Yoga studio owner Cindy Dollar says she had felt that some new energy and collaboration was needed at her Coxe Avenue center on the South Slope. She told Matlock she wanted to sell One Center Yoga. And the seed was planted for a potential link between the two entrepreneurs. The sale of Dollar’s studio was official on Aug. 1. Renamed the Embodiment Center, the revamped yoga space will cel-

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SPACE SHIFTER: Cat Matlock, owner of West Asheville Yoga, recently purchased One Center Yoga to create the Embodiment Center. Photo courtesy of Cat Matlock ebrate its grand opening in October, says Matlock. “We started having meetings and conversations about what that would look like,” Matlock says. “[Dollar] wanted to sell the business to someone who would honor the space as the home of Iyengar yoga in our community.” One Center Yoga, which acquired Lillah Schwartz’s Iyengar studio Lighten Up Yoga in 2012, will remain open, and the schedule will stay the same through the end of September, with big changes on the horizon starting in October, says Matlock. “I want to honor that [the Iyengar yoga lineage], but having only that program is not sustainable,” she says. Matlock will add vinyasa yoga, dancing, health coaching, therapeutic foam rolling, music events, video creation of local yoga instructors’ classes, and pre- and postnatal yoga programs. She’s also open to any ideas the community has to bring all “five koshas” to the Embodiment Center. The koshas, roughly translated from Sanskrit as the layers of our being, include the annamaya (physical body), pranamaya (breath body), manomaya (mental body), vijnanamaya (intellectual body) and anandamaya (spiritual body), Matlock explains. She’s been a massage therapist since 1993, a yoga student and practitioner since 1988, and a yoga instructor since 2001. Matlock leads classes and workshops in the Asheville area

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and at her current studio. One of the workshops, called Rolling Therapeutics, combines trigger point, massage, foam rolling and yoga. The Asheville community, she says, needs practices to help balance the body, mind and nervous system. “There are layers of beliefs about ourselves and our world right now, and it feels like scary times for a lot of people, and that is really deep in our nervous system,” she says. “The Embodiment Center will offer everything for all layers of ourselves [the koshas], with the goal of clearing our inner space so our inner brilliance can shine.” In the next few weeks, Matlock will run a Kickstarter campaign to raise funds for soundproofing the current One Center Yoga studio in order to have music events and multiple classes held at the same time. She plans to offer dance parties and strengthening yoga practices, all in alignment with her overarching vision of a wellness center based on teachings from the Upanishads, a collection of Sanskrit philosophical texts. The vision will encompass Iyengar alignment yoga, currently offered at One Center Yoga, as well as vinyasa yoga, Ayurvedic medicine, dancing, health coaching, and kirtan (call-and-response chanting and singing). “There will be many types of classes, workshops and pranayama (breathing exercises) to help our energy body and mind body with meditation and

forgiveness practices and prayer work to tap into spiritual practices,” says Matlock, who is certified by the International Association of Yoga Therapists. “We are prisoners of our neural system,” she continues. “We need practices to help balance the body, mind and nervous system.” Matlock says she hopes the One Center Yoga instructors will stay, and so far, she adds, nearly everyone has been very receptive. “I want to keep that root of Iyengar yoga and then want to layer on” — for example, by hosting music events in the larger practice room. She plans to install soundproofing between the practice spaces and add an acoustical tile ceiling in the larger yoga room in September. A concert with the local band Rising Appalachia, which Matlock says has been very supportive, will be the kickoff event for the Embodiment Center in October. The new center will include therapeutic yoga teacher training that focuses on utilizing foam rollers to alleviate chronic pain. The Embodiment Center will also be a home for a trauma-informed yoga therapy training. Next spring Matlock will join the faculty of international organization Sundara Yoga Therapy, which offers trauma-informed yoga therapy workshops and trainings in the U.S. and Canada for use with traumatized populations. Matlock is a traumainformed yoga therapist and an advanced instructor of therapeutic yoga for treating anxiety. Matlock also plans to have a dedicated video recording room at The Embodiment Center to develop an online subscription program. The program, she says, will help instructors develop their own online courses available to the public. Matlock will maintain her current studio, West Asheville Yoga, in its current form, she says, but plans to find a larger space to include a front reception area with two bathrooms. Dollar, who opened One Center Yoga 12 years ago, taught in the basement of her home before opening the yoga studio at 120 Coxe Ave. “It just happened. A lot of things came together first, but the bottom


line is it just happened. I was happy about the move out of my home,” says Dollar, who always wanted her studio to be a wellness center. There is more to health than just asana (yoga postures), she adds. “I love what we do at One Center Yoga, and asana is a big part, but this is an opportunity under Cat [Matlock] to become bigger in so many ways. “From knowing Cat,” says Dollar, “she has a lot of energy and is interested in expanding and is good at it. She will take One Center Yoga to places that I could never take it.” Dollar compares the experience to sending a child off to college, saying she will be right there beside the project and won’t let the students or studio down. “I would almost rather have closed it than passed it off just for money or just for somebody to take it,” says Dollar, who confirms

that Matlock is the right buyer. “I’m dedicated to the practice of yoga, which includes right livelihood and tending to the students. ... This is an opening and welcoming opportunity for the whole yoga community. We need to be open-hearted about all kinds of yoga.”  X

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23


GREEN SCENE

OF GRIME AND THE RIVER BY MAX HUNT

IN OUR BLOOD

mhunt@mountainx.com

With regulators’ resources strained, local environmental groups have stepped in to take up the slack, forming a chain of organizations that span the entire length of the French Broad and many of its tributaries. The Whitmires, for instance, helped found the Transylvania French Broad Stewards in 2014. The organization provides updates on river conditions, shares information on the French Broad for tourists and residents, and organizes events like the annual Upper French Broad River Fest in Rosman. “We do free tube rides for the kids and that kind of stuff. It also helps us with asking for money from the county for river cleanups,” Whitmire says of the festival. “We’re just trying to get local individuals focused.” Farther downstream, where the French Broad joins with several major tributaries — the Mills and Little rivers, Cane Creek, and the aptly named Mud Creek — groups like the Mills River Partnership, a coalition of local stakeholders, focus on keeping the water entering the French Broad as pristine as possible. Besides its role as a major tributary to the French Broad south of Asheville, the Mills River supplies the region with a significant portion of its drinking water. “This intake plant feeds all of Hendersonville,” says Maria Wise, pointing to a collection of pipes and pumps that jut out into the Mills near its intersection with U.S. Highway 280. A second, smaller plant several miles downstream supplies 16 to 20 percent of the water Asheville uses, she adds. Like Whitmire, Wise can trace her interest in the French Broad to a childhood spent along its banks. The Madison County native currently serves as watershed coordinator for the Mills River Partnership. “My older brother was a riverkeeper in Virginia for a few years, and my dad worked for the cooperative extension and was on the soil and water board. An interest in the land and the water is in our blood.”

Not so long ago, the French Broad and its tributaries powered the economy of Western North Carolina by transporting goods, generating electricity and whisking away industrial pollutants. These days, the economic value of the river depends more and more on the overall health of the waterway, whether for the drinking water it supplies to over 1 million people, the region’s booming beer industry, or attracting tourists and new residents. That shift is driving a small army of local government workers, environmental organizations and residents to continue and expand efforts to improve the quality of the river’s water. While much has changed for the better over the past several decades, much remains to be done: The river still runs muddy brown after hard rains, and negative stereotypes and rumors about its water quality persist on social media and by word-of-mouth. In this two-part series, Xpress invites you on a guided a trip down the river as we examine the work of various communities to write the next chapter in the French Broad’s history. This week, we’ll explore the upper sections of the river that flow northward through Transylvania and Henderson counties. BIRTH OF A RIVER A handpainted wooden sign about the size of a phone book marks “mile zero” of the river’s journey through WNC, just outside the town of Rosman. Headwaters Outfitters, owned and operated by David and Debi Whitmire, sits besides this sign at the confluence of the river’s north and west forks. David Whitmire, whose family roots along the French Broad go back to the 1820s, says the river played a large role in his upbringing. “My grandfather would drop us boys off and pick us up at the bottom of the run,” he says. “The confluence here was always a popular place to sit back and wormfish when you were a kid.” In many ways, the growth of Headwaters Outfitters mirrors the French Broad’s revitalization over the past three decades. From its modest start with “a little eight-passenger van and about 10 canoes” in 1992, Whitmire says Headwaters now boasts a fleet of

24

Communities along Upper French Broad work to restore water quality

AUG. 16 - 22, 2017

IN THE BEGINNING: Reputed to be the third oldest river in the world, the French Broad has gone from a polluted industrial dumping ground to a key cog in Western North Carolina’s outdoor and tourism industries. This renaissance is a result of government, nonprofit and individual efforts to improve water quality throughout the watershed. Photo by Mike Belleme, courtesy of the Transylvania County Tourism Development Authority about 70 boats. The outfitter offers tube, kayak and canoe rentals out of its bustling, full-service retail store. There’s even the obligatory taproom. Through it all, Whitmire says he’s made sure his customers know the significance of the river they’re on. “This is mile marker 0; you’re doing the first 8-10 miles of a beautiful old river — the third-oldest river in the world,” he says with pride. A GENTLER CURRENT Unlike the rock-strewn whitewater of the river’s lower sections near Asheville, the Upper French Broad babbles placidly through a mostly rural setting. Away from industry and residential neighborhoods, this stretch of the river has escaped some of the water quality issues that have plagued sections that pass through more populated areas downstream. Even so, human activity has impacted the upper reaches of the river through the years. Loose soils — the result of agriculture, tree cutting and grading — along the riverbank often lead to trees falling into the waterway during heavy rains, says Whitmire. In addition, sediment runoff from surrounding farms and development projects can turn the French Broad into a

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muddy brown soup after significant rainfall. The sediment can literally suffocate aqueous wildlife and introduce harmful bacteria into the water, according to Landon Davidson, regional supervisor for the N.C. Department of Water Quality. “Nonpoint source pollutants [such as sediment, nutrient runoff, and bacteria] remain the most significant threat to water quality and aquatic habitats in the watershed,” says Davidson, whose department monitors 22 stations in the French Broad watershed. While the department works with partner organizations and communities across Western North Carolina to develop and implement plans for managing runoff, its efforts are often limited by a small budget and lack of manpower, according to many of those interviewed for this article. “The scope of our program spans from overseeing coal ash residuals cleanup, inspecting all sizes of wastewater treatment facilities, permitting sewer extensions, permitting injection wells, regulating animal operations, responding to complaints and emergencies impacting water quality, managing groundwater contamination incidents and more,” says Davidson. The department’s 15-person staff oversees 19 counties in Western North Carolina.

WASHED AWAY While Mills River is known for being one of the cleanest of the French Broad tributaries, sediment entering the waterway from adjacent agricultural fields and residential developments is an ongoing concern, according to Wise.


In addition to degrading water quality, erosion can severely impact a farmer’s land. Mills River Partnership works with local farmers to install grass waterways — strips of uncultivated land which provide a spillway for excess rainwater — in fields adjacent to creeks and streams feeding into the Mills, says Wise. “You would be surprised how much water will run off of this field in a heavy rainstorm,” she says, pointing to a cornfield several hundred feet from the Mills. “The farmer was losing a lot of corn and incredible amounts of topsoil.” In addition to the grassways, volunteers plant “live stakes” to reinforce and strengthen the riparian zones along creeks. “We want all these streams to be completely inundated with plants and trees and shrubs,” Wise says, “because they’re taking up the sediment and filtering it out. The more filtering that can be done all along the way, the better.” SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE Balancing the health of local streams with the economic realities of those who live along them is key to ensuring cooperation on any river-related project. “We don’t want to change the way people have done business and lived along the river,” says Whitmire. “We embrace the cultures that were here first, and I think that’s important to try to maintain those things. A lot of those families have been there, like mine, for seven generations or so.” Economic incentives, Wise says, help local farmers justify participation in water quality improvement projects. “In almost all cases, you can find an economic angle, where it’s helping their operation on some level,” she says. “The farmers are putting up some of their money with every project, so it is important to recognize their efforts.” Mills River Partnership also works to educate the surrounding community on the relationship between farming and water quality, and to dispel negative perceptions of farming’s impact on the French Broad watershed. “People say agriculture is contributing a lot [of contaminants], but they don’t really understand how that works,” notes Wise. “A lot of our education is explaining farming practices to the general public, so they understand what everyone’s up against, and reminding them how many problems are coming from residential development, too.” FISHING FOR FILTH Progressing downstream along the river’s course toward Asheville,

the impact of human population on the waterway increases. “As you move downstream, the data indicates the increased impact from human activity as turbidity, nutrient, temperature, [and] specific conductivity increase,” Davidson says. “Many of these tributaries are flowing through towns and developed areas along the river.” A 2016 map produced by the N.C. Department of Water Quality identifies at least 10 “impaired” sections of waterways in Transylvania and Henderson counties. One glaring example is Mud Creek, which winds through Hendersonville along Interstate 26. In addition to the sediment that gives the creek its name, refuse from storm drains and roadways also finds its way into the water after heavy storms. “The storm drains pick up the litter on the sides of the roads and pipe it to the closest creek,” says Eric Bradford of the environmental nonprofit Asheville GreenWorks, which works throughout the French Broad watershed. Once the trash gets into the water, he adds, it can degrade into tiny pieces that can enter the food chain all the way to the Gulf of Mexico. To help capture this waste before it enters the French Broad, Asheville GreenWorks recently partnered with the city of Hendersonville to install a “trash trout” along Mud Creek. Since its implementation on June 8, the device has yielded eye-opening results. “We got about 230 pounds of trash from one recent rainstorm,” Bradford reveals. The volume of trash collected in devices like the trash trout helps quantify the amount of litter that washes down tributaries over time. “You look out in the river, you might see a cup float by, and think it’s not a big deal,” Bradford says. “But now, we’re capturing it for you, so you can actually see all that trash that floated past in that rain event.” ECOLOGY MEETS ECONOMY A clean river also means a vibrant economy. River access points have been added at Etowah, Horse Shoe and Mills River in recent years. In addition to Headwaters Outfitters, Lazy Otter Outfitters opened in 2016 to expose kayakers, tubers and fishing enthusiasts to the sections of the river between Brevard and Asheville. The French Broad Paddle Trail, launched in April 2012 with the support of environmental nonprofits RiverLink and MountainTrue, Oskar Blues Brewery and other local sponsors, allows boaters to travel complete sections of the river, with the opportunity to stop at local restaurants and

campgrounds along the way. “It connects us to Asheville in a neat way, because people start here and end up there,” says Whitmire. Breweries are also flocking to the water’s edge. Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., for example, invested over $100 million in its Mills River facility and employs more than 100 people. In Brevard, Oskar Blues has partnered with city government on the Cherry Street Greenway project. The beer maker attracts thousands of visitors to Transylvania County each year with its taproom and special events like the Burning Can festival. “Brewers are inherently connected to our watersheds as the health of that watershed directly impacts the main ingredient in beer,” says Sierra Nevada’s sustainability manager Cheri Chastain. The company has implemented a variety of stormwater management strategies at their facility, which “help to recharge the aquifer we pull our brewing water from and slow the flow of rain water headed to the French Broad,” she says. Trails like the Oklawaha Greenway, which runs along Mud Creek in Hendersonville, also spotlight the status of the waterway. “It’s putting a lot of pressure and focus on keeping Mud Creek in good condition,” says Michael Arrowood of the Henderson County Tourism Development Authority. Still in the planning stages, the proposed Ecusta Trail would travel through the French Broad River valley from Hendersonville to Brevard along U.S. Highway 64. The Ecusta trail and a new nature area at Fletcher Community Park

ECO ASHEVILLE GREEN DRINKS ashevillegreendrinks.com • 3rd WEDNESDAYS, 7pm - Ecopresentations, discussions and community connection. Free. Held at Lenoir Rhyne Center for Graduate Studies, 36 Montford Ave. CREATION CARE ALLIANCE OF WNC creationcarealliance.org • TH (8/17), 5:30-7pm - “On Care for Our Common Home,” general meeting with speaker Connie Mitchell. Free. Held at First Baptist Church of Asheville, 5 Oak St. DEFENDERS OF WILDLIFE 1 Rankin Ave., 2nd Floor, 828-4120983, defenders.org • TH (8/17), 5:30-7pm - “Wild Waters of WNC,” workshop focused on the wild waters of WNC with aquatic biologist Jim Herrig. Participants will build a simple water viewer for habitat and wildlife viewing underwater. Registration required: southeastoffice@defenders.org. Free.

on Cane Creek are both expected to draw visitors by highlighting the beauty of the river corridor. “The trails and people are going down towards the river,” says Arrowood. “The more time people spend on the river, the more they say they want this to be clean. It all ties in.” HERONS AND HELLBENDERS The abundance of wildlife along the French Broad is both a consequence and a sign of the river’s improved health. According to RiverLink, the French Broad watershed is believed to have one of the largest great blue heron populations in the world. “You can’t go on the river now and not see several blue herons,” says Wise. “They were not there when I was a kid.” In addition, the French Broad is home to rare flora and fauna, from the carnivorous mountain sweet pitcher plant and the Appalachian elktoe mussel to the tiny bog turtle and prehistoric hellbender salamander. “That’s our canary in the mine there, so to speak,” says Whitmire of the hellbender, “because it requires excellent water conditions, since they breathe through their skin.” A healthy wildlife habitat can also serve as yet another way to attract people to the river, he adds. “If you’re a birder and haven’t enjoyed the French Broad valley, the diversity of birds is incredible,” Whitmire notes. “And these are great native trout waters. The fish-

CONTINUES ON PAGE 26

GREEN GRANNIES avl.mx/0gm • 3rd SATURDAYS, 4pm - Sing-along for the climate. Information: singfortheclimate.com Free. Held at Pritchard Park, 4 College St.

FARM & GARDEN MUSHROOMS OF WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA: HANDS-ON FORAGING (PD.) Saturdays, 8/19 -9/16, 10am1:30pm - Explore local forests in search of edible, medicinal and regional mushrooms with fungi forager Mateo Ryall. $30 per class or $100 for 4 classes. Info: herbandroots.com, livinroots@gmail. com, Herb Roots@facebook. com,  or 413-636-4401. BUNCOMBE COUNTY EXTENSION MASTER GARDENERS 828-255-5522, buncombemastergardener.org, BuncombeMasterGardeners@ gmail.com • TH (8/17), 11:30am-1pm “Gardening in the Mountains: Drought Tolerant Gardening,”

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class. Registration required. Bring your lunch. Free. Held at Mountain Horticultural Crops Research and Extension Station, 74 Research Drive Mills River BUNCOMBE COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARIES buncombecounty.org/governing/ depts/library • TU (8/22), 6:30pm - “Invasive Plants,” presentation. Free. Held at Enka-Candler Library, 1404 Sandhill Road, Candler LIVING WEB FARMS 828-891-4497, livingwebfarms.org • SA (8/19), 1:30pm - “Permaculture Earthworks & Farm Wetland Ecosystems,” workshop regarding water harvesting for irrigation, erosion control, diversion and storage. $15. Held at Living Web FarmsGrandview, 149 Grandview Lane Hendersonville POLK COUNTY FRIENDS OF AGRICULTURE BREAKFAST polkcountyfarms.org • 3rd WEDNESDAYS, 7-8am - Monthly breakfast with presentations regarding agriculture. Admission by donation. Held at 4-H Center, Locust St, Columbus

AUG. 16 - 22, 2017

25


FARM & GARDEN

G REEN SC E N E

Abundance of grace

ing industry itself generates a huge amount of tourism dollars that come into the county and to the western part of the state.” Statistics gathered by the Department of Water Quality have shown a large improvement in water quality in the French Broad basin over the past 30 years, according to Davidson. “Overall data trends show the progress in reducing contaminants such as fecal coliform bacteria,” he says. “There is also much less industrial activity in the basin and better management of both point and nonpoint source pollutants.”

Inmates grow through gardening program

RIVER ON THE REBOUND While encouraging signs of progress abound, river advocates on the Upper French Broad say new challenges lurk on the horizon. Whitmire points to the recent die-off of native hemlocks as an issue river advocates will likely need to contend with in the coming years. “They’re standing now, but they’re standing dead,” he notes. “We’re just seeing part of the tip of what’s going to be flowing down that river.” Along the Mills River tributary Foster Creek, Mills River Partnership is hoping to team up with Living Web Farms on a streambank restoration initiative next year. In addition, the farm is researching crops that can be planted in creekside areas. With arable land scarce in the mountains, Wise explains, farmers have long resisted the idea of leaving prime agricultural acreage in the bottomlands fallow to provide a buffer between farming uses and waterways. Wise hopes new options for crops that can make money for farmers while protecting water quality will be identified. “If we can really make a good case for some value-added crops that can be grown in the riparian zone, that’s benefiting everyone,” she says. Most importantly, says Davidson, residents, businesses and nonprofit groups must continue to spread awareness of the French Broad watershed as a public asset, one all should take steps to protect. “The waters of the French Broad are owned by you, the citizens of North Carolina, the same individuals that can affect the greatest impact on the system for better or for worse,” Davidson advises. “If you use the river to recreate or understand its aesthetic and economic contribution to our region, take an active role in advocating for its protection.” Next week: A look at the French Broad’s renaissance in Buncombe and Madison counties.  X 26

AUG. 16 - 22, 2017

GROWING CONFIDENCE: The Seasons of Grace garden at the Swannanoa Correctional Center for Women produced a bumper crop of squash and other fruits and vegetables in its first season. Photo courtesy of the Seasons of Grace garden project

BY MAGGIE CRAMER mcramerwrites@gmail.com Sally Reeske has been teaching horticulture at the Swannanoa Correctional Center for Women, a minimum-custody prison, for the past two years. While the vocational course through A-B Tech offers inmates hands-on learning and training opportunities via an instructional plot, Reeske wondered if she could do even more for the incarcerated women. This spring, she recruited help from Warren Wilson College in the form of borrowed equipment and student-intern labor, and, with the work of inmates interested in planting and harvesting, the Seasons of Grace garden program at SCCW was born. Through producing food, the program is on a mission to “grow a foundation to build women’s self-esteem, creativity and resilience,” Reeske says, adding that it also aims to express appreciation to the community by donating the fruits of its labor to MANNA FoodBank. To start, though, Seasons of Grace participants focused on getting fresh fruits and vegetables directly to the SCCW

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population. By midsummer, the allvolunteer group had already succeeded in its effort: A bumper crop of yellow crookneck translated into two servings of squash for each of the more than 300 women housed there. “Fruits and vegetables aren’t necessarily abundant in the dining hall, or at least certain foods,” Reeske explains. The team purposefully planted varieties they knew the women want to eat, including honeydews, watermelons and cantaloupes. Inmates, officers and dining hall staff have appreciated their work, raving about the resulting meals, she notes. Through a partnership between Seasons of Grace and the nonprofit Mountain BizWorks, the garden volunteers received assistance in creating a plant sale this past weekend at the Sourwood Festival in Black Mountain. The event served as a fundraiser for Seasons of Grace, which doesn’t receive funding from the center or A-B Tech. But Reeske feels the community connections made there are even more valuable, noting that many customers shared interest in volunteering with the garden project and other efforts at SCCW.

Mountain BizWorks also recently hosted an entrepreneurial information session for women in the center who may be interested in starting their own business. “If you start a small business and you were formerly incarcerated, you might be more likely to hire someone who was also formerly incarcerated,” Reeske says. “That creates an economy for people who typically have a very challenging time once they’re released … because they have to check that box.” Ultimately, Seasons of Grace piggybacks on the aims of BizWorks’ offerings and A-B Tech’s course: reduced recidivism rates and successful reintegration. “Growing your own food can be very empowering,” Reeske says. “I think seeing a project through from start to finish, like from seed to harvest, can be very empowering.” It’s also about cultivating confidence, she stresses, by forming a connection with nature and wonder: “That keeps you growing, even in a place where it’s not that easy to feel inspired.”­X


FOOD

A SOUTHERN TRADITION Pimento cheese may have been invented in New York, but Asheville cooks have made it their own But she couldn’t find her preferred mayonnaise — Duke’s — so she had it shipped to her. By the case. Pimento cheese may be a Southern thing, but it originated in the North — New York state, to be precise. It was an early “scientific” food, industrially produced and marketed. The scientific food movement grew out of the women-led Domestic Science movement in the late 1800s to bring order and reason to the home, most specifically in cooking and eating. With the invention of cream cheese in the late 19th century in Upstate New York and the introduction of canned pimentos from Spain about the same time, someone decided that putting the two together would be a good idea. Manufacturers — and homemakers — jumped on the wagon. The first published recipe for pimento cheese appeared in 1908, according to Southern Living. It called for cream cheese, mustard, chives and minced pimentos, and it caught on. The imported pimentos weren’t always easy to find, and they weren’t cheap. So when farmers in Georgia began to grow them, it could have led the way for pimento cheese to become a Southern staple. Although at the time, most of the commercially made product was manufactured in the North, it was distributed nationally. VARIATIONS ON A THEME

CHEESE, PLEASE: Marlisa Mills makes pimento cheese in her Black Mountain home. Mills began making the Southern staple herself during a stint in Connecticut, where she discovered that local supermarkets did not carry the cheesy spread. Photo by Leslie Boyd

BY LESLIE BOYD leslie.boyd@gmail.com Marlisa Mills didn’t realize when she took a job in Connecticut that pimento cheese really is a Southern thing. “I

went into a Shaw’s grocery store and asked where they kept the pimento cheese, and you’d have thought I’d asked for fried goldfinch,” says Mills, who moved back to Buncombe County earlier this year. “That’s when I knew I’d have to make my own.”

Before World War II, most cookbooks didn’t offer recipes for pimento cheese but treated it as an ingredient to be purchased, writes South Carolina-based food writer Robert Moss in an article for Serious Eats. By then, the cream cheese version had pretty much lost its appeal in the North, but enterprising Southerners took it in a new direction. In the 1940s, someone decided that grated hoop cheese (a mild cheddar) might be even tastier than mashed cream cheese. Although some still make pimento cheese with mashed soft cheeses (think Velveeta), most today use grated cheddar and other harder cheeses.

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“I think mashing it makes it slimy,” Mills says. She uses a mix of yellow and white cheddars and, of course, Duke’s mayonnaise, a dash of lemon juice, a dash of paprika and little Worcestershire sauce. Early Girl Eatery adds a dash of bourbon. And although Mills has her own recipe, she still loves to taste other people’s versions. “It’s nice to be able to buy it when you don’t have time to make it,” she says. Recently, she discovered True South’s traditional cheddar cheese pimento spread

Early Girl Eatery’s pimento cheese (This makes enough for a huge party. Adjust measurements as needed.) 12 cups grated sharp white cheddar cheese 12 cups grated local farmstead cheese ¾ cup Parmesan cheese 1 ¼ cup homemade mayonnaise 1 ½ cup chopped pimentos, drained and rinsed, 1 ½ teaspoon dark chili powder 1/8 to 1/4 teaspoon ground cumin 3 tablespoons bourbon 1 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper Mix together and refrigerate.

with pecans, calling it “the best I’ve ever bought.” True South is an offshoot of Colorful Palate Catering in Arden, which opened in 2002. Co-owner Tara Letts says she and business partner Ragan Evans Lewis decided to split the pimento cheese business from the rest of the catering three years ago because demand was so high. The product has done well, and unlike restaurant varieties, it’s available online as well as in some retail outlets, including Roots & Fruits and Merry Wine Market in Black Mountain. It’s also on the menu at the Woolworth Walk Soda Fountain and Barley’s Taproom in Asheville. The traditional spread with pecans is the most popular of the four varieties True South makes (El Diablo, with cheddar cheese and hot pepper, horseradish havarti and smoked

Marlisa Mills’ pimento cheese 2 cups shredded cheddar cheese (1 cup white, 1 cup yellow) ½ cup Duke’s mayonnaise 1 tablespoon lemon juice ½ teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 4 ounces chopped pimentos Mix and refrigerate for at least an hour before serving.

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gouda are the other three), and it’s the one Mills discovered recently. “It’s like the nut-coated cheese balls your mother used to make for church suppers,” Letts says. “People love it.” True South uses a little bit of cream cheese in its recipe to make the consistency creamier, Letts says. QUALITY COUNTS While there are almost as many recipes for pimento cheese as there are people who love it, aficionados all agree on one thing: You need to use quality cheese. Rob Voigt is general manager at Loretta’s in Asheville, which is known for its grilled pimento cheese sandwiches and for the Big Bad Wolf (pimento cheese, pulled pork, ham, bacon, coleslaw and Creole mustard). “I don’t use Velveeta because it’s well, one molecule away from plastic,” Voigt says. “The trick to good pimento cheese is good cheese.” Like many traditional Southern foods, pimento cheese is comfort food, Voigt says. “It’s like having a bowl of soup in the winter,” he says. Julie Strehling, co-owner of Early Girl Eatery, says part of the comfort of pimento cheese is that so many Southerners remember it from happy childhood events — family picnics, church suppers, weddings. And although she didn’t grow up with it, she pretty much fell in love at first bite. Early Girl kitchen manager Michael Lamb thinks the appeal of pimento cheese is its high fat content. “All that delicious fat,” he says. “That’s what we love about it.” Early Girl uses a local farmstead cheese from Yellow Branch Farms for its pimento cheese, along with a dash of cumin, a little bourbon and homemade mayonnaise. “That alone makes ours unique,” says Lamb, who notes that the restaurant’s grilled pimento cheese sandwich is one of its biggest sellers. The spread’s versatility could also be a reason for its popularity — you’ll find it as a dip, in a sandwich, on hamburgers, and sometimes eaten all by itself. “The thing is, this is part of Southern life,” Mills says. “You can’t have a party without it.”  X


SMALL BITES by Thomas Calder | tcalder@mountainx.com

The Great American Jerk Off returns For the second year in a row, Ole Shakey’s Getaway’s Great American Jerk Off looks to honor and celebrate an American tradition that dates back centuries. The competition invites both professional and amateur chefs to shave, strip, season and dehydrate their meats as a way to showcase and highlight the wide range of flavors and interpretations available in beef jerky. A $5 wristband allows attendees to sample the entire selection, while a panel of judges, known as the Circle, will determine the winner for both categories. “It’s a competition, but we’re all just coming together to have a great community event,” says Eliza Eaton, social media and marketing representative for Ole Shakey’s Getaway. At press time, the professional competitors included Michelle Bailey of Smoky Park Supper Club and Franky Bloom of Sovereign Remedies. Eaton encourages those interested in competing to sign up at Ole Shakey’s website. A total of 10 slots are available in both the professional and amateur groups. Entry is free. Participants are required to bring 4 pounds of beef jerky to offer as samples. Those in the amateur category are also permitted to sell their jerky during the event. Charlie Hodge, co-owner of Ole Shakey’s Getaway, will act as emcee alongside Sovereign Remedies’ bartender  Brian DuBois. Andy Farrell will provide live music. Last year’s amateur champion, Collin Lee, will return this year to defend his title. His win awarded Lee the chance to sell his beef jerky all year at Ole Shakey’s, and this year’s champion will receive the same opportunity. Lee, a sous chef at Mojo Kitchen & Lounge, is not shy about wanting to repeat his success. “I’d like to keep selling my jerky at the bar,” he says. His winning product, known as The People’s Jerky, was inspired

Dinner 7 days per week 5:00 p.m. - until Bar opens at 5:00 p.m. Brunch - Saturday & Sunday 10:30 a.m.–2:30 p.m. LIVE MUSIC Tue., Thu., Fri. & Sat. Nights Also during Sunday Brunch

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KING OF THE JERK: Collin Lee will compete again in this year’s Great American Jerk Off. At last year’s inaugural event, Lee took home the top prize in the amateur category. Along with the accolade, he was awarded the opportunity to sell his jerky at Ole Shakey’s Getaway. Photo by Thomas Calder

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FOOD

Cafe, Market & Beverage Budget Friendly

Beer & Wine Tastings

by a Korean bulgogi recipe. He has since added new seasonings to his repertoire, including flavors such as Smokey Memphis Barbecue and Mom’s Meatloaf. Jerk Off attendees this year can expect to find samples of The People’s Jerky, as Lee intends to stick with his tried-and-true recipe for the upcoming competition. “I feel like I’ve perfected the tenderness and flavor,” he says. Regardless of the outcome, Lee says his vision for his beef jerky has evolved because of last year’s win. The future goal, he says, is “for every hiker to have [The People’s Jerky] with them.” “We really love this event because it takes the Asheville spirit of friendly food and beverage competition with Shakey’s unique charm,” says Ole Shakey’s Getaway’s coowner  Morgan Hickory. “Also, who doesn’t like an event that basically forces you to make inappropriate puns all day.” The Great American Jerk Off begins at 4 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 20. The event is for ages 21 and older. Tasting tickets cost $5 at the door. To register as a competitor, visit oleshakeys.com.  BIODYNAMIC WINE TASTING

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MetroWines will host an informal, all-day educational biodynamic wine tasting to coincide with the solar eclipse on Monday, Aug. 21. Led by Andy Hale, MetroWines’ director of education, participants will learn about the biodynamic process while sampling pours of Montinore pinot gris and pinot noir. “Biodynamic goes beyond organic,” says Hale. “While organic farming preserves the Earth, biodynamic seeks to better the Earth. … Grapes are harvested under the full moon, and some jobs are only performed during the alignment of certain planets and stars.”

The Biodynamic Wine Tasting runs 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday, Aug. 21, at MetroWines, 169 Charlotte St. The event is free to attend. For details, visit metrowinesasheville.com. FREE CANNING CLASS Chef Hanan Shabazz will host a free community canning class on Tuesday, Aug. 22, at Green Opportunities’ Southside Kitchen. The chef will teach participants how to preserve tomatoes or okra that was grown in the Southside Community Garden. RSVP is required. The class takes place 6-7 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 22, at the Southside Kitchen in the Arthur R. Edington Education and Career Center, 133 Livingston St. Admission is free. RSVP at avl.mx/40b.  SAUCES TO ELEVATE YOUR COOKING Living Web Farms will offer a class led by Patryk Battle and Meredith Leigh that explores homemade sauces, from salsas to chutneys, salad dressings to béchamel. “We will demonstrate some very basic techniques and demystify some more intimidating preparations with the idea of making everything from marinara sauce to hollandaise easy and doable for the home cook,” says Leigh in a press release. Along with tutorials, participants will have the chance to taste a number of the sauces made in class. Sauces to Elevate Your Cooking will run 6-7:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 24, at The French Broad Food Co-op, 90 Biltmore Ave. Tickets are by donation, with a suggested amount of $10. For details, visit avl.mx/3zx.

SAUSAGE-MAKING CLASS Hickory Nut Gap Farm’s butcher, Elliot Orwick, will host a sausagemaking class on Thursday, Aug. 24. The evening event includes a tutorial on grinding and seasoning handmade sausages, and students will team up to practice these skills. The class runs 6-8 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 24, at Hickory Nut Gap Farm, 57 Sugar Hollow Road. Tickets are $55. For details and tickets, visit avl. mx/3zy.  RAISING FUNDS FOR PISGAH LEGAL SERVICES John Fleer of Asheville’s Rhubarb will team up with Tandy Wilson of City House in Nashville, Tenn., for a farm-to-table dinner to benefit Pisgah Legal Services, a nonprofit law firm that has provided free civil legal aid since 1978. Recent funding cuts by the N.C. General Assembly has resulted in a loss of over $500,000 to the organization. According to the press release, the “multicourse dinner will feature local food from Sunburst Trout Farms and Benton’s Smoky Mountain Country Hams and will be paired with seasonal wines and craft beer.” Along with the meal, interested guests can purchase preevent tickets, which will include a meet-and-greet with the acclaimed chefs, culinary advice and a sample of caviar and Champagne. This is Fleer and Wilson’s first collaborative dinner. In 2016, Wilson was the recipient of the James Beard Foundation’s Best Chef of the Southeast award. The farm-to-table dinner begins at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 22, at Rhubarb, 7 S. Pack Square. Tickets are $125 per person and are available at avl. mx/401 or by calling 828-210-3405. For more information about Pisgah Legal Services, visit pisgahlegal.org.  X

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BEER SCOUT by Scott Douglas | jsdouglas22@gmail.com

Leviathan on the horizon The Whale Craft Beer Collective surfaces in West Asheville Despite Asheville’s increasingly crowded brewery market, the number of dedicated craft beer bars available to local consumers has remained relatively stagnant over the years. But that’s about to change with the introduction of The Whale Craft Beer Collective in West Asheville, expected to launch in early October. The brainchild of Wicked Weed veterans Andrew Ross and Jesse Van Note, The Whale will showcase world beers alongside esoteric local offerings with a focus on educating independent beer lovers looking to expand their horizons. The name is particularly significant to Ross and Van Note, as the term “whale” is shorthand in beer trading circles for highly sought-after and hardto-find rarities, an aspect of beer service in which the bar intends to specialize. Beyond difficult-to-obtain beers, however, the secondary title’s emphasis on “collective” denotes the bar’s community focus, an integral component of the Whale’s mission statement, according to Ross. “A craft beer collective is something we spent a lot of time thinking about,” he says. “Most of our friends work in craft beer, and when we set out to do this, we wanted to approach it from a perspective of gathering the ideas of people in our community about what we were lacking as a community and creating a space we all wanted to hang out in. We want to create something approachable, friendly and at the same time cater to a more knowledgeable crowd of beer consumers.” The Whale will open with 20 draft handles and a substantial bottle list, and while “whales” will be a defining component of the beers on offer, more affordable options will be available as well. Customers can expect those less expensive beers to include the traditional antecedents to popular modern styles — such as Pilsner Urquell, a classic Czech lager introduced in 1842 —as opposed to more commonly available cheap U.S. macrolagers. “I think it’s really important to be able to educate consumers about where these beers came from — for people to be able to drink their favorite beers, but also to understand why those beers exist,” Van Note points out.

bar experience in town by venturing off the beaten path typically explored by downtown pub crawlers. Van Note’s succinct explication of The Whale’s guiding ethos suggests a venue intended for drinkers seeking to engage with beer on a deeper level. “We don’t want to just focus on whatever beer is the hottest new thing,” he says. “We also want to celebrate where those beers came from — the past, present and future of beer. The people who are the innovators of the future need to be celebrated too, but I think staying current while also respecting the past is the key to a successful beer bar.” The Whale Craft Beer Collective will open in October at 507 Haywood Road. To apply for a job at The Whale, send a résumé to thewhaleavl@gmail.com.  X

THE LIFE AQUATIC: At The Whale Craft Beer Collective, owners Jesse Van Note, left, and Andrew Ross will showcase international beers, specializing in hard-to-find brews. With 20 taps and an extensive bottle list, the West Asheville business hopes to create an approachable community space that also caters to a more knowledgeable crowd of beer drinkers. Photo by Scott Douglas “For example, without Urquell, there would be no Budweiser or Miller Lite.” The Whale plans to host regular educational programs and weekly classes, with guest instructors culled from Ross and Van Note’s network of industry connections. Lectures, guided tastings and frequent beer festivals are expected to be consistent features of the taproom’s event schedule. A grand opening festival showcasing noteworthy beers from around the world is currently in the planning stages, following soft-opening events throughout early fall. While Urquell may be a regular offering alongside other classics such as Weihenstephaner Hefeweizen or Spaten Lager and traditional Belgian ales, Ross and Van Note plan to build on the extensive relationships they’ve developed through their years in North Carolina’s independent beer community by contributing to the creation of brews unique to The Whale. Mike Karnowski of Zebulon Artisan Ales will brew a pilsner as The Whale’s exclusive house beer, and plans are already underway to collaborate on other one-off beers with esteemed

local and regional breweries such as Fonta Flora. “It’s legally impossible to open with a world-class cellar,” Ross notes. “That could take years to develop, although we’ll start building it immediately. But we’ll also supplement vintage offerings with beers made specifically for us by brewers we respect like Mike [Karnowski].” The Whale shares a building at 507 Haywood Road with Haywood Common, a restaurant from Belly Up food truck proprietors Hannah and Rob Starr that will also provide food at the taproom. The bar will feature an inviting Scandinavian aesthetic with a large outdoor patio. The initial staff-out will be limited, with résumés currently being accepted. Applicants with prior beer industry are encouraged, and a high degree of global beer knowledge is a prerequisite. As is true of the bar’s namesake, The Whale is designed as something to be sought out rather than stumbled upon. By locating on an up-and-coming stretch of Haywood Road, Ross and Van Note hope to attract neighborhood locals and tourists willing to seek out the best beer MOUNTAINX.COM

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A R T S & E N T E R TA I N M E N T

DARK CITY

Asheville’s Solar Eclipse Festival celebrates an astronomical rarity

BY DANIEL WALTON danielwwalton@live.com Nearly 20 years ago, Amy Sayle of UNC Chapel Hill marked her calendar for Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. The astronomy educator didn’t know where she’d be on that day or exactly what she’d be doing. But one part of her plan was certain: For most of that afternoon, she’d be looking up. Sayle’s far-off commitment stemmed from the promise of a total solar eclipse, the first in almost a century to pass across the entire continental U.S. “I’ve literally been talking about this eclipse since 1998 — people stopped laughing about a year and a half ago,” she says. On Monday, Ashevilleans can share in the excitement during Asheville’s Solar Eclipse Festival at Pack Square Park, a part of the Carolina Solar Eclipse Parties initiative organized by Sayle and the UNC Morehead Planetarium and Science Center. The Asheville event is one of more than 50 simultaneous parties being held across the Carolinas. From Fontana Dam in the far west to Folly Beach, S.C., in the southeast, each site offers eclipse glasses for safe viewing and demonstrations for grasping the science behind the show in the sky. “Thanks to funding from the North Carolina Space Grant, we gave all of our partners a full day of training on a kit of 13 hands-on educational activities,” says Sayle. “Just looking at the eclipse is amazing, of course, but we want to help people understand what’s going on and how it works.” Solar eclipses occur thanks to a convenient cosmic coincidence: Although the sun is roughly 400 times larger in diameter than the moon, it’s also roughly 400 times farther away. When the heavenly bodies align on just the right plane, the moon appears to pass over the sun, darkening the skies until it slips perfectly over the shining disc. Much like a quarter, when held close to the eye, can obscure the view of a much larger light bulb, the tiny moon can block out the massive sun because of its proximity to the Earth. Observers will see a total eclipse in the approximately 70-mile-wide shadow directly under the moon, known as the umbra. Starting in Oregon, the umbra will move from

HEADS UP: The skies promise plenty of drama this month, with a partial lunar eclipse on Aug. 7, a Perseid meteor shower peaking on Aug. 12 and — the pièce de résistance — a rare, coast-to-coast total solar eclipse on Aug. 21. Just outside the path of totality, Asheville viewers will experience 99.2 percent darkness and should protect their eyes with special eclipse-viewing glasses. Photo by Cindy Kunst west to east across the country before passing through the southwest corner of North Carolina and the middle of South Carolina into the Atlantic Ocean. However, Sayle says, a much wider area will be covered by the moon’s penumbra, the lighter shadow in which the sun is partially obscured. “All of North America sees a partial eclipse, and part of South America as well. We’re all getting this,” she says. Although Asheville lies just outside the path of totality, the moon will still block 99.2 percent of the sun on Monday afternoon. “I don’t think people understand just how long the eclipse will last,” says Cory Van Auken, marketing manager for the Asheville Museum of Science and organizer of the Pack Square Park event. “You’ll be able to see the moon traverse across the sun at around 1:08 p.m., and maximum coverage will be at about 2:36 p.m.,” he says. When asked what to expect, Van Auken explains the striking scene associated with the eclipse. “With only

1 percent of the sun visible, it’s almost going to look like nighttime, and the temperature will cool by as much as 10 degrees,” he says. “Streetlights will be coming on, and animals will start to act differently.” Beyond the astronomic phenomenon, Asheville’s Solar Eclipse Festival features food vendors, the Splashville interactive fountain and solar-inspired music curated by DJ Kipper of Mix 96.5. Area science organizations and community groups are also offering a wide variety of eclipse-related family activities. “The National Centers for Environmental Information is actually bringing equipment to monitor temperature and light,” says Van Auken, “while Asheville Yoga is playing off the solar theme by teaching people the sun salutation.” Additional viewing sites are available at Owen, North Buncombe and Roberson high schools for residents who don’t want to venture downtown. Van Auken adds that safety is crucial when viewing the eclipse. “The darkness will trick you into thinking it’s OK

to look up, but even 1 percent of the sun can still really damage the tissue in your eyes,” he says. AMOS is selling eclipse glasses in its gift shop for $1 a pair leading up to the festival and will distribute them for free at the event while supplies last. Both Van Auken and Sayle hope that the eclipse sparks a wave of wider interest in science and astronomy throughout the Carolinas. After all, says Sayle, “You might as well make friends with the sky. You’re going to be living under it your whole life.”  X

WHAT Asheville’s Solar Eclipse Festival ashevillescience.org/solar-eclipse WHERE Pack Square Park WHEN Monday, Aug. 21, noon-3 p.m. Free

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A&E

Sunshine go away today

Eclipse-related events around WNC Cherokee Fairgrounds and the Museum of the Cherokee Indian. The Warriors of AniKituhwa will perform at the fairgrounds along with storytellers and craft demonstrators. The museum will host children’s activities. $25 per day. avl.mx/3zo

“Cherokee people have observed eclipses for millennia and have several names for them,” says the website for the Cherokee Cultural Eclipse Celebration. “The oldest is ‘Nvdo walosi ugisgo’ … ‘The frog eats the sun/ moon.’” The Cherokee event — where, in honor of that legend, visitors are encouraged to bring drums and make noise from when the eclipse begins until the sun returns — is one of many eclipse-viewing parties being held in the westernmost counties of North Carolina, which will be in the path of totality, or total darkness. Xpress rounds up that and other eclipse-related happenings. All events are on Monday, Aug. 21, unless otherwise noted. • Children’s museum Hands On!, 31 N. Main St., Hendersonville, offers the exhibit Orbiting Objects in preparation for the solar eclipse. “All ages will enjoy discovering how planets orbit around the sun,” says a press release for the display, on view in the party room through Friday, Aug. 18, from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. handsonwnc.org • “Andrews is Totality Town, N.C.,” says the website for the locale’s eclipse events. The town in Cherokee County is “the only place in North Carolina where the very centerline of the eclipse’s path travels right through town” and will see two minutes and 28 seconds of total darkness. The 5K Shadow Run takes place Saturday, Aug. 19, at 7:30 a.m. On Aug. 21, Andrews offers viewing locations at Heritage Park, the Bear Ridge Mall Park & View and Andrews Middle School. Some spaces include camping. Make reservations at avl.mx/3zh Talks and lectures Saturday, Aug. 19-Monday, Aug. 21, at various times, include “Astrology and Mythology of Solar Eclipses,” telescopes demonstrations, a star party and the NASA Megacast. avl.mx/3zi • The town of Tryon holds a solar eclipse party, hosted by the Polk County Public Library and Polk County Early College Science Club at Harmon Field from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. The festivities include music, food, crafts and activities, and eclipse-viewing glasses will be available. polkschools.org/eclipse

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MOON SHADOW: There are five phases of a total solar eclipse, during which viewers in the path of the moon’s shadow, or umbra, may be able to see Baily’s beads (blobs of light at the edge of the moon) and a solar corona creating a diamond ring effect. Photo via Thinkstock • At Clingmans Dome, in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the trailhead parking area will be the site of a ticketed event including eclipse viewing, educational exhibits and story tellers. The event is currently sold out, but canceled tickets will be released through recreation.gov • The Cashiers Eclipse Festival includes food trucks, beer by The Ugly Dog Public House and Satulah Mountain Brewing, ice cream and a performance by ’60s and ’70s cover band Coconut Groove. avl.mx/3zk • The Downtown Sylva Eclipse Festival is a weekendlong celebration. It launches Friday, Aug. 18, from 7 to 9 p.m. with a concert by Porch 40 at Bridge Park. Saturday, Aug. 19, brings a performance by A Social Function at 4 p.m., followed by Moonlight Madness, an after-hours shopping event. On Sunday, Aug. 20, “Solar eclipse educational panels will be held at Southwestern Community College

MOUNTAINX.COM

with astronomy professors and subject matter experts,” according to the Jackson County website. The eclipse festival starts at Bridge Park at 11 a.m. Monday, with food trucks, lectures and a performance by the Colby Deitz Band. avl.mx/3zl • An eclipse block party takes place in downtown Franklin from 1 to 6 p.m., with solar telescope viewing, a post-eclipse concert, giveaways, Moon Pies and RC Cola. And at the Smoky Mountain Center for the Performing Arts, 1028 Georgia Road, Franklin, the excitement begins at 11 a.m. with music by Mountain Faith Band, a DJ on the front lawn, according to event information, while inside the theater, “a live video stream [is] provided by NASA as some of [its] top scientists share commentary as the eclipse happens.” avl.mx/3zn • The Cherokee Cultural Eclipse Celebration is slated for Sunday, Aug. 20, and Monday, Aug. 21, at the

• Gorges State Park, 976 Grassy Ridge Road, Sapphire — home to 26 cascades and waterfalls — is the site of a three-day family-friendly occasion. “The park offers prime viewing spots, and we’ll … have live music, food trucks, ranger-led nature hikes, science discussions and demonstrations, face painting and more,” says the Friends of Gorges State Park website. “This event has been designated as an official 2017 Carolinas Solar Eclipse Party location through a joint effort between North and South Carolina, coordinated by the Morehead Planetarium and funded by N.C. Space Grant and S.C. Space.” Eclipserelated activities begin Saturday, Aug. 19. At presstime, no campsites were available for Saturday or Sunday. friendsofgorges.org/eclipse-at-gorges • “Take the Eclipse Crawl,” says the website for Bryson City’s fête. Participating merchants will have eclipse-themed food and drink offerings throughout the weekend. On Friday, Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 18, 19 and 20, catch live music at Riverfront Park from 7 to 9 nightly. The Fire Department on Main Street hosts a full-dome planetarium experience on Saturday and Sunday; the Swain County Agricultural Fair takes place Saturday, and the Appalachian Festival is on Sunday. On eclipse day, a block party at the rail road depot runs from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. with music by Grandpa’s Cough Medicine and The Company Store. The Swain County Event Park promises live music (Andrew Scotchie & The River Rats and Lyric), plus food trucks. Parking is $10 cars/$20 vans/$40 buses. greatsmokies.com  — Alli Marshall  X


by Alli Marshall

amarshall@mountainx.com

‘TAKE WHAT YOU HAVE TO MAKE WHAT YOU WANT’ WRES honors its co-founder, mission and 16 years of broadcasting published, with the help of his wife, and distributed to local barbershops. Realizing he could reach a wider audience through the airwaves, Hayes not only learned about broadcasting but launched his own recording company. It was work in education, through the Head Start program, that brought Hayes to Asheville in 1977. That same year, he launched the Hillcrest Enrichment Program in the public housing community of the same name. “In July of ’77, I went into Hillcrest and got to know the parents” of the children he’d been working with, says Hayes. “In order to talk to the parents, I had to watch ‘All My Children.’” He laughs about the soap opera. “I had to

sit through all of that to get to the point of being able to talk to them.” Hayes also created programs at fellow Housing Authority communities Klondyke Homes, Lee Walker Heights and Deaverview Apartments, but it was the Hillcrest High Steppers — the drum and majorette corp from that first initiative — that captured Asheville’s hearts. “We didn’t have any drums. … Cardboard boxes and sticks were the first drums they learned to play on,” Hayes says of the students in that program. “Take what you have to make what you want.” The only batons were owned by two girls who were already

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SOUND WAVES: The programming on radio station WRES is broad, but the idea is simple. “It’s about the community,” says co-founder John Hayes. “The people keep me motivated and give me a belief that we miss really living when we get narrowly focused on me, myself and I. You open up, and someone else shares with you, and in sharing, you connect.” Photo by Cindy Kunst “The first time people hear something, they really don’t hear it. It takes hearing it more than once,” says John Hayes, co-founder, president and CEO of local radio station WRES 100.7-FM. “My vision was to give nonprofits the opportunity to get their message out to people in a way that people would hear it more than once.” As he speaks, an episode of “No Limits,” focusing on scholarships currently available through A-B Tech, is being recorded. The segment will air three days a week at 11 a.m., hopefully reaching listeners who can take advantage of the educational programs. One of WRES’ earliest goals was to serve “not just the black community, but the community, period, aimed at

people of low wealth,” says Hayes. He draws a distinction between the lowincome designation and a person’s own measure of wealth, and how they’re able to “use that gift to benefit others [and therefore] empower [themselves].” WRES celebrates 16 years on air with a banquet celebrating Hayes and his many contributions to the community, on Saturday, Aug. 19. EXPANDING THE REACH A native of Birmingham, Ala., Hayes was living in Winston-Salem when he first worked in radio. His show, “Black Awareness” — on station WAAA — originated as a newspaper that he selfMOUNTAINX.COM

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A& E in another group, and there was no money to fund the initiative. But Hayes applied for a grant through a program under then-Gov. Jim Hunt. The governor influenced Ashevillebased agencies to contribute money to both the Hillcrest High Steppers and the community youth football team that Hayes coached.

RIDING THE (AIR) WAVES With a similar combination of ingenuity, charm and grit, Hayes forged ahead with his plan for a radio station that would connect the community to the resources it needed. As president of the local branch of the NAACP — Hayes served in that role for 16 years — he thought that organization would be a good umbrella for the station. But a former national president of the association dissuaded Hayes from that model.

So, with area business and community leaders — including Sophie Dixon, who, like Hayes, still operates the station — Hayes set up a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit and launched WRES. Local luminaries involved with the station’s founding were Scott Dedman and Terry Bellamy, among others. Hayes counts among the station’s great successes the early program “Credit Talk,” which provided information on credit scores and classes to build skills around financial security. “It’s all about empowering people of low wealth on health issues, money issues [and] life issues,” he says, “so that we can lift the whole community up.” More than a decade and a half into broadcasting, WRES is still tapping into the expertise of leaders in communities of color and sharing that knowledge through informative shows. The station also spins an array of music (gospel, blues, soul, contemporary and more), and airs all of the games of the Asheville Tourists baseball team. That particular coverage, says Hayes, allows parents to share a handed-down-from-one-generation-to-the-next experience with their children: listening to the game on the radio together.

Sometimes lifting the community up is as simple as a good song or a home run. When asked how his spiritual practice impacts his radio work Hayes, who is an ordained elder of the Churches of God in Christ, laughs. “My pastor and I look at this as a calling,” he says. “This is what I’m here to do. … I’m serving each and every day.” With 16 years of service under his belt, Hayes is focused on the future of WRES as well as the community he reaches. “I think it’s important that we learn to celebrate ourselves,” he says. “If you’re looking for somebody else to empower you, you’ll be waiting forever.”  X

WHAT WRES 100.7-FM Sweet 16 Banquet WHERE A-B Tech/Mission Health Conference Center WHAT Saturday, Aug. 19, 7 p.m. $25. wresfm.com

Mountain Xpress Presents

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FEATURING EN V E X AWARD WINNING BANDS, RADIO, FOOD TRUCKS, ICE CREAM, ENTERTAINMENT, & SPECIAL BREWS

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AUG. 17 5–9PM


by Bill Kopp

bill@musoscribe.com

BLUE STATE The River Valley Blues Festival has grown quickly from its 2015 inception as a local effort in a bar 10 miles outside Asheville to a two-day event featuring world-class talent. This year’s festival boasts a lineup featuring internationally touring headliners Grady Champion and Janiva Magness  and takes place Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 19 and 20, at Salvage Station. Blues has its roots firmly in the traditions and experiences of AfricanAmericans; it’s arguably the “blackest” of all musical forms. But Champion isn’t surprised when he learns that he is the only person of color on the bill for the River Valley Blues Festival. “A lot of festivals that we play are gonna be predominantly white performers,” he says. While he admits that his own fan base is largely white, he says, “if a young African-American has got an option to play blues or to play something else, he sees it’s difficult to make a living playing the blues.” Champion’s take on the blues begins with familiar, solid influences — in conversation, he mentions John Lee Hooker, Buddy Guy and Johnny Winter — and applies a sensibility that draws from gospel and hip-hop. “A lot of the older blues guys always said that you can’t really sing the blues unless you’ve been to church,” says Champion, who grew up in small-town Mississippi, one of a family of 28 children. “What we did every Sunday was go to church, and we got it in us first.” His immersion in hip-hop would come much later. In the early 1990s, Champion began his musical career as a rapper, branding himself MC Gold. Looking back on that period, Champion believes it helped create a foundation for the blues he sings and plays today. “Being a rapper really gave me the upper hand as far as writing stories and lyrics,” he says, noting that that background gives his music a “bit of a different feel.” He continues, “But it all grows from the same place.” The winner of the 2010 International Blues Challenge and a multiple Blues Music Awards nominee, Champion has released nine albums to date. His newest, One of a Kind, will be out in September. Champion’s original music is based more upon “feel” than preconceived notions about what is or isn’t blues.

Grady Champion and Janiva Magness headline River Valley Blues Festival

WORLD-CLASS AND LOCAL: The River City Blues Festival has increased in size and scope from its humble beginnings two years ago. In addition to many Asheville-based performers, this year’s event features two stars of the blues scene, Grady Champion, left, and Janiva Magness. Champion’s photo courtesy the artist; Magness’ photo by Jeff Dunas “Some people push the nongrowth of blues,” Champion says, adding that the marketplace “force-feeds artists who basically sit down and play; they probably just read off a paper. They think blues is just 12 bars, sitting down, no energy.” His brand of blues is steeped in a tradition of high energy. “When I get on that stage,” Champion says, “They’re gonna know, ‘Oh, this is the blues.’” Though Magness is not AfricanAmerican, she comes by her blues honestly. Both her parents took their own lives when she was young. As a subsequent foster teen, she had a hard life that, at age 17, included giving up a baby for adoption. Magness would eventually find solace singing the blues, though her recording career didn’t begin until the singer was in her mid-30s. She has released 12 albums — her newest EP, Blue Again, is due later this year — yet, for many years, Magness sang songs written by others. But beginning with her Grammy-winning 2016 album Love Wins Again, she put her efforts into songwriting. Sharing stories from her struggles “makes for the possibility for connection with other human beings,” she says.

With that sharing comes healing. “Sometimes it’s incremental, little millimeters at a time,” Magness says, “and sometimes it’s huge leaps. But it’s still forward motion.” Looking back, at least at sources of influence, matter, too. Magness describes Blue Again — which she’ll preview at the River Valley Blues Festival — as “a pretty potent collection of some of my favorite covers and artists: Etta [James], Bo [Diddley], Nina [Simone] and more. It’s raw, and right back to the taproot for me.”

Event organizer Zuzu Welsh says that this year’s festival will feature seven local acts in addition to Magness (Saturday’s headliner) and Champion (Sunday’s festival closer). The bill includes Ashley Heath, Paper Crowns, Moses Jones, Dirty Badgers, Roots & Dore and Virginia & the Slims, all hosted by the Zuzu Welsh Band.  X

WHAT The third annual River Valley Blues Festival WHERE Salvage Station 466 Riverside Drive salvagestation.com WHEN Saturday, Aug. 19, and Sunday, Aug. 20, noon-10 p.m. $25 per day/$40 both days

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A&E

by Thomas Calder

tcalder@mountainx.com

MODERN HIEROGLYPHICS Symbolism and color theory mark Joshua Spiceland’s latest collection In There Is No Other, his latest collection, local artist Joshua Spiceland plays with fire — figuratively speaking. Flames, lighting bolts, shooting stars and oil drums are among the symbols featured in the series of paintings, which will be on display at Push Gallery beginning Friday, Aug. 18. “I feel that all art is symbolic, and good art can convey both feelings and ideas,” says Spiceland. “What new meaning can these objects that we see every day take on when they are presented in the symbolic realm of the picture?” Abstract backgrounds connect the series. Some look like quilts. Others suggest mountain and cloud formations. Within a number of the paintings, silhouetted figures run, dance and lunge across the canvas. Many are aflame, while a few

THERE IS NO OTHER: “I hope that people appreciate my mashup of these various styles that I’ve been juggling into a cohesive body of work,” says Joshua Spiceland. “I feel like, as a whole, the pieces really have a certain punctuation and a rhyme to them.” Photo by Jack Pitfield are morphing into otherworldly creatures. In one instance, two figures merge into a single being. Often in the collection, the objects antagonize the human subject. In “Killing Time,” a pair of headless men hoist sledgehammers in the air, prepared to strike down a clock. Just as the objects offer symbolic interpretation, so do the people, both in their actions and depictions. “The figures themselves are mostly presented in silhouette, where there is no skin tone,” Spiceland explains. “When presented against a lit background, we are all quite similar.” That idea is part of the collection’s exploration of the shared human experience. The work, notes Spiceland, aims to depict the common needs, struggles and joys experienced across countries and continents. This point is further emphasized by the exhibit’s title. There Is No Other seeks to challenge the very concept of dissimilarity, which is often achieved by emphasizing differences of race, religion, gender and sexual orientation. These arbitrary distinctions, notes the artist, undermine the fact that “we’re all in this together, in a very real and metaphysical way.”

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“I feel like he has his own code that he’s speaking through,” says Push Gallery owner Rob Sebrell. In Sebrell’s opinion, this is one of the many joys of Spiceland’s work. Each painting requires an audience’s undivided attention. For those willing to take in the collection as a whole, there’s the promise of a greater understanding, Sebrell says. Spiceland echoes Sebrell’s point, describing his work as “modern hieroglyphics.” Along with the objects and figures, Spiceland employs color theory to convey certain moods and messages to his audience. “[Color theory] deals with the ability to push and pull the illusion that exists within the surface plane of the picture through three main aspects,” he says. Spiceland defines these elements as value (light vs. darkness), temperature (heat vs. cold) and intensity (saturation vs. dullness). “By manipulating those three aspects you can … create a very visceral sense,” he explains. It’s instinct that Spiceland seems most eager to summon through There Is No Other. “[Art] encourages a heightened sense of beauty, and it fosters, in the audience, a certain eye for cherishing life,” Spiceland says. “If an artist can show me something new

that I’ve never seen before, then that brightens my day and that heightens my own eye’s ability to dig into the amazing nature of existence.” The symbolic nature of art, Spiceland continues, allows viewers to reach this enhanced experience. “It transcends words. That’s the most amazing thing about [art],” he says. “It is international. It is beyond English or Japanese of any other isolated notion of limited language through instinctual appreciation of shape and composition. You can appreciate something that is difficult to say with words.”  X

WHAT There Is No Other instagram.com/joshuaspiceland WHERE Push Gallery 25 Patton Ave. WHEN Opening reception Friday, Aug. 18, 7-9 p.m. The exhibit will remain on view through Sunday, Oct. 8


T H E AT E R P R E V I E W by Tony Kiss | avlbeerguy@gmail.com

SHOWTIME When audiences arrive at Asheville Community Theatre to see the Mel Brooks musical comedy The Producers, they will experience much more than a big, Broadwaystyle hit show. The landmark downtown playhouse has been given a major overhaul, which includes such upgrades as new seating, an improved auditorium design, and better lighting and sound. Offstage, there are upgraded dressing rooms, fire alarms and a new roof on all three parts of the building, says ACT Executive Director Susan Harper. “Our facility is 44 years old and was significantly out of date,” she says. “Our technology was from another century. This was about bringing the theater into the 21st century, both in patron amenities and in technology.” The Friday, Aug. 18, reopening is a chance to show off the updates and christen the revamped performance space with The Producers. The show is directed by Jerry Crouch, who has led many musicals at ACT over the years, including Fiddler on the Roof, Oklahoma! and Kiss Me Kate. The storyline of The Producers follows a washed-up theatrical producer who conspires with a highstrung accountant to stage a certain flop to hide the financial irregularities from a previous production. The 1968 movie, written and directed by Brooks, starred Zero Mostel and Gene Wilder. A Broadway version starring Nathan Lane and Matthew Broderick opened in 2001 and won 12 Tony awards. There was also a 2005 movie based on that stage production. For the local show, Crouch has assembled a cast of 27, including 10 performers who are new to ACT. Zachary Landolt stars as Max, the greedy producer; Matthew Harper as Leo, the nervous accountant; and Alex Likens as Ulla, Max’s secretary. Crouch described The Producers as a natural for him to take on. “It has all the bells and whistles of a big musical comedy,” he says, adding that he was “very honored” to direct the first show in the reopened theater. Renovation planning launched in 2009, and theater representatives began working with fundraising consultants in 2015.

Renovated ACT reopens with ‘The Producers’

SCHEMES AND DREAMS: Zachary Landolt, left, and Matthew Harper star as the former “King of Broadway and his nervous accountant who conspire to stage the worst show ever in ’The Producers.’” The production launches Asheville Community Theatre’s new season and celebrates its post-renovation reopening. Photo courtesy Asheville Community Theatre The theater set a budget of $1.6 million and began fundraising in January 2016. But “we did not start the project until we had pledges to cover what we are calling phase one,” Harper says. The theater eventually raised $2,170,000. Donations came from generous arts patrons and the Buncombe County Tourism Development Authority, through the Tourism Product Development Fund, which provided a $1 million grant. “We were very humbled and thrilled by the response for our plans,” Harper says. Perhaps the biggest change the audience will see is the new seating in the redesigned auditorium. The old seats, which were well past their prime and had become “mushy,” have been replaced. The new seating is both comfortable and offers better back support — and includes cup holders for drinks from the concession stand, Harper says. Another big change is the addition of aisles that — although dropping capacity from 393 to 303 — will make it easier for patrons to reach their seats. In September, the theater will begin fundraising on phase two of the project, which includes a larger black box theater, an education space, improvements to the lobby and concession stand and a change in programming, Harper says. “Right now, we do three

musicals and three plays on the main stage. We will do five musicals on the main stage and six plays in the black box.” A date for phase two construction start has not been set, she says, because, “We want to show our donors that we completed phase one on time and on budget. Right now we have to get our stage back up and operational.” After all, the show must go on. For his part, Crouch is already thinking ahead to next season, when he will direct no-holds-barred comedies 9 to 5 and The Full Monty.  X

WHAT The Producers WHERE Asheville Community Theater 35 E. Walnut St. ashevilletheatre.org WHEN Friday, Aug. 18-Sunday, Sept. 10. Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m.; Sundays at 2:30 p.m.; Thursdays, Aug. 31 and Sept. 7 at 7:30 p.m. $15-$30

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SMART BETS

A&E

by Edwin Arnaudin | Send your arts news to ae@mountainx.com

Juniper Bends Reading Series

Hustle Souls This spring, Asheville-based soul, roots and funk band Hustle Souls released a series of live performance videos on Facebook. Filmed at the Snaggy Mountain artist retreat in Burnsville, the work caught the eyes and ears of studio whiz Eric “Mixerman” Sarafin, who invited the band to collaborate. Ben Harper’s go-to mixer since 1995’s Fight for Your Mind and the engineer for Barenaked Ladies’ 2003 album Everything to Everyone, Sarafin produced and mixed fellow local rockers The Broadcast’s Dodge the Arrow. Hustle Souls and Sarafin have recording sessions booked for October, and, on Friday, Aug. 18, the band will launch a Kickstarter campaign to cover production costs and studio time for the proposed 10-track album. The show, at Asheville Music Hall, starts at 10 p.m. with an opening set from The Freeway Revival. Free. ashevillemusichall.com. Photo by Libby Gamble

For eight years, organizers of the Juniper Bends Reading Series have curated quarterly presentations by established and emerging local authors. The fall lineup spotlights the work of writer, performer and creativity coach Nina Hart (Somewhere in a Town You Never Knew Existed Somewhere), digital content writer and awardwinning storyteller Mandy Gardner and actress-turnedscreenwriter and novelist Maggie Marshall (the forthcoming The Gondolier’s Wife). The trio will read long-form pieces (a change from typical Juniper Bends events) at the free event hosted by Downtown Books & News on Friday, Aug. 18, at 7 p.m. Wine is available by donation, and all three authors will be on hand afterward to sign books. dbnbooks.com. Photo of Hart courtesy of the author

David Troy Francis Pianist and composer David Troy Francis has had a prolific seven years as an Asheville resident. He’s played numerous local concerts and served as choral director of the Absolutely Amazing Deerfield Chorus. He’s seen BARK! The Musical — for which he wrote the music — staged by Asheville Community Theatre. His Modern American Music nonprofit project produced the contemporary opera Dead Man Walking at UNC Asheville and Western Carolina University and Passion of the Little Match Girl at N.C. Stage. Francis and his husband are moving to Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, in September, making his I’ll Remember April concert, on Brevard First United Methodist Church’s new 7-foot Steinway piano, his last local performance. The concert takes place Sunday, Aug. 20, at 4 p.m. Free. brevardfumc.org. Photo courtesy of Francis

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Best of Enemies Inspired by Osha Gray Davidson’s 1996 nonfiction book that chronicles the unlikely friendship between black activist Ann Atwater and C.P Ellis, grand cyclops of the Durham chapter of the Ku Klux Klan, Mark St. Germain’s play Best of Enemies is the latest selection by Different Strokes! Performing Arts Collective. In choosing the work nearly a year ago, managing artistic director Stephanie Hickling Beckman says she was drawn to “what these two angry, opposite people have to go through in order to find common ground and how relevant that is to the divisive times we’re going through in 2017.” Directed by Ashleigh Millet-Goff, the play’s cast features Sean David Robinson, Janet Oliver, Bjorn Goller and Molly Graves. Best of Enemies runs Thursday, Friday and Saturday evenings from Aug. 17 to Sept. 2 at BeBe Theatre. $18 in advance/$21 day of show. Advance tickets for opening weekend are $15. differentstrokespac.org. Photo by Lupé Perez


A&E CA LEN DA R

by Abigail Griffin

DOWNTOWN AFTER 5: With the blues running through his blood, Cedric Burnside has been playing music all his life and is widely regarded as one of the best drummers in the world. Burnside is headlining the Friday, Aug. 18, Downtown After 5 outdoor music event that takes place on North Lexington Avenue. The show has two local openers beginning at 5 p.m. The Stump Mutts are playing all original alternative rock, and Lyric brings her blend of pop, soul and funk. For more information, visit ashevilledowntown. org. Photo of Cedric Burnside courtesy of the Asheville Downtown Association (p. 41) ART THE ASHEVILLE DARKROOM 207 Coxe Ave. Suite 16, 828-572-3275, theashevilledarkroom. com • 3rd MONDAYS 6-8pm - "Darkroom basics," workshop. $10.

ART/CRAFT STROLLS & FAIRS ART HOP facebook.com/ artgallerytrailwnc1, artgallerytrailwnc1@ gmail.com • 3rd FRIDAYS, 4-7pm - Self-guided tours of 13 fine arts and crafts galleries in Historic Hendersonville and Flat Rock. Free to attend. Held at Art Gallery Trail WNC, S Main St, Hendersonville COME TO LEICESTER STUDIO TOUR cometoleicester.org • SA (8/19) & SU (8/20), 10am-6pm - Self-guided art tour of art studios in the Leicester community featuring paintings, iron work, wood work, textiles, pottery, jewelry, aroma therapy candles and brooms.

Maps available online or at Addison Farm's Vineyard. Free to attend. Held at Addison Farms Vineyard, 4005 New Leicester Highway, Leicester GROVEWOOD GALLERY 111 Grovewood Road, 828-253-7651, grovewood.com • SA (8/19), 11am-4pm Self-guided, art tours of studios at Grovewood Village. Free to attend. TRYON ARTS AND CRAFTS SCHOOL 373 Harmon Field Road, Tryon, 828-859-8323 • MO (8/21), 9am-5pm - Open house. Free to attend.

AUDITIONS & CALL TO ARTISTS ASHEVILLE GALLERY OF ART 82 Patton Ave., 828-2515796, ashevillegallery-of-art. com • WE (8/16), noon5:30pm - Submissions accepted for membership to the Asheville Gallery of Art. Bring membership applications and five original

pieces. Contact for full guidelines. ASHEVILLE YOUTH CHOIRS ashevilleyouthchoirs.org • TH (8/17), 4-7pm - Open auditions for the 2017-2018 season. Registration required. Held at First Baptist Church of Asheville, 5 Oak St. MAHEC 121 Hendersonville Road, 828-257-4400 • Through TU (9/5) - Visual art submissions accepted for MAHEC's ACEs Resilience Art Show. Information: Resilienceartshow@ gmail.com or sys.mahec. net/ce/aces2017.aspx.

MUSIC AFRICAN DRUM LESSONS AT SKINNY BEATS DRUM SHOP (PD.) Sundays 2pm, Wednesdays 6pm. Billy Zanski teaches a fun approach to connecting with your inner rhythm. Drop-ins welcome. Drums provided. $15/ class. (828) 768-2826. www.skinnybeatsdrums. com

ASHEVILLE DOWNTOWN ASSOCIATION 828-251-9973, ashevilledowntown.org • FR (8/18), 5pm "Downtown After 5," outdoor concert with Cedric Burnside, Lyric and The Stump Mutts. Free. Held at Downtown After 5, 100 Block N. Lexington Ave. (at Hiawassee St.) BREVARD FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 325 N. Broad St., Brevard, 828-883-9025 • SU (8/20), 4pm - "I'll Remember April," David Troy Francis piano concert. Free. BUNCOMBE COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARIES buncombecounty.org/ governing/depts/library • SA (8/19), 2pm "Jazz Hour," featuring live music by Wendy Jones, Rick Dillinger, Zack Page and Michael Jefry Stevens. Free. Held at Pack Memorial Library, 67 Haywood St. CHARLES GEORGE V.A. MEDICAL CENTER 1100 Tunnel Road • FR (8/18), 1pm - The United States Navy Band "Country Current" performance. Free.

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A &E CA LEN DA R CITY OF ASHEVILLE 828-251-1122, ashevillenc.gov • FRIDAYS, 6-10pm - Asheville outdoor drum circle. Free. Held at Pritchard Park, 4 College St. CITY OF MORGANTON MUNICIPAL AUDITORIUM 401 South College St. Morganton, 828-433-SHOW, commaonline.org • SA (8/19), 7pm - Sarah Tucker concert, folk/rock. $10/$8 seniors & youth. HENDERSON COUNTY DEMOCRATIC PARTY 905 S. Greenville Highway, Hendersonville, 828-692-6424, myhcdp.com • 2nd & 4th WEDNESDAYS, 7pm - "Strings and Things," folk pop music jam. Free. MUSIC AT MARS HILL mhu.edu • TH (8/24), 7:30pm - Faculty duo recital featuring Dr. Alan Theisen (saxophone) and Professor Misty Theisen (flute),. Free. Held in the Broyhill Chapel, 100 Athletic St., Mars Hill MUSIC ON MAIN 828-693-9708, historichendersonville.org • FR (8/18), 7pm - Outdoor live music event featuring Flashback – The Party Band. Free. Held at Hendersonville Visitor Center, 201 S. Main St., Hendersonville PICKIN’ IN THE PARK cantonnc.com • FRIDAYS through (8/25) Outdoor bluegrass concert with clogging. Free. Held at Canton Recreational Park, Penland St., Canton RHYTHM & BREWS CONCERT SERIES 828-233-3216, facebook.com/ rhythmandbrewshendersonville • TH (8/17), 5-9pm - Outdoor concert featuring Come Back Alice, Southern gypsy funk. Free. Held at South Main Street, 301 S. Main St., Hendersonville

by Abigail Griffin SHINDIG ON THE GREEN 828-258-6101, x345, folkheritage.org • SATURDAYS through (9/2) Outdoor old-timey and folk music jam sessions and concert. Free. Held at Pack Square Park, 121 College St. SMOKY MOUNTAINS SONGWRITERS FESTIVAL smswf.com • WE (8/16) through SU (8/20) - Songwriters’ festival with workshops, concerts and presentations. See website for full schedule, locations and costs. SUMMER TRACKS CONCERT SERIES 828-290-4316, summertracks.com • FR (8/18), 7pm - Seth Walker, blues/swing concert. Free. Held at Rogers Park, 55 W. Howard St., Tryon WNC HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION wnchistory.org • SA (8/19), 1-3pm - "Jamming at the Museum," open jam for oldtime musicians of all skill levels. Free. Held at Smith-McDowell House Museum, 283 Victoria Road

THEATER ASHEVILLE COMMUNITY THEATRE 35 E. Walnut St., 828-254-1320, ashevilletheatre.org • FRIDAYS through SUNDAYS (8/18) until (9/10) & THURSDAYS (8/31) & (9/7) - The Producers, musical. Fri. & Sat.: 7:30pm. Sun.: 2:30pm. Thurs.: 7:30pm. $15$30/$100 opening night. BREVARD LITTLE THEATRE 55 E. Jordan St., Brevard, 828-884-2587, TheBrevardLittleTheatre.org • FRIDAYS through SUNDAYS until (8/27) - Rainmaker. Fri. & Sat.: 7:30pm. Sun.: 3pm. $18/$12 student/$6 children.

2017

needs

Business Partners 42

AUG. 16 - 22, 2017

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FLAT ROCK PLAYHOUSE 2661 Highway 225, Flat Rock, 828-693-0731, flatrockplayhouse.org • WEDNESDAYS through SUNDAYS until (8/20) - Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, musical. Wed. & Thurs.: 7:30pm. Fri. & Sat.: 8pm. Wed., Thurs., Sat. & Sun.: 2pm. $15 and up. MONTFORD PARK PLAYERS 828-254-5146, montfordparkplayers.org • FRIDAYS through SUNDAYS until (9/2), 7:30pm - Peter Pan. Free. Held at Hazel Robinson Amphitheatre, 92 Gay St. PARKWAY PLAYHOUSE 13 Green Mountain Drive, Burnsville, 828-682-4285, parkwayplayhouse.com • FRIDAYS through SUNDAYS until ( 8/19) - Footloose. Fri. & Sat.: 7:30pm. Sun.: 3pm. $22/$20 seniors, students & military/$12 for children. THE AUTUMN PLAYERS 828-686-1380, www,ashevilletheatre.org, caroldec25@gmail.com • FR (8/18) & SA (8/19), 2:30pm - The Hollow, classic murder mystery. $6. Held at 35below, 35 E. Walnut St. • SU (8/20), 2:30pm - The Hollow, classic murder mystery. $6. Held at UNC-Asheville Reuter Center, 1 Campus View Road THE MAGNETIC THEATRE 375 Depot St., 279-4155 • THURSDAYS through SUNDAYS until (8/19) - Six Knots, comedy/ drama. 7:30pm. $10-16. TRYON FINE ARTS CENTER 34 Melrose Ave., Tryon, 828- 8598322, tryonarts.org • TU (8/22), 7pm - Stage Door Series: Dark Horse Theater presents four short plays. Admission by donation.

Contact givelocal@mountainx.com to get involved


GALLERY DIRECTORY AMERICAN FOLK ART AND FRAMING 64 Biltmore Ave., 828-2812134, amerifolk.com • Through WE (8/23) - 2017 Coming Home, group exhibition of folk art.

SEVEN SISTERS GALLERY 117 Cherry St., Black Mountain, 828-669-5107, sevensistersgallery.com • Through SU (10/29) Exhibtion of oil paintings by Joyce Shlapkohl.

ART AT UNCA art.unca.edu • Through SA (9/9) - The Holocaust-Era Gross-Breesen Farm for Jewish Youth, multimedia exhibition. Reception: Saturday, Sept. 9, 3-5pm. Held at UNC Asheville - Ramsey Library, 1 University Heights

TANDEM GALLERY 20 North Mitchell St., Bakersville • Through TH (8/31) - Exhibition of ceramic art by Noel Bailey. THE HAEN GALLERY 52 Biltmore Ave., 828-254-8577, thehaengallery.com • Through TH (8/31) - A Summer Configuration, exhibition with works by Joyce Garner, Ursula Gullow and Tim Anderson.

ART AT WCU 828-227-2787, bardoartscenter.wcu.edu • MO (8/21) through FR (12/8) - Return from Exile: Contemporary Southeastern Indian Art, exhibition. Reception: Friday, Nov. 10, 5-7pm. Held at The WCU Bardo Fine Arts Center, 199 Centennial Drive ARTS COUNCIL OF HENDERSON COUNTY 828-693-8504, acofhc.org • Through FR (8/18) - Bring Us Your Best, juried all-media art exhibition. Held at Blue Ridge Community College, 180 West Campus Drive, Flat Rock ASHEVILLE ART MUSEUM ON THE SLOPE 175 Biltmore Ave., ashevilleart.org • Through SU (9/17) - Home Land, exhibition of the art of southeastern Native Americans. ASHEVILLE GALLERY OF ART 82 Patton Ave., 828-251-5796, ashevillegallery-of-art.com • Through TH (8/31) - True Colors, paintings of Anne Bonnyman and Jane Snyder. BLACK MOUNTAIN CENTER FOR THE ARTS 225 W. State St., Black Mountain, 828-669-0930, blackmountainarts.org • Through FR (9/1) - Sibling Artistry, photos and fiber art of sisters Joye Ardyn Durham and Jan Durham. CALDWELL ARTS COUNCIL 601 College Ave SW, Lenoir, 828-754-2486 • Through SA (9/30) - Modern Traditions, group exhibition of furniture, paintings and photography.

TRACEY MORGAN GALLERY 188 Coxe Ave, TraceyMorganGallery.com • Through SA (9/24) Transplants, group exhibition featuring painting, photography, and sculptural installation.

‘RETURN FROM EXILE’: The Western Carolina University Fine Art Museum’s newest exhibition focuses on contemporary artists from tribal nations with a historical connection to the southeastern U.S. Return from Exile: Contemporary Southeastern Indian Art, a national traveling exhibition, features more than 30 contemporary Southeastern Native American artists working in a variety of mediums. Works include paintings, drawings, printmaking, basketry, sculpture and pottery. The exhibition opens Monday, Aug. 21, and runs through Friday, Dec. 8, with an all-day symposium and reception to be held Friday, Nov. 10. For more information, visit bardoartscenter.wcu.edu. Petition by Joseph Erb, courtesy of the WCU John W. Bardo Fine and Performing Arts Center. FLOOD GALLERY FINE ART CENTER 2160 US Highway 70, Swannanoa, 828-273-3332, floodgallery.org/ • Through SA (9/16) Repurposed Found & Pirated Altered Art, exhibition of repurposed and altered collages by Tom Johanson.

HABITAT TAVERN & COMMONS 174 Broadway St. Asheville, habitatbrewing.com • Through TH (8/31) Exhibition of works by Victor Palomino.

GALLERY 1 604 W. Main St., Sylva • Through TH (8/24) - Smoky Mountain Showcase, exhibition of works from 18 artists from Jackson and Swain counties. GREEN SAGE CAFE SOUTH 1800 Hendersonville Road • Through SU (10/1) - Beloved Bears, photography exhibit.

Mountain Xpress Presents

MORA CONTEMPORARY JEWELRY 9 Walnut St., 828-575-2294, moracollection.com • Through TH (8/31) Exhibition of the jewelry of Emily Rogstad. ODYSSEY COOPERATIVE ART GALLERY 238 Clingman Ave., 828-2859700, facebook.com/ odysseycoopgallery • Through TH (8/31) Exhibition of ceramic art by

HIGHLAND BREWING CO. AT

AUG. 17 * 5–9PM

FEATURING X AWARD WINNING BANDS, RADIO, FOOD TRUCKS, ICE CREAM, ENTERTAINMENT, T! & SPECIAL E VEN BREWS

FRE E

Trish Salmon, Denise Baker and other gallery members. PENLAND SCHOOL OF CRAFTS 67 Doras Trail Bakersville, 828765-2359, penland.org • Through (9/17) - Parched | Inverted Landscapes, exhibition of work by Susan Goethel Campbell. PINK DOG CREATIVE 348 Depot St., pinkdog-creative.com • FR (8/18) through SA (9/30) Impossible Interior Babel, exhibition of paintings by Jeremy Phillips. Reception: Friday, Aug. 18, 6-9pm. POSANA CAFE 1 Biltmore Ave., 828-505-3969

• Through TH (8/31) - CLOUDS, group art show on the theme of climate change. PUBLIC EVENTS AT A-B TECH 828-398-7900, abtech.edu • Through TU (9/5) - Exhibition of Ann Vasilik watercolors. Held at A-B Tech Conference Center, 16 Fernihurst Drive RURAL HERITAGE MUSEUM AT MARS HILL 100 Athletic St., Mars Hill, 828689-1304 • SA (8/19) through SU (3/4) - The Civil War In the Southern Highlands: A Human Perspective, multi-media exhibition showing original letters and newly-discovered documents.

TRANSYLVANIA COMMUNITY ARTS COUNCIL 349 S. Caldwell St., Brevard, 828-884-2787, tcarts.org • WE (8/16) through FR (9/15) - Through the Needle’s Eye 2017, The Embroiderers' Guild of America national touring exhibition. WOOLWORTH WALK 25 Haywood St., 828-254-9234 • Through WE (8/30) - Julie Calhoun-Roepnack + Paul Moberg, exhibition of ceramic and mixed media. YANCEY COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 321 School Circle Burnsville, 828-682-2600 • Through SA (9/9) - BRAGging Rights, Blue Ridge Fine Arts Guild exhibition. ZAPOW! 150 Coxe Ave., Suite 101, 828575-2024, zapow.net • Through SA (9/2) - Attack of the Cult Movies, group exhibition. Contact the galleries for admission hours and fees

EMPYREAN ARTS Pole, Aerial & More! FIRST CLASS FOR NEW STUDENTS $15 4 classes $50 | 8 classes $100 12 classes $150 | 16 classes $175

• each option comes with 2 open studio sessions • purchase one month at a time or set up auto renewal every 30 days (no contracts) • family members can share a subscription

32 Banks Ave #108 • Downtown Asheville

EmpyreanArts.org 782.3321

MOUNTAINX.COM

AUG. 16 - 22, 2017

43


CLUBLAND

COMING SOON wed 8/16

Private event

thu 8/17 7-9PM–Music on the Patio (free)

7PM–native harroW &

ian fitzgeraLD

8/16: T RIVIA! 7-9 PM 8/17: $1 O FF F ULL P OURS A PP. C HIC F OOD 8/20: S TOCK U P FOR THE E CLIPSE!

8:30PM–aLive, WiLLie, & abLe:

a LocaL tribute to WiLLie neLson fri 8/18

7PM–taYLor Martin banD

anD YeLLoW

COMING SOON: 8/26: N IKKI T ALLEY ! 8-10 PM F REE 8/27: F LOW Y OGA + C IDER 12:30 PM

6:30-9PM–friDaYs on the LaWn:

toM Waits 4 no Man W/ stevie Lee coMbs sat 8/19 7:00PM–takenobu sun 8/20

5:30PM–an evening of Music & Laughs:

sarah cLanton & DanieLLe ate the sanDWich

7:30PM–WiLson’s hot string banD tue 8/22 7:30PM–tuesDaY bLuegrass sessions wed 8/23 5-9PM–aLL You can eat snoW crab Legs 6:30-9PM–Music on the Patio (free)

7:00PM–the tiM griMM banD thu 8/24 7-9PM–Music on the Patio (free) 7:00PM–the DanberrYs 9:00PM–triPtYch souL &

brother oLiver

fri 8/25 6:30-9PM- isis LaWn series: PurPLe 7PM–annie seLLick jazz quartet 9:00PM–jackie venson sat 8/26 7PM– MichaeL reno harreLL 9PM–fouL Mouth jerk aLbuM reLease ISISASHEVILLE.COM DINNER MENU TIL 9:30PM LATE NIGHT MENU TIL 12AM

TUES-SUN 5PM-until 743 HAYWOOD RD 828-575-2737

44

AUG. 16 - 22, 2017

MOUNTAINX.COM

HOMEGROWN HARMONIES: From busking on the streets of Asheville to sharing the stage with the likes of the Blind Boys of Alabama & Bettye Lavette, local rockers Andrew Scotchie & The River Rats have honed their ardent blend of blues and rock into a rousing live experience that continues to captivate audiences around WNC and the southeast. Catch Scotchie and the River Rivers when they roll into Brevard’s 185 King Street on Friday, Aug. 18 for a 8 p.m. show. Photo courtesy of 185 King Street. WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 16 185 KING STREET Vinyl Night, 6:00PM 5 WALNUT WINE BAR Les Amis (African folk), 8:00PM 550 TAVERN & GRILLE Karaoke, 8:00PM ASHEVILLE GUITAR BAR Hank Bones or Kon Tiki, 7:30PM

BARLEY'S TAPROOM & PIZZERIA Dr. Brown's Team Trivia, 8:30PM BEN'S TUNE-UP Pierce Edens (blues, Appalachian folk), 7:00PM BLUE MOUNTAIN PIZZA & BREW PUB Open Mic w/ Billy Owens, 7:00PM BURGER BAR Double Trouble Karaoke w/ Dee & Quinn, 12:00AM

CORK & KEG 3 Cool Cats (vintage rock 'n' roll), 7:30PM CREPE BOURREE Gypsy Duets, 7:00PM CROW & QUILL Vaden Landers (blues, oldtime, country), 9:00PM DOUBLE CROWN Western Wednesday w/ Bryan Marshall & His Payday Knights (classic country covers), 8:00PM Classic Country Vinyl w/ DJ David Wayne Gay, 10:00PM

GOOD STUFF Jim Hampton & friends perform "Eclectic Country" (jam), 7:00PM HIGHLAND BREWING COMPANY Woody Wood Wednesdays (rock, soul, funk), 5:30PM JACK OF THE WOOD PUB Old-time session, 5:00PM LAZY DIAMOND Killer Karaoke w/ KJ Tim O, 10:00PM LOBSTER TRAP Cigar Brothers, 6:30PM


OPEN MIC

WILD WING CAFE Jason Whittaker (acoustic), 7:00PM

PULP Slumber Drones w/ Strange Avenues & Lefty, 9:00PM POST 25 Albi & The Lifters (American swing, French chanson), 7:00PM POUR TAPROOM Music Bingo!, 7:00PM SALVAGE STATION RnB Wednesday Jam Night w/ Ryan RnB Barber & friends , 8:00PM SANCTUARY BREWING COMPANY Brother Bluebird, 5:00PM Film screening: Racing Extinction w/ Leilani Münter, 6:00PM THE BLOCK OFF BILTMORE Forest School Foundation fundraiser, 5:00PM Indivisible Asheville, 5:30PM THE MOTHLIGHT Acid Cult: A live techno party w/ Black Box Theory, Lommol, Annelise Kopp & Alex Brown, 9:30PM TIMO'S HOUSE Open Mic Hip-Hop w/ JJ Smash & Genetix, 9:00PM

WILD WING CAFE SOUTH J Luke (acoustic), 6:30PM

THURSDAY, AUGUST 17

THU FRI

ONE WORLD BREWING Billy Litz (multi-instrumentalist), 9:00PM

SAT

WHITE HORSE BLACK MOUNTAIN The Asheville Art Trio (jazz), 7:30PM

SUN

ONE STOP AT ASHEVILLE MUSIC HALL Evil Note Lab, 10:00PM

TUE

UPCOUNTRY BREWING COMPANY Asheville Girls Pint Out , 6:00PM

Historic Live Music Venue Located At

185 CLINGMAN AVE • ASHEVILLE

WED

ODDITORIUM Crooked Ghost w/ Shaken Nature, Never Getting Famous & Orange Doors (rock), 9:00PM

NIGHT EVERY MONDAY 7PM

TRESSA'S DOWNTOWN JAZZ AND BLUES Invitational Blues & Soul Performance (blues, soul), 9:00PM

THU

MG ROAD Salsa Night w/ DJ Mexicano Isaac, 7:00PM

5 WALNUT WINE BAR Pleasure Chest (blues, rock, soul), 8:00PM

8/17 THE WILD REEDS

w/ Alexa Rose

CALEB GILBERT + GREG PAYNE TAQUERIA 8/18 AND THE PIEDMONT BOYS OPEN AT 11AM DAILY CULTURE FEATURING KENYATTA HILL: HARVEST RECORDS + 8/19 40TH ANNIVERSARY TOUR THEGREYEAGLE.COM COMING SOON 8/20 MARTHA SCANLAN 8/22 TYLER HILTON

this week only

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT

w/ Chalwa

AN EVENING WITH

w/ Christina Holmes

8/23 8/24 DR. DYNAMITE

STRANGE AVENUES ASHEVILLE ALBUM RELEASE SHOW w/ Fashion Bath, Slumber Drones w/ Cult of Kings

Thursday • Aug 17th

8/25: RBTS Win (LP Release Show) w/ Marley Carroll, Erick Lottary, DJ Kutzu

Mountain Xpress Best of WNC Party! 5-10pm

8/26: Deep River (10th Anniversary Show): Benefiting Asheville Humane Society

Friday • Aug 18th Radical Departure Northeast IPA Brewery Only Can Release, 12-10pm

8/27: Zuzu Welsh Band + 28 Pages 8/29: Hardcastle, Estuarie, The Wormholes

Friday • Aug 25th POW! Triple IPA Release 12-10pm

ALTAMONT THEATRE Somewhat Petty (Tom Petty tribute), 8:00PM

eVery week

ASHEVILLE GUITAR BAR Will Ray & The Space Cooties, 7:30PM

Thursdays: Roots & Friends Open Jam:

BARLEY'S TAPROOM & PIZZERIA Alien Music Club, 9:00PM Alien Music Club (live jazz), 9:00PM

6:30-9:00pm

extended hours Monday-Thursday 3-9pm Friday-Saturday 12-10pm Sunday 12-6pm

BEN'S TUNE-UP Savannah Smith & The Southern Soul (country, roots, soul), 8:00PM BLACK MOUNTAIN ALE HOUSE Bluegrass Jam w/ The Big Deal Band, 8:00PM

12 Old Charlotte Hwy. Suite 200 Asheville, NC 28803 828-299-3370

BLUE MOUNTAIN PIZZA & BREW PUB Ionize, 7:00PM BYWATER Well Lit Strangers, 6:00PM

highlandbrewing.com

THIS WEEK AT ASHEVILLE MUSIC HALL

THIS WEEK AT THE ONE STOP:

THU 8/17 10pm Funk You [Progressive Funk/Rock] FRI 8/19 10pm Sexual Thunder! [High-Energy Psychedelic] SAT 8/20 10am Bluegrass Brunch w/ Chicken Coop Willeye, Bald Mountain Boys and Woody Wood ft Sufi Brothers UPCOMING SHOWS - ASHEVILLE MUSIC HALL:

8/25 9/1

HUSTLE SOULS

with The Freeway Revival FRI 8/18 – 9 pm – Suggested $5 Donation

SATURDAY DANCE PARTY with DJ AVX

SAT 8/19 – 10 pm – Suggested $5 Donation

9/2 9/8

The Broomstix BEAT LIFE: Mobley, Professor Toon, Raj Mahal & Vietnam Jerry Lose Yourself to Dance w/ DJ Marley Carroll Cabinet

Tickets available at ashevillemusichall.com @avlmusichall MOUNTAINX.COM

@onestopasheville AUG. 16 - 22, 2017

45


C LUBLAND

TAVERN

CREEKSIDE TAPHOUSE Reggae Thursdays w/ Station Underground (reggae, rock, jam), 8:00PM

Downtown on the Park Eclectic Menu • Over 30 Taps • Patio 14 TV’s • Sports Room • 110” Projector Event Space • Shuffleboard Open 7 Days 11am - Late Night

day Af Sun al Fu ternoon Tunes with nction i c o U pm AS nplugged – 4:30

THU. 8/17 Jeff Anders & Jordan Okrend (acoustic rock)

FRI. 8/18

Where The Blue Ridge Mountains Meet the Celtic Isles

MONDAYS Quizzo – Brainy Trivia • 7:30pm Open Mic Night • 9pm

DJ MoTo

(dance hits, pop)

SAT. 8/19 Flashback

WEDNESDAYS Asheville’s Original Old Time Mountain Music Jam • 5pm

(classic hits)

20 S. Spruce St. • 225.6944 packStavern.com

THURSDAYS Mountain Feist • 7pm Bluegrass Jam • 9:30pm Bourbon Specials

WOBBLERS SAT THE UNIQUE ROOTS BAND 8/19 9PM / $5 WESTERN SWING TUE w/ TEXAS T & THE 8/22 TUMBLEWEEDS 7 PM / FREE

BUFFALOES FRI FLYING HONKY TONK / ROCK & ROLL 8/25 9PM / $5 SHANE PRUITT BAND SAT GOSPEL, 8/26 9PM / $5BLUES, ROCK & ROLL IRISH SUNDAYS Irish Food and Drink Specials Traditional Irish Music Session • 3-9pm OPEN MON-THURS AT 3 • FRI-SUN AT NOON CRAFT BEER, SPIRITS & QUALITY PUB FARE SINCE 1996

95 PATTON at COXE • Downtown Asheville

252.5445 • jackofthewood.com

46

AUG. 16 - 22, 2017

MOUNTAINX.COM

CROW & QUILL Carolina Catskins (ragtime, jazz), 9:00PM DARK CITY DELI The Fairview Flyers, 5:00PM DOUBLE CROWN Sonic Satan Stew w/ DJ Alien Brain, 10:00PM FOGGY MOUNTAIN BREWPUB Jamie Saylor Band (folk, Americana), 9:00PM FRENCH BROAD BREWERY Community Center (orchestral rock), 6:00PM GREY EAGLE MUSIC HALL & TAVERN Breadfoot (country), 6:00PM The Wild Reeds w/ Alexa Rose (indie, folk), 9:00PM HIGHLAND BREWING COMPANY Mountain Xpress "Best of WNC" Party, 3:00PM East Side Social Ride, 6:00PM Roots & friends open jam (blues, rock, roots), 7:00PM ISIS MUSIC HALL & KITCHEN 743 Native Harrow & Ian Fitzgerald , 7:00PM Alive, Willie, and Able: a local tribute to Willie Nelson , 8:30PM

PACK'S TAVERN Jeff Anders & Jordan Okrend (acoustic rock), 8:00PM PISGAH BREWING COMPANY The Appalucians (early show), 4:00PM Kick The Robot, 8:00PM POUR TAPROOM Tunes at the Taps w/ Cornbred, 7:00PM PURPLE ONION CAFE Darlyne Cain, 7:30PM SANCTUARY BREWING COMPANY Billy Litz (soul, roots), 7:00PM SWEETEN CREEK BREWING Vinyl Night, 6:30PM THE AC LOUNGE The AC Lounge w/ Jordan Okrend, 8:00PM THE BLOCK OFF BILTMORE 'Racing Extinction' Documentary w/ Leilani Munter, 6:00PM Jay Brown (folk, roots, blues) , 8:30PM Service Industry Night, 11:00PM THE FAIRVIEW TAVERN Live Band Karaoke & Open Jam w/ Old School, 9:00PM THE MOTHLIGHT The Moth: True Stories Told Live (theme: "caution"), 7:00PM

JACK OF THE WOOD PUB Bluegrass Open Jam Session, 7:00PM

TIMO'S HOUSE Steady Reppin' (Benefit for Planned Parenthood), 8:00PM

LAZY DIAMOND Heavy Night w/ DJ Butch, 10:00PM

TOWN PUMP John Dickie, 9:00PM

LOBSTER TRAP Hank Bones, 6:30PM ODDITORIUM William Methany w/ Minorcan & Daydream Creatures (indie), 9:00PM ONE STOP AT ASHEVILLE MUSIC HALL Mitch's Totally Rad Trivia, 6:30PM Funk You (progressive funk, rock), 10:00PM ONE WORLD BREWING The Bluebirds (bluegrass), 9:00PM

TRESSA'S DOWNTOWN JAZZ AND BLUES Jesse Barry & The Jam (live music, dance), 9:00PM UPCOUNTRY BREWING COMPANY Anya Hinkle (bluegrass), 9:00PM WEDGE BREWING CO. Pint night w/ Elk In WNC, 6:00PM WILD WING CAFE Hunter Griggs (Acoustic), 9:00PM

OSKAR BLUES BREWERY H.R. Gertner (Americana), 6:00PM

WILD WING CAFE SOUTH Izzi Hughes (acoustic), 6:00PM

PULP Slice of Life Comedy Open Mic w/ Grayson Morris, 9:00PM

WXYZ LOUNGE AT ALOFT HOTEL WXYZ unplugged w/ Sarah Tucker, 8:00PM


FRIDAY, AUGUST 18 185 KING STREET Andrew Scotchie & The River Rats (rock, fusion), 8:00PM 5 WALNUT WINE BAR What It Is (funk, jazz, blues), 9:00PM 550 TAVERN & GRILLE Chicken Coop Willaye Trio (Appalachian roots), 9:00PM ALTAMONT THEATRE Nicole Atkins w/ Thayer Serrano (rock, soul, country), 8:00PM ASHEVILLE GUITAR BAR Jody Carroll, 7:30PM ASHEVILLE MUSIC HALL Hustle Souls w/ The Freeway Revival (rock, soul), 9:00PM BEN'S TUNE-UP Live Mashup w/ Iggy Radio, 6:00PM DJ Kilby (vinyl set), 10:00PM BLUE MOUNTAIN PIZZA & BREW PUB Acoustic Swing, 7:00PM BOILER ROOM Rebirth (EDM), 10:00PM BURGER BAR Burger Bar Bike Night, 12:00AM CORK & KEG Megan & Her Goody Goodies (vintage jazz), 8:30PM DOUBLE CROWN Rock & Soul Obscurities w/ DJ Greg Cartwright, 10:00PM DOWNTOWN AFTER 5 Cedric Burnside w/ Lyric & The Stump Mutts, 5:00PM FLOOD GALLERY FINE ART CENTER Classic World Cinema, 8:00PM FOGGY MOUNTAIN BREWPUB Calvin Get Down (funk), 10:00PM FRENCH BROAD BREWERY Nikki Talley (country, folk), 6:00PM FRENCH BROAD OUTFITTERS HOMINY CREEK The Dirty Dead (Grateful Dead tribute), 8:00PM GOOD STUFF Breadfoot & JC Tokes (one-man-band extravaganza), 8:30PM

GREY EAGLE MUSIC HALL & TAVERN Caleb Gilbert w/ Greg Payne & The Piedmont Boys, 9:00PM HABITAT TAVERN & COMMONS WORD! w/ David Joe Miller, Sheila Arnold Jones & Adam Booth, 7:00PM HIGHLAND BREWING COMPANY Radical Departure release w/ Bad Weather States (Southern rock), 7:00PM ISIS MUSIC HALL & KITCHEN 743 Tom Waits 4 No Man w/ Stevie Lee Combs, 6:30PM Taylor Martin Band & Yellow Feathers , 7:00PM JACK OF THE WOOD PUB Dreamcatcher Bluegrass Band, 9:00PM LAZOOM BUS TOURS Krekel & Whoa, 1:30PM LAZY DIAMOND Rotating rpm rock 'n' soul DJ, 10:00PM LOBSTER TRAP Rob Parks & friends, 6:30PM MOE'S ORIGINAL BBQ WOODFIN Bald Mountain Boys, 6:30PM

Featuring

Largest Selection of Craft Beer on Tap • 8 Wines Low Light Mondays: Soft lighting & Live Music every week

Music Bingo every Wednesday - 7pm

Tunes at the Taps: Live Music Every Thursday!

8/16: Fhiit Life Barre to Bar Music Bingo: 7-9pm 8/17: $4 Cigar City Beers! Tunes at the Taps w/ Cornbred (blues) 8/21: Low Light Mondays w/ live music by Hope Griffin 7-9pm 8/24: Meals on Wheels Fundraiser 5-9pm Tunes at the Taps w/ Jordan Okrend 7pm

On Tap! 2 Hendersonville Road P o u r Ta p R o o m . c o m Monday - Thursday 2pm-10pm Fri. & Sat. 12pm-12am • Sunday 2-10pm

NEW MOUNTAIN THEATER/ AMPHITHEATER Roots of a Rebellion w/ PMA (reggae), 9:00PM ODDITORIUM Beasts of the South East: Summer Slam (metal), 8:00PM ONE STOP AT ASHEVILLE MUSIC HALL Free Dead Fridays w/ members of Phuncle Sam, 5:00PM ONE WORLD BREWING Naked Scholar (funk), 9:00PM ORANGE PEEL Trial By Fire (Journey tribute), 9:00PM PACK'S TAVERN DJ MoTo (dance hits, pop), 9:30PM PISGAH BREWING COMPANY Dark Star Orchestra (Night 1), 6:00PM SALVAGE STATION Cash Unchained: The Music of Johnny Cash, 9:00PM SANCTUARY BREWING COMPANY Strange Avenues, 8:00PM THE AC LOUNGE The AC Lounge w/ DJ Malinalli, 8:00PM

MOUNTAINX.COM

AUG. 16 - 22, 2017

47


CLU B LA N D

8/16 wed acid cult: a live techno party

w/ black box theory, lommol, annelise kopp (dj lil meow meow), alex brown

8/17 thu 8/18

the moth:

true stories told live theme: caution

aunt sis

fri

free!

w/ wizardskin, heatwarmer, cyboman

8/19

sat

lucy dacus

dina maccabee

THE BILTMORE ESTATE Newsboys w/ Mandisa, 7:30PM THE GREENHOUSE MOTO CAFE Pre-Wedding Party w/ Good Directions Band, 8:00PM THE MOTHLIGHT Aunt Sis w/ Wizardskin, Heatwarmer & Cyboman (Americana, indie, rock), 9:30PM TIMO'S HOUSE Funky Friday w/ DJ Drew & Franco Niño, 8:00PM TOWN PUMP Community Center, 9:00PM

w/ molly burch

8/21 mon

THE BLOCK OFF BILTMORE Unite! Open Mic Night, 7:00PM Late Night Party w/ DJ Kent Scott, 11:00PM

free!

w/ janel leppin, alec sturgis

Yoga at the Mothlight

Tuesdays and Thursdays- 11:30am Details for all shows can be found at

themothlight.com

Free Live Music THU - 8/17 • 6:30PM ANYA HINKLE (BLUEGRASS)

FRI - 8/18 • 9PM PURPLE (FUNK)

SAT - 8/19 • 9PM FRANKLINS KITE (ROCK/FOLK)

TRESSA'S DOWNTOWN JAZZ AND BLUES The King Zeros (blues), 7:00PM Jesse Barry & The Jam (live music, dance), 10:00PM WHITE HORSE BLACK MOUNTAIN The Riccardis (musical parody & satire), 8:00PM WILD WING CAFE Shake It Like A Caveman, 9:00PM WILD WING CAFE SOUTH A Social Function (acoustic), 9:00PM WXYZ LOUNGE AT ALOFT HOTEL WXYZ electric w/ DJ Phantom Pantone, 8:00PM

SATURDAY, AUGUST 19 185 KING STREET The Fishsticks Solar Eclipse Party (funk, jam), 8:00PM 5 WALNUT WINE BAR Shake It Like a Caveman (rock n' roll), 9:00PM 550 TAVERN & GRILLE Elusive Groove, 9:00PM ALTAMONT THEATRE An Evening of Improv Comedy w/ Reasonably Priced Babies, 8:00PM ASHEVILLE MUSIC HALL Saturday Summertime Dance Party w/ DJ Avx, 10:00PM BEN'S TUNE-UP Gypsy Jam, 3:00PM Rhoda Weaver, 9:00PM

OPEN DAILY 11:30AM UNTIL MIDNIGHT 1042 HAYWOOD RD. ASHEVILLE, NC 28806

828.575.2400 UPCOUNTRYBREWING.COM

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AUG. 16 - 22, 2017

MOUNTAINX.COM

#headupcountry

BLACK MOUNTAIN ALE HOUSE Dave Dribbon (Americana, rock), 7:30PM

BLACK MOUNTAIN TAILGATE MARKET The Fairview Flyers, 9:00AM

MG ROAD Late Night Dance Parties w/ DJ Lil Meow Meow , 10:00PM

THE SUMMIT AT NEW MOUNTAIN AVL 30 & Up Casual and Sexy w/ DJ Twan, 10:00PM

BLUE MOUNTAIN PIZZA & BREW PUB Larry Dolamore (acoustic), 7:00PM

NATIVE KITCHEN & SOCIAL PUB Native Yard Sale, 9:00AM

TIMO'S HOUSE Summer House Sessions, 9:00PM

NEW MOUNTAIN THEATER/ AMPHITHEATER Rick & Morty's Rave Adventures, 9:00PM

TOWN PUMP Jimmy & The Jawbones, 9:00PM

BOILER ROOM Dance Party & Drag Show, 10:00PM BURGER BAR AshevilleFM DJ Night, 12:00AM CITY OF MORGANTON MUNICIPAL AUDITORIUM Sarah Tucker, 7:00PM CONUNDRUM SPEAKEASY & INTRIQUE LOUNGE Sedection Speakeasy Presents Burlesque!, 7:00PM Zelda Holiday Burlesque w/ Speakeasy Seduction, 7:00PM Burlesque!, 8:00PM CORK & KEG Zydeco Ya Ya (two-steps, waltzes), 8:30PM CROW & QUILL Sirius B (Gypsy folk, world music, rock), 9:00PM DOUBLE CROWN Pitter Platter, 50s/60s R&B + RnR w/ DJ Big Smidge , 10:00PM FOGGY MOUNTAIN BREWPUB Simon George & Friends (funk, jazz), 10:00PM FRENCH BROAD BREWERY Skylarks (indie, rock), 6:00PM FROG LEVEL BREWERY Bend & Brew, 11:00AM GINGER'S REVENGE 1st Annual Brewer's Bash, 6:00PM GOOD STUFF Papa "Vay" Vaden Landers (old-time, country, roots), 8:30PM GREY EAGLE MUSIC HALL & TAVERN Culture w/ Kenyatta Hill & Chalwa (reggae), 9:00PM HIGHLAND BREWING COMPANY Letters To Abigail (Americana, country, bluegrass), 7:00PM ISIS MUSIC HALL & KITCHEN 743 Takenobu, 7:00PM JACK OF THE WOOD PUB The Wobblers (roots, gospel, jazz), 9:00PM LAZOOM BUS TOURS Lyric (soul), 1:30PM Lyric (funk, soul, pop), 5:30PM LAZY DIAMOND Sonic Satan Stew w/ DJ Alien Brain, 10:00PM LOBSTER TRAP Sean Mason Trio, 6:30PM

ODDITORIUM Pussy Launcher w/ Secret Bleeders (punk), 9:00PM ONE STOP AT ASHEVILLE MUSIC HALL Sexual Thunder! (psychedelic, New Orleans funk), 10:00PM ORANGE PEEL ABSFest Speakeasy Allstars w/ The Judy Chops (burlesque), 8:00PM OSKAR BLUES BREWERY Syrrup (dance, electronic), 6:00PM PACK SQUARE PARK Shindig on the Green, 7:00PM PACK'S TAVERN Flashback (classic hits), 9:30PM PISGAH BREWING COMPANY Dark Star Orchestra (Night 2), 6:00PM PURPLE ONION CAFE Chuck Johnson & Charlyhorse, 8:00PM SALVAGE STATION Sweat & Soul (community bootcamp, yoga), 10:30AM River Valley Blues Festival, 12:00PM SANCTUARY BREWING COMPANY Yoga, 10:00AM Fundraiser w/ Kyle Milligan, 12:00PM Calvin Get Down (funk), 8:00PM SIERRA NEVADA BREWING CO. Sierra Nevada AfterNooner Series , 2:00PM THE AC LOUNGE The AC Lounge w/ The Anne Combs Trio, 8:00PM THE BLOCK OFF BILTMORE 2umbao Salsa Lesson, 9:30PM DJ Malinalli's Latin Rhythms & Saturday Salsa Dance, 10:30PM THE BILTMORE ESTATE Tony Bennett, 7:30PM THE GREENHOUSE MOTO CAFE Awake in the Dream, 8:00PM THE MOTHLIGHT Lucy Dacus w/ Molly Burch (alternative, indie), 9:30PM

TRESSA'S DOWNTOWN JAZZ AND BLUES Ryan R&B Barber (r&b, soul), 10:00PM UPCOUNTRY BREWING COMPANY Franklins Kite , 9:00PM WHITE HORSE BLACK MOUNTAIN The Asheville Jazz Orchestra, 8:00PM WXYZ LOUNGE AT ALOFT HOTEL WXYZ live w/ The Lefties, 8:00PM

SUNDAY, AUGUST 20 5 WALNUT WINE BAR The Duane Simpson Trio (jazz, funk, blues), 7:00PM ALTAMONT THEATRE An Evening w/ David Olney (folk, Americana, blues), 6:30PM ASHEVILLE GUITAR BAR Musicians Jam & Pot Luck, 3:30PM BARLEY'S TAPROOM & PIZZERIA P-Lo (Latin jazz), 7:30PM BEN'S TUNE-UP Good Vibes w/ Oso REy (old school reggae), 3:30PM Good Vibes w/ The Dub Kartel, 7:00PM BLACK MOUNTAIN ALE HOUSE Sunday Jazz Brunch, 11:00AM BLUE MOUNTAIN PIZZA & BREW PUB Mark Bumgarner (Americana), 7:00PM BURGER BAR Push Presents: Skate Cinema, 12:00AM DIANA WORTHAM THEATRE The Magpie Salute, 8:00PM DOUBLE CROWN Killer Karaoke w/ KJ Tim O, 10:00PM FLOOD GALLERY FINE ART CENTER True Home Open Mic Night (music, poetry, comedy), 5:00PM GINGER'S REVENGE Sunday Sip & Stretch, 12:45PM GREY EAGLE MUSIC HALL & TAVERN An evening w/ Martha Scanlan (folk), 8:00PM


LIVE MUSIC FRIDAY & SATURDAY NIGHT NO COVER CHARGE HABITAT TAVERN & COMMONS A Taste of Soul Brunch, 12:00PM HIGHLAND BREWING COMPANY Reggae Sunday w/ Dennis "Chalwa" Berndt, 1:00PM ISIS MUSIC HALL & KITCHEN 743 Sarah Clanton & Danielle Ate The Sandwich , 5:30PM Wilson's Hot String Band (jazz, oldies), 7:30PM LAZY DIAMOND Pabst Sabbath w/ DJ Chubberbird, 10:00PM LOBSTER TRAP Phil Alley, 6:30PM LUELLA'S BAR-B-QUE BILTMORE PARK Gypsy Jazz Brunch w/ Leo Johnson, 1:00PM ODDITORIUM Free Queer Dance Party w/ DJ Nickie Moore, 9:00PM ONE STOP AT ASHEVILLE MUSIC HALL Bluegrass Brunch, 10:30AM OSKAR BLUES BREWERY Hope Griffin (Americana), 3:00PM PULP Alex Travers w/ Bless Your Heart & Maddie Shuler, 7:00PM PISGAH BREWING COMPANY Sunday Paper Crowns Jam, 6:00PM SALVAGE STATION Open Mic Night w/ The Wet Doorknobs, 7:00PM SANCTUARY BREWING COMPANY Sanctuary Two Year Anniversary w/ Dangermuffin, 2:00PM SWEETEN CREEK BREWING 5 on 5 for Ki, 1:00PM THE BLOCK OFF BILTMORE Bubbles, Brunch & Buti Yoga, 12:30PM Bluegrass and Bothwell, 5:00PM Island Vibes Roots Reggae w/ DJ Roy & Leg Cash, 10:00PM TIMO'S HOUSE Bring Your Own Vinyl, 8:00PM WICKED WEED BREWING Summer Concert Series w/ The Firecracker Jazzband, 4:00PM

MONDAY, AUGUST 21 185 KING STREET Open mic night, 6:00PM 5 WALNUT WINE BAR Siamese Jazz Club (R&B, soul, funk), 8:00PM ASHEVILLE GUITAR BAR Classical Guitar Mondays, 7:30PM BEN'S TUNE-UP Twelve Olympians (electronic jam), 7:00PM

MONDAY 65¢ WINGS

TUESDAY

THURSDAY

THIRSTY THURSDAY ALL DRAFTS $3

FRIDAY AUGUST 18

MOUNTAIN SHAG

CHICKEN COOP WILLAYE TRIO

WEDNESDAY

SATURDAY

KARAOKE W/ DJ DO IT

AUGUST 19

ELUSIVE GROOVE

FULL MENU — 15 TAPS OPEN WEEKDAYS 4 PM OPEN FOR LUNCH, FRI-SUN NOON

Free Screening: Racing Extinction w/ race car driver, Leilani Münter

Located Next to Clarion Inn — 550 Airport Road Fletcher — 550tavern.com — www.facebook.com/550TavernGrille

Thursday, 8/17 ● 6pm 39 S. Market St. ● theblockoffbiltmore.com

DOUBLE CROWN Country Karaoke w/ KJ Tim O, 10:00PM GOOD STUFF Songwriter's "open mic", 7:30PM GREY EAGLE MUSIC HALL & TAVERN Open mic night (music & comedy), 6:00PM HIGHLAND BREWING COMPANY Game Night, 4:00PM JACK OF THE WOOD PUB Quizzo Trivia Night, 7:00PM LOBSTER TRAP Bobby Miller & friends, 6:30PM MG ROAD The Living Room (live music), 8:30PM ODDITORIUM Risque Monday Burlesque w/ Deb Au Nare, 9:00PM ORANGE PEEL Summer Movie Series: Wayne's World, 8:00PM OSKAR BLUES BREWERY Total Eclipse of the Heart, 12:00PM Mountain Music Mondays (open jam), 6:00PM PACK SQUARE PARK Asheville's Solar Eclipse Festival, 12:00PM POUR TAPROOM Lowlight Monday Nights, 7:00PM SANCTUARY BREWING COMPANY Open Mic Night, 6:00PM SIERRA NEVADA BREWING CO. Sierra Nevada Total Eclipse Party, 12:00PM Total Eclipse Party, 12:00PM THE BLOCK OFF BILTMORE Sol Sistar Activation w/ DJ SMOKIFANTASTIC (post-eclipse party), 9:00PM

MOUNTAINX.COM

AUG. 16 - 22, 2017

49


MOVIES

C LU BL A N D THE IMPERIAL LIFE Ghost Pipe Trio , 9:00PM THE MOTHLIGHT Dina Maccabee w/ Janel Leppin & Alec Sturgis (experimental, folk), 9:00PM TIMO'S HOUSE Mystery Flavor Monday w/ 56k Connection & Your Allure, 8:00PM TOWN PUMP The YeahTones, 9:00PM UPCOUNTRY BREWING COMPANY Old Time Music Open Jam , 6:30PM WHITE HORSE BLACK MOUNTAIN Jay Brown & Bob Hinkle, 7:30PM

TUESDAY, AUGUST 22 5 WALNUT WINE BAR The John Henrys (hot jazz), 8:00PM 550 TAVERN & GRILLE Shag night, 6:00PM ASHEVILLE GUITAR BAR Gypsy Jazz Jam Tuesdays, 7:30PM

ASHEVILLE MUSIC HALL Tuesday night funk jam, 11:00PM

HIGHLAND BREWING COMPANY Dr. Brown's Team Trivia, 6:00PM

SANCTUARY BREWING COMPANY Taco and Trivia Tuesday, 6:00PM

BEN'S TUNE-UP Summer soul series w/ Juan Holladay & friends, 6:00PM Lyric , 8:00PM

ISIS MUSIC HALL & KITCHEN 743 Tuesday bluegrass sessions w/ Ken Chapple & friends, 7:30PM

BLACK MOUNTAIN ALE HOUSE Trivia, 7:30PM

JACK OF THE WOOD PUB Western Swing w/ Texas T & The Tumbleweeds, 7:00PM

THE BLOCK OFF BILTMORE Swing Asheville & Jazz-nJustice Benefit Tuesday w/ House Hoppers (lessons @ 7 and 8 p.m.), 9:00PM Swing Asheville's Latenight Vintage Blues Dance, 11:00PM

BLUE MOUNTAIN PIZZA & BREW PUB Ben Phan (singer-songwriter), 7:00PM BURGER BAR Tonkin' Tuesdays, 12:00AM

LAZY DIAMOND Heavy Metal Karaoke w/ KJ Tim O, 10:00PM LOBSTER TRAP Jay Brown, 6:30PM

DOUBLE CROWN Country Western & Cajun Rarities w/ DJ Brody Hunt, 10:00PM

MG ROAD Keep It Classic Tuesdays w/ Sam Thompson, 5:00PM

GOOD STUFF Old time-y night, 6:30PM

ODDITORIUM Open Mic Comedy Night w/ Tom Peters, 9:00PM

GREY EAGLE MUSIC HALL & TAVERN Tyler Hilton w/ Christina Holmes (indie, rock, folk), 8:00PM HABITAT TAVERN & COMMONS Qi Gong, 10:30AM Asheville Beer & Hymns, 6:00PM

ONE STOP AT ASHEVILLE MUSIC HALL Turntable Tuesdays, 10:00PM

THE MARKET PLACE RESTAURANT AND LOUNGE Rat Alley Cats, 7:00PM THE MOTHLIGHT MANAS w/ The Dead Tongues, Jeremy Joachim & Simple Machines (experimental), 9:00PM TOWN PUMP Jordyn Pepper, 9:00PM UPCOUNTRY BREWING COMPANY Old Time Music Open Jam , 6:30PM Open Mic w/ Chris O'Neill , 6:30PM WHITE HORSE BLACK MOUNTAIN Irish sessions & open mic, 6:30PM

ORANGE PEEL Portugal. The Man w/ The Dig (alt. rock. indie, psychedelic), 8:00PM

H PICK OF THE WEEK H

Documentarian Amanda Lipitz sets inspiring high-school drama against a background of social unrest in Sundance hit Step

WILD WING CAFE SOUTH Weary Travelers (bluegrass), 6:00PM

Mountain Xpress Presents

Step HHHH DIRECTOR: Amanda Lipitz PLAYERS: Blessin Giraldo, Cori Grainger, Tayla Solomon, Gari McIntyre, Paula Dofat DOCUMENTARY RATED PG THE STORY: The step dance team of a girls high school in Baltimore prepares for a big competition while navigating the social pressures inherent to life as an inner-city teen.  THE LOWDOWN: An uplifting documentary that makes no attempt to hide its motivations.

FRE ET!

FEATURING EN V E X AWARD WINNING BANDS, RADIO, FOOD TRUCKS, ICE CREAM, ENTERTAINMENT, & SPECIAL BREWS

HIGHLAND BREWING CO. AT

50

AUG. 16 - 22, 2017

AUG. 17 5–9PM

MOUNTAINX.COM

Playing a bit like Hoop Dreams meets The Fits with more than a touch of any one of the much-maligned spate of early-aughts teen dance dramas, Step is an inspirational documentary that wears its heart on its sleeve. While its brief sub-90-minute running time doesn’t leave much room for depth or context, it’s a film whose message is both timely and necessary. The film follows the step dance team of an inner-city Baltimore school for at-risk girls as they struggle to make their mark in competition, and the results are predictably uplifting if occasionally superficial. But what Step lacks in subtlety, it more than makes up for in emotional resonance. As far as heart-string-tugging goes, first-time documentarian Amanda

Lipitz’s film is particularly blatant in its aims. Fortunately, Step’s emotional exploitation is (mostly) justified by the social significance of its story, and its ambitions are achieved just as successfully as those of its young subjects. Focusing on three central members of the Baltimore Leadership School for Young Women’s Lethal Ladies of BLYSW step troupe, Lipitz’s film provides a fascinating insight into the social realities of young black women trying to find their way in a society that is at best indifferent and at worst actively hostile to people of their gender, ethnicity and socio-economic backgrounds. While the team as a whole is followed during the preparations for a major regional step competition, three members take center stage: there’s class valedictorian Cori, with aspirations to a Johns Hopkins education but no way to pay for it; Tayla, whose corrections officer mom seems more engaged in step practice than her daughter; and team founder Blessin, whose slipping grades and abysmal attendance record threaten her very participation in the team she created. This trio represents a broad cross section of the life experiences common to the school as a whole, and while the details may differ from case to case, the commonality of their struggles is presented in believably realistic detail by Lipitz.


THE ATE R INFO R M ATIO N

REVIEWS & LISTINGS

ASHEVILLE PIZZA & BREWING CO. (254-1281) ASHEVILLEBREWING.COM/MOVIES

BY SCOTT DOUGLAS, FRANCIS X FRIEL & JUSTIN SOUTHER

HHHHH = Watching the girls grapple with the standard teen problems of navigating college applications, family dysfunction and budding relationships takes on added dimensionality amid the social unrest of post-FreddieGray Baltimore. It’s tough to avoid the feeling that these girls have the deck thoroughly stacked against them, even as Lipitz populates their world with the optimistic influences of surrogate parental figures such as dogged college admissions counselor Paula Dofat and the tough-but-fair Gari “Coach G” McIntyre. The girls’ success may be far from a foregone conclusion, but at least they’re not fighting for it on their own. If I have one central complaint with Step, it’s that it reasons from conclusions rather than toward them. Lipitz has an abundantly clear agenda, and every step of the film seems calculated to serve a purpose. There’s no sense of documentary objectivity, and it seems that details are consistently obscured to ensure the film’s pervasive positivity remains beyond reproach. However, in the wake of the disastrously stupid expression of unchecked racism that took place in Charlottesville over the weekend, I for one am more than happy to accept the unquestioned positivity of a film like Step as it stands. Rated PG for thematic elements and some language. Opens Friday at Grail Moviehouse. REVIEWED BY SCOTT DOUGLAS JSDOUGLAS22@GMAIL.COM

The Nut Job 2: Nutty by Nature HHHS

CARMIKE CINEMA 10 (298-4452) CARMIKE.COM

M A X R AT I N G

DIRECTOR: Cal Brunker PLAYERS: Will Arnett, Katherine Heigl, Maya Rudolph, Jackie Chan, Bobby Cannavale, Bobby Moynihan CHILDREN’S ANIMATED ADVENTURE COMEDY RATED PG THE STORY: Surly Squirrel and the gang are back, this time to stop the Mayor from turning their home, Liberty Park, into Liberty Land, a garish amusement park. THE LOWDOWN: Weird, cool and funny, this is your best bet this week if you’re trying to decide between this and the mountain of garbage currently being served up on the big screen for your family’s consumption. I don’t know whether it’s the film critic’s equivalent of Stockholm syndrome or I’m just becoming a beaten down old man quicker than expected (it’s been coming for a long time), but I’m pleased to report that The Nut Job 2: Nutty by Nature is, despite that title, a good little movie. Yeah, it’s your standard slobs vs. snobs story, with a hefty dose of “we need to stop that land developer!” thrown in for good measure, but it tweaks those formulas just enough to make them seem fresh. With a strong anti-authoritarian streak and a very hard stance against musicals (both will always get a big thumbs up from me), this is a kiddie flick with something to say. It’s no Zootopia, but what it provides is a snappy story in a beautifully detailed environment with an almost nihilistic approach to how seldom we truly learn from our mistakes. While it stumbles a bit in the first act and falls victim to several tropes that would normally make me immediately turn on a film (the Climbing Villain, to cite just one), it more than makes up for all that simply by being the best-looking animated film currently in theaters. My only real gripe is that Will Arnett, as lead squirrel Surly, seems as if he just can’t care about any of this in the slightest, phoning it in and barely making an impression in what could’ve been a more intense, outsized performance. Bobby Moynihan is great as the Mayor (license plate:

CAROLINA CINEMAS (274-9500) CAROLINACINEMAS.COM

Xpress is shifting some of its movie coverage to online-only as we expand other print sections of the newspaper. Virtually all upcoming movies will still be reviewed online by Xpress film critics Scott Douglas, Francis X. Friel and Justin Souther, with two or three of the most noteworthy appearing in print. You can find online reviews at mountainx.com/movies/reviews. This week, they include:

HHHS THE GLASS CASTLE HHH NUT JOB 2 HHHS LETTERS FROM BAGHDAD HHH

ANNABELLE: CREATION

STEP (PICK OF THE WEEK)

HHHH

EMBEZZLN), Jackie Chan is down to clown as Feng, leader of a secret killer elite squad of Chinatown mice, and Bobby Cannavale is perfect as Frankie the dog. The rest of the cast turns in serviceable performances for a film like this, although Maya Rudolph, so great in the otherwise miserable Emoji Movie, seems as if she has no idea what to do with her character, lead dog Precious, her tone and accent shifting from scene to scene, sometimes shot to shot. And Katherine Heigl continues her reign of cinematic terror, this time with her voice alone, but we’re at least spared her usual dead-eyed delivery. The Bugs Bunny-inspired character designs, the manic background business in every shot, the third act showdown in the amusement park (in particular a great gag that reinvents the little kids in a trenchcoat trying

FILM BREVARD MUSIC CENTER 349 Andante Lane, Brevard, 828-862-2100, brevardmusic.org • SA (8/19), 8:30pm - Apollo 13, film screening. $20/$16 students.

CO-ED CINEMA BREVARD (883-2200) COEDCINEMA.COM EPIC OF HENDERSONVILLE (693-1146) EPICTHEATRES.COM FINE ARTS THEATRE (232-1536) FINEARTSTHEATRE.COM FLATROCK CINEMA (697-2463) FLATROCKCINEMA.COM GRAIL MOVIEHOUSE (239-9392) GRAILMOVIEHOUSE.COM REGAL BILTMORE GRANDE STADIUM 15 (684-1298) REGMOVIES.COM

to pass as an adult trick to truly bizarre effect) and just the fact that the filmmakers are taking maximum advantage of their medium to get as wild and inventive as possible while giving you a reason to care about these furry little critters are all reason enough to check this one out. Open Road, while not nominally known for their children’s fare, seems to have a knack for splitting the difference between Daffy Duck and Buzz Lightyear, crafting these films and characters with the feel of old school cel-animated wackiness within the confines of the hideous, now ubiquitous 3-D design model. That’s about the best we can ask for these days. I’ll take it. Rated PG for action and some rude humor. Now Playing at AMC Classic River Hills 10, Carolina Cinemark, Regal Biltmore Grande. REVIEWED BY FRANCIS X. FRIEL MOVIEJAWNX@GMAIL.COM

• SU (8/20), 8:30pm - 2001: A Space Odyssey, film screening. $20/$16 students.

• FR (8/18), 4:30-6pm

BUNCOMBE COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARIES buncombecounty. org/governing/depts/ library

screening. Free. Held

- Pixar Film Series: Finding Dory, film

at West Asheville Library, 942 Haywood Road

MOUNTAINX.COM

FLOOD GALLERY FINE ART CENTER 2160 US Highway 70, Swannanoa, 828-2733332, floodgallery.org/ • FR (8/18), 8-10pm Classic World Cinema: The Serpent's Egg, film screening. Free to attend.

AUG. 16 - 22, 2017

51


SCREEN SCENE by Edwin Arnaudin | edwinarnaudin@gmail.com pianist Michael Jefry Stevens — on Thursday, Aug. 17, at 7 p.m. with Thelonious Monk: Straight, No Chaser. Charlotte Zwerin’s 1988 documentary is executiveproduced by Clint Eastwood and combines live performances by Monk and his band with interviews of the pianist’s friends and family. Free. freeburgpianos.com

STAR REPORTER: Actress Rosario Dawson speaks with Dr. Lawrence Reynolds of Mott’s Children’s Center in Flint, Mich., in a scene from, “America Divided.” Photo courtesy of Epix • The Haywood County Public Library screens episode one of the five-part documentary series America Divided on Thursday, Aug. 17, from 2 to 4 p.m. The opening installment, Something in the Water, follows hip-hop artist Common as he returns to his hometown of Chicago to explore disparities in the criminal justice system; actress Rosario Dawson’s travels to Flint, Mich., to uncover the man-made cause of the city’s water crisis; and TV producer Norman Lear’s investigation of gentrification in New York City. The series continues each Thursday through Sept. 14. Refreshments will be provided. Free, but registration is required. Call 828-356-2507 or email kolsen@haywoodnc.net to reserve a spot. haywoodlibrary.libguides.com/main • Due to popular demand, Asheville Pizza & Brewing Co. has added a second showing of Titanic on Thursday, Aug. 17, at 7 p.m. The event commemorates the film’s forthcoming 20th anniversary and the birthday of the epic’s writer/ director James Cameron. Tickets are $3 and available online and at the Asheville Pizza box office on Merrimon Avenue.  ashevillebrewing.com/movies • Freeburg Pianos in Hendersonville continues its monthly Legends of Music film series — curated by local jazz

• The West Asheville Library’s Pixar film series continues on Friday, Aug. 18, at 4:30 p.m. with a screening of Finding Dory. The feature presentation will be preceded by the Pixar short film Piper. Free. avl.mx/1z5 • Purl’s Yarn Emporium’s weekly Nerd Love Night spotlights the films of Hayao Miyazaki throughout August. Upcoming 6 p.m. screenings include Kiki’s Delivery Service (Aug. 20) and Castle in the Sky (Aug. 27). Bring a knitting project to work on during the movie. Free. purlsyarnemporium.com • The Orange Peel’s Summer Movie Series continues Monday, Aug. 21, at 8 p.m., with a screening of Wayne’s World. Free. theorangepeel.net • Tickets are on sale for screenings of the documentary May It Last: A Portrait of the Avett Brothers at the Fine Arts Theatre on Tuesday, Sept. 12, at 7 and 9:30 p.m. Over the course of two years, directors Judd Apatow and Michael Bonfiglio were granted in-depth access to the North Carolina band with a specific focus on its 2016 collaboration with producer Rick Rubin on the album True Sadness. Tickets are $13.93 (including a service fee) and available online and at the Fine Arts box office.  fineartstheatre.com  X

STA RTI NG F RI DAY

Logan Lucky

Caper Comedy from director Steven Soderbergh, starring Daniel Craig, Adam Driver, Channing Tatum and Riley Keough. According to the studio: “Trying to reverse a family curse, brothers Jimmy (Channing Tatum) and Clyde Logan (Adam Driver) set out to execute an elaborate robbery during the legendary Coca-Cola 600 race at the Charlotte Motor Speedway.” Early reviews are strongly positive. (PG-13)

Step

See Scott Douglas’ review 52

AUG. 16 - 22, 2017

MOUNTAINX.COM

The Hitman’s Bodyguard

Action comedy from director Patrick Hughes. According to the studio: “The world’s top protection agent (Ryan Reynolds) is called upon to guard the life of his mortal enemy, one of the world’s most notorious hitmen (Samuel L. Jackson). The relentless bodyguard and manipulative assassin have been on the opposite end of the bullet for years and are thrown together for a wildly outrageous 24 hours. During their raucous and hilarious adventure from England to the Hague, they encounter high-speed car chases, outlandish boat escapades and a merciless Eastern European dictator (Gary Oldman) who is out for blood. Salma Hayek joins the mayhem as Jackson’s equally notorious wife.” Early reviews are mixed. (R)

Wind River

Neo-Western thriller from writer/director Taylor Sheridan, who penned Sicario and Hell or High Water. Jeremy Renner and Elizabeth Olsen star as a troubled game tracker and a rookie FBI agent who team up to investigate a murder on a remote Indian reservation. Early reviews are positive. (R)

S PEC IA L SCR E E N IN GS

Fear and Desire HHHH

DIRECTOR: Stanley Kubrick PLAYERS: Frank Silvera, Paul Mazursky, Kenneth Harp, Stephen Coit, Virginia Leigh WAR DRAMA Rated NR Very few people have seen Stanley Kubrick’s feature directorial debut Fear and Desire (1953), and for good reason — the director hated this early work so much that he tried to have every print destroyed. Luckily for us, he failed. While it’s by no means a great film, Kubrick’s criticism of his own work was unduly harsh. Elements of what would become his auteurial signature were already in place despite his extreme youth (Kubrick was only 24 when production began), and I’ve always been of the opinion that he was just upset that he didn’t come out of the gate with something equal to Citizen Kane, which Orson Welles directed at a similar age. Kubrick’s gripes aside, there’s plenty of interesting material to be found in his story of four military pilots of indiscriminate nationality in an unspecified conflict who crash behind enemy lines and must make there way back to safety. There are some intriguing metaphysical overtones and anti-war sentiments that Kubrick would revisit in later films, albeit in a less obtrusive light, and many of his visual flourishes were evident from the very beginning. Remembered today mostly as a curiosity for Kubrick completists, I’ve always felt that Fear and Desire deserves a critical reevaluation. The Asheville Film Society will screen Fear and Desire on Tuesday, Aug. 22, at 7:30 p.m. at The Grail Moviehouse, hosted by Xpress movie critic Scott Douglas.

Something the Lord Made HHHH

DIRECTOR: Joseph Sargent PLAYERS: Alan Rickman, Mos Def Mary Blalock - Kyra Sedgwick, Gabrielle Union, Charles S. Dutton, Mary Stuart Masterson DRAMA Rated NR It’s easy to forget that HBO wasn’t always known for its original programming, but that was certainly the case when Something the Lord Made debuted over a dozen years ago. At the time, the pay-cable outlet had seen some success with shows like The Wire, Deadwood  and The Sopranos, but the days of ratings domination with hits like Game of Thrones were still in the distant future. So when Something the Lord Made found its way onto screens, audiences and critics weren’t prepared to arbitrarily accept a made-for-TV period medical drama just because it was from HBO. But the true story of a white surgeon (Alan Rickman) and the black custodian (Mos Def) who would help him revolutionize heart surgery found its footing, largely due to bravura performances from Rickman and Def. While the movie feels pretty slight by today’s standards, its deft handling of institutional racism hit home at the time, and remains unfortunately relevant all these years later. The Hendersonville Film Society will show Something the Lord Made on Sunday, Aug. 20, at 2 p.m. in the Smoky Mountain Theater at Lake Pointe Landing Retirement Community, 333 Thompson St., Hendersonville.

The Serpent’s Egg HHHH

DIRECTOR: Ingmar Bergman PLAYERS: David Carradine, Liv Ullman, Gert Frobe, Heinz Bennett, James Whitmore DRAMA Rated R The most critically damned of all Ingmar Bergman films, the legendary director’s only English-language work is by now ripe for rediscovery and reappraisal as an intensely personal work unlike anything else in his filmography. The Serpent’s Egg is nothing if not peculiar. For his vision of Germany, Bergman seems more reliant on Sternberg’s The Blue Angel and the world of Fritz Lang than he does on history itself. There are occasional odd in-jokes, as when Bauer refers to a strange case being worked on by an Inspector Lohmann, a Lang character that Frobe had himself played. Bergman’s sense of displacement is evident in the fact that characters not central to the story speak in un-subtitled German, and the whole film has the feel of a man (both Bergman and his hero) trapped in a nightmare. This excerpt was taken from a review by Ken Hanke originally published on Feb. 22, 2006. Classic World Cinema by Courtyard Gallery will present The Serpent’s Egg on Friday, August 18, at 8 p.m. at Flood Gallery Fine Art Center, 2160 U.S. 70, Swannanoa.


MARKETPLACE REAL E S TAT E | R E N TA L S | CL AS S E S & W OR K S HOP S

R OOM M ATES | SERV ICES | M U S I CIA N S’ SERV ICES

JOB S PETS

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A N N OU N CEMENTS | M I ND, BO DY, SPI R I T A U TOMOTIV E | X C HANG E | ADULT

Want to advertise in Marketplace? 828-251-1333 x111 tnavaille@mountainx.com • mountainx.com/classifieds If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. Remember the Russian proverb: “Doveryai, no proveryai,” trust but verify. When answering classified ads, always err on the side of caution. Especially beware of any party asking you to give them financial or identification information. The Mountain Xpress cannot be responsible for ensuring that each advertising client is legitimate. Please report scams to ads@mountainx.com REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE

EMPLOYMENT GENERAL

2 BEDROOMS 2 BATHS WOLF LAUREL 40 minutes north of Asheville and well worth the drive. Finished basement. Wonderful views. 5 minute drive to the Appalachian Trail. 828-2429559

Love Live Music? Asheville Music Hall & The One Stop are now accepting applications for door staff/venue security. Please send resume with references to info@ashevillemusichall.com.

KENILWORTH! Private large and luscious landscaped backyard, 3BR, 2BA, 2178 sqft, 1920's updated one-level bungalow w/ tons of original charm. Huge family room w/vaulted ceiling that opens onto large screened back porch. Full unfinished walkout basement and double garage. $559,000. Broker Drea Jackson/ Native Asheville: 828-712-7888. nativeAsheville@gmail.com 320Kenilworth.com PRIVATE HUGE HOUSE WITH GARDENS AND STONE WALL FOR SALE Private House 12 min to town . Three flrs/beds/baths & two fireplaces. Basement Apt. Phenomenal 175" stone wall and huge deck. Leave Message with Tufic. 845 702 6214 .

RENTALS APARTMENTS FOR RENT ENCHANTED MONTFORD COTTAGE FOR RENT Furnished. Lush gardens, quiet street. Pristinely cleaned and maintained. No pets, no smoking. Sgl occupancy only, ideal for a kind, quiet, low-key, neat-freak. $1350/ month. Utilities included. Email: hummingbird@mantisgardens. com. www.mantisgardens. com/guest-house_backyardguest-cottage

SHORT-TERM RENTALS 15 MINUTES TO ASHEVILLE Guest house, vacation/short term rental in beautiful country setting. • Complete with everything including cable and internet. • $150/day (2-day minimum), $650/ week, $1500/month. Weaverville area. • No pets please. (828) 6589145. mhcinc58@yahoo.com

WANTED TO RENT SMALL APARTMENT WORK EXCHANGE Professional pianist seeks apartment in exchange for work and cash. Experienced in yard and landscaping. John: (404) 740-6903.

ROOMMATES ROOMMATES ALL AREAS Free Roommate Service @ RentMates.com. Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at RentMates.com! (AAN CAN)

TROLLEY TOUR GUIDES If you are a "people person," love Asheville, have a valid Commercial Driver's License (CDL) and clean driving record you could be a great Tour Guide, Full-Time and seasonal part-time positions available. Training provided. Contact us today! 828-251-8687. Info@GrayLineAsheville.com; www.GrayLineAsheville.com VEGETABLE HARVESTER Hacienda Farms, Inc. is hiring 14 farmworkers to cultivate and harvest vegetable crops in Transylvania County, NC for a temporary period starting on 09/13/2017 and ending on 11/30/2017. Two (2) months of work experience harvesting vegetables is required. The wages offered are the highest of $11.27/hr. or applicable piece rates. This job requires prolonged standing, bending, stooping, and reaching. Job is outdoors and continues in all types of weather. Workers may be requested to submit to prehire drug or alcohol tests at no cost to the worker. Workers must be able to lift 70lbs. to shoulder height repetitively throughout the workday and able to lift and carry 70lbs. in field. Employer guarantees work will be available for at least three-quarters of the period stated. Required tools supplies, and equipment will be provided at no cost to worker. Housing will be available for workers who cannot reasonably return home after each working day. Transportation and subsistence expenses will be provided, or reimbursed after 50% of the work contract is completed, if appropriate. Applicants should apply for the position at their local State Workforce Agency office. Job Order Number: NC10724901.

ADMINISTRATIVE/ OFFICE HELPMATE SEEKS ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGER Helpmate, a domestic violence agency in Asheville seeks part-time Administrative Manager. This position will provide executive support to Helpmate’s leadership team by scheduling meetings, maintaining filing systems, interacting with vendors, procuring supplies, generating correspondence, returning phone calls and taking meeting notes. Qualified candidates will hold at least an Associate’s degree, 2 years’ of relevant experience, high-level organizational and communication skills, advanced technological skills, and commitment to

Helpmate’s mission. Diverse candidates encouraged to apply. Email resume and cover letter to HelpmateAsheville@gmail.com with “Administrative Manager” in the subject line by noon on August 23. No emails or phone calls, please.

our Buncombe, Haywood and Jackson county areas. Bachelors degree required in related field with 2 years post experience. Benefits offered: medical, dental, vision, 401K and paid time off. Email resume to erenegar@ rescare.com 828-575-9802

SALES/ MARKETING

FAMILY SERVICE ASSOCIATE Available immediately. Family Service Associate to recruit and provide case management to families with pre-school aged children for a Head Start program. • Job Duties Include but are not limited to: • Maintains the outreach and recruitment of children and families • Assists families to fully utilize available community resources • Work in partnership with the parent towards short and long range family-identified goals to promote healthy, selfsufficient families. • Requirements: • Bachelor’s degree in Social Work or related areas and at least two years of experience. Equivalent of education and experience may be acceptable. • Valid NC driver’s license. • Ability to pass Physical exam, TB test, criminal background check and drug screening. • Fluency in English and Spanish preferred. Salary Range: $32,323 to $33,280, DOQ. • Please send resume, cover letter and (3) professional work references with complete contact information and a copy of the NC DCDEE Qualifying Letter to: • Email: Admin@ communityactionopportunities. org • Mail: Human Resources Manager, 25 Gaston Street, Asheville, NC 28801. • Fax: (828) 253-6319. Open until filled. EOE and DFWP.

ANNIE'S BAKERY • SALES ASSOCIATE Annie’s Bakery is seeking a Sales Associate to assist our Sales and Marketing Manager with promotion of our company. Duties include, but are not limited to, outside sales calls, communication with existing and potential customers along with social media updates, data collection and research. Candidate should have strong communication, customer service and organizational skills. Required experience in social media, Microsoft office, and proven success in sales and marketing. Quick advancement opportunities available for right candidate. Send resume to Mark@anniesbread.com

SALES PROFESSIONAL Mountain Xpress has a salaried entrylevel sales position open. Necessary attributes are: gregarious personality, problem solving skills, confident presentation, and the ability to digest and explain complex information. The ideal candidate is organized, well spoken, has good computer skills, can work well within an organization and within in a team environment, can self-monitor and set (and meet) personal goals. The job largely entails account development (including cold calling); and also detailed record keeping, management of client advertising campaigns, and some collections. If you are a high energy, positive, cooperative person who wants a stable team environment with predictable income and meaningful work, send a resume and cover letter (no walk-ins, please) about why you are a good fit for Mountain Xpress to: xpressjob@ mountainx.com

RESTAURANT/ FOOD

FOOD SERVICE WORKERS NEEDED! Cooks, prep cooks, dishwashers needed for a private school in Arden. Opportunity for advancement. Uniforms/shoes/ meals/benefits! Pre-employment background check and drug screening. Apply through www. sagedining.com Questions? Email S0063@sagedining.com or call Brian Ross 828.712.4350 https://www.sagedining.com/ people/careers/ position/20016

Program position. For more details and to apply: http:// abtcc.peopleadmin.com/ postings/4317

RETAIL

XCHANGE MEDICAL SUPPLIES

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES PAID IN ADVANCE! Make $1000/week mailing brochures from home! No experience required. Helping home workers since 2001! Genuine opportunity. Start immediately! www.MailingPros.net (AAN CAN)

ASSISTANT BOOKSTORE MANAGER A-B Tech is currently taking applications for an Assistant Bookstore Manager position. For more details and to apply: http:// abtcc.peopleadmin.com/ postings/4319

EMPLOYMENT SERVICES

JOBS WANTED

ON-SITE COMPUTER REPAIR TECHNICIAN WANTED Computer Repair Technician to work on-site and in-shop fixing machines running Windows/OSX; solving networking issues. Experience with Managed Service Providers, iOS, and good customer service skills a plus. Living Wage Certified. Resumes: info@ oneclickavl.com

FUNDRAISER/ EVENT PLANNER Available for work. Strong Interpersonal and public speaking skills. Previous experience: Nonprofit founder, educator, support group facilitator. Highly organized, detail oriented, high degree of personal and professional integrity. shackelton61@gmail.com

OXYGEN • ANYTIME • ANYWHERE No tanks to refill. No deliveries. The AllNew Inogen One G4 is only 2.8 pounds! FAA approved! Free info kit: 877-673-2864 (AAN CAN).

TOOLS & MACHINERY WOODWORKER'S DREAM SHOP LIQUIDATION SALE Top notch power and hand tools. New, old and antique tools including Drill Press, Lathe, Power Saws, etc. contact: rebcasey@att.net

HOME IMPROVEMENT GENERAL SERVICES DRIVEWAY SEAL COATING Parking Lots • Striping • Interior/exterior Painting • Powerwashing • Deck

staining. Top quality work • Low prices • Free estimate • Over 30+ years experience. Call Mark: (828) 299-0447.

HANDY MAN HANDYMAN. WOODWORKER. DRAFTSMAN. Jack of all trades for hire, serving Asheville and surrounding areas. If you need something built, fixed or replaced, call/text Mike at (414)881-6329. HIRE A HUSBAND • HANDYMAN SERVICES Since 1993. Multiple skill sets. Reliable, trustworthy, quality results. $1 million liability insurance. References and estimates available. Stephen Houpis, (828) 280-2254.

HEATING & COOLING MAYBERRY HEATING AND COOLING Oil and Gas Furnaces • Heat Pumps and AC • • Radiant Floor Heating • • Solar Hot Water • Sales • Service • Installation. • Visa • MC • Discover. Call (828) 658-9145.

POLICE OFFICER A-B Tech is currently taking applications for a Police Officer position. For more details and to apply: http:// abtcc.peopleadmin.com/ postings/4327

TEACHING/ EDUCATION INTERESTED IN WORKING AT A-B TECH? Full-Time, Part-Time and Adjunct Positions available. Come help people achieve their dreams! Apply for open positions at https://abtcc.peopleadmin. com PART-TIME MATH TEACHER Montford Hall is looking for a part-time math teacher to join our incredible academic team. Please visit http://www. montfordhall.org/employment to find out more.

HUMAN SERVICES COMMUNITY ALTERNATIVES CURRENTLY HIRING FOR I/ DD-QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL Full time I/DD-Qualified Professional needed for

PHYSICAL THERAPY ASSISTANT PROGRAM CHAIRPERSON A-B Tech is currently taking applications for a Chairperson, Physical Therapy Assistant

MOUNTAINX.COM

AUG. 16 - 22, 2017

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FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

HU MOR

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “To disobey in order to take action is the byword of all creative spirits,” said philosopher Gaston Bachelard. This mischievous advice is perfect for your use right now, Aries. I believe you’ll thrive through the practice of ingenious rebellion — never in service to your pride, but always to feed your soul’s lust for deeper, wilder life. Here’s more from Bachelard: “Autonomy comes through many small disobediences, at once clever, well thought-out, and patiently pursued, so subtle at times as to avoid punishment entirely.” TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Congratulations! I expect that during the next three weeks, you will be immune to what psychoanalyst Joan Chodorow calls “the void of sadness, the abyss of fear, the chaos of anger, and the alienation of contempt and shame.” I realize that what I just said might sound like an exaggeration. Aren’t all of us subject to regular encounters with those states? How could you possibly go so long without brushing up against them? I stand by my prediction, and push even further. For at least the next three weeks, I suspect you will also be available for an inordinate amount of what Chodorow calls “the light of focused insight” and “the playful, blissful, all-embracing experience of joy.” GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The coming days would an excellent time to celebrate (even brag about) the amusing idiosyncrasies and endearing quirks that make you lovable. To get you inspired, read this testimony from my triple Gemini friend Alyssa: “I have beauty marks that form the constellation Pegasus on my belly. I own my own ant farm. I’m a champion laugher. I teach sign language to squirrels. Late at night when I’m horny and overtired I may channel the spirit of a lion goddess named Sekhmet. I can whistle the national anthems of eight different countries. I collect spoons from the future. I can play the piano with my nose and my toes. I have forever banished the green-eyed monster to my closet.” CANCER (June 21-July 22): Your education may take unusual forms during the coming weeks. For example, you could receive crunchy lessons from velvety sources, or tender instructions from exacting challenges. Your curiosity might expand to enormous proportions in the face of a noble and elegant tease. And chances are good that you’ll find a new teacher in an unlikely setting, or be prodded and tricked into asking crucial questions you’ve been neglecting to ask. Even if you haven’t been particularly street smart up until now, Cancerian, I bet your ability to learn from uncategorizable experiences will blossom. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “If you love someone, set them free,” said New Age author Richard Bach. “If they come back, they’re yours; if they don’t, they never were.” By using my well-educated intellect to transmute this hippy-dippy thought into practical advice, I came up with a wise strategy for you to consider as you re-evaluate your relationships with allies. Try this: Temporarily suspend any compulsion you might have to change or fix these people; do your best to like them and even love them exactly as they are. Ironically, granting them this freedom to be themselves may motivate them to modify, or at least tone down, the very behavior in themselves that you’re semi-allergic to. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In 1892, workers began building the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York. But as of August 2017, it is still under construction. Renovation has been and continues to be extensive. At one point in its history, designers even changed its architectural style from Neo-Byzantine and Neo-Romanesque to Gothic Revival. I hope this serves as a pep talk in the coming weeks, which will be an excellent time to evaluate your own progress, Virgo. As you keep toiling away in behalf of your dreams, there’s no rush. In fact, my sense is that you’re proceeding at precisely the right rate.

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AUG. 16 - 22, 2017

MOUNTAINX.COM

BY ROB BREZSNY

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In accordance with the astrological omens, I hereby declare the next two weeks to be your own personal Amnesty Holiday. To celebrate, ask for and dole out forgiveness. Purge and flush away any non-essential guilt and remorse that are festering inside you. If there truly are hurtful sins that you still haven’t atoned for, make a grand effort to atone for them — with gifts and heart-felt messages if necessary. At the same time, I urge you to identify accusations that others have wrongly projected onto you and that you have carried around as a burden even though they are not accurate or fair. Expunge them. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): How many countries has the United States bombed since the end of World War II? Twenty-five, to be exact. But if America’s intention has been to prod these nations into forming more free and egalitarian governments, the efforts have been mostly fruitless. Few of the attacked nations have become substantially more democratic. I suggest you regard this as a valuable lesson to apply to your own life in the coming weeks, Scorpio. Metaphorical bombing campaigns wouldn’t accomplish even 10 percent of your goals, and would also be expensive in more ways than one. So I recommend using the “killing with kindness” approach. Be wily and generous. Cloak your coaxing in compassion. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You know about the Ten Commandments, a code of ethics and behavior that’s central to Christianity and Judaism. You may not be familiar with my Ten Suggestions, which begin with “Thou Shall Not Bore God” and “Thou Shall Not Bore Thyself.” Then there are the Ten Indian Commandments proposed by the Bird Clan of East Central Alabama. They include “Give assistance and kindness whenever needed” and “Look after the well-being of your mind and body.” I bring these to your attention, Sagittarius, because now is an excellent time to formally formulate and declare your own covenant with life. What are the essential principles that guide you to the highest good? CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Here’s a definition of “fantasizing” as articulated by writer Jon Carroll. It’s “a sort of ’in-brain’ television, where individuals create their own ’shows’ — imaginary narratives that may or may not include real people.” As you Capricorns enter the High Fantasy Season, you might enjoy this amusing way of describing the activity that you should cultivate and intensify. Would you consider cutting back on your consumption of movies and TV shows? That might inspire you to devote more time and energy to watching the stories you can generate in your mind’s eye. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In 43 cartoon stories, the coyote named Wile E. Coyote has tried to kill and devour the swift-running flightless bird known as the Road Runner. Every single time, Wile E. has failed to achieve his goal. It’s apparent to astute observers that his lack of success is partly due to the fact that he doesn’t rely on his natural predatory instincts. Instead, he concocts elaborate, overly-complicated schemes. In one episode, he camouflages himself as a cactus, buys artificial lightning bolts, and tries to shoot himself from a bow as if he were an arrow. All these plans end badly. The moral of the story, as far as you’re concerned: To reach your next goal, trust your instincts. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): You temporarily have cosmic permission to loiter and goof off and shirk your duties. To be a lazy bum and meander aimlessly and avoid tough decisions. To sing off-key and draw stick figures and write bad poems. To run slowly and flirt awkwardly and dress like a slob. Take advantage of this opportunity, because it’s only available for a limited time. It’s equivalent to pushing the reset button. It’s meant to re-establish your default settings. But don’t worry about that now. Simply enjoy the break in the action.


ANNOUNCEMENTS ANNOUNCEMENTS MAKE THE CALL TO START GETTING CLEAN TODAY Free 24/7 Helpline for alcohol & drug addiction treatment. Get help! It is time to take your life back! Call Now: 855-732-4139. (AAN CAN) PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Call us first. Living expenses, housing, medical, and continued support afterwards. Choose adoptive family of your choice. Call 24/7. 877-362-2401. (AAN CAN)

CLASSES & WORKSHOPS CLASSES & WORKSHOPS

INTUITIVE PAINTING 1 DAY WORKSHOP! SATURDAY, AUGUST 19TH, 10 TO 4PM Come Experience the Aliveness and Vitality of your own Creative Spirit! Free your Soul through Painting! Weekly ongoing classes: Tuesday evenings and Wednesday nights. 828-2524828 SacredSpacePainting.com NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY!

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT BODYWORK

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FOR MUSICIANS MUSICAL SERVICES ACOUSTIC GUITAR BUILDING CLASS Build your own acoustic guitar in our shop in Black Mountain. No experience necessary, all tools and instruction will be provided. Currently have openings for Monday and Tuesday evenings from 5-8pm. Call Ken for information 828-228-7440. INSTRUMENT REPAIRS & RESTORATIONS Does your instrument need some love? Experienced  luthier can repair anything with strings.  Come visit us in Black Mountain.  www. baileyacousticshop.com.  828228-7440. NOW ACCEPTING STUDENTS IN JAZZ PIANO, COMPOSITION, AND IMPROVISATION (ALL INSTRUMENTS). Michael Jefry Stevens, “WNC Best Composer 2016” and “Steinway Artist”, now accepting students in jazz piano, composition, and improvisation (all instruments). 35 years experience. M.A. from Queens College (NYC). Over 90 cds released. 9179161363. michaeljefrystevens.com WHITEWATER RECORDING Mixing • Mastering • Recording. (828) 684-8284 www.whitewaterrecording. com

PETS PET SERVICES

COUNSELING SERVICES

edited by Will Shortz

No. 0712

CELEBRITY CROSSWORD

To mark the 75th anniversary of the New York Times crossword, which debuted in 1942, we are publishing a series of puzzles co-created by famous people who solve the Times crossword, working together with regular Times puzzle contributors. This collaboration is by the comedian Elayne Boosler, who was recently named by Rolling Stone magazine as one of the “50 Best Stand-Up Comics of All Time,” working together with Patrick Merrell, a writer/ illustrator in Vero Beach, Fla. This is Patrick’s 86th puzzle for The Times. The celebrity collaborations will continue periodically through the year. More information about the making of today’s puzzle appears in the Times’s daily crossword column (nytimes.com/column/wordplay). 44 Goat coat 2 Toss ACROSS 3 Little red monster 46 Modern-day remake 1 TV’s “Top ___” of a Bing Crosby film? 4 Sticky strip 5 Be abrasive 5 French vineyard 10 One on a U.S. penny 49 Snooping 50 Gardner who wrote 6 Wheel adornment 14 Pause “The Case of the 7 Member of the first 15 Apply, as lotion Negligent Nymph” family 16 Moon unit? 51 Canine 8 What may have a dog 17 Troop group command leg to the left or right? 18 Modern-day remake 54 Word derived from 9 Squelch of a Robert De Niro the name of a Belgian 10 Computer that film? town accurately predicted 20 Lands on a couch, 56 F.D.R., Churchill and Ike’s 1952 election say Stalin’s last meeting 11 Where a congregation 22 Indians’ home: Abbr. place congregates 23 Part of EGBDF 60 ... and something to 12 App customer 24 Jessica of “Fantastic eat while watching the 13 “Bloody” queen Four” remakes 19 Please ___ (invoice 26 Fine cotton 63 Slant stamp) 28 Modern-day remake 64 Rock’s Jethro ___ 21 What good comics do of a W. C. Fields film? 65 Guy with a lot of 25 Tournament pass 33 Overnight flight bookings? 27 Bouncer’s checks, for 34 Brief blow 66 Gentle tune short? 35 South African golfing 67 Make litterproof? 28 Long march great 68 Emo emotion 29 Prefix meaning “half” 38 Kuwaiti leader 30 “All in the Family” 69 Animals that mother 39 Whopping provided hair used in Chewbacca’s costume 31 Feeling of anxiety 40 Relative of a musette 32 It’s stuck on a grill 41 Carson not known for his monologues DOWN 36 Cut above the flank 42 Completely busted 1 Give it up, so to speak 37 Southern Slav

PUZZLE BY ELAYNE BOOSLER AND PATRICK MERRELL

39 T.S.A. screening 52 Grumbly “Are you 58 Lecture 40 “That so?!” still sleeping?” 59 They might emerge response 42 Film lovers may on hilltops 53 Pop run in it 61 A peck in a park is 43 Half of a towel set 55 Video game with a one, for short square ball 44 Deface 57 Sci-fi princess 62 “As if!” 45 Kind of boid that catches the woim? ANSWER TO PREVIOUS NY TIMES PUZZLE 47 Like cheap toilet paper 48 Aches (for) 51 Barracks barkers: Abbr.

ASHEVILLE PET SITTERS Dependable, loving care while you're away. Reasonable rates. Call Sandy (828) 215-7232.

AUTOMOTIVE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICES WE'LL FIX IT AUTOMOTIVE • Honda and Acura repair. Half price repair and service. ASE and factory trained. Located in the Weaverville area, off exit 15. Please call (828) 275-6063 for appointment. www.wellfixitautomotive.com

2017

LOCAL INDEPENDENT MASSAGE THERAPY CENTER OFFERING EXCELLENT BODYWORK 947 Haywood Road, West Asheville. Experience the best bodywork in Asheville at our beautiful massage center for very reasonable rates. Integrative, Deep Tissue, Prenatal,Couples, Reflexology, Aromatherapy, Reiki. $60-70/hr. Complimentary fine tea lounge. Free lot parking, handicap accessible. (828)5523003 ebbandflowavl@charter. net - ebbandflowavl.com

T H E N E W Y OR K TI M ES CR OSSWOR D PU ZZLE

needs Business Partners

Paul Caron

ADULT

Furniture Magician

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• Black Mountain

AUG. 16 - 22, 2017

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Thank you for voting us Best of WNC! #1 Chinese Restaurant (tie)

Outdoor Dining Full Bar Event Room Catering

redgingerasheville.com 2

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

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MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

82 Patton Ave. Downtown Asheville 828.505.8688


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BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

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Thank you WNC for voting us #1!

Call 828-628-1369 for all your plumbing needs 90 Number Nine Rd. Fairview, NC 28730

THANKS, ASHEVILLE! for voting me one of the Best!

5 years in a row! Sona Merlin Real Estate Broker Appalachian Realty (828) 216-7908 www.sonamerlin.com 4

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

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AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

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Mountain Xpress Presents

TABLE OF CONTENTS 8 EATS 34 DRINKS 50 OUTDOORS 58 FARM & GARDEN 62 MEDIA 66 WORK & BUSINESS 72 PETS

t r pa DEAR READER, Welcome to the grand conclusion of this year’s Best of WNC — the tabulated results of thousands of writein ballots, presenting the most detailed look available at what and whom we collectively favor and what we think is best about living in the mountains. This week, we unveil the winners in over 250 categories, including those in the most heavily voted Eats and Drinks

! o tw

categories. You’ll also find who readers tapped as tops in the Pets, Outdoors, Work & Business, Media, and Farm & Garden sections, not to mention the regional winners for small towns to the north, east and west of Asheville. Because local businesses are at the center of the Best of WNC project, the results wind up being a valuable consumer guide to the shops, institutions, professionals and places we like most. The results also provide feedback to businesses to help them grow and excel. Additionally, the Best of WNC identifies current civic problems and, when looked at over a span of years, illustrates how the area has changed.

SMALL TOWNS 78 SWANNANOA / BLACK MOUNTAIN 81 MARSHALL / MARS HILL 82 WEAVERVILLE / WOODFIN 86 HOT SPRINGS 87 WAYNESVILLE

Be sure to watch for Xpress’ pocket guide to the Best of WNC in September, which presents all of the year’s winners in a compact, glossy format. And while you’re out and about, keep an eye out for X-Award certificates and store-window decals on display identifying businesses as Best of WNC winners. Thanks are due to the thousands who voted, to the Mountain Xpress staff who worked on the project and to the businesses that bought thank-you ads. If you have comments or suggestions for next year’s Best of WNC survey — please drop us a line at bestofwnc@mountainx.com. — Jeff Fobes  X

We have taken great care to ensure the accuracy of the Best of WNC listings, but if you have corrections, questions or suggestions, email us at listings@mountainx.com, or call 251-1333.

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

BALLOT OFFICIALS Able Allen, Thomas Calder, Jeff Fobes, Dan Hesse, Susan Hutchinson, Jordan Isenhour, Lauren Kriel THEME DESIGN Scott Southwick DESIGNERS: Norn Cutson, Jordan Isenhour, Scott Southwick LISTINGS EDITORS Dan Hesse, Jordan Isenhour PHOTO COORDINATOR Able Allen PHOTOGRAPHERS Able Allen, Thomas Calder, Cindy Kunst, Adam McMillan, Emma Grace Moon, Jack Sorokin, Scott Southwick CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Able Allen, Thomas Calder, Virginia Daffron, Jeff Fobes, Susan Foster, Dan Hesse, Max Hunt, Susan Hutchinson, Alli Marshall, Tracy Rose, Gina Smith AD SALES Thomas Allison, Sara Brecht, Bryant Cooper, Susan Hutchinson, Niki Kordus, Tim Navaille, Brian Palmieri, Heather Taylor IT & WEB Bowman Kelley FRONT OFFICE/ ACCOUNTING Able Allen, Amie Fowler-Tanner, Jordan Isenhour DISTRIBUTION Denise Montgomery, Jeff Tallman and a fantastic team of devoted drivers Copyright 2017 by Mountain Xpress COVER PHOTO Cindy Kunst

LET US KNOW

6

PUBLISHER & EDITOR Jeff Fobes

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

Some Best of WNC categories received inadequate votes to allow us to declare first-, second- and third-place winners.

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

COVER DESIGN Scott Southwick


area map

MAP KEY nORTH sOUTH �AST wEST dOWNTOWN AREA rIVER ARTS DISTRICT

OUTLYING AREAS na OUTER NORTH sa OUTER SOUTH

na • Mars Hill • Spruce Pine

�a OUTER EAST

• Marshall • Hot Springs • Burnsville • Weaverville

wa OUTER WEST

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• Fairview • Old Fort • Marion • Swannanoa • Black Mountain • Chimney Rock

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26

NORTH

Woodfin

Grove Park Inn

EAST DOWNTOWN

wa



Asheville

• Candler • Sylva • Murphy • Cherokee • Cullowhee • Nantahala • Bryson City • Waynesville

WEST

Black Mountain River Arts District

Swannanoa



26 240

240

40

Biltmore Estate

Fairview 40

Candler

SOUTH Bent Creek

hB nc

Lake Julian

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Arden/Skyland

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26

Fletcher

• Fletcher • Brevard • Saluda • Tryon

s•a Arden/Skyland

• Hendersonville • Mills River • Flat Rock

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

Additional map for Outlying Areas on pg. 80

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

7


EATS The people FAVORITE RESTAURANT 1 NINE MILE d  w

233 Montford Ave., Asheville 505-3121 • ninemileasheville.com 751 Haywood Road, Asheville 575-9903

2 CÚRATE d

13 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 239-2946 • heirloomhg.com/curate

3 LIMONES d

13 Eagle St., Asheville 252-2327 • limonesrestaurant.com

BARBECUE 1 12 BONES SMOKEHOUSE r  s  x 5 Foundy St., Suite 10, Asheville 253-4499 • 12bones.com 3578 Sweeten Creek Road, Asheville 687-1395

2 LUELLA'S BAR-B-QUE n  s 501 Merrimon Ave., Asheville 505-7427 • luellasbbq.com 33 Town Square Blvd., Asheville 676-3855

3 MOE’S ORIGINAL BAR B QUE s 4 Sweeten Creek Road, Asheville 505-8282 • moesoriginalbbq.com

BEST VALUE 1 WHITE DUCK TACO SHOP d  s  r  x 12 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 232-9191 • whiteducktacoshop.com 1 Roberts St., Asheville 258-1660 16 Miami Circle, Arden 676-1859

2 MAMACITA’S d

77-A Biltmore Ave., Asheville 255-8080 • mamacitasgrill.com

3 PAPAS & BEER w

1000 Brevard Road, Asheville 665-9070 • papasandbeerasheville.net

ICON KEY nORTH sOUTH �AST wEST dOWNTOWN AREA rIVER ARTS DISTRICT a OUTLYING

AREA

x HALL OF FAME (Winner four years or more in a row)

8

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

of Western North Carolina have spoken, and it’s apparent from voting patterns that we are not just passionate about food in general, but most emphatically about barbecue, breakfast, burgers and pizza. Along with the perpetually popular race for Favorite Restaurant, those four categories received the greatest number of votes, with barbecue leading the foursome. And despite a spring move down the street from its original River Arts District digs to the new Foundation development, 12 Bones Smokehouse still smokes the competition. This year’s results in the New Restaurant category point to a shift in local enthusiasm, if not tastes. Last year’s favorite newbie was the locally owned Red Ginger Dimsum & Tapas. But this year, with eateries popping up seemingly on a weekly basis in Asheville (and no shortage of them devoted to tacos), WNC picked Bartaco, part of a national chain, as its favorite new establishment. Meanwhile, in the Taco category, the ever-popular White Duck, which just opened yet another location in South Asheville, retained its longtime supremacy, with Taco Temple coming in second. Voters stuck to their guns in keeping other old favorites in top slots. Bouchon maintained its place as WNC’s reigning monarch in the French Fries category, Asheville Pizza didn’t slip from its lead position as the best Kid-Friendly eatery, and Cúrate edged out Chestnut to keep its title as favorite Restaurant in Downtown. Please welcome these new Hall of Fame members: Well-Bred Bakery & Café (Bakery-Sweets/Desserts); White Duck Taco Shop (Best Value, Quick Meal); Biscuit Head (Biscuits); 12 Bones Smokehouse (Ribs); Tupelo Honey Café (Southern).

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

— Gina Smith  X

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

PHOTO BY JACK SOROKIN

12 BONES SMOKEHOUSE: Best Barbecue and Best Ribs


BE

ST OF

14

20 WNC

white duck taco shop MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

9


BEST OF EATS BISCUITS 1 BISCUIT HEAD d  w  x

417 Biltmore Ave., Suite 4F, Asheville 505-3449 • biscuitheads.com 733 Haywood Road, Asheville 333-5145

2 SUNNY POINT CAFÉ w 626 Haywood Road, Asheville 252-0055 • sunnypointcafe.com

3 TUPELO HONEY CAFÉ d 12 College St., Asheville 255-4863 • tupelohoneycafe.com

Mu c hi simas Gr a ci as A s hevi ll e ! Heirloom Corn Tortillas Ground Onsite Daily Slow Roasted Chicken & Pork Pastor Tacos Tortas Tequila

BREAKFAST 1 SUNNY POINT CAFÉ w  x 626 Haywood Road, Asheville 252-0055 • sunnypointcafe.com

2 BISCUIT HEAD d  w 417 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 505-3449 • biscuitheads.com 733 Haywood Road, Asheville 333-5145

3 EARLY GIRL EATERY d 8 Wall St., Asheville 259-9292 • earlygirleatery.com

OR D E R O NL I NE @

132 CHARLOTTE STREET, ASHEVILLE, NC

828-255-8098

M A M AC ITA S TACO TEMP LE. CO M M- T H 1 1 A M- 9 PM • F & S 11A M - 10 P M CL O S ED S U N D AY S

BRUNCH 1 SUNNY POINT CAFÉ w  x 626 Haywood Road, Asheville 252-0055 • sunnypointcafe.com

10 Patton Ave., Asheville 348-8540 • farmburger.net

1831 Hendersonville Road, Asheville 575-2393

2 JUICY LUCY'S BURGER BAR AND GRILL s

620 Hendersonville Road, Asheville 277-0355 • juicylucysburgerbarandgrill.com

2 RANKIN VAULT COCKTAIL LOUNGE d 7 Rankin Ave., Asheville 254-4993 • rankinvault.com

3 UNIVERSAL JOINT w 784 Haywood Road, Asheville 505-7262 • ujasheville.com

BURRITO 1 MAMACITA’S d  x

77-A Biltmore Ave., Asheville 255-8080 • mamacitasgrill.com

2 NEO BURRITO w  n

1341 Parkwood Road, Asheville 772-9602 • eatneo.com

Deli - Market - Food Truck - Catering

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

107 Black Mountain Ave., Black Mountain 669-5100 • redradish.com

3 67 BILTMORE d

67 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 252-1500 • 67biltmore.com

CHAIN-OPERATED RESTAURANT 1 CHICK-FIL-A s  d  E

1832 Hendersonville Road, Asheville 277-9913 • chick-fil-a.com 170 Merrimon Ave., Asheville 253-2201 40 S. Tunnel Road, Asheville 298-2571

2 CARRABBA’S ITALIAN GRILL E 10 Buckstone Place, Asheville 281-2300 • carrabbas.com

3 MELLOW MUSHROOM d 50 Broadway, Asheville 236-9800 • mellowmushroom.com

CHEESEMAKER/CHEESE DAIRY

1 THREE GRACES DAIRY n  a

1 FARM BURGER d  s  x

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

2 THE RED RADISH E  a

3 TUPELO HONEY CAFÉ d

BURGER

10

Asheville 575-2819 • cornerkitchencatering.com

1 LOOKING GLASS CREAMERY E  a

12 College St., Asheville 255-4863 • tupelohoneycafe.com

807 Patton Avenue • 575-2758 www.gypsyqueencuisine.com

1 CORNER KITCHEN CATERING 

2 LIMONES d

13 Eagle St., Asheville 252-2327 • limonesrestaurant.com

Thank you for voting us one of the Best Food Trucks Asheville! Come get the same great food at our Cafe!

CATERING COMPANY

2 Town Square Blvd., Asheville 772-9568 • eatneo.com

3 URBAN BURRITO n

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

640 Merrimon Ave., Suite 203, Asheville 251-1921 • urbanburrito.com

57 Noble Road, Fairview 458-4715 • ashevillecheese.com 335 Milky Way, Marshall 656-2195 • 3gracesdairy.com

2 SPINNING SPIDER CREAMERY n  a 4717 E. Fork Road, Marshall 206-5509 • spinningspidercreamery.com

3 CANE CREEK CREAMERY s  a

1448 Cane Creek Rd (8 Cheese House Rd), Fletcher 338-0188 • canecreekorganics.com

CHEF 1 KATIE BUTTON (CÚRATE AND NIGHTBELL) d  x 13 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 239-2946 • curatetapasbar.com

2 JOE SCULLY (CHESTNUT AND CORNER KITCHEN) d 3  JASON SELLERS (PLANT) d 165 Merrimon Ave., Asheville 258-7500 • plantisfood.com

DINER/HOME-STYLE 1 HOMEGROWN d  x

371 Merrimon Ave., Asheville 232-4340 • slowfoodrightquick.com

2 TASTEE DINER w

575 Haywood Road, Asheville 412-5566 • tasteedinernc.com

3 FIVE POINTS RESTAURANT d 258 Broadway, Asheville 252-8030


reader poll

s’

thing downtown asheville needs

This word cloud is created by combining key words from the write-in answers fromthe survey. The more people who gave an answer, the bigger the word appears.

reader poll

s’

biggest threat to asheville’s uniqueness

This word cloud is created by combining key words from the write-in answers fromthe survey. The more people who gave an answer, the bigger the word appears.

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

11


BEST OF EATS

continued

DONUTS 1 VORTEX DOUGHNUTS d 32 Banks Ave., Suite 106, Asheville 552-3010 • vortexdoughnuts.com

2 HOLE DOUGHNUTS w

168 Haywood Road, Asheville 774-5667 • hole-doughnuts.com

3 KRISPY KREME w

960 Patton Ave., Asheville 254-6007 • krispykreme.com

FOOD TRUCK 1 EL KIMCHI  x

551-6775 • facebook.com/ElKimchi

2 GYPSY QUEEN CUISINE w 807 Patton Ave., Asheville 575-2758 • gypsyqueencuisine.com

3 MELT YOUR HEART 989-6749 • avl.mx/3uo

FRENCH FRIES 1 BOUCHON d  x

62 N. Lexington Ave., Asheville 350-1140 • ashevillebouchon.com

2 FARM BURGER d  s 10 Patton Ave., Asheville 348-8540 • farmburger.net

1831 Hendersonville Road, Asheville 575-2393

3 FIVE GUYS BURGERS AND FRIES s 1838 Hendersonville Road, Asheville 277-3894 • fiveguys.com

FRIED CHICKEN 1 ROCKY’S HOT CHICKEN SHACK w  s 1455 Patton Ave., Asheville 575-2260 • rockyshotchickenshack.com

PHOTO BY JACK SOROKIN

3749 Sweeten Creek Road, Arden 676-3222

ASHEVILLE PIZZA & BREWING CO.: Best Pizza and Best Kid-Friendly Restaurant

2 HOMEGROWN d

371 Merrimon Ave., Asheville 232-4340 • slowfoodrightquick.com

3 KING DADDY'S CHICKEN AND WAFFLE w

444 Haywood Road, Suite 101, Asheville 785-1690 • ashevillekingdaddy.com

GREEN/SUSTAINABILITYFRIENDLY RESTAURANT 1 GREEN SAGE CAFE d  s  w  x

HEALTHIEST RESTAURANT 1 PLANT d

1 CELEBRITY'S HOT DOGS w

2 LAUGHING SEED d

2 HOT DOG WORLD s  a

3 GREEN SAGE CAFE d

3 THE HOT DOG KING E  a

165 Merrimon Ave., Asheville 258-7500 • plantisfood.com 40 Wall St., Asheville 252-3445 • laughingseed.com 5 Broadway, Asheville 252-4450 • greensagecafe.com

5 Broadway, Asheville 252-4450 • greensagecafe.com

1800 Hendersonville Road, Asheville 274-4450 70 Westgate Parkway, Asheville 785-1780

2 HOMEGROWN d

371 Merrimon Ave., Asheville 232-4340 • slowfoodrightquick.com

HOT BAR 1 WHOLE FOODS MARKET E 4 S. Tunnel Road, Asheville 239-9604 • wholefoodsmarket.com

2 EARTH FARE w  s

66 Westgate Parkway, Asheville 253-7656 • EarthFare.com 1856 Hendersonville Road, Asheville 210-0100

2 PLANT d

165 Merrimon Ave., Asheville 258-7500 • plantisfood.com

3 NEO BURRITO w

1341 Parkwood Road, Asheville 772-9602 • eatneo.com

12

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

HOT DOGS

3 GREENLIFE GROCERY (WHOLE FOODS) d

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

70 Merrimon Ave., Asheville 254-5440 • wholefoodsmarket.com

1409 Brevard Road, Asheville 670-5954 • facebook.com/ashevillehotdogs 226 Kanuga Road, Hendersonville 697-0374 • hotdogworld.net

1487 Charlotte Highway, Fairview 628-1036 • thehotdogkingfairview.com

KID-FRIENDLY 1 ASHEVILLE PIZZA AND BREWING CO. n  d  x 675 Merrimon Ave., Asheville 254-1281 • ashevillebrewing.com 77 Coxe Ave., Asheville 255-4077

2 SALVAGE STATION d

466 Riverside Drive, Asheville 407-0521 • salvagestation.com

3 CREEKSIDE TAPHOUSE E 8 Beverly Road, Asheville 575-2880 • creeksidetaphouse.com


We’re Honored to be Voted Best Vegetarian & Healthiest Restaurant. CHEERS!

165 merrimon avenue • (828) 258-7500 • www.plantisfood.com MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

13


our y e c un anno with win ICIAL F F O an

BEST OF EATS

continued

D R A AW UES

PLAQ

PHOTO BY EMMA GRACE MOON

CHESTNUT: Best Business Lunch LATE-NIGHT

BUSINESS LUNCH

1 ROSETTA'S KITCHEN d  x

1 CHESTNUT d  x

1 MELLOW MUSHROOM d  x

2 RANKIN VAULT COCKTAIL LOUNGE d

2 MELA INDIAN RESTAURANT d

2 WICKED WEED BREWING d

3 MOJO KITCHEN & LOUNGE d

3 PACK'S TAVERN d

3 LEXINGTON AVENUE BREWERY d

116 N. Lexington Ave., Asheville 232-0738 • rosettaskitchen.com 7 Rankin Ave., Asheville 254-4993 • rankinvault.com

48 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 575-2667 • chestnutasheville.com 70 N. Lexington Ave., Asheville 225-8880 • melaasheville.com 20 S. Spruce St., Asheville 225-6944 • packstavern.com

55 College St., Asheville 255-7767 • mojokitchen.biz

LOCAL-FOOD EMPHASIS

8.5” x 11” HIGH QUALITY MOUNT $60 + SHIPPING

1 HOMEGROWN d  x

371 Merrimon Ave., Asheville 232-4340 • slowfoodrightquick.com

2 SUNNY POINT CAFÉ w 626 Haywood Road, Asheville 252-0055 • sunnypointcafe.com

3 EARLY GIRL EATERY d

OUTDOOR DINING 1 UNIVERSAL JOINT w 784 Haywood Road, Asheville 505-7262 • ujasheville.com

2 SUNSET TERRACE n

Grove Park Inn, 290 Macon Ave., Asheville 800-438-5800 • omnihotels.com/hotels/ashevillegrove-park/dining/sunset-terrace

3 WICKED WEED BREWING d 91 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 575-9599 • wickedweedbrewing.com

8 Wall St., Asheville 259-9292 • earlygirleatery.com

LUNCH 1 MELA INDIAN RESTAURANT d 70 N. Lexington Ave., Asheville 225-8880 • melaasheville.com

2 WHITE DUCK TACO SHOP d  s  r

PASTA 1 VINNIE'S NEIGHBORHOOD ITALIAN n 641 Merrimon Ave., Asheville 253-1077 • vinniesitalian.com

2 NINE MILE d  w

233 Montford Ave., Asheville 505-3121 • ninemileasheville.com 751 Haywood Road, Asheville 575-9903

12 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 232-9191 • whiteducktacoshop.com

ONLY AVAILABLE AT MOUNTAINXPRESS. NEWSKEEPSAKE.COM

1 Roberts St., Asheville 258-1660 16 Miami Circle, Arden 676-1859

3 NINE MILE d

233 Montford Ave., Asheville 505-3121 • ninemileasheville.com

14

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

PEOPLE-WATCHING

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

50 Broadway, Asheville 236-9800 • mellowmushroom.com

91 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 575-9599 • wickedweedbrewing.com 39 N. Lexington Ave., Asheville 252-0212 • lexavebrew.com

PIZZA 1 ASHEVILLE PIZZA AND BREWING CO. n  d  s  x 675 Merrimon Ave., Asheville 254-1281 • ashevillebrewing.com 77 Coxe Ave., Asheville 255-4077 1850 Hendersonville Road, Asheville 277-5775

2 MARCO'S PIZZERIA s  n 1854 Hendersonville Road, Asheville 277-0004 • marcos-pizzeria.com 946 Merrimon Ave., Asheville 285-0709

3 FAVILLA’S NEW YORK PIZZA w 1093 Patton Ave., Asheville 225-3032 • favillasnypizza.com

PUB GRUB 1 WESTVILLE PUB w

777 Haywood Road, Asheville 225-9782 • westvillepub.com

3 CHIESA d

2 JACK OF THE WOOD d

3 STRADA d

3 WICKED WEED BREWING d

152 Montford Ave., Asheville 552-3110 • chiesaavl.com

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

27 Broadway, Asheville 348-8448 • stradaasheville.com

95 Patton Ave., Asheville 252-3445 • jackofthewood.com

91 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 575-9599 • wickedweedbrewing.com


Celebrating our 12th anniversary!

MX

midnight Sunday, April 2nd for a chance to win four Reserves Flex Tickets for the 2017 Season!

giveaway!

Find this MX Promo at mountainx.com and comment before midnight Sunday, August 20th for a chance to win a $40 gift card to Hopey & Co.!

a $40 gift card to Hopey & Co. Cafe • Market • Budget-friendly

hopeyandcompany.com Black Mountain | South AVL | Downtown AVL

Go to avl.mx/40l & enter password: number1asheville

MX

Thanks, Asheville!

Find this MX Promo at mountainx.com and comment before midnight Sunday, April 2nd for a chance to win four Reserves Flex Tickets for the 2017 Season!

giveaway!

Find this MX Promo at mountainx.com and comment before midnight Sunday, August 20th for a chance to win a private training session from Mindful Mutz!

VOTED BEST INDIAN EVERY YEAR SINCE 2006 1st Place • Lunch 2nd Place • Business Lunch

a 1 hour customized private training session ($75 value) from Mindful Mutz Training & Behavior Consulting, LLC

melaasheville.com

70 N. LEXINGTON AVENUE 828.225.8880

mindfulmutz.com | 828-230-6389

Go to avl.mx/40j & enter password: number1asheville

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

15


BEST OF EATS

continued

THANKS FOR VOTING US #1 RESTAURANT IN EAST ASHEVILLE! 1011 Tunnel Rd, Asheville NC 28805 Home Trust Bank Plaza • 828.505.7531

coppercrownavl.com

PHOTO BY CINDY KUNST

COPPER CROWN: Best Restaurant In East Asheville

THANK YOU ASHEVILLE ❤ FOR VOTING US ❤

#1 ALTERNATIVE HEALING CENTER

QUICK MEAL 1 WHITE DUCK TACO SHOP d  s  r  x 12 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 232-9191 • whiteducktacoshop.com 1 Roberts St., Asheville 258-1660 16 Miami Circle, Arden 676-1859

2 MAMACITA’S d

RESTAURANT IN DOWNTOWN 1 CÚRATE d

13 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 239-2946 • heirloomhg.com/curate

2 CHESTNUT d

48 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 575-2667 • chestnutasheville.com

3 LIMONES d

13 Eagle St., Asheville 252-2327 • limonesrestaurant.com

77-A Biltmore Ave., Asheville 255-8080 • mamacitasgrill.com

3 TACO TEMPLE d

RESTAURANT IN THE RIVER ARTS DISTRICT

132 Charlotte Street, Asheville 255-8098 • mamacitastacotemple.com

us #1...YAY! or voting Thank you f Alchemy seeks to transform the way Chinese Medicine is experienced through the creation of a vibrant and welcoming sanctuary. As a tearoom, apothecary, and acupuncture practice, we are committed to nourishing the individual and the community while supporting environmental well-being.

Accepting New Patients! 62 Clayton Street, Asheville NC 28801 alchemyasheville.com • 828.575.9419 16

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

RIBS

1 WHITE DUCK TACO SHOP d  s  r 12 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 232-9191 • whiteducktacoshop.com

1 12 BONES SMOKEHOUSE r  s  x 5 Foundy St., Suite 10, Asheville 253-4499 • 12bones.com

1 Roberts St., Asheville 258-1660

3578 Sweeten Creek Road, Asheville 687-1395

16 Miami Circle, Arden 676-1859

2 LUELLA'S BAR-B-QUE n  s

2 12 BONES SMOKEHOUSE r  s

501 Merrimon Ave., Asheville 505-7427 • luellasbbq.com

5 Foundy St., Suite 10, Asheville 253-4499 • 12bones.com

33 Town Square Blvd., Asheville 676-3855

3578 Sweeten Creek Road, Asheville 687-1395

3 MOE’S ORIGINAL BAR B QUE s 4 Sweeten Creek Road, Asheville 505-8282 • moesoriginalbbq.com

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

3 THE BULL AND BEGGAR d

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

37 Paynes Way, No. 007, Asheville 575-9443 • thebullandbeggar.com

RESTAURANT IN WEST ASHEVILLE 1 NINE MILE d  w

233 Montford Ave., Asheville 505-3121 • ninemileasheville.com 751 Haywood Road, Asheville 575-9903

2 SUNNY POINT CAFÉ w 626 Haywood Road, Asheville 252-0055 • sunnypointcafe.com

3 THE ADMIRAL w

400 Haywood Road, Asheville 252-2541 • theadmiralnc.com

RESTAURANT IN NORTH ASHEVILLE 1 AVENUE M n

791 Merrimon Ave., Asheville 350-8181 • avenuemavl.com

2 AMBROZIA BAR AND BISTRO n 1020 Merrimon Ave., Asheville 350-3033 • ambrozia-avl.com

3 HOMEGROWN d

371 Merrimon Ave., Asheville 232-4340 • slowfoodrightquick.com

RESTAURANT IN EAST ASHEVILLE 1 COPPER CROWN E

1011 Tunnel Rd., Asheville 505-7531 • coppercrownavl.com


Thank You Asheville! 12 Bones / 12 Years! Full Rack of Wins!

Best BBQ in WNC 12 Years in a Row! www.12bones.com Asheville Location

Arden Location

5 Foundy Street in the River Arts District

3578 Sweeten Creek Rd. Near BB Barns Nursery

Mon-Fri 11am-4pm

Tues-Sat 11am-4pm

253-4499

687-1395

Carry Out 4-6pm at Both Locations MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

17


BEST OF EATS

THANK YOU WNC

2 EAST VILLAGE GRILLE E

3 NINE MILE d

1177 Tunnel Road, Asheville 299-3743 • eastvillagegrille.com

for voting us one of the best!

3 CREEKSIDE TAPHOUSE E

-2nd place (tie)

1829 Hendersonville Road, Asheville 505-7676 • tupelohoneycafe.com

233 Montford Ave., Asheville 505-3121 • ninemileasheville.com

8 Beverly Road, Asheville 575-2880 • creeksidetaphouse.com

RESTAURANT STILL NEEDED IN ASHEVILLE

RESTAURANT IN SOUTH ASHEVILLE 1 TUPELO HONEY CAFÉ s

2 WILD GINGER NOODLE BAR s

BEST EUROPEAN RESTAURANT

1950 Hendersonville Road, Suite 12, Asheville 676-2311 • wildgingernoodle.com

-3rd place

3 131 MAIN RESTAURANT s

Biltmore Park Town Square, 308 Thetford St., Asheville 651-0131 • 131-main.com

BEST NEW RESTAURANT

RESTAURANT TO TAKE OUT-OF-TOWNERS TO 1 CÚRATE d

13 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 239-2946 • heirloomhg.com/curate

NEW RESTAURANT (OPENED IN THE LAST 12 MONTHS) 1 BARTACO d

121 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 984-229-8226 • bartaco.com

2 PIZZA MIND w

285 Haywood Road, Asheville 575-9181 • pizzamindavl.com

3 PETE’S PIES d

62 N. Lexington Ave., Asheville 505-2708 • petespiesavl.com

RESTAURANT THAT GIVES BACK TO THE COMMUNITY

2 TUPELO HONEY CAFÉ d  s 12 College St., Asheville 255-4863 • tupelohoneycafe.com

petespiesavl.com

1 CHINESE  2  VIETNAMESE  3  THE CHEESECAKE FACTORY 

1 ROSETTA'S KITCHEN d 116 N. Lexington Ave., Asheville 232-0738 • rosettaskitchen.com

1829 Hendersonville Road, Asheville 505-7676

TH A NK YOU ASHEV ILLE!

Huge outdoor seating area! Meeting, party & venue space available. Pet and family friendly! Vintage video games, Golden Tee, Skee Ball, Cornhole, Beach Volleyball! ALL NFL, NHL and college football action! BBQ & over 30 LOCAL & worldly craft beers plus full bar!

4 Years in a row! BE

14 WNC

18

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

(Just Off Tunnel Rd.)

1st Place! Neighborhood Bar East Asheville

ST OF

20

CreekSideTapHouse.com 8 Beverly Rd. Asheville, NC

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

828-575-2880

Find us on Facebook & Twitter.

3rd Place! Kid-Friendly

3rd Place! Restaurant in East Asheville


Big bout yah 2

nd

1st

3rd

Pasta

Favorite Restaurant

Lunch

Salad

Restaurant in West Asheville

Restaurant to Take Out-of-Towners

montford: 828.505.3121 • west: 828.575.9903 • ninemileasheville.com • facebook.com/ninemile MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

19


BEST OF EATS 2 CORNER KITCHEN s

RESTAURANT WINE LIST

3 Boston Way, Asheville 274-2439 • thecornerkitchen.com

1 ZAMBRA d  x

85 W. Walnut St., Asheville 232-1060 • zambratapas.com

3 AVENUE M n

791 Merrimon Ave., Asheville 350-8181 • avenuemavl.com

2 CÚRATE d

RESTAURANT THAT BEST REPRESENTS THE SPIRIT OF ASHEVILLE 1 ROSETTA'S KITCHEN d

40 Wall St., Asheville 252-3445 • laughingseed.com

626 Haywood Road, Asheville 252-0055 • sunnypointcafe.com

2 NINE MILE d  w

3 HOMEGROWN d

371 Merrimon Ave., Asheville 232-4340 • slowfoodrightquick.com

ROMANTIC DINING 1 ZAMBRA d  x

85 W. Walnut St., Asheville 232-1060 • zambratapas.com

485 Hendersonville Road, Asheville 274-3582 • apolloflamebistro.net

1 THE LOBSTER TRAP d  x

3 BOUCHON d

2 OYSTER HOUSE BREWING w

thing north asheville needs

This word cloud is created by combining key words from the write-in answers fromthe survey. The more people who gave an answer, the bigger the word appears.

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

3 APOLLO FLAME BISTRO & PIZZA s

2 OMNI GROVE PARK INN n

62 N. Lexington Ave., Asheville 350-1140 • ashevillebouchon.com

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

233 Montford Ave., Asheville 505-3121 • ninemileasheville.com 751 Haywood Road, Asheville 575-9903

SEAFOOD

290 Macon Ave., Asheville 800-438-5800 • omnigroveparkinn.com

20

62 N. Lexington Ave., Asheville 350-1140 • ashevillebouchon.com

1 LAUGHING SEED d  x

2 SUNNY POINT CAFÉ w

s’

3 BOUCHON d

SALAD

116 N. Lexington Ave., Asheville 232-0738 • rosettaskitchen.com

reader poll

13 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 239-2946 • heirloomhg.com/curate

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

reader poll

s’

35 Patton Ave., Asheville 350-0505 • thelobstertrap.biz

625 Haywood Road, Asheville 575-9370 • oysterhousebeers.com

thing south asheville needs

This word cloud is created by combining key words from the write-in answers fromthe survey. The more people who gave an answer, the bigger the word appears.


Thank You for Voting Us Your #1 (again) Big hugs from the Avenue M Family! Thanks to the neighborhood for an amazing first 7 years.

#1

Restaurant in North Asheville

#1

Pet-Friendly Restaurant

#1

Neighborhood Bar – North

#3

Restaurant That Gives Back To The Community

Eat. Drink. Gather. in the heart of North Asheville Wed-Thu 5pm-10pm • Fri-Sat 5 pm- 10:30pm Sun Brunch 10am-2pm • Lite Fare 2pm-5pm • Dinner 5pm-9pm 791 Merrimon Avenue Asheville, NC 28804 828.350.8181 • avenuemavl.com MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

21


BEST OF EATS

PHOTO BY EMMA GRACE MOON

POSANA: Best Special Diet Options (Gluten-Free, Lactose-Free, etc.) 3 HARBOR INN w

880 Brevard Road, Asheville 665-9940

SERVICE 1 VINNIE'S NEIGHBORHOOD ITALIAN n 641 Merrimon Ave., Asheville 253-1077 • vinniesitalian.com

2 CHESTNUT d

48 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 575-2667 • chestnutasheville.com

3 CÚRATE d

13 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 239-2946 • heirloomhg.com/curate

SOUTHERN 1 TUPELO HONEY CAFÉ s  d  x 1829 Hendersonville Road, Asheville 505-7676 • tupelohoneycafe.com 12 College St., Asheville 255-4863

2 HOMEGROWN d

371 Merrimon Ave., Asheville 232-4340 • slowfoodrightquick.com

3 MOOSE CAFÉ w

570 Brevard Road, Asheville 255-0920 • eatatthemoosecafe.com

SPECIAL DIET OPTIONS (GLUTEN-FREE, LACTOSE-FREE, ETC.) 1 POSANA d  x

1 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 505-3969 • posanarestaurant.com

22

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

2 PLANT d

165 Merrimon Ave., Asheville 258-7500 • plantisfood.com

3 LAUGHING SEED d

40 Wall St., Asheville 252-3445 • laughingseed.com

SPLURGE RESTAURANT 1 CÚRATE d  x

13 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 239-2946 • heirloomhg.com/curate

2 LIMONES d

13 Eagle St., Asheville 252-2327 • limonesrestaurant.com

2 THE ADMIRAL w

400 Haywood Road, Asheville 252-2541 • theadmiralnc.com

3 PLANT d

165 Merrimon Ave., Asheville 258-7500 • plantisfood.com

SUB SHOP/DELI/SANDWICHES 1 JERSEY MIKE’S SUBS s  E  w 1816 Hendersonville Road, Asheville 277-1514 • jerseymikes.com 104A River Hills Road, Asheville 298-6453 1341 Parkwood Road, Asheville 271-4612

2 ASHEVILLE SANDWICH COMPANY w 794 Haywood Road, Asheville 252-0110 • AshevilleSandwichCo.com


MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

23


BEST OF EATS 3 ROMAN’S LOCAL DELI & CATERING d 75-A Haywood St., Asheville 505-1552 • romansasheville.com

TACO 1 WHITE DUCK TACO SHOP d  s  r  x 12 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 232-9191 • whiteducktacoshop.com 1 Roberts St., Asheville 258-1660

VEGETARIAN 1 PLANT d

165 Merrimon Ave., Asheville 258-7500 • plantisfood.com

2 LAUGHING SEED d

40 Wall St., Asheville 252-3445 • laughingseed.com

3 ROSETTA'S KITCHEN d 116 N. Lexington Ave., Asheville 232-0738 • rosettaskitchen.com

16 Miami Circle, Arden 676-1859

2 TACO TEMPLE d

132 Charlotte Street, Asheville 255-8098 • mamacitastacotemple.com

3 TACO BILLY w

201 Haywood Road, Asheville 505-0088 • tacobillyasheville.com

TAKE-OUT 1 DOC CHEY’S NOODLE HOUSE d  x 37 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 252-8220 • doccheysasheville.com

24

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

19 Broadway, Asheville 225-2551 • wasabiasheville.com

2 GREEN TEA SUSHI RESTAURANT w 2 Regent Park Blvd., Asheville 252-8300 • greenteasushiasheville.com

3 ICHIBAN STEAKHOUSE & SUSHI BAR s

2 Hendersonville Road, Asheville 252-7885 • ashevilleichiban.com

SUSHI

1 DOC CHEY’S NOODLE HOUSE d

1 WASABI JAPANESE RESTAURANT d  x

1 RED GINGER DIMSUM & TAPAS d

2 GREEN TEA SUSHI RESTAURANT w

2 ORIENTAL PAVILION w

3 ZEN SUSHI n

37 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 252-8220 • doccheysasheville.com

82 Patton Ave., Asheville 505-8688 • redgingerasheville.com 48 Westgate Parkway, Asheville 236-3839 • orientalpavilion.com

19 Broadway, Asheville 225-2551 • wasabiasheville.com

2 Regent Park Blvd., Asheville 252-8300 • greenteasushiasheville.com 640 Merrimon Ave., Asheville 225-6033 • zen-sushi-asheville.com

3 GAN SHAN STATION d 143 Charlotte Street, Asheville 774-5280 • ganshanstation.com

48 Westgate Parkway, Asheville 236-3839 • orientalpavilion.com 641 Merrimon Ave., Asheville 253-1077 • vinniesitalian.com

1 WASABI JAPANESE RESTAURANT d  x

CHINESE

2 ORIENTAL PAVILION w 3  VINNIE'S NEIGHBORHOOD ITALIAN n

continued

JAPANESE 1 HEIWA SHOKUDO d

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

87 N. Lexington Ave., Asheville 254-7761 • heiwashokudo.com

INDIAN 1 MELA INDIAN RESTAURANT d  x 70 N. Lexington Ave., Asheville 225-8880 • melaasheville.com

2 CHAI PANI d

22 Battery Park Ave., Asheville 254-4003 • chaipaniasheville.com


WASABI Japanese Restaurant & Sushi Bar

Brought to you By the owners of IchIBan Japanese steakhouse

thank you asheVILLe!

wInner!

Best Japanese restaurant 2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

wInner! Best sushI

Helping Asheville Eat & Drink Local Since 2008

2005-2009

Featuring locally raised meats and fresh produce

2011-2017

Open 7 days for Lunch & Dinner

1 9 B r oa dwa y • d ow ntow n • 225-2551

Voted One Of The Best Japanese Restaurants 2017 Located near Biltmore Village in Biltmore station

CATEGORY WIN:

yama Japanese restaurant now open! 4 regent Park Blvd • west asheville

Sub Shop-Deli-Sandwiches

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

75A Haywood St. Asheville, 28801 828-505-1552 ORDER ONLINE romansasheville.com BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

25


APOLLO FLAME

BEST OF EATS

- Hall of Fame Winner -

Voted best greek restaurant 20 straight years!

We’d like to thank current and future customers for all of your support. Come try the best! Thanks, John & Susan Poulos

Best Quality, Best Prices, Best Food, Best Service

HOURS: 10:30 AM - 10 PM MONDAY THRU SATURDAY 274-3582 / 485 Hendersonville Rd In the Forest Edge Shopping Ctr

PHOTO BY EMMA GRACE MOON

WELL-BRED BAKERY & CAFE: Best Bakery (Sweets/Desserts) and regional awards in Weaverville/Woodfin 3 INDIA GARDEN E 80 S. Tunnel Road, Asheville 298-5001 • indiagardenonline.com

KOREAN 1 KOREAN HOUSE d

122 College St., Asheville 785-1500 • koreanhousenc.com

2 STONEBOWL KOREAN s

1987 Hendersonville Road, Asheville 676-2172

3 KOREANA s  a

221 Airport Road, Arden 676-2844 • koreanaasheville.com

THAI 1 LITTLE BEE THAI d

45 S. French Broad Ave., Suite 190, Asheville 239-8808 • littlebeethai.com

2 SUWANA'S THAI ORCHID RESTAURANT d

11 Broadway, Asheville 281-8151 • suwanasthaiorchid.com

26

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

3 THE THAI KITCHEN n

535 Merrimon Ave., Suite C, Asheville 251-1960

GREEK 1 APOLLO FLAME BISTRO & PIZZA s  w  x 485 Hendersonville Road, Asheville 274-3582 • apolloflamebistro.net 1025 Brevard Road, Asheville 665-0080

2 TWISTED LAUREL EATERY AND TAPS n  d  a 10-A S. Main St., Weaverville 645-2700 • twistedlaurel.com 130 College St., Asheville 552-3240

3 GOLDEN FLEECE SLOW EARTH KITCHEN n

111 Grovewood Road, Asheville 424-7655 • goldenfleeceasheville.com


Thank you for voting usÂ

Best Asian Market 5 Regent Park Blvd

Open 7 days a week

Asheville, NC 28803

(828) 254-7235

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

27


BEST OF EATS

continued

ITALIAN 1 VINNIE'S NEIGHBORHOOD ITALIAN n  x 641 Merrimon Ave., Asheville 253-1077 • vinniesitalian.com

2 STRADA d

27 Broadway, Asheville 348-8448 • stradaasheville.com

3 CHIESA d

152 Montford Ave., Asheville 552-3110 • chiesaavl.com

EUROPEAN 1 BOUCHON d  x

62 N. Lexington Ave., Asheville 350-1140 • ashevillebouchon.com

2 CÚRATE d

13 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 239-2946 • heirloomhg.com/curate

2 PETE’S PIES d

62 N. Lexington Ave., Asheville 505-2708 • petespiesavl.com

MEXICAN 1 PAPAS & BEER w  x

1000 Brevard Road, Asheville 665-9070 • papasandbeerasheville.net

PHOTO BY ADAM MCMILLAN

2 EL QUE PASA w

891 Patton Ave., Asheville 255-2227

THE HOP ICE CREAM CAFE: Best Ice Cream

3 ZIA TAQUERIA w

521 Haywood Road, Asheville 575-9393 • ziataco.com

LATIN AMERICAN 1 SALSA’S d  x

6 Patton Ave., Asheville 252-9805 • salsasnc.com

2 LIMONES d

13 Eagle St., Asheville 252-2327 • limonesrestaurant.com

3 CHUPACABRA LATIN CAFE n 50 N. Merrimon Ave., Suite 101, Asheville 333-9230 • chupacabralatincafe.com

28

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

ICE CREAM 1 THE HOP ICE CREAM CAFE n  w  x 640 Merrimon Ave., Asheville 254-2224 • thehopicecreamcafe.com

FROZEN YOGURT/CUSTARD 1 WHIT’S FROZEN CUSTARD n  s 565 Merrimon Ave., Asheville 505-1771 • whitsasheville.com

721 Haywood Road, Asheville 252-5155

2 ULTIMATE ICE CREAM E 1070 Tunnel Road, Asheville 296-1234 • ultimateicecreamasheville.com

3 KILWIN'S CHOCOLATES, FUDGE & ICE CREAM d

1840 Hendersonville Road, Asheville 575-2455

2 YOLO FROZEN YOGURT n

505 Merrimon Ave., Asheville 255-4515 • facebook.com/YoLoAsheville

3 TCBY s

26 Battery Park Ave., Asheville 252-2639 • kilwins.com/asheville

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

1800 Hendersonville Road, Asheville 274-1100 • store.tcby.com/home/dinglecreekcrossing

CHOCOLATE 1 FRENCH BROAD CHOCOLATE LOUNGE d  x 10 S. Pack Square, Asheville 252-4181 • frenchbroadchocolates.com

2 THE CHOCOLATE FETISH d 36 Haywood St., Asheville 258-2353 • chocolatefetish.com

3 KILWIN'S CHOCOLATES, FUDGE & ICE CREAM d 26 Battery Park Ave., Asheville 252-2639 • kilwins.com/asheville


Merci Beaucoup Y’all

French Fries

We Love WNC and Y’all Love us Too! Thank you so much for your support. We couldn’t have done it without you!

First place

European

Serving up affordable, Latin-inspired, casual cuisine

First place

Romantic Dining Third place

Cubans, Burritos, Fish Tacos, Ceviche, Mussels, Margaritas, Local Drafts

Restaurant Wine List Third place

50 N. Merrimon Ave., Suite 101, Asheville, NC 28804 828-333-9230 • www.chupacabralatincafe.com MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

29


BEST OF EATS

continued

BAKERY (SWEETS/DESSERTS) 1 WELL-BRED BAKERY & CAFÉ n  s  a x

26 N. Main St., Weaverville 645-9300 • wellbredbakery.com 6 Boston Way, Asheville 774-5307

2 OLD EUROPE PASTRIES & COFFEE d 13 Broadway, Asheville 255-5999 • oldeuropepastries.com

3 OWL BAKERY w

295 Haywood Road, Asheville 785-1770 • owlbakery.com

BAKERY (BREAD) 1 CITY BAKERY CAFÉ d  x 60 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 252-4426 • citybakery.net 88 Charlotte St., Asheville 254-4289

2 FARM & SPARROW  PHOTO BY EMMA GRACE MOON

MANNA FOODBANK: Best Nonprofit Helping With Hunger Issues

30

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

(wholesale and tailgate markets) 633-0584 • farmandsparrow.com

3 OWL BAKERY w

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

295 Haywood Road, Asheville 785-1770 • owlbakery.com

LOCAL FOOD/ DRINK PRODUCT 1 BUCHI KOMBUCHA  x 484-8229 • drinkbuchi.com

2 ROOTS HUMMUS r

166 W. Haywood St., Asheville 232-2828 • rootsfood.com

3 HIGHLAND BREWING COMPANY E 12 Old Charlotte Highway, Suite 200, Asheville 299-3370 • highlandbrewing.com

CULINARY/COOKING CLASSES 1 A-B TECH COMMUNITY COLLEGE d  x 340 Victoria Road, Asheville 398-7900 • abtech.edu

NONPROFIT HELPING WITH HUNGER ISSUES 1 MANNA FOODBANK E 627 Swannanoa River Road, Asheville 299-3663 • mannafoodbank.org

2 ASHEVILLE POVERTY INITIATIVE n 789 Merrimon Ave., Asheville 231-4169 • ashevillepovertyinitiative.org

3 FOODCONNECTION.CO d 22 S. Pack Square, Asheville 407-0353 • foodconnection.co


r e you IAL c n u anno an OFFIC ith win w

Great Food! Greater Company! 12 Baskets Café

citybakery

summer seasonal

HAWAIIAN

The Asheville Poverty Initiative Wants to THANK WNC ! for voting us one of the best WNC non-profits… Our 12 Baskets Café, using 100% rescued, already-prepared food, has been building community and breaking down stereotypes since October 2016 at Kairos West — 610 Haywood Road — entrance in the back off State.

Bring this ad for a free lunch Monday-Friday 11:30 – 1:00 PM.

D R A AW UES

PLAQ

a soft, and fluffy braided loaf fused with pineapple, ginger, and vanilla.

delicious with a dab of butter or used as french toast!

8.5” x 11” HIGH QUALITY MOUNT $60 + SHIPPING

Come Join Us and “Get Filled!” Thank you to our partners: Mela’s, India Garden, Bean Works, Morrison Healthcare/Mission Hospital, Earthfare Westgate, Nine Mile West, RHA, Starbucks/Biltmore Square, Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse, Buxton BBQ, Hop West, West Village Market, Family Dollar, Danny’s Dumpster, and Village Potters!

ONLY AVAILABLE AT MOUNTAINXPRESS. NEWSKEEPSAKE.COM

available thursdays 60 Biltmore Avenue // 252.4426 88 Charlotte Street // 254.4289 citybakery.net/catering

“Improving the function of your body”

Thank you for voting us

one of the BEST

ChIRoPRaCToRS in WnC for 7 years in a row!!

Focusing on Chiropractic Sports Medicine & Manual Therapy to improve performance and your overall quality of life. Targeted patient specific rehabilitation and soft tissue techniques to enhance your movement and eliminate your pain and dysfunction.

3106 Sweeten Creek Rd., Suite E Asheville, NC 28803

828-676-0963 www.bmyerschiro.com

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

31


828.254.5677

600-B Centrepark Drive, Asheville, NC 32

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES


MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

33


DRINKS BAR THAT BEST REPRESENTS THE SPIRIT OF ASHEVILLE 1 WICKED WEED BREWING d 91 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 575-9599 • wickedweedbrewing.com

2 SOVEREIGN REMEDIES d 29 N. Market St., Asheville 919-9518 • sovereignremedies.com

3 WEDGE BREWING COMPANY r 37 Paynes Way, Suite 001, Asheville 505-2792 • wedgebrewing.com 5 Foundy St., Asheville 253-7152

BAR FOR LIVE MUSIC 1 ISIS MUSIC HALL w 743 Haywood Road, Asheville 575-2737 • isisasheville.com

2 5 WALNUT WINE BAR d 5 Walnut St., Asheville 253-2593 • 5walnut.com

3 THE GREY EAGLE r

185 Clingman Ave., Asheville 232-5800 • thegreyeagle.com

BAR WITH A VIEW

PHOTO BY ADAM MCMILLAN

1 SKY BAR d  x

HOPS & VINES: Best Homebrewing/Winemaking Supplies

18 Battery Park Ave., Asheville 258-1058 • worldcoffeecafe.com

2 THE MONTFORD ROOFTOP BAR d 199 Haywood St., Asheville 505-8750 • themontford.com

3 TOP OF THE MONK d 92 Patton Ave., Asheville 254-5470 • topofthemonk.com

ICON KEY nORTH sOUTH �AST wEST dOWNTOWN AREA rIVER ARTS DISTRICT a OUTLYING AREA x HALL OF FAME (Winner four years or more in a row)

34

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

although our

region is home to multiple thriving beverage industries, 2017 is the year that hard cider came on strong in the Best of WNC polls. This year’s Cidery category exceeded past performances to garner as much voter love as many of the perennially hot beer and coffee categories, ultimately tapping Urban Orchard Cider Co. for the No. 1 slot. This year also marked a first for Western North Carolina’s booming craft beer scene as Wicked Weed Brewing was acquired by AnheuserBusch, becoming our first local brewer to sell to a major international corporation. Despite the intense controversy that erupted after the

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

sale, Wicked Weed managed to walk away with honors in numerous Best of WNC categories, including top ranking in the incredibly popular Bar That Best Represents the Spirit of Asheville race. But voting closed just days before the brewery announced the acquisition, so we’ll have to wait to see how Asheville rates this heavyweight in next year’s polls. On the nonalcoholic front, coffee continued to reign supreme with the Coffee House contest clocking nearly as many votes as the top beer category (Local All-Round Brewery). But it seems that tea may be edging up on java in general popularity. This year’s Asheville Coffee Expo, which happens in September, has announced the

addition of a brand-new Tea Pavilion featuring local tea purveyors. Also, in the 2017 Best of WNC polls, the Place to Drink Tea category pulled in support that was competitive with many coffee, beer and bar categories, resulting in a landslide victory for Dobra Tea. Will the upcoming closure of Dobra’s Black Mountain location due to new development affect the number of votes the business receives in next year’s Best of WNC? Only time will tell. Please welcome the Brewgrass Festival (Favorite Local Beer Event) to this year’s Hall of Fame. — Gina Smith  X


BE

ST OF

14

20 WNC

Thank you Asheville for voting us #1 Wine Shop. We think you’re #1 too!

METROWINESASHEVILLE.COM

BIG SHOP SELECTION • SMALL SHOP SERVICE Free, Close Parking

169 Charlotte Street • Asheville, NC 28801 • 828.575.9525

metrowinesasheville.com • ashevilleschoolofwine.com • blindtastingleague.com MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

35


BEST OF DRINKS

continued

PHOTO BY SCOTT SOUTHWICK

SALVAGE STATION: Best Family/Kid-Friendly Bar BAR WITH BAR GAMES 1 WELL PLAYED d

58 Wall Street, Asheville 232-7375 • wellplayedasheville.com

2 TWIN LEAF BREWERY d

2 HIGHLAND BREWING COMPANY E 12 Old Charlotte Highway, Suite 200, Asheville 299-3370 • highlandbrewing.com

3 ASHEVILLE PIZZA AND BREWING CO. n

675 Merrimon Ave., Asheville 254-1281 • ashevillebrewing.com

144 Coxe Ave., Asheville 774-5000 • twinleafbrewery.com

3 RETROCADE w

800 Haywood Road #100, Asheville 575-9488 • ashevilleretrocade.com

GAY-FRIENDLY BAR 1 O.HENRY’S d

237 Haywood St., Asheville 254-1891 • ohenrysofasheville.com

DIVE BAR 1 THE BURGER BAR r

1 Craven St., Asheville https://www.facebook.com/pages/BurgerBar/117798551579430

2 SCANDALS NIGHTCLUB d 11 Grove St., Asheville 505-1612 • scandalsnightclub.com

2 DESOTO LOUNGE w

504 Haywood Road, Asheville 255-1109 • desotolounge.com

3 THE DOUBLE CROWN BAR w 375 Haywood Road, Asheville thedoublecrown.com

HOTEL BAR

466 Riverside Drive, Asheville 407-0521 • salvagestation.com

36

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

1 THE BIER GARDEN d

46 Haywood St., Asheville 285-0002 • ashevillebiergarden.com

2 HICKORY TAVERN s

Biltmore Park Town Square, 30 Town Square Blvd., Asheville 684-0975 • thehickorytavern.com

3 PACK'S TAVERN d

20 S. Spruce St., Asheville 225-6944 • packstavern.com

UPSCALE BAR 1 SOVEREIGN REMEDIES d 29 N. Market St., Asheville 919-9518 • sovereignremedies.com

1 ALOFT ASHEVILLE DOWNTOWN d  x

2 THE IMPERIAL LIFE d

2 MONTFORT ROOFTOP BAR d

3 NIGHTBELL d

3 PILLAR ROOFTOP BAR d

3 TOP OF THE MONK d

51 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 232-2838 • aloftashevilledowntown.com 199 Haywood St., Asheville 505-8750 • themontford.com

FAMILY/KID-FRIENDLY BAR 1 SALVAGE STATION d

SPORTS BAR

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

309 College St., Asheville 575-1188 • pillaravl.com

48 College St., Asheville 254-8980 • imperialbarasheville.com 32 S. Lexington Ave., Asheville 575-0375 • thenightbell.com 92 Patton Ave., Asheville 254-5470 • topofthemonk.com


YOUR CLOTH DIAPER AND BABYWEARING HEADQUARTERS

Thank you for voting us the Best Kids Clothing Store! Back to school sale is going on now

Thanks for voting us Best of WNC!

Enjoy 50% off consignment clothing and 25% off new clothing 647 Haywood Rd. ~ West Asheville ~ 253-4747

thelittlestbirds.com

It’s all fun and games until... never mind, it’s all fun and games. 828.232.7375 wellplayedasheville.com

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

37


BEST OF DRINKS 1 SOVEREIGN REMEDIES d

WINE BAR

29 N. Market St., Asheville 919-9518 • sovereignremedies.com

1 5 WALNUT WINE BAR d  x 5 Walnut St., Asheville 253-2593 • 5walnut.com

2 SANTÉ WINE BAR AND TAP ROOM d 1 Page Ave., 146/152, Asheville 254-8188 • santewinebar.com

3 BATTERY PARK BOOK EXCHANGE & CHAMPAGNE BAR d Grove Arcade, 1 Page Ave., Suite 101, Asheville 252-0020

BAR OR BREWERY THAT GIVES BACK TO THE COMMUNTY 1 HIGHLAND BREWING COMPANY E 12 Old Charlotte Highway, Suite 200, Asheville 299-3370 • highlandbrewing.com

2 NEW BELGIUM BREWING w

3 CHARLOTTE STREET GRILL AND PUB d 157 Charlotte St., Asheville 252-2948 • charlottestreetpub.com

2 WICKED WEED BREWING d 91 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 575-9599 • wickedweedbrewing.com

3 JACK OF THE WOOD d 95 Patton Ave., Asheville 252-3445 • jackofthewood.com

NEIGHBORHOOD BAR - EAST 1 CREEKSIDE TAPHOUSE E 8 Beverly Road, Asheville 575-2880 • creeksidetaphouse.com

2 THE SOCIAL E 1078 Tunnel Road, Asheville 298-8780 • thesocialasheville.com

NEIGHBORHOOD BAR SOUTH 1 THIRSTY MONK - BILTMORE PARK s 2 Town Square Blvd., Suite 170, Asheville 687-3873 • monkpub.com/biltmore-park

2 VILLAGE WAYSIDE BAR AND GRILL s 30 Lodge St., Asheville 277-4121 • villagewayside.com

3 BLUE GHOST BREWING COMPANY s  a

125 Underwood Road, Fletcher 376-0159 • blueghostbrewing.com

3 EAST VILLAGE GRILLE E

21 Craven Street, Asheville 333-6900 • avl.mx/3v1

3 SIERRA NEVADA TAPROOM & RESTAURANT s  a 100 Sierra Nevada Way, Mills River 681-5300 • sierranevada.com

NEIGHBORHOOD BAR DOWNTOWN 1 FOGGY MOUNTAIN BREW PUB d 12 Church St., Asheville 254-3008 • foggymountainavl.com

continued

1177 Tunnel Road, Asheville 299-3743 • eastvillagegrille.com

NEIGHBORHOOD BAR NORTH 1 AVENUE M n

791 Merrimon Ave., Asheville 350-8181 • avenuemavl.com

2 FRAZIER’S TAVERN d 389 Merrimon Ave, Asheville 258-9828

NEIGHBORHOOD BAR - WEST 1 WESTVILLE PUB w

777 Haywood Road, Asheville 225-9782 • westvillepub.com

2 DESOTO LOUNGE w

504 Haywood Road, Asheville 255-1109 • desotolounge.com

3 WEST ASHEVILLE LOUNGE AND KITCHEN w 401 Haywood Road, Asheville 505-7929 • walkavl.com

BARTENDER 1 JACKSON ZOELLER (THE BIER GARDEN) d  x 46 Haywood St., Asheville 285-0002 • ashevillebiergarden.com

2 JOCELIN ROSAS (URBAN ORCHARD CIDER CO.) w 210 Haywood Road, Asheville 774-5151 • urbanorchardcider.com

BAR: LOCAL BEER SELECTION 1 THIRSTY MONK d  s  n 92 Patton Ave., Asheville 254-5470 • monkpub.com Biltmore Park Town Square, 2 Town Square Blvd., Suite 170, Asheville 687-3873 51 N. Merrimon Ave., Suite 113, Woodfin 424-7807

2 BARLEY'S TAPROOM & PIZZERIA d 42 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 255-0504 • barleystaproom.com

3 WICKED WEED BREWING d 91 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 575-9599 • wickedweedbrewing.com

Thank you, Asheville!

1 st Place Pub Grub 1 st Place Neighborhood Bar - West 10:30am-2am, 7 days a week• Food 10:30am–1am (Brunch, Lunch & Dinner) 777 Haywood Road Asheville • www.westvillepub.com • 225-WPUB 38

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES


FOR VOTINGLARGEST IN THE ARIN WNC’s EA’S LARGEST & BEST & BEST READER READER SURVEY SURVEY MOUNTAINX.COM/BESTOFWNC

2017

u o y k n tha ! g n i t o v r fo

needs Business Partners

Contact givelocal@mountainx.com to get involved

WE ♥ YOU TOO!

Thanks for voting us best downtown neighborhood bar!

828-254-3008

|

foggymountainavl.com MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

|

12 Church Street

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

39


BEST OF DRINKS

Voted Best Antique Shop in WNC!

MON-THURS 10-6 • FRI-SAT 9-6 SUN 1-6 • Call for winter hours

With 70,000 square feet of shopping in a historic tobacco barn, we have the largest selection of antiques and collectables in North Carolina!

Asheville, NC • minutes from the Biltmore Estate 75 Swannanoa River Rd (Hwy 81, Asheville) 828-252-7291 • www.atbarn.com

PHOTO BY ABLE ALLEN

AVENUE M: Best Neighborhood Bar - North, Best Restaurant in North Asheville and Best Pet-Friendly Restaurant BAR: UNUSUAL BEER SELECTION 1 THIRSTY MONK d  s  n  x 92 Patton Ave., Asheville 254-5470 • monkpub.com

3 BURIAL BEER CO. d 40 Collier Ave., Asheville 475-2739 • burialbeer.com

CREATIVE, EXPERIMENTAL BREWERY

Biltmore Park Town Square, 2 Town Square Blvd., Suite 170, Asheville 687-3873

1 WICKED WEED BREWING d  x

51 N. Merrimon Ave., Suite 113, Woodfin 424-7807

2 BURIAL BEER CO. d

2 FUNKATORIUM d 147 Coxe Ave., Asheville 552-3203 • avl.mx/2r4

3 WICKED WEED BREWING d 91 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 575-9599 • wickedweedbrewing.com

LOCAL ALL-ROUND BREWERY 1 HIGHLAND BREWING COMPANY E  x 12 Old Charlotte Highway, Suite 200, Asheville 299-3370 • highlandbrewing.com

2 WICKED WEED BREWING d 91 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 575-9599 • wickedweedbrewing.com

91 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 575-9599 • wickedweedbrewing.com 40 Collier Ave., Asheville 475-2739 • burialbeer.com

3 BHRAMARI BREWHOUSE d 101 S. Lexington Ave., Asheville 214-7981 • bhramaribrewhouse.com

CIDERY 1 URBAN ORCHARD CIDER COMPANY w 210 Haywood Road, Asheville 774-5151 • urbanorchardcider.com

2 NOBLE HARD CIDER w

356 New Leicester Highway, Asheville 575-9622 • noblecider.com

3 BOLD ROCK HARD CIDER s  a 72 School House Road, Mills River 595-9940 • boldrock.com

Thank you WNC!

OurFamilyDoctorAsheville.com

40

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

Thanks for voting us to the top! MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

The best primary care doctors under one roof. Now taking new patients! 828.252.2511


# 1 local cidery #2 Brewmaster: Josie Mielke

e! Here's to you, Ashevill

210 Haywood rd. wavl | urbanorchardcider.com | 828-744-5151

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

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BEST OF DRINKS

continued

PHOTO BY CINDY KUNST

HOLLIE STEPHENSON OF HIGHLAND BREWING COMPANY: Best Brewmaster BREWMASTER

Thank you for choosing us as your favorite corner market. ...A CONVENIENT natural food store! Everything you need (including good prices) AND an awesome deli with the cleanest ingredients you’ll find around town.

Open every day till 10pm Mon-Sat: 8am - 10pm Sun: 9am - 10pm 771 Haywood Rd. • West Asheville 225-4949 • Deli: 225-4952

www.westvillagemarket.com BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

12 Old Charlotte Highway, Suite 200, Asheville 299-3370 • highlandbrewing.com

2 JOSIE MIELKE (URBAN ORCHARD CIDER CO.) w

150 Eastside Drive, Black Mountain 669-0190 • pisgahbrewing.com

3 WHITE ZOMBIE (CATAWBA BREWING CO.) d 32 Banks Ave., Asheville 552-3934 • catawbabrewing.com

210 Haywood Road, Asheville 774-5151 • urbanorchardcider.com

3 TIM GORMLEY (BURIAL BEER CO.) d 40 Collier Ave., Asheville 475-2739 • burialbeer.com

FAVORITE LOCAL BEER EVENT 1 BREWGRASS FESTIVAL  x brewgrassfestival.com

2 BEER CITY FESTIVAL d

Roger McGuire Green, Pack Square Park, Asheville beercityfestival.com

Come see us!

42

1 HOLLIE STEPHENSON HIGHLAND BREWING COMPANY E

2 PALE ALE (PISGAH BREWING CO.) E  a

LOCAL DARK BEER 1 GREEN MAN PORTER (GREEN MAN BREWERY) d 27 Buxton Ave., Asheville 252-5502 • greenmanbrewery.com

2 NINJA PORTER (ASHEVILLE BREWING COMPANY) d 77 Coxe Ave., Asheville 255-4077 • ashevillebrewing.com

3 OATMEAL PORTER (HIGHLAND BREWING COMPANY) E 12 Old Charlotte Highway, Suite 200, Asheville 299-3370 • highlandbrewing.com

3 JUST BREW IT HOMEBREW FESTIVAL  justeconomicswnc.org/just-brew-it

LOCAL BEER (ANY STYLE) 1 GAELIC ALE (HIGHLAND BREWING COMPANY) E 12 Old Charlotte Highway, Suite 200, Asheville 299-3370 • highlandbrewing.com

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

LOCAL IPA 1 IRON RAIL IPA (WEDGE BREWING COMPANY) r  x 37 Payne's Way, Asheville 505-2792 • wedgebrewing.com

2 PERNICIOUS IPA (WICKED WEED) d

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

91 Biltmore Ave, Asheville

3 HIGHLAND IPA (HIGHLAND BREWING COMPANY) E 12 Old Charlotte Highway, Suite 200, Asheville 299-3370 • highlandbrewing.com

LOCAL SOUR BEER 1 BLACK ANGEL (WICKED WEED BREWING) d 91 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 575-9599 • wickedweedbrewing.com

2 OBLIVION (WICKED WEED BREWING) d 91 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 575-9599 • wickedweedbrewing.com

3 HI-WIRE GOSE (HI-WIRE) d 197 Hilliard Ave, Asheville 738-2448 • hiwirebrewing.com

BEER STORE 1 BRUISIN' ALES d  x 66 Broadway, Asheville 252-8999 • bruisin-ales.com

2 TASTY BEVERAGE COMPANY d 162 Coxe Ave., Suite 101, Asheville 232-7120 • tastybeverageco.com

3 APPALACHIAN VINTNER s 745 Biltmore Ave., Suite 121, Asheville 505-7500 • appalachianvintner.com


MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

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44

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AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

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BEST OF DRINKS

continued

THANK YOU FOR VOTING US #

1 PAWN SHOP AGAIN!

LARGEST JEWELRY & PAWN STORE IN ASHEVILLE!

PHOTO BY ABLE ALLEN

METRO WINES: Best Wine Store

The LARGEST selection of jewelry, diamonds and custom designed jewelry NO CREDIT NEEDED! PAYMENT PLANS AVAILABLE!

HOMEBREWING/ WINEMAKING SUPPLIES 1 HOPS & VINES w

797 Haywood Road, Suite 100, Asheville 252-5275 • hopsandvines.net

2 ASHEVILLE BREWERS SUPPLY n 712-B Merrimon Ave., Asheville 358-3536 • ashevillebrewers.com

3 FIFTH SEASON GARDENING CO. E

3 LOCATIONS 1186 Patton Avenue 828-254-8681 M-S 9-7 • Sun 1-6

1 THE SOUTHERN KITCHEN AND BAR d  x

2 ASHEVILLE WINE MARKET d

41 N. Lexington Ave., Asheville 251-1777 • southernkitchenandbar.com

2 MAYFEL'S d

22 College St., Asheville 252-8840 • mayfels.net

3 THE ODDITORIUM w

1045 Haywood Road, Asheville 575-9299 • ashevilleodditorium.com

1 BILTMORE WINERY s  x

2695 Sugarloaf Road, Hendersonville 685-2402 • burntshirtvineyards.com

Cherokee • Open 24 Hours Across from the Casino (828) 554-0431 BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

1 METRO WINES d

626 Haywood Road, Asheville 252-0055 • sunnypointcafe.com

COCKTAILS 1 SOVEREIGN REMEDIES d 29 N. Market St., Asheville 919-9518 • sovereignremedies.com

2 BURNTSHIRT VINEYARDS s  a

Mon-Sat 9-7

3 SAINT PAUL MOUNTAIN VINEYARD s  a

588 Chestnut Gap Road, Hendersonville 685-4002 • saintpaulmountainvineyards.com

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

WINE STORE

1 SUNNY POINT CAFÉ w

LOCAL WINERY 1 Lodge St., Asheville 800-411-3812 • biltmore.com/wine/visit-the-winery

736 Tunnel Road 828-299-4440

46

4 S. Tunnel Road, Asheville 412-3200 • fifthseasongardening.com

BLOODY MARY

169 Charlotte St., Asheville 575-9525 • metrowinesasheville.com 65 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 253-0060 • ashevillewine.com

3 APPALACHIAN VINTNER s 745 Biltmore Ave., Suite 121, Asheville 505-7500 • appalachianvintner.com

COFFEE HOUSE 1 HIGH FIVE COFFEE BAR  d  n  x

190 Broadway, Suite 102 Pioneer Building, Asheville 398-0209 • highfivecoffee.com 13 Rankin Ave., Asheville 713-5291 2000 Riverside Drive, Woodfin 785-8272

2 TOP OF THE MONK d

2 BATTLECAT COFFEE BAR w

3 THE CROW & QUILL d

3 IZZY’S COFFEE HOUSE w

92 Patton Ave., Asheville 254-5470 • topofthemonk.com

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

106 N. Lexington Ave., Asheville thecrowandquill.com

373 Haywood Road, Asheville 713-3885 • battlecatcoffeebar.com 976 Haywood Road, Asheville 258-2004 • izzyscoffee.com


797 Haywood Rd. Suite 100 828-252-5275

Thank you for voting us the best place for all your brewing needs! Check out facebook.com/hopsandvinesavl to see what’s on tap!

We DID It!

Voted “Best Of” in multiple categories

16 Yrs! * All Female Staff * Thanks WNC! WE’VE MOVED! New Location: 1085 Tunnel Rd - Asheville

Mans Ruin Tattoo & Piercing www.mansruintattoos.com

u o y k n a th ! g n i t o v r fo FOR VOTINGLARGEST IN THE ARIN WNC’s EA’S LARGEST & BEST & BEST READER READER SURVEY SURVEY MOUNTAINX.COM/BESTOFWNC

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

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BEST OF DRINKS

continued

PHOTO BY SCOTT SOUTHWICK

DOBRÁ TEA: Best Place To Drink Tea and Best Coffee/Tea House In Which To Read A Book ESTABLISHMENT WITH THE BEST COFFEE

2 BATTERY PARK BOOK EXCHANGE & CHAMPAGNE BAR d Grove Arcade, 1 Page Ave., Suite 101, Asheville 252-0020

1 HIGH FIVE COFFEE BAR  d  n

190 Broadway, Suite 102 Pioneer Building, Asheville 398-0209 • highfivecoffee.com 13 Rankin Ave., Asheville 713-5291 2000 Riverside Drive, Woodfin 785-8272

3 HIGH FIVE COFFEE BAR  190 Broadway, Suite 102 Pioneer Building, Asheville 398-0209 • highfivecoffee.com

2 DYNAMITE ROASTING COMPANY E  a 3198 U.S. Highway 70, Black Mountain 357-8555 • dynamiteroasting.com

3 STARBUCKS IN INGLES  COFFEE/TEA HOUSE IN WHICH TO READ A BOOK

One of Asheville, North Carolina’s Best Gift Shops duncanandyork.com | 828.575.2441 33 N. Lexington Ave.

48

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

1 DOBRÁ TEA d  w  E  x

78 N. Lexington Ave., Asheville 575-2424 • dobrateanc.com 707 Haywood Road, Asheville 505-4307 120 Broadway Street, Black Mountain 357-8530

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

COFFEE ROASTER 1 DYNAMITE ROASTING COMPANY E  a x

3198 U.S. Highway 70, Black Mountain 357-8555 • dynamiteroasting.com

2 PENNYCUP COFFEE CO. r 362 Depot Street, Asheville pennycupcoffeeco.com

3 BEAN WERKS COFFEE & TEA w

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

753 Haywood Road, Asheville 254-7766 • beanwerkscoffeecompany.com

PLACE TO DRINK TEA 1 DOBRÁ TEA d  w  E  x 78 N. Lexington Ave., Asheville 575-2424 • dobrateanc.com 707 Haywood Road, Asheville 505-4307 120 Broadway Street, Black Mountain 357-8530

SMOOTHIES/JUICES 1 ELEMENTS REAL FOOD JUICE BAR & CAFE d

233 S. Liberty St., Asheville 412-5701 • elementsrealfood.com

2 GREEN SAGE CAFE d  w 5 Broadway, Asheville 252-4450 • greensagecafe.com 70 Westgate Parkway, Asheville 785-1780

3 MOUNTAIN JUICERY s

1863 Hendersonville Road, No. 132, Asheville 277-6006 • mountainjuicery.com


MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

49


OUTDOORS BICYCLE CLUB OR GROUP 1 ASHEVILLE ON BIKES  x ashevilleonbikes.com

2 BLUE RIDGE BICYCLE CLUB  blueridgebicycleclub.org

HIKING CLUB OR GROUP 1 OUTWARD HOUNDS HIKING CLUB s 31 Glendale Ave., Asheville 505-3440 • avl.mx/3v6

2 CAROLINA MOUNTAIN CLUB  carolinamountainclub.org

RUNNING CLUB OR GROUP 1 NORM'S MAGGOTS  jusrunning.com

2 HIGHLAND BREWING CO. RUN CLUB E 12 Old Charlotte Highway, Suite 200, Asheville 299-3370 • highlandbrewing.com

3 ASHEVILLE TRACK CLUB  AshevilleTrackClub.org

DAY HIKE 1 BLACK BALSAM  1  GRAVEYARD FIELDS  2  MAX PATCH  3  CRAGGY GARDENS  PHOTO BY ABLE ALLEN

OVERNIGHT HIKE NAVITAT CANOPY ADVENTURES: Best Canopy/Zip-Line Tour

1 ART LOEB TRAIL  PLACE TO CAR CAMP

beauty is

1 DAVIDSON RIVER  2  MILLS RIVER 

ICON KEY nORTH sOUTH �AST wEST dOWNTOWN AREA rIVER ARTS DISTRICT a OUTLYING AREA x HALL OF FAME (Winner four years or more in a row)

50

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

one of the top reasons people love living here — Best of WNC voters have told us this for years. Most people move to Asheville for the mountains, so it’s only sensible to fully immerse oneself in the inherently gorgeous, wondrous and unique environment of Western North Carolina. You can ride a wave of perpetual childlike awe while exploring our region’s wilderness trails and streams. From wading through Flat Creek for a stream cleanup to running the Mount Mitchell Challenge, Western North Carolina seems to offer an unending

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

diversity of ecologies and amenities. Based on the responses to this year’s Best Of WNC poll, it looks like most of you, dear readers, are enamored with our ubiquitous backcountry offerings. Voting was heaviest for best Day Hike, Outdoor Gear And Apparel Shop and Bike Shop. And while many are happy to share their favorite fishing hole or day hike, just as many of you are fiercely protective of, and tight-lipped about, where you find adventure in the wilderness. This year’s winners include the grandiose Art Loeb Trail, the

grueling Shut-In Trail Run and popular snow-day destination Cataloochee Ski Area, among others. But whatever your passion — skiing, biking, running, hiking, camping, climbing, fishing, paddling, tubing or zip lining — you can use this year’s Outdoors winners to explore the best ... or just smile to yourself that your secret spot is still hidden. Please welcome Cataloochee Ski Area (Ski Resort) to this year’s Hall of Fame. — Dan Hesse  X


MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

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our y e c un anno with win ICIAL F F O an

BEST OF OUTDOORS

continued

D R A AW UES

PLAQ

PHOTO BY ABLE ALLEN

SOUTHERN APPALACHIAN HIGHLANDS CONSERVANCY: Best Conservation Nonprofit

8.5” x 11” HIGH QUALITY MOUNT $60 + SHIPPING

PICNIC SPOT 1 CRAGGY GARDENS  2  MAX PATCH  3  BILTMORE ESTATE s 1 Lodge St., Asheville 800-411-3812 • biltmore.com

1648 Brevard Road, Asheville 855-936-8823

3 FRENCH BROAD ADVENTURES n  a 9800 U.S. Highway 25, Marshall 800-570-7238 • frenchbroadrafting.com

RUNNING EVENT/ RACE - ROAD

1 DAVIDSON RIVER 

ONLY AVAILABLE AT MOUNTAINXPRESS. NEWSKEEPSAKE.COM

1 NANTAHALA GORGE  2  FRENCH BROAD SECTION 9 

1 RACE TO THE TAPS  racetothetaps.com

2 ASHEVILLE MARATHON AT BILTMORE ESTATE  ashevillemarathon.com

RUNNING EVENT/ RACE - TRAIL

RAFTING COMPANY 1 NANTAHALA OUTDOOR CENTER w  a x 13077 U.S. Highway 19 W., Bryson City 785-5082 • noc.com

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

608 Riverside Drive, Asheville 855-936-8823 • zentubing.com

FISHING SPOT

WHITEWATER PADDLING SECTION

52

2 ZEN TUBING d  r

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

1 SHUT-IN RIDGE TRAIL RUN 

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

trailrunner.com/event/shut-in-ridge-trail-run

CANOPY/ZIP-LINE TOUR 1 NAVITAT CANOPY ADVENTURES n  a x 242 Poverty Branch Road, Barnardsville 626-3700 • navitat.com

2 THE GORGE s  a

166 Honey Bee Drive, Saluda 855-749-2500 • thegorgezipline.com

3 FRENCH BROAD ADVENTURES n  a 9800 U.S. Highway 25, Marshall 800-570-7238 • frenchbroadrafting.com

SKI RESORT 1 CATALOOCHEE SKI AREA w  a x 1080 Ski Lodge Road, Maggie Valley 926-0285 • cataloochee.com

2 WOLF RIDGE SKI RESORT n  a 578 Valley View Circle, Mars Hill 689-4111 • skiwolfridgenc.com

3 SUGAR MOUNTAIN RESORT  1009 Sugar Mountain Drive, Sugar Mountain 898-4521 • skisugar.com


MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

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BEST OF OUTDOORS BIKE SHOP 1 LIBERTY BICYCLES s  x 1378 Hendersonville Road, Asheville 274-2453 • libertybikes.com

2 MOTION MAKERS BICYCLE SHOP w 878 Brevard Road, Asheville 633-2227 • motionmakers.com

3 ASHEVILLE BICYCLE COMPANY n 1000 Merrimon Ave., Asheville 774-5215 • ashevillebikecompany.com

ENVIRONMENTAL NONPROFIT 1 MOUNTAINTRUE d 29 N. Market St., Suite 610, Asheville 258-8737 • mountaintrue.org

2 RIVERLINK r 170 Lyman St., Asheville 252-8474 • riverlink.org

3 ASHEVILLE GREENWORKS w 2 Sulphur Springs Road, Asheville

OUTDOOR GEAR AND APPAREL SHOP 1 REI s

Biltmore Park Time Square, 31 Schenck Parkway, Asheville 687-0918 • rei.com/stores/asheville

2 DIAMOND BRAND OUTDOORS s  d 1378 Hendersonville Road, Asheville 684-6262 • diamondbrandoutdoors.com 53 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 771-4761

3 SECOND GEAR w

444 Haywood Road, Asheville 258-0757 • secondgearwnc.com

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BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

254-1776 • ashevillegreenworks.org

CONSERVATION NONPROFIT 1 SOUTHERN APPALACHIAN HIGHLANDS CONSERVANCY d 372 Merrimon Ave., Asheville 253-0095 • appalachian.org

2 MOUNTAINTRUE d 29 N. Market St., Suite 610, Asheville 258-8737 • mountaintrue.org

3 RIVERLINK r 170 Lyman St., Asheville 252-8474 • riverlink.org


reader poll

s’

thing east asheville needs

This word cloud is created by combining key words from the write-in answers fromthe survey. The more people who gave an answer, the bigger the word appears.

reader poll

s’

thing west asheville needs

This word cloud is created by combining key words from the write-in answers fromthe survey. The more people who gave an answer, the bigger the word appears.

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

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Family Owned & Operated

100 Buckeye Access Rd. (828) 274-2520 www.Gentr yHeatingInc.com

On time and Professional Since 1963 MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

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FARM & GARDEN TAILGATE/FARMERS MARKET 1 NORTH ASHEVILLE TAILGATE MARKET n  x

1 University Heights, Asheville 333-0960 • northashevilletailgatemarket.org

2 WEST ASHEVILLE TAILGATE MARKET w 718 Haywood Road, Asheville westashevilletailgatemarket.com

3 ASHEVILLE CITY MARKET d

N. Market St. (between Woofin and Walnut St.), Asheville 348-0340

COMMUNITY GARDEN 1 THE LORD'S ACRE E  a 26 Joe Jenkins Road, Fariview thelordsacre.org

2 BURTON STREET COMMUNITY PEACE GARDENS  47 Bryant St., Asheville

3 DR. JOHN WILSON COMMUNITY GARDEN E  a 99 White Park Dr., Black Mountain

COMMUNITY SUPPORTED AGRICULTURE (CSA) FARM

PHOTO BY CINDY KUNST

1 FLYING CLOUD FARM E  a

ASHEVILLE MULCH YARD: Best Mulch Supplier

1860 Charlotte Highway, Fairview 768-3348 • flyingcloudfarm.net

we love our authentic experiences.

2 IVY CREEK FAMILY FARM n  a 390 North Fork Road, Barnardsville 713-8383 • ivycreekfamilyfarm.com

3 FULL SUN FARM w  a 90 Bald Creek Road, Leicester 683-1607 • fullsunfarm.com

ICON KEY nORTH sOUTH �AST wEST dOWNTOWN AREA rIVER ARTS DISTRICT a OUTLYING AREA x HALL OF FAME (Winner four years or more in a row)

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BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

Couple that with loving to eat, and it’s no wonder that 40 percent of local farmers increased their sales at farmers markets from 2015 to 2016, according to a 2016 report from the Appalachian Sustainable Agriculture Project. Farms constitute the “headwaters” for the region’s swelling love affair with local, fresh food and the popular farm-to-table movement. In short, we seem to love our farms, and many of us dream of being farmers. Ask a young person around here what they want to be doing in five or 10 years and there’s a surprisingly good chance the answer will be to have a farm (close to town so they can

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still go to the clubs, of course). This year’s Xpress reader survey found that 8 percent of us wish they owned a farm — a far cry from the current 2 percent of the U.S. population employed in agriculture! While these aspirations may sound farfetched to jaundiced old-timers, we are blessed with a variety of support programs, including those that match wannabe farmers with land and train them up so they know what to do when they hit the ground. Soaring land prices have made microfarms (aka gardens) more popular, so for Xpress readers wanting to get in on the action, your peers recommend B.B. Barns and Fifth Season Gardening Co. for gardening

supplies and Reems Creek Nursery for trees and shrubs. Pretty much any way you like your agriculture — from growing food for yourself or others, to purchasing a share in a CSA, to nurturing a gorgeous lawn — this region’s temperate climate and dedicated farmers and service-providers offer us all a plethora of ways to ways to join in. Please welcome Reems Creek Nursery (Nursery for Trees, Shrubs) to this year’s Hall of Fame. — Virginia Daffron and Susan Hutchinson  X


Thank you for voting us #1 again! 828.505.7320

greenhomecleaning.com

Many Thanks!

8 2 8. 5 4 5 . 5 5 0 3 s m a r t f e l l e r t re ewo r k s .co m MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

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BEST OF FARM & GARDEN

The Natural Scapes team would like to thank Mountain X readers for choosing us as the #1 landscaping company again this year!

828-273-0987 www.NaturalScapesAsheville.com

PHOTO BY ABLE ALLEN

ORGANIC GROWERS SCHOOL: Best Help Learning To Farm/Garden HELP LEARNING TO FARM/GARDEN 1 ORGANIC GROWERS SCHOOL w

THANKS FOR VOTING US ONE OF THE BEST IN WNC! WE HAVE BIKES

ON SALE AT

30

%

OFF

OFFERING BIKES FROM BMC, YETI, PIVOT & CANNONDALE

1 SKY TOP ORCHARD s  a x 1193 Pinnacle Mountain Road, Flat Rock 692-7930 • skytoporchard.com

2 GRANDAD'S APPLES N’ SUCH s  a 2951 Chimney Rock Road, Hendersonville 685-1685 • grandadsapples.com

3 STEPP’S HILLCREST ORCHARD s  a 170 Stepp Orchard Drive, Hendersonville 685-9083 • steppapples.com

1 APPALACHIAN SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE PROJECT d 306 W. Haywood St., Asheville 236-1282 • asapconnections.org

FAVORITE FARM TO VISIT 1 HICKORY NUT GAP FARM E  a x 57 Sugar Hollow Road, Fairview 628-1027 • hickorynutgapfarm.com 22 Franny’s Farm Road, Leicester 544-1823 • frannysfarm.com

GARDEN SUPPLY STORE 1 B.B. BARNS GARDEN, GIFT, LANDSCAPE COMPANY s  a 3377 Sweeten Creek Road, Arden 650-7300 • bbbarns.com

2 FIFTH SEASON GARDENING CO. E 4 S. Tunnel Road, Asheville 412-3200 • fifthseasongardening.com

3 REEMS CREEK NURSERY n  a 70 Monticello Road, Weaverville 645-3937 • reemscreek.com

ROADSIDE FARM STAND

828-251-4686

YOUNGBLOODBIKES.COM BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

NONPROFIT SUPPORTING FARMS/FARMLAND PRESERVATION

2 FRANNY’S FARM w  a

233 MERRIMON AVE

60

P.O. Box 17804, Asheville 28816 214-7833 • organicgrowersschool.org

ORCHARD

1 FLYING CLOUD FARM E  a x 1860 Charlotte Highway, Fairview 768-3348 • flyingcloudfarm.net

MULCH SUPPLIER 1 ASHEVILLE MULCH YARD E  a

2 SILAS’S PRODUCE FARMER’S MARKET E  a 841 Charlotte Highway, Asheville 691-9663 • avl.mx/2ss

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

2425 U.S. Highway 70, Swannanoa 707-1615 • ashevillemulchyard.com 326 Merrimon Ave., Weaverville 484-8131 9 Frito Way, Arden 687-2792

2 RIVERSIDE STUMP DUMP r  s 690 Riverside Drive, Asheville 251-5777 • themulchlady.com 5505 Old Haywood Road, Mills River 712-4758

TREE SERVICE 1 SMART FELLER TREE WORKS  x 545-5503 • smartfellertreeworks.com

2 ASHEVILLE ARBORISTS s  a 13 Atkins Street, Arden 778-TREE • ashevillearborists.com

2 CAROLINA TREE MONKEYS E  a 1120 Charlotte Highway, Fairview 329-1371 • carolinatreemonkeys.com

NURSERY (TREES, SHRUBS) 1 REEMS CREEK NURSERY n  a x 70 Monticello Road, Weaverville 645-3937 • reemscreek.com

2 B.B. BARNS GARDEN, GIFT, LANDSCAPE COMPANY s  a 3377 Sweeten Creek Road, Arden 650-7300 • bbbarns.com

3 JESSE ISRAEL & SONS w

570 Brevard Road, Asheville 254-2671 • jesseisraelandsonsnursery.com

LANDSCAPE/ GRADING SERVICE 1 NATURAL SCAPES s

8 Floyd Drive, Asheville 273-0987 • naturalscapesasheville.com


Thank You! Our Customers are the Best!

70 Monticello Rd. Weaverville, NC I-26/Exit 18 828-645-3937

www.reemscreek.com

Mountain Xpress Presents

HIGHLAND BREWING CO. AT

AUG. 17 * 5–9PM

FEATURING X AWARD WINNING BANDS, RADIO, FOOD TRUCKS, ICE CREAM, ENTERTAINMENT, T! & SPECIAL E VEN BREWS

FRE E

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MEDIA LOCAL RADIO STATION (COMMERCIAL) 1 98.1 THE RIVER w

1190 Patton Ave., Asheville 259-9695 • 981theriver.com

2 99.9 KISS COUNTRY w 13 Summerlin Road, Asheville 257-2700 • 99kisscountry.com

3 STAR 104.3 w

13 Summerlin Road, Asheville 257-2700 • star1043.iheart.com

LOCAL RADIO STATION (NONCOMMERCIAL) 1 WCQS - WNC PUBLIC RADIO d 73 Broadway, Asheville 210-4800 • wcqs.org

2 WNCW (88.7) E  a Isothermal Community College, 286 ICC Loop Road, Spindale 287-8000 • wncw.org

3 103.3 ASHEVILLEFM w 864 Haywood Road, Asheville 348-0352 • AshevilleFM.org

FREE PUBLICATION OTHER THAN XPRESS 1 THE LAUREL OF ASHEVILLE d  x 110 Executive Park, Asheville 670-7503 • thelaurelofasheville.com

PHOTO BY THOMAS CALDER

2 WNC WOMAN n  a

P.O. Box 951, Marshall 28753 649-9555 • wncwoman.com

THE LAUREL OF ASHEVILLE: Best Free Publication Other Than Xpress

3 THE BOLD LIFE s  a

between a

PO Box 1070, Flat Rock 692-3230 • boldlife.com

LOCAL WEBSITE OTHER THAN MOUNTAINX.COM 1 ASHVEGAS.COM  x ashvegas.com

2 ROMANTICASHEVILLE.COM  romanticasheville.com

3 BLAINESWORLD.NET w  a

19 N. Kaufmann Stone Way, Biltmore Lake blainesworld.net

3 THE828.COM  Asheville

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BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

tumultuous start of the Trump presidency (Most OverReported Story) and public concern over health care, global terrorism and police-community relations, there’s been no shortage of topics for media outlets to cover in the past 12 months. We’re all familiar with the headlines about HB2 (Most Important Local News Story), the 2016 drought and subsequent wildfires (second Most Important Local News Story), and regional infrastructure projects like the RAD and I-26 Connector project.

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One may wonder how residents of Western North Carolina get their news. According to a sixcounty survey conducted by DASIS Research, 46 percent of residents 18 or over say they don’t watch television at all, and 32 percent say they shun the internet entirely! The biggest battles in the Media section this year were for who would lay claim to being the best radio station and print publication. The winners of those duels are 98.1 The River (Radio Station — Commercial), WCQS (Radio Station — Noncommercial), and the

Laurel of Asheville (Free Publication Other Than Xpress). Although the more some things change, others stay the same: Asheville Citizen-Times reporter John Boyle took top honors again for favorite Local Print Reporter, while WLOS’ Darcel Grimes continues to reign supreme over the years as best Local TV Personality/ Announcer. And online, news and entertainment website ashevegas.com retains its title as best Local Website Other Than mountainx.com. — Max Hunt  X


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63


BEST OF MEDIA MOST IMPORTANT LOCAL NEWS STORY 1 HB2  2  WILDFIRES  3  AFFORDABLE HOUSING  MOST OVER-REPORTED STORY 1  DONALD TRUMP  2  HB2  3  SPICER GREENE BILLBOARD DRAMA  LOCAL PRINT REPORTER 1  JOHN BOYLE (ASHEVILLE CITIZEN-TIMES)  x 252-5610 • citizen-times.com

LOCAL RADIO PERSONALITY 1 EDDIE FOXX (THE EDDIE FOXX SHOW, 99.9 FM, KISS COUNTRY) w 13 Summerlin Road, Asheville 257-2700 • 99kisscountry.com

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2 JEFF MESSER* (THE JEFF MESSER SHOW, 880 AM, THE REVOLUTION) *SHOW NO LONGER AIRING w 13 Summerlin Road, Asheville 257-2700 • 880therevolution.com

3 JOSH MICHAEL (JOSH AND AMANDA IN THE MORNING, STAR 104.3 FM) w 13 Summerlin Road, Asheville 257-2700 • star1043.com

LOCAL TV PERSONALITY/ ANNOUNCER 1 DARCEL GRIMES (WLOS) s  x 110 Technology Drive, Asheville 684-1340 • wlos.com

2 JAY SILTZER (WLOS) s 110 Technology Drive, Asheville 684-1340 • wlos.com

3 JASON BOYER (WLOS) s 110 Technology Dr., Asheville 684-1340 • wlos.com

FAVORITE FEATURE IN XPRESS 1 MOVIE REVIEWS  x 2  CLUBLAND  mountainx.com/clubland

3 NY TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE 


Thanks for voting us #1 in WNC four years in a row!

Mountain Xpress Presents

HIGHLAND BREWING CO. AT

AUG. 17 * 5–9PM

Not to sound like Accountaholics, but we find your faith in us simply intaxicating!

FEATURING X AWARD WINNING BANDS, RADIO, FOOD TRUCKS, ICE CREAM, ENTERTAINMENT, T! & SPECIAL E VEN BREWS

FRE E

#1 Accountant/CPA

301 W Haywood St Asheville, NC 28801 828-785-1556

Action Tax

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

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65


WORK & BUSINESS BUSINESS THAT BEST REPRESENTS THE SPIRIT OF ASHEVILLE 1 RAINBOW COMMUNITY SCHOOL w 574 Haywood Road, Asheville 258-9264 • rainbowcommunityschool.org

2 LAZOOM TOURS d

14 Battery Park Ave., Asheville 225-6932 • lazoomtours.com

3 ASHEVILLE SAVINGS BANK d 11 Church St., Asheville 250-8430 • ashevillesavingsbank.com

BANK 1 ASHEVILLE SAVINGS BANK d  E  w  x 11 Church St., Asheville 250-8430 • ashevillesavingsbank.com 10 S. Tunnel Road, Asheville 298-8193 1012 Patton Ave., Asheville 254-1778

2 HOMETRUST BANK d  E 10 Woodfin St., Asheville 254-8144 • hometrustbanking.com

1011 Tunnel Road, Suite 180, Asheville 259-8000

3 FIRST CITIZENS BANK d 108 Patton Ave., Asheville 257-5700 • firstcitizens.com

CREDIT UNION 1 STATE EMPLOYEES’ CREDIT UNION n  d  s  x

PHOTO BY EMMA GRACE MOON

701 N. Broadway, Asheville 253-8009 • ncsecu.org

MOUNTAIN BIZWORKS: Best Support Organization For New Businesses

One Oak Plaza, Asheville 225-2900

many of us dream of working for

20 All Souls Crescent, Asheville 274-4200

ICON KEY nORTH sOUTH �AST wEST dOWNTOWN AREA rIVER ARTS DISTRICT a OUTLYING AREA x HALL OF FAME (Winner four years or more in a row)

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BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

ourselves. Others want to work for a company with soul, where they can be of use contributing to something that matters. Well, good news: WNC is a great place for startups, and it abounds with small, independent businesses and nonprofits, many of which are fueled as much by passion as by money. This happy state seems to have registered with WNC residents: When Xpress surveyed people this year for what they most wish for, a better job did not make the top. Instead,

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it ranked a distant second, dwarfed by a widespread yearning for “a less contentious world.” In what sectors do we prefer to work? Health care, first, with hospitality and nonprofit sectors being the second and third most popular choices, according to Xpress’ survey. And do we have work? While unemployment rates in rural counties remain high, the Asheville metro area has the lowest unemployment in the state, holding through the summer around 3.4 percent.

A couple special congratulations are in order. A big hurrah goes to Asheville Savings Bank for its three first-place wins: Business That Gives Back To The Community, Mortgage Company and Bank Services For Small Business. And a hats off to Rainbow Community School for its two first-place wins: Business That Best Represents The Spirit Of Asheville and Business With EarthFriendly Practices. — Able Allen  X


Mountain Xpress Presents

FRE ET! E VEN

NERS: N I W D R A year’s X AW is h t g in r u t a Fe

S:

ND BEST BA

LYRIC * B . S U I RATS SIR R E V I R E IE & TH H C T O KS , W SC C U R T ANDRE OD

WS , FO O I Y BRE D T A R R A T P BES CIAL & SPE EAM R C E IC

With guest appearances from LaZoom with nuns!

HIGHLAND AUG. 17 BREWING CO. 5–9PM AT

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

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67


BEST OF WORK & BUSINESS 2 TELCO COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION E  w 36 Tunnel Road, Asheville 252-6888 • telcoccu.org

712 New Leicester Highway, Asheville 252-6458

3 SELF-HELP CREDIT UNION d 391 S. French Broad Ave., Asheville 255-0809 • self-help.org

BANK SERVICES FOR SMALL BUSINESS 1 ASHEVILLE SAVINGS BANK d  E  w  x 11 Church St., Asheville 250-8430 • ashevillesavingsbank.com 10 S. Tunnel Road, Asheville 298-8193 1012 Patton Ave., Asheville 254-1778

2 HOMETRUST BANK d  E 10 Woodfin St., Asheville 254-8144 • hometrustbanking.com

1011 Tunnel Road, Suite 180, Asheville 259-8000

MORTGAGE COMPANY 1 ASHEVILLE SAVINGS BANK d  E  w 11 Church St., Asheville 250-8430 • ashevillesavingsbank.com 10 S. Tunnel Road, Asheville 298-8193 1012 Patton Ave., Asheville 254-1778

2 MOVEMENT MORTGAGE d 84 Coxe Ave., Suite 1-B, Asheville 460-1300 • movement.com

3 PRIME MORTGAGE LENDING OF WEST ASHEVILLE w 862 Haywood Road, Asheville 348-1907 • goprimeasheville.com

SUPPORT ORGANIZATION FOR NEW BUSINESSES 1 MOUNTAIN BIZWORKS d  x 153 S. Lexington Ave., Asheville 253-2834 • mountainbizworks.org

2 SCORE E  a 104 Broadway Ave., Black Mountain 669-8286

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EMPLOYMENT SECTOR TO WORK IN 1 HEALTH CARE  2  HOSPITALITY & TOURISM  3  NONPROFIT  CO-OP/WORKEROWNED BUSINESS 1  FRENCH BROAD FOOD COOP d  x 90 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 255-7650 • frenchbroadfood.coop

2 FIRESTORM BOOKS & COFFEE w 610 Haywood Road, Asheville 255-8115 • firestorm.coop

3 MB HAYNES CORPORATION w 187 Deaverview Road, Asheville 254-6141 • mbhaynes.com

BUSINESS THAT GIVES BACK TO THE COMMUNITY 1 ASHEVILLE SAVINGS BANK d  E  w 11 Church St., Asheville 250-8430 • ashevillesavingsbank.com 10 S. Tunnel Road, Asheville 298-8193 1012 Patton Ave., Asheville 254-1778

2 RAINBOW COMMUNITY SCHOOL w 574 Haywood Road, Asheville 258-9264 • rainbowcommunityschool.org

3 MB HAYNES CORPORATION w 187 Deaverview Road, Asheville 254-6141 • mbhaynes.com

BUSINESS WITH EARTHFRIENDLY PRACTICES 1 RAINBOW COMMUNITY SCHOOL w 574 Haywood Road, Asheville 258-9264 • rainbowcommunityschool.org

2 GREEN SAGE CAFE d  w 5 Broadway, Asheville 252-4450 • greensagecafe.com 70 Westgate Parkway, Asheville 785-1780

3 EARTH FARE w

66 Westgate Parkway, Asheville 253-7656 • EarthFare.com


Mr. K’s Used Books, MUsic and More

New & USed: Books • Vinyl Records CDs • Comics • Video Games Books on CD • DVDs BUY • SeLL • TRAde

Thank You for Voting Us

1 Used Book Store

#

5 Years in a Row!

Open Mon. - Sat. 9am-9pm • Sun. 12-6pm 800 Fairview Rd. • Asheville, NC

River Ridge Shopping Center • Beside A.C. Moore • Hwy 240 exit #8

299-1145 • www.mrksusedbooks.com MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

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69


WELL, HOT DOG!

s k n Tha ville ! e h s A DRTIMGILLESPIE.COM | 828.252.9351 | TIMOTHY E. GILLESPIE, DMD, PA | 36 ORANGE ST, 28801 70

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

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Asheville’s Thank you for recognizing One Click Fix in the “Best of” Most Reliable computer repair category. We’re grateful to our clients Computer and community - We strive to provide the best service possible.  Repair Greg Mayer info@oneclickavl.com | oneclickavl.com | 828-318-8558 Shop Hours: 9-5 M-F | 438 Montford Ave., Asheville, NC 28801

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

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71


PETS dogs and VETERINARY SERVICES 1 ANIMAL HOSPITAL OF NORTH ASHEVILLE (AHNA) n  x 1 Beaverdam Road, Asheville 253-3393 • ahna.net

2 CHARLOTTE STREET ANIMAL HOSPITAL d

208 Charlotte St., Asheville 232-0440 • charlottestreetanimalhospital.com

3 PET VET ON PATTON w 2 Hansel Ave., Asheville 232-9990 • petvetonpatton.com

ALTERNATIVE PET HEALTH-CARE PROVIDER 1 LAUREL DAVIS d

251A Haywood Street, Asheville 254-2221 • sunvetanimalwellness.com

2 DR. ANDREA FOCHIOS (PEOPLE & PETS ACUPUNCTURE) w 16 Harris Ave., Asheville 254-2773 • avl.mx/3t5

3 BETH HAMPTON JONES (ANIMAL ACUPUNCTURE AND WELLNESS CLINIC) d

21 Battery Park, Suite 103, Asheville 450-0851 • ashevilleanimalacupuncture.com

PET SUPPLY STORE 1 PATTON AVENUE PET COMPANY w  d  s  x 1388 Patton Ave., Asheville 505-8299 • pattonavenuepet.com 109 Patton Ave., Asheville 255-7737 582 Hendersonville Road, Asheville 575-9282

2 PETSMART E

Please welcome the Patton Avenue Pet Company (Pet Supply Store) to the 2017 Hall of Fame.

150 Bleachery Blvd., Asheville 298-5670 • petsmart.com

3 ASHEVILLE PET SUPPLY n 1451 Merrimon Ave., Asheville 252-2054 • ashevillepetsupply.com

ICON KEY

cats, birds and bees, ponies and piggies: We keep all kinds here in Western North Carolina. Asheville is uncommonly pet-friendly. Indeed, it’s not uncommon to overhear tourists remarking how pet-friendly the town is. You can buy gourmet dog biscuits (human-quality ingredients, of course), bone-flavored doggie beer (no alcohol included) or a scoop of doggie ice cream. You can take your pooch to dinner, to bars or simply to enjoy the plethora of water dishes set out on downtown sidewalks so the critters don’t get thirsty, even for half a block. It’s a good thing there are so many training and obedience schools, so pups can graduate to life in public around here. Our adoration of our animal companions has sparked a vibrant sector of training schools, rescue organizations, veterinary clinics, acupuncturists, as well as pet sitters, bakers and accessory providers. Why, our nonprofits not only help match us with our perfect pet, but they also help hold down food and vet costs for owners in need. Use these results to find readers’ favorite places to shampoo, board, provide health care for and share their mountain lifestyle with their pets. Explore the most loved area parks, vendors and nonprofits that cater to animals.

— Dan Hesse and Susan Hutchinson  X

nORTH sOUTH �AST wEST dOWNTOWN AREA rIVER ARTS DISTRICT a OUTLYING

AREA

x HALL OF FAME (Winner four years or more in a row)

PHOTO BY ADAM MCMILLAN

PET VET ON PATTON: Best Pet Daycare Facility 72

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THANK YOU for VOTING US #1

From our dog family to yours...Thank you, Asheville!

Solving problems

between people & dogs with modern science

1ST PLACE

ASHEVILLE’S BEHAVIOR CENTER | 828-656-8305 | DOGDOORBEHAVIORCENTER.COM

National 2014 Practice of the Year, Gentle 24 Hour Nursing Care, Advanced & Accurate Dental Care, Gold Standard Feline Practice, Minimally Invasive Laparoscopic Surgery, Endoscopy, Ultrasound, Echocardiograms, Digital X-Ray, Video Ear Diagnostics, Advanced Pain Control

Thank you for voting us one of the best Alternative Pet Health Care Providers! Your Holistic Veterinarian in Asheville, NC We provide holistic healthcare for the entire family.

Call us at 828-254-2773 Dr. Andrea Fochios 16 Harris Ave Asheville, NC 28806

www.officeofpeopleandpetsacupuncture.com

Western North Carolina’s most comprehensive Specialty & Emergency Animal Hospital

Unsurpassed in Caring • State-of-the-Art Affordable • Serving all WNC • Extended Hours

1 Beaverdam Road at Merrimon Ave. • 828-253-3393 ahna.net • Join us on Facebook MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

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BEST OF PETS

continued

PET KENNEL 1 THE SOAPY DOG r

270 Depot St., Asheville 350-0333 • thesoapydog.com

2 PET VET ON PATTON w 2 Hansel Ave., Asheville 232-9990 • petvetonpatton.com

3 HAPPY TAILS COUNTRY CLUB s  a 1984 Cane Creek Road, Fletcher 628-8510 • happytailscc.com

PET DAYCARE FACILITY 1 PET VET ON PATTON w 2 Hansel Ave., Asheville 232-9990 • petvetonpatton.com

2 AT PLAY WITH SPARKY s 542 Short McDowell St., Asheville 254-5772 • atplaywithsparky.com

3 THE SOAPY DOG r

270 Depot St., Asheville 350-0333 • thesoapydog.com

PET-SITTING SERVICE 1 HAIR OF THE DOG s

1210 Hendersonville Road, Asheville 274-4150 • hairofthedogasheville.com

GROOMING SERVICE 1 WAGGERS DOG DEPOT n  x 1020 Merrimon Ave., Asheville 271-4741 • waggersdogdepot.com

2 CANINE SHEAR HEAVEN s 422 McDowell St., Asheville 254-3386 • canineshearheaven.com

3 THE SOAPY DOG r

270 Depot St., Asheville 350-0333 • thesoapydog.com

PHOTO BY CINDY KUNST

TRAINER/TRAINING CENTER

BYWATER: Best Pet-Friendly Bar

1 THE DOG DOOR d

1 Battle Square, Suite A, Asheville 656-8305 • dogdoorcanineservices.com

OUTDOOR PLACE TO TAKE YOUR DOG

2 WOOF IN THE WOODS E  a 1451 Charlotte HWY, Fairview 222-2222 • woofinthewoods.com

1 CARRIER PARK / 3  MINDFUL MUTZ TRAINING & BEHAVIOR FRENCH BROAD RIVER PARK w  x 230-6389 • mindfulmutz.com

ANIMAL SHELTER/RESCUE ORGANIZATION 1 BROTHER WOLF ANIMAL RESCUE s  x

220 Amboy Road/508 Riverview Drive, Asheville

2 BILTMORE ESTATE s 1 Lodge St., Asheville 800-411-3812 • biltmore.com

3 BENT CREEK EXPERIMENTAL FOREST  srs.fs.usda.gov/bentcreek

31 Glendale Ave., Asheville 505-3440 • bwar.org

PET-FRIENDLY BAR

2 ASHEVILLE HUMANE SOCIETY w

1 BYWATER r

3 CHARLIE'S ANGELS ANIMAL RESCUE s  a

2 WEDGE BREWING COMPANY r

14 Forever Friend Lane, Asheville 761-2001 • ashevillehumane.org

796 Riverside Drive, Asheville bywaterbar.com

5526 Hendersonville Road, Fletcher 885-DOGS • wncanimalrescue.org

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37 Paynes Way, Suite 001, Asheville 505-2792 • wedgebrewing.com 5 Foundy St., Asheville 253-7152

3 BATTERY PARK BOOK EXCHANGE & CHAMPAGNE BAR d Grove Arcade, 1 Page Ave., Suite 101, Asheville 252-0020

PET-FRIENDLY RESTAURANT 1 AVENUE M n

791 Merrimon Ave., Asheville 350-8181 • avenuemavl.com

2 UNIVERSAL JOINT w 784 Haywood Road, Asheville 505-7262 • ujasheville.com

3 SUNNY POINT CAFÉ w 626 Haywood Road, Asheville 252-0055 • sunnypointcafe.com

PET-FRIENDLY HOTEL 1 ALOFT ASHEVILLE DOWNTOWN d  x 51 Biltmore Ave., Asheville 232-2838 • aloftashevilledowntown.com


Thank You Asheville!

Thanks to Our Customers Being voted the #1 Groomer in WNC seven years in a row is quite an honor and we owe it all to you! Call Us Today To Experience the Waggers Difference 1020 Merrimon Ave., Ste. 102 Asheville, NC 28804 (828) 271-4741 www.waggersdogdepot.com

• Do-it-yourself dogwash • Full service grooming • Doggie Daycare • Kennel/ overnight boarding

LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED SINCE 2003 828-350-0333

thesoapydog.com

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

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reader poll

s’

thing the river arts district needs

Our Mission is Your Vision

Thank You WNC!

Asheville Eye Associates thanks Mountain Xpress readers for voting us Best Eye Care Specialist!

Serving the communities of

Asheville, South Asheville, Hendersonville, Sylva, Franklin, Hayesville, and Boone NC

Ashevilleeye.com | (828)258-1586

FOR VOTINGLARGEST IN THE ARIN WNC’s EA’S LARGEST & BEST & BEST READER READER SURVEY SURVEY MOUNTAINX.COM/BESTOFWNC

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2017

u o y k n a th ! g n i t o v r fo

This word cloud is created by combining key words from the write-in answers fromthe survey. The more people who gave an answer, the bigger the word appears.

needs Business Partners

Contact givelocal@mountainx.com to get involved


Mountain Xpress Presents

E E R F ! T N E EV

Featuring this year’s X AWARD WINNERS:

BEST BANDS: BEST

SIRIUS.B * LYRIC ANDREW SCOTCHIE & THE RIVER RATS

RADIO , FOOD TRUCKS

&

ICE CREAM

With guest appearances from LaZoom with nuns!

HIGHLAND BREWING CO. AT

AUG. 17 5–9PM

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

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SMALL TOWNS swannanoa / black mountain BREAKFAST RESTAURANT 1 LOUISE'S KITCHEN x

115 Black Mountain Ave., Black Mountain 357-5446 • louisesblackmtn.com

2 BLUE RIDGE BISCUIT COMPANY 601 W. State St., Black Mountain 357-8501 • avl.mx/3ss

3 BREAKFAST SHOPPE 2345 U.S. Highway 70, Swannanoa 686-0051

LUNCH RESTAURANT 1 VERANDA CAFÉ & GIFTS x

PHOTO COURTESY OF LOUISE’S KITCHEN

119 Cherry St., Black Mountain 669-8864 • verandacafeandgifts.com

LOUISE’S KITCHEN: Best Breakfast Restaurant

2 NATIVE KITCHEN & SOCIAL PUB 204 Whitson Ave., Swannanoa 581-0480 • nativesocialpub.com

3 MY FATHER’S PIZZA 110 Cherry St., Black Mountain 669-4944 • myfatherspizza.com

ICON KEY nORTH sOUTH �AST wEST dOWNTOWN AREA rIVER ARTS DISTRICT a OUTLYING AREA x HALL OF FAME (Winner four years or more in a row)

78

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

sometimes, the

smallest fruit is the sweetest. The nectar of WNC culture lies hidden in its many tiny metropolises. You have to look beyond Asheville’s city limits to discover many of the region’s hidden treasures, including delicious food, refreshing drinks, impassioned arts and heartwarming performances. This year, we asked voters to identify the best arts and cultural events to be found in various WNC towns, as well as local historical and cultural landmarks. And some won in landslides. Two-thirds of regionally knowledgeable voters told us the Vance Birthplace is the best Cultural or Historical Landmark in the

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

Weaverville/Woodfin area. Meanwhile, over one-third proclaimed The French Broad River Festival to be the Best Cultural or Arts Event in Hot Springs. If you didn’t weigh in this year on behalf of your favorite small town, consider sharing next year what’s on your not-to-be-missed list. This year, we welcome these Hall of Fame inductees: • in Swannanoa/ Black Mountain — Louise’s Kitchen (Breakfast Restaurant), The Dripolator Coffeehouse (Coffee & Sweets) and Veranda Café & Gifts (Lunch Restaurant); • in Waynesville — Panacea Coffeehouse, Café & Roastery (Coffee &

Sweets); • in Weaverville/Woodfin — Well-Bred Bakery & Café (Breakfast Restaurant, Lunch Restaurant) and Blue Mountain Pizza and Brew Pub (Music/Entertainment Venue) — each of them having chalked up four wins in a row in their categories. The distinction puts them in select company in the Small Towns section. Competition runs hot, with the heaviest voting in the food categories, and precious few dining establishments have managed to hang onto first place for more than a couple consecutive years … until now. — Able Allen  X


2017

needs

Business Partners

Contact givelocal@mountainx.com to get involved

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

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BEST OF SMALL TOWNS swannanoa / black mountain continued

ART GALLERY 1 SEVEN SISTERS CRAFT GALLERY x 117 Cherry St., Black Mountain 669-5107 • avl.mx/3vg

2 BLACK MOUNTAIN CENTER FOR THE ARTS

DINNER RESTAURANT 1 NATIVE KITCHEN & SOCIAL PUB 204 Whitson Ave., Swannanoa 581-0480 • nativesocialpub.com

2 FRESH WOOD FIRED PIZZA & PASTA 100 S. Ridgeway Ave., Black Mountain 669-6999 • freshwoodfiredpizza.net

225 W. State St., Black Mountain 669-0930 • blackmountainarts.org

MUSIC/ENTERTAINMENT VENUE 105-C Montreat Road, Black Mountain 669-0816 • whitehorseblackmountain.com

3 NATIVE KITCHEN & SOCIAL PUB

2 TAKE A HIKE OUTFITTERS

Black Mountain

100 Sutton Ave., Black Mountain 669-0811 • takeahikenc.com

BUSINESS THAT BEST REPRESENTS THE SPIRIT OF YOUR TOWN

3 SEVEN SISTERS CRAFT GALLERY 117 Cherry St., Black Mountain 669-5107 • sevensistersgallery.com

1 TOWN HARDWARE AND GENERAL STORE

CULTURAL OR ARTS EVENT

103 W. State St., Black Mountain 669-7723 • townhardware.com

1 LEAF FESTIVAL

2 NATIVE KITCHEN & SOCIAL PUB

377 Lake Eden Road, Black Mountain 686-8742 • theLEAF.org

204 Whitson Ave., Swannanoa 581-0480 • nativesocialpub.com

2 SOURWOOD FESTIVAL

3 THE MERRY WINE MARKET

201 E. State St., Black Mountain sourwoodfestival.com

204 Whitson Ave., Swannanoa 581-0480 • nativesocialpub.com

COFFEE & SWEETS

1 MONTREAT 2  BLACK MOUNTAIN COLLEGE, ROCKMONT

103 W. State St., Black Mountain 669-7723 • townhardware.com

150 Eastside Drive, Black Mountain 669-0190 • pisgahbrewing.com

207 W. State St., Black Mountain 357-5656 • thetrailheadrestaurant.com

CULTURAL OR HISTORICAL LANDMARK

1 TOWN HARDWARE AND GENERAL STORE

1 WHITE HORSE BLACK MOUNTAIN x 2  PISGAH BREWING COMPANY

3 THE TRAILHEAD RESTAURANT AND BAR

RETAIL STORE

108 West State St., Black Mountain 669-9050 • themerrywinemarket.com

1 THE DRIPOLATOR COFFEEHOUSE x 221 W. State St., Black Mountain 669-0999 • avl.mx/3w7

2 DYNAMITE ROASTING COMPANY 3198 U.S. Highway 70, Black Mountain 357-8555 • dynamiteroasting.com

3 FILO PASTRIES

1155 Tunnel Road, Asheville 298-9777 • filopastries.com

Burnsville

40

Hot Springs 26

Mars Hill Marshall

Weaverville

DOWNTOWN

Woodfin

Asheville

Black Mountain 40

Swannanoa 40

Waynesville

Sylva

26

Cullowhee

Hendersonville Brevard

“Proudly supporting your coffee habit since 1999.”

221 W. STATE STREET BLACK MOUNTAIN, NC 828.669.0999 80

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

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Flat Rock


continued

marshall / mars hill wa BREAKFAST RESTAURANT 1 ZUMA COFFEE x

7 Main St., Marshall 649-1617 • zumacoffee.com

2 THE WAGON WHEEL 390 Carl Eller Road, Mars Hill 689-4755

3 THE SWEET MONKEY BAKERY 133 S. Main St., Marshall 649-2489 • sweetmonkeybakery.com

LUNCH RESTAURANT 1 ZUMA COFFEE x

7 Main St., Marshall 649-1617 • zumacoffee.com

2 STACKHOUSE 37 South Main St., Mars Hill 680-1213

2 THE SWEET MONKEY BAKERY 133 S. Main St., Marshall 649-2489 • sweetmonkeybakery.com

3 THE ORIGINAL PAPA NICK'S 2 S. Main St., Mars Hill 689-8566 • theoriginalpapanicks.com

DINNER RESTAURANT 1 THE ORIGINAL PAPA NICK'S

PHOTO COURTESY OF MADISON COUNTY BREWING

2 S. Main St., Mars Hill 689-8566 • theoriginalpapanicks.com

2 STACKHOUSE 37 South Main St., Mars Hill 680-1213

3 STAR DINER 115 North Main St., Marshall 649-9900

COFFEE & SWEETS 1 ZUMA COFFEE x

7 Main St., Marshall 649-1617 • zumacoffee.com

2 THE SWEET MONKEY BAKERY 133 S. Main St., Marshall 649-2489 • sweetmonkeybakery.com

ART GALLERY 1 FLOW x

14 Main St., Marshall 649-1686 • flowmarshall.com

MADISON COUNTY BREWING: Best Thing To Happen To Marshall/Mars Hill In The Last 12 Months MUSIC/ENTERTAINMENT VENUE 1 GOOD STUFF GROCERY

38 Bailey's Branch Road, Marshall 649-9711 • heygoodstuff.com

2 MADISON COUNTY ARTS COUNCIL 90 S. Main St., Marshall 649-1301 • madisoncountyarts.com

3 ZUMA COFFEE

7 Main St., Marshall 649-1617 • zumacoffee.com

RETAIL STORE 1 PENLAND & SONS DEPARTMENT STORE 50 N. Main St., Marshall 649-2811

CULTURAL OR ARTS EVENT

BEST THING TO HAPPEN TO YOUR TOWN IN THE LAST 12 MONTHS

1 ART ON THE ISLAND ARTS FESTIVAL avl.mx/3sf

2 BASCOM LAMAR LUNSFORD FESTIVAL Mars Hill

1 MADISON COUNTY BREWING 45 N. Main St., Marshall 649-8600 • madisoncountybrewing.com

avl.mx/3sp

CULTURAL OR HISTORICAL LANDMARK 1 MARSHALL HIGH STUDIOS 115 Blannahasset Island, Marshall 649-0177 • marshallhighstudios.com

2 COURTHOUSE MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

BUSINESS THAT BEST REPRESENTS THE SPIRIT OF YOUR TOWN 1 ZUMA COFFEE 7 Main St., Marshall 649-1617 • zumacoffee.com

2 MARSHALL CONTAINER CO. 10 S. Main St., Marshall 649-8700 • marshallcontainer.com

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

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BEST OF SMALL TOWNS

continued

weaverville / woodfin

Thank you for voting for us one of the best for 5 years in a row!

PHOTO BY BETH MANGUM

ART IN AUTUMN: Best Cultural Or Arts Event BREAKFAST RESTAURANT 1 WELL-BRED BAKERY & CAFÉ x

3 BLUE MOUNTAIN PIZZA AND BREW PUB 55 N. Main St., Weaverville 658-8778 • bluemountainpizza.com

26 N. Main St., Weaverville 645-9300 • wellbredbakery.com

2 CREPERIE AND CAFE OF WEAVERVILLE 113 N. Main St., Weaverville 484-9448 • creperieandcafe.com

3 STONEY KNOB CAFÉ

DINNER RESTAURANT 1 STONEY KNOB CAFÉ x 337 Merrimon Ave., Weaverville 645-3309 • stoneyknobcafe.com

337 Merrimon Ave., Weaverville 645-3309 • stoneyknobcafe.com

Sunshine Window Cleaning Green Bee House Cleaning 828.281.0062 828.450.084 greenbeeclean.com sunshinewindowgutter.com BE

ST OF

14

20 WNC

82

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

LUNCH RESTAURANT 1 WELL-BRED BAKERY & CAFÉ x 26 N. Main St., Weaverville 645-9300 • wellbredbakery.com

2 STONEY KNOB CAFÉ

2 GLASS ONION 18 N. Main St., Weaverville 645-8866 • glassonionasheville.com

3 BLUE MOUNTAIN PIZZA AND BREW PUB

337 Merrimon Ave., Weaverville 645-3309 • stoneyknobcafe.com

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

55 N. Main St., Weaverville 658-8778 • bluemountainpizza.com

COFFEE & SWEETS 1 WELL-BRED BAKERY & CAFÉ x 26 N. Main St., Weaverville 645-9300 • wellbredbakery.com

2 ALLGOOD COFFEE

10 S. Main St., Weaverville 484-8663 • allgood.coffee

ART GALLERY 1 MIYA GALLERY x

20 N. Main St., Weaverville 658-9655 • miyagallery.com

2 MANGUM POTTERY

16 N. Main St., Weaverville 645-4929 • mangumpottery.com

3 ARTISANS ON MAIN 14 N. Main St., Weaverville 658-9617


Mountain Xpress Presents

Offering our own craft-brewed beer, hand-tossed pizza with fresh local ingredients, & scrumptious homemade ice cream

HIGHLAND BREWING CO. AT

AUG. 17 * 5–9PM

FEATURING X AWARD WINNING BANDS, RADIO, FOOD TRUCKS, ICE CREAM, ENTERTAINMENT, T! & SPECIAL E VEN BREWS

FRE E

1st Place Business That Best Represents the Spirit of Your Town (Weaverville & Woodfin)

1st Place Music/Entertainment Venue (Weaverville & Woodfin) Top 3 Lunch and Dinner Restaurant (Weaverville & Woodfin)

~ celebrating 19 years ~ we thank you for your continued support

Waynesville, NC • twigsandleaves.com

Thank you to the best staff around who work hard every day to make it happen Live music every night from 7-9 55 N Main St downtown Weaverville bluemountainpizza.com • 828.658.8778 Tue-Sun 11am to 9pm with extended hours Fri-Sat until 10pm MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

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83


BEST OF SMALL TOWNS MUSIC/ENTERTAINMENT VENUE 1 BLUE MOUNTAIN PIZZA AND BREW PUB x

55 N. Main St., Weaverville 658-8778 • bluemountainpizza.com

2 TWISTED LAUREL EATERY AND TAPS 10-A S. Main St., Weaverville 645-2700 • twistedlaurel.com

RETAIL STORE 1 CURTIS WRIGHT OUTFITTERS 24 N. Main St., Weaverville 645-8700 • curtiswrightoutfitters.com

1 MANGUM POTTERY 16 N. Main St., Weaverville 645-4929 • mangumpottery.com

1 THYME IN THE GARDEN 190 Weaverville Highway, Asheville 658-3700 • thymeinthegardenasheville.com

CULTURAL OR ARTS EVENT 1 ART IN AUTUMN PO Box 235, Weaverville 28787 avl.mx/3s6

2 WEAVERVILLE ART SAFARI 338-9335 • weavervilleartsafari.com

S E U Q A L P D R A AW

1 VANCE BIRTHPLACE 2  LAKE LOUISE BEST THING TO HAPPEN TO YOUR TOWN IN THE LAST 12 MONTHS 1  PUBLIX 165 Weaver Blvd., Weaverville 658-1020 • publix.com

2 ZEBULON ARTISAN ALES 8 Merchant Alley, Weaverville zebulonbrewing.com

BUSINESS THAT BEST REPRESENTS THE SPIRIT OF YOUR TOWN 1 BLUE MOUNTAIN PIZZA AND BREW PUB 55 N. Main St., Weaverville 658-8778 • bluemountainpizza.com

2 WELL-BRED BAKERY & CAFÉ 26 N. Main St., Weaverville 645-9300 • wellbredbakery.com

3 MANGUM POTTERY 16 N. Main St., Weaverville 645-4929 • mangumpottery.com

2017

your L e c n u A anno an OFFICI ith win w

CULTURAL OR HISTORICAL LANDMARK

needs Business Partners

8.5” x 11” HIGH QUALITY MOUNT $60 + SHIPPING

Contact givelocal@mountainx.com to get involved

ONLY AVAILABLE AT MOUNTAINXPRESS. NEWSKEEPSAKE.COM

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MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

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BEST OF SMALL TOWNS

The Square rooT

hot springs

PHOTO COURTESY OF HOT SPRINGS RESORT & SPA

HOT SPRINGS RESORT & SPA: Business That Best Represents The Spirit Of Your Town and Cultural Or Historical Landmark BREAKFAST RESTAURANT 1 SMOKY MOUNTAIN DINER 70 Lance Ave., Hot Springs 622-7571 • avl.mx/2sg

LUNCH RESTAURANT

Brevard

1 SPRING CREEK TAVERN

145 Bridge St., Hot Springs 622-0187 • thespringcreektavern.com

2 IRON HORSE STATION RESTAURANT & TAVERN

First Place - Lunch Restaurant First Place - Dinner Restaurant

s q ua r e r o o t r e s ta u r a n t . c o m 33 TimeS arcade alley B r e va r d , N c 828.884.6171 86

BEST OF WNC - PART TWO

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

24 S. Andrew Ave., Hot Springs 866-402-9377 • theironhorsestation.com

DINNER RESTAURANT 1 IRON HORSE STATION RESTAURANT & TAVERN

24 S. Andrew Ave., Hot Springs 866-402-9377 • theironhorsestation.com

2 MOUNTAIN MAGNOLIA INN RESTAURANT

204 Lawson St., Hot Springs 622-3543 • mountainmagnoliainn.com

3 SPRING CREEK TAVERN

MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

145 Bridge St., Hot Springs 622-0187 • thespringcreektavern.com

MUSIC/ENTERTAINMENT VENUE 1 SPRING CREEK TAVERN 145 Bridge St., Hot Springs 622-0187 • thespringcreektavern.com

CULTURAL OR ARTS EVENT 1 FRENCH BROAD RIVER FESTIVAL Hot Springs frenchbroadriverfestival.com

CULTURAL OR HISTORICAL LANDMARK 1 HOT SPRINGS RESORT & SPA 315 Bridge St., Hot Springs 622-7676 • nchotsprings.com

BUSINESS THAT BEST REPRESENTS THE SPIRIT OF YOUR TOWN 1 HOT SPRINGS RESORT & SPA 315 Bridge St., Hot Springs 622-7676 • nchotsprings.com


continued

waynesville

Specializing in Regional Cuisine

BREAKFAST RESTAURANT 1 CLYDE'S RESTAURANT 2107 S. Main St., Waynesville 456-9135

2 JOEY'S PANCAKE HOUSE (CLOSED PERMANENTLY)

Thank You WNC!

4309 Soco Road, Maggie Valley 926-0212 • joeyspancake.com

3 THE BUTTERED BISCUIT 1226 Dellwood Road, Waynesville 246-6446

39 Miller Street Downtown Waynesville

828.456.5559

LUNCH RESTAURANT

Mon-Sat 11:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.

1 THE SWEET ONION RESTAURANT

Reservations accepted. | Walk-ins welcome.

39 Miller St., Waynesville 456-5559 • sweetonionrestaurant.com

2 BOOJUM BREWING COMPANY 50 N. Main St., Waynesville 246-0350 • boojumbrewing.com

WNC’s

3 BOGARTS RESTAURANT & TAVERN

Olde Time Tobacco Shoppe

303 S. Main St., Waynesville 452-1313 • bogartswaynesville.com

DINNER RESTAURANT 1 THE SWEET ONION RESTAURANT x 39 Miller St., Waynesville 456-5559 • sweetonionrestaurant.com

PHOTO COURTESY OF FOLKMOOT USA

2 BOGARTS RESTAURANT & TAVERN

FOLKMOOT USA: Best Cultural Or Arts Event

303 S. Main St., Waynesville 452-1313 • bogartswaynesville.com

3 BOOJUM BREWING COMPANY 50 N. Main St., Waynesville 246-0350 • boojumbrewing.com

COFFEE & SWEETS 1 PANACEA COFFEEHOUSE, CAFÉ & ROASTERY x 66 Commerce St., Waynesville 452-6200 • panaceacoffee.com

MUSIC/ENTERTAINMENT VENUE 1 HAYWOOD ARTS REGIONAL THEATRE 250 Pigeon St., Waynesville 456-6322 • harttheatre.org

2 THE STRAND AT 38 MAIN 38 N. Main St., Waynesville 283-0079 • 38main.com

2 KANDI'S BAKERY 200 S. Main St., Waynesville 246-0180 • kandiscakesandbakeshop.com

3 TRAILHEAD CAFE & BAKERY 18 N. Main St., Waynesville 452-3881 • trailheadcafebakery.com

ART GALLERY 1 TWIGS AND LEAVES GALLERY x 98 N. Main St., Waynesville 456-1940 • twigsandleaves.com

RETAIL STORE 1 MAST GENERAL STORE

63 N. Main St., Waynesville 452-2101 • mastgeneralstore.com

2 HAZELWOOD SOAP COMPANY 435 Hazel Wood Ave., Waynesville 456-3385 • hazelwoodsoapcompany.com

CULTURAL OR ARTS EVENT 1 FOLKMOOT USA folkmoot.org

BEST THING TO HAPPEN TO YOUR TOWN IN THE LAST 12 MONTHS 1 CHICK-FIL-A 1832 Hendersonville Road, Asheville chick-fil-a.com

BUSINESS THAT BEST REPRESENTS THE SPIRIT OF YOUR TOWN 1 BOOJUM BREWING COMPANY 50 N. Main St., Waynesville 246-0350 • boojumbrewing.com

WHAT CATEGORY WOULD YOU LIKE TO SEE ADDED TO THIS SECTION NEXT YEAR? 1 BEST BREWERY MOUNTAINX.COM/GUIDES

Thank you,

Asheville! B&B Tobacconists 377 Merrimon Ave ( 828 ) 253-8822

AUGUST 16 - 22, 2017

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Mountain Xpress 08.16.17  

Independent news, arts and events for Western North Carolina.

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