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MAY 26_MAY 29

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TELLURIDE_COLORADO #MFILM17


A Film About Lives Transformed by the Sea

A Film About Lives Transformed by the Sea


W EL C O ME

WELCOME

TO MOUNTAINFILM I’ve had the honor and privilege of being festival director of Mountainfilm for 10 years, and this year marks what is by far our most ambitious festival ever. In the past decade, the festival has grown significantly, offering more and more to its audience each year. The reason we’ve experienced this kind of success is because of the faith in this organization from its remarkable creative community, generous donors, dedicated sponsors, committed board and, most of all, devoted staff, many of whom you see in this photo. We’re going to need even more from this dynamic collective if we’re going to fulfill the lofty goal of this year’s festival theme: In 2017, we’re looking at climate change under the title The New Normal. Aside from presenting an extremely strong slate of climate-related films, we’ve assembled a fresh and innovative symposium on the subject that will look at the disturbing changes to our

planet that are becoming normalized. Of course other film festivals feature programming on climate change, but what makes Mountainfilm different is that we intend to do something about it. As the planet heats up, The New Normal will encompass a litany of unforeseen and unprecedented challenges. We believe, however, that The New Normal can be something else entirely: Telluride setting its sights on going carbon neutral. This region has a long history of innovation, and we’re collaborating with a wide array of local entities, organizations and individuals to organize and implement a plan to make this happen. It’s not going to be easy because Telluride’s carbon footprint is nearly twice the national average, but we’re hopeful our engaged and committed audience will join us in this ambitious effort. As the great polar explorer Norman Vaughan, who was a regular guest at Mountainfilm for years, put it, “Dream big and dare to fail.” That’s exactly what we plan to do.

– DAVID HOLBROOKE

Mountainfilm Festival Director

P R E SE NTATI O NS | E V E N T S | AWA R D S & J U D G E S | B OA R D & D O N O R S | S TA F F | VO L UNTEERS | IN MEMO RIA M | MA PS

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15 FILMS OVERVIEW 16 FILMS 50 ADRENALINE 52 KIDZ KINO 56 SCHEDULE 65 BASE CAMP 67 PRESENTATIONS OVERVIEW 68 MOVING MOUNTAINS SYMPOSIUM 72 SPEAKERS 82 LIBRARY S U MMIT SP O N SO R S

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W HAT ’S INSID E 85 EVENTS OVERVIEW 86 GALLERY WALK 92 TOWN TALKS 97 READING FRENZY 98 FREE-RANGE PROGRAMS 100 SPECIAL EVENTS 103 AWARDS & JUDGES 107 BOARDS & DONORS 109 STAFF 110 VOLUNTEERS 111 IN MEMORIAM 112 MAPS P O S TER & C OV ER D ESIGN | S T EPHEN R O C KWO O D P R O GR A M D ESIGN | PEAKEV ENT PUB LICAT IO NS. C O M P R O GR A M C OV ER/PO S T ER AR T | J US T IN B RICE GUARIGLIA

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BA S E CAMP SPO NSO RS AM E R I CAN ALP IN E CL UB ; BA R N A N A ; BI G AG N E S ; B R O W N D O G P IZZA ; C E L E R I T Y L I MO , CLIF BA R & C O MPA N Y; C O F F E E C O WB OY; C O L O R A D O O FFICE O F F I L M , T E L E V ISIO N A N D MED IA ; ED ELW EISS WO O D F L O O R IN G; GO O D LIGHT N ATUR A L CAN D L E S ; G UAYA KI YER BA MATE; HA N A H; H O N E Y S T I N GER ; IN D IA N R ID GE FA R M AN D BAK E RY; JAGGED ED GE; JUS T F O R K I D S F O UN DATIO N ; L A C O CIN A D E L UZ; M AX S T R AN G A R C HITECTUR E; MO N TR O SE WAT E R FAC T O RY; MO UN TA IN LIMO ; MUN K PAC K; N AU; SMA R T BY N ATUR E; S TEA MIN G BE AN C O F F EE; S TR IP P ED MIX ER S; SUER TE T E Q UI L A; T ELL UR ID E SP O R T S; THE B R O W N BAG ; T O W N O F MO UN TA IN VILL AGE; W E S T E R N R I SE. P R E SE NTATI O NS | E V E N T S | AWA R D S & J U D G E S | B OA R D & D O N O R S | S TA F F | VO L UNTEERS | IN MEMO RIA M | MA PS

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21 AN D OLDER


FES T IVAL T IPS HOSPITALITY & COMMUNICATIONS

Start the festival by picking up your pass and a program at Hospitality, which is located at 112 E. Colorado Avenue. There, you can orient yourself and start planning.

HOW TO

MOUNTAINFILM STRATEGIZE

You can’t do it all. We recommend that you pick a few priority films or presentations and arrive early for them. Remember: We play each film at least twice and have a full schedule of TBAs. Additionally, don’t forget about the theater presentations, town talks and other special events. MOUNTAINFILM APP & TBAS

THE Q SYSTEM

Mountainfilm Q team members — who you can recognize by their red vests and red umbrellas — will begin handing out Qs to people in line 45 minutes before a show starts. The lower the number on a Q, the better the chance you’ll get into the theater. A Q doesn’t guarantee a seat; it merely lets staff know your place in line and prevents others from cutting. So show up early to get a Q and then be in line when staff begin calling Q numbers. If you aren’t there when your Q is called, you’ll end up at the back of the line. You can also check Mountainfilm’s app for updates on theater lines and capacity under “Hot Seats.” MORE THAN FILMS

Want a break from movies? We host free events in the form of Coffee & Conversations, Booze & Banters, FreeRange Programming, the Ice Cream Social and our wildly popular Reading Frenzy. THE MOUNTAINFILM STORE

An array of Mountainfilm apparel is available at BootDoctors & Paragon Outdoors, located at 213 W. Colorado Avenue.

Find the full schedule, descriptions of films, presenter bios, event details and real-time festival updates on Mountainfilm’s free mobile app. Search for “Mountainfilm” in the app GETTING AROUND store to download it. Festival beta, All Mountainfilm theaters are including TBAs and program changes, accessible by foot, bicycle or the can also be found on our website. gondola, which runs between We’ll announce Sunday TBAs on Telluride and Mountain Village from 7 Saturday night by 8 p.m. and Monday a.m. to 12 a.m. On Friday and Saturday TBAs by Sunday at 8 p.m. during the festival, gondola hours are THEATER LINES extended until 1 a.m. Telluride’s free shuttle bus, the Galloping Goose, All theaters have two lines: 1) runs a loop through Telluride every 10 passholders and ticket holders and minutes. (Check street signs for times 2) ticket buyers. Pass and ticket and stops.) In Mountain Village, call holders are admitted first; additional 970-728-8888 for Dial-A-Ride service tickets are sold for $25 if seats are still within town limits. available. Show up early, especially at the smaller theaters: Sheridan Opera House (230 seats), Nugget (160), Masons (130), Off-Width (120) and Library (66). Be sure to learn how the Q system works (next paragraph). P R E SE NTATI O NS | E V E N T S | AWA R D S & J U D G E S | B OA R D & D O N O R S | S TA F F | VO L UNTEERS | IN MEMO RIA M | MA PS

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TMV_Mtnfilm_IncentiveAd2017.pdf

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O UR MISSIO N PHOTO MERRICK CHASE

MOUNTAINFILM’S MISSION

Mountainfilm uses the power of film, art and ideas to inspire audiences to create a better world. MOUNTAINFILM ON TOUR

Along with our annual festival, Mountainfilm travels year-round and worldwide with a rich selection of the festival’s best-loved films. We present both single-event and multiday shows, hosted by a wide array of organizations that reach audiences from Minnesota and New York to Singapore and Australia.

WHAT WE DO MOUNTAINFILM FOR STUDENTS

We aim to educate and inspire beyond theater audiences. With the cooperation of Mountainfilm on Tour hosts, we connect with schools around the world to offer free K-12 learning opportunities based on informative, fun and imaginative films. MOUNTAINFILM COMMITMENT GRANT

Mountainfilm awards 10 cash grants of up to $5,000 to filmmakers, photographers, artists and adventurers whose projects are intended to move audiences to action on issues that matter. Several grantee projects have premiered at the festival. Keep an eye out for this year’s crop. MOUNTAINFILM ONLINE

Mountainfilm has a dynamic, userfriendly site that offers the full festival schedule, profiles of our films and special guests, information on our initiatives and timely blogs about news and noteworthy subjects. Visit mountainfilm.org, and follow @mountainfilm on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

NEW THIS YEAR - THE NEW NORMAL

In 2017, Mountainfilm is stepping up its environmentally friendly initiatives like never before by launching The New Normal initiative. This wideranging effort to reduce carbon emissions includes recycling and composting, providing all-vegetarian meals, further elimination of singleuse products and festival travel offsets for all our special guests and staff. Please join us by toting your own reusable dinnerware to festival events, considering offsets for your festival travel and committing to our five New Normal actions: educate, reduce, offset, advocate and celebrate. Visit our website to learn more and sign up. THE NEXT STEP

Mountainfilm strives to go beyond inspiration to promote action toward positive change. One way to do that is facilitate interaction between Mountainfilm audiences and the humanitarian, environmental, social and cultural causes espoused by our filmmakers and presenters. The Next Step offers a platform for nonprofit organizations to table, meet with guests and share information about how the public can get involved to effect change.

P R E SE NTATI O NS | E V E N T S | AWA R D S & J U D G E S | B OA R D & D O N O R S | S TA F F | VO L UNTEERS | IN MEMO RIA M | MA PS

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Field testing the indomitable spirit. O P E N 8 A M - 4 P M M O S T DAY S

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WEL C OME | SP O NSO R S | C O NTE NT S | FE S T I VA L T I P S | O U R M I S S I O N | W H AT ’S N E W | FIL MS | S C HED ULE Toad&Co-S17-MountainFilm-Ad-2.375inx7.75in.indd 1

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PURCHASE TICKETS AT TellurideYogaFestival.com

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201 W. Colorado Ave. Ste. 200 Upstairs in the Nugget Bldg., Corner of Main St. & Fir View schedule online at: tellurideyoga.com, (970) 729-1673

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P R E SE NTATI O NS | E V E N T S | AWA R D S & J U D G E S | B OA R D & D O N O R S | S TA FF | VO L UNTEERS | IN MEMO RIA M | MA PS

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REAL ESTATE

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Congratulations to Telluride Mountainfilm for 39 years of educating, inspiring and motivating audiences about issues that matter.

gotelluride.com JON DWIGHT MANAGING DIRECTOR 970.708.0691 JON@GOTELLURIDE.COM 14

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F IL MS

16-47 FILMS

THE MEANDER

52-53 KIDZ KINO

50-51 ADRENALINE

OWL DANCE OFF PART II

56-65

SCHEDULE & BASE CAMP

HEY DEER

PR OGRAM WR I TE R S F E S TI VA L TH E ATER S SC - Seth Cagin KC - Kingston Cole DH - David Holbrooke PK - Peter Kenworthy KK - Katie Klingsporn HS - Heather Sackett

PALM=Palm Theatre HC=High Camp SOH=Sheridan Opera House NUG=Nugget Theatre

MAS=Masons Theatre OW=The Off-Width LIB=Wilkinson Public Library

See maps, page 112, for theater locations.

P R E SE NTATI O NS | E V E N T S | AWA R D S & J U D G E S | B OA R D & D O N O R S | S TA FF | VO L UNTEERS | IN MEMO RIA M | MA PS

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F ILMS

A Field Guide To Losing Your Friends Chad Clendinen FRIDAY, 8:45 P.M., BC SUNDAY, 6:45 P.M., PALM

120 Days: Tarpon Season Ben Knight and Travis Rummel

116 Cameras Davina Pardo FRIDAY, 12:30 P.M., MAS SUNDAY, 9:30 A.M., MAS

“It looks bad again in the world,” says Auschwitz survivor Eva Schloss, who started talking about her wartime experience in 1986. As one of the last living Holocaust survivors, she meets with different audiences about twice a week, explaining, “I need it for my sanity.” 116 Cameras follows Schloss as she embarks on a new and futuristic storytelling platform: being recorded in three dimensions so that, as an interactive hologram, she can continue to bear witness long into the future. Director/producer Davina Pardo previously produced the feature-length Very Semi-Serious (Mountainfilm 2015) about the cartoonists at The New Yorker magazine. —SC (USA/UK, 2017, 15 min.)

FRIDAY, 9:15 A.M., SOH SATURDAY, 6:15 P.M., HC

IN PERSON: Ben Knight, Travis Rummel Even if you couldn’t care less about fishing, you should still watch every fishing film ever made by the Felt Soul Media team. Why? Because they exemplify the art and craft of filmmaking. This latest short about saltwater flyfishing for tarpon is no exception. Using super high-resolution, black and white and their trademark, slow-motion punctuation, Ben Knight and Travis Rummel have created a piece that is dreamy and wide awake all at once. The effect is harmonized by Knight’s agile editing that gives the pace both punchiness and lyricism. And, in classic Felt Soul style, the most beautiful and arresting images of the film are peripheral to the story: In this fish film, it’s all about the birds. —PK (USA, 2016, 7 min.)

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IN PERSON: Tyler Dunning, Chad Clendinen Nate Henn was full of humor, generosity and spirit. He was alive. But then, in 2010, a series of terror-related bombings devastated Kampala, Uganda, leaving 74 people dead, including Henn. The news was a devastating blow for his best friend Tyler Dunning, who plunged into darkness, grief and self-medication. His only solace? Exploring Rocky Mountain National Park, where the cliff faces, pine forests and wildlife softened his raw emotions. It was a failed attempt to climb Longs Peak that really changed him: The humbling experience sent him on a quest to visit all 59 U.S. national parks. From Glacier to Bryce, Saguaro to Kenai, the Everglades to Yellowstone, he roamed. And through the adventures that unfolded, he pieced his life back together. He started to let others in. And, finally, he was able to say goodbye. —KK (USA, 2017, 14 min.) World Premiere

WEL C OME | SP O NSO R S | C O NTE NT S | FE S T I VA L T I P S | O U R M I S S I O N | W H AT ’S N E W | FIL MS | S C HED ULE


FILMS

Albatross Chris Jordan FRIDAY, 6 P.M., NUG SATURDAY, 6 P.M., SOH SUNDAY, 12:15 P.M., NUG

IN PERSON: Chris Jordan, Jim Hurst

Adaptation Bangladesh: Sea Level Rise Justin DeShields SATURDAY, 12:15 P.M., PALM SUNDAY, 3:45 P.M., SOH

IN PERSON: Alizé Carrére The new normal of global climate change is, generally, a harrowing reality to contemplate. Cultural anthropologist (and Moving Mountains Symposium speaker, page 71) Alizé Carrére helps us see, however, that it does not need to be a reality devoid of hope. In Bangladesh — the most densely populated country in the world and one that will bear a disproportionate share of the impact of global climate change — Carrére shows us the kind of resilience, flexibility and innovation that will be requisite for the survival of our species. —PK (USA/Bangladesh, 2017, 10 min.) World Premiere

Artist Chris Jordan alit on Midway Island in 2009 to photograph the albatrosses that populate this small spot of land in the middle of the Pacific. Little did Jordan know that he would return time and again to Midway on a wildly challenging eight-year odyssey to tell the story of these remarkable birds and what they mean to him. This is not your textbook nature documentary, but rather a revelatory and existential examination of life, loss and love. Exquisitely beautiful, immensely touching and ultimately inspiring, Albatross takes us on a journey to this remote island that few people ever see. What we glean is a profound understanding of how our everyday material lives intersect with the natural world, even when it seems far away. —DH (USA, 2017, 96 min.)

American Psychosis Amanda Zackem SATURDAY, 6:15 P.M., PALM SUNDAY, 12:15 P.M., SOH SUNDAY, 7 P.M., SOH

IN PERSON: Amanda Zackem “There’s a kind of emotional incapacity to understand collapse, even when it’s facing you,” says journalist, author and activist Chris Hedges. Hedges compares the disorder of modern America to what he observed as a foreign correspondent for The New York Times in former East Germany and Bosnia under Milosevic. Totalitarianism is nothing less than mass psychosis, and dissent is the only antidote, both as a basis of hope for society and as the only way for the individual to stay sane. Inspired by an essay Hedges published in Ad Busters, filmmaker Amanda Zackem sets Hedges’ pithy narration against mournful images of daily life in America, a suggestion that the truth is in plain view if one only chooses to look. —SC (USA, 2016, 15 min.)

World Premiere

P R E SE NTATI O NS | E V E N T S | AWA R D S & J U D G E S | B OA R D & D O N O R S | S TA F F | VO L UNTEERS | IN MEMO RIA M | MA PS

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F ILMS

A Shepherd Vern Moen

A Restless Peace

FRIDAY, 9:30 A.M., NUG SATURDAY, 9:30 A.M., NUG

Krystle Wright FRIDAY, 12:30 P.M., NUG SATURDAY, 9 P.M., NUG SUNDAY, 6:45 P.M., MAS

IN PERSON: Krystle Wright Australian photographer Stephen Dupont has a fascination with disappearing worlds and, more particularly, with death. With camera in hand, he finds veins to mine in war, in Mexico’s celebration of the Day of the Dead and in professionals who deal with the deceased. In witnessing his mother’s death, he asks himself, “How far can I take it?” —SC (Mexico/Australia, 2017, 4 min.) World Premiere

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Ascend

IN PERSON: Vern Moen

(USA, 2017, 6 min.)

Being under the age of 35, well educated, tattooed and musically inclined, Joe Wells doesn’t fit the typical mold of a shepherd. But it’s the lifestyle that fits him, the vocation he has chosen. And in a society where many consumers have lost connection to their food and countless jobs have been replaced by technology, he occupies a rarified place, one dictated by bleating lambs, kicking hooves, yipping dogs, early mornings, the whims of nature and the inexorable cycles of life and death. A Shepherd offers an intimate look at Wells’ life in Oregon’s Willamette Valley, where his bond with his flock is raw, codependent and ineffable. —KK

World Premiere

(USA, 2016, 10 min.)

Simon Perkins FRIDAY, 9:15 A.M., SOH SATURDAY, 6:15 P.M., HC MONDAY, 11 A.M., PALM

IN PERSON: Simon Perkins, Jon Wilson After being diagnosed with a rare form of cancer, Jon Wilson had his left leg fully amputated. The loss of a limb stopped the cancer, but it didn’t stop Wilson from enjoying his favorite pastime of mountain biking. This short film celebrates the indomitable spirit that keeps him zooming through singletrack. “If I don’t ride a bike, I will lose my mind. It’s because I need to find that spiritual place, that spiritual channel on the trail,” Wilson says. “The simple answer is that it brings me joy.” —KK

WEL C OME | SP O NSO R S | C O NTE NT S | FE S T I VA L T I P S | O U R M I S S I O N | W H AT ’S N E W | FIL MS | S C HED ULE


FILMS

Bayard and Me Matt Wolf FRIDAY, 12:30 P.M., MAS SUNDAY, 9:30 A.M., MAS

This intimate portrait of civil rights movement icon Bayard Rustin is told from the perspective of Rustin’s partner. Not only was it bold to be openly gay in 1977, when Rustin and Walter Naegle met, but theirs was also an interracial and intergenerational relationship, challenging three societal taboos at once. Through Rustin, Bayard and Me explicitly ties gay rights to the civil rights movement, observing that Rustin faced discrimination within the movement because of his homosexuality. Director Matt Wolf helps restore Rustin to his rightful place in history as one of the architects of nonviolent civil resistance in the U.S. Rustin did not live to see gay marriage become a reality, but it is the quiet dignity of Rustin’s and Naegle’s same-sex union that occupies the film’s emotional center and speaks most compellingly to the ideal of equal rights. —SC

Bending the Arc Being Hear Palmer Morse SATURDAY, 12 P.M., MAS SUNDAY, 7 P.M., OW

IN PERSON: Palmer Morse For most of his life, Gordon Hempton has been in pursuit of nature’s myriad and multi-faceted soundscapes as an awardwinning acoustic ecologist. During that time, he has become a master of a skill that is inarguably a dying art: listening. In this short film, he shares insights on the constant and nuanced communications of nature, the alarming extinction of places unaffected by human noise, the way quiet can open our eyes to the larger picture and the benefits of simply paying attention to place. Silence, as he puts it, “is the think tank of the soul.” —KK (USA, 2016, 10 min.)

Pedro Kos FRIDAY, 6:30 P.M., LIB SATURDAY, 3:15 P.M., SOH

IN PERSON: Pedro Kos, Eric Sawyer In 1983, a couple of young volunteers at a clinic in Haiti learned that people were dying of curable diseases only because they were not being treated. This awareness sparked Paul Farmer, then 23, and Ophelia Dahl, then 18, to dedicate themselves to a lifetime of providing healthcare to the world’s most impoverished people. Bending the Arc charts the inspiring story of their pioneering organization, Partners in Health, from its origins and beyond, where its workers combatted not only deadly infectious diseases but also a bias on the part of the world health establishment against spending money to aid the world’s most dispossessed. Bending the Arc testifies to the possibility of a few committed individuals bringing change to a global problem that seemed utterly intractable, making a powerful argument along the way that health care is basic human right. —SC (USA/Haiti, 2016, 102 min.)

(USA, 2016, 16 min.) P R E SE NTATI O NS | E V E N T S | AWA R D S & J U D G E S | B OA R D & D O N O R S | S TA F F | VO L UNTEERS | IN MEMO RIA M | MA PS

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Bill Nye: Science Guy David Alvarado and Jason Sussberg SATURDAY, 9:30 A.M., PALM SUNDAY, 4 P.M., PALM

IN PERSON: Jason Sussberg, Kate McLean

Blood Road

With his signature bow tie, blue lab coat and irrepressible enthusiasm, Bill Nye became a hero for millions of children in the ’90s as the star of the PBS show “Bill Nye the Science Guy,” where he demonstrated astonishing properties behind everyday things. The show ended in 1998, but that didn’t diminish Nye’s fierce belief in scientific fact and the importance of education. With his field under increasing attack, he took on a new role: climate change activist and defender of evolution, education and science. Bill Nye: Science Guy chronicles Nye’s extraordinary life, including this new chapter, which has him traveling to Greenland to examine ice cores, debating prominent creationists and climate change deniers, and reflecting on his own childhood. Through it all, Nye comes back to something his dad instilled in him: to leave the world better than he found it. —KK

Nicholas Schrunk

(USA, 2017, 101 min.)

(USA/Vietnam, 2017, 90 min.)

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THURSDAY, 8:45 P.M., BC SATURDAY, 9:15 P.M., MAS SUNDAY, 6:30 P.M., LIB

IN PERSON: Rebecca Rusch, Nicholas Schrunk Rebecca Rusch has won numerous championships in ultra-endurance mountain bike races. In Blood Road, she undertakes another kind of endurance challenge on two wheels: covering 1,200 miles of the fabled Ho Chi Minh Trail in Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia and stopping at the obscure site in the jungle where her father’s plane crashed in 1972 during the Vietnam War. Rusch, who was 3 when her father disappeared, is joined by Vietnamese professional cyclist Huyen Nguyen. For both women, the trek is not only a difficult expedition across often-uncharted and rugged terrain, but also an investigation into the war that scarred their families, the people who lived and still live nearby, and the land along the trail. —SC

Brette Peter Mortimer, Josh Lowell, Nick Rosen SATURDAY, 9:15 A.M., HC SUNDAY, 9:45 A.M., OW

After completing a number of bold first ascents and free solos at her home base in Squamish, British Columbia, rock climber Brette Harrington expands her range on a yearlong road trip. “It’s so exciting finding your own way up and solving puzzles along the way,” she explains with the same casual, undaunted and bubbly nature that she employs to tackle brand-new disciplines and some of the West’s rowdiest lines. —SC (USA, 2016, 11 min.)

WEL C OME | SP O NSO R S | C O NTE NT S | FE S T I VA L T I P S | O U R M I S S I O N | W H AT ’S N E W | FIL MS | S C HED ULE


FILMS

Chasing Coral Charged: The Eduardo Garcia Story Phillip Baribeau FRIDAY, 8:45 P.M., BC SATURDAY, 6:30 P.M., OW* SUNDAY, 6:45 P.M., PALM

Brujas Miles Joris-Peyrafitte FRIDAY, 12:30 P.M., MAS SUNDAY, 9:30 A.M., MAS

IN PERSON: Lindsey Hagen, Arianna Gil, Antonia Perez Community through skateboarding? It’s not your mother’s path to political organization and activism, which is probably not a bad thing. And why shouldn’t skateboards, ripped jeans, nose rings and free-form youth culture have a serious voice in today’s political discourse? After all, where have private jets, pinstripes, cufflinks and the status quo delivered us? —PK (USA, 2017, 7 min.)

IN PERSON: Eduardo Garcia, Jennifer Jane, Phill Baribeau, Dennis Aig, et al. It was just a dead bear in a metal can. But unbeknownst to Eduardo Garcia, the animal was concealing a live electrical wire. As he stooped to poke at it with his knife, he was hit with 2,400 volts of electricity, which left him with life-threatening injuries and forever altered the course of his life. Charged: The Eduardo Garcia Story recounts the heartwrenching recovery of the “bionic chef,” adventureseeker and Montana outdoorsman. Returning to nature and the kitchen help Garcia heal. But the emotional challenges prove more difficult than the physical. Garcia grapples with a painful family history, a complicated romantic relationship and finding a way to be himself again as he realizes recovery is not one dramatic reveal, but the never-ending process of a million tiny achievements. —HS

Jeff Orlowski FRIDAY, 6:15 P.M., PALM SATURDAY, 8:45 P.M., SOH SUNDAY, 12 P.M., PALM

IN PERSON: Jeff Orlowski, Larissa Rhodes, Zack Rago, Joanie Kleypas, Richard Vevers, et al. Otherworldly habitats that are home to a psychedelic array of colors, creatures and life, coral reefs are crucial foundations of ocean ecosystems. But hidden from sight, these miraculous places are largely out of mind for most. And they are under dire threat as warming ocean temperatures trigger unprecedented rates of bleaching and dying. In Chasing Coral, a team of scientists, photographers and divers set out to document this underwater crisis and share it with a global audience. It’s no easy task, and they face technical challenges, the whims of nature and the ticking clock as the team races to record bleaching events as they happen. Chasing Coral is a film that pairs beauty and urgency with a glimpse of the tragedies that will continue if humans don’t address climate change. —KK (USA, 2016, 93 min.)

(USA/Mexico, 2017, 86 min.) *Part of Cine de las Montañas (page 100). P R E SE NTATI O NS | E V E N T S | AWA R D S & J U D G E S | B OA R D & D O N O R S | S TA F F | VO L UNTEERS | IN MEMO RIA M | MA PS

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F ILMS

City of Ghosts Matthew Heineman SATURDAY, 9 P.M., PALM SUNDAY, 6:45 P.M., NUG

Chocolate Spokes Brendan Leonard SATURDAY, 12 P.M., SOH SUNDAY, 12:15 P.M., OW

IN PERSON: Gregory Crichlow, Brendan Leonard “You’re not investing in a bike; you’re investing in a relationship.” So says Gregory Crichlow, the bowtied owner of Chocolate Spokes, a Denver bike shop he opened in 2011. Making a relationship with neighborhood residents is something that gives Gregory pride. “As soon as you get a bike…your boundary expands a little bit because you can go farther.” From fixing a tire to building custom bikes, Crichlow has helped make Denver’s Five Points neighborhood and his shop go beyond what anyone thought possible. —KC (USA, 2017, 8 min.)

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In 2013, amid the Syrian Civil War, ISIS moved into the city of Raqqa, Syria. Militants overran government loyalists, seized control of the square and declared the city under their control. After that, ISIS began an insidious campaign of propaganda, public execution, media control and jihad-fueled oppression. In this treacherous atmosphere, and at enormous risk of their lives, a group of citizen journalists banded together with a mission to tell the world about the outrages unfolding in Raqqa. With cameras, computers, savvy and a network of astonishingly brave individuals, they defy and frustrate ISIS by continuing to tell the world about its affronts to humanity. With incredible access to this story, filmmaker Matthew Heineman (Cartel Land, Mountainfilm 2015) proves once again to be a fearless and potent storyteller. Equal parts devastating and courageous, City of Ghosts will shake you to the core. —KK (USA, 2017, 91 min.) Contains violent images

Conservation Generation Spencer MacDonald FRIDAY, 6:45 P.M., MAS SATURDAY, 9:15 A.M., MAS SUNDAY, 4:15 P.M., MAS

“Young farmers” may seem like an oxymoron, but fortunately for all of us there’s a young generation committed to agriculture. On the frontlines of the battle for environmental sustainability in the face of climate change, the four farmers in Spencer MacDonald’s Conservation Generation are as devoted to a vocation that’s equal parts livelihood, lifestyle and sacred cause as they are clear-eyed about the challenges. While the National Young Farmers Coalition, which produced Conservation Generation, represents a broad movement, the focus here is on the specific problem of water scarcity in the arid Southwest. Two of the four are farming in northern New Mexico, and two are farming near Telluride, Colorado. —SC (USA, 2016, 10 min.)

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FILMS

Cowtown Greg Kohs FRIDAY, 9 P.M., LIB SATURDAY, 6:15 P.M., NUG

The Convention Jessica Dimmock FRIDAY, 12:30 P.M., MAS SUNDAY, 9:30 A.M., MAS

At an annual conference of older transsexual men at a seaside resort in Washington state, a speaker welcomes firsttime attendees, telling them that at this conclave, “You don’t have to pretend to be anybody else other than who you are inside.” The men who feel like women, as they put it, express deep relief in the solidarity that comes from being in the company of others like themselves, some for the first time in their lives. At the same time, they speak poignantly about the lifelong pain of being different. The title of Jessica Dimmock’s short film gently posits that while cross-dressing may be no more or less of a social construct than conventional standards of gender-encoded styles of dress, hairstyle and behavior, nonconformity comes at an enormous cost. —SC

The oldest weekly professional rodeo in the United States is a place called Cowtown, located in the unexpected eastern state of New Jersey. Here, third-generation proprietor Howard “Grant” Harris, a former bull rider and lifelong cowboy, strives to keep his birthright intact, running horses, producing a weekly show and fending off exorbitant offers to purchase and develop his prime land. He could cash out, but in his mind he’s already got all the treasures he needs. “What we do is what we are,” he says. “We don’t know how to do anything else.” —KK (USA, 2017, 10 min.)

Das Fischer Ben Herndon SATURDAY, 9:15 P.M., OW

IN PERSON: Ben Herndon Stylish flannel shirt? Check. Bottle of fine whiskey? Got it. Expensive flyrod? Purchased. Canvas tent complete with typewriter, fireplace, tiki torches and record player? Wait — this is getting ridiculous. Das Fischer is a short film by Ben Herndon that takes a wry look at the idealization of American masculinity and outdoor pursuits. It’ll make you think twice the next time you wear that flannel. — KK (USA, 2017, 9 min.)

(USA, 2017, 10 min.)

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Dirtbag: The Legend of Fred Beckey Dave O’Leske

Denali’s Raven Renan Ozturk SATURDAY, 12 P.M., SOH SUNDAY, 12:15 P.M., OW

IN PERSON: Leighan Falley Like a raven on an updraft, Leighan Falley soars above the glaciers and peaks of the Alaska Range with her daughter, Skye, strapped into the backseat of her de Havilland Beaver. Born of a desire to see more of the dramatic landscape and a need to supplement her career as a mountain guide, Falley now works as a commercial pilot in Talkeetna, Alaska. She comes from a long line of aviators and finds inspiration working with other women in the high alpine. Denali’s Raven is a glimpse into the life of an Alaskan pilot, skier, alpinist and mother. —HS (USA, 2016, 9 min.)

FRIDAY, 6:15 P.M., SOH SATURDAY, 11:45 A.M., NUG SUNDAY, 8:45 P.M., BC

IN PERSON: Fred Beckey, Dave O’Leske, Jason Reid, et al. Fred Beckey is a towering figure whose innumerable first ascents cemented his legacy as one of the greatest climbers of all time. Dirtbag: The Legend of Fred Beckey looks back at this singular life, following the nonagenarian climber over the last decade as he’s slowed but never stopped doing what he loves most. Beckey, like many people of great accomplishment, is controversial, having alienated fellow climbers by stealing routes (and even girlfriends). While the film delves into those peccadilloes, it is ultimately an affectionate portrait of a remarkable man in the sunset of his career. This Mountainfilm Commitment Grantee required great persistence from director and Telluride, Colorado, local Dave O’Leske, who pursued the story for the last 10 years. —DH (USA, 2017, 98 min.) World Premiere

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Ditch the Van Mallory Cunningham and Kyle Romanek FRIDAY, 6:45 P.M., MAS SATURDAY, 9:15 A.M., MAS SUNDAY, 4:15 P.M., MAS

IN PERSON: Ben Sollee, Mallory Cunningham, Kyle Romanek Cellist, singer-songwriter and political activist Ben Sollee spent a lot of time on whirlwind tours, flying over and driving through America’s towns and cities. He was becoming burnt out, and his health was suffering. So he bought an Xtracycle cargo bike, strapped his cello to it and set off on a five-year, 5,000-mile journey. His Ditch the Van Tour brings hardships — like broken wheels, tornadoes and unfriendly motorists — and takes twice as long for half the money of a traditional tour. But it also offers meaningful experiences and a more human pace of life in a frantic world, allowing Sollee time to ponder the big questions, such as: What is worth sacrificing? And what story is he trying to tell? —HS (USA, 2017, 10 min.) World Premiere

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FILMS

El Hara Doing it Scared Matthew Newton SATURDAY, 12:15 P.M., HC SUNDAY, 12:15 P.M., HC

IN PERSON: Matthew Newton Eighteen years ago, Paul Pritchard was abseiling from the top of the Totem Pole, a gravity-defying tower that juts up from the sea off the coast of Tasmania, when he dislodged a boulder that hit him on the head. In an instant, his life changed: The accident left Paul with hemiplegia, a condition that severely limits movement and feeling on the right side of his body. But it didn’t shut him down. In Doing it Scared, Pritchard, with the help of friends and fellow climbers, returns to the Totem Pole to challenge himself in an entirely new way. —KC (Australia, 2016, 12 minutes) U.S. Premiere

Dolores Erin Owens FRIDAY, 6:30 P.M. OW* SATURDAY, 3:45 P.M., OW

The success of the 1970s farm workers movement in California is mainly attributed to labor leader Cesar Chavez. But what is largely written out of history is that Chavez had a partner, peer and Farm Workers Union cofounder who was equally crucial to the movement’s success: Dolores Huerta. This film celebrates the remarkable life of Huerta and pays overdue credit to her tireless commitment to workers rights. We learn of a woman both heroic and flawed, one who devoted her life to lifting up others but who also spent weeks away from her 11 children. From fearless young lady on the picket line to veteran union leader blocked from the highest leadership role, Dolores faced discrimination, oppression and injustice with unwavering courage. To quote the immortal motto Huerta coined: “Si se puede.” —KK (USA, 2017, 98 min.) *Part of Cine de las Montañas (page 100).

Mo Scarpelli and Margaux Fitoussi FRIDAY, 12:30 P.M., MAS SUNDAY, 9:30 A.M., MAS

IN PERSON: Mo Scarpelli, Margaux Fitoussi One of the joys of Mountainfilm is the opportunity to be transported to foreign lands and cultures that most of us are unlikely to ever know in person. In the case of El Hara, the journey is not just geographical and cultural but temporal, too. The film takes us back in time to the Jewish ghetto in Tunis, the Hara, where the writer and intellectual Albert Memmi, now a nonagenarian, lived as a child. It is a world that Memmi describes as a “tissue of lies and hatred,” in which he and his ghetto community were alienated from both the French colonizers and the colonized majority Muslim Tunisians. Like a fortress, the doors and walls, the alleys, the sounds and smells of the Hara embraced and protected its residents. And, like a prison, it kept them locked up in their unalterable differentness. —PK (Tunisia/France, 2017, 16 min.)

P R E SE NTATI O NS | E V E N T S | AWA R D S & J U D G E S | B OA R D & D O N O R S | S TA F F | VO L UNTEERS | IN MEMO RIA M | MA PS

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The Farthest Emer Reynolds WEDNESDAY, 8:45, BC FRIDAY, 6:30 P.M., HC SATURDAY, 6:30 P.M., MAS

The End of Snow Morgan Heim SATURDAY, 9 P.M., HC SUNDAY, 9:15 A.M., SOH

IN PERSON: Kori Price, Jane Zelikova, Morgan Heim A scientist dredges up 10,000-year-old silt from the bottom of an alpine lake. A lovable hermit known as the “Snow Guardian” meticulously records weather data at his remote Colorado cabin. A Wyoming rancher raises cattle sustainably with water conservation in mind. By analyzing the data from these different sources, climate scientist and skier Jane Zelikova hopes to better understand the dwindling Western snowpack and how people can adapt to a future without snow. And because the Rocky Mountain West depends on snow for recreation, water and food — and is increasingly plagued by wildfires and droughts — this important research comes not a moment too soon. —HS (USA, 2016, 20 min.)

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IN PERSON: Emer Reynolds, Fran Bagenal, Candy Hansen There is never going to be another mission quite like it. In 1977, NASA sent two Voyager probes into space just in time for a historic alignment that allowed them to make a successful exploration of the outer planets of our solar system. It was the beginning of an incredible fact-finding mission and interstellar journey that gave us the first close-up images of Jupiter’s red spot, Saturn’s rings, Uranus’ drab crust and Neptune, beautiful blue luminous Neptune. The Voyager mission finally gets the treatment it deserves in The Farthest, which rounds up the hyperintelligent pack of scientists involved with the mission 40 years later to recount the audacious project. It’s a film filled with boundless human ingenuity, the lure of the unknown, the unfathomable qualities of space and one unforgettable golden record. Buckle up for a dazzling ride. —KK

Fishpeople Keith Malloy SATURDAY, 12 P.M., SOH SUNDAY, 12:15 P.M., OW MONDAY, 9 A.M., PALM

IN PERSON: Keith Malloy, Lynne Cox Keith Malloy’s lyrical ode to the ocean is comprised of portraits of six people who virtually live in, on or beneath the water. Some are endurance and extreme athletes, like deep sea free diver and spear fisher Kimi Werner and big wave surfer Matahi Drollet. Others, like marine photographer Ray Collins and social worker Eddie Donnellan, are devoted to introducing people to the transformative power of the sea. All have found their purpose in the water. —SC (USA, 2017, 60 min.)

(Ireland, 2016, 116)

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FILMS

Fix and Release Scott Dobson

Frans Lanting: The Evolution of LIFE

FRIDAY, 9:45 A.M., NUG SATURDAY, 9:30 A.M., NUG

Each year, hundreds of turtles are admitted to the Ontario Turtle Conservation Centre, a donation-fueled medical clinic that administers to the fascinating reptiles. Hit by cars, damaged by boats or mauled by predators, they come in broken. And under the expertise of Dr. Sue Carstairs and her team, the reptiles are nursed back to life (when possible), their babies are hatched and, as a result, more turtles are released to the wild than are admitted. In Fix and Release, director Scott Dobson manages to tell an uplifting story of wildlife that also conveys the incredible qualities of an overlooked animal. Incredibly resilient, longlived and vital to wetlands, turtles finally get some well-deserved time in the limelight. —KK (Canada, 2017, 16 min.)

Steven Kochones

For Flint Brian Schulz FRIDAY, 9:15 P.M., MAS SATURDAY, 3:30 P.M., MAS SUNDAY, 9:15 A.M., PALM

IN PERSON: Brian Schulz. Matthew Mills We’ve all heard of Flint, Michigan. Stricken by poverty, crime and tainted water, Flint has made headlines across the globe. For Flint, a short film by Brian Schulz, is making a new headline. Meet Valorie Horton, a potter introducing art to a youth culture otherwise devoid of such craft; Ryan Gregory, an artist who makes awesomely bizarre musical instruments and “fish bikes” out of discarded material; and Leon El-Alamin, a former criminal now teaching atrisk youth how to avoid the perilous path he once tread. These three, and others like them, are telling a new story of Flint, one of redemption and regeneration. —KC (USA, 2017, 17 min.)

SATURDAY, 9:15 A.M., SOH SUNDAY, 3:45 P.M., SOH

Nearly a decade ago, inspired by NASA’s iconic images of planet Earth and the mind-bending vastness of evolution, nature photographer Frans Lanting was struck with an ambitious idea: Tell the story of life on Earth through pictures. What ensued was a years-long project that took Lanting and his wife across the globe to capture images that would take people from the Big Bang to the present. They shot lava eruptions, microorganisms too tiny to see with the naked eye, squishy sea invertebrates, rodents, apes and, finally, humans. This film chronicles the project and its humbling conclusion that we’re all players in a tableau of interconnectedness. “The realization that we are all related is truly profound,” Frans says. “And that’s an awesome realization as we’re hurtling through space on this tiny living planet.” —KK (USA, 2015, 23 min.)

P R E SE NTATI O NS | E V E N T S | AWA R D S & J U D G E S | B OA R D & D O N O R S | S TA F F | VO L UNTEERS | IN MEMO RIA M | MA PS

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Girl Unbound: The War to Be Her Erin Heidenreich

Freedom of the Wheels - For Matt and Will Every Adventure is a No Brainer Jon Glassberg FRIDAY, 9:15 P.M., SOH SUNDAY, 4 P.M., NUG SATURDAY, 3:30 P.M., HC

IN PERSON: Matt Segal, Jon Glassberg Professional climber Matt Segal is in a slump and needs something to shake him out of it. The solution: a two-stroke scooter, climbing partner Will Stanhope and a harebrained plan to tandem ride 200 miles to Aspen, Colorado, in the middle of the winter to send an ice climb. In this ode to the cinematic classic Dumb and Dumber, Segal and Stanhope take on snowy conditions, sketchy mountain passes, thick traffic and their own friendship. Will they survive? As one says, “You gotta keep scootering, until you get taken out by a semi…” —KC (USA, 2015, 19 min.) World Premiere

FRIDAY, 12:15 P.M., SOH SATURDAY, 12 P.M., OW

To be born female in South Waziristan, a tribal area of Pakistan on the Afghan border that’s dominated by the Taliban, is inherently challenging. It is even more so for Maria Toorpakai, born female, but with the instincts and temperament of a boy, to a father so notoriously permissive that he was once confined to a mental hospital for believing his wife and daughters should be educated. Toorpakai further inflamed Taliban sensibilities by pursuing competitive squash in international competitions and, even worse, by becoming famous. Erin Heidenreich’s documentary is far more than the stirring story of an athlete’s determination to win against tough odds, including Taliban death threats. It’s also a portrait of a remarkable Pakistani family, born to tribalism but struggling to achieve modernity. “Where do I fit in?” Toorpakai asks stoically. “I have no idea. I have no idea.” —SC

Guided Bridget Besaw FRIDAY, 6:45 P.M., MAS SATURDAY, 9:15 AM., MAS SUNDAY, 4:15 P.M., MAS

IN PERSON: Bridget Besaw Master wilderness guide Ray Reitze has spent his life leading people into the Maine woods via snowshoes and canoes. A teacher of specialized skills not typically offered in the classroom or used in the boardroom — think basket weaving and canoe shaping — Reitze believes that guiding “is the means to help people connect… with nature.” A philosopher and consummate outdoorsman, Reitze grapples with his own mortality and passing his knowledge to future generations as he reaches his twilight years. —KC (USA, 2016, 19 min.)

(USA, 2016, 80 min.) 28

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FILMS

HAFE: The Story Behind Sam Ketay

Guilt Trip Anthony Bonello/ Mike Douglas SATURDAY, 9 P.M., HC SUNDAY, 9:15 A.M., SOH

IN PERSON: Mike Douglas If you’re determined to summit and ski remote Mont Forel, the secondhighest peak in Greenland, knowing that the aircraftfueled expedition will pump carbon into the atmosphere, you might mitigate the guilty pleasure by bringing along a climate scientist. This renders Guilt Trip into a perfect Mountainfilm package, offering a dose of adrenaline and wonder at the staggering beauty of the natural world, but not without with the science of climate change, seasoned with guilt over our own contribution to making April in Greenland downright hot. That the balmy weather and rapidly melting ice partially thwart both scientific research and adventure travel is a bitter irony lost on no one. —SC

FRIDAY, 6:15 P.M., SOH SATURDAY, 11:45 A.M., NUG

IN PERSON: Sam Ketay, Paul Auerbach, York Miller Dr. Paul Auerbach, a professor of emergency medicine at Stanford University, and Dr. York Miller, a professor of medicine at the University of Colorado, were recent medical school grads when they decided to take a backpacking trip high into the San Juan Mountains. Above 11,000 feet, they experienced abdominal discomfort, bloating and premonitory belching. Wilderness medicine had no term for these combined symptoms. They dubbed it high-altitude flatus expulsion (HAFE), and their findings were published in The Western Journal of Medicine, evoking a surprising response. This film is for anyone who has ever gone camping and eaten too many beans. —KC (USA, 2016, 6 min.)

The Hanging Geoff Feinberg FRIDAY, 9:15 A.M., SOH SATURDAY, 6:15 P.M., HC

IN PERSON: Geoff Feinberg You’ve probably seen the photos: click-bait on social media portraying a darkhaired young man perched perilously, crazily, on top of building towers and cranes or hanging one-handed from ledges. Meet 19-yearold Kirill. The architectureobsessed Moscow resident eschewed the typical path of college and armed forces for a life of urban exploration. His objectives: the rooftops of Moscow, where he pushes the boundaries of risk and exposure while exploring the wilder side of his city. Atop the buildings, cranes and the city’s highest points, he gains a perspective few of his fellow city dwellers will ever encounter. —KK (Russia, 2016, 15 min.)

World Premiere

(Canada, 2016, 35 min.) P R E SE NTATI O NS | E V E N T S | AWA R D S & J U D G E S | B OA R D & D O N O R S | S TA F F | VO L UNTEERS | IN MEMO RIA M | MA PS

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The High Five Mike Jacobs SATURDAY, 9:15 P.M., OW

The Highway Mike Douglas

The Hard Way Jeremy Lurgio and Erik Petersen SATURDAY, 9:15 A.M., HC SUNDAY, 9:45 A.M., OW

IN PERSON: Jeremy Lurgio Montana runner Bob Hayes splits his own wood, mends his barn and fences, hauls hay for his cows and participates in more than 30 races every year. None of these feats would be exceptionally inspiring — except that Hayes was born in 1926. He began running at age 60, raced a 5K at the insistence of his kids, and got hooked. He’s now a revered celebrity of the Missoula, Montana, running community, known for his grit and motivation. The Hard Way proves age is just a number and that the best race is the next one. —HS

SATURDAY, 9:15 A.M., HC SUNDAY, 9:45 A.M., OW

IN PERSON: Mike Douglas Professional skier Stan Rey has driven the Sea to Sky Highway (Highway 99) between Whistler and Vancouver, British Columbia, countless times since he was a kid, always intrigued by the imposing silhouette of the Tantalus Range in the distance. It was on this stretch of winding, coastal highway that his sister has a devastating car accident, so skiing takes a backseat for Rey as he tends to his sister’s recovery. But little by little, skiing provides an escape. The Highway is the emotional story about not taking anything for granted and, finally, pulling off a bucket-list dream. —HS

On October 2, 1977, Dusty Baker hit his 30th home run of the season for the Los Angeles Dodgers. As Baker rounded the bases, an excited rookie named Glenn Burke met him at home plate, raised his arm in the air and slapped Baker’s hand. It was the first high five recorded in the history of sports. A year later, Burke was forced out of baseball amid rumors about his sexual orientation. This fast-moving film by Mike Jacobs uses the conception of the high five as a foundation to explore the larger issue of what it means — then and now — to be gay in professional sports. —KK (USA, 2016, 10 min.)

(Canada, 2016, 15 min.)

(USA, 2016, 20 min.)

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FILMS

An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power Bonni Cohen, Jon Shenk MONDAY, 9 A.M., HC MONDAY, 11:30 A.M., HC

Few documentaries have made an impact as great as An Inconvenient Truth when it was released in 2006. The film, which followed Al Gore’s efforts to educate people about climate change, won an Oscar and transformed the dialogue surrounding the issue. A decade later, the former vice president is still at it, traveling the world to witness the impacts of climate change and continuing to proselytize about how the solutions are within reach. Like its predecessor, An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power follows Gore’s efforts to explain the peril and the potential to turn things around. Ten years later, the threat from climate change is ever more imminent, giving this film new urgency. —DH Note: Thank you to Paramount Pictures and Participant Media for allowing Mountainfilm to screen An Inconvenient Sequel. Due to scheduling issues, it will play Monday only in back-to-back screenings at High Camp. (USA, 2016, 100 min.)

Iran: A Skier’s Journey Jordan Manley

Into Twin Galaxies Jochen Schmoll

SATURDAY, 12:15 P.M., HC SUNDAY, 12:15 P.M., HC

IN PERSON: Jochen Schmoll, Sarah McNairLandry, Erik Boomer, Ben Stookesberry Somewhere near Baffin Bay, in the frozen expanse of western Greenland’s ice sheets, are two connected rivers. It’s a never-beforeexplored area that polar adventurers Sarah McNairLandry, Erik Boomer and Ben Stookesberry have dubbed “Twin Galaxies.” The trio are true explorers, hauling sleds of gear and kayaks across 600 miles of glaciers and crevasses to be the first to run an Arctic river that they’ve only glimpsed on Google Earth. The 46-day expedition combines kiteboarding, skiing, camping and kayaking and is fraught with injuries, disappointments and frigid weather. But their efforts are rewarded with stunning canyons of blue ice and the chance to paddle first descents of churning waterfalls that spit them out into the Arctic Ocean. —HS

FRIDAY, 9:15 P.M., OW SATURDAY, 9:30 A.M., OW SUNDAY, 12:30 P.M., MAS

IN PERSON: Jordan Manley, Laura Yale They were cautioned not to travel to Iran. Too dangerous, too restrictive, too unknown. But skiers Chad Sayers and Forrest Coots went anyway. What they found: bustling bazaars, intricately adorned mosques, steamy bathhouses, snowy slopes and small pockets of rich ski culture. This poetic film from Jordan Manley is a meditation on a complex country that can be both welcoming and impenetrable, as seen through the eyes of skiers. —KK (Canada, 2016, 13 min.)

(Greenland/Austria, 2016, 52 min.)

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Keepers of the Future Avi Lewis FRIDAY, 9:15 P.M., MAS SATURDAY, 3:30 P.M., MAS SUNDAY, 9:15 A.M., PALM SUNDAY, 12:15 P.M., SOH

IN PERSON: Avi Lewis

John Schocklee: A Fairy Tale Ryan Heffernan FRIDAY, 6:45 P.M., MAS SATURDAY, 9:15 A.M., MAS SUNDAY, 4:15 P.M., MAS

He lived with his parents until he was 26, took a minimum-wage guide position at the age of 39, and at 52 still hasn’t landed what society would deem a real job. But refusing to grow up has worked out well for John Schocklee, who splits life between ski guiding at America’s rowdiest ski mountain, in Silverton, Colorado, and rowing dories down the ultimate river, The Grand Canyon. He lives in an alley shack, wears Teva sandals like they’re going out of style and doesn’t make much money. But he doesn’t want to. John Schocklee, A Fairy Tale taps into Schocklee’s fountain of youth. Hint: It involves mountains, snow and ’90s hip-hop. —KK (USA, 2017, 7 min.)

Jonah Andrew Ellis FRIDAY, 12:30 P.M., MAS SUNDAY, 9:30 A.M., MAS

IN PERSON: Andrew Ellis When the spoken words of a former African American slave underscore an elliptical modern dance piece, the effect is powerful and disconcerting. Like apparitions, unsettling questions arise: Where are the divides between past, present and future? In how many ways, and for how many generations, are our sins revisited upon us? —PK (USA, 2016, 6 min.)

Canadian journalist, media personality and documentarian Avi Lewis, along with his wife, author Naomi Klein, has advocated for radically new social and political structures as the only possible effective response to climate change. In Keepers of the Future, he profiles a community organization that demonstrates how “deep local democracy” can help even a poor population build environmental, economic and political resilience. Recovering from the devastation of the Salvadoran Civil War, the Lower Lempa coordinadora, a farmers cooperative, has restored degraded ecosystems, diversified small-scale agriculture to build local self-sufficiency and fostered political resistance against national initiatives to “develop” the region by establishing a wage-based economy of tourism and farming. Can this model succeed? Can it be replicated? —SC (USA, 2017, 24 min.)

U.S. Premiere 32

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FILMS

The Last Honey Hunter Ben Knight FRIDAY, 9:15 P.M., PALM SATURDAY, 3:30 P.M., PALM SUNDAY, 4 P.M., HC

Lindsey Ross: A Less Convenient Path

IN PERSON: Ben Knight, Ben Ayers In the mist-shrouded mountains of Nepal’s Hongu River valley, the Kulung people carve their lives out of the land and practice an ancient form of animism structured around the god Rongkemi. There you will find a wiry and unassuming man named Mauli Dhan Rai, who is believed to be chosen by the gods for the rite of honey harvesting. The task, which involves climbing rope ladders up sheer cliffs to cut down combs made by the world’s largest honeybee (before collecting the poisonous honey within), is extraordinarily dangerous. It’s also a spiritual pursuit soaked in myth that the Kulung believe taps directly into the gods. But with roads, technology and market forces, it may not be around for long. This 2016 Mountainfilm Commitment Grantee, directed by Ben Knight, puts a spotlight on a remarkable practice under threat of modernity. —KK (USA, 2017, 32 min.)

World Premiere

Andrew Schoneberger FRIDAY, 6:45 P.M., MAS SATURDAY, 9:15 A.M., MAS SUNDAY, 4:15 P.M., MAS

Leche y Miel Justin Clifton FRIDAY, 6:30 P.M. OW* SATURDAY, 3:45 P.M., OW

IN PERSON: Justin Clifton Immigrant farm worker Jose Gonzalez churns the fertile dirt of Yuma, Arizona, one of the country’s most important agricultural river valleys. With 350 days of sunshine, more than 90 percent of the U.S.’s winter supply of leafy vegetables are grown there. It’s satisfying, honest work. And Gonzalez, his family and his church have built a thriving community around the life-giving Colorado River. But the river is overallocated, dammed and diverted. Leche y Miel asks the question: Can Yuma continue to be the promised land of milk and honey for the community’s future? (USA, 2016, 14 min.)

IN PERSON: Lindsey Ross, Andrew Schoneberger In an age of speed, convenience and ease, artist Lindsey Ross does things the hard way. Packing her truck with unwieldy vintage cameras and gallons of chemicals, she makes arresting portraits and lovely pictures of iconic Yosemite landmarks using wet plate collodion photography. The method is from another century (the 1850s to 1890s, to be exact), and the process is painstaking, yielding oftendisappointing results. But when the stars align, the result is a one-of-a-kind masterpiece. Lindsey Ross: A Less Convenient Path is a profile of an artist who isn’t afraid of a little elbow grease and is intimately familiar with the beauty that’s born of struggle. —HS (USA, 2017, 11 min.)

World Premiere

*Part of Cine de las Montañas (page 100).

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Mammoth Grant Slater

Look & See: A Portrait of Wendell Berry Laura Dunn FRIDAY, 9 P.M., LIB SATURDAY, 6:15 P.M., NUG

Writer, poet and thinker Wendell Berry could have spent his life working in offices, living in cities, chasing career opportunities around the country. Instead, he returned home to Henry County, Kentucky, where he bought a piece of land and began a deliberate life of farming, raising a family, writing and teaching. This lifelong relationship with the land and community would form the foundation of his prolific writings. It also forms the core of this thoughtful film, using Berry’s biography as a springboard to examine the drastic changes that have swept agriculture in the United States. What was once a lifestyle rife with agrarian values of simplicity, stewardship and rootedness transitioned before Berry’s eyes into a capital-intensive model of industrial agriculture, machine labor, soil erosion and debt. In this way, Look & See becomes a greater story of, to use Berry’s famous title, “the unsettling of America.” —KK

FRIDAY, 9:15 P.M., PALM SUNDAY, 4 P.M., HC

Lunag Ri Joachim Hellinger FRIDAY, 9:15 P.M., SOH SUNDAY, 4 P.M., NUG SATURDAY, 3:30 P.M., HC

IN PERSON: Conrad Anker Although his Nepalese father trained as a trekking guide, Austrian sport climber David Lama never felt the pull of his paternal homeland. Fifteen years after his last childhood visit to Nepal, Lama embarks on a quest to summit the neverbefore-climbed, 22,661-foot Lunag Ri with American mountaineer Conrad Anker. Although the two have a 27-year age gap, the pairing turns out to be fortuitous as the duo push the limits of alpine climbing. After facing a difficult decision on summit day, Lama comes to appreciate his connection to his Nepalese family and realizes that maybe his genes shape his life as a climber after all. —HS (USA, 2016, 18 min.)

IN PERSON: Grant Slater In the remote Russian Arctic, an aging permafrost scientist and his son have been toiling for years on a plan that’s equal parts ambitious, fantastical and brilliant. Their goal: recreate the Ice Age by repopulating vast swaths of land with herbivores, such as bison, muskox and, eventually, lab-created mammoths. Their hope is that the animals will restore the forest back to grassland steppe, mitigating the effects of climate change. For Sergey and Nikita Zimov, Pleistocene Park isn’t only a short-term project about animals and habitat. It’s a life’s work seeking a solution for humanity, defusing a giant carbon bomb and reversing the ever-escalating effects of climate change. This poetic film, by Mountainfilm Commitment Grant recipient Grant Slater, highlights the human ingenuity and wideranging ambition at work in the climate crisis. —KK (USA, 2017, 26 min.)

(USA, 2016, 82 min.) 34

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FILMS

Metronomic The Meander Stash Wislocki SATURDAY, 12:15 P.M., PALM SUNDAY, 9:15 A.M., SOH

IN PERSON: Stash Wislocki, Hilary Cooper, Max Holmes Eons ago, the San Miguel River carved the Telluride valley. At the beginning of the 20th century, this town’s mining community, frustrated by the river’s vagaries, straightened its natural path. In the fall of 2016, the river was returned to its original course, an effort that required imagination, foresight and a lot of heavy machinery. The Meander tells the story of the San Miguel and the herculean effort made to restore the river’s original flow, which, in turn, has generated environmental benefits for the Valley Floor’s ecosystem and also created a carbon sink at the town’s doorstep. —DH (USA, 2017, 7 min.)

World Premiere

Vladimir Cellier SATURDAY, 9:15 P.M., OW

Saxophones mixed with climbing ropes? When you sprinkle a handful of artists, singers and dancers into the high-flying absurdist world of French aerialists, the formula could easily go awry. But in the hands of Baraka Films, the result is this inventive short, which manages to be clever, selfdeprecating and hilarious all at once. Slackliners, cliff dancers, BASE jumpers, giant rope swings into the abyss and one unforgettable flying band. You’ll never look at a drum kit the same way. —KK (France, 2015, 15 min.)

Monumental: Skiing Our National Parks Chris Kitchen SATURDAY, 9 P.M., HC

IN PERSON: Chris Kitchen From director Chris Kitchen comes an ode to America’s best idea: our national parks. One hundred years after the 1916 creation of the National Park Service, a crew of skiers set out on adventures in Yosemite, Yellowstone, Grand Teton, Glacier and Olympic national parks. Following in the footsteps of the first explorers, photographers and surveyors of the American West, the group skis big lines and cultivates friendships from their backcountry camps. Without the summer crowds, the wilderness comes alive with the same beauty, wonder and solitude that enchanted the winter visitors of a century ago and inspired preserving the land for future generations. —HS (USA, 2016, 42 min.)

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No Man’s Land David Byars SATURDAY, 6:15 P.M., PALM SUNDAY, 7 P.M., SOH

IN PERSON: David Byars, Hal Herring, Stash Wislocki

My Irnik Matthew Hood and Francois Lebeau SATURDAY, 12 P.M., SOH SUNDAY, 12:15 P.M., OW

IN PERSON: Matthew Hood, Francois Lebeau In the Canadian Arctic, in the remote community of Kuujjuaq, a young father and mother are raising their irnik (son) with an emphasis on shared adventures, connection to the land, the heritage of dog sledding, learning from the environment and experiencing all that is the Far North — the dark rawness of the winter, the thaws of springtime, the seal soup of summer and the caribou hunting of the fall. My Irnik is about familial lines, ancestral culture, generational transference of knowledge and the individual’s path to seek his or her own dreamscapes. —KK (Canada, 2017, 15 min.)

Why did a group of heavily armed, self-described patriots occupy the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in the winter of 2016? The occupation of Malheur emerged from economic hard times on the range: It featured a collision of symbols, the rugged cowboy of the American West versus the allegedly tyrannical federal government. It became a focal point for a plethora of right-wing causes, and it was a major media circus. Perhaps the most surprising revelation in the rigorously nonjudgmental feature documentary No Man’s Land (a Mountainfilm Commitment Grant winner by David Byars) is the heady sense of purpose appropriated by the occupiers in championing the cause of liberty, even as the substance of their grievance remains elusive. As militia member Jason Patrick concludes, the Malheur occupation was “basically some pissed-off people trying to get their voices heard.” —SC

Nobody Loves Me Jeff Reichert and Farihah Zaman FRIDAY, 9:45 A.M., NUG SATURDAY, 9:30 A.M., NUG

High in Lake Titicaca in the Andes, a large and homely frog once thrived, a species endemic to high altitude and cold water named Telmatobius culeus. But over-collecting for human consumption, pollution and predation by introduced species have devastated the Titicaca water frog — which has a hard enough life as is, given its resemblance to a certain human sexual organ and the many unflattering nicknames its appearance has spawned. In 2016, 10,000 frogs died all at once, and it wasn’t the first mass die-off this critically endangered species has experienced. This short film from The Redford Center shines a new light on these underappreciated animals, showing their amazing adaptability, crucial role in the aquatic ecosystem and what’s at stake — unless humans intervene. —KK (Bolivia/USA, 2017, 12 min.)

(USA, 2017, 78 min.) 36

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FILMS

North of Known Bryan Smith SATURDAY, 9:15 A.M., HC SUNDAY, 9:45 A.M., OW

IN PERSON: Bryan Smith, Gavin McClurg For years, professional paraglider Gavin McClurg harbored an ambitious dream to soar the length of the entire, 500-milelong Alaska Range, riding thermals as far as possible before landing to camp for the night. Dave Turner joins McClurg on the adventure, but the pair run into trouble when bad weather grounds them for days at a time. Hiking takes its toll, and the expedition turns into a desperate quest to make it to their next food cache. North of Known features beautiful aerial shots of North America’s highest peaks — Denali, Foraker and Hunter — while the film’s stars fly by in pursuit of their dream, looking small and vulnerable in the great wide open. —HS (USA/Canada, 2017, 52 min.)

U.S. Premiere

One Hundred Thousand Beating Hearts Peter Byck FRIDAY, 9:15 P.M., MAS SATURDAY, 3:30 P.M., MAS SUNDAY, 9:15 A.M., PALM

IN PERSON: Peter Byck Will Harris is not a typical back-to-the-earth organic farming advocate: He’s a hard-bitten, fourthgeneration, good ol’ boy cowboy who raised cattle in strictest post WWII industrial fashion. Addicted to ammonium nitrate fertilizer, hormones and antibiotics, Harris squeezed every penny out of every cow pound. Until he didn’t. In 1995, Harris began to change how he farmed. He began to pay more attention to the microbes in his soil than to his chemically sponsored beef yields. In the process, he went from liking what he was doing “every year a little bit less” to feeling good about everything his transformed farm had to show him — including things he never expected to see. —PK

Osama & Ayman’s Fourth of July Ben Mullinkosson FRIDAY, 12:30 P.M., MAS SUNDAY, 9:30 A.M., MAS

Osama and Ayman are skaters, goof-offs, brothers, Americans. They’re also practicing Muslims. In this 2016 Mountainfilm Commitment Grant winner, they skate, laugh, pray and reflect on what it means to be Muslim American in an era of fear and under the specter of such presidential edicts as travel bans and forced identification. —KK (USA, 2017, 7 min.)

(USA, 2016, 15 min.) P R E SE NTATI O NS | E V E N T S | AWA R D S & J U D G E S | B OA R D & D O N O R S | S TA F F | VO L UNTEERS | IN MEMO RIA M | MA PS

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Ram Dass, Going Home Derek Peck

The Perfect Flight Joshua Izenberg FRIDAY, 9:45 A.M., NUG SATURDAY, 9:30 A.M., NUG MONDAY, 9 A.M., PALM

The perfect flight for a falcon is the one that yields a kill. And food. For falconer Shawn Hayes, the perfect flight arcs higher: It shares with others the love and awe he feels from partnering with a wild animal — sharing with kids, especially, to help keep them away from a life of trouble. —PK (USA, 2016, 5 min.)

Person of the Forest Melissa Lesh and Tim Laman FRIDAY, 9:45 A.M., NUG SATURDAY, 9:30 A.M., NUG

IN PERSON: Melissa Lesh, Tim Laman, Cheryl Knott In the vanishing lowland rainforests of Borneo, research is underway to uncover and understand the unique cultural behaviors in wild orangutans before it’s too late. There, photographer Tim Laman, researcher Cheryl Knott and young explorer Robert Suro have documented these incredible animals in action as the orangutans do things like make pillows, fashion umbrellas and display greetings. The project, 20 years in the making, offers a fascinating glimpse into the habits of these apes, as well as a window into human evolution. And with habitat disappearing at an alarming rate, the research may prove to be key in protecting this critically endangered species. —KK

SATURDAY, 9:15 A.M., SOH SUNDAY, 3:45 P.M., SOH

IN PERSON: Derek Peck As Eastern mysticism has gone virtually mainstream, Ram Dass, Going Home checks in with the legendary American writer and spiritual teacher whose 1971 book, Be Here Now, arguably launched the still-expanding awareness of awareness in the United States. Filmmaker Derek Peck visits Ram Dass at his home in Maui. In his mid-80s, Ram Dass discusses major milestones in his journey, from early drug use to his spiritual education on visits to India, to a 1997 stroke that was “an act of grace” because it forced him inward. Nearing death, he is still teaching. Death, he says at one point, “is another step towards home.” —SC (USA, 2016, 31 min.)

(Borneo/Sumatra/USA, 2017, 17 min.)

World Premiere 38

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FILMS

Safety Third The Rugby Boys of Memphis The Rabbit Hunt Patrick Bresnan FRIDAY, 9:45 A.M., NUG SATURDAY, 9:30 A.M., NUG

In a realm of highly industrialized agriculture — the vast sugar plantations of the denatured Florida Everglades — rabbits are a byproduct of the crop. The rabbits flee the mechanical sugar cane harvest and subsequent field burnings and are hunted by nearby residents for food and profit. This short verité film chronicles one family’s hunt, offering the audience a glimpse into a modern and urban twist on subsistence. —SC (USA, 2016, 12 min.) *Contains violent images

Cedar Wright and Taylor Keating

David Darg

FRIDAY, 9:15 P.M., SOH SUNDAY, 4 P.M., NUG SATURDAY, 3:30 P.M., HC

FRIDAY, 9:15 P.M., PALM SUNDAY, 4 P.M., HC

IN PERSON: Cedar Wright, Taylor Keating

IN PERSON: David Darg, Calvin Gentry

“There’s a fine line between being bold and being a dumbass. And I think Brad did some time on both sides of the line.” Such are the words filmmaker and climber Cedar Wright uses to describe the subject of his new film. Meet Brad Gobright, 27 years old, busboy at a fine dining establishment, dirtbag, college dropout. His diet consists of donuts, scraps from work, croissants, apple pie — any and all junk food. And one other thing: Gobright is one of the best and boldest free solo climbers in the sport — who nobody has heard of. Safety Third shines the spotlight on Gobright, probably for a shorter moment than he deserves. But it doesn’t matter. His mind is elsewhere, focused on his next free solo. —KC

Calvin Gentry drives around his Memphis neighborhood in Tennessee, pointing out the park where fights break out, the corner store where he has witnessed shootings and telling stories of friends and relatives who are addicted to crack or in jail. His would be a dead-end life of crime, too, he admits candidly, if it were not for rugby. With little more than a ball and a patch of grass, the sport provides brotherhood, unity and a shot at a college scholarship for a group of inner city boys. When these rugby players work hard, there’s no stopping them. The Rugby Boys of Memphis is the inspiring success story of a team of resilient athletes. —HS (USA, 2016, 12 min.)

(USA, 2017, 31 min.)

World Premiere

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Samuel in the Clouds Peter Van Eecke FRIDAY, 9:15 P.M., OW SATURDAY, 9:30 A.M., OW SUNDAY, 12:30 P.M., MAS

Less than a generation ago, Chacaltaya, outside La Paz, Bolivia, billed itself as the highest ski area in the world. With a summit at 17,785 feet, it offered year-round glacier skiing, even though it was only 16 degrees south of the equator. The glacier melted in 2009, and the ski area no longer operates. Samuel Mendoza, whose father taught him how to operate the jerry-built rope tow, can’t bring himself to leave. He maintains the forlorn lodge, visited by occasional tourists and a few scientists who collect air samples, studying the warming that melted the snow. Why does he persist? “Maybe the snow will come back,” he says. Mendoza participates in religious ceremonies honoring the mountain gods and watches the clouds. “For generations,” a radio voice says, “one generation could predict the future based on the experience of the prior generation.” At Chacaltaya, that is no longer true. —SC (Bolivia, 2017, 70 min.) 40

Science in America - Neil deGrasse Tyson Sarah Klein and Tom Mason SATURDAY, 12:15 P.M., PALM SUNDAY, 3:45 P.M., SOH

How did America rise from a backwoods country to be one of the greatest nations the world has ever known? That’s the question posited by Neil deGrasse Tyson, America’s best known contemporary scientist, at the beginning of this short film. His answer, unequivocally, is science. Tyson elaborates with a robust and heartfelt defense of a field that’s been under attack. —KK (USA, 2017, 5 min.)

The Seed Vault: Preserving Crop Diversity, Forever. Daniel Sherer FRIDAY, 9:15 P.M., MAS SATURDAY, 3:30 P.M., MAS SUNDAY, 9:15 A.M., PALM

IN PERSON: Daniel Sherer Amid a snow-covered Nordic landscape, a portal on the side of a frosty mountain leads to a long, dark tunnel and then a frozen door. Behind that door: the history of agriculture — of cultivation, selection and environmental symbioses — as told by more than 880,000 seeds. This is the Svalbard Global Seed Vault, the largest collection of seeds in the world and a safeguard against loss of diversity, insurance that human agriculture can adapt and continue to feed the world. This film follows worldrenowned scientist Cary Fowler as he delves into the state of agriculture, co-evolution, extinction and the future of our food supply. —KK (USA, 2017, 17 min.)

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FILMS

Take Every Wave Rory Kennedy FRIDAY, 8:45 P.M., NUG SUNDAY, 9:15 A.M., HC

Slacker

Suzy and the Simple Man

Max Lowe

Ian Darling, Suzan Muir and Jon Muir

FRIDAY, 9:15 A.M., SOH SATURDAY, 6:15 P.M., HC

IN PERSON: Max Lowe Fruita, Colorado-based geologist Terry Acomb is the Yoda of slacklining. He was an early guide in the sport who helped discover the highlining mecca the Fruit Bowl near Moab, Utah, and he co-founded the now infamous GGBY, a Thanksgiving celebration that combines highlining, BASE jumping and human expression each November in the desert. His home, which sits amid a network of perches and lines, is a magnet for climbers and slackliners from around the country. And when he says “I’m going to be slacklining when I’m 85,” you don’t doubt it. In this film, Acomb reflects on the sport’s tight-knit community, its innovations and the individuals driving the golden age of slacklining. —KK

FRIDAY, 9:30 A.M., MAS SATURDAY, 3:30 P.M., NUG

IN PERSON: Ian Darling, Suzy Muir, Jon Muir Jon and Suzy Muir are the couple next door. That is, they are the off-the-grid, self-sufficient, dyed-inthe-wool, non-conformist couple next door. In Australia. This simple, touching and engrossing film tracks an eight-year slice of their not-so-nextdoor lives. In a way, not a lot happens. In another, everything does. The Muirs’ story, developed in a slow, rhythmic, no-surprises cadence, is full of surprises. One of the biggest may be how deeply they endear themselves to us without ever softening the focus of the autobiographical lens. A postscript: If you’re prone to garden envy, be prepared for a serious case. —PK

Laird Hamilton is best known as a pioneering big wave surfer, but that label doesn’t do him justice. He is a consummate waterman, innovator of wave riding, free diver, windsurfer, long-distance paddler and man more able and at home in the ocean than most of us are on dry land. In this feature documentary, Rory Kennedy traces Hamilton’s life and legacy, from a childhood as a towheaded outcast in Hawaii to the defiant streak that compelled him to sit out competitive surfing (despite being among the best in the world) and the obsessive nature that’s led to many breakthroughs in surf technology, including tow-in and foil methods. In Hamilton, you’ll find a man devoted to water, impervious to fear and driven to push limits far beyond what seems possible. —KK (USA, 2017, 117 min.)

(Australia, 2016, 91 min.)

(USA, 2017, 9 min.)

World Premiere

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The Time Travelers Brendan Leonard, Forest Woodward, Gnarly Bay FRIDAY, 9:15 A.M., SOH SATURDAY, 6:15 P.M., HC

Through the Wall Tim Nackashi SATURDAY, 9 P.M., PALM SUNDAY, 6:45 P.M., NUG

Ten Meter Tower

It’s as easy as falling off a log. Except that it’s not falling — you actually have to make a conscious step. From better than 30 feet up. Into thin air. Followed by a plummet into deep water. Still, it’s only a simple step. And provided you use a modicum of commonsense technique, it’s proven harmless. Not to mention the exhilaration factor. Interesting to watch who can — and, mostly, who cannot — take that “simple” step. —PK

Undocumented immigrant Abril and her 2-year-old son Julian live on one side of a great wall in suburban San Diego. Her husband, Julian’s father Uriel, lives on the other side in Tijuana, Mexico. Each Sunday, Abril, Julian and Uriel join hundreds of splintered families making the trek to meet at the border wall, where American helicopters circle overhead and the only contact is the touch of fingertips through the metal slats. Through the Wall is the heartbreaking story of a family separated by the U.S.Mexico border who spend time together the only way they legally can. —HS

(Sweden, 2016, 16 min.)

(USA, 2016, 6 min.)

Maximilien Van Aertryck THURSDAY, 8:45 P.M., BC SATURDAY, 9:15 P.M., MAS

IN PERSON: Brendan Leonard, Forest Woodward, John Mark Seelig, Seth Mason In 2016, members of the U.S. Men’s Rafting team hatched an incredible challenge for themselves: attempt to break the speed record for 277 miles of the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon by rowing the entire stretch in only 34 hours. The Time Travelers follows their mission, which entailed designing and building a 48-footlong Millenial Falcon of rivercrafts, swapping out customary paddles for oars and training intensely for eight months until launch day in January 2017. What could have been a purely physical challenge turned into something much more: a lesson in camaraderie, perspective and the power of a wild river. In the hands of the team that made The Important Places (Mountainfilm 2015), it becomes an unforgettable story of adventure. —KK (USA, 2017, 24 min.)

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FILMS

Trophy Shaul Schwarz and Christina Clusaiu

Tough Jennifer Zheng FRIDAY, 9:30 A.M., MAS SATURDAY, 3:30 P.M., NUG

In this deft animated short, Jennifer Zheng concisely captures the tenderness of a Chinese mother and an American daughter coming to terms after years of being out of step with one another over what could or should be. The Chinese Cultural Revolution provides an apt metaphoric backdrop. —PK (UK, 2016, 5 min.)

FRIDAY, 12:30 P.M., NUG SATURDAY, 9 P.M., NUG SUNDAY, 6:45 P.M., MAS

A conservationist with a scheme to save rhinos by harvesting their ivory sustainably. A lifelong hunter who devotes his time and resources to killing the animals he loves the most. And an anti-poacher who works with hunters. There is little in Trophy that is unambiguous. This film by Shaul Schwarz and Christina Clusaiu takes an in-depth look into big game hunting, making clear that it’s far from simple. Instead, it’s a briar of conservation interests, black market demands and the consequences of treating animals as commodities. This beautifully shot film unfolds in unbiased chapters, offering much to ponder and letting the audience draw its own conclusions. —KK

Waking Dragons Brett Schreckengost FRIDAY, 6:15 P.M., PALM SATURDAY, 8:45 P.M., SOH SUNDAY, 12 P.M., PALM

IN PERSON: Brett Schreckengost In January of 2017, Telluride Helitrax was hired to do avalanche control work by dropping bombs on Ajax Peak, the iconic mountain that overlooks downtown Telluride, Colorado. Lucky for us, local filmmaker Brett Schreckengost was there to capture it from an airborne vantage. This short film is an ode to the beauty and power of the San Juan Mountains in winter. —KK (USA, 2017, 5 min.)

World Premiere

(USA/UK, 2017, 109 min.)

P R E SE NTATI O NS | E V E N T S | AWA R D S & J U D G E S | B OA R D & D O N O R S | S TA F F | VO L UNTEERS | IN MEMO RIA M | MA PS

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Wild Harvest Alaska Where the Wild Things Play Water Warriors Michael Premo FRIDAY, 9:15 P.M., MAS SATURDAY, 3:30 P.M., MAS SUNDAY, 9:15 A.M., PALM SUNDAY, 4:15 P.M., OW

IN PERSON: Michael Premo In New Brunswick, Canada, a multicultural community comprised of members of Mi’kmaq Elsipogtog First Nation, French-speaking Acadians and white Englishspeaking families banded together behind a common cause: to prevent SWN, a Texas-based natural gas company, from laying claim to their backyard. Together, they set up road blockades, protests and a small, yet potent, resistance. Water Warriors tells the story of a community resolute in the protection of its lands. —KC (USA, 2017, 22 min.)

Krystle Wright FRIDAY, 9:15 A.M., SOH SATURDAY, 6:15 P.M., HC

IN PERSON: Krystle Wright, Aidan Hayley, Jenny Abegg, Kjersti Christensen Friday night at the local watering hole and … where the ladies at? Answer: BASE jumping from high desert cliffs, performing physicsdefying tricks on slacklines, climbing granite routes, shredding singletrack, skiing huge backcountry lines and generally leaving you fellas behind. This rowdy ode to female athletes by Krystle Wright leaves no doubt about the state of women in today’s outdoor world: badass. —KK (USA, 2017, 5 min.)

Anna Brones, Amy DuFault, and Jenny Nichols FRIDAY, 6:45 P.M., MAS SATURDAY, 9:15 A.M., MAS SUNDAY, 4:15 P.M., MAS

IN PERSON: Anna Brones, Amy DuFault, Jenny Nichols Wild Harvest Alaska poses the question: What if we thought about our clothes like we think about our food? In the wilds of Alaska’s dense greenery, a group of environmentally conscious textile producers are doing just that. Using plants harvested from the woods or purchased from local growers, a company called Botanical Colors is employing safe and sustainable methods to make bright yellow, deep purple and vibrant red from natural dye sources found in their backyard. —HS (USA, 2017, 4 min.)

World Premiere

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FILMS

Yasuni Man Ryan Killackey SATURDAY, 12 P.M., MAS SUNDAY, 7 P.M., OW

IN PERSON: Ryan Killackey

Winter’s Watch Brian Bolster FRIDAY, 6:45 P.M., MAS SATURDAY, 9:15 A.M., MAS SUNDAY, 4:15 P.M., MAS

To be alone on a cold northern island every winter, charged with caring for the brooding hulk of a huge, old, deserted (possibly haunted) hotel, may hold little appeal for most. For an introspective photographer who dreamed as a child of tall ships and a life at sea, it makes for a perfect retreat. —PK (USA, 2017, 14 min.)

Yasuni is a vast tract of Amazonian rainforest in Ecuador. It comprises both a national park and an ethnic reserve for the native Waorani people. It’s a place of unsurpassed natural beauty that’s been identified as the most biologically diverse place on Earth. It is also home to Ecuador’s largest untapped oil reserves. A small tribe of indigenous people bent on preserving their homeland and traditional way of life is pitted against a national government allied with one of the world’s richest and most powerful industries. The rarest and most vulnerable species of plant and animal life are subject to predation by chainsaws, bulldozers and toxic spillage. It’s Avatar come to life. But, at this point, without redemption or a happy ending. —PK (USA, 2017, 93 min.) *Contains violent images

Young Guns Nick Rosen, Josh Lowell, Peter Mortimer FRIDAY, 9:15 P.M., SOH SUNDAY, 4 P.M., NUG SATURDAY, 3:30 P.M., HC

IN PERSON: Kai Lightner Teenagers Ashima Shiraishi and Kai Lightner met in 2014 at the Ring of Fire climbing competition. They were each the youngest of their genders — going head to head with adults. And they both won. That set the standard for everything that’s since unfolded as Shiraishi and Lightner have repeatedly crushed expectations and the competition. “They represent the future of climbing, and the question is, where are they going to take it?” asks pro climber Meagan Martin. Young Guns hints at the answer as it follows the two climbers around the world, from a V15 boulder in Japan to Thor’s Hammer in Norway. To watch Shiraishi and Lightner climb is to watch art ascend. —KC (USA, 2016, 27 min.)

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Risk* Laura Poitras

Zain’s Summer: From Refugee to American Boy Joshua Seftel FRIDAY, 12:30 P.M., MAS SUNDAY, 9:30 A.M., MAS

Zain’s Summer depicts the sunny side of the refugee experience. Zain and his siblings and mother fled Pakistan 11 months before the period the film covers, a six-week summer language program to prepare young, new immigrants for the start of school. The possibility of a new life in America, relatively free from fear of violence and persecution, represents the very best of America in director Joshua Seftel’s telling. Zain’s openness to what the U.S. offers is old-fashioned and inspiring. —SC (USA, 2016, 13 min.)

FRIDAY, 9:15 P.M., HC SUNDAY, 9:45 A.M., NUG

Zo Kwe Zo (All Are Human) Lindsay Brahnam FRIDAY, 12:15 P.M., SOH SATURDAY, 12 P.M., OW

IN PERSON: Lindsay Branham, Andrew Ellis In the war-torn Central African Republic, circa 2013, a young couple, Julius and Claire, struggle to start a family. After his brother is killed by Muslim Seleka rebels, Julius joins an antiSeleka group. Violence begets more violence, and for the civilians caught in the crossfire there’s no obvious strategy for survival. This heart-rending dramatization of a true story is based on interviews conducted in the Central African Republic. —SC (USA/Central African Republic, 2017, 13 min.)

World Premiere *Contains violent images

Acclaimed documentarian Laura Poitras is not afraid. For years, she’s made films that examine subjects that are eminently hard to access, but her resolute pursuit of these stories has edified our understanding of this opaque world. Her last effort, Citizen Four, won an Oscar for documenting Edward Snowden as he tried to outrun U.S. authorities after he leaked National Security Agency secrets. Risk delves once again into the shadows of our government as it unpacks the complicated story of Julian Assange of WikiLeaks. Assange is a controversial figure, so much so that Poitras openly wrestles with the various dimensions of his character during the film, which only makes Risk that much more fascinating. —DH *A late edition to the festival. We apologize that it’s not in order. (USA, 2017, 97 min.)

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FILMS

BEHIND THE FENCE

BEHIND THE FENCE

VR Studio Gallery 81435, 283 S. Fir St. FRIDAY NOON-4 P.M. SATURDAY AND SUNDAY 9 A.M.-4 P.M. MONDAY 9 A.M.-1 P.M.

Mountainfilm is thrilled to partner with Google to host a virtual reality studio again in 2017. Stop by Gallery 81435 for an immersive storytelling experience. A Google representative or volunteer will help you with headsets, swivel chairs and a variety of stories to explore. This year’s lineup features films about the new Bears Ears National Monument, the persecution of Royingya Muslims in Myanmar, coral bleaching events, melting ice and more. Don’t miss it. —KK

P R E SE NTATI O NS | E V E N T S | AWA R D S & J U D G E S | B OA R D & D O N O R S | S TA F F | VO L UNTEERS | IN MEMO RIA M | MA PS

47


We live and love adventure, whether it’s dropping cliffs on our boards, riding singletrack in the mountains, or exploring the ever-dynamic and exciting digital world. VentureWeb is a digital agency based in beautiful Squamish, BC. Since 2006 our mission has been to work with the world’s best adventure brands, experiences and destinations to engage and inspire their communities. VentureWeb is very proud to have partnered with Mountainfilm for the last 7 years to bring the festival experience to a worldwide digital audience. We hope you have a wonderful time at this year’s festival! We love to chat. Call us on +1(604) 815-4542, email us at hello@ventureweb.net or visit www.ventureweb.net


REP

AIRS & TRADE-IN

May 26–28 Friday–Sunday | 11AM –5PM Visit us at Patagonia Telluride, 200 W. Colorado Ave.

Worn Wear Repairs

We Want Your Used Patagonia Clothing!

Bring your tired, worn clothing

Bring us your Patagonia clothing that

(any brand) to the Worn

you’re no longer using. We accept

Wear Truck and learn how to

clothing that’s in excellent working

keep your gear in use longer.

condition at our discretion. When you

Repairs are free!

trade it in, we’ll give you Worn Wear Merchandise Credit valued at 50% of the price we’ll sell it for in Worn Wear. Most styles accepted, including Men’s, Women’s, Kids, and Baby.

learn more: wornwear.com @wornwear #wornwear We accept Patagonia clothing that functions perfectly and is in good condition. © 2017 Patagonia, Inc.


ADR EN A L I N E GOPRO: RETURN TO THE DITCH TANDEM

ADRENALINE

Saturday, 8:45 p.m., Base Camp Outdoor Theatre Sunday, 6:45 p.m., High Camp

For Saturday’s Base Camp screening, the audience is encouraged to bring warm layers, blankets, high energy and low-backed chairs. Films are listed in screening order, and the show is free and open to the public.

Ice Call - Sam Favret

Dawn to Dusk

David Lacote

Scott Hardesty

At the Mer de Glace glacier on Mont Blanc, freeskier Sam Favret gets abstract with a surreal landscape of frozen flumes, runnels, caves, features and walls, giving whole new meaning to the notion of skiing “icy conditions.” —KK

Any film that can combine an ode to The Big Lebowski with some goddamn fast longboarding is good by us. Far out, man. —SW

(France, 2016, 4 min.)

Honnold Solos Lover’s Leap in Dan Osman Tribute Corey Rich In the classic 1997 film Masters of Stone 4, Dan Osman blew minds when he raced up a route on Lover’s Leap in California sans rope in only 4 minutes and 25 seconds. A quarter century later, Alex Honnold set out to break that record. Yeah, it’s an ad for Stride Health. But it’s still pretty metal. —KK (USA, 2016, 2 min.)

Danny MacAskill’s Wee Day Out Stu Thomson Train whistles, farm animals, rolling green hills, hay bales and the most audacious bike tricks you’ve ever seen. Just another wee day out with physics-defying bike phenom Danny MacAskill. —KK

(USA, 2017, 2 min.)

Owl Dance-Off Part II Megan Lorenz, GoPro Owl Dance-Off Part II is the muchanticipated follow-up to wildlife photographer Megan Lorenz’s awardwinning internet sensation Owl DanceOff. —BK (Canada, 2017, 2 min.)

Johanna Under the Ice Ian Derry Finnish free diver Johanna Norblad is the world record holder in the littleknown sport of free diving under ice. British director Ian Derry captures one of Norblad’s dives in this chilling visual poem that’ll leave you wishing you were wearing an extra layer. —BK (Finland, 2016, 4 min.)

(Scotland, 2016, 7 min.) 50

WEL C OME | SP O NSO R S | C O NTE NT S | FE S T I VA L T I P S | O U R M I S S I O N | W H AT ’S N E W | FIL MS | S C HED ULE


AD REN ALINE GoPro: Record Breaking Jump with David Wise GoPro A massive hip jump and a whopping 46.5 feet of vertical. Kids, don’t try this at home. —SW (Italy, 2017, 2 min.)

Craig Grant bring us the latest installment of Yeti Cycle’s “Proven Here” series, following riders Shawn Neer and Jubal Davis around Whitefish, Montana’s best singletrack. —BK (USA, 2017, 5 min.)

GoPro: Line of the Winter, Leó Tallefier

Adventures of a Hobo Clown King

Leó Tallefier, GoPro

Jeff Seal

What does it take to win GoPro’s Line of the Winter title? Bird calls, huge air, a dicey route through the woods, a little rock wall tap and an enormous level of stoke. —KK

“I really don’t want this video to encourage anyone to go out and try this,” says filmmaker Jeff Seal, who’s the subject of his own film about his many failed attempts to hop freight trains in New York. —BK (USA, 2016, 5 min.)

Nazaré - Black Carnival Kylian Castells Nazaré, Portugal, is home to one of the biggest waves on the planet. Add 90 seconds of beautiful cinematography, and you’ve got Black Carnival. —SW (Portugal, 2017, 2 min.)

Tatum Monod: 2016 Josh Berman Tatum Monod is the embodiment of grace and steeze as she threads down pillowed slopes, steep spines and bold backcountry lines in this 2016 season edit. —KK (USA, 2016, 4 min.)

GoPro: Return to the Ditch Tandem GoPro Remember when kayakers Rush Sturges and Ben Marr took their boats down that crazy concrete ditch, flying like banshees into the sea? In this film, they return to the scene, only with a higher entry point and a new weapon of choice: the tandem kayak. —KK (Canada, 2017, 4 min.)

Whitefish - Proven Here Joey Schusler

(France, 2016, 3 min.)

Boys in the Bugs Zachary Barr, Peter Mortimer, Nick Rosen Who needs coaches, fad diets or training regimens when you’ve got guts, spirit and whisky? That’s the attitude of Matt Segal and Will Stanhope, professional climbers and subjects of Boys in the Bugs, who set out to climb one of the most difficult 5.14 cracks in the world: The Tom Eagan Memorial Route in British Columbia’s Bugaboos. What they lack in self-discipline, they make up for in stickto-it-ness as season after season passes without success. The film crew gives up, crowds watch in amusement and the boys have to find demoralizing campground work. But they stay with it, proving that perseverance — and pain — pay off in the end. —KK (USA, 2016, 18 min.)

Dan Atherton Sends It Down the Hardline MTB Track Red Bull Unfurling down the dark forests and steep hillsides in the north of Wales is a downhill track like no other. Dense forests, huge drops, enormous consequences and insane technical challenges. This is the Red Bull Hardline MTB track. And in this film, Dan Atherton sends it. —KK (UK, 2016, 4 min.)

Ah, the intoxicating smells of RAW 6K, burning cable cams and earthy, high-alpine dust in the morning. Joey Schusler and P R E SE NTATI O NS | E V E N T S | AWA R D S & J U D G E S | B OA R D & D O N O R S | S TA F F | VO L UNTEERS | IN MEMO RIA M | MA PS

51


KIDZ KIN O

LOST IN LIGHT

KIDZ KINO

Monday, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., Palm Theatre

Kidz Kino, a perennial festival favorite, is a program of short, family friendly films curated by kids for kids. The program is free to all passholders and kids under age 12. Tickets are available to the general public for $10. The audience is encouraged to join the Free-Range group bike ride before the movies (page 99).

The Pits

A Higher Crawling

Mike Hayhurst & David Bizarro

Eric Becker - with Q&A

Love and companionship is what everybody is truly looking for in life, even avocados. The Pits follows two avocado halves as they roam the lonely city streets looking for love. This film e(pit)omizes what it means to find your other half. —Kitty, age 17

A brand new generation of rock climbers is emerging. Watch as these two really, really young people compete for the spot of best crawler. —Wiley, age 15

(USA, 2016, 4 min.)

Stu Thomson

Pawo Antje Heyn

52

(USA, 2016, 3 min.)

Danny MacAskill’s Wee Day Out Epic mountain bike tricks. —Jake, age 12 (Scotland, 2016, 7 min.)

Pawo is a humorous but adorable film that lets the viewer embark on a fun journey with the main character. I enjoyed watching the film, and I hope you smile like I did when I saw it. —Bella, age 14

Winter the Grommet

(Germany, 2015, 7 min.)

(USA, 2017, 5 min.)

Stefan Hunt A young surfer helps kids get clean water. —Jake, age 12

WEL C OME | SP O NSO R S | C O NTE NT S | FE S T I VA L T I P S | O U R M I S S I O N | W H AT ’S N E W | FIL MS | S C HED ULE


KID Z KIN O

I AM NOT A MOUSE

Owl Dance-Off, Part II

Ascend

GoPro/ Megan Lorenz

Simon Perkins - with Q&A

You will like Owl Dance-Off because the owls jam out to some seriously groovy music. The owls look like they are having a fun time, and I hope you do, too. —Joe, age 11

People without limbs can be superhuman. Watch as Jon Wilson rides his mountain bike everywhere. —Wiley, age 15

(USA, 2017, 2 min.)

Lost in Light

I Am Not a Mouse Evgenia Golubeva

(USA, 2016, 6 min.)

Sriram Murali This film is about how light pollution changes what you see. —Henry, age 13

It’s about a mom telling someone she’s a mouse and then her turning into a mouse. That’s really all I understand about the movie, but I really liked it. —Cyrus, age 6

(USA, 2016, 3 min.)

(UK, 2016, 2 min.)

A Small Escape

This film comes not from the production studios of Hollywood, but from an elementary school classroom in Silverton, Colorado, a ski town just over the mountain from Telluride. Dear Kendall, Love Silverton captures the vivacity, adventure and love associated with Kendall Mountain, while simultaneously illustrating the hard work and effort put into the production by the brilliant student filmmakers, aged 7 to 9. — Kitty, age 17

David Sandell

(USA, 2016, 8 min.)

This is such a sweet movie that it makes me want to watch more movies! —Zoe, age 5

Avery McRae Presentation

Hey Deer Örs Bárczy Deer thinks he has all that he needs. And then he discovers himself, and everything changes. —Maia, age 13 (Hungary, 2016, 7 min.)

(Sweden, 2016, 3 min.)

Dear Kendall, Love Silverton Sallie Barney’s class - with Q&A

Eleven-year-old Avery McRae is part of a group of kids who are suing the federal government over its apathy toward climate change. She’ll talk about the effort.

P R E SE NTATI O NS | E V E N T S | AWA R D S & J U D G E S | B OA R D & D O N O R S | S TA F F | VO L UNTEERS | IN MEMO RIA M | MA PS

53


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54

WEL C OME | SP O NSO R S | C O NTE NT S | FE S T I VA L T I P S | O U R M I S S I O N | W H AT ’S N E W | FIL MS | S C HED ULE


BETWEEN EVENTS

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P R E SE NTATI O NS | E V E N T S | AWA R D S & J U D G E S | B OA R D & D O N O R S | S TA FF | VO L UNTEERS | IN MEMO RIA M | MA PS

55


56

8:00 AM 8:15 8:30 8:45 9:00 AM 9:15 9:30 9:45 10:00 AM 10:15 10:30 10:45 11:00 AM 11:15 11:30 11:45 12:00 PM 12:15 12:30 12:45 1:00 PM 1:15 1:30 1:45 2:00 PM 2:15 2:30 2:45 3:00 PM 3:15 3:30

CAPACITY [500]

CAPACITY [650]

(p. 68-70)

HIGH CAMP 9 A.M. 2:30 P.M.

MOVING MOUNTAINS SYMPOSIUM: THE NEW NORMAL

HIGH CAMP

PALM

NUGGET

Q&A

A Shepherd (p.18) Nobody Loves Me (p.36) The Perfect Flight (p.38) Fix and Release (p.27) Person of the Forest (p.38) The Rabbit Hunt (p.39)

FANTASTIC BEASTS SHORTS

9:45 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.

CAPACITY [160]

MASONS

Q&A

Tough (p.43) Suzy & The Simple Man (p.41)

9:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

CAPACITY [120]

Q&A

Zo Kwe Zo (All Are 12:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. Human) (p.46) 12:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m. WHEN THEY CAME FOR Girl Unbound: The War A Restless Peace (p.18) ME SHORTS to be Her (p.28) 116 Cameras (p.16) Trophy (p.43) Bayard and Me (p.19) Q&A Q&A Osama and Ayman’s Fourth of July (p.37) Jonah (p.32) The Convention (p.23) El Hara (p.25) Zain’s Summer: From Refugee to American Boy (p.46) Brujas (p.21)

12:15 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.

Q&A

120 Days: Tarpon Season (p.16) The Hanging (p.29) Slacker (p.41) Where the Wild Things Play (p.44) Ascend (p.18) The Time Travelers (p.42)

9:15 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.

OUT THERE 1 SHORTS

CAPACITY [230]

SHERIDAN OPERA HOUSE CAPACITY [120]

THE OFF-WIDTH LIBRARY CAPACITY [66]

S C HEDUL E FR I DAY


3:45 4:00 PM 4:15 4:30 4:45 5:00 PM 5:15 5:30 5:45 6:00 PM 6:15 6:30 6:45 7:00 PM 7:15 7:30 7:45 8:00 PM 8:15 8:30 8:45 9:00 PM 9:15 9:30 9:45 10:00 PM 10:15 10:30 10:45 11:00 PM 11:15 11:30 11:45 12:00 AM

Risk (p.46)

The Rugby Boys of Memphis (p.39) Mammoth (p.34) The Last Honey Hunter (p.33)

FILMS

Q&A

Young Guns (p.45) Freedom of the Wheels: For Matt and Will Every Adventure is a No Brainer (p.28) Lunag Ri (p.34) Safety Third (p.39)

CLIMBING SHORTS

9:15 - 11:15 p.m.

Q&A

HAFE: The Story Behind (p.29) Dirtbag: The Legend of Fred Beckey (p.24)

6:15 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.

PRESENTATIONS & EVENTS

Q&A

9:15 p.m. - 11:15 p.m.

9:15 p.m. - 11:15 p.m.

Q&A

Q&A

Q&A

Waking Dragons (p.43) 6:30 p.m. - 8:45 p.m. Chasing Coral (p.21) The Farthest (p.26)

6:15 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.

6 p.m. - 8 p.m.

Take Every Wave (p.41)

8:45 p.m. - 11 p.m.

Q&A

Albatross (p.17)

9:15 p.m. - 11 p.m.

Q&A

Iran: A Skier’s Journey The Seed Vault: (p.31) Preserving Crop Samuel in the Clouds Diversity, Forever. (p.40) (p.40) For Flint (p.27) Water Warriors (p.44) Q&A Keepers of the Future (p.32) One Hundred Thousand Beating Hearts (p.37)

NEW NORMAL SHORTS

9:15 p.m. - 11:15 p.m.

Q&A

6:30 p.m. - 8:45 p.m. Conservation CINE DE LAS Generation (p.22) MONTAÑAS Guided (p.28) Leche y Miel (p.33) Winter’s Watch (p.45) Dolores (p.25) Wild Harvest: Alaska (p.44) Spanish Lindsey Ross: A Less Language Convenient Path (p.33) John Shocklee: A Fairy Tale (p.32) Ditch the Van (p.24)

6:45 p.m. - 8:45 p.m.

SLOW HANDS SHORTS

Q&A

Cowtown (p.23) Look & See: A Portrait of Wendell Berry (p.34)

9 p.m. - 11 p.m.

Q&A

Bending the Arc (p.19)

6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.

3:30 – 6:30 P.M. (p. 86 - 89)

GALLERY WALK

SC HED ULE FRIDAY


58

8:00 AM 8:15 8:30 8:45 9:00 AM 9:15 9:30 9:45 10:00 AM 10:15 10:30 10:45 11:00 AM 11:15 11:30 11:45 12:00 PM 12:15 12:30 12:45 1:00 PM 1:15 1:30 1:45 2:00 PM 2:15 2:30 2:45 3:00 PM 3:15 3:30

9:15 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.

CAPACITY [230]

SHERIDAN OPERA HOUSE

Q&A

Doing it Scared (p.25) Into Twin Galaxies (p.31) Sarah McNair-Landry, Erik Boomer and Ben Stookesberry (p.75)

Science in America Neil deGrasse Tyson (p.40) Adaptation Bangladesh: Sea Level Rise (p.17) The Meander (p.35) Paul Hawken (p.74)

Q&A

12:15 p.m. - 2 p.m.

12:15 p.m. - 2 p.m.

Q&A

NUGGET

MASONS CAPACITY [120]

THE OFF-WIDTH LIBRARY CAPACITY [66]

9:15 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.

SLOW HANDS SHORTS

9:30 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.

9:15 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

8–9 A.M. (p. 92-95)

COFFEE & CONVERSATION

CAPACITY [120]

Q&A

11:45 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Q&A

Q&A

Being Hear (p.19) Yasuni Man (p.45)

12 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.

Q&A

Q&A

Works in Progress (p.83)

1 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Q&A

First Amendment Issues for Filmmakers (p.82)

Colorado Avenue (p. 101)

2–3:30 P.M.

ICE CREAM SOCIAL

Q&A

Zo Kwe Zo (All Are Human) (p.46) Girl Unbound: The War to be Her (p.28)

12 p.m. - 2 p.m.

Using VR for Conservation advocating and Iran: A Skier’s Journey Generation (p.22) storytelling (p.82) (p.31) Guided (p.28) Samuel in the Clouds A Shepherd (p.18) Q&A Winter’s Watch (p.45) (p.40) Nobody Loves Me Wild Harvest: Alaska (p.36) Q&A (p.44) The Perfect Flight Lindsey Ross: A Less (p.38) Fix and Release (p.27) Convenient Path (p.33) Person of the Forest John Shocklee: A Fairy Tale (p.32) (p.38) The Rabbit Hunt (p.39) Ditch the Van (p.24) 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

FANTASTIC BEASTS SHORTS

9:30 a.m. - 11 a.m.

CAPACITY [160]

Denali’s Raven (p.24) HAFE: The Story My Irnik (p.36) Behind (p.29) Chocolate Spokes Dirtbag: The Legend of (p.22) Fred Beckey (p.24) Fishpeople (p.26)

ICONOCLAST SHORTS

12 p.m. - 2 p.m.

Q&A

Frans Lanting: The The Hard Way (p.30) Evolution of LIFE (p.27) Bill Nye: Science Guy The Highway (p.30) Florence Williams (p.20) Brette (p.20) (p.78) North of Known (p.37) Ram Dass: Going Q&A Home (p.38)

9:15 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

OUT THERE 2 SHORTS

CAPACITY [500]

CAPACITY [650]

9:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

HIGH CAMP

PALM

S C HEDUL E S AT U R DAY


3:45 4:00 PM 4:15 4:30 4:45 5:00 PM 5:15 5:30 5:45 6:00 PM 6:15 6:30 6:45 7:00 PM 7:15 7:30 7:45 8:00 PM 8:15 8:30 8:45 9:00 PM 9:15 9:30 9:45 10:00 PM 10:15 10:30 10:45 11:00 PM 11:15 11:30 11:45 12:00 AM

9 p.m. - 11:15 p.m.

Q&A

120 Days: Tarpon Season (p.16) The Hanging (p.29) Slacker (p.41) Where the Wild Things Play (p.44) Ascend (p.18) The Time Travelers (p.42)

OUT THERE 1 SHORTS

6:15 p.m. - 8:15 p.m.

Q&A

Young Guns (p.45) Freedom of the Wheels: For Matt and Will Every Adventure is a No Brainer (p.28) Lunag Ri (p.34) Safety Third (p.39)

CLIMBING SHORTS

3:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

3:15 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.

8:45 p.m. - 10:45 p.m.

Q&A

Albatross (p.17)

6 p.m. - 8 p.m.

Q&A

Bending the Arc (p.19)

3:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.

9 p.m. - 11 p.m.

Q&A

Q&A

Q&A

6:30 p.m. - 8:45 p.m. Cowtown (p.23) Look & See: A Portrait The Farthest (p.26) of Wendell Berry (p.34)

6:15 p.m. - 8:15 p.m.

Tough (p.43) The Seed Vault: Suzy and the Simple Preserving Crop Man (p.41) Diversity, Forever. (p.40) For Flint (p.27) Q&A Water Warriors (p.44) Keepers of the Future (p.32) One Hundred Thousand Beating Hearts (p.37)

3:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Spanish Language

Charged: The Eduardo Garcia Story (p.21)

CINE DE LAS MONTAÑAS

6:30 p.m. - 8:15 p.m.

5:30–6:30 P.M. (p. 96-97)

BOOZE & BANTER

Q&A

Q&A

PRESENTATIONS & EVENTS

Q&A

FILMS

3 p.m. - 4 p.m. Art and Advocacy (p.83)

3:45 p.m. - 6 p.m. Leche y Miel (p.33) Dolores (p.25)

Q&A

Waking Dragons (p.43) Through the Wall The End of Snow (p.26) Chasing Coral (p.21) A Restless Peace (p.18) 9:15 p.m. - 11:15 p.m. 9:15 p.m. - 10:45 p.m. (p.42) Guilt Trip (p.29) Trophy (p.43) Ten Meter Tower (p.42) Metronomic (p.35) City of Ghosts (p.22) Monumental: Skiing Q&A Blood Road (p.20) Das Fischer (p.23) Q&A Our National Parks Mitch Mishky (p.78) Skype Q&A (p.35) Q&A The High Five (p.30)

9 p.m. - 11 p.m.

Q&A

American Psychosis (p.17) No Man’s Land (p.36)

6:15 p.m. - 8:15 p.m.

Q&A

The Last Honey Hunter (p.33) Tim Laman and Cheryl Knott (p.73)

3:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

SC HED ULE S AT URDAY


60

8:00 AM 8:15 8:30 8:45 9:00 AM 9:15 9:30 9:45 10:00 AM 10:15 10:30 10:45 11:00 AM 11:15 11:30 11:45 12:00 PM 12:15 12:30 12:45 1:00 PM 1:15 1:30 1:45 2:00 PM 2:15 2:30 2:45 3:00 PM 3:15 3:30

Q&A

Q&A

12:15 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.

American Psychosis (p.17) Keepers of the Future (p.32) Roger Cohen (p.72)

Q&A

12:15 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

12 p.m. - 2 p.m.

NUGGET CAPACITY [160]

Q&A

Albatross (p.17)

12:15 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.

Take Every Wave (p.41) The End of Snow (p.26) Guilt Trip (p.29) 9:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. The Meander (p.35) Risk (p. 46) The Future of Skiing (p. 77)

9:15 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

CAPACITY [230]

SHERIDAN OPERA HOUSE

Waking Dragons (p.43) Doing it Scared (p.25) Into Twin Galaxies Chasing Coral (p.21) (p.31) Erik Weihenmayer Q&A (p.79)

Q&A

The Seed Vault: Preserving Crop Diversity, Forever. (p.40) For Flint (p.27) Water Warriors (p.44) Keepers of the Future (p.32) One Hundred Thousand Beating Hearts (p.37)

NEW NORMAL SHORTS

9:15 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

CAPACITY [500]

CAPACITY [650]

9:15 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

HIGH CAMP

PALM

MASONS CAPACITY [120]

THE OFF-WIDTH LIBRARY CAPACITY [66]

9:45 - 11:45 a.m.

OUT THERE 2 SHORTS

Q&A

Iran: A Skier’s Journey (p.31) Samuel in the Clouds (p.40)

12:30 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.

Q&A

TVA: The New Normal business pitch (p.83)

12:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.

2–4 P.M. (p. 99)

READING FRENZY

Q&A

Denali’s Raven (p.24) My Irnik (p.36) Chocolate Spokes (p.22) Fishpeople (p.26)

ICONOCLAST SHORTS

12:15 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.

116 Cameras (p.16) The Hard Way (p.30) Bayard and Me (p.19) The Highway (p.30) 10:30 - 11:30 a.m. Osama and Ayman’s Brette (p.20) Fourth of July (p.37) North of Known (p.37) Advanced Activism (p. 83) Jonah (p.32) The Convention (p.23) Q&A El Hara (p.25) Zain’s Summer: From Refugee to American Boy (p.46) Brujas (p.21)

WHEN THEY CAME FOR ME SHORTS

9:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

Maximizing the Impact of Your Film (p.83)

9 a.m. - 10 a.m.

8–9 A.M. (p. 92-94)

COFFEE & CONVERSATION

CAPACITY [120]

S C HEDUL E SU N DAY


3:45 4:00 PM 4:15 4:30 4:45 5:00 PM 5:15 5:30 5:45 6:00 PM 6:15 6:30 6:45 7:00 PM 7:15 7:30 7:45 8:00 PM 8:15 8:30 8:45 9:00 PM 9:15 9:30 9:45 10:00 PM 10:15 10:30 10:45 11:00 PM 11:15 11:30 11:45 12:00 AM

4 p.m. - 6 p.m.

Q&A

3:45 p.m. - 6:15 p.m.

BOOZE & BANTER

Q&A

FILMS

Q&A

TBA

9:30 p.m. - 11:30 p.m

PRESENTATIONS & EVENTS

Q&A

TBA

TBA

9 p.m. - 11:30 p.m.

9:15 p.m. - 11:15 p.m.

Q&A

Q&A

TBA

9:15 p.m. - 11:30 p.m.

Q&A

TBA

TBA

Q&A

9:30 p.m. - 11:30 p.m.

9:30 p.m. - 11:30 p.m

Q&A

TBA

9:15 p.m. - 11:15 p.m.

Science in America 4 p.m. - 6 p.m. 4 p.m. - 5 p.m. Neil deGrasse Tyson Bill Nye: Science Guy The Rugby Boys of 4:15 p.m. - 6:15 p.m. 4:15 p.m. - 6:15 p.m. CLIMBING SHORTS Your Roadmap to (p.40) (p.20) Memphis (p.39) Young Guns (p.45) SLOW HANDS SHORTS Water Warriors (p.44) Carbon Neutrality Frans Lanting: The Mammoth (p.34) Freedom of the (p.83) Conservation Telluride Theatre Q&A The Last Honey Hunter Evolution of LIFE (p.27) Wheels: For Matt and Generation (p.22) Presents: Marcellus Adaptation (p.33) Will Every Adventure is Guided (p.28) Shale (p.76) Bangladesh: Sea Level a No Brainer (p.28) Winter’s Watch (p.45) Rise (p.17) Q&A Q&A Lunag Ri (p.34) Wild Harvest: Alaska YEGs (p. 81) Safety Third (p.39) (p.44) Ram Dass: Going Lindsey Ross: A Less Home (p.38) Q&A Convenient Path (p.33) 5:30–6:30 P.M. (p. 96-97) John Shocklee: A Fairy Q&A Tale (p.32) 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Ditch the Van (p.24) 6:45 p.m. - 8:45 p.m. 6:45 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. 6:45 p.m. - 8:45 p.m. Ten Meter Tower A Field Guide to (p.42) ADRENALINE PROGRAM Through the Wall (p.42) 7 p.m. - 9 p.m. 6:45 p.m. 9 p.m. Losing Your Friends 7 p.m. - 9 p.m. (p.50) Blood Road (p.20) City of Ghosts (p.22) Being Here (p.19) (p.16) A Restless Peace (p.18) American Psychosis Yasuni Man (p.45) Q&A Q&A Charged: The Trophy (p.43) (p.17) Eduardo Garcia Story Q&A No Man’s Land (p.36) (p.21)

4 p.m. - 6 p.m.

SC HED ULE SUNDAY


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8:00 AM 8:15 8:30 8:45 9:00 AM 9:15 9:30 9:45 10:00 AM 10:15 10:30 10:45 11:00 AM 11:15 11:30 11:45 12:00 PM 12:15 12:30 12:45 1:00 PM 1:15 1:30 1:45 2:00 PM 2:15 2:30 2:45 3:00 PM 3:15 3:30

An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power (p.31)

11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.

PRESENTATIONS & EVENTS

KIDZ KINO (p.52)

11 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Q&A

9 a.m. - 11 a.m.

An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power (p.31)

9 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.

CAPACITY [500]

CAPACITY [650]

The Perfect Flight (p.38) Fishpeople (p.26)

HIGH CAMP

PALM

FILMS

TBA

9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

CAPACITY [230]

SHERIDAN OPERA HOUSE NUGGET

TBA

9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

CAPACITY [160]

MASONS

9 a.m. - 1 p.m. TBA

CAPACITY [120]

THE OFF-WIDTH LIBRARY CAPACITY [66]

TBA

9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Telluride Town Park (p. 101)

1–4 P.M.

CLOSING PICNIC

TBA

9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

8–9 A.M. (p. 92-94)

COFFEE & CONVERSATION

CAPACITY [120]

S C HEDUL E M O N DAY


THE OFFICIAL WINE OF

TELLURIDE MOUNTAINFILM #EXTREMEWINEMAKING

hand-roasted to order in telluride, co

3:45 4:00 PM 4:15 4:30 4:45 5:00 PM 5:15 5:30 5:45 6:00 PM 6:15 6:30 6:45 7:00 PM 7:15 7:30 7:45 8:00 PM 8:15 8:30 8:45 9:00 PM 9:15 9:30 9:45 10:00 PM 10:15 10:30 10:45 11:00 PM 11:15 11:30 11:45 12:00 AM

thebean.com 1-800-230-BEAN (2326) P R E SE NTATI O NS | E V E N T S | AWA R D S & J U D G E S | B OA R D & D O N O R S | S TA F F | VO L UNTEERS | IN MEMO RIA M | MA PS

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8:00 AM 8:15 8:30 8:45 9:00 AM 9:15 9:30 9:45 10:00 AM 10:15 10:30 10:45 11:00 AM 11:15 11:30 11:45 12:00 PM 12:15 12:30 12:45 1:00 PM 1:15 1:30 1:45 2:00 PM 2:15 2:30 2:45 3:00 PM 3:15 3:30

PRESENTATIONS & EVENTS

Q&A

FILMS

8:45 p.m.-11 p.m.

Ten Meter Tower (page 42) Blood Road (p. 20)

8:45 p.m.-11 p.m.

Q&A

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

Q&A

A Field Guide to Losing Your Friends (p. 16) Charged: The Eduardo Garcia Story (p. 21)

8:45 p.m.-11 p.m.

Q&A

8:45 p.m.-11 p.m.

ADRENALINE PROGRAM (p. 50)

8:45 p.m.-11 p.m.

SUNDAY

PH OTO BY GUS GUSC I O RA

Q&A

HAFE: The Story Behind (p. 29) Dirtbag: The Legend of Fred Beckey (p. 24)

TOWN PARK MAIN STAGE | FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

THURSDAY

The Farthest (p. 26)

WEDNESTAY

BA S E CA MP O UT D O O R T HEAT RE


124 Lawson Pt, Mountain ViLL age This magnificent 5,457 sf home on 1.36 acres has commanding views of the surrounding peaks from every room and is privately located in a cul-de-sac. The spacious open floor plan is perfect for entertaining, and the stone fireplaces provide cozy ambiance. The home’s 5 beds and 7 baths can accommodate the largest of families.

$3,800,000 937 PriMrose Lane, teLLuride Views, views, views! Located on the desirable east end of town on the “sunny side,” this home enjoys spectacular views of Bear Creek, Ingram Falls, and the ski area. The home’s 5 bedrooms and 3.5 baths with an oversized 2-car garage and rooftop deck with hot tub will please the most discriminating buyer.

$2,450,000 Lorian Penthouse 9, Mntn ViLL age Magnificent 5 bedroom, 5.5 bath, 4,720 square foot fully furnished penthouse with two master suites, numerous decks, and one underground parking space. The home’s sleek interior is reminiscent of Danish modern inspiration married perfectly with traditional elements. Amenities include a game room fitness center, hot tub and pool.

$2,900,000

Michael J. Ward, GRI & Lynn K. Ward

970.708.0932 • 970.708.0968 Michael@Telluride-Colorado.com • www.nevasca.com


PR E S ENTAT IO NS

68-70

MOVING MOUNTAINS SYMPOSIUM FOREST WOODWARD

72-81 SPEAKERS

PHOTO TIM LAMAN

82-83 LIBRARY

CHASING CORAL

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S YMPOS I U M

THE NEW NORMAL MOVING MOUNTAINS SYMPOSIUM FRIDAY, 9 A.M.-2:30 P.M., HIGH CAMP

Climate change looms over us, an existential specter, omnipresent and unyielding. Scourges abound, such as the decimation of Western forests by the pine beetle, coral bleaching in the oceans and widespread global disruption. This is The New Normal. But at Mountainfilm, we want The New Normal to be something else. We want The New Normal to be an engaged, committed community (such as, say, the good people reading this), setting a new direction toward carbon neutrality. Our ambitious symposium will delve into the current and future implications of climate change. We’re also going to look closely at solutions, provided by an impressive array of people working assiduously to avert calamity. To that end, we’re particularly excited about guest Garry Charnock, who hails from the British village of Ashton Hayes. In 2006, he spearheaded an audacious initiative for his small town to go carbon 68

neutral. Ashton Hayes has been successful in notably reducing its CO2 while simultaneously increasing the sense of community as everyone works toward this common goal. There’s an enormous opportunity for the Telluride region (and beyond!) to work toward carbon neutrality, but it won’t be easy here because our carbon footprint is twice the national average. This is the time to embrace Telluride’s rich history in innovation and come together around this crucial issue. The 2017 Moving Mountains Symposium will explore how this could happen, but please know that it involves asking the Mountainfilm community — our audience, guests, sponsors and, of course, ourselves — to do more to combat climate change. Let’s rethink the way we live our lives to be more climate friendly. Together, we can have a real and tangible impact on the seminal challenge facing the planet and its people. After all, what do you want The New Normal to be?

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S YMPO SIUM

FOREST WOODWARD

MORNING SESSION: THE CHALLENGE, THE OPPORTUNITY 9 A.M.-12 P.M. Speakers listed in order of appearance.

John Holdren

After serving as President Obama’s senior science and technology adviser for eight years, John Holdren, who holds a Ph.D. in aerospace engineering and theoretical plasma physics from Stanford, continues to work on key climate issues from the perches of Harvard and Woods Hole Science Center. Holdren will present the latest science on climate change and what that portends for the planet’s future.

Joanie Kleypas

Joanie Kleypas is an oceanographer from the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder who focuses on coral reefs and is featured in the film Chasing Coral (page 21). She’ll talk about what she calls “the big trifecta” — warming, ocean acidification and the loss of oxygen — which are major chemical and physical changes that will affect organisms everywhere.

Andrew Jones

An expert on international climate and energy issues, Andrew Jones is a system dynamics modeler, keynote speaker and designer of simulationbased learning environments. As the co-director of Climate Interactive, he focuses on developing energy and impact models that will provide a sensible path forward. His dynamic presentations provide hope for a New Normal that is sustainable and livable.

Scientist Roundtable

Holdren, Kleypas and Jones will discuss the role of science during these tenuous times.

Meghan Kallman

Meghan Kallman is founder of Conceivable Future, an organization that looks at the climate crisis as a reproductive justice issue. Her group poses this question: How do you decide to have a baby when opportunities to lead a healthy and productive life are increasingly jeopardized?

P R E SE NTATI O NS | E V E N T S | AWA R D S & J U D G E S | B OA R D & D O N O R S | S TA FF | VO L UNTEERS | IN MEMO RIA M | MA PS

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S YMPOS I U M

ADAPTATION BANGLADESH: SEA LEVEL RISE

SYMPOSIUM Julia Olson & Avery McRae

Our Children’s Trust is a coalition of bold young people who are suing the federal government over climate change. Julia Olson is the lead attorney and 11-year-old Avery McRae is one of the plaintiffs in this landmark case, which is, so far, working its way through the courts successfully.

1:15-2:30 P.M.

Garry Charnock

Alizé Carérre Alizé Carérre, a former National

Geographic Young Explorer, has researched and reported on innovations in adaptation along the frontlines of the climate crisis in such places as Bangladesh and Nepal.

Alarmed by climate change, Gary Charnock was inspired by his training as a hydrologist and experience as a journalist to start an initiative in his English village of Ashton Hayes called Going Carbon Neutral. The effort has been significant, drawing both international press and queries from around the world. Charnock will discuss a road map to carbon neutrality and explain what Telluride can learn from Ashton Hayes.

James Balog

Adam Chambers

James Balog, a photographer and the star of the essential climate change documentary Chasing Ice, will discuss what he calls “human tectonics.” He’ll share his experiences photographing glacier melt, forest fires and other massive geological forces caused by climate change and explain how what he sees in the field will impact less extreme locations. LUNCH : 12-1:15 P.M. 70

AFTERNOON SESSION: THE ROADMAP TO CARBON NEUTRALITY

Adam Chambers is a climatologist who specializes in soil and now works with the Pinhead Climate Initiative to help bring Telluride to carbon neutrality. He will discuss the program and explain exciting local initiatives.

Telluride’s New Normal Panel

Charnock, Chambers and Mountainfilm’s New Normal Director Rachel Landis will talk about Telluride’s New Normal.

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S P EAKER S

ROGER COHEN

SUNDAY, 12:15 P.M., SHERIDAN OPERA HOUSE

“Humanity seems to be gripped by a kind of mass hypnosis that no force can counter. The resulting movements, like the Crusades or the 17th-century Dutch tulip craze, cannot be controlled. We find ourselves in such a moment,” wrote Roger Cohen in The New York Times last summer in a column called “Trump and the End of Truth.” Cohen, who has been with The New York Times since 1990 — as a foreign correspondent, foreign editor and, most recently, op-ed columnist — has seen collapse and catastrophe, most viscerally in Bosnia during the mid-‘90s, and is applying these experiences to his insightful columns today. Cohen is trying to contextualize what’s happening globally as democracies dissipate and strongmen are once again in vogue. As he wrote, “This looks like the end of a brief interlude that began 72

in 1945. The interlude was relatively peaceful by historical standards. It saw the construction of a rules-based world order undergirded by visceral knowledge of destruction and acute awareness of potential Armageddon.” Cohen’s concern is similar to many other journalists who see truth in disarray all over the world. “Facts are now a quaint hangover from a time of rational discourse, little annoyances easily upended.” In this conversation with festival director David Holbrooke, Cohen, who was born in London and raised in South Africa before becoming a naturalized American, will talk about the disparate global forces that are coming together to destabilize so much of the world in this unnerving time. As he wrote in The New York Times, “Writing into such an environment is like directing a canoe into a gale. Still, here goes, while words still have some meaning.”

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SPEAKERS

TIM LAMAN AND CHERYL KNOTT

SATURDAY, 3:30 P.M., PALM

Tim Laman and Cheryl Knott are not your typical married couple. Laman is a field biologist and wildlife photojournalist whose striking images of spiked-nosed tree frogs, probiscus monkeys and other little-known species have graced the pages of National Geographic many times. His delightful 2013 Mountainfilm presentation on birds of paradise with Edwin Scholes remains a favorite with audiences, and along with birds he’s spent much of his career studying and photographing orangutans.

Knott, meanwhile, is a biological anthropologist, accomplished primatologist and college professor who specializes in great ape behavior. Recently, with their two children in tow, the couple lived and worked in Borneo’s Gunung Palung National Park, one of a diminishing number of orangutan habitats on Earth, where they studied, documented and revealed critical threats to the survival of these compelling animals. Their work is chronicled in Person of the Forest (page 38).

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S P EAKER S

PAUL HAWKEN

SATURDAY, 12:15 P.M., PALM

Author, entrepreneur and public intellectual Paul Hawken was last at Mountainfilm in 2007 to talk about his book Blessed Unrest, which examined the vast, global movement that inspires social and environmental change. That work informed his recent long-awaited effort: Drawdown: The Most Comprehensive Plan Ever Proposed to Reverse Global Warming. Hawken edited the book, working with a wide array of experts to assemble a thoroughly researched compendium of potential solutions to this ultimate threat. In an extension of the symposium, Hawken’s presentation will posit that The New Normal can be a world 74

where we come together to turn back what seems to be an inexorable rise in temperatures across the planet. It’s not easy work, and Hawken recognizes that. “Unquestionably, distress signals are flashing throughout nature and society, from drought, sea level rise and unrelenting increases in temperatures to expanded refugee crises, conflict and dislocation,” he writes. But Hawken is undaunted. “We see global warming not as an inevitability but as an invitation to build, innovate and effect change, a pathway that awakens creativity, compassion and genius.”

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SPEAKERS

SARAH MCNAIR-LANDRY, ERIK BOOMER AND BEN STOOKESBERRY

SATURDAY, 12:15 P.M., HIGH CAMP

As the daughter of Arctic guides who grew up roaming the wilderness of Baffin Island via kite skis and sled dogs, Sarah McNair-Landry was raised on polar exploration. Fittingly, she made the first traverse of the Northwest Passage by snowkite with her brother in 2011. Erik Boomer, meanwhile, is an Idaho native and kayaking hardman known both for running massive whitewater drops and embarking on intrepid expeditions — such as circumnavigating Ellesmere Island in the Canadian Arctic in 2011. And kayaker Ben Stookesberry has made a career of achieving first descents on wild and unexplored

rivers from Colombia to Papua New Guinea; he’s notched 70 first descents in 15 countries. When the three of them put their heads together to hatch an expedition, the result was as epic and far-flung as you might imagine: Attempt to traverse the Greenland Ice Sheet on kite skis before paddling a first descent of a barely known Arctic river. Their journey is the subject of the documentary Into Twin Galaxies (page 31). In this presentation, the trio of explorers will tell the behind-thescenes stories — which include family, frigid water and a trip-threatening injury — that couldn’t fit into the film.

P R E SE NTATI O NS | E V E N T S | AWA R D S & J U D G E S | B OA R D & D O N O R S | S TA FF | VO L UNTEERS | IN MEMO RIA M | MA PS

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S P EAKER S

TELLURIDE THEATRE

SUNDAY, 4:15 P.M., OFF-WIDTH

PHOTO MERRICK CHASE

MITCH MISHKY

SATURDAY, 9:15 P.M., OFF-WIDTH

Pinball wizard, bus driver and emcee extraordinaire, Mitch Mishky has been involved in odd jobs and weird adventures as long as he can remember. He is Telluride’s trivia host, stargazing guide and voice of The Ride Festival. He is lead dance commander for the band Spacegunner, and he has appeared onstage in such memorable performances as Dr. Frank N. Furter in Telluride Theatre’s rendition of “Rocky Horror Picture Show.” In 2016, he left Telluride for a traveling gig with Weber, teaching people how to grill, and ended up on an unexpected and whirlwind adventure to Iceland. He will recount the journey in a theatrical monologue.

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Hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” has proved divisive in communities from northern Colorado to New York state. This special stage work by Telluride Theatre plumbs the depths of those divides and examines the stories of people living on lands affected by resource extraction. Telluride Theatre is a community theater company that formed in 2011 when the avante-garde SquidShow Theatre merged with the longrunning Telluride Repertory Theatre. The small, scrappy and innovative company produces a year-round slate of theatrical treasures for Telluride audiences: musicals, original works, comedies, educational pieces, Shakespeare and burlesque shows. For this special Mountainfilm performance, Telluride Theatre Executive Director Colin Sullivan and Artistic Director Sasha Sullivan partnered with Paul Zimet and Ellen Maddow of renowned New York Citybased company Talking Band for an original play that blends activism with live stage art. In “Marcellus Shale,” a rural community confronts the effects of fracking as it transforms the landscape and divides friends and families. Directed by Sasha Sullivan, this music-theater work is inspired by interviews with people living on the Marcellus Shale formation, as well as Dostoevsky’s “The Demons.” Not suitable for children.

WEL C OME | SP O NSO R S | C O NTE NT S | FE S T I VA L T I P S | O U R M I S S I O N | W H AT ’S N E W | FIL MS | S C HED ULE


SPEAKERS

PHOTO KATIE KLINGSPORN

THE FUTURE OF SKIING

SUNDAY, 9:15 A.M., SHERIDAN OPERA HOUSE

Telluride has fueled its culture and economy by being a ski town for more than four decades, but what would happen if there was no snow? This year, the resort had a big snow year, but only after it opened late because of warm temperatures. It also experienced repeated instances of winter rain — something that used to be extremely rare. The concept of a ski area whose snow has vanished is explored in the film Samuel in the Clouds (page 40), which looks at Chalcataya in Bolivia, formerly the world’s highest ski resort, rendered dusty and barren when a glacier melted in 2009. The Future of Skiing will examine the bleak consequences posed to the sport by climate change and

attempt to understand what can be done. We’ve assembled a dynamic and influential lineup of speakers that includes Auden Schendler from Aspen Ski Company and the snow sports advocacy group Protect Our Winters, Telluride Ski Resort CEO Bill Jensen, OpenSnow climatologist Joel Gratz, head of the Colorado Outdoor Recreation Industry Office Luis Benitez, pro skier and activist Angel Collinson and pro snowboarder Jeremy Jones, who founded Protect Our Winters. Skiers have not often been known as advocates, but it’s up to this vibrant community to better understand the issues and work toward a solution — so we can all continue to shred.

P R E SE NTATI O NS | E V E N T S | AWA R D S & J U D G E S | B OA R D & D O N O R S | S TA FF | VO L UNTEERS | IN MEMO RIA M | MA PS

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S P EAKER S

FLORENCE WILLIAMS

SATURDAY, 9:15 A.M., SHERIDAN OPERA HOUSE

With a string of long-form articles on such topics as forest bathing, the effects of natural fractal patterns on our brains, the science of negative sounds and the benefits of nature for kids with ADHD, Florence Williams is a leading nature writer who works at the intersection of health, science and the environment. She is a contributing editor at Outside magazine, and her work has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, Mother Jones and Slate. Her first book, the 2012 Breasts: A Natural and Unnatural History, received the Los Angeles Times Book Prize in science and technology. Recently, she traveled around the

78

world — from forest trails in Korea to American deserts and islands in Finland — on a quest to investigate the science behind nature and well-being. The results became the foundation for her new book, The Nature Fix: Why Nature Makes Us Happier, Healthier and More Creative, an illuminating read for anyone who’s ever wondered why it feels so good to take a walk in the woods. Measurements of everything from stress hormones to heart rate to brain waves, she writes, indicate that when we spend time in green space, “there is something profound going on.”

WEL C OME | SP O NSO R S | C O NTE NT S | FE S T I VA L T I P S | O U R M I S S I O N | W H AT ’S N E W | FIL MS | S C HED ULE


SPEAKERS

ERIK WEIHENMAYER

SUNDAY, 12:15 P.M., HIGH CAMP

Erik Weihenmayer is a consummate adventurer: He has stood atop Mount Everest, climbed the Seven Summits and kayaked the entire 277-mile length of the Grand Canyon. And he’s done it all blind — Weihenmayer lost his sight as a teenager in Connecticut after being struck by retinoschisis. From the beginning, though, he resisted the notion that blindness would sideline him. Weihenmayer wrestled as a high school student, began rock climbing and soon got into alpinism. His accomplishments

in the outdoor realm have followed a deep belief in shattering barriers that also led him to found an organization and movement called No Barriers. His mission is to help people with challenges turn into the storm of life, face barriers head on, embrace a pioneering and innovative spirit, and team up with great people to live rich in meaning. Today, Weihenmayer is a soughtafter public speaker and the author of eight books, including No Barriers, which came out this spring.

P R E SE NTATI O NS | E V E N T S | AWA R D S & J U D G E S | B OA R D & D O N O R S | S TA FF | VO L UNTEERS | IN MEMO RIA M | MA PS

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S P EAKERS

CAMERON KRUSE

YEGs

SUNDAY, 3:45 P.M., SHERIDAN OPERA HOUSE

Through its Young Explorers Grants (YEG) program, National Geographic Society has launched the career of many a photographer, explorer, researcher and bright young mind. Each year, Mountainfilm brings a handful of these “YEGs” to the festival for presentations and exhibits. The 2017 crop includes: Chris A. Johns is a photographer and Ph.D. candidate at the University of Florida who has spent recent years prowling the thick cloud forests of Hawaii in search of Philodoria, a tiny and little-known moth endemic to the island state. Johns aims to document, study and create a family tree of these highly adapted moths, which are threatened by a critical loss of the plant they eat. Through the grueling work, Johns has already identified several species new to science. As the daughter of former National Geographic editor in chief Chris Johns, taking pictures was probably in Louise Johns’ DNA. But she didn’t consider herself a photographer until she took a photojournalism class in college and was subsequently inspired to document the changing landscapes of the West while working as a wrangler on a Montana ranch. In her project, “Harmony in a Montana Conflict Zone: Riding Range on a Yellowstone Borderline,” she reveals the changing relationship between ranchers and nature by chronicling range rider, wildlife biologist and mother Hilary Anderson. 80

Stretching from Manali to Srinagar in the north of India, like a necklace across the Himalaya Mountains, is the highest-altitude road in the world. Each year, pummeled by landslides, avalanches and flooding, the road is reconstructed. But, with a new tunnel scheduled to be completed, that will soon change. Explorer Cameron Kruse’s project, “A Road Among Clouds,” will document the people, places and stories behind the final reconstruction using images, social media and film. Michael O. Snyder is part of a team working on a project titled “America’s Eroding Edges,” which travels to the margins of the United States’ territory, where the rim of American identity meets the edge of rising oceans. From Alaska to Guam, the American Samoa and the Northern Mariana Islands, the team is chronicling the citizens who have been largely cropped out of America’s climate change portrait. Prior to his work on this project, Snyder hiked the Appalachian and John Muir trails, rode the TransSiberian Railway and cycled more than 3,000 miles across Europe.

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PHOTO ©TOwn Of MOunTain Village

TMVOA is proud to be a sponsor of Mountainfilm in Telluride

TMVOA is the funding source of the gondola, Dial-A-Ride, Sunset Concert Series and other events that help make Mountain Village the special place that it is. Visit www.tmvoa.org for more information.

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S P EAKER S

PHOTO ERIC MOORE

THE LIBRARY

All workshops, presentations and events at the Library are free to the public after passholders are seated.

USING VR FOR ADVOCATING & STORYTELLING SATURDAY, 9:15-10:45 A.M.

Sarah Steele, VR program manager for Google, hosts an interactive session with filmmakers Jeff Orlowski (Chasing Coral, page 21), Fitz Cahall (Bears Ears, page 47) and Lindsay Branham (Behind the Wall, page 47), who all have VR projects featured at this year’s festival, about how to use the latest technology to tell stories and advocate for important issues.

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FIRST AMENDMENT ISSUES FOR FILMMAKERS SATURDAY, 11:30 A.M.-12:30 P.M.

The First Amendment is under attack from the highest level in this country, and documentarians need to understand the new landscape. Deia Schlosberg is a filmmaker who faced 45 years in prison after being arrested while filming a pipeline protest. Attorney Edward Klaris is an expert on legal issues surrounding documentary filmmaking. They will talk about legal rights — and landmines — of the medium.

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SPEAKERS WORKS IN PROGRESS: BLIND KAYAKING, CLIMATE JUSTICE & GRAND TRANSECT

ADVANCED ACTIVISM

SATURDAY, 1-2:30 P.M.

People are energized like never before to protest, write letters and otherwise stand up for their political beliefs, but what if you want to go further and engage in civil disobedience? Climate activist Tim DeChristopher (star of Bidder 70), who went to federal prison for his protest in December 2008, will lead a workshop on advanced activist strategies and the subsequent implications for those willing to stand tall in this current political climate.

The journey of making a film can sometimes be as dramatic as the film itself. Meet several filmmakers currently on that odyssey. Michael Brown’s film Dark Canyon chronicles the incredible story of blind kayaker Erik Weihenmayer (page 79) paddling down the Grand Canyon. Christi Cooper is shooting a film about a group of children suing the federal government over climate change. And Pete McBride is chronicling the arduous transect of the Grand Canyon he completed with Kevin Fedarko.

ART & ADVOCACY SATURDAY 3-4 P.M.

In today’s political climate, artists are using their medium as a platform for protest in unprecedented ways. Aaron Huey, executive director of The Amplifier Foundation (page 88); artist Justin Brice Guariglia (page 89); photographer and activist Richard Vevers (Chasing Coral, page 21) and directors Paul Zimet and Ellen Maddow, who wrote the play “Marcellus Shale” (page 76) — will discuss art as a crucial vessel for political statement.

MAXIMIZING THE IMPACT OF YOUR FILM SUNDAY, 9-10 A.M.

Making a film is always challenging, but today there are more resources available to filmmakers than ever. Veteran filmmaker Doug Block, who founded the documentary blog The D-Word, will discuss resources for filmmakers navigating the tricky waters of filmmaking. Ted Richane, who works on outreach and impact for Vulcan Productions (Racing Extinction and other documentaries), will focus on how filmmakers can best position their completed project to maximize impact.

SUNDAY, 10:30-11:30 A.M.

TVA: THE NEW NORMAL BUSINESSES PITCH SUNDAY, 12:30-1:45 P.M.

Telluride Venture Accelerator, a Telluride incubator program for startup businesses, has selected three businesses that embody The New Normal for a special Mountainfilm pitch event. Representatives from each business will give a short presentation on their innovative ideas to an audience that will include potential investors.

THE ROADMAP TO CARBON NEUTRALITY SUNDAY, 4-5 P.M.

As the Environmental Center Coordinator at Fort Lewis College, Rachel Landis is an expert on community organizing and engaging citizens in meaningful action. Mountainfilm would know: She shepherded this year’s New Normal initiative. Here, she will lead a workshop for people motivated to shrink their own carbon footprints, laying out a manageable roadmap toward carbon neutrality.

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114 East Colorado Avenue Telluride, Colorado Ri ckT opper|9702615877 www. cpcneut ek. com 84

rusticoristorante.com

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EVENT S

86-89 GALLERY WALK

SHEPARD FAIREY

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READING FRENZY PHOTO ERIC MOORE

92-96 TOWN TALKS

PHOTO GUS GUSCIORA

98-101 SPECIAL EVENTS PHOTO MERRICK CHASE

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EV ENT S JEN BUCK

GALLERY WALK

Opening Reception Friday, 3:30-6:30 p.m.

A vibrant social event that takes place in various venues and galleries, the Gallery Walk is Mountainfilm’s unofficial kickoff to Friday night. Artists will be on hand to speak about their exhibits, and the work will remain on display throughout the weekend.

81435

AH H AA E AS T

DEREK ELAND

JEN BUCK

SATURDAY AND SUNDAY, 9 A.M.-4 P.M.; MONDAY, 9 A.M.-1 P.M.

SATURDAY-MONDAY, 9:30 A.M.-5:30 P.M.

In 2016, U.K.-based artist Derek Eland hiked to Everest Base Camp. Unlike the rest of the crowd, though, he wasn’t part of a climbing expedition. As Everest’s first artist-in-residence, he built a confessional-style diary room and spent two months collecting stories from the climbers, cooks, Sherpas, doctors and porters passing through. The result: tales from hundreds of people representing 25 countries and 12 languages. Eland has paired a selection of these stories with images from Everest to create an intimate portrait of life on the world’s highest mountain. 86

A fragment of rainbow imprinted above a stormy sea, tidy sets of waves rolling toward shore, a surfer on a moonlight mission under the stars. The photographs of Santa Barbara, California-based surfer Jen Buck transport viewers to watery worlds where lines are fluid, skies are canvases and the surf’s always up. For Buck, who lived in Telluride before moving to the coast, the fusion of surfing and photography is more than a hobby or job — it’s a lifestyle.

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EV ENT S

RENAN OZTUK

AH HAA F OYER

TH E B UT C H E R & T H E BA K E R

GALEN ROWELL RETROSPECTIVE

FACES OF REFUGEES

SATURDAY-MONDAY, 9:30 A.M.-5:30 P.M.

SATURDAY, 7 A.M.-9 P.M.; SUNDAY, 8 A.M.-2 P.M.; MONDAY, 7 A.M.-4 P.M.

Galen Rowell was a prolific wilderness and adventure photographer whose prowess behind the lens was matched only by his appetite for climbing and exploration. During the course of his life and career, he authored 17 large-format books, published in a variety of magazines, traveled from Nepal to Patagonia and put up numerous first ascents. Fifteen years after his death in a plane crash in California at age 61, Mountainfilm celebrates his life with a retrospective of his work.

AH HAA WES T NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC YOUNG EXPLORERS

As the producer of Mountainfilm, Stash Wislocki is in charge of the behind-the-scenes work that keeps the festival running. He is also a filmmaker who traveled to the Kakuma Refugee Camp in 2012 for a gig with the nonprofit FilmAid. There, he took portraits of hundreds of children hailing from war-torn or conflicted countries, such as Iran, Somalia, Syria, Iraq, Sudan and Yemen — the same countries that would fall under President Trump’s attempted travel ban. The specter of the ban inspired him to create this collection called “Faces of Refugees.”

SATURDAY-MONDAY, 9:30 A.M.-5:30 P.M.

Each year, Mountainfilm hosts a handful of National Geographic Young Explorers for presentations and exhibits: The work of Chris A. Johns, Louise Johns, Cameron Kruse and Michael O. Snyder will fill the Ah Haa’s West Gallery. (Read more about the Young Explorers on page 81.) P R E SE NTATI O NS | E V E N T S | AWA R D S & J U D G E S | B OA R D & D O N O R S | S TA F F | VO L UNTEERS | IN MEMO RIA M | MA PS

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EV ENT S

GALLERY WALK

H I GH CAMP

G HOS T T OWN - OUT S ID E

SATURDAY-SUNDAY, 9 A.M.-11 P.M.; MONDAY 9 A.M.-1 P.M.

SHEPARD FAIREY SATURDAY, 7 A.M.-6 P.M.; SUNDAY, 8 A.M.-6 P.M.; MONDAY, 7 A.M.-6 P.M.

As founder of Obey clothing and creator of iconic images, such as the Barack Obama “Hope” poster, Shepard Fairey is one of America’s most prominent and influential street artists. The graphic designer, activist and illustrator is also a partner artist with The Amplifier Foundation, which is dedicated to amplifying the voices of grassroots movements through art and community engagement. Through this partnership comes the installation of a Fairey mural on the wall adjacent to Ghost Town with free prints offered on the patio (or inside in the case of bad weather).

G HOS T T OWN - IN S IDE LEIGHAN FALLEY SATURDAY, 7 A.M.-6 P.M.; SUNDAY, 8 A.M.-6 P.M.; MONDAY, 7 A.M.-6 P.M.

Leighan Falley is a Talkeetna, Alaskabased commercial pilot, mother, guide, alpinist and the subject of Denali’s Raven (page 24). She is also an artist whose paintings depict her intimate relationship with mountains. From sweeping representations of glaciated valleys to casual sketches of peaks under the moon, her work evokes the many moods of mountains: harsh and unforgiving, serene and expansive, dynamic and alive.

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RICHARD VEVERS As a former advertising executive in London turned ocean conservationist, Richard Vevers combines his talents of effective communication and stunning underwater photography for a good cause: to convey the urgent, alarming and wide-reaching effects of coral bleaching to a global population. He’s spent years documenting coral reefs around the globe, even as they are ravaged by bleaching events, and is a subject of Chasing Coral (page 21).

L A C O CI N A D E L U Z STEPHEN DUPONT SATURDAY-MONDAY, 7:30 A.M.-9 P.M.

Australian-born photographer Stephen Dupont has never shied away from dark subjects. From wars in Afghanistan and Rwanda to funerals in Sri Lanka and famine in Angola, he’s created hauntingly beautiful images of human conflict, fragile cultures and marginalized peoples, all while managing to capture the dignity of his subjects. He is the subject of A Restless Peace (page 18).

MI XX RENAN OZTURK SATURDAY-MONDAY, 11 A.M.-6 P.M.

Renan Ozturk is many things: accomplished expedition climber, talented landscape artist and awardwinning filmmaker. In the spring of 2016, he traveled with a team to Nepal to capture a story of the last honey hunters — men braving steep cliffs and angry swarms of bees to collect mind-altering honey in a mythsteeped tradition that’s now in peril. These images, set to be published in National Geographic, accompany The Last Honey Hunter (page 33).

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EV ENT S

LINDSEY ROSS

OU T S IDE

TELLURIDE GALLERY OF FINE AR T

TIM LAMAN

JUSTIN BRICE GUARIGLIA

Wildlife photojournalist Tim Laman’s stunning photos — of ornate birds of paradise, delicate tree frogs, psychedelic-colored mantis shrimps and more — have graced the pages of many issues of National Geographic. Along with his wife, biological anthropologist Cheryl Knott, and their children, Laman recently worked in the canopies of Borneo researching and photographing orangutans.

SATURDAY, 10 A.M.-6 P.M.; SUNDAY AND MONDAY, 12-6 P.M.

SL ATE GRAY G ALLE RY THE NEW NORMAL, A GROUP SHOW SATURDAY-MONDAY, 10 A.M.-6 P.M.

What is The New Normal of environmental justice, weather behavior and island life? Three Mountainfilm artists delve into these questions in this special group show. It will features work by The Amplifier Foundation, an organization led by artist Aaron Huey that’s dedicated to amplifying the voices of grassroots movements through art and community engagement; Danny Schmidt, a filmmaker who has captured images of climate change in action during floods and fires; and Forest Woodward, who is chronicling the lives of children on the frontlines of rising seas in the island nation of Tuvalu.

New York City-based Justin Brice Guariglia is a transdisciplinary artist who explores landscape and ecology through the lens of politics, culture, science, journalism, mythology and history. He uses scale and materials to forge new ways of experiencing the world around us, and much of his work has explored the Anthropocene. He will be collaborating and flying with the NASA/JPL Oceans Melting Greenland mission through 2020.

TE L L UR I D E A R T S H Q LINDSEY ROSS, ARTIST-IN-RESIDENCE SATURDAY-MONDAY, 9:30 A.M.-5:30 P.M

2017 Mountainfilm artist-in-residence Lindsey Ross specializes in wet plate collodion — an old, slow photographic process that entails the use of a hulking camera, a portable darkroom and the hand-coating and exposing of large glass prints. The result: one-of-akind, black-and-white images imbued with care and rustic authenticity. For this exhibit, Ross spent much of May capturing photos of Telluride and its surroundings.

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Celebrating stories that inspire change.

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VulcanProductions.com

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PHOTO: BEN MOON

Mountainfilm on Tour travels year-round and worldwide with a selection of current and best-loved films from the annual festival in Telluride. Through the tour, we reach over 70,000 people each year, including over 20,000 students with our free, K-12 public education screenings. Catch us on the road or contact us to find out how you can bring Mountainfilm to your town. See our tour locations at mountainfilm.org/tour

YEAR-ROUND

WORLDWIDE

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T OW N TA L K S PHOTO SARAH SCHWAB

COFFEE TALKS

Saturday, Sunday and Monday, 8 a.m.-9:15 a.m.

LOCATIONS/HOSTS #1 AH HAA WEST/ TOM SHADYAC

#5 HOTEL TELLURIDE/ CARA PALLONE/LAURA COLBERT

#2 AH HAA EAST/ ANNA BRONES #3 CHRIST CHURCH UPSTAIRS/ ABE STREEP #4 CHRIST CHURCH DOWNSTAIRS/ STEPHANIE JOYCE

#6 MOUNTAIN LODGE TELLURIDE / ALEC JACOBSON #7 BLACK IRON AT MADELINE HOTEL/ CAITLIN KETEL

SATURDAY #1

SLOW HANDS AND THE SIMPLE LIFE

In our ultra-fast-paced society, slowing down, starting from scratch and doing things the old-fashioned way is rare. Not so for off-the-grid farmers and film subjects Jon and Suzy Muir (Suzy and the Simple Man, page 41) and wet plate collodion photographer and Mountainfilm artist-in-residence Lindsey Ross (page 89). They will talk about the value of slow, simple and strippeddown.

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#2

ON THE EDGE TO GET THE SHOT

National Geographic photographer Pete McBride has trudged across arid deltas and walked the length of The Grand Canyon for projects. Krystle Wright, star of The Mysteries (Mountainfilm 2016), spent over four years chasing a single BASE jumping shot after it came to her in a dream. And filmmaker and photographer Marcus Haney (No Cameras Allowed, Mountainfilm 2015) has been hospitalized at least once while trying to capture an image. They’ll discuss the risks that come with nailing the perfect shot.

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T O W N TALK S

PHOTO ERIC MOORE

#3

ONE ON ONE WITH JOHN HOLDREN

Harvard professor and Woods Hole Research Center advisor John Holdren worked as President Barack Obama’s chief adviser on science and technology issues for eight years, making him the longest-serving presidential science adviser in U.S. history. He will talk about why science is an essential ingredient in good government. #4

YOU CAN’T HANDLE THE TRUTH

When you’re an expert on the dire conditions humans face with climate change, how do you incorporate that knowledge into your own life and conversations? Climate Interactive Director Drew Jones, climate attorney Julia Olson and ecosystems scientist Steve Running, a former board member for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, will explore this thorny issue. #5

VALLEY FLOOR — 10 YEARS OF OPEN SPACE

It’s been 10 years since Valley Floor Preservation Partners and Town of Telluride raised $50 million to purchase the Valley Floor — 570 acres of river corridor and rolling meadows on Telluride’s doorstep — to preserve in perpetuity as open space. Telluride locals Hilary Cooper, Chris Hazen

and Jane Hickcox, who have been closely involved in the Valley Floor story, will talk about the first decade of Forever Wild. #6

RUNNING FOR CHANGE

#7

THE WORLD BENEATH THE WAVES

One of the most effective avenues for making change is to run for local office. Arlene Burns, former Mountainfilm festival director and current mayor of Mosier, Oregon; Kim Stone, who was elected to the Highland Park, Illinois, city council in 2013; Meghan Kallman, city councilor in Providence, Rhode Island (and founder of Conceivable Future); Chris Arndt, author of The Right’s Road to Serfdom; and San Miguel County Commissioner Joan May will talk about the challenges, and importance, of running for office. Open-water swimmer Lynne Cox (Fishpeople, page 26), surfer and filmmaker Keith Malloy (Fishpeople, page 26) and underwater photographer Zack Rago (Chasing Coral, page 21) have all spent significant time exploring, playing or working in the ocean. They’ll discuss the lure of the wild world under the waves and the alarming changes oceans are undergoing.

P R E SE NTATI O NS | E V E N T S | AWA R D S & J U D G E S | B OA R D & D O N O R S | S TA FF | VO L UNTEERS | IN MEMO RIA M | MA PS

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T OW N TA L K S

COFFEE TALKS

SUNDAY

CAN NATURE HEAL?

#1

Author Florence Williams (page 78) traveled the world to research claims that nature is salubrious for her book The Nature Fix. Film subject Tyler Dunning (A Field Guide To Losing Your Friends, page 16) experienced nature’s healing firsthand when visiting every national park helped him recover from the loss of his best friend. And Cheryl Strayed, bestselling author of Wild, found solace from grief when she hiked the Pacific Crest Trail. They will discuss the hard and soft evidence of nature’s healing powers. #2

CLIMATE: CAN BUSINESSES LEAD THE WAY?

Businesses are emerging in surprising ways as champions in the climate fight, but can they do more? Amy Roberts, the executive director of the Outdoor Industry Association; Lisa Pike Sheehy, Patagonia’s vice president of environmental activism; and Tom Peters, who has written numerous books about how businesses can operate better in all facets, will discuss what roles conscientious companies can play in the climate crisis. #3

THE SAGEBRUSH REBELLION

Across the Western United States, a right-wing militia movement has been on the rise in recent years as its members protest the federal government, demand public land be handed back to the people and stage occupations. David Byars, director of No Man’s Land (page 36), and film subject and Montana journalist Hal Herring (No Man’s Land, page 36) will talk about the fallout and future of the insurrection. #4

THE OCEAN IN THE ANTHROPOCENE

The ocean is showing the effects of plastic pollution and climate change in drastic ways, but is it a case of out 94

of sight, out of mind? Filmmaker Chris Jordan (Albatross, page 17), underwater photographer Richard Vevers (Chasing Coral, page 21) and ocean scientist Joanie Kleypas (Chasing Coral, page 21) discuss the alarming changes they’ve seen in ocean habitats and the challenge of getting the world to care. #5

SCIENCE UNDER THREAT

#6

TAKING THE FAMILY INTO THE FIELD

#7

SPACE: A DREAM DEFERRED?

With funding and support for science threatened under the new administration, many fret about the future of governmental research, environmental regulations, education and space programs. Lauren Kurtz of the Climate Science Defense Fund; Justin Brice Guariglia, an artist who has worked with NASA (page 89); and Jason Sussberg, director of Bill Nye: Science Guy (page 20), discuss the perils. National Geographic wildlife photographer Tim Laman and primatologist Cheryl Knott (page 73) recently lived and worked in Borneo’s Gunung Palung National Park, where they researched and documented orangutans living in the park’s canopies. The couple brought their two children along, as they have on many field assignments. They’ll deliberate the risks and rewards of taking family into the field. The United States has put a man on the moon, orbited the Earth from space and sent a man-made probe into interstellar space, where it continues to travel today. But what is the future for U.S. space travel? Planetary scientists and film subjects Fran Bagenal and Candy Hansen (both of The Farthest, page 26) will discuss their extraordinary work and look to what lies ahead.

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T O W N TALK S

MONDAY #1

MOVIE STARS

What’s it like to be the subject of a documentary film as crews film your life and, later, when your story goes public? Previous Mountainfilm guests and film subjects Johnnie Jameson (Mile 19), Tom Voss (Almost Sunrise) and Harold Mintz (1-800-Give-MeYour-Kidney) talk about how their lives changed after films about them premiered at Mountainfilm in 2016. #2

VANISHING TRADITIONS

With technology and its brother-inarms modernity permeating even the most remote locales on Earth, ancient languages, rites and traditions are vanishing. Ben Ayers of the dZi Foundation and director Ben Knight documented one such threatened rite in their film The Last Honey Hunter (page 33). Director Ryan Killackey chronicled a culture and environment on the brink in Yasuni Man (page 45). They’ll discuss what, if anything, can be done to turn the tide. #3

A DANGEROUS WORLD

Roger Cohen (page 72) has worked for The New York Times for more than two decades as a foreign correspondent, editor and columnist. For the past year, he’s written incisive columns about the disturbing trend toward authoritarianism across the globe. Bob Baer is a current CNN contributor and former CIA agent who worked extensively in the Middle East. Together they will discuss the great unsettling that’s happening globally. #4

MUSIC MONDAY

The tradition continues as Mountainfilm invites its musically inclined friends and guests to gather for an hour of song and celebration. Join Mountainfilm musician-in-residence and cellist Ben Sollee (Ditch the Van, page 24),

SHEL guitarist Sarah Holbrook and longtime festival friend Peter Yarrow for this special musical interlude. #5

LOCAL CLIMATE SOLUTIONS

#6

MOVIES WITH A MISSION

#7

CLIMATE CHANGE AND ADAPTATION

Climate change seems insurmountable, but there are ways to start small, shrink your footprint and organize a local movement for positive change. Garry Charnock, who spearheaded an effort in his own U.K. village to become carbon neutral (page 70); Rachel Landis, the coordinator at Fort Lewis College’s Environmental Center; and Adam Chambers, a scientist working with the newly minted Pinhead Climate Institute in Telluride, will talk about tackling the issue on a local level. You’ve made a film about a crucial issue with the hope that it will have an impact. Now what? Jeff Orlowski, director of Chasing Coral (page 21); Pedro Kos, director of Bending the Arc (page 19); Louie Schwartzberg, who has made several nature documentaries; and Geralyn Dreyfous of Impact Partners talk about challenges and strategies to turn documentaries into changemaking vehicles. In locations around the world, humans are coming up with ingenious ways to adapt to climate change — because they’re on the frontlines and have no choice or because they want to be part of solving the greatest threat humankind has ever faced. Cultural anthropologist Alizé Carrére (page 70), earth systems scientist Max Holmes and photographer Forest Woodward (page 89) will discuss some of the more innovative projects and adaptations they’ve encountered.

P R E SE NTATI O NS | E V E N T S | AWA R D S & J U D G E S | B OA R D & D O N O R S | S TA FF | VO L UNTEERS | IN MEMO RIA M | MA PS

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T OW N TA L K S

BOOZE & BANTER

LOCATIONS/HOSTS #1 THE LIBERTY BAR/ SARAH HOLBROOKE #2 SMUGGLER’S BREW PUB/ BOYD MATSON

Saturday and Sunday, 5:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m.

SATURDAY Colorado is poised to become an innovator in working toward a more sustainable future when it comes to climate change. Auden Schendler, vice-president of sustainability at Aspen Ski Company; Julie Duvall, who works for the state’s U.S. Senator Michael Bennett; and climatologist Adam Chambers discuss how Colorado can lead the way. #2

OUTSIDE MAGAZINE TURNS 40

#3

INTO THE UNKNOWN

Outside holds a singular place in the adventure world as a magazine that has introduced us to countless larger-than-life characters and almost as many great writers. Outside’s contributing editors Peter FrickeWright (host of Outside Podcast), Florence Williams (page 78) and Abe Streep join executive editor Axie Navas to talk about what adventure means as the magazine enters its fifth decade.

Though Earth is well explored by now, there are still places surrounded by mystery. Film subject and Arctic explorer Sarah McNair-Landry (Into Twin Galaxies, page 31), film subject and paraglider Gavin McClurg (North of Known, page 37), and film subject and expedition kayaker Ben Stookesberry (Into Twin Galaxies, page 31) recount their experiences from launching into the unknown. 96

SUNDAY

COLORADO AS A CLIMATE LEADER

#1

#3 BLACK IRON AT MADELINE HOTEL/ TIMMY O’NEILL

#1

SNOWPACK SOS

#2

REMEMBERING UELI STECK

#3

THE ULTIMATE DIRTBAG CLIMBER

How is climate change affecting snowpack around the world? Veteran and professional snow-sport athletes Jeremy Jones, Angel Collinson, Hilaree O’Neill, Mike Douglas and Sierra Quitiquit will talk about The New Normal they’re experiencing in the mountains and what we can do about it. The world lost one of its greatest alpinists when Ueli Steck fell to his death on 25,791-foot Nuptse on March 30, 2017. The 40 year old, who was featured in past Mountainfilm documentaries Swiss Machine and High Tension, was training for a route up Everest when the tragedy took place. Fellow climbers Conrad Anker and Mike Libecki, along with film director Zac Barr, will talk about Steck’s career and legacy, as well as their perspectives on how top-flight alpinists deal with risk. Film subject Fred Beckey (Dirtbag: The Legend of Fred Beckey, page 24) is a pioneer of climbing who’s put up countless first ascents in the 80 years he’s been at it. He also epitomizes the archetype of dirtbag climber. Host Timmy O’Neill will talk with Beckey and Dirtbag director Dave O’Leske about Beckey’s lifelong obsession and many achievements on rock.

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READ IN G FRENZY

PHOTO GUS GUSCIORA

READING FRENZY Sunday, 2-4 p.m. Hotel Madeline Ballroom in Mountain Village

Between the Covers Bookstore — Telluride’s beloved purveyor of books — moves up to Hotel Madeline Sunday afternoon for a celebration of Mountainfilm authors who will sign and sell their books. It’s a bookworm’s dream come true. Featured authors will include: Conrad Anker Jenni Lowe Anker Christopher Arndt James Balog Fred Beckey Anna Brones Anne Charnock Craig Childs Roger Cohen Lynne Cox

Kelly Cordes Tyler Dunning Derek Eland Scott Fitzgerald Paul Hawken Hal Herring Ginny Hicks Tim Laman Brendan Leonard Luke Mehall

Tom Peters Rebecca Rusch Jason Russell Auden Schendler Tom Shadyac Barry Shaffer Ben Sollee (selling CDs) Erik Weihenmayer Florence Williams

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S P ECIAL E V E N T S

FREE-RANGE PROGRAMS SATURDAY THROUGH MONDAY

Mountainfilm inspires people to get outside, and to honor that tradition we offer Free-Range Programs — events centered around the abundant forests, trails and landscapes of Telluride. Passholders and the general public can sign up for these free events, if applicable, at Hospitality (112 E. Colorado Avenue), beginning Thursday, May 26. Rain or shine!

STARGAZING WITH THE VOYAGER SCIENTISTS FRIDAY, 9:45 P.M. MEET AT ST. SOPHIA GONDOLA STATION

Following the screening of The Farthest (page 26), join planetary scientists and film subjects Fran Bagenal and Candy Hansen — members of the team that launched the Voyager space probe mission — for an evening of planet gazing above Telluride. Local amateur astronomer Mitch Mishky (page 76) will lead the event.

CLIMATE CHANGE TREE WALK SATURDAY, 11 A.M. MEET AT HOSPITALITY

What will these mountain landscapes look like in 100 years? Climate scientists Steve Running and Richard Waring will attempt to answer that question on a nature hike by observing how subtle differences in climate are reshaping vegetation, particularly with trees. Participants should wear sturdy shoes and bring warm layers.

OLD-STYLE PHOTOGRAPHS WITH LINDSEY ROSS SATURDAY, 4:30 P.M. MEET AT HOSPITALITY

2017 Mountainfilm artist-in-residence Lindsey Ross (page 89) specializes in wet plate collodion photography — an unwieldy and time-consuming 19th century method that produces 98

incredible black-and-white images. Join Ross on a short walk to one of her favorite spots in Telluride, where she’ll talk about the process and make a series of portraits. Materials are expensive, so there will be a $250 fee for an 8x11 artwork, but it’s free if you just want to walk and watch.

A NATURE FIX WITH FLORENCE WILLIAMS SUNDAY, 10 A.M. MEET AT HOSPITALITY

As the author of The Nature Fix, 2017 Mountainfilm presenter Florence Williams (page 78) has done extensive research on the physiological benefits nature has on human health. In this program, participants can put the theories to the test by getting blood pressure readings and other health measurements before and after a session of full immersion in the outdoors.

A VALLEY FLOOR MEANDER SUNDAY, 12 P.M. MEET AT SHERIDAN OPERA HOUSE PARK

On this 10th anniversary of the acquisition of the Valley Floor as open space in perpetuity, take a hike with Hilary Cooper, Chris Hazen and Max Holmes on the land to check out the newly restored upper river channel and celebrate 10 years of wild.

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SPECIAL EV ENT S

PHOTO GUS GUSCIORA

BACKCOUNTRY CHEFFING WITH EDUARDO GARCIA SUNDAY, 12:30 P.M. MEET AT HOSPITALITY

Eduardo Garcia, subject of Charged: The Eduardo Garcia Story (page 21), is a consummate outdoorsman who survived a devastating accident to thrive as a chef. In this outdoor bilingual demo, he’ll show participants how to elevate backcountry cuisine, proving that just because you’re cooking in the backcountry doesn’t mean your food has to be bland.

B IS FOR BICYCLE GROUP RIDE MONDAY, 9-10:30 A.M. MEET IN THE PALM THEATRE PARKING LOT

What better way to prepare for a morning of movies than a group bicycle ride? Kids, parents and bike lovers of all ages are invited to ride before Mountainfilm’s annual

Kidz Kino film program (page 52). Mountainfilm special guests Rebecca Rusch (Blood Road, page 20), Scott Fitzgerald (page 97) and others will lead this all-ages, all-abilities excursion and get everyone back in time for the movies.

MEMORIAL DAY RIDE WITH REBECCA RUSCH MONDAY, 10:30 A.M.-OPTIONAL MEET AT THE GONDOLA PLAZA ON OAK STREET

Rebecca Rusch (Blood Road, page 20) will lead a Memorial Day excursion, which will start with a ride to the Lone Tree Cemetery for words, reflection and commemoration. From there, riders have the option to continue on a longer mountain bike ride toward Bridal Veil Falls. Mountain bikes can be rented at Bootdoctors or, for the short ride, bikes can be borrowed from Wilkinson Public Library.

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S P ECIAL E V E N T S

PHOTO ERIC MOORE

PARTIES & MORE

Along with the films, presentations, panels, hikes, book fairs and art walks, Mountainfilm squeezes a few parties and special surprises into the mix. Special events are free to the public, unless noted.

VIRTUAL REALITY STUDIO

CINE DE LAS MONTAÑAS EN ESPAÑOL

FRIDAY NOON-4 P.M. SATURDAY AND SUNDAY 9 A.M.-4 P.M. MONDAY 9 A.M.-1 P.M.; GALLERY 81435

FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, 6:30 P.M. OFF-WIDTH THEATER

Virtual reality is an exciting and immersive platform for modern storytelling. Mountainfilm is thrilled to partner with the good folks of Google to host a VR studio again in 2017. Stop in. A Google representative or volunteer will help you with headsets, swivel chairs and a variety of stories to explore. This year’s lineup features films about the new Bears Ears National Monument, a prison camp in Myanmar, coral bleaching events, melting ice and more. Don’t miss it.

Mountainfilm is thrilled to host two free nights of film aimed at Telluride’s Latino community featuring the films Dolores (page 25) on Friday and Charged: The Eduardo Garcia Story (page 21) on Saturday. Both will include special guests, live translation of the films into Spanish and more. El festival de tiene el agrado de invitarlos a dos noches de películas GRATUITAS dedicadas a nuestra comunidad Latina. La película del viernes se llama, Dolores. Esta pelîcula

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SPECIAL EV ENT S nos muestra la vida y el trabajo de la legendaria activista Dolores Huerta. La película del sábado se llama Charged: La Historia de Eduardo Garcia, una historia emocionante de sobrevivencia. Ambas presentaciones incluyen invitados especiales, interpretación en vivo de las películas en español y una comida en el patio de la escuela antes de la película a las 5:30 p.m.

PROTECT OUR WINTERS PHONE IT IN BOOTH ALL WEEKEND; PALM THEATRE

Protect our Winters wants to make it easy for you to act on climate issues. To do so, the organization is installing its advocacy phone booth outside the Palm Theatre all weekend. The easy-to-use booth offers instructions, scripts and phone numbers of congresspeople to help get your voice heard in D.C.

AMERICAN ALPINE CLUB/YETI PARTY FRIDAY, 8 P.M.; THE LIBERTY

A tradition hosted by the American Alpine Club, the 2017 party will celebrate the legacy of climbing legend Fred Beckey, the star of Dirtbag: The Legend of Fred Beckey (page 24). Co-host YETI will hold a raffle, and the first 200 people will receive their drinks in a YETI-insulated mug. Passholders only.

ICE CREAM SOCIAL SATURDAY, 2-3:30 P.M. COLORADO AVENUE (MAIN STREET) BETWEEN ASPEN AND FIR STREETS

It’s called the Ice Cream Social, but it’s much more than scoops of free frozen treats. It’s a block party that hosts local and national nonprofits, a farmers market with locally grown produce, a place to grab lunch and the perfect outdoor gathering to discuss which films have blown your mind. In light of Mountainfilm’s 2017 theme, The New Normal, we’re sourcing ice cream from local provider La Cocina de Luz

and weaving in more climate change education and action than ever before. Don’t miss Patagonia’s Worn Wear Truck at the social. The Farmers Market runs from 1 to 5 p.m.

OSPREY PARTY WITH BEN SOLLEE SATURDAY, 8:30 P.M.; OAK

Mountainfilm’s musician-inresidence, Ben Sollee, (Ditch the Van, page 24) will perform with Kentucky Native at this late-night party hosted by Osprey Packs. Open to Patron, Ama Dablam, Special Guest, Palmyra and Staff passholders.

CLOSING AWARDS PICNIC MONDAY, 1-4 P.M. AWARDS CEREMONY STARTS AT 2:30 P.M. TELLURIDE TOWN PARK

Wrap up the festival with a tasty vegetarian lunch and the festival awards in the park. The picnic is free with Fitzroy, Palmyra, Ama Dablam, Special Guest and Patron passes, and tickets are on sale at Hospitality and the picnic entrance for $25. Final voting for Audience Choice Awards will take place before the ceremony begins.

MOUNTAINFILM DOWNLOW MONDAY, 7 P.M. AH HAA SCHOOL FOR THE ARTS

The DownLow, a storytelling event organized through Telluride Theatre, has become a wildly successful event, thanks to the ingenious, hilarious, outrageous and touching tales told by its performers. This special Mountainfilm edition, themed “Taking It To the Limit,” features Mountainfilm guests and Telluride locals.

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AWARD S & J UD GES

PHOTO MELISSA PLANTZ

AWARDS

Festival awards are announced at the Closing Picnic & Awards Ceremony, which takes place in Telluride Town Park from 1-4 p.m. on Monday, May 29.

AUDIENCE CHOICE AWARD

As part of The New Normal initiative, voting for the 2017 Audience Choice Award will be digital — passholders can vote using the Mountainfilm app or at voting stations located in Hospitality (112 E. Colorado Avenue) and the Closing Picnic. Audience members must have their passes with them to vote. CHARLIE FOWLER AWARD

Charlie Fowler was a world-class climber and Telluride-area local who died on a 2006 expedition in China with his partner Christine Boskoff. He’s represented in spirit by this $1,000 juried award that goes to a climbing film. CINEMATOGRAPHY AWARD

This juried award goes to the film with the most outstanding cinematography. FESTIVAL DIRECTOR’S AWARD

Mountainfilm Festival Director David Holbrooke gives this award to a film, project or individual he finds exceptional.

MOVING MOUNTAINS PRIZE

This $3,000 juried prize supports a nonprofit featured in a festival film. Judges watch nominated films and examine the mission of each organization, considering its scope, impact and need. NORMAN VAUGHAN INDOMITABLE SPIRIT AWARD

The great polar explorer Norman Vaughan’s motto was “Dream big and dare to fail.” Funded by his widow Carolyn Muegge-Vaughan and Rick and Lindsey Silverman, this award is given to a film that epitomizes Vaughan’s indomitable spirit. STUDENT AWARD

High school students from the immersive Mountainfilm for Students festival program select the film they think will most inspire their generation. THE NEW NORMAL AWARD

This special prize will recognize a film, project, individual or initiative that is devoted to battling climate change.

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AWAR DS & J U D G E S

MOVING MOUNTAINS JOHNNIE JAMESON

Johnnie Jameson is a Vietnam veteran, a longtime letter carrier for the postal service and a long-distance runner who has participated in every L.A. marathon since its inauguration in 1986. And, as the 2016 Mountainfilm documentary Mile 19 illustrated, he is also a man of warmth, wisdom, indomitable spirit and inspiring resilience.

PHOTO MERRICK CHASE

LEILANI MUNTER

Biology grad turned race car driver and environmental activist Leilani Munter is an advocate for renewable energy, solar power, electric cars, plant-based diets and animal welfare. She was featured in the Louie Psihoyos documentary Racing Extinction (Mountainfilm 2015) in which she drove a Tesla at impressive speeds. In January of 2017, she drove the first-ever vegantheme race car in a Daytona race. TOM VOSS

Following U.S. Army active duty that included hundreds of combat missions in Iraq, Tom Voss returned to America, where his struggles to transition back into society prompted him to walk 2,700 miles across the country. The walk became the subject of the film Almost Sunrise (Mountainfilm 2016) and led Voss to a new path of practicing and teaching meditation workshops for veterans, their families and active servicemen.

CHARLIE FOWLER CLAIRE CARTER

As film officer for the Kendal Mountain Festival, Claire Carter spends her life searching for fantastic films and bold adventurers. Carter, who hails from the U.K., is also a poet, trail runner, avid climber and filmmaker. She co-directed Operation Moffat, a portrait of British climbing legend Gwen Moffat, which screened at Mountainfilm 2016. KELLY CORDES

Kelly Cordes is a writer and climber whose lifelong avoidance of full-time work has left ample room for expeditions around the globe. He has notched first ascents in Pakistan, pioneered linkups in Patagonia and contributed to Alpinist, Climbing and The New York Times. He is the author of The Tower: A Chronicle of Climbing and Controversy on Cerro Torre. MIKE LIBECKI

Climber, soloist, father and adventurer Mike Libecki has a few notable specialties. One: wild expeditions, often solo, to parts unknown in search of unexplored rock. Two: dedication to his daughter, who has adventured with him in places like Antarctica. And three: His irrepressible stoke for life. “The time is now,” as he is wont to say, “Why ration your passion?” 104 WEL C OME | SP O NSO R S | C O NTE NT S | FE S T I VA L T I P S | O U R M I S S I O N | W H AT ’S N E W | FIL MS | S C HED ULE


AWARD S & J UD GES PHOTO MERRICK CHASE

CINEMATOGRAPHY EUGENIE FRERICHS

Photographer Eugenie Frerichs has documented young farmers in British Columbia, workers building the Patagonia National Park in Chile and men in trees all over North America. Born in Colorado, raised in Oregon and currently living in Ojai, California, she is the director of photography at Patagonia. She was Mountainfilm’s 2014 artist-in-residence. MARCUS HANEY

When he was a broke college student, James Marcus Haney sneaked into Coachella music festival. This trespass changed his life irrevocably and miraculously blossomed into a successful career as a music photographer and filmmaker. Haney’s films include the 2014 Mountainfilm selection No Cameras Allowed, and his stylish, intimate photos of musicians — such as Mumford & Sons, Elton John and Jay-Z — have appeared in Rolling Stone and other publications. CHIP THOMAS

Chip Thomas is an artist, activist and doctor who lives and works on the Navajo reservation in northern Arizona. Long drawn to black-and-white photography and street art, Thomas, aka jetsonorama, installs beautiful installations where you’d least expect them: on trailers, water towers and abandoned buildings on Navajo lands. As a 2016 Mountainfilm artist-inresidence, he installed the arresting and powerful mural that was on the wall overlooking Ghost Town coffee shop last year.

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B OARD S & D O N O RS BOARD OF DIRECTORS Kimberly Williams, President Erik Dalton, Vice President Lindsay Hower, Secretary Steve Cieciuch, Treasurer Lance Waring, At-Large Suzan Beraza Katherine Borsecnik Jack Castle Mallory Dimmitt Nancy Donohue Brooks Entwistle Sheryl Tishman

ADVISORY BOARD Conrad Anker Arlene Burns Wade Davis Aaron Huey Chris Jordan Ace Kvale Katie Lee Rebecca Martin Doug Peacock Chris Rainier

James Balog Jimmy Chin Lynn Hill Pico Iyer Ben Knight Frans Lanting Maya Lin Hilaree O’Neill Louie Psihoyos Beth Wald Paul Watson

DONORS

EVEREST Anonymous • Borsecnik/Weil Family

Stuart & Joanna Brown • Shushana & Jack Castle Dalton Family Foundation • Nancy Donohue & Diane Elam • The Entwistle Family Charitable Fund Bruce & Bridgitt Evans • Tully & Elise Friedman, Honorary Trustees • William and Flora Hewlett Foundation High Meadows Group • Casey & Megan McManemin Elizabeth R. Patterson • The Phelan Family Dick & Susan Saint James Ebersol, Honorary Trustees Ann & Rich Teerlink, Honorary Trustees Telluride Foundation • Sheryl & Daniel Tishman

K2 Thom Beers • Ashley Hayward & Michael Goldberg Jesse & Mary Johnson • Sherry & Paul Lambert Jim & Joanne Steinback • Barrett Toan & Polly O’Brien Kimberly Williams

DENALI Patty Jen & Christopher Arndt • Dan & Liz Caton Chip & Cathe Dyer • Patrick & Elena Ferrall The Fifteen Group Foundation • Judy & Steven Gluckstern • The Grace Trust • Dr. Hill & Bettie Hastings Joseph & Lynne Horning • Richard & Charlotte Jorgensen • The Kanbar Philanthropic Fund John & Peiper Kirkendoll • Jim & Kay Mabie The Markley Family • Anu & Michelle Parekh The Rankin Family • Dinny Sherman Anita & Prabha Sinha • The Spitzer Family Tom & Donna Stone Missy & Mike Young Saul Zaentz Charitable Foundation

EIGER Anonymous • Ruth Bender • Sophia Bush Steve & Kendall Cieciuch • Bonnie & Louis Cohen Susan Daley • Ian Darling • Charlotte Fox • Jeffrey Katz Suzanne LaFetra • John & Bridget Macaskill The Mannion Family • John & Margaret Matthews Karen Ray • Christopher Riley • Salehi Family Foundation Terry & Susan Tice • Sheila Wald EL CAPITAN Anonymous • David & Maire Baldwin Paul Bosch • Angela & Roger Box • Deanna & Dann Byck Elizabeth Cleveland • Richard Cornelius & Lynn Brubaker John Dille • Mallory Dimmitt & Bert Martin Vevie & Lawrence Dimmitt • Rose & Peter Edwards Danna English & Gary Rosenfeld • Erdman Foundation Joseph & Margaret Evangelisti • Jeff & Allison Goldberg Kenneth Goldman • Garrett Gruener & Amy Slater Family Fund at the East Bay Community Foundation Clare Hart & Greg Baer • Charles M. Helzberg & Sandra Baer • Litty Holbrooke & Andy Frey • Richard Hughes Elyn & Jeffrey Kronemeyer • Audrey Marnoy • Sage & Alex Martin • Merle & Jerry Measer • Lou Mintz & Beverly Crilly • Lynn Nebus • Joy & John O’Malley • Dione & Martin Owens • Kelli Petersen • Jeff Price & Jennie Franks Price • Tom & Susan Sargent • Barry & Barbara Shaffer Joss Stewart • Chris & Judy Stjernholm • Max & Tamara Strang • Cheryl Strayed & Brian Lindstrom • Zelda & Sheldon Tenenbaum • Dale Vrabec • Jean & Phil Wagner Marvin Wenger & Beth-Ann Schwabacher-Wenger Shannon & Kimberly Wynne

EMERITUS BOARD MEMBERS Susan Dalton Beth Gage Mike Shimkonis Rick Silverman

HONORARY BOARD OF TRUSTEES Dick & Susan Saint James Ebersol Tully & Elise Friedman Ann & Rich Teerlink

LEGACY CIRCLE

We thank our most generous donors who have included Mountainfilm in their estate plans to provide future support for Mountainfilm. Anonymous | Ruth E. Bender | Cathe & Chip Dyer Dr. Hill & Bettie Hastings | Sage & Alex Martin

AJAX Anonymous • Lee Anderson • Marcia & John Mike Cohen • Mark Doty & Heidi Miller Beth & George Gage • Jon Goldin-Dubois Just For Kids Foundation • Maya Lin • Dr. John McCall • Jens Molbak • Penelope L. Peterson Genevieve Plamondon • Laura & Chris Pucillo Rick Silverman • Stephanie Tomasky Suzanne Dyer Wise EL DIENTE Paul & Mary Anderson • Joel & Betty Bechtel • Judy & Paul Beckett • Ruth Bender • Michael Bowling & Nicole Segneri • Wendy Brooks • George & Lydia Bubolo • David & Deborah Cohen • Kevin & Ann Cooney • Day Family Foundation • Elizabeth Farrar & Craig Echols • Bobbie L. & Lisa A. Fontenot • William & Katrine Formby • Joslin Kimball Frank • Michael & Risa Freedman • Dave & Lael Fruen • Beth & George Gage • Ron & Ellen Gager • David Gast & Elena Schmid • Kathy Green • Judy Hall • & Warner Paige • Reese Henry & Company • P.J. Younglove Hovey • Lindsay K. Hower • Anabel, James & JJ Jennings • Chase Lambert • Julie M. Lampton • The Lehman-Stamm Family Fund • In honor of Paul Lehman & Ronna Stamm Betsy & Wight Martindale • The Daniel M. Neidich & Brooke Garber Foundation • Lisa & Victor Nemeroff • Christopher Paine • Suzanne Pfister • Dr. & Mrs. Sam Rehnborg • Bee & Frank Reichel • Telluride Rentals • Nichole and Jim Riley • Mr. Andre Schwartz & Ms. Virginia Eggers • Jennifer & Mike Shimkonis • Strom & Caroline Thacker In Honor of Chris Paine • Duff Simbeck • Nan Theberge Strom & Caroline Thacker in honor of Chris Paine • Ming Tsai • Lance Waring & Laura Colbert SNEFFELS Anonymous • Arborist Services Telluride • George & Jackie Antoine • Jim Bedford • Suzan Beraza • Anne & Tobin Brown • Cara Bunch Kimberly Bunch • Mark Campbell • Martha & Jon Dwight • Amy & Mark Dobbins • Celia Dunn • Jessica & Mark Galbo • Barbara Glanznig & Stash Wislocki • Penelope Place Gleason • Maurice & Virginia Hicks • Sarah & David Holbrooke • John & Carlotta Horn • Carolyn Jackson • Bob Justis Marki Knopp • Bill & Miriam Klingsporn • Katie Klingsporn & Kingston Cole • Olivia & Daniela Kronemeyer • Amy Levek • Erik Ljung • Denise Ludwig • Crystal & Andrew Merrill • Duncan Quirk • Jane Reldan • Laura Schumack • Caroline Scott • Naani Sheva • Pamela & Scott Shifrin David & Gail Teton-Landis • Cecily Tyler • Lindsey Walker • Bill Wells • Michael Wykoff 107


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S TAFF STAFF Sage Martin | Executive Director

David Holbrooke | Festival Director Stash Wislocki | Festival Producer Crystal Merrill | Tour Director Katie Klingsporn | Program Director Pamela Shifrin | Operations Director Cara Bunch | Tour & Education Manager Jim Riley | Development & Marketing Manager Naani Sheva | Tour Programming Coordinator Hayley Nenadal | Programming Coordinator Lise Waring | Communications & Social Media

MEDIA Barbara Kondracki | Program Design

Tor Anderson | Map Design Stephen Rockwood | Graphic & Poster Design Venture Web | Web Design & Development

FESTIVAL MANAGERS

Patti Duax | Special Guests Coordinator Drew Ludwig | Gallery Manager Curt Rousse | Technical Director Greg Babush | Film Inspection Maisy Cooper | Volunteer Coordinator Will Falltrick | Events Manager Ian Manson | Master Rigger Brady Richards | Communications, Shipping & Receiving Manager Tim Territo | Production Manager Kathrine Warren | Q Team Manager Marissa Mattys | Passes Manager Jesse Palmer | Media Manager Aimee Romero | Media Manager Scott Rahilly | Film Traffic Coordinator Landon Feller | Assistant Event Manager Jessica Galbo | Hospitality Manager Meehan Fee | Transportation Coordinator Tree Preist | Lighting Designer Kristen Hughes | Festival Accountant Jason Merritt | Hospitality Manager Mary Molloy-Rios | Assistant Communications Manager Kristen Permakoff | Closing Picnic Manager Erik “Viking” Cooper | Rigger Scott Upsher | Rigger Allison Manson | Rigger Tim Vierling | Rigger Heather Baltzley | Festival Signage John Young | Free-Range Program Manager Miles Galbo | Production Assistant Erin Klenow | Communications Mary Rios | Communications

TECHNICAL PRODUCTION DJ Babb • Mike Babb

Greg Babush • Mark Burrows • Gypsie Frank • Dita Frank Wanashe Frank • Michael Lawless • Karl Mehrer Chas Phillips • Dean Rolley • Curt Rousse

THEATER MANAGERS John Rosenberg • Gerry LaBonte

Amy Russell • Erika Bush • Julie McNair • Ron Borrego Dean Bubolo • Josie Kovash • Ben Kerr Joshua “Jasper” Daniel • Cat Lee-Covert G Douglas Seitsinger • April Bindock • Seth Green Rob Huber • Kathleen Morgan • Sherry Brieske Lauren Metzger • Peter Lundeen • Michael Edwards Kelsey Trottier • Adam Ball • Michelle Montague Jeff Shannon • Mark Davis • Geoff Hanson Taylor Landry

PROJECTIONISTS Greg Babush • Tom Wardaszka Filip Celander • Peter Halter • Aimee Schaefer Travis Bird • Brad Spooner • Sergio Laureano Luci Reeve • Nate Balding • Chris Miller • Derrick Casto • Patty Lecht • Jay Pregent • Matt Jones • Talia Kopecki • Cassy Babb • Brandon Theige • Jeremy Spracklen THEATER EMCEES Seth Berg • Ashley Boling

Heather Chase • Elissa Dickson Art Goodtimes • Megan Heller • Sarah Holbrook Megan Honea • Natalie Jones • Andy Konigsmark Mitch Mishky • Colin Sullivan • Sasha Sullivan Lance Waring

WEBSITE & PROGRAM WRITERS Anna Brones

Seth Cagin • Kingston Cole • David Holbrooke Peter Kenworthy • Erin Klenow • Katie Klingsporn Corinne Platt • Heather Sackett

ADRENALINE PROGRAMMERS Katie Klingsporn Ben Knight • Hayley Nenadal • Stash Wislocki KIDZ KINO PROGRAMMERS Maia Coe • Zoe Cooper

Arabella Galbo • Joseph Galbo • Cyrus Holbrooke Kitty Holbrooke • Wiley Holbrooke • Henry Martin Jake Martin • Brooke Shifrin

TOWN TALK EMCEES Anna Brones • Laura Colbert Alec Jacobson • Steph Joyce • Caitlin Ketel Sarah Holbrooke • Timmy O’Neill • Cara Pallone Boyd Matson • Abe Streep • Tom Shadyac FESTIVAL PHOTOGRAPHERS Ben Eng • Kristofer Noel Melissa Plantz • Sarah Schwab

GUEST & JUDGE WRANGLERS

Rory Cowey • Karla Gonzalez • Andrea Hart Brianne Hovey • Jen Knopp • Patrick Laguens Angela Mallard • Emily Scott • Jessica Sullivan

MOUNTAINFILM HOUSE BAND Douglas Chard

Heather Flaker • John Fitzgerald • Patrick Hiester

QUEUE BUSKERS Steve Green • Alex Paul

Elizabeth Plotkin • Sophia Chudakoff

2017 FESTIVAL AWARDS Katy Parnello INTRO EDITORS Keith Hill • Aurelie Siegers

Aymeric Tchoungui • Mallory Cunningham Raven Hopgood • Stash Wislocki

SCREENING COMMITTEE Jaime Becktel • Chase Dyer Beth Gage • Beth Gibson • Bettie Hastings Jane Julian • Davene Kaplan • Ben Kerr Marki Knopp • Judy Kohin • Kris Kwasniewski Grace Larsen • Lucy Lerner • Lindsay Newman Mark Plantz • Heather Sackett • Christopher Smith Lexi Tuddenham • Jim Womeldorf MOUNTAINFILM ON TOUR PRESENTERS Ashley Boling

Cara Bunch • Stephen Burns • Heather Chase Elissa Dickson • Jessica Galbo • David Holbrooke Natalie Jones • Katie Klingsporn • Marissa Mattys Crystal Merrill • Jason Merritt • Hayley Nenadal Jim Riley • Jacob Reuter • Naani Sheva Colin Sullivan • Lexi Tuddenham • Stash Wislocki

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VOL U NT E E R S

PHOTO MERRICK CHASE

Laurie Adams Pattie Adler Arlen Albert Josh Aldrich Zachary Alexander Robert Allen Nancy Andrew Constanza Arevalo Autumn Ascano Jonathan Augello Amanda Baltzley Sarah Barger Kris Barnum Lauren Barrette Rachel Bellamy Jim Berkowitz Ana G Biele Tim Bixler Lynn Black Sarah Bootsma David Brankley Alisha Brieske Meghan Brieske Scott Brodie Norman Brones Karen Brown Zachary Browning Megan Burke Jordan Burlison Desiree Cain James Cates Katherine Charbonneau Courtney Childe Nate Christensen Paul Cifaldi Ryan Cinalli Trevor Cobb Hailee Cotton Rory Cowie Claire Cripps Charles Dalton Donna Damm Erin Dashner Tova Davis Wade Davis Ross Deardorff Liz Delehant Andrew Dengate Rhea Depagter Rosemary Dewar 110

Meredith Dinga Brad Donaldson Angela Dye Skip Edwards Brian Evans Ryan Fallt Lyn Faulkner Rube Felicelli Rita Flemming Michael Flynn Clarissa Fortier Sara Freeman Bruce French Kurt Friederich Kiki Froberg Laura Frost Christine Gamage Sean Garrett Caleigh Gearheart Tom Gearheart Trey Gearheart Vidur Gopinath Rachel Griego Beth Grimes Matthew Gullicksrud Maddie Gumerman Braden Gunem Ashtyn Haebe Kevin Hans Anna Hanson Jane Hardman Paige Hardman Sarah Hart Jeff Hauser Grace HeglundLohman Leslie Heist Kaitlin Herlihy Eleanor Herman Bart Hero Luke Herro Kirsten Hjelmstad Emily Hoffman Bridget Holvenstot Christopher Holvenstot Kevin Horan Charlene Hovey David Hutchinson Alison James Mary Jeanes

Montana Johnson Bradley Jones Cheryl Jones Robert Justman Davene Kaplan Margie Kaplan Alexis Klein Deborah Knight Marki Knopp Kari Koeberle Jo Kopke David Kuntz Ryan Kusuno Caroline Lajoie Erich Lange Anita Langford Bill Langford Marty Langion Elaine Lareina Angela Laurita Carol Lee Bill Leenheer Erica Lindauer David Linden Ruby Linkhart Natia Luck Hegon Maciel Annie Magill Katheryn Maloney Elizabeth Manus Christin Marcos Ben Marshall Mary Marshall Audra Massey Bob Mather Karee Maxson Kristen McCulloch Heidi McDaniel Timothy McGovern Neal McKinley Sandy McLaughlin Cheryl McMurphy Gordon McPhee Max McSimov Tania Medel Nicole Mercado Lindsey Mersereau Leah Metz Andrew Miller James Miller Dana Morawitz

Shelley Mortvedt Taylor Mott Michael Mowery Marisa Murgolo Patrice Mutchnick Riley Myers Pat Neely Luciana Nemes Van Tassel Kate Newburgh Keith Nichols Breanna Nielsen Janet Niichel Dorothy Norbie Jennie Noreen Kevin Noreen Cindy Norman Kendra Norris Mel Norton Caleb O’Brien Martha Ohlson Patricia Overton Madison Padgett Soraya Padilla Tanya Paliani Avery Parducci Dakota Passero Clifford Pastor Gabriella Paterson Taylor Paterson Alia Payne Gillian Pierce Ryan Pike Samuel Pike Patricia Pitts Stacey Plunkett Mariel Polifroni Wyndham Pounds Crystal Pulak Tristan Purdy Katie Rahn Rachel Raykov Peggy Redford Luc Revel Willie Rios Leigh Robertson Paul Rockwood Katie Roos Angela Roumain Matt Roumain Charlotte Rowland

WEL C OME | SP O NSO R S | C O NTE NT S | FE S T I VA L T I P S | O U R M I S S I O N | W H AT ’S N E W | FIL MS | S C HED ULE

Isaac Sammis Robert Sanders Courtney Sanford Lisa Schaffer Kaiulani Schuler Fred Shapiro Olga Spanhoff Joanna Spindler Kiersten Stephens Michael Stjernholm Anikke Storm Christine Strasser Chambri Swartz Jess Swigonski Bridget Taddonio David Taft Deanna Tamborelli Jenn Tamo Chelsea Tarnas Beverly Taylor Lee Taylor Travis Tayrien Susan Thiele Lydia Thompson Skye Thompson Ashley Ting Douglas Tooley Sharron Toulouse Carly Trimbach Colleen A Trout Mayrah Udvardi Robyn Van Gelder Peter Vanicek John Verbeck Camila Vizzoco Delfina Vizzoco Callie Wallace Doug Ward Brooke Warren Daniel Watts Kobi Weinberg Adam Weiss August White John White Chandler Wigton Nancy Wilson Jennifer Winter David Ziegler Alicia Zimmel


IN MEMO RIAM PHOTO NICK WOLCOTT

IN MEMORIAM SCOTT ADAMSON HELEN CABLE JONATHAN DEMME KYLE DEMPSTER ELAINE FISCHER JOE HOLBERT BARTON LEWIS GINA MARIE PACE ROYAL ROBBINS STEVE ROOT GLIDER BOB SAUNDERS UELI STECK ROB STEWART JUNKO TABEI TREVOR TICE

P R E SE NTATI O NS | E V E N T S | AWA R D S & J U D G E S | B OA R D & D O N O R S | S TA F F | VO L UNTEERS | IN MEMO RIA M | MA PS

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AC C O M M O DAT I O N S IN TELL UR ID E FAI R M O N T H E R I TAGE P L ACE, FR A N Z K L AM M E R L O D G E L AT I T UD E 3 8 N E W S H E R I DAN H O TEL R I V E R C L UB T E L L UR ID E V I C T O R I AN I N N

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N e va s c a N e va s c a Real Estate in Telluride ~ Since 1985 jimj@rmi.net w w win. nTelluride e v a s c a~. cSince o m 1985 Real Estate jimj@rmi.net w w w. n e v a s c a . c o m

Jim Jennings 970.729.0065 Jim Jennings 970.729.0065

308 N Trout Lake Rd - Trout Lake

1320 North Trout Lake Road - Trout Lake

308 North Trout Lake Road is a new, family owned,

308 N Trout Lake Rd - Trout Lake

This high country San Juan mountain adventure property 1320 North Trout Lake Road - Trout Lake

Offered and therefore picksatup$379,000 a lot of solar gain.

Offered at year-round. $695,000 accessible

cabin in very good condition located one hundred feet 308 North Trout Lake Road is a new, family owned, from the north shore of the incredibly scenic Trout Lake. cabin in very good condition located one hundred feet It features three bedrooms, two bathrooms and a large from the north shore of the incredibly scenic Trout Lake. south facing great room with vaulted ceilings and a gas It features three bedrooms, two bathrooms and a large fireplace. The great room has fantastic views across south facing great room with vaulted ceilings and a gas Trout Lake to Sheep Mountain and all the peaks around fireplace. The great room has fantastic views across Lizard Head Pass. The residence faces directly south Trout Lake to Sheep Mountain and all the peaks around and therefore picks up a lot of solar gain. Lizard Head Pass. The residence faces directly south

is adjacent to Lizard Head Wilderness Area on the This high country San Juan mountain adventure property Galloping Goose Trail at Trout Lake. This carefully mainis adjacent to Lizard Head Wilderness Area on the tained three bedroom, two bathroom passive solar, one Galloping Goose Trail at Trout Lake. This carefully mainowner custom built retreat with detached garage/worktained three bedroom, two bathroom passive solar, one shop is now available for the first time. It offers glorious owner custom built retreat with detached garage/workmountain views with outdoor recreation opportunities of shop is now available for the first time. It offers glorious fishing, hiking, biking, jeeping and skiing and is fully mountain views with outdoor recreation opportunities of accessible year-round. fishing, hiking, biking, jeeping and skiing and is fully

Offered at $379,000

Offered at $695,000

526 W Colorado Ave - Telluride

Pandora Lot #21 - Idarado

526 West Colorado Avenue is a five bedroom four bath, partially historic family home with office located 526 West Colorado Avenue is a five bedroom four on Colorado Avenue between the Telluride Gondola bath, partially historic family home with office located Station and Lift #7. It features unobstructed southern on Colorado Avenue between the Telluride Gondola views of the ski area and has a fully remodeled one Station and Lift #7. It features unobstructed southern bedroom, one bath guest house located on the Coloviews of the ski area and has a fully remodeled one rado Pacific alley. This estate property is perfect for full bedroom, one bath guest house located on the Colotime resident families or second home owners and is rado Pacific alley. This estate property is perfect for full in move in ready condition or a tremendous remodel time resident families or second home owners and is opportunity. in move in ready condition or a tremendous remodel

Offeredopportunity. at $3,240,000

Pandora 21 is a flat, tree covered, estate parcel loPandora Lot #21 - Idarado cated only one mile from the center of the Historic Town Pandora is bordered a flat, treeon covered, estate parcel loof Telluride.21It is one side by the Idarado cated onlyand oneon mile of the Historic Town Bike path thefrom otherthebycenter Pandora Lane. The entire of It iscovered bordered one sideBlue by the Idarado 1.9Telluride. acres are by on Colorado Spruce and Bike pathtrees and giving on the the other by Pandora Lane. ThePark entire Aspen property a US National 1.9 acres are covered by Colorado Blue Spruce and Service setting, yet, it is only a fifteen minute walk to the Aspen trees giving the property a US National Park Gondola Corridor/Oak Street and Colorado Avenue. Service yet,hundred it is onlyand a fifteen minute views walk to the This lot setting, has three sixty degree and Gondola Corridor/Oak Street square and Colorado Avenue. easily accommodates a 7000 foot family estate This lot has threeonhundred degree views and two or and threesixty levels. easily accommodates a 7000 square foot family estate Offered at $2,199,000 on two or three levels.

Offered at $3,240,000

Offered at $2,199,000

526 W Colorado Ave - Telluride


Yo u w a n t to m a k e a difference. $VDJOREDOQRQSURÀWWKH1DWLRQDO*HRJUDSKLF Society invests in innovative and passionate H[SORUHUVVFLHQWLVWVDQGVWRU\WHOOHUVOLNH\RXZKR have a vision for a better planet. Join us and learn more at natgeogrants.org.

Photographer and biologist Tim Laman—in partnership with his wife, anthropologist Cheryl Knott—received a grant from the National Geographic Society to support their documentation of orangutans in Borneo and Sumatra. The Bornean and Sumatran orangutans represent two distinct species with unique sets of learned, culturally transmitted behaviors. They are both critically endangered, with only some 14,000 6XPDWUDQRUDQJXWDQVUHPDLQLQJLQWKHZLOG7LPDQG&KHU\O·VZRUNZDVIHDWXUHGLQ the December 2016 issue of National Geographic magazine.

PHOTO BY TIM LAMAN

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