Page 1

trend watch

SPRING 2014

I M AG E M AG A Z I N E ’ S

BUILD, REMODEL & DECORATE

CREATIVE SOLUTIONS TRANSFORM YOUR HOME WITH INSPIRED IDEAS FROM LOCAL PROFESSIONALS


contents

spring 2014

18

48 68

FEATURES

18 Building Dreams into Reality

12 Editor’s Note

64 Flooring

A beautiful, functional renovation by the Northcape Design-Build team. By Mary Gow

14 Ask the Experts

67 Interior Design

17 Builders & Contractors

48 Classic Composition

35 Spotlight: Ennis Construction.

82 New & Now: Introduce the unexpected.

Crown Point Cabinetry: Custom cabinetry to your taste. By Mary Gow

68 Hubble Shire Farm

Steven Favreau’s visionary Federal. By Dian Parker

38 Spotlight: Randall T. Mudge Architects.

42 Windows 47 Kitchens 58 New & Now: Kitchen must-haves.

60 Spotlight: The Ultimate Bath Store.

trend watch

SPRING 2014

I M AG E M AG A Z I N E ’ S

BUILD, REMODEL & DECORATE

CREATIVE SOLUTIONS TRANSFORM YOUR HOME WITH INSPIRED IDEAS FROM LOCAL PROFESSIONALS

Cover: A stunning custom kitchen, created in homage to Frank Lloyd Wright and the Prairie movement, features strong lines, cantilevered projections, and terraced surfaces for a one-of-a-kind look. Courtesy of Crown Point Cabinetry.

10 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014

84 Lighting 86 Spotlight: The Lighting Center at Rockingham Electric.

88 Energy 91 Landscape 104 Advertisers Index


image

editor’s note

trend watch 2014

There’s No Place Like Home

W Deborah Thompson Executive Editor dthompson@mountainview publishing.com

ith the arrival of spring, it’s time once again to take stock of our homes and get started on new improvement projects. Whether you’re planning a new build or renovating your current residence, our area has a wealth of professionals with the skills and experience to guide you through your project, large or small. We discovered that a trend of the past few years is continuing as people are still choosing to stay at home more. They’re investing their dollars to make their homes more comfortable, livable, and functional. From adding a water feature and a patio to brightening the foyer with a fresh coat of paint, it’s time to get to work. My sincere thanks goes to Mary Gow, who worked tirelessly to contact builders, architects, designers, and experts in kitchens, bathrooms, windows, lighting, heating and cooling, and landscaping to gather the best tips and advice from this fabulous pool of experts. Thanks, too, to the talented professionals who responded to our request by providing their insight as well as gorgeous photos of their projects. No matter what you’re planning for 2014, our information is sure to spark your creativity. Do your research, check out the options, make the appropriate calls, and break out the drop cloths and rollers. Don’t forget to send us photos of your projects to be published in a future issue. Enjoy!

Mountain View Publishing, LLC 135 Lyme Road Hanover, NH 03755 (603) 643-1830 www.mountainviewpublishing.com Publishers

Bob Frisch Cheryl Frisch Executive Editor

Deborah Thompson Contributing Editor

Mary Gow Associate Editor

Kristy Erickson Copy Editor

Elaine Ambrose Creative Director/Design

Ellen Klempner-Béguin Advertising Design

Hutchens Media, LLC Web Design Locable Advertising

Bob Frisch

KEEP US POSTED: image magazine wants to hear from readers. Correspondence may be addressed to: Letters to the Editor, image, 135 Lyme Road, Hanover, NH 03755. Or email us at: dthompson@mountainviewpublishing.com. Advertising inquiries may be made by email to rcfrisch1@comcast.net. image is published quarterly by Mountain View Publishing, LLC © 2014. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part is strictly prohibited. image magazine accepts no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts, artwork, or photographs.

From Contributing Editor Mary Gow: Talking with our local experts about home design for Trend Watch is always a great pleasure. This year, my fourth with Trend Watch, I bring new perspective to the magazine. Last summer and fall we remodeled our 1870s farmhouse in central Vermont. Now, we are loving the results. Our fuel bills are lower with super-insulation and more efficient heating. Our lives are less cluttered with fresh clean lines and well-placed custom cabinetry. The new open floor plan flows with our lives and brings glorious views and natural light into more of our home. Through this process, my admiration of our local experts continues to grow. Our architects, general contractors, energy-efficiency experts, painters, carpenters, plumbers, electricians, and interior designers transform our lives as they design, build, and furnish our homes. Sharing their insights and expertise with you through Trend Watch is a privilege.

12 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014

Mary Gow Contributing Editor


Ask the Experts 2014 What one tip would you give homeowners as they look ahead to their 2014 projects? What’s your wish this year? A sleek, updated kitchen? An outdoor water feature or fire pit? Maybe our local professionals can help you decide what to tackle this year as they answer our question.

BUILDERS “Make your home more energy efficient. There’s still a lot of room for that and it pays off. Cut down on air infiltration, seal doors and windows, and add more insulation.” David Anderson Hill, David Anderson Hill, Inc., South Woodstock, VT “If I could do one thing in my house this year, I would do the guest bathroom. A bathroom is an easy target to upgrade.” Jay Tucker, Old Hampshire Designs, New London, NH

KITCHENS “For a fresh new look, add a backsplash. This gives you the biggest bang for your buck! A new backsplash can create a whole new feeling in your room, whether you’re looking for something soft and warm or edgy, cool, and contemporary. This is an inexpensive way to create a new space that is personal and unique to you.” Jessica Boisvert, Greenwood Kitchens & Bath, LLC, Grantham, NH “Make over the busy area of the home—the kitchen!” Melinda Blodgett, Blodgett’s Sash & Door, Lebanon, NH

BATHROOMS “Renovate a bathroom. Your bathroom and kitchen give you the best return on investment; you’ll recoup those dollars plus get the enjoyment.” Rand Hinman, The Ultimate Bath Store, The Granite Group, Lebanon, NH

APPLIANCES “An easy improvement any homeowner could make would be to replace an inefficient appliance with one of the new energy-efficient washers, dishwashers, or refrigerators.

14 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014

Replacing an old refrigerator with a new Energy Star certified model could save from $200 to $1,100 on energy costs over its lifetime. New washers can be up to 83 percent more efficient and use 56 percent less water.” David Perry, Perry’s Oil Service, Inc., Bradford, VT

LIGHTING “Make the switch to LED bulbs. They last for a very long time and are super energy efficient and safe. Plus, they are brighter than most incandescent bulbs.” Nichole Myers, The Lighting Center at Rockingham Electric, Claremont, NH “Buy local. Lighting made in the USA is BIG! Here in the Northeast we have some of the best lighting manufacturers in the world. From table and floor lamps to indoor and outdoor lighting, come see the quality for yourself.” Greg Isabelle, Illuminations by Barre Electric, West Lebanon, NH “Add under-cabinet lighting in the kitchen. The LED choices are phenomenal, and the price has come way down. No maintenance and great energy savings.” Lois Horan, Creative Lighting Designs and Décor, Lebanon, NH

WINDOWS “Get an energy audit! It will tell you so much about what you can do to improve your energy efficiency. Oftentimes, window replacement will be part of that recommendation.” Steve Cary, Loewen Window Center, White River Junction, VT “Window improvement! Increase the R-value of your windows to decrease heat loss. You can repair or restore your existing windows or add interior storm windows, making your house tighter and preserving its design integrity.” Jackie Hennard, Window Improvement Masters, Orford, NH


FLOORING

PAINT

“If budgets are tight, a new room of carpeting will freshen up any floor. There are so many choices of style, color, and texture to fit anyone’s budget.” Liz Michalenoick, Flat Rock Stone and Tile, LLC, Claremont, NH

“Wallpaper is back in a big way, from Mod to IndoIkat. Give a room an edge—change a feature wall for a great visual punch in your favorite room.” Kirstin Quick, Lebanon Paint & Decorating, West Lebanon, NH

“Increase the living space of your home without increasing the footprint of the home. Finishing attic and basement spaces has grown in popularity. This is where you can get the biggest return on your investment. Simple flooring, painting, and lighting can dramatically change a space.” Chad LaDuke, Carpet King and Tile, Keene, NH store

“Depending on its condition, the outside of your house should always be considered first because of its exposure to the elements. By protecting the house exterior with a good coat of paint, you may keep costly repairs and replacement at bay and you get the benefit of a nicer-looking house.” Jeff Wilmot, Jeff Wilmot Painting, South Royalton, VT

INTERIOR DESIGN

HOME HEATING

“The kitchen or the bath. If you’re considering a bathroom renovation, think about a larger, more luxurious shower instead of a tub. If you’re planning to remodel the kitchen, try to maximize the space to accommodate all of the functions required of today’s kitchens—not just cooking but home office, homework center, and family hub.” Alice Williams, Alice Williams Interiors, Hanover, NH

“This may sound old, but it is still the most important thing that many homeowners can benefit from: insulation and weatherization. If you have already insulated the basement, the attic, and the walls, then the next most important home improvement may be upgrading the heating system and finally adding renewables, while the rebates are still available.” Kimberly Quirk, Energy Emporium, Enfield, NH

“Energy-efficient window treatments! They are a really good investment. Hunter Douglas is very innovative, and they came up with a honeycomb shade that is inside another honeycomb, so it creates a very energy-efficient product. This year they introduced a “trio”—it can reduce heat loss through your windows by up to 40 percent.” Eleanor Shepard, Shepard Interiors, Quechee, VT

“Get a new high-efficiency EPA-approved woodstove or consider an alternative energy central-heating system—wood or pellet.” Bill Mathewson, Home Comfort Warehouse, White River Junction, VT

“Redo your bedroom! Creating a space that is restful and comfortable can make such a difference. I have always tried to urge our clients to create a space that lets them unwind at night and get a great rest, waking up in the morning feeling recharged and ready to tackle the day. We work with clients to suggest great bedding and fabrics, color selections, and lighting.” Cheryl Boghosian, Gilberte Interiors, Inc., Hanover, NH

“High-performance propane furnaces and boilers are shown to lower costs and add value to homes in the Northeast, with best in class efficiency, or AFUE ratings as high as 90 to 98 percent. Not only that, they serve a variety of space and water-heating applications, allowing today’s homeowners to customize their residential energy use.” Felicia LaBranche, Eastern Propane & Oil, Rochester, NH

 www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

15


Ask the Experts 2014

LANDSCAPE “Develop a master plan. If you own a large parcel of land, you may want to begin with a forestry plan. If you have a smaller parcel, you may want to begin with an accurate survey. The biggest problem I often encounter is when people have built disparate elements without considering how they relate to one another as a whole. A thoughtful master plan will provide a guide for years of development on the landscape and will repeatedly pay back financial and aesthetic dividends.” Scott Wunderle, Terrigenous Landscape Architecture, Chester, VT

16 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014

OUTDOOR FURNITURE

“Improve your planting! Add a water feature! Rearrange and organize your existing plantings! Like rearranging furniture in your house, you can create a new feeling with just a few changes.” John Sullivan, JSLA, LLC, North Sutton, NH

“Enlarge your outdoor space and make it more inviting, whether it be a deck, patio, or porch.” Judy Evans Sleeper, All Decked Out, Quechee, VT

“Establish curb appeal by creating or upgrading an outdoor living space, patio, or walkway. Consider replacing that failing timber or dry-cast block retaining wall, or eliminate that steep slope and create more land by installing an engineered retaining wall.” Doug Bartlett, Carroll Concrete, Newport, NH

“Make yourself a comfortable place to enjoy your yard. Outfit it with a comfortable chair, table for tea and a book, and an umbrella. In New England, folks love tilting umbrellas for flexibility in the afternoon sun.” Lynne Wardlaw, Deck Dock Home & Garden, Sunapee, NH


CREATORS & DREAM MAKERS

builders • contractors Whether you’re building a home, adding a room, or renovating a kitchen or bath, the decisions and the details can be overwhelming. From traditional principles to 21st century innovation, local architects and builders have the skills, experience, and vision to guide you and help you achieve your goals.

www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

17


PHOTOS COURTESY OF NORTHCAPE DESIGN-BUILD

building

Dreams into Reality

MAKING IT WORK THE CONNECTOR : Talking with Sue Painter, Northcape Architectural Designer. MG: The connector ties the house and garage together, but given the distance and the grade, the challenge was to integrate the elements with a space that would suit the family’s needs. SP: Taking into consideration how the space would be used, we decided on three levels, with an entry door into the middle level. This level actually has a cathedral ceiling, with fixed windows letting light in. Guests parked outside would use that mid-level door. We carried design features from the house through the connector to the garage and apartment—big roofs, casement windows, the cedar shingles. The diamond pattern of shingles in the peaks of the main house carries through to the other peak.

BY MARY GOW

A Beautiful, Functional Renovation by 18 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014

t


BEFORE

“The goa lw Adironda as to create more ck lakefro nt-style h of an ome.”

T

he new homeowners of a gorgeous,

lakeside timber frame home in our region loved the property’s location and many of its features, but they wanted it updated with a fresh look and modifications to meet their needs for a comfortable vacation home for their family and for entertaining friends. To bring about this transformation, the homeowners called in Northcape Design-Build of Sunapee. “The clients were great. They had the vision and the wherewithal to make it happen,” says Everett Pollard, President and owner of Northcape. “It was fun, absolutely fun,” he recalls, explaining that with Northcape’s team approach, multiple aspects of this major project were occurring simultaneously. The owners, in fact, were staying in the fully remodeled old cottage on the property within weeks of the fall closing. By midwinter they were in the remodeled main house; the garage with guest apartment and connector followed just a few months later. 

y

the Northcape Design-Build Team www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

19


“This home is all about entertaining—having friends and family over and making them feel welcome. They wanted places so you can be there with everybody or go off into your own space. This house is meant to be comfortable.” —

20 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014

Patricia Westgate, Interior Designer


There were several priorities for the redo. A cottage on the property dating from the 1920s or ’30s was thoroughly updated to be a hospitable and private three-season retreat for family or guests. “We updated everything inside—refinished floors and walls, added new carpeting, new appliances,” says Pollard. Another priority was to make use of the house. “It is a beautiful timber frame. We didn’t need to reconfigure a lot, but the décor wasn’t what its new owners wanted. The goal was to create more of an Adirondack lakefront-style home.” The kitchen and sunroom were isolated initially from the living and dining areas, so Pollard’s team, he explains, “suggested taking out an entire wall to unify it and create more of an open great-room concept.” An unfinished lower level was transformed into a game room, home theater, exercise room, full bath, and full bar. “My vision was to open up that space that became a game room to let more light in and to get a slight view of the lake. We cut concrete out to install windows and put stone veneer on the exterior.” The owners also wanted a garage. It happened that the previous owner had the same thought and had plans for a detached garage on the only part of the site where it was feasible. “Our concept was very similar. We purchased those plans and with Sue Painter, our building designer, worked out a 50-foot connector to get from the house to the garage, working with the topography and change in grade.” A fun guest suite was incorporated above the garage. 

BEFORE

LIVING ROOM/KITCHEN: By removing the existing wall and adding a custom buffet, this space was transformed into a great entertaining area.

www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

21


“If you see something you like, save photos, discuss it with your designer, and you can achieve it.” —Patricia Westgate, Interior Designer

22 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014


BEFORE OPENING UP THE FLOW

THE KITCHEN: Removing the cooktop from the island allowed for an uninterrupted work space.

ď ˝

The kitchen became an invitation into the great room when the walls were removed and replaced with a custom-designed buffet. An island with seating and a dropped table allowed entertaining for any size group of friends and family. From finding just the right lights for over the island to the indoor-outdoor fabric used on the stools and chairs, Northcape Interior Designer Patricia Westgate never lost sight of how function, design, color, durability, and proper placement all played a key role in the final results.

The wood in this buffet came to life in the hands of master craftsman Jeff Thurston from Thurston Millwork.

www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

23


LAKESIDE RESORT AT SUNAPEE by Patricia Westgate, Interior Designer for Northcape Design-Build

What could be more enjoyable than having your very own New Hampshire lake house minutes from a ski mountain? This is where in-house Interior Designer Patricia Westgate’s vision and the vision the clients had of sharing this unique property with family and friends started to come together. The stage was set for the charm of this Adirondack house when local fieldstone became the focal point for the floor-to-ceiling fireplace in the great room. A Sam Moore sectional provided customized seating with two swivel low-back chairs that completed the perfect conversation setting or relaxing lake viewing. The room came to life when a splash of color and fun was added with pillows of different sizes and shapes. From the unique wall map of Sunapee, New Hampshire, to the earth-tone leather reclining couch and chairs found in the office, to the many inviting sitting areas, a special place to be is found at every turn. Each bathroom has its own unique look and feel with granite, tile, wallpaper, fixtures, and cabinetry designed with the personal style of the homeowners in mind. The apartment above the garage is complete with painted cabinets, a retro refrigerator, glass tile backsplash, and dropped eating area. A welcoming living room open to the kitchen, built-in bunk beds, and a second bedroom and full bath make it hard to decide where you would like to stay. This truly is a lakeside resort! TW

A custom wall-sized map of Sunapee is the backdrop for the relaxed feel of this toneon-tone office.

Furniture and accessories: Regal House Furniture

24 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014


GET THE LOOK INTRODUCE COLOR: Color plays a major part in the interior environment. A great way to achieve this is with accessories that can change with the seasons or your mood!

“When I design a home, it is the homeowner’s design. I design for you. I am always excited when I’m done and a homeowner says, ‘We have the exact same taste!’ I try to achieve the look that a client wants and the comfort they seek in their home.” —Patricia Westgate, Interior Designer

THE NORTHCAPE TEAM Everett Pollard, President and owner of Northcape. Initial concept for the addition and connector. Designed the new “walk-out” level with the home theater, game room, and exercise room. Sue Painter, Northcape Architectural Designer. Designed the addition and connector. Rick Alibrandi, Northcape Project Manager. Responsible for all renovation work and construction. He supervised all vendors and trade partners and worked with the homeowners and the Northcape team to complete a successful project.

From left: Susan Painter, Carol Sullivan, Jim Goin, Everett Pollard, Robin Pollard, Rick Alibrandi, and Patricia Westgate.

Patricia Westgate, Northcape Selections Coordinator and Interior Designer. Worked a tremendous number of hours with the homeowners, shopping for products and making selections. These included cabinet design, tile layouts for custom showers, furniture selection and purchase, paper and paint color selections, window treatments, and more. Peter Schiess, Landscape Architect, Owner of Landforms, LTD. designed and built the landscaping. Northcape Design-Build 3 Alpine Court Sunapee, NH (603) 763-2477 northcapedesign.com

www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

25


builders • contractors

CREATORS & DREAM MAKERS

The use of natural materials remains a popular building trend, along with open floor plans and lots of large windows to let in the light. Jay Tucker of Old Hampshire Designs remarks on another direction he’s seeing. “The trend continues that people are building smaller. Instead of putting money into volume, homeowners are choosing more energyefficient homes with high-quality finishes and nicer details.” 

build YOUR dream

PHOTOS COURTESY OF OLD HAMPSHIRE DESIGNS

FINDING THE RIGHT BUILDER FOR YOUR PROJECT MAKES YOUR DREAM COME TRUE

26 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014


The heart of this home is the Great Room, which opens up on one side with a glass wall, allowing sunlight in while looking out to the surrounding hills. The fireplace is constructed from granite found on the property and complements the Timberpeg™ post and beam construction.

GRANITE COUNTERTOPS, NICE BATHROOM AND KITCHEN FIXTURES, AND HARDWOOD FLOORS THROUGHOUT ARE AMONG THE LEADING FINISHES AND FEATURES.

—Jay Tucker, Old Hampshire Designs New London, NH

www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

27


builders • contractors

WE HAVE A LOT MORE REQUESTS FOR GEOTHERMAL HEATING AND COOLING SYSTEMS.

—Jay Tucker, Old Hampshire Designs New London, NH

ENERGY SAVINGS Homeowners continue to look for ways to save money on energy bills, and geothermal heating and cooling systems may be the answer. “These systems work and are very much in demand,” says Jay Tucker of Old Hampshire Designs. “With them, air conditioning in the summer is almost free. This goes hand in hand with the homes being smaller and more efficient.” Jay also recommends another way to save. “In new construction, it is critical that you invest in superior insulation in your home. Insulation, including the spray foams, has become more affordable, and you get tremendous value. Would you build a marginal foundation? Of course not. The same is true with insulation. Invest in it now and you will enjoy its benefits for years and years,” Jay advises.

IS YOUR HOME SMART? David Anderson Hill of South Woodstock, Vermont, says, “Smart-house technology is becoming the norm. House systems can be controlled remotely from your smartphones and tablets. You can adjust heat, set alarms, lights, shades, video, open and close awnings, know when a door opens or shuts—anything that has power or has a sensor can be monitored and controlled by the system,” David explains. He continues, “Even as people are building energy-efficient smart homes, in design there is still a love for New England vernacular—proportions, texture, timber frame construction. This has been our specialty in new construction, and we have a reputation for adaptive reuse of antique materials.” 28 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014


PHOTO COUR TESY OF OL

D HAMPSHIR

E DESIGNS

HOW TO FIND A BUILDER • Contact your local home builders’ association to obtain a list of builders. • Look in the real estate section of your local newspaper to learn the types of homes they are building and the prices. • Ask real estate professionals, friends, and relatives for recommendations. • Ask builders on your list for the addresses of their recently built homes. Builders may even be able to provide names of some homeowners who would be willing to talk with you.

TOP TRENDS Transitional Style A middle ground between traditional and contemporary design is becoming more popular. Flexible Floor Plans As more households are becoming multi-generational, rooms are being built with change in mind. An offi ce can become a bedroom, and dedicated living and dining areas are being transformed into multi-purpose family areas. Accessible Design Forget the spiral staircase, sunken living room, and high cabinets. The homes of tomorrow will be easy to move around in, even if you or members of your family have physical limitations, allowing you to age in place. Healthy Home Homeowners are using more low- and no-VOC paints; nontoxic, eco-friendly materials; and energy-effi cient appliances. Energy and Water Effi ciency features include low-water toilets and sinks, high-effi ciency furnaces and air conditioners (including using geothermal), closed cell insulation, and high-effi ciency windows. Abundant Storage Spacious walk-in closets and plenty of cabinets are in demand. Garages are also getting bigger to accommodate more cars and provide storage space. Outdoor Living Rooms and Screened Porches The yard becomes part of the fl oor plan when sliding or folding glass doors lead to patios and decks. Sources: www.bhg.com, thelenconstruction.com www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

29


builders • contractors

New construction shingle-style cottage on Lake Sunapee blends perfectly with its setting.

LAKESIDE RETREAT McGray & Nichols constructed this charming cottage on Lake Sunapee. While the new home incorporates the latest materials and energy-efficient features, it has the look of a comfortable, classic older home nestled in the woods. The stacked windows of the two-story foyer (which has a balcony inside) bring natural light into the stair tower. PHOTOS COURTESY OF MCGRAY & NICHOLS BUILDERS & PHOTO BY JOHN W. HESSION.

30 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014


A CONTINUED TREND IS TO DESIGN LARGE EXTERIOR LIVING SPACES WHICH FLOW VISUALLY AND FUNCTIONALLY WITH THE INTERIOR SPACES.

—Louise Bonfiglio, Owner & President McGray & Nichols New London, NH

Fine craftsmanship extends to the interior of the informal, open home. The vaulted ceiling with coffered beams, living room beams, as well as the wood paneling, built-ins, and trim on the entire main level are crafted out of locally harvested #2 pine. The homeowner chose country-grade red oak to run throughout the house. Outside, exposed rafter tails are reminiscent of fine homes from an earlier era. The back-to-back stone fireplace warms the comfortable living room and screened porch. Large windows overlooking the deck afford views of the lake beyond. 

www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

31


builders • contractors

Left and above: Pippin Hill Winery and wedding venue, Charlottesville, Virginia. Bottom left: Community Center at Bundoran Farm development, Charlottesville, Virginia. Below: Bridgewater Hill vacation home.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF GEOBARNS

32 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014


BARNS ARE MAKING A COMEBACK, WITH GEOBARNS BEING BUILT THROUGHOUT THE US.

— George Abetti President of Geobarns White River Junction, VT

“In our fast-paced culture, we long for simpler times and a connection to the land that the American barn provides,” says George Abetti, President of Geobarns. Geobarn structures provide warmth and strength, offering a no-frills approach, giving clients high value for the money by keeping the details simple. The company’s free-span truss system allows for wide-open gathering spaces. From tiny yoga studios to beautiful homes and large buildings, Geobarns has a building to fit every client’s vision.  www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

33


builders • contractors CHOOSING AN ARCHITECT Building can be a complicated process, comprised of many design options, building code restrictions, zoning laws, land use regulations, environmental issues, choices of building materials, and selecting the right contractor. An architect will help you navigate this process and present you with creative solutions that you might never have considered on your own. An architect can provide • More effi cient and economical planning. • Energy-effi cient design using state-of-the-art sustainable materials and building techniques. • The ability to establish a working budget early in the design process. • The opportunity to increase the value of your property, giving your home a higher resale value.

Questions to Consider

Sign up for our

FREE NEWSLETTER Sign up TODAY at mountainviewpublishing.com/ newsletter • Top Stories from the Web • Upcoming Events • Win Great Local Prizes Sponsored by Mascoma Savings Bank

When meeting with a prospective architect, you may want to ask the following questions: • What is your design philosophy? • Do you have experience with the building type and size of my project? • Will you share with me a portfolio of similar projects and provide a list of client references? • What challenges do you foresee for my project? • What is your estimated timetable for my project? • What are the steps in the design process, and how are they organized? • Do you have experience with green or sustainable design? • In anticipation of a formal proposal with costs, what would you expect your fee to be for this project?

Like us on Facebook for your chance to win great prizes!

Facebook Contests, Sweepstakes & Giveaways!

mountainviewpublishing.com/facebook 34 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014

• What is included in your basic services and what services would incur additional fees? • What is your track record with completing a project within the original budget? TW Source: www.aia.org


Spotlight • Ennis Construction

BY MARY GOW

Custom efficient home in the Lakes Region.

on time within budget

SUPERIOR ENERGY EFFICIENT HOMES

PHOTOS COURTESY OF ENNIS CONSTRUCTION

“A HOME CAN CAPTURE HISTORY AND CONSERVE ENERGY AND PRECIOUS ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES WHILE BEING A STATEMENT OF BEAUTY AND ELEGANCE,” says Dana Ennis, founder and President of Ennis Construction, based in Ascutney, Vermont. “We have a long history of innovation in energy conservation,” says Ennis. “We worked on the first solar thermal panels in the state—for heating and  domestic hot water—back in 1978.”  

www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

35


Spotlight • Ennis Construction Through the decades Ennis Construction acquired a reputation for its “green building” practices before green became popular by incorporating energy efficiency, superior insulation, and nontoxic and environmentally friendly building materials in their homes and other projects while not compromising on the elegant and sophisticated details of fine homebuilding. NEW TRENDS “There are new products now for insulation. Window options with high R values have expanded. With these tighter homes, installation of fresh air systems is important—ventilators that provide fresh air into the home economically. The range of energy-conserving options is extensive, Ennis notes. In response, his company has developed, “a whole a la carte menu of what you can do that’s affordable and has a reasonable payback, from weatherstripping to geothermal, photovoltaic solar, solar thermal, and even wind turbines. Homeowners can choose options for energy conservation in their home. From triple-glazed windows to sustainable flooring, we aim to give them the information they need so they can get the most for their money on features that make the most sense for them. “We published our own detail book, built on our 35-plus years of experience, seminars, and study of building science,” says Ennis. Many of Ennis Construction’s projects deal with historic properties. “We have an eye to keeping historic character and marrying it to alternative energy and energy efficiency and modern technological advantages,” he says. Q: What’s hot for 2014? People are looking for better answers, looking to not burn as much fuel. Nobody likes to spend their money on oil and gas. If cleaner fuel is more affordable, people will do it. For example, solar photovoltaics with tax credits are viable, and the products have become less expensive. It is very rewarding to be able to look into a variety of new projects that we can excel at this coming year. We received five Excellence in Housing Awards in 2013 from the National Association of Home Builders and look forward to entering more of our work this year. TW

36 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h • kitchen.

2014

lumber barn


Center: This south-facing house captures the sun for solar gain. Left: Stone fireplace with its water feature acts as a great heat supplier, passive solar heat sink, and humidifier. Below: Intricate details in trim add to interest and finish of this home.

“We have an eye to keeping historic character and marrying it to alternative energy and energy efficiency and modern technological advantages.” —Dana Ennis

Left: Natural stone floor and slate vanity top and tub surround make a nice combination in this bathroom. Above: Custom cabinetry and stone counters are accented by cable lighting.

Ennis Construction Ascutney Professional Building Route 5, PO Box 418 Ascutney, VT (802) 674-2646 www.ennisconstruction.com

www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

37


Spotlight • Randall T. Mudge and Associates

Architects

planning & designing

YOUR PERFECT HOME

PHOTOS BY RENDELL STOCKMAN

Stair hallway, view to the river.

38 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014


RANDALL T. MUDGE AND ASSOCIATES have been providing architectural design services for a diverse list of clients as well as project types from their Lyme office for more than 32 years. Randy Mudge works in concert with Patricia Hill, AIA, and Jeremy Greeley, AIA, to create carefully conceived professional results through all phases of the architectural design process. The PowerHouse Mall Arcade, David’s House, Tom Tom, Ledyard Banks, and the Corey Ford Rugby Clubhouse are among their commercial and institutional projects. Residential projects include renovations, additions, and new homes. Q: In planning a new home or renovating an existing one, why hire an architect? RM: Architects are educated to objectively evaluate sites, organize building programs, discuss and present design options that align with a client’s preferences, develop designs for construction and pricing, assist the client in bids or negotiations for a construction contract, and to be the third-party administrator of the client–contractor contract during construction. Architects are required to continue their education throughout the life of their license. The bottom line is that an architect’s insight is invaluable as one considers options for existing and future real estate investments. Q: What should I expect in the design process? RM: Architecture is a team sport. As a key player, you will be asked many questions throughout the design process, such as your spatial needs, budget, level of finish, schedule, and material preferences. The architect will work with you to refine and define your future structure. The architect will also work with you and the skilled building contractors and sub-contractors we are so fortunate to have in this area to achieve the most important goal in architecture—getting it built.  Living room with architectural mantel and surround artifacts.

www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

39


Spotlight • Randall T. Mudge and Associates

Architects

Q: What is your design philosophy? RM: Creation is a very powerful tool that should be used with great care and respect for the impact a design will have on the present as well as the future and the past.

View of the house from the river side. From left: open porch, living room, sitting area, entry hall, study, master bedroom. The two large dormers are in the guest bedrooms. Small dormers provide light to the porch and living room.

This residence is home to a very active retired couple. Working with the clients, we created their primary living space on one level with two guest bedrooms upstairs. The master bedroom with a study is separated by the central entry and stairs from the kitchen, sitting, dining, and living spaces. These spaces are open to each other to permit easy visual as well as verbal communication between occupants. Thanks to careful siting within the constraints of forest, field, and shoreland setbacks, all rooms receive sun from the south and have views to the Connecticut River. An open porch with a fireplace is a feature that integrates indoor and outdoor activities on the river side. Architectural artifacts collected by the clients are featured throughout the home, especially in key areas of the living spaces. TW

The master bedroom with doors opens to a private garden area.

40 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014

lumber barn

The kitchen features handmade cabinets by local craftsmen.


The living room, dining room, and kitchen viewed from the sitting room show the open nature of the living spaces.

Randall T. Mudge & Associates Architects 85 Dartmouth College Highway Lyme, NH (603) 795-4831 rtm@rtmudge-architects.com Randall T. Mudge, AIA M. Arch., Yale University B. Arch., Montana State University B.A., University of New Hampshire Registered Architect: New Hampshire, Vermont www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

41


windows

CREATORS & DREAM MAKERS

open the space BRING IN THE SUNSHINE

With today’s choices for windows and doors, homeowners are finding that they don’t have to sacrifice beauty, functionality, or durability for energy efficiency. “We see a lot of contemporary design that carries through the windows,” says Steve Cary of Loewen Windows in White River Junction. “Many of today’s architects focus on an open concept with clean lines and lots of light. These designs often include larger operating windows, such as windows the size of doors,” Steve continues. 

The windows in this room allow views that give a feeling of being in the treetops.

Both beauty and energy savings are found in today’s casement windows as well as in double-hung, sliding, and bay or bow styles. PHOTOS COURTESY OF LOEWEN WINDOW CENTER

42 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014


COURTESY OF WINDOWS & DOORS BY BROWNELL

Floor-to-ceiling wall of windows brings the outdoors in.

INTERIOR STORM WINDOWS DECREASE HEAT LOSS THROUGH WINDOWS AND ADD TO THE AESTHETIC OF YOUR HOME.

—Jackie Hennard Window Improvement Masters Orford, NH

INTEGRATED SHADES “Marvin has introduced a fully integrated interior shade system,” says April Bolin of Windows & Doors by Brownell. “Consumers and builders can now order shades with their Marvin windows that are custom made for each unit.” Benefits include: • Available in 15 colors in either light filtering or blackout • Opens from either the top or the bottom • Fully concealed mechanisms and hidden cords • Also available for swinging or sliding doors

www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

43


windows

ABOUT THE PROJECT: This 1970s home was completely remodeled for a growing and active family. Initially the customers were interested in European windows for reasons of aesthetics, quality, and energy performance. They were seeking an ultra-modern look with large expanses of glass to enjoy their mountain vistas while not compromising

44 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014

energy performance. When introduced to Loewen, they were happily surprised to learn a North American-based manufacturer provided all the attributes of a European-made product with competitive pricing, superior warranties, lead times, and local service. Window types include tripleglazed fixed picture windows, casements, and awnings.

ONE TREND IS TO LARGE, MOVING WALL SYSTEMS OF WINDOWS. IN SUNROOMS YOU CAN HAVE AN ENTIRE WALL THAT OPENS,

LETTING THE OUTDOORS IN.

—Steve Cary Loewen Window Center of VT & NH White River Junction, VT


BEAUTY THAT PERFORMS “There’s a real push for high energy performance,” says Steve Cary of Loewen Windows. “Triple glazing is extremely sought after in all types of architecture—contemporary and traditional. “With today’s triple-glazed windows, you can have high clarity and high solar gain. Clarity is visible light transmittance, and high solar gain means windows function as passive solar heating,” Steve explains. “The Europeans say that each window can be considered a little furnace. We agree! Because of the heat gain with the proper type of Low-E glass and triple glazing, the windows help you heat your house with the sun.” 

PHOTOS COURTESY OF LOEWEN WINDOW CENTER

www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

45


windows REPLACEMENT WINDOWS If you’re building a new home, it will most likely include the latest energy-efficient windows. But if you’re a budget-conscious homeowner trying to reduce heating bills, you may want to consider replacing your windows, even if your home is only a few years old.

With rising energy costs and environmental awareness, many consumers are now looking to replace windows that in many cases are relatively new and still functioning properly. It is estimated that as many as 50 million homes in America still have single-pane windows, and many of these homeowners are now opting to

COURTESY OF WINDOW IMPROVEMENT MASTERS

replace these inefficient windows with new multi-paned, energy-efficient units, according to weathershield.com. Many of Marvin Windows’ replacement lines are available with the company’s new Tripane triple glazing system. These units achieve a U-factor of .25 or lower. They have also introduced a retractable screen system, eliminating the need for removal and storage of screens. MULTIPLE BENEFITS Besides energy savings, consumers with older windows may be ready for replacements for several reasons: • Tilt-in windows are easy to clean (no more climbing on ladders!). • New windows are easy to open and close. • Homeowners want low-maintenance choices with tough, durable finishes in favor of their older woodenframed windows, which can warp or rot and need to be sanded and painted or stained. If you want to maintain the historical integrity and aesthetic value of your home’s wooden windows, vinyl-clad wooden options are available. TW 46 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014


CREATORS & DREAM MAKERS

kitchens More than just a space for cooking, kitchens have become the hub of the home. Besides high-performance appliances and durable surfaces, homeowners want their kitchens to include an office area, room for the kids to do homework, even docks for recharging electronics, which has led to creating a comfortable space where the whole family can gather.

www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

47


PHOTOS COURTESY OF CROWN POINT CABINETRY

BY MARY GOW

Classic

Composition

CUSTOM CABINETRY TO YOUR TASTE

48 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014


Crown Point Cabinetry in Claremont handcrafts outstanding quality all-wood custom cabinetry for homes across the country and beyond. Their design teams— 18 designers in all—work directly with homeowners, architects, builders, and interior designers.  www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

49


“The diamond-muntin detail over the main sink is drawn from the diamond motif carried throughout the house. This detail, designed by the architect, occurs in the windows; we carried it through the cabinetry.”

E

very piece is custom made and fi nished by Crown Point’s skilled cabinetmakers. Along with years of experience, Crown Point offers innovation: new appliances, extra storage spaces, and perfect built-in nooks are seamlessly incorporated into their designs and cabinets. “This lakefront home is all about entertaining and family,” says Mark Wirta, the Crown Point Cabinetry designer who worked directly with the homeowners, their architect, and their interior designer to create cabinets, paneling, and storage throughout this welcoming property. “All players in this project relied heavily on the expertise of C.W. Ostrom Builders of Sunapee to bring it from dream to reality,” Mark says. With its ample island and comfortable proportions, this is a working kitchen and inviting gathering place. “It has almost the capacity of a commercial kitchen,” says Wirta, “equipped with convection oven, cooktop, microwave, two ovens, ice maker, refrigerator drawers in the island, and its big built-in Sub-Zero fridge.” At the same time, it is a gathering place. “The big island offers children and guests space to visit while the cook is in the kitchen.” Inset cabinetry with fl at-panel drawers and door fronts, and a bead around openings for doors and drawers give the kitchen a classic look.  50 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014


“The butler’s pantry is often a nook you don’t see. This one is very much a part of the kitchen and is seen through the archway. It has a wood countertop, a traditional feature in pantries. The glass bypass doors let you see what’s in those cupboards.” www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

51


Right: Custom builtin cabinetry wraps around the corner, providing additional storage space and a beautiful solid wood top for displaying family photos and favorite books. Below: The laundry room is smart, functional, and beautiful. Opposite: A spacious mudroom with graceful dividers, open shelves, and turned legs creates an elegant space to store daily necessities for each member of the family.

“It’s important that your utility space be laid out for ease of everyday use. With cabinetry above and a hanging rod at left, this laundry space is set up for quick access while keeping unsightly supplies behind closed doors.”

52 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014


PLENTY OF STORAGE

“Built-in cabinetry really gives you a feeling of old-world craftsmanship, integrated into the bones of a new home,” Mark says. “Whenever possible, it’s a great idea to integrate storage in a way that is both useful and beautiful.” www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

53


Above: An oversized window seat with flip-top storage below the cushion provides a comfortable seat to enjoy the view. Top right: The great room is wrapped with quartersawn oak paneling to match the built-in cabinetry. The dark-stained wood evokes the feel of a turn-of-the-century summer lakeside estate. Bottom, from near right: More quartersawn oak paneling conceals an expertly placed closet door. The concealed closet door is pushed open to reveal a small coat closet with open shelving and a hanging rod. The distinctive character of Ponderosa pine creates a unique and handsome wet bar in the billiard room. The diamond muntins are repeated here, continuing the theme throughout the home.

54 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014


Choosing a particular design element and repeating it throughout the home is a great way to unify many rooms with completely different furnishings and finishes. In the great room, the diamond-muntin motif used in the kitchen is seen again in the window and the glass cabinetry doors. TW

Crown Point Cabinetry PO Box 1560 462 River Road Claremont, NH (800) 999-4994 www.crown-point.com

www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

55


kitchens

CREATORS & DREAM MAKERS

cook up your ideal

kitchen No matter how many people are in your home—family or guests— they love to gather in the kitchen. Make yours more welcoming and efficient with new appliances. “Induction cooking, while not new, is becoming much more affordable and popular,” says David Perry of Perry’s Oil Service. “An induction cooktop is faster and more energy efficient than a traditional electric cooking surface.”

When the owners purchased this 1920s large Victorian home, the kitchen was far too small for their active family and was hemmed in by a steep rear staircase. In addition, the couple cooks together and maintains a Kosher kitchen, so they needed counter space as well as storage for multiple sets of dishes and flatware. The staircase was removed in order to open up the space and fill it with natural light. The result is a bright and spacious chef’s kitchen with timeless appeal and plenty of room for the whole family. Design: Deborah Brien, Riverlight Builders, Inc. Builder: Riverlight Builders, Inc. Photography by John Sherman TOP PHOTO AND INSET COURTESY OF RIVERLIGHT BUILDERS

56 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014


“Fisher & Paykel’s new 36-inch single-drawer DishDrawer™ offers dishwashing for nine place settings,” says David Perry of Perry’s Oil Service. “In their doubledrawer dishwashers, both drawers operate independently, so different wash cycles can operate simultaneously to accommodate a variety of loads.”

FISHER & PA YKEL DISHDR

AWERTM CO

URTESY OF PE

WHAT’S HOT FOR 2014?

RRY’S OIL

Rock Tile and Stone in Claremont. “It’s a

FLAT-PANEL PAINTED CABINET DOORS ARE

new countertop surface that is incredibly

HOT THIS YEAR.

“Neolith!” says Liz Michalenoick of Flat

scratch resistant, heat proof (even direct fl ame), and resistant to chemicals like

—Melinda Blodgett Blodgett’s Sash & Door Lebanon, NH

bleach and oven cleaner. It is one of the most durable surfaces made.” TW

PHOTO COURTESY OF BLODGETT’S SASH & DOOR

www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

57


KITCHEN MUST-HAVES

NEW & NOW

1

4

3

5

2

6

58 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014


8

7

1. EUROCHEF STOVE ILVE 40-inch Duel Fuel Range from the Majestic line features up to 6 semi-sealed burners and a multifunction European convection oven and standard electric oven. Rotisserie and full-width warming drawer are standard features. www.perryoil.com

2. BEE HOUSE TEAPOTS Bee House makes wonderful functional teapots, tea mugs, canisters, and more. www.beehouseteapot.com

3. BREVILLE HEMISPHERE CONTROL BLENDER No matter what your blending needs—smoothies, salsas, chopping nuts, pureeing soups—this powerful machine delivers fantastic results every time and looks great while doing it. www.surlatable.com

4. VINTAGE WAREHOUSE CLOCK Decades ago, a clock like this one kept time in a busy warehouse. Reproducing its weathered rust patina, deco numerals, and telegraph-company logo, this version evokes the character of that bygone era. www.restorationhardware.com

5. MASTRAD® MORTAR AND GRATER COMBO Stylish and practical bamboo container holds the stainless-steel mortar and pestle, as well as two graters for various foods inside. www.surlatable.com

6. BLANCO SINK The Blancoaxis 6-S-IF in exclusive stainless steel is a true all-rounder. Ergonomically arranged working zones with draining surfaces, main and additional bowls, and a well-planned range of accessories provide flowing space-saving sequences and increase the working radius. Photo: Blanco www.blanco-germany.com

7. SPLASH-PROOF SUPER-FAST THERMAPEN® The Super-Fast Thermapen is a professional tool that has become the top consumer cooking thermometer for home use. Its popularity among foodies and bloggers has made the Thermapen an essential tool in the best-equipped home kitchens. www.thermoworks.com

8. DUALIT NEW GENERATION CLASSIC 2-SLICE TOASTER Dualit has upgraded its iconic toaster with a setting for buns and bagels and a defrost setting for frozen bread. What hasn’t changed is the superlative quality and design that have made Dualit famous: Each toaster is still hand-assembled in England and built to last. www.williams-sonoma.com

www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

59


Bathroom Spotlight • The Ultimate Bath Store

New England’s Premier Bath & Kitchen Center

BATHING BEAUTIES PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE ULTIMATE BATH STORE

60 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014


This page and opposite: Tresham Bathroom Collection by Kohler.

“TODAY PEOPLE ARE MOVING FROM TRADITIONAL LOOKS TO CONTEMPORARY ONES AND INCORPORATING CONTEMPORARY STYLE INTO TRADITIONAL HOMES,” says Rand Hinman of the Ultimate Bath Store. With 13 locations, including Lebanon, Concord, and Manchester, The Ultimate Bath Store carries a wide selection of tubs, lavatories, and fi xtures for bathrooms and kitchens. In their well-appointed showrooms, customers and contractors can see the latest designs and options from leading suppliers.  www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

61


Bathroom Spotlight • The Ultimate Bath Store

“Freestanding bathtubs—soaking tubs and air tubs—are a hot trend,” says Rand. “These are not like the old claw-foot tubs,” Rand explains. “They are deeper and quite sculptural. Many have a heated shell, so the surface is heated too, not just the water. It feels great on your back and legs as you soak.” With adjustable temperatures for the tub itself, bathing becomes a soothing, spa-like experience. Another option? “Air tubs have a built-in system with multiple channels that blow warm air into the water, giving a deep massage,” Rand says. Air tubs as well as whirlpools with circulating water are available in freestanding tub models.

Hansgrohe 27437 PuraVida 400 AIR Showerhead with shower arm.

Kohler’s Flipside Showerhead.

Elevance Bubble Massage Air Bath by Kohler.

62 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

Essencia Oval Air Tub by BainUltra.

2014

lumber barn


In toilets, the trend is wall-hung models. With a clean look and controls concealed in the wall, they give a small bathroom more space, and they have a modern look. Kaldewei Centro Duo Oval Soaking Freestanding Tub with Feet and Moulded Panel. www.fixtureuniverse.com

If you’re looking for new fi xtures, the trend in showers is rain showerheads, according to Rand. These large showerheads hang from the ceiling and feature a rain-like pattern of water fl ow. “They are very relaxing,” Rand says. Like the rain, these can deliver a gentle shower of water or a more powerful fl ow. You can create a spa shower experience—a vertical spa—with a range of options, including body sprays, overhead and hand-held showerheads, and lights. Kohler even has an innovative wireless speaker/showerhead called the Moxie, and with Bluetooth technology, it brings your music right into the shower with you. In toilets, the trend is toward wallhung models. The water tank and working parts are concealed in the wall. With a clean look and less mass, these new toilets open up more bathroom fl oor space and give a room a modern look. What surfaces should you consider? Rand says that tile is the most frequently used product for bathroom surfaces. Sleek modern lines and natural colors and materials are all infl uencing bathroom and shower design. TW

The Ultimate Bath Store 266 Mechanic Street Lebanon, NH (603) 545-3438 www.ultimatebathstore.com www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

63


fl ooring

CREATORS & DREAM MAKERS

SET THE STAGE FOR LIVING

from the ground up

Smart & Affordable What’s hot for 2014? Chad LaDuke of Carpet King & Tile says, “Cork. We have seen sales grow rapidly. It is a green product, the tree is not killed in the harvesting of cork, and the available looks are improving all the time.” 64 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014


GOING GREEN With demand for sustainable materials increasing, floor manufacturers have taken notice by adding lines that boast high recycled content and raw materials obtained from sustainable sources.

CORK FLOORING IS SOFT AND QUIET UNDERFOOT AND PROVIDES INSULATION TO THE HOME.

—Chad LaDuke, Carpet King & Tile, Keene, NH store

www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

65


fl ooring

FRESH IDEAS FOR FLOORS While wood and carpeted floors continue to be popular in the 21st century, these materials have evolved to become more environmentally friendly. For wood flooring, look for varieties certified by Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) and you’ll know it came from forests managed with strict standards of sustainability. Are you a wine lover? Then perhaps you’ll choose wood floors made from reclaimed wine barrels. Some engineered wood flooring now uses wood pulp mixed with stone dust to produce a strong, stable base, which replaces the former plywood base construction. Carpet industry leaders such as Mohawk are producing carpeting with fibers made with corn sugar instead of nylon. Other manufacturers are offering carpeting with fibers made from 100 percent postconsumer food and drink containers. TW 66 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014


CREATORS & DREAM MAKERS

interiors The design trend is leaning toward sleeker, cleaner lines in interior spaces and furnishings. Rooms are bathed in a calm, serene look with comfort that draws you in. Gone is any trace of busyness or embellishment. Palettes are light and bright, and soft blues and grays of any shade are the new neutrals. Vivid and versatile accents bring lively splashes of color.

www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

67


BY DIAN PARKER Photos by Eric Roth Photography Before photos by Steven Favreau

T

he founding fathers of this country created a strict edict based on liberty and freedom. Those virtues were proudly represented in the stately, upright Federal style of architecture. A prime example of this is found in the historic town of Chelsea in central Vermont. There you can find a traditional, two-story brick 1832 Federal home with its distinct, proud façade. Once inside, however, you are thrust into a different world. Upon entry, you are caught off guard—a fitting initiation for what is to come. Greeting you in the traditional New England, high-ceilinged foyer with its sweeping twostory staircase are walls painted in wide floor-to-ceiling stripes of deep brown, white, and pink fuchsia. The stairs are swathed in striking leopard-print carpet. This is the mastermind of Steven Favreau, owner and Interior Designer, who says, “I love to mix the old and new, the avant-garde with the classical.” Indeed, the entire house that Favreau designed is a seamless meld of the antique and the modern. These polar qualities elicit a lively conversation right from the start. 

visionary federal

HUBBLE SHIRE FARM 68 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014


www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

69


BEFORE MOVING FROM DRAB TO FAB

THE ENTRYWAY as it may have looked in 1832 was dull and unremarkable when Favreau purchased the home.

THE MASTER BEDROOM was unremarkable and understated. Favreau changed the entry and added an adjacent luxurious master bath and closet.

GET THE LOOK

Designer Favreau combined fine Anichini linens with a canopy and bed skirt of his own design. The bold choice of orange lifts the room and adds excitement.

70 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014

“We were looking for a grand, historic country farm within a community,” Favreau says. “We looked originally in France but finally found just what we wanted in Chelsea.”


A GRAND AND HISTORIC FARM Originally from the Boston area, Favreau trained at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York City. He was voted one of the “40 to Watch” by the Business Journal, and his designs have been featured in numerous showcases and publications. Favreau and his husband, Gary Decad, now split their time between Boston, San Francisco, and Vermont. “We were looking for a grand, historic country farm within a community,” Favreau says. “We looked originally in France but finally found just what we wanted in Chelsea.” After seven months of intensive work, the house was completely restored. Contractor Tom Dowlin, with his team of local builders and craftsmen, accomplished a remarkable transformation. “My biggest challenge was scheduling subcontractors to keep such a large project moving and on schedule,” Dowlin says, “especially when one area was ready for finish work while another area was still being rebuilt.” The first major challenge for Dowlin was leveling and repairing the first floor to carry the second-floor load. The two original, main carrying beams, one in the basement and one on the second floor, ran the full length through the middle of the house. “Unfortunately, the previous owner had placed a load-bearing wall in the kitchen area, 15 inches off beam,” Dowlin says. “That bent the hell out of the floor joists.” The structural integrity of the house had been greatly compromised. The crew had to build two temporary walls on each side of the beam to support and hold the upstairs floor joists while leveling the floor. The owners wanted to keep the integrity of the original 1832 structure as intact as possible and make use of whatever was salvageable. The kitchen-floor area needed replacing, and luckily they found all the boards they needed stored up in the attic. All the floors were then stained a deep walnut to darken the one-inch-thick spruce. The walls needed new wiring and plaster repairs. Random-width, two-inch-thick lumber studs made wiring and plumbing difficult. “First we had to remove the old random wiring and feed the new wiring into the existing walls and ceiling,” Dowlin recalls. “We could then skim coat the old plaster if the wall was sound.” The plasterer, Jeff Irish, needed to make the plaster finish perfect for Favreau’s inspired selections of wallpaper—a challenging job.  www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

71


BOLD AND COURAGEOUS. Favreau’s use of dramatic wall coverings, tiles, and artwork bring an exuberance to the stately home. Clockwise from top left: The dining room’s use of a traditional pattern in an overscaled pattern and bold color makes the room more playful. The kitchen wall letters shout the name of the farm (Gary Decad, pictured). Favreau even lined the kitchen cabinets in a whimsical log motif; a close-up of the farm’s lettering; the master shower plays on the tree wallpaper with a tree ring pattern carved into the tile.

ou e r d

72 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014


The new kitchen features stateof-the-art appliances, lighting, and cabinetry made from furniture pieces.

Each room is a tapestry of light and dark, warm and cool, traditional and modern—uniting form and function in a medley of old and new. Because most of the windows could no longer be opened, the 36 original windows needed rebuilding in order to make the weighted lead sashes operational. After the necessary reglazing, the single-pane windows required storm windows for winter. Favreau wanted them to be interior mounted. Dowlin says, “We made the frames out of one-inch-thick by two-inch-wide clear pine, rabbited out to accept the one-eighth-inch annealed glass and the three-eighths-inch quarter-round molding.” Steven Favreau knew the finished results he wanted, even before Dowlin ever set foot in the house. He already had drawings ready with plans showing details, right down to the measurements and locations of all the electrical outlets, keeping in mind the future illumination of specific works of art. MELDING OLD AND NEW All the workers on this project were local. Favreau has a lot of respect and love for the people and the town. “It was why Gary and I chose Vermont. It is still pure and authentic, and the people lack pretense. It was not about taking our lifestyle from San Francisco

to Chelsea. We didn’t want a romanticized version of Vermont coming here.” Surrounding the grand house are 25 pastoral acres that include 150-year-old perennial flower gardens that Decad lovingly cares for. They are abundant with his favorite flower, the dahlia. The first branch of the White River cuts through their back field, adding an always-changing water dynamic. This 1832 house is a wonderful example of classic architecture preserved. The floors, doors, woodwork, shutters, doorknobs, and windows are all original. And to be sure, Favreau’s interior design is an original as well—in fact, it’s a knockout. Each room is a tapestry of light and dark, warm and cool, traditional and modern—uniting form and function in a medley of old and new. The staid and proud brick exterior belies the startling energy within. The exciting foyer with its dramatic curving staircase surrounded on all sides by those bold and brazen stripes gave the painter, Sue Wilmott, a rollicking challenge. “Steven told me if the stripes don’t work, it’s only paint, and we can paint over it. Thank goodness for Tom (Dowlin) and his laser-beam light!” The laser light sits on a tripod and beams a horizontal 180 degree www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

73


BEFORE MOVING FROM DRAB TO FAB

THE LIVING ROOM was papered in a bright traditional motif with period curtains to match when Favreau purchased the home. Now the room is adorned with bright colors and geometric prints against a peaceful canvas of Benjamin Moore’s Palladian Blue.

light onto the wall. Wilmott could then tape the wall, following the beam, before painting the stripes. There are five bedrooms, five working fireplaces, and an apartment in the back of the house. The apartment used to be the hayloft over the attached barn but now has the appearance of a sophisticated New York City loft. There are five full bathrooms and one half bath. The original 250-foot well is still in use. Each room holds surprises, and Favreau clearly has a sense of humor. In the lovely, pale living room with its orange accents, there is an old painting over the mantel. It depicts a stodgy elderly woman in a stocking bonnet. She looks to be casting a stern judgment on the faux chinchilla throw lying across the Favreaudesigned sofas and the contemporary Italian Possini glass-globe chandelier of chrome and nickel. In one corner is an 1830s’ French grandfather clock and in another a French secretary dating to 1820. Favreau is clearly drawn to antiques with a lot of character. The dining-room wallpaper was inspired by a late 1700s’ design. The color is the Pantone featured color for 2014, “Radiant Orchid,” a bold fuchsia. Over its fireplace is a large photograph of Aaron Davis, who lived in the house from 1865 to1888. The 14 chairs are contemporary reproduction frames of classic Louis XV design, painted in high-gloss teal enamel and covered in purple faux-crocodile with a velvet candy stripe. In the corner stands another grandfather clock, English 1840s. 74 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014

The new living room is an energized gathering place supervised by a rather stoic ancestor who seems not at all pleased with the modern-day shenanigans.


A VIBRANT SHOWCASE Steven Favreau, a former Broadway and Moulin Rouge dancer, owns Favreau Design, an interior design company. Gary Decad is a molecular scientist and manages a team of 25 scientists for IBM. Says Decad, “This house was tiredlooking when we first saw it, but we imagined its potential. Vermont fit us like a glove. We love it here.” In a mere 26 weeks, start to finish, Favreau and crew created an exciting and eclectic home, maintaining the integrity of the original archetypal Federal brick house. You walk in and feel the vitality and robust charm of the place. “We had one interesting find during construction,” Dowlin says, “a penny dated 1811 under the floorboards.” Now, 200 years later, Hubble Shire Farm has become a vibrant showcase and a fitting stage for a dramatic presentation of Favreau’s design work and the superb craftsmanship of local Vermonters— as well as a serene country retreat. TW

C O N TA C T S : Designer: Favreau Design favreaudesign.com (802) 625-2015 Builder: Dowlin Construction, Chelsea, VT dowlinconstruction@gmail.com (802) 685-3095 Sheet Rock and Plaster: Jeff Irish, Bethel, VT (802) 234-0094 Painting & Wallpaper: Susan Wilmott, Chelsea, VT suewilmott@myfairpoint.net (802) 685-7703 Tile Installation: Dave Lenart, Bethel, VT dllenart@earthlink.net (802) 234-5940 Electric: Braman Electric, Chelsea, VT bramanelectric@gmail.com (802) 883-2231 Carpenter: Carl Pepperman, Chelsea, VT carlpepperman@gmail.com (802) 685-3157 Carpenter: Sam Kelman, Washington, VT samuel.kelman@gmail.com Floor Refinishing: Floors Only, Waitsfield, VT (802) 496-2210

Plumbing and Heating: Jerry Swasey, Royalton, VT (802) 763-8609 Chair Upholstery: Linda Bradford, Tunbridge, VT (802) 889-3478 Roof Repair and Barn Painting: Lou Maraget (802) 272-7614 Brick/Chimney Repair: Chimney Savers, Randolph, VT chimneysaversvt.com (802) 447-3803 Exterior Painting: Green Mountain Painting, Thetford, VT paintmegmp@gmail.com (802) 785-2557 Glass Shower Enclosures: Portland Glass, West Lebanon, NH (603) 298-5854 Structural Design (carrying beam for 2nd floor): Bethel Mills, Bethel, VT lang@bethelmills.com (802) 234-9951 Wood Stove Installation: Chimney Sweep Fireplace Shop, Barre, VT chimneysweepshop.com (802) 476-4905

www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

75


interiors

CREATORS & DREAM MAKERS Soothing pale tones, beautiful textures, and comfortable furniture create a welcoming, serene master retreat.

The trend for interiors is to incorporate comfort and functionality into a style we love to live with. Clean lines and neutrals remain popular, but they’re being spiced up with soft, thick textures begging to be touched; patterns from toneon-tone to eye-popping; and the introduction of accessories and larger pieces in bright colors. “It’s clear that color is coming,” says Alice Williams of Alice Williams Interiors in Hanover. “Many manufacturers are incorporating color into upholstered furniture, painted pieces, and accessories.” 

decorating for style & comfort CHOOSE FABRICS AND FURNITURE THAT ARE BOTH PEACEFUL AND INSPIRING

76 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014

BENCHMADE BY BROWNSTONE THOMPSON SOFA WWW.LAYLAGRAYCE.COM

Radiant Orchid: Pantone Color of the Year 2014


I RECOMMEND THAT OUR CLIENTS WORK TO ESTABLISH A SENSE OF HOW THEY USE THEIR SPACES COUPLED WITH THE COLORS AND FEEL THAT APPEAL TO THEM.

—Cheryl Boghosian Gilberte Interiors Hanover, NH

PHOTO COURTE

SY OF GILBERT

E

www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

77


interiors

EASY UPDATES Would you like to be able to adapt the look of your rooms inexpensively and quickly? “Go for versatility,” says Alice Williams. “There is a defi nite trend to create rooms that can grow and change. With a foundation built with pieces of furniture in solid-colored fabrics, other pieces in the room can be changed and added. You can have throw pillows and decorative items that can be easily replaced to transform the look of a room. This can be done seasonally, or if you go on a trip and fi nd a great eclectic piece, it can easily be added.” Cheryl Boghosian of Gilberte Interiors agrees. “We see furniture and larger pieces using more neutrals and whites and bringing in the rich accent colors in pillows, bedding, and more fl exible pieces.” Cheryl shares another valuable tip by adding, “Sometimes looking at 78 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014


Left: Cheryl Boghosian of Gilberte Interiors predicts more naturallooking textured blinds and energy-efficient treatments, but also sees “more interest in softening the space with fabric—Roman shades, gauzy linen sheers, and drapes.” Below: Lucy’s Loveseat by Shackleton Thomas.

What’s Hot?

MOTORIZED SHADES WITH AN APPLICATION SO YOU CAN OPERATE THEM FROM YOUR SMARTPHONE OR TABLET.

—Eleanor Shepard Shepard Interior Selections Quechee, VT

what a homeowner has for furnishings and rethinking how they are used and in which rooms can let us suggest how items can be reused. Our experience and our skilled craftsmen can recreate a piece that’s old and worn—changing fi nishes, shapes, cushions, or fabric so that it provides a fresh, fun change. This can allow clients to reuse what they have but in ways they did not realize could make such an impact.”  www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

79


interiors

PHOTOS COURTESY OF ALICE WILLIAMS

GOING GREEN Besides comfort and style, today’s consumers want well-made furniture that will last, and they’re purchasing pieces that are manufactured using sustainable practices. “Eco-friendly products continue to be popular,” says Alice Williams. “With everything in our lives, we are becoming more aware of our impact on the environment. I continue to see an interest in purchasing furniture that will last and 80 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014


Left: The homeowners wanted to incorporate a casual dining and sitting area into their sunroom, which features custom millwork and a custom rug and furniture chosen thoughtfully for the space by Alice Williams. Right: Set in the heart of a grand Tudor-style home, this living room was furnished by Alice Williams to be a comfortable and cozy, relaxing place for the family and their guests.

MANY MANUFACTURERS ARE INCORPORATING COLOR INTO UPHOLSTERED FURNITURE, PAINTED PIECES, AND ACCESSORIES.

—Alice Williams Alice Williams Interiors Hanover, NH

won’t end up in a landfi ll quickly. My customers look for quality pieces manufactured in an environmentally friendly manner, and they’re particularly interested in those made in America.” TW www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

81


INTRODUCE THE UNEXPECTED

NEW & NOW Shop local businesses for stylish accessories that add interest and a sense of fun to any room.

2

1. HIGH SOCIETY GRANDE TABLE LAMP IN FROSTED CRYSTAL WITH SILK SHADE This one-light table lamp from the Barbara Barry collection by Visual Comfort will enhance your home with a perfect mix of form and function. www.designersupplyhouse.com 2. TANGIER 22”X22” LINEN PILLOW Boasting an intricate orangeand-white design, this pillow will infuse your space with global allure. The feather-and-down fill ensures long-lasting loftiness. www.onekingslane.com 3. AZZURO CARVED BERGÈRE While this bergère has the classic carved, exposed wood frame and padded armrests, a weathered bisque finish and bright, patterned upholstery lend thoroughly modern appeal. www.onekingslane.com

1

3

4. GARIBALDI WALL MIRROR (Gold Leaf & Clear Mirror Finish) www.decorsouth.com 5. GEO CHAIR, MEDIUM BROWN A beautifully arched lauan wood frame turns this practical seat into a work of art. www.onekingslane.com 6. LEE JOFA FABRICS Whether you are reupholstering a chair or decorating an entire room, Lee Jofa fabrics can help you create the home of your dreams. Available through designers. www.leejofa.com 7. BORGHESE MIRRORED CONSOLE TABLE WITH DRAWERS (Antique Mirror & Silver Leaf Finish) www.decorsouth.com

82 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014

4


6

5

7

www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

83


lighting

CREATORS & DREAM MAKERS

light up your living space Lighting enhances the ambience of any room, and it’s one of the key elements that helps make your house a home. Each room has its own unique needs, however, so consulting with a local professional can help determine your needs and guide you to the proper choices.

84 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014

Recessed lighting and pendants over the island and sink create an inviting workspace. Under-cabinet LED lighting has become a must-have in the kitchen.

“More people are building sleek, contemporary homes in the Upper Valley,” says Lois Horan of Creative Lighting Designs in Lebanon. “With many types of contemporary lighting like monorail or cable lighting, you can create a look that isn’t as defined as older styles (such as traditional or country) are, and be open to fun, different designs.” Lois adds, “More wood and shade styles of natural materials are also a new trend for lighting fixtures.” TW

MEYDA EURI TANTA LIGHT COURTESY OF ILLUMINATIONS BY BARRE ELECTRIC


LED IS THE MOST ENERGY-EFFICIENT WAY TO GO.

—Lois Horan Creative Lighting Designs Lebanon, NH

“LED lighting will give you the same look as incandescent lighting, but for a fraction of the cost,” says Greg Isabelle of Illuminations by Barre Electric. “When shopping for LEDs, keep in mind the differences in color, beam spread patterns, and shapes and sizes, or simply let us pick the right one for you.”

www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

85


Spotlight • The Lighting Center at Rockingham Electric BY MARY GOW

new trends

LIGHTING THE WAY “INTEGRITY MATTERS MOST” is the longtime philosophy of Rockingham Electrical Supply Company and The Lighting Center at Rockingham Electric, a familyowned company since 1958. Now with nine supply and two showroom locations—including one in Claremont— The Lighting Center is Northern New England’s premier lighting showroom, with thousands of styles of lights to choose from. Nichole Myers, Showroom Manager at The Lighting Center in Claremont, answers our questions about the latest in lighting. Q: What’s new in design for pendant lighting, freestanding models, and built-in lighting? A: There is still a hot trend in industrial modern, meaning refabricating vintage designs with modern nuances. When you look for examples, you’ll often see the old-fashioned Edison bulbs (that are clear with exposed fi laments) or a design that is very casual in interpretation. While not so much in New Hampshire, nationwide we’ve been seeing more interest in mid century modern design. This style is being defi ned by the use of cool and whimsical color in modern fi xtures—think tangerine, turquoise, and purple. I’ve seen this used in clean, modern environments for a pop of color. It’s also great in a cottage environment! We’re also seeing the resurgence of brass—but not the highly polished fi nishes. Brass in 2014 is in more muted tones—it’s antiqued or burnished and has a beautiful, timeless feel. And, of course, LED is still very strong. It’s widely used for under- and in-cabinet lighting. This isn’t very surprising, though. The benefi ts of LED lights are so far-reaching: they work beautifully, they’re dimmable, they’re energy effi cient, and they require virtually no maintenance. But specifi cally in design, LEDs are useful because they’re small and generate 86 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014

Built-in back lighting shows off this in-home artwork. THE LIGHTING CENTER AT ROCKINGHAM ELECTRIC; JOHN W. HESSION PHOTOGRAPHY

very little heat, so they can be used in hard-to-reach places like drawers, backsplashes, and under or inside cabinetry. Q: What’s the latest technology in lighting? A: It’s all about wireless control. Today’s homeowners can remotely control their home’s lighting, HVAC, window shades, security system, and media. The key word is “control”—customers want full control of their home environment. We continue to see interest and growth in our Lutron brand of wireless control systems. LED quality and functionality have greatly improved, but we still counsel our customers to use professional lighting designers and electricians when integrating LEDs into residential or commercial lighting systems.


Recessed, soft lights create a spa-like feeling in this master bathroom.

THE LIGHTING CENTER AT ROCKINGHAM ELECTRIC; JOHN W. HESSION PHOTOGRAPHY

For example, dimming LED lights can be challenging, so seeking the guidance of a qualified designer or electrician results in a more successful experience. We’re expecting to see more demand for LED lights given the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, which requires that new light bulbs sold in stores be 25 percent more energy efficient than current models. This means access to lower-cost LED lighting options is crucial. Under this act, certain incandescents have been phased out of stores since 2012, and this will continue in 2014. For example, 100W incandescent bulbs were phased out in 2012; 75W incandescent bulbs were phased out in 2013; and 40W and 60W incandescents will be phased out in 2014. The act’s goal is to provide higher-quality lighting with lower operating costs for users.

One of the cost-savings consumers see with LED lighting is the bulb’s lifespan. Each LED bulb can last about 50,000 hours—which means if it’s on for eight hours a day, it will last for 17 years. For example, the US Department of Energy estimates that the adoption of LED lighting by consumers by 2027 could save Americans $265 billion in lighting costs. Q: Do you have any favorite lighting lines? A: My personal favorites are: • Hubbardton Forge. They are known for excellent craftsmanship, quality, and style. Plus, these beautiful, unique pieces are made in the USA. • Kichler. This line delivers great quality, customer service, and price ranges—all in one catalog.

• Hinkley. These products are a step up in quality from Kichler, plus they have beautiful newer styles and a wide variety. Q: Any further design trends, tips, or advice? A: Stayed tuned! We’re seeing such innovation and creativity in the industry. I’m guessing we’ll see more use of alternative materials (like wood, fiber, beads, and so forth), more color, and a continued emphasis on energy efficiency. TW

The Lighting Center at Rockingham Electric 221 Washington Street Claremont, NH (603) 542-8711 Monday–Friday, 7am–5pm, Saturday 9am–3pm www.rockinghamlightingcenter.com

www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

87


energy

CREATORS & DREAM MAKERS

Solar panels and large windows to let in the sun contribute to savings on energy costs. COURTESY OF WINDOWS & DOORS BY BROWNELL

‘renew’ your home

ALTERNATIVE ENERGY IS MORE AFFORDABLE THAN EVER

“Essential in 2014 will be a way to monitor or measure and control your energy consumption,” says Kimberly Quirk of Energy Emporium in Enfield. “Smart grids, smart thermostats, and data loggers for solar hot water and solar electric are all becoming more important in everyday life. When people start measuring their usage, they start modifying it and become more efficient.” 88 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014

lumber barn


COURTESY OF HOME COMFORT WAREHOUSE

COURTESY OF EASTERN PROPANE MASCOT II

NAPOLEON WOOD FURNACE HMF100

CONSIDER NEW OPTIONS COURTESY OF ENERGY EMPORIUM

“Energy conservation is on the mind of every consumer,” says Felicia LaBranche of Eastern Propane in Rochester. “With the price of heating oil increasing more than two and a half times since 2000, the Northeast demand for home heating oil has declined by 47 percent during that same period. With an estimated payback of six to eight years, it is no wonder Eastern experienced unprecedented interest in oil-to-propane conversions in 2013.” Felicia continues, “Find out how much your oil heating system is really costing you. Homeowners with an old furnace or boiler are literally blowing money right out their chimney. Furnace or boiler efficiency is rated by annual fuel-utilization efficiency, or AFUE. Heating systems manufactured as recently as the 1990s only had to meet a minimum 78 percent AFUE, meaning that as much as 22 percent of the fuel they consume is escaping up the chimney and elsewhere. With furnaces or boilers older than that, chances are it’s even worse.” Propane is an option to consider. “High-efficiency propane furnaces provide energy, cost, and carbon savings in both new and existing homes,” Felicia says. “It’s too early to know which tax credits will extend into 2014. However, high-efficiency propane boilers used for space- and water-heating systems may qualify for a variety of federal, state, and

Based on the quality of the product and price point, LAARS Mascot II high-efficiency propane boilers are extremely popular. • Made in America • Energy Star Rated, 95 percent Efficiency (AFUE) • Combines heating and domestic hot water in one appliance

• Estimated life of 25 years • 2 year parts, 12 year heat exchanger warranty with 100 percent manufacturer guarantee Another option: A clean-burning wood or pellet furnace or boiler (above right) can work in conjunction with an existing heating system.

www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

89


energy

WE’RE SEEING CONTINUED GROWTH OF HOME REMODELING. WHEN ADDING ON ROOMS, HOMEOWNERS ARE OFTEN INCLUDING GAS FIREPLACES FOR AMBIENCE AND HEAT. — Bill Mathewson

Home Comfort Warehouse White River Junction, VT

utility credits or incentives. For example, with conversions done in 2013, a homeowner could receive an energy-efficient tax credit from the federal government of up to $500 for a qualifying new propane boiler. Watch for updates on the Database of Incentives for Renewables & Efficiency at dsireusa.org to see what incentives may apply,” Felicia advises. OTHER OPTIONS “In the last few years the technology for extracting heat from cold air has improved quite a bit,” says Kimberly Quirk of Energy Emporium. “There are now some air-to-air heat pumps that can provide heat using electricity at much higher efficiency than direct electrical heating, even in New England. Changing from a fossil fuel to electrical heating gives you the possibility to offset that electricity locally with solar PV or wind power—better for the environment and a good long-term investment. Generating energy locally also helps stabilize your budget and provides independence from foreign fuel sources.” Kim goes on to describe an exciting development. “We will also see many more community renewable energy systems—solar arrays being built for a neighborhood or group of friends and family. Not every house or property has good solar access, so the community net metering programs will allow for sharing of a location with good solar access.” Bill Mathewson of Home Comfort Warehouse in White River Junction says, “The price of solar has come down. It is more affordable than ever, and both Vermont and New Hampshire have incentives that help lower costs.” TW 90 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014


CREATORS & DREAM MAKERS

landscape How will you enjoy your outdoor living space this year? Would your family enjoy gathering around a fire pit or a water feature? Is it time to install a new walkway or stone wall? No matter what’s on your wish list for your lawn, deck, patio, or pool, local professionals have the skills and talent to turn your dream into reality.

www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

91


landscape

CREATORS & DREAM MAKERS

natural inspiration CREATE BALANCE BY CHOOSING THE RIGHT LANDSCAPE DESIGN

What elements would you include in your ideal landscape? A patio or an outdoor kitchen? An attractive rock wall or a water feature? Whatever you and your family desire, local experts can advise you on details, from construction to native plants. “Have fun making your environment what you want it to be,” says Landscape Architect John Sullivan of JSLA. “It’s all about designing for your needs and how you are going to use your space. A landscape architect can help you program the elements that will create the environment you desire.” 

APE

LA LANDSC

TESY OF JS PHOTO COUR

92 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014


A pond in a natural setting creates atmosphere and can also become a hobby with fish and plantings. PHOTO COURTESY OF JSLA LANDSCAPE

IF YOU DON’T HAVE WATERFRONT PROPERTY, YOU CAN CREATE YOUR OWN SERENE, MEDITATIVE ENVIRONMENT RIGHT AT YOUR HOME.

—John Sullivan JSLA, LLC North Sutton, NH www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

93


landscape “People are interested in projects organized around order, light, views, and the creation of outdoor space,” observes Scott Wunderle of Terrigenous Landscape. “The focus is less on building ‘things’ and more about atmosphere and an emotional response to the property.” Scott adds, “Many of our clients are working on a broader scale in terms of their projected schedule. These are legacy projects, looking ahead to when the property is passed on to children and grandchildren.” Continuing the idea of thinking long-term, Scott says, “Projects seem to be more generous. There is a desire to improve quality of life over a longer period of time.” 

A “wave wall” provides a decorative backdrop for swimmers and a middle ground for those viewing the pastures beyond the gardens. PHOTOS COURTESY OF TERRIGENOUS

INVEST IN THE DESIGN PROCESS. YOU’LL ENJOY THE RESULTS DAILY.

—Scott Wunderle Terrigenous Landscape Architecture Chester, VT

This historic site grew untouched for over 40 years. The project involved selective thinning to allow sunlight to reach the forest floor and to open up the space as you enter the property. This marriage of land management and design changed the quality of light on the forest floor, exposed stone walls, and improved a sugarbush.

94 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014


landscape

Sign up for our

FREE NEWSLETTER

ARISTA OUTDOOR FURNITURE COURTESY OF ALL DECKED OUT

Sign up TODAY at mountainviewpublishing.com/ newsletter • Top Stories from the Web • Upcoming Events • Win Great Local Prizes Sponsored by Mascoma Savings Bank

POOLSIDE COMFORT As people create and renovate areas to extend their living space outdoors, exciting new furniture and accessories are making patios, decks, and poolside zones more comfortable than ever. “The days of running your cushions in and out of the house are long gone,” says Judy Evans Sleeper of All Decked Out in Quechee. “Comfortable, easy-care cushions in a wide variety of acrylic fabrics are fade resistant and quick drying. Pair them with teak, wicker, enviro-wood, wrought iron, or aluminum frames.” Lynn Wardlaw of Deck Dock Lawn & Garden in Sunapee agrees and says, “The most exciting trend is deep seating—comfortable outdoor cushioned furniture. In the past, people were

Like us on Facebook for your chance to win great prizes!

Facebook Contests, Sweepstakes & Giveaways!

mountainviewpublishing.com/facebook 96 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014

leery of cushions outdoors. Now, the new materials—solution-dyed synthetic fabrics, specifi cally Sunbrella—don’t fade, mildew, or rot. They keep looking good even as they stay out in the weather. The foam inside them is new, too. It is designed to let water run through—the opposite of a sponge—so water runs out and the cushions last.” 


landscape

ABOVE: ST. CATHERINE CUSHION OUTDOOR FURNITURE. INSET: A MANTA OUTDOOR FIRE PIT. COURTESY OF DECK DOCK FURNITURE

CLASSICO OUTDOOR FURNITURE COURTESY OF ALL DECKED OUT

98 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014


PLACE LOUNGE CHAIRS OR ADIRONDACKS AROUND A LOW TABLE, A FIRE TABLE, OR A FIRE

PIT.

—Judy Evans Sleeper All Decked Out Quechee, VT

Outdoor fi replaces, fi re pits, and fi re tables extend the seasons for using outdoor spaces. “People are embracing the outside of the home and blending it with the inside,” says Judy Evans Sleeper of All Decked Out. “Add a fi re feature. A fi re pit not only brings warmth, it can also quickly transform your backyard into a cozy and welcoming setting. Add either a gas fi re table or a wood-burning pit for heat and atmosphere.” Lynn Wardlaw of Deck Dock Home & Garden says, “The trend of setting up outdoor rooms continues. Pizza ovens, fi re pits, and seating where you can actually take a nap extend your living space.”  www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

99


landscape

BEFORE

REDI-ROCK RETAINING WALL, BEFORE AND AFTER, COURTESY OF CARROLL CONCRETE

WALLS AND STAIRS “In 2013 we enjoyed an increase in the sales of our Redi-Rock Ledgestone and Redi-Scapes retaining wall systems within the residential market,” says Doug Bartlett of Carroll Concrete in Newport, New Hampshire. “We anticipate this trend will continue in 2014 and look forward to a larger segment of the residential community discovering the benefits of these products.” Doug goes on to describe the product: “Redi-Rock blocks are large-scale blocks that can weigh as much as 2,500 pounds each and are installed using a hydraulic excavator. Redi-Scapes are smaller landscape-sized blocks weighing around 60 pounds each and are typically set by hand. Both products have the look of natural stone with all the structural benefits of a manufactured wall system, which is especially appealing to the homeowner. As engineered, modular, interlocking systems, both Redi-Rock and Redi-Scapes significantly reduce the cost and installation time associated with natural stone without sacrificing the look of natural stone. The blocks can also be colored to complement or contrast existing natural stone features, such as ledge outcroppings, or to create one’s own landscaped design. Many designs incorporate stairs, above-grade sections, and radius walls as well as freestanding columns.”  100 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014


landscape

OUR MAIN OBJECTIVE IS TO CONSTRUCT BUILDINGS THAT WILL LAST FOREVER.

—Robert Therrien The Carriage Shed White River Junction, VT

ADDITIONAL STRUCTURES Do you need an extra storage building, garage, toolshed, or barn? Constructing a separate outbuilding on your property may be the answer. Many new styles offer secondfloor apartments for guests or in-laws. From huge, elaborate horse barns to modest outbuildings for tools to garden pavilions, The Carriage Shed specializes in Amish-built structures. Amish crews craft components and install the structures, and The Carriage Shed works with homeowners and architects around the country. “We’re doing a lot of horse barns,” says Robert Therrien, owner of The Carriage Shed, based in White River Junction. “Many have an indoor arena as well as the stalls, and have an apartment upstairs. Some are very elaborate with details including red cedar shakes, big cupolas, and fine finishes in doors and windows.” Robert continues, “Barn-style garages are very popular. They complement many 102 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014


photos courtesy of the carriage shed

styles of architecture and fit the New England landscape. We are also seeing more barn-style garages that include an apartment for guests or family.”

CONSIDER YOUR NEEDS If you think your shed is just for storing tools, think again. Here are some ways to think outside the box: Option 1: An Office For a space that’s free from distractions, move outside the house. With a heat source, Internet connection, desk, and file cabinet, you’ll be up and running in no time. Option 2: A Playhouse Clear the clutter by creating a special place to house all those toys, stuffed animals, games, and books. The kids will love having their own special place. Option 3: A Music Room Does your son’s rock group practice in your basement? Everyone will appreciate having a dedicated space for the next sensational boy band—away from the house. tw Source: builddirect.com

www.mountainviewpublishing.com •

103


advertisers index

104 i m a g e t r e n d w a t c h •

2014

Alice Williams Interiors Inside front cover

Landforms Inside back cover

All Decked Out 100

LaValley Building Supply 95

Biron’s Flooring 65

Lawn Master of Vermont 102

Blanc & Bailey 33

Lebanon Paints 78

Blodgett’s Sash & Door 59

Loewen Window Center 45

Bonin Architects 29

Longacres Nursery Center 104

Cabinetry Concepts & Surface Solutions 5

Love’s Bedding & Furniture 83

Carpet King & Tile 65

Lumber Barn 101

Carroll Concrete 103

MB Pro Landscape Design 97

Chippers 103

McGray & Nichols 11

Crown Point Cabinetry 9

Mellish Construction 41

Davis Alterations & Building 33

Northcape Design-Build 13

Davis Frame 34

Old Hampshire Designs 28

db Landscaping 40

Perry’s Oil 57

Deck Dock Home & Garden 93

Peter French Fine Woodworking 27

Eastern Propane 6

Procopio Design 81

Energy Emporium 90

Randall T. Mudge and Associates 34

Ennis Construction 1

Revered Painting 77

Estes & Gallup 41

Richard Electric 85

Excel Plumbing and Heating 63

Riverlight Builders 31

Favreau Interior Design Back cover

Rockingham Electric 7

Flat Rock Tile 66

Rodd Roofing 8

Floorcraft 66

Sage’s Interiors 80

GR Porter & Sons 31

Schaal Electric 89

GeoBarns 2

Shepard Interiors 78

Gilberte Interiors 79

Snow Building Construction 27

Greenwood Kitchens 59

Springfield Fence 97

Hanover True Value 98

Stahler Furniture 80

Henderson’s Tree & Garden 101

Terrigenous Landscape 96

Home Comfort Warehouse 90

The Carriage Shed 102

Illuminations by Barre Electric 85

Trumbull-Nelson 80

Jack Rossi Landscape Architecture 102

Twin State Door 28

Jancewicz & Son 4

Upland Construction 16

Jeff Wilmot Painting 79

Windows & Doors by Brownell 46

JSLA 100

Woodstock Home & Hardware 3


t

Trend Watch - 2014  

Read about building dreams into reality with a beautiful functional renovation, custom cabinetry from Crown Point Cabinetry, the seamless me...