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Vol. 2, Issue 42

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July 3, 2013

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Gavin Parker has his eye on the ball and prepares to swing during a friendly game of “backyard” cricket Sunday afternoon. Players and spectators of all ages came from across southern Alberta to take in the annual match in Pincher Creek. See more photos in this week’s online edition at www.shootinthebreeze.ca .

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Page 2 Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13

Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

My Little Corner By Shannon Robin We tried something new this weekend – a staycation in the forestry. For several years we’ve talked about getting a camper, and a few weeks ago bit the bullet and bought a fifth wheel. Delivery day was last Thursday, but by the time we arrived back in Pincher Creek it was too dark to head out to a campsite. Determined to try it out, I suggested that we spend the night at Walmart. Jaiden, in her teenaged wisdom, proclaimed, “That’s greasy!” It was like she had issued a dare. I convinced Dennis and the dog to come along. We grabbed our pyjamas, pillows and a cold beer and set off to the parking lot. Jaiden stayed home, of course. I was a little disappointed. I imagined an opportunity to meet some interesting people who were passing through, but we didn’t see a soul. There were eight other units, but all were quiet and dark, and most were gone before dawn. Stubbornly sticking it out, we drank our beer and checked out our new digs. Semis and other noisy traffic kept me awake a good portion of the night. In the morning we cruised home with an adventure we likely won’t repeat any time soon under our belts. I’ve seen people stay in that parking lot for days but, while it’s a great convenience for travellers, I prefer a quieter place to sleep. Friday after work we hastily packed up what we thought we’d need for a few days and hauled the trailer to a spot near friends in the forestry. Thank goodness we were close to home or we would have been grumpy about the many things we didn’t think of packing. Until we get a grip on the whole camping scenario, I imagine we’ll have a list in hand every time we come back to town. Dennis has been driving with trailers and equipment in tow since he was a kid on the farm, so backing up into a tight space was no problem. The problem was our lack of communication when he needed me to guide. It probably took 10 minutes, but it felt like an hour. I’m not a proficient mind reader and my gestures (or lack of) and comments didn’t make sense to him either. It was a huge relief when our new summer home was finally in its place. Hopefully it won’t

need to be moved often and will be used as much as we imagine it will be. The concept of random camping is quite foreign to me, but it certainly is awesome to have this beautiful countryside in our backyard. What is 20 minutes away for us, others drive hours to come to. Over the past five years we’ve noticed quad trails and campsite access closures when we drive through the Castle area. I assume these spots have been abused or overused. Despite a few yahoos, most people seem to be respectful of the land. Even though there were people all around, the weekend was fairly quiet and uneventful where we stayed. There were a few things I could have done without, like the mosquitos, the fellow with the quad helmet that made a variety of sounds from sirens to semi horns, and another fellow who confronted several people because he believed he had sole claim to the river, but overall it was great. We enjoyed quiet walks on the trails, birds singing to greet the day and lots of fresh air. I didn’t see a newscast all weekend, and didn’t mind that my phone wasn’t constantly buzzing with messages. It was and will be a great escape. Waterton was the destination for Canada Day, and was it ever busy at the park! There was a huge turnout despite some trail closures and no access to the Akamina Parkway. It was nice to get back to the slower pace of the forest afterward. One person I maintained contact with through the weekend was my friend Angie. Last week’s editorial was based on her story in facing the High River flood. If you missed it, I hope you’ll look back to read about her experience. Over the course of the weekend her mood lifted from one of utter despair to one of cautious optimism. She continues to amaze and inspire me. I can’t tell you how much the support – through kind words of concern, financial and material donations, and prayers – from our readers and friends have meant to her. Angie was allowed access to her home Monday afternoon. After fearing the worst, she was thrilled to find some items salvageable even though the house is coded orange and not habitable now. Please keep Angie, the other flood victims and the volunteers in your thoughts – the road ahead will continue to be challenging for all.

Advertising Editorial

Share your stories and news ideas! Submitted articles, letters to the editor and photos are always welcome. Shannon Robin, Publisher – Writing, Photography and Design Cary Robison – Editing, Printing and Accounting Brenda Shenton – Administrative Assistance, Writing and Photography Brad Quarin – Writing & Photography Stan & Lil Skahl – Distribution

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The Breeze Mailbox Cream of the crop For 10 days in late June, my brother and I could be seen lugging huge packs around Coleman and the surrounding mountains. This was our first time exploring the Crowsnest on foot and we were pleasantly surprised by the hospitality and kindness of the people we encountered on the trail and in various restaurants. From a couple offering to let us crash on their floor if our ride didn’t make it through due to flooding, to the SLS guys who stopped not once, but twice, to offer us a ride when we were trudging through mud, to all the locals who gave us advice on routes and conditions – everyone was truly a pleasure to encounter. The Crowsnest has proved that southwestern Albertans are the cream of the crop. Makes us proud to be Albertan. Spencer Raymond Madden www.mountainobsession.com

A nod to volunteers Cleaning up the old road through the Frank Slide on June 1 was no picnic, but it certainly was effective. I cannot believe how much garbage 11 people could pick up and put into the back of trucks, and then unload into dumpsters – even separating the types of garbage. Six loads to the landfill are testament to the hard work that was done by these enthusiastic volunteers. We did not find any gems of historic value, but it was interesting to look. I really appreciate all your help to get rid of garbage that has been accumulating in this magnificent Alberta provincial historical resource, particularly since one section of the Crowsnest Community Trail now passes through the area. The eyes of the community and the world are on the Frank Slide, and it now looks so much better. I was impressed with your work ethic – you were very thorough! Everybody did such a good job and really worked hard to get every last speck of garbage. This community really appreciates and needs its volunteers, and how wonderful that so many people came out to help. Crowsnest Historical Society and Crowsnest Heritage Initiative share my appreciation for the good work done on June 1, and they add their thanks to mine. It is doubly rewarding for us to clean up historic sites on public land. It was a great opportunity for the Frank Slide Interpretive Centre to work with Crowsnest Forest Stewardship Society, ESRD, Crowsnest Historical Society, and Crowsnest Heritage Initiative to accomplish something truly great with the help of some extraordinary people. I hope you had some fun along the way. Drop in and see the Frank Slide Interpretive Centre again sometime. Monica Field Frank Slide Interpretive Centre


Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13 Page 3

Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

A medal for the mayor

By Brad Quarin Pincher Creek’s mayor, Ernie Olsen, is one of the community’s adopted sons, having arrived 12 years ago, but he belongs. “It’s home, it’s someplace I moved to and I don’t want to leave,” he says. “I have no intentions of ever leaving, whether I’m mayor or not.” He became attached to the community, and in turn he made a big enough mark here to receive a Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal. The medal was presented to him at a meeting of town council in February by Councillor Wayne Oliver. “It means all my efforts as mayor and [on] previous council haven’t gone for naught, somebody must be paying attention,” he says. Councillors Sahra Hancock and Don Anderberg both believe the nomination came from the Federation of Canadian Municipalities. While Ernie thinks it’s mainly town government work that got him the medal, as former owner of the Pincher Creek Sobeys he also donated thousands of dollars to different groups and charities. He says that may be part of the reason for the honour as well. “I’m hoping it wasn’t just because I was mayor.” Ernie is actually an adopted son not just of Pincher Creek but of Canada as well, as he was born in Denmark. His family came to Canada when he was six and he lived in Ontario until 20 years ago. He and his wife moved to Alberta for his job with Garden Market IGA. Having previously run his own business, Ernie started at IGA as a trainee and liked the job because less responsibility meant fewer headaches. Of course, the irony is that he wound up running the grocery store and the headaches came back. After living in Okotoks, he came to Pincher Creek to run the local Sobeys and came to know the town. “It’s a community with so much potential,” he says. “It’s like everything’s just sitting there waiting for somebody to go out and grab it and pull it in.”

Photo by Brad Quarin Mayor Ernie Olsen with his Diamond Jubilee Medal and plaque.

As owner of Sobeys, Ernie helped sponsor as many volunteers and causes as possible. In retrospect, he wonders if larger donations to just a few select charities would have made more of a difference, but little donations help as well. He left Sobeys four years ago and served on town council for three years. He describes town government work as interesting and different. “I came in with some really big ideas, and found out after I got in that government works slowly,” he says. He was more aware of that when he became mayor. “My pet project is trying to get our airport open,” he says. The airport has been there for years, origi-

nally built for water bombers for fires. It’s being used by four or five private planes, but Ernie says the airport hasn’t realized its full potential. He wants to transport people between Pincher Creek and Fort McMurray for work. Wayne Oliver says Ernie has been concerned with his constituents’ well-being, and is good to work with even if they sometimes disagree. When presenting the medal, Wayne said he was thankful for what Ernie taught him about town government, since Wayne was new to the council. Sahra Hancock describes Ernie as a very dedicated mayor who makes sure everyone has a chance to talk. Don Anderberg says working with Ernie is generally pleasant, and they’ve also curled together in the past. In her work with him on the Pincher Creek Foundation, which is concerned with seniors’ housing, Millie Loeffler describes Ernie as pleasant, with good ideas. She says he has the interests of the foundation in mind. One person who works with Ernie outside of town government is Rebecca Holand at Beaver Mines General Store. Ernie has worked there since 2009, though at reduced hours since he became mayor. Rebecca calls him “the rock of the Beaver Mines General Store,” who’s “willing to jump in and do everything from ordering beer to cooking up a smokie.” “We have great fun here,” she says. She thinks Ernie works there to relax and enjoy the informal atmosphere. She describes him as loyal, and although he seems serious, “He’s got a very dry sense of humour.” Ernie considers his Diamond Jubilee Medal to be an honour, and his family is proud. His mother lives in a nursing home in Eastern Canada and already talked a lot about her son being mayor, so she was excited about the medal. One of his kids lives in Ontario, and a daughter came to Pincher Creek after he moved here. Ernie has decided to run for a second term as mayor. However, he may find a medal from the Queen to be hard to top.

$100,000 donation from Teck will build UROC trails By Jim Lucas United Riders of Crowsnest would like to thank Teck for its exceptionally generous donation of $100,000. The donation is to UROC but it is fundamentally a donation to the community of Crowsnest Pass. UROC is entrusted with turning this donation into something of lasting value to the members of the community. UROC, formed in 2009, is a recreational mountain biking club. Our membership was just over 100 last year and is growing. That Teck chose to support our cause is a reflection of the quality of our trail-building projects and their community orientation. They

are not just for mountain bikers; you can hike, run, snowshoe and cross-country ski – just don’t expect to drive on them. We have a good plan, thanks to Community Futures and IMBA Trail Solutions, and we have the people to make this happen. As we continue in our efforts to raise funds to implement the grand scheme of multiple trail networks within Crowsnest Pass, this donation raises the profile of our projects, further enhances our club’s credibility and helps us achieve our goals. We currently have about 10 kilometres of high-quality trail on the Pass Powderkeg hill

in Blairmore. We will hire professional trail builders to expand this network – ultimately we would like about 25 km of mixed styles of trail to achieve a critical mass. This, plus other trails in the area, will make it worthwhile for mountain bikers to come to this area and stay a few days. We will allocate part of the donation to trail building this year, but will set aside around half to be used as matching funds in a grant application. If we can double our money, we will really be able to show some impressive progress next year. UROC will continue to build and maintain trails using volunteers, but having paid help will get the job done much sooner.


Page 4 Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13

Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

Science cafe teaches road ecology By Brad Quarin Loretta and Rob Schaufele are putting the “citizen” back in citizen science with a science café to be held at the Frank Slide Interpretive Centre on July 11. Members of the public are invited to enjoy refreshments and mingle with scientists in a relaxed discussion of road ecology. “Our intent is to basically explain to locals what road ecology is and talk to them about some of the issues revolving around Highway 3,” Rob says. Fresh from winning an Alberta Emerald Award for environmental excellence, Rob and Loretta will be there to hear concerns and ideas people may have. The Crowsnest Pass couple work on Road Watch in the Pass, a project of the Miistakis Institute which allows the public to report wildlife crossings and roadkill on Highway 3. Their focus is on road ecology, a look at the interaction of roads and the environment. It’s a broad subject that can include issues with waterways, pollution and noise, but they’re more concerned with collisions of animals and vehicles. For the discussion, they’ve chosen a science café format, a casual discussion accessible to the public. As the “café” part suggests, there will be coffee, pop, juice and snacks like crackers and cheese. They’re happy with the interpretive centre as the venue. “There’s no better place in the Pass, with the fantastic view of the highway ... and a theatre, which is perfect for the screening of the film,” Rob says. The movie to be shown is Highway Wilding by Leanne Allison, a documentary short that covers

Highway 3 wildlife crossings and mitigation tactics. Loretta and Rob describe it as “dynamic” and interesting. They had met Leanne, were interviewed by her and spent time with her on Highway 3. The short will be followed by two clips specifically about Road Watch in the Pass, one by Leanne and one shown at the Emerald Awards. In the discussion afterwards, local ecologists may be present, not to give presentations but to answer questions, Rob says. They’ll talk about how highway crossing mitigation tactics really work, Loretta says. There are some misconceptions about mitigation, like the idea that the whole of Crowsnest Pass will be fenced off, that they want to address. “We want to hear if people are afraid or concerned.” They previously heard such concerns at the Lifestyle Show and got their message across. Some people may have new ideas. “We’re open to all ideas and suggestions,” Rob says. A science café was previously held at the Blackbird Coffee House in 2010, on the general topic of citizen science. Speakers included Rob on Road Watch, Elizabeth Anderson on the BearSmart program and Peter Sherrington on his eagle count. That event went over well, clearing the way for this one. “It would be nice to have more of them,” Loretta says. It’s possible an idea for another science café could come up at the July 11 session. The science café is free to attend, and lasts from 7 to 9 p.m. Although letting Rob and Loretta know you’re coming isn’t mandatory, they’ll appreciate it if you do.

Nature presentations at Beauvais Lake By Brad Quarin Campers at Beauvais Lake, a 20-minute drive southwest from Pincher Creek, are in for a treat this summer.“It is a beautiful setting,” says Heidi Eijgel, a visitor services specialist with Alberta Parks. As well, there is an amphitheatre in the forest, which is the scene for the Beauvais Lake speaker series, a chance to learn more about nature. The eight weekly presentations, an increase from last year’s four, started last Saturday. Heidi was previously involved in a wildlife lecture series at the Pincher Creek library last winter. She says this series is different because of the atmosphere, topics more particular to Beauvais Lake and a different kind of audience. Campers from around the province will see the presentations, as will the cottagers. Hopefully, people from the neighbouring towns will drive in to check them out, too. The series began last weekend with Colin Weir of the Alberta Birds of Prey Foundation in Coaldale, who brought some of his feathered friends. Aside from co-ordinating the lectures, Heidi will give one of the presentations herself, this Saturday. When scientists reintroduced northern leopard frogs to Beauvais Lake, she photographed and documented the whole process, making it “a more personal story.” There was some question about whether the new

frogs would survive the winter, but it turned out they pulled through and were laying eggs. The whole project was “an amazing success,” she says. One presentation she’s excited about will be the last, about Beauvais Lake itself. It will be given on Aug. 17 by cottagers Bette Beswick and Klaus Exner. “They are incredible photographers,” Heidi says, and she wants to see their work on the big screen. Many of the speakers are provided by the Alberta Conservation Association, who also pushed for the Beauvais Lake location, Heidi says. The Beauvais Lake Cottage Association ran fundraisers for the event, and Shell donated a significant amount. A major purpose of the series is for scientists to share their knowledge of the area with the public, Heidi says. In turn, sharing information can help protect the wilderness. The amphitheatre has space for 200 people, and they have filled it in the past. Some people bring their own chairs. Those who come should plan ahead and make a day of it with a picnic beforehand, she suggests. Beauvais Lake has campsites that can be reserved and others that can be taken by the first party to come along. If driving in just for the speakers, please use the boat launch parking lot.

Did you know there are more photos, cartoons and puzzles in our online edition? Check it out at www.shootinthebreeze.ca

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Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

Shootin’ the Breeze

July 3/13 Page 5

Pioneering First Nations teacher retires By Brad Quarin Staff and students of Peigan School in the Piikani Nation recently showed their appreciation for Linda Yellow Face, one of the school’s first First Nations teachers, upon her retirement. For Linda, who has also served as viceprincipal, it was an emotional moment. “It was really good,” she says. “I was really appreciative that the whole staff did something for my retirement.” The ceremony marked the end of a 27-year career, during which Linda feels there was some progress in the school. Sue Leong-Neumann, who teaches kindergarten there, describes Linda as supportive to the staff. “She’s very approachable,” Sue says. “She would go to bat for you.” Linda is also pretty involved in the community, she adds. For one kindergarten teaching assistant, Linda is not only vice-principal, but family. “She’s just a very special lady to me, just like a mother to me,” says Sylvia Yellow Face, Linda’s daughterin-law. “She has contributed so much.” The students respect her as well. “The kids all know who she is,” Sue says. “She’s popped into my class and the kids will all say hi to her.” In her teaching career, Linda has aimed to promote Blackfoot culture. “I really believe that we’re Blackfoot, and that’s who we are,” she says. “So it’s important for all of us to know our language, know our history, and know who we are as a people.” “They have to know their identity, and know that they have a reason to be proud,” she says, explaining that Blackfoot culture is a way of life that affects how one thinks and treats others. Linda got started as a teacher after working as a TA at St. Michael’s School in Pincher Creek, finding she enjoyed helping kids learn and seeing

Photo by Brad Quarin Linda Yellow Face

the teachers at work. She then went to the University of Lethbridge. “She was one of the first teachers to receive her bachelor of education for Piikani Nation,” Sylvia says. Linda’s niche was special education, as she felt there were too few teachers providing it. She also felt there were too many native children in special ed, many of whom may have had personal problems but shouldn’t have been there. “I think we stream fewer into special ed than other places,” she says. Eventually, she moved into teaching classes outside special ed. There are certain advantages to working at Peigan School. “I really enjoy working with our own people,” she says, and it’s close to home. But there are also some challenges with funding and with some students. “They tend to think,

what’s the point in getting an education?” she says. “That’s an ongoing battle.” So she tries to be a role model for the kids. There has been slow progress over the years, she thinks. She’s seen students pursue higher education and lead good lives. Over the years, her work has involved supporting the students in academics, culture and athletics, having coached volleyball for a long time. Like many teachers, she’s provided emotional support to students as well. “I’m always there for the students,” she says. I think they know it, too, because they come to me.” Sylvia remarks that Linda has “gone through generations,” teaching kids and then their kids. She’s also taught some of the teachers working now at Peigan School, Sue says. All in all, Linda enjoyed her teaching career a lot, except the marking part. “It kept me young,” she says. “As a teacher, you never quit learning stuff.” Her retirement ceremony, held towards the end of June, was open to staff and students, although the rain may have kept some students from coming. The staff gave gifts, a slideshow and speeches, and a TA sang a Blackfoot song. As for what’s next for Linda, some rest may be in order. “My sister used to tell me, when she retires … ‘I’m going to sleep for six months,’ ” Linda recalls, laughing. “So I just might do that.” Seriously, though, she says she has projects to do she hasn’t had time for. She would like to write more, having written some fictional short stories and true stories from Piikani history. Her writings so far have been for her enjoyment and for her family, but she’d like to try to write for a broader audience. Enjoy your retirement, Linda.

Pincher Creek farmers market moves to arena By Brad Quarin The Sunnygirl mark stands for approval and quality, and it’s worn by Pincher Creek’s farmers market, open every Friday and coming to a new location. In June, the farmers market opened for the season and it will run until mid-October, says its manager, Tracy Glen. There’s also a Christmas market in December. A farmers market consists of vendors selling food directly to customers, and Pincher Creek’s boasts an interesting variety in goods. Different vendors offer fresh meat, produce, baking and honey, and less-edible things such as sewing, shirts, jewelry and crafts like birdhouses, Tracy says. There are advantages to buying at a farmers market. “You support your locals, for sure. Buying local is huge,” Tracy says. The consumer may also find the foods are of better quality. “It’s all good, clean produce. It’s safe food.”

The Slow Food movement supports environmental protection and humane treatment of animals and opposes use of pesticides. Freshness is typical. “Most of the produce is picked that morning, and the breads and the buns are baked that night,” Tracy says. The Sunnygirl mark, awarded by the government of Alberta, means you know the farmers market follows strict rules. “Has to be homemade, homegrown,” Tracy says. Only a fifth of the vendors can be non-local, and the farthest vendor is a wine vendor from northern Alberta. There are advantages for the sellers as well. For one thing, farmers may find it difficult taking their products to more distant markets, Tracy says. Perishables decline in quality over time and sell less. Plus, the farmers market is patronized by a large public. There’s often a long lineup before the market opens in the morning, she says. Vendors also enjoy free advertising on the farmers market association website.

For the past five years, the farmers market has been held at Kootenai Brown Pioneer Village, where Tracy used to work. Sometimes, people who came to shop would check out the museum and the tourist information centre. This Friday will be its last day at the museum, and then it moves to the arena on July 12. The Pincher Creek farmers market has been accredited for five years, since Tracy took an online course and food safety course. Her job is to make sure the farmers market is following the rules. Her dog Sage is also a familiar face at the market, working as a greeter. “Everybody knows Sage,” Tracy says. For the future, Tracy would like to see new vendors, including one lady who makes greeting cards and another who makes teddy bears. Business so far this year has been good, and Tracy feels the customers like the farmers market. “They keep coming back, ‘nuff said.” The market is open from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Fridays.


Page 6 Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13

Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

Photo by Shelly Malmberg Pincher Creek Elks Club member Dennis Robin presents Colette Sinnott with a donation for early childhood mapping.

Elks support Early Childhood Mapping By Brad Quarin

ECMap is a research project of Alberta Education that stresses the importance of children’s first years, and helps communities identify ways to support positive early childhood development. The project is active in Pincher Creek, and has received a helping hand from the local Elks Club. Colette Sinnott, who was involved in the project, accepted a $300 cheque from the Elks to Pincher Creek Family Resource Society. A donation of $300 can go a long way, Colette says, and the money went to developmental checkups for kids. Questionnaires concerning children of different ages measured their gross motor skills, fine motor skills, cognitive development and communication.

Photo by Jessica Jensen

4 on 4 hockey fun

ON JULY 3 THE ALBERTA ON JULY 3FLOODS

About 30 kids between the ages of seven and 12 took to the pavement for Pincher Creek’s third annual 4 on 4 road hockey festival last Saturday. The event provided kids with a day of fun activities, including a used equipment swap, crafts and music. In the photo above, Rylan Bruns has the ball for team yellow. Behind him are Alex Comeau, left, and Carl Tetachuk.

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Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13 Page 7

Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

In loving memory of

Louis Schultz

Mr. Louis Henry Schultz of Crowsnest Pass, Alta. passed away on June 22, 2013 at the Crowsnest Pass Continuing Care Centre in Blairmore, at the age of 87 years. Louis was born on Aug. 12, 1925 in Pincher Creek, Alta. to proud parents, Henry and Hannah Schultz. In his youth, Louis was well known for his happy demeanour, joyous laugh and kind heart. He loved dancing at Coleman’s dance hall and was highly acclaimed as the best dancer around by the lovely ladies who lined up to be swept off their feet. Louis and his brother Carl started Schultz Brothers, a company with several heavyduty Caterpillars, specializing in road construction. Several roadways in the Pass and in Pincher Creek, including the Kananaskis Road, were formed due to their skilled labours. Louis worked tirelessly his entire life and, after several years of working in Lumbey, B.C., he returned home to assist his father in running the family farm at Pincher Creek. Always ready for an adventure, Louis was passionate in his attempts to find the Lost Lemon Mine. He may have been a private and content individual, but he enjoyed the excitement of the local watering holes, a cold mug of draft beer and games of chance. It is a sure bet that he rests in peace and is grateful for the wonderful times spent with family and friends. Louis is survived by his sister, Irene McNeil of Kelowna, B.C.; his sister-in-law, Rose Ellen Schultz of Grande Prairie, Alta.; numerous nieces and nephews including his cherished niece, Megan deBoer; and his friends, Marlene and Garry Anctil of Blairmore and Wayne Muldoon of Pincher Creek. He was predeceased by his parents, Henry and Hannah Schultz; his siblings, Albert Schultz, Alice Conn, Carl Schultz and Beulah Fraser; his in-laws, Mort McNeil, Dave Fraser and Tom Conn; his nephews, Brian Conn and Wayne Schultz; and special cousin, Leroy Schultz. With respect for his final wishes, no funeral services will be held. Donations in memory of Louis may be made to the Crowsnest Pass Health Foundation, Bag 1, Blairmore, AB T0K 0E0. Condolences may be registered at www.fantinsfuneralchapel.ca. With grateful appreciation, we wish to acknowledge the kindness and care provided by the nursing staff at long-term care, the York Creek Lodge, Dolores Ross, Fantin’s Funeral Chapel and everyone who befriended Louis throughout his lifetime. Fantin’s Funeral Chapel entrusted with arrangements. (877) 896-8555

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Two-year-old Jasper Smith helps his mom, Jenice, remove invasive plants along Crowsnest River.

A grand riverside weed pull By Brad Quarin Crowsnest Conservation Society is at it again, teaming up with others in Crowsnest Pass to clean up the community. This time, there was a grand weed pull along Crowsnest River in Blairmore on Thursday, where trees were previously planted in Riverside Park. “We’re trying to take out the weeds, and eventually these plants are going to grow up and replace the weeds in the long run,” says Kim Lutz, who works for the municipality. Kim estimates about 15 people took part, including members of the conservation society, concerned citizens and staff of the Nature Conservancy of Canada. At least four firefighters also came out to help, says Wade Plain Eagle. Those pitching in were rewarded with sandwiches from Cinnamon Bear, courtesy of the Oldman Watershed Council.

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Page 8 Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13

Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

Biking builds confidence By Brenda Shenton Teachers Sue Milligan and Roy Lach were thrilled with the recent Grade 3 bike program at Canyon School. They planned and executed the program as part of their phys-ed outdoor pursuits curriculum. Sue says many families stepped forward to help, supplying bikes to those who had none and making sure the bikes and helmets were transported to the school, where they were stored for the duration of the session. The weeklong program took place in June, with a bike safety course encompassing good operating techniques, road safety, an obstacle course and a slow race to teach control. The children rode every day. “The more we got out the better,” says Sue. “It’s crazy and amazing, all their smiles.” The two classes began early in the week riding on the creek path, and then moved to the St. Michael’s School track when creek water levels became an issue. Sue says she was particularly moved by one little guy who had never ridden a bike and within three days was riding exceptionally well. Part of their mandate for the program was to teach the kids to keep physically active and to help build their confidence, she says.

Photo by Jessica Jensen

Rhett Fitzpatrick, left, and Kieran Randall are ready to roll with Canyon School teacher Roy Lach.

HUDDLESTUN SENIOR CITIZENS NEWS By Joyce McFarland

Here we are in Pincher Creek, safe and sound, while relatives and friends from far and wide, entranced by media coverage of flooding, are phoning to check up on us. Some think that because Calgary is a weekly base for hospitals, doctors, checkups, kids, clothes and entertainment, we must live five miles down the road. The gas tank tells us different, but right now we can thank God for that. However, nearer to the heart are the concerns that are touching – no, devastating – the lives and plans of many of your relatives and friends around Calgary and High River, and all Calgarians in general. When I was a greenhorn and married an old farmer “they” told me that this was next-year country. I guess we’ll have to bite the bullet again on this one. At the Huddlestun Centre it is business as usual and unusual. Recently, David Green met with a committee designated to research and apply for a grant to upgrade and refurbish our meeting place. Up and running since 1974, the building is now required to be wheelchair and handicapped friendly. As seniors, we want to encourage this at every level of opportunity but it is a huge project, especially for the bathrooms. Quotes, estimates and square feet are in John Goluk’s capable hands, while the ladies are mulling over colours and upkeep. There will be an update on progress at the general meeting in September. Once again, we must thank Sobeys for the generous donation of doughnuts and cookies for snacks after the bingo on June 28. The management and staff are our willing supporters. Our friends from Crestview Lodge and Vista Village enjoy the bingo games and a little visit afterwards. Without their buses and the volunteer helpers, these little side trips would

not be possible, and it all takes some planning ahead as well. Our president, Leny Mace, had a birthday in June so she shared a lovely cake with the crib players a couple of weeks ago. Twenty people each got a perfect slice served in style by Vernie Bruder. I believe Vernie has had some practice cutting wobbly cakes. The July calendars are ready to pick up and regular programs are good to go. There will be a board meeting on July 16 at 11 a.m. and bingo on the 26th, the last Friday of the month. There will be no bingo in the middle of July, perhaps not in August either, if grandchildren and summer holidays are still on the bucket list. We’ll keep you posted. I see the Southern Alberta Summer Games, which include events for seniors, are slated for Pincher Creek during the first week of July 2014. It is never too soon to start gearing up for whatever you are good at. Contact Diane Burt-Stuckey to participate as a player or volunteer. Your enthusiastic support will be a shot in the arm for our hometown. Black eye to me for writing the name of our new secretary, Marina May, incorrectly in a past article. Sorry about that but Marina is a nice name to stand alone anyway. Fred White and the Royal Canadian Legion ran a very successful seniors’ fish derby at the Bobby Burns Fish Pond on June 19, with sunshine all the way. About 60 people enjoyed the super lunch after landing a hundred fish for judging. The biggest fish story, of course, went to a man, but it is worth noting that an 83-year-old lady got the medal for the smallest fish and that makes her a winner, too. Thanks to all the Legion members who do all the work every year.

The ducks are coming! By Brad Quarin Ducks are beginning to sell in the run-up to the duck race during Rum Runner Days. The rubber ducks will be taking a swim in the Crowsnest River on July 20, in a major fundraiser for the Crowsnest Pass Boys and Girls Club. “Come on everybody, step up and get your duck!” says Scott Warris, president of the club. There are 1,200 yellow ducks and 480 green ducks, each with a number matching a ticket available to purchase. A yellow duck sells for $5 and a green one costs $20. Although you won’t get to keep the duck, you do get something better – the winning green duck brings a prize of $1,500. The bin of ducks will be dropped into the river by volunteers. Other volunteers who make the event possible are the “stuck duck chuckers” who make sure ducks don’t get stuck in the river, say Scott and his wife, Penny. Penny says the ducks have sometimes taken 40 minutes to complete the race, but with a lot of rain and a higher river, last year it was only 12. “It was quite exciting,” she says. Right now, Scott says they’re spreading the word, and while sales were initially slow, he thinks they may pick up the week before the event. If all ducks are sold, it’ll mean $14,000 for the Boys and Girls Club, money that will likely go straight into their after-school programs and the related transportation, he says. In the time between 3 and 6 p.m., many kids are home alone, and those programs give them something to do and are central to the club’s purpose. The duck race doesn’t provide the club’s entire budget of $150,000. They also receive some support from United Way, the municipality, Teck Coal, small businesses and others. Recently, the club received a $1,000 donation out of the blue from a Calgary couple who spend weekends in the Pass, Scott says. Ducks are available to buy at Stone’s Throw Cafe, Copy Magic, Servus Credit Union, the library and other locations.


Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13 Page 9

Family docs rock!

Doctors and staff at the Associate Clinic in Pincher Creek don their Family Docs Rock T-shirts in support of a campaign launched by the Alberta College of Family Physicians. The campaign promotes the value of family physicians and encourages patients to share their stories about how a family physician made a difference in their lives. You can read several patient stories at www.bit.ly/patientsdocsrock and more details about the campaign can be found at www.familydocsrock.ca .

In the back row, from left, are Kathryn, Susan, Dr. Tobias Gelber, Scott, Dr. Jonathan Pearce, Jeff, Lincoln. Middle row: Susan, Helen, Florrie, Tawyna, Dr. Tracy Burton, Dr. Beverly Burton, Jackie, Tammy, Chalsey, Julie, Dr. Antony Irving, Celina, Dr. Gavin Parker, Susan, Larissa, Laïs. Front: Ashley, Naomi, Maria, Danielle, Cathy. Photo courtesy of the Associate Clinic.

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Find the answers, along with more puzzles and cartoons, in this week’s online edition at www.shootinthebreeze.ca


Page 10 Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13

Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

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Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

Burgers for flood relief By Brad Quarin Lunch is being served today in Pincher Creek by Young Parkyn McNab Chartered Accountants. Two bucks gets you a hotdog or hamburger, chips and a pop, served next to the ATB from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. All proceeds go to the Canadian Red Cross to support the victims in what Premier Alison Redford calls the worst flooding in Alberta’s history. The idea came from chartered accountant Aletta Maier of Pincher Creek. She says the staff of YPM saw donations were being made and asked themselves what they could do for people affected by the flood. A barbecue seemed appropriate for the summer season, Aletta says. They knew of a person in High River whose basement was flooded, and had to be pulled out of the water. The meat will be cooked by YPM staff, and they’re getting help from their marketing people in Lethbridge. Aletta says they hope for 100 to 125 people to come, and that the crowd will donate whatever they can on top of the $2.

Calling all shutterbugs! By Brad Quarin Got some Yousuf Karsh in you? The Crowsnest Pass Public Art Gallery and Shootin’ the Breeze are teaming up to put on a photography contest for the Doors Open and Heritage Festival in August. The photo contest is another way to celebrate the heritage of the Pass, says Krisztina Wood, managing director of the Allied Arts Association. Local shutterbugs can submit one photo in one or more of four categories: Crowsnest Pass heritage, people, scenery or wildlife. The entry fee is $10 per photo and the contest is open to all ages in Crowsnest Pass and nearby communities. The pictures will be on display at the gallery in Frank from August 1 to 30, and a winner in each category will be selected by jury, with a $100 prize for each. The public will also get to pick a favourite picture, for another $100 prize. The gallery held the contest last year as well, and got a nice level of participation. Krisztina wants to do even better this year. Entrants have until July 24 to drop off their photos at the gallery.

See yourself at Teck, visit: www.teck.com/careers

Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13 Page 11

Mark Your Calendar Thursday, July 4 – Brighter Futures Splish-Splash program (ages 0-6) - 12 p.m. at the Pincher Creek pool – Rotary luncheon - 11:45 a.m. at Heritage Inn, Pincher Creek – Jam session - 2 p.m. at Coleman Legion – Interpretive programs - 8 p.m. at Falls Theatre & Crandell Theatre in Waterton Park – Blackfoot crafts & stories - 10 a.m. at Crandell Campground in Waterton Park – Through Ancient Eyes hike - 1 p.m., meet at pullout on north side of Red Rock Parkway in Waterton Park Friday, July 5 – Farmers market - 11 a.m. at Pioneer Place in Pincher Creek – Interpretive programs - 8 p.m. at Falls Theatre & Crandell Theatre in Waterton Park – Bertha Falls walk - 2 p.m., meet at trailhead in Waterton Park – Meat draws - 5 p.m. at Bellevue Legion – Darts - 6 p.m. at Coleman Legion Saturday, July 6 – Sinister 7 Race start - 7 a.m. at Gazebo Park in Blairmore; finish line at Crowsnest Sports Complex in Coleman – Running club - 9:30 a.m. at Monster Fitness in Pincher Creek – Summer lecture series: reintroduction of northern leopard frogs - 9 p.m. at Beauvais Lake Provincial Park amphitheatre – Chris Irwin’s Horse Sense at the Horseshoe Pavilion in Pincher Creek – Soulfest - 12 p.m. at Twin Butte Country Store – Blakiston Falls walk - 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. at Red Rock Canyon in Waterton Park – Interpretive programs - 8 p.m. at Falls Theatre & Crandell Theatre in Waterton Park – Look, See, Play! (ages 4-12) - 2 p.m. at the community kitchen shelter near the lakeshore in Waterton Park – Geocache 101 - 10 a.m. at Waterton Heritage Centre – International Peace Park hike - 10 a.m. at Bertha trailhead in Waterton Park – Free pool - 1 p.m. at Coleman Legion – Meat draws - 3 p.m. at Pincher Creek Legion Sunday, July 7 – Sinister 7 Race finish line at Crowsnest Sports

Complex in Coleman – Turtle Mountain Riding Club - 1 p.m. at the arena – Blakiston Falls walk - 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. at Red Rock Canyon in Waterton Park – Chris Irwin’s Horse Sense at the Horseshoe Pavilion in Pincher Creek – Interpretive programs - 8 p.m. at Falls Theatre & Crandell Theatre in Waterton Park Monday, July 8 – Golf 4 the Cure - 6 p.m. at Pincher Creek golf course – Cribbage - 7:30 p.m. at Coleman Legion – Interpretive programs - 8 p.m. at Falls Theatre & Crandell Theatre in Waterton Park – Look, See, Play! (ages 4-12) - 2 p.m. at the community kitchen shelter near the lakeshore in Waterton Park Tuesday, July 9 – Interpretive programs - 8 p.m. at Falls Theatre & Crandell Theatre in Waterton Park – Bertha Falls walk - 2 p.m. meet at trailhead in Waterton Park – Blackfoot crafts & stories - 10 a.m. at Crandell Campground in Waterton Park – Through Ancient Eyes hike - 1 p.m. meet at pullout on north side of Red Rock Parkway in Waterton Park Wednesday, July 10 – Summer reading program – 11 a.m. (preschool) and 1 p.m. (ages 6-12) at the library in Blairmore – C.N.P. indoor playground - 10 a.m. at MDM Centre in Bellevue – Coleman Community Society meeting - 6 p.m. at Coleman Legion – Parent Link Ooey-gooey Spaghatooey - 10 a.m. at Lebel Mansion garden in Pincher Creek – Interpretive programs - 8 p.m. at Falls Theatre & Crandell Theatre in Waterton Park – Look, See, Play! (ages 4-12) - 2 p.m. at the community kitchen shelter near the lakeshore in Waterton Park – Take Off Pounds Sensibly - 6 p.m. at Bellecrest Seniors Centre in Bellevue – Geocache 101 - 10 a.m. at Waterton Heritage Centre – International Peace Park hike - 10 am. at Bertha trailhead in Waterton Park

Full details are available in the Breeze online calendar – www.shootinthebreeze.ca List your event by calling 403-904-2227 or emailing brenda@shootinthebreeze.ca Listings are free for non-profit groups, service clubs, schools, youth organizations and events advertised in the Breeze.


Page 12 Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13

Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

Red and white celebrations for Canada Day Clockwise from top left: Morgan Lloyd shows her Canadian pride at Cenotaph Park in Coleman; Talia Richards gives a great effort in the kids’ games at Waterton; Myrna Dembicki serves

PINCHER CREEK CO-OP

HOMETOWN

Canada Day cake at Flumerfelt Park in Coleman; Grade 1 students at Canyon School in Pincher Creek personalized their patriotism; and Parker Heidrich is painted to celebrate Canada Day.

Photo credits: Brad Quarin (top left and top right), Jessica Jensen (lower left), Shannon Robin (centre) and Brenda Shenton (bottom right)

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* With this coupon and a minimum purchase of $100 before applicable taxes at Pincher Creek Co-op Food Store (excludes tobacco, gift cards, phone cards, lottery or gas purchases). Limit one (1) coupon per family and/or customer account. No cash value. No copies. Coupon must be presented to the cashier at the time of purchase. Valid from Friday, July 5 until closing Thursday, July 11, 2013.

* With this coupon and a minimum purchase of $75 before applicable taxes at Pincher Creek Co-op Food Store (excludes tobacco, gift cards, phone cards, lottery or gas purchases). Limit one (1) coupon per family and/or customer account. No cash value. No copies. Coupon must be presented to the cashier at the time of purchase. Valid from Friday, July 5 until closing Thursday, July 11, 2013.

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Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13 Page 13

Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

Welcome to the online-only pages of Shootin’ the Breeze! Here you will find regular weekly features like syndicated puzzles and cartoons, along with supplementary photos and information to go with the stories found in this week’s print edition. With unlimited pages, the sky is the limit!

Regular features: Cartoons - pages 14 and 15 Puzzles and trivia - pages 16 to 21 Puzzles answers - page 22

Special features this week: Cricket match - pages 24 and 25 Canada Day at Waterton - pages 26 to 33 Riverside Weed Pull - pages 34 to 37 Canada Day at Kootenai Brown - pages 38 and 39 Canyon Grade 3 bike program - pages 40 to 43 Canada at Crowsnest Pass - pages 44 to 52 Pincher Creek Office Hours: Weekdays 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 697 Main Street

403-627-3313 1-800-207-8584

R

obin & Co.

Chartered Accountant

Striving for Excellence

Coleman Office Hours: Thursdays 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 8506 19th Avenue

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We do U.S. tax returns! • Financial Statement Preparation • Corporate Tax Returns • Accounting and Computer Consulting • Setup of Computer or Manual Accounting Systems • Tax, Financial and Estate Planning • Computerized Monthly/Quarterly Bookkeeping, Payroll and GST • Business Consulting and Planning Business Valuations

• Final Returns and T3 Returns • Will Planning Including Tax Analysis of Property Transfers

• Income Tax Preparation • Retirement and Estate Planning • Investment Analysis - Basic education including advice on some of the tools used to evaluate investments, discussion of diversification, risk and rate of return, and various alternative types of investments including tax analysis • Tax Planning Including Income Splitting and Investment Products to Reduce Tax Payable • Tax Estimates for Current or Future Years • Lease vs. Purchase Analysis • Loan/Mortgage Analysis • Insurance Planning • Education Funding and Alternatives • Planning After Separation or Divorce

Dennis Robin, B.Mgt., CA


Page 14 Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13

Pincher Creek Office Hours: Weekdays 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 697 Main Street

403-627-3313 1-800-207-8584

Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

R

obin & Co. Chartered Accountant

Striving for Excellence

Coleman Office Hours: Thursdays 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 8506 19th Avenue

403-562-0003 1-800-207-8584


Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

Follow us on Twitter @thebreeze2012

Join us via social media ... There’s more to the Breeze

Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13 Page 15

Like us on facebook Be sure it’s the page that looks like our front cover!


Page 16 Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13

Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities


Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13 Page 17

Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

1. Which group released “I Think I Love You”? 2. Who wrote and recorded “Fast Car”? 3. Name the group that recorded “Sweets for My Sweet.” 4. Who released “Brass in Pocket”? 5. Name the song that contains this lyric: “Time, time, time, see what’s become of me. While I looked around for my possibilities, I was so hard to please.” Answers 1. The Partridge Family, in 1970. The song came out at the debut of the television sitcom “The Partridge Family.” Of the show’s cast members, only David Cassidy and Shirley Jones participated in the song’s recording. 2. Tracy Chapman, in 1988. The song is the story of generations of poverty, with the singer following in her mother’s footsteps. 3. The Drifters, in 1961. The song was a debut single for The Searchers in 1963 and has since been covered by a number of artists. 4. The Pretenders, in 1980. The “brass” refers to money. The song has been used in commercials, including one in 2011 for the BlackBerry PlayBook. 5. “Hazy Shade of Winter,” originally released by Simon & Garfunkel in 1966. The Bangles covered the song in 1987 as the soundtrack of the film “Less Than Zero.”

There’s more good stuff online at www.shootinthebreeze.ca

(c) 2013 King Features Synd., Inc.


Page 18 Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13

Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

1. Is the book of Psalms in the Old or New Testament or neither? 2. In the sight of the Lord, how many years are but as yesterday when it is past? 1, 100, 500, 1,000 3. From Psalms 23, “The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not” what? Lead, Restore, Walk, Want 4. Which Psalm charges the Lord with making void the covenant? 5, 89, 103, 116 5. From Psalms 147, what did God giveth snow like? Praise, Outcasts, Wool, Clouds 6. David sang, “Oh that I had wings like a” what? Dove, Raven, Bird, Locust ANSWERS: 1) Old; 2) 1,000; 3) Want; 4) 89; 5) Wool; 6) Dove Contact Wilson Casey at WC@TriviaGuy.com (c) 2013 King Features Synd., Inc.

Printing Puzzles from the online edition of the Breeze Click this link to go back to the host page for this edition of the paper. http://www.shootinthebreeze.ca/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&layout=blog&id=47&Itemid=92

From there, choose “Download as PDF” to save a copy to your computer. Open the document and print whichever pages you like! Have fun!


Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13 Page 19


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Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities


Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13 Page 21


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Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13 Page 23


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Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

Cricket anyone?

Gavin Parker up to bat Photo by Jessica Jensen


Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13 Page 25

Annual Pincher Creek match

Justine Jorgensen Photo by Jessica Jensen


Page 26 Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13

Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

Canada Day celebrations

Photo by Shannon Robin


Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13 Page 27

at Waterton

Photo by Shannon Robin


Page 28 Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13

Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

Canada Day celebrations

Photo by Shannon Robin


Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13 Page 29

at Waterton

Photo by Shannon Robin


Page 30 Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13

Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

Canada Day celebrations

Photo by Shannon Robin


Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13 Page 31

at Waterton

Photo by Shannon Robin


Page 32 Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13

Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

Canada Day celebrations

Photo by Shannon Robin


Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13 Page 33

at Waterton

Photo by Shannon Robin


Page 34 Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13

Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

Riverside weed pull

Merilyn Liddell

Photo by Brad Quarin


Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13 Page 35

Crowsnest Conservation Society

Bernice Sprague

Photo by Brad Quarin


Page 36 Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13

Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

Riverside weed pull

Sally Bulloch

Photo by Brad Quarin


Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13 Page 37

Crowsnest Conservation Society

Mitch Gettman, left, and Allan Bulloch

Photo by Brad Quarin


Page 38 Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13

Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

Canada Day celebrations at

Kaydence North Peigan was leaving KBPV as Anita James and her dog Joe were heading there. Photo by Jessica Jensen


Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13 Page 39

Kootenai Brown Pioneer Village

Parker Heidrich was a model subject for the patriotic face painting. Photo by Jessica Jensen


Page 40 Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13

Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

Grade 3 bike program

Photo by Jessica Jensen


Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13 Page 41

Canyon School – Pincher Creek

Photo by Jessica Jensen


Page 42 Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13

Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

Grade 3 bike program

Photo by Jessica Jensen


Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13 Page 43

Canyon School – Pincher Creek

Photo by Brenda Shenton


Page 44 Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13

Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

Canada Day celebrations

Crowsnest Pass Royal Canadian Air Cadets march through downtown Coleman in the Canada Day parade led by Nigel Smith, front right.

Photo by Brad Quarin


Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13 Page 45

Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

at Crowsnest Pass

Morgan has been transformed into a Canadian maple leaf! Photo by Brad Quarin


Page 46 Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13

Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

Canada Day celebrations

Doug Young flips burgers for the crowd at Flumerfelt Park Photo by Brad Quarin


Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13 Page 47

Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

at Crowsnest Pass

Finley cools off in the spray park Photo by Brad Quarin


Page 48 Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13

Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

Canada Day celebrations

Robert and Elizabeth Anderson and their daughters Linnea, left, and Marin enjoy the day at Flumerfelt Park. Photo by Brad Quarin


Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13 Page 49

Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

at Crowsnest Pass

Kristian waits peacefully in line for the Astro Jump Photo by Brad Quarin


Page 50 Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13

Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

Canada Alberta Day celebrations flood

Crowsnest Pass – Lyons Creek meets up with the Crowsnest River

Samantha enjoys the Astro Jump slide. Photo by John Kinnear Photo by Brad Quarin


Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13 Page 51

Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

at Crowsnest June 2013Pass

Oldman Dam – the bank washed away at the bridge to the Cottonwood Campground Willow goes for a wild ride! Photo by Shannon Robin Photo by Brad Quarin


Page 52 Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13

Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

Canada Alberta Day celebrations flood

Crowsnest Pass – Lyons Creek meets up with the Crowsnest River

Myrna Dembicki serves up Canada Day cake and a smile Photo by John Kinnear Photo by Brad Quarin


Serving Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Waterton and surrounding communities

Shootin’ the Breeze July 3/13 Page 53

How you can help!

Donate to the Alberta Floods Fund

Call 1-800-418-1111 Email WeCare@redcross.ca For more information visit the Canadian Red Cross website www.redcross.ca/donate/donate-online/ donate-to-the-alberta-floods

Make a donation locally for High River flood victims Shootin’ the Breeze will accept donations for families in High River until Thursday, July 4. Please consider the following items: Summer clothing, jackets and footwear for men, women and children * New undergarments and socks Baby formula, diapers, clothing, and blankets Toiletries, shampoo, soap, toothpaste, toilet paper, deodorant Brushes, combs, curling irons and hair products Feminine hygiene products Non-perishable food items and bottled water Household linens - sheets, towels, blankets and pillows Cleaning supplies, antibacterial wipes, garbage bags and bleach Shovels, brooms, rubber gloves, rubber boots, mops and pails Pet food and supplies Sunscreen and bug repellent Small items of personal comfort or luxury * If you are able to donate new or used clothing, please remember that access to laundry services is limited – washing the items before bringing them in makes a huge difference. Most people will not be returning to their homes for some time - please do not send winter items or large household items - consider what you feel you would need most in the same situation. Financial donations will also be accepted to assist Angie Fox with rebuilding her home and business. Please make cheques payable to “Angie Fox”. You can read her story on page 2. Shootin’ the Breeze office hours are 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday to Thursday Please call 403-904-2227 or 403-627-8829 if you need your donations picked up. Financial contributions can be mailed to Box 1060, Pincher Creek, AB T0K 1W0

The biggest gift you can give is hope!


Shootin' the Breeze – July 3, 2013