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MAY 2010 FEBRUARY 2011

48

HOURS IN AMSTERDAM

COWBOY BOOTS WITH ATTITUDE SCOTLAND’S GOURMET POWER

HELENA BONHAM CARTER

FROM CORSETS TO ZANY MUSE


CHLOÉ BOUTIQUES

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BOULEVARD AT JUMEIRAH EMIRATES TOWERS THE DUBAI MALL DUBAI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES WWW.CHLOE.COM


Contents FEBRUARY 2011

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Features

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25 QUEEN OF HEARTS Helena Bonham Carter started her career as an English rose in numerous period dramas. Today, she has her pick of roles and often acts as Tim Burton’s zany muse. BY JANICE TURNER

35 THESE BOOTS WERE MADE FOR WALKING Every real Texan has at least one pair of stylish cowboy boots. And so they should, as the town of El Paso is renowned for making the best boots in the world. BY JEREMY HART

41 CITY OF FRAGRANCES Kannauj is the capital of the Indian perfume industry. In the same way that Europeans associate the French town of Grasse with lavender, this city evokes the smells of sandalwood. BY CATHARINE BILLIAU

47 MR. PREPPY Tommy Hilfiger has clocked up 25 years in the fashion industry with his own label. He’s had some ups and downs, but his classic clothing line still stands for smart casual style. BY SCOTT ADAMS

53 DREAMING OF GOLD DUBLOONS What would a tropical island paradise be without a good pirate story? Seychelles is well served by the exploits of Olivier Levasseur and his legendary treasure. BY TONY KARACSONYI

57 A TASTE FOR ALL SEASONS There’s a culinary revolution happening in Scotland with a focus on the best locally sourced produce prepared by award-winning chefs. BY NICK RICE February 2011

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Regulars 6 10 12 14 16 19 22 66 70 72 74

TRAVEL SHORTS World Matters WANDERLUST Cinque Terre, Italy WORLD CALENDAR Events to Diarise WELL TRAVELLED Rainer Becker STYLE CENTRAL Loving Ideas MY WORLD Turgay Hilmi, French Horn Virtuoso CELEBRITY CITY Anissa Helou’s Beirut 48 HOURS in Amsterdam DUBAI DIARY The Hot List COOL STUFF Futuristic Technology DEPARTURE Rock Bridge, Jordan

Emirates News 77 The latest news and information about Emirates, helpful travel tips and its global network.

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COVER PHOTO: CONTOUR BY GETTY IMAGES Published for Emirates by

PO Box 2331, Dubai, UAE. Telephone: (+971 4) 2824060, fax:(+971 4) 2824436, e-mail: emirates@motivate.ae

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Editor-in-Chief Obaid Humaid Al Tayer Group Editor & Managing Partner Ian Fairservice Group Senior Editor Gina Johnson Email: gina@motivate.ae Senior Editor Guido Duken Email: guido@motivate.ae, Arabic Editor Ghoufran Fakhri Email: ghoufran@motivate.ae, Deputy Editor Nick Rice Email: nick@motivate.ae Editorial Assistant Hilda D’Souza Art Directors Tarak Parekh, Rehab Barham General Manager – Production and Circulation S Sasidharan Production Manager C Sudhakar General Manager, Group Sales Anthony Milne Email: anthony@motivate.ae Business Development Manager Nicola Hudson Email: nicola@motivate.ae Senior Advertisement Manager Jaya Balakrishnan Email: jaya@motivate.ae; Deputy Advertisement Manager Murali Narayanan Advertisement Manager Shruti Srivastava Editorial Consultants for Emirates: Editor: Siobhan Bardet Arabic Editor: Hatem Omar Deputy Editor: Stephanie Byrne Website: emirates.com

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Emirates takes care to ensure that all facts published herein are correct. In the event of any inaccuracy, please contact The Editor. Any opinion expressed is the honest belief of the author based on all available facts. Comments and facts should not be relied upon by the reader in taking commercial, legal, financial or other decisions. Articles are by their nature general, and specialist advice should always be consulted before any actions are taken.

Printed by Emirates Printing Press, Dubai, UAE


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travelshorts

ROYALCARIBBEANPRESSCENTER.COM

CULTURE ICON

World’s Largest Ship On Course Standing proudly at five times the size of the Titanic, setting a new world record for carrying over 6,000 passengers, and with a construction cost of over $1.4 billion, the MS Oasis of the Seas is an engineering marvel. Yet she does not hold the title of being the largest passenger ship ever constructed. That honour goes to her sister ship, MS Allure of the Seas. Both ships are in the fleet of Royal Caribbean International and until recently held the coveted distinction of being the world’s largest passenger vessels, that was until design engineers recently discovered that Allure of the Seas is actually five centimetres longer. But irrespective of minor measurements, the two giants together represent a new era of cruise liners. While the world economy was in freefall, Royal Caribbean were having these two record breakers made – Oasis being delivered in December 2009 and Allure in December 2010.

Bavaria is known for BMW, Oktoberfest, bratwurst and lederhosen. Yet lederhosen (leather breeches) are not unique to Bavaria. This durable form of clothing was once widespread in the Alpine and surrounding regions, which included large parts of Germany, and the Tyrol region of western Austria and northern Italy. The main reason behind the popularity of lederhosen was that they are far more durable than textile clothing and easy to clean, which made them the preserve of the working class. But it was that very association with manual labour that saw lederhosen stigmatised as uncultured peasants clothing during the urbanisation of the 19th century. Lederhosen might have disappeared altogether if it wasn’t for the fondness of Bavarians to do things their way. By the 1880s several clubs were formed in Munich and other Bavarian cities to preserve traditional clothes and customs. Today, every real ‘Bayer’ has a pair in his closet somewhere, ready to wear on festive occasions. And that’s why lederhosen are now seen as something uniquely Bavarian.

Superlatively Speaking

COMPLIED BY HILDA D’SOUZA

The Largest Deserts in the world

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Sahara Desert, (9,100,00 km2) Covering most of Northern Africa this subtropical desert is also known as ‘The Great Desert’. Wind and occasional rains have shaped the landscape into visually stunning sand dunes and dune fields.

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Arabian Desert, (2,600,000 km2) This vast wilderness stretches from Yemen to the Gulf and from Oman to Jordan and Iraq. One of the largest concentrations of oil reserves in the world is found in here.

Australian Desert (1,550,000 km2) Approximately three per cent of the Australian population lives in the Australian desert that occupies 38 per cent of the continent. This unforgiving and vast region boasts rare snakes, reptiles and mammals.

Gobi Desert (1,040,000 km2) This large desert region in Asia covers parts of northern and northwestern China and southern Mongolia. The Gobi is a cold desert owing to its location in the far north. Temperatures fall to minus 40°C and its dunes are occasionally covered in snow and frost.

Kalahari Desert (520,000 km2) This semi-arid desert encompasses most of Botswana and parts of Namibia and South Africa. For thousands of years this hot region has been home to the Bushmen tribes of southern Africa.


travelshorts

AMAZING OMAN

Thanks to its seafaring tradition, Oman is a country with a rich cultural mix. This heritage is celebrated annually at the Muscat Festival, which this year runs from 27 January to 24 February. The main festival grounds are located in Muscat’s heart at the Qurum and Naseem parks. Activities include funfairs, electronic games, laser shows, fireworks, as well as a carnival. Sports fans will enjoy the return of the Tour of Oman bike race between 15-20 February with 128 professional cyclists racing through Muscat, Sur, up the mighty Jebel Al Akhdhar and through the surrounding regions. After the success of the inaugural competition, places for this year’s event have been in great demand. The cultural element comes in the form of top Arabic poets, book reading sessions and cinema events. At the heart of the action are the Oman Heritage Village and the International Arts and Creativity Village, which will feature over 200 artisans, exhibitors and speakers. Gourmets can indulge in the Oman Food Festival between 5-15 February, showcasing both Omani cooking and international cuisine.

i·tin·er·ant 1. Travelling from place to place, working in one place for a comparatively short time and then moving on to work in another place. 2. A person who alternates between working and wandering. 3. A person who travels from place to place, especially for business.

WHEN IN ROME... In Italy, don’t leave the table during dinner as it’s considered rude. And always keep your hands above the table, even when you are finished eating. In Switzerland, do consider that the country has four official languages: German, Italian, French, and Romansch. In Argentina, remember that dinner is eaten late. People will usually have dinner at 9 or 10 PM.

TRAVEL TIP: AVOID ANNOYING BUSINESS JARGON Let’s Talk That For most troubled souls this phrase takes the place of “let’s discuss that,” or “let’s talk about that”. As with most jargon, the origin of this message is unknown.

before machines set pins automatically. But really, does the phrase help describe any business plan? Learning As in “I had a critical learning from that project”. It’s easier understood the traditional way: “I learned a lesson from that project.”

Drill Down A phrase often wielded by superiors Price Point What it really means is price, full stop. So it wanting a subject examined should suffice if you just said “price”. more closely. Giving 110% The phrase has been overdone to the point Ducks In a Row The saying of sounding nonsensical. It is also found to be a favourite apparently comes from the of football coaches. days of bowling Over The Wall It apparently means to send something to the client. Absurd? Thought so too.

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wanderlust

PHOTO: CORBIS/ARABIAN EYE

Cinque Terre, Italy

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Teetering gloriously on the rugged edges of the Italian Riviera coastline are the five villages that make up the Cinque Terre, namely: Monterosso al Mare, Vernazza, Corniglia, Manarola and Riomaggiore. Only paths, boats and trains connect this UNESCO World Heritage Site. Hiking between the five Cinque Terre villages is as pleasurable as walking gets, but it’s easier if you are reasonably fit. The seafront trails follow the

Open Skies

ancient mule tracks through terraces of lemon trees and olive groves, and when you arrive at the next village there’s a row of trattorias with chatty patrons, a blue ocean and the smell of basil and fresh anchovies to help you forget your aching legs from the steep hike. But a little bit of muscle pain is nothing compared to the pride of completing the Cinque Terre walk. ❖


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worldcalendar

March 2011

Highlights of global events for the month ahead. 4-7, FRIDAY CARNAVAL INTERNATIONAL DE VICTORIA It will be floats galore as countries gather in Seychelles for three days of festivities. Music and food will set the stage for the international carnival theme – ‘the melting pot of cultures’. seychellestourisme.com 4-12, FRIDAY AYE WRITE! GLASGOW’S BOOK FESTIVAL Widely attended by readers and writers alike, the sixth edition of the Glasgow book festival presents the best of Scottish and international writers. A wealth of literati will debate and mingle in the halls of Scotland’s impressive Mitchell Library. ayewrite.com 6, SUNDAY BARCELONA MARATHON Thousands will line the marathon route in Barcelona, Spain’s major tourist hub. The circular course starts and finishes at Avenue Reina Maria Cristina and passes through major attractions such as Camp Nou, Casa Milà and Torre Agbar. barcelonamarato.es

COMPLIED BY HILDA D’SOUZA

11-19, FRIDAY DOLOMITI SKI JAZZ One of the most prestigious events on the Italian festival calendar is held in the beautiful surroundings of the Val di Fiemme in northern Italy. Internationally acclaimed jazz artists perform in exclusive ski resorts and open-air concerts in the Alpine valley. dolomitiskijazz.com

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12-20, SATURDAY LA TRANSMAROCAINE Morocco’s iconic multi-discipline event attracts extreme sports enthusiasts to one of the world’s most intense endurance programmes. Paddling Ouarzazate lake and biking the steep Atlas ranges are just some of the stamina tests participants face. transmarocaine.org

16-18, WEDNESDAY WINTER X GAMES EUROPE The international winter action sports event returns for a second year with even tougher competitions and bigger prizes! The three-day event held in Tignes, France, is Europe’s premier winter showcase with 66,000 spectators cheering on their favourites. tignes.net 20, SUNDAY ONETANGI BEACH RACES Huge numbers turn out to watch ingenious craft race on and off the waters of New Zealand’s Onetangi beach. Enjoy an action packed day full of entertainment and family fun events such as the Sandworks competition, mad hatters tea party and fun fair alley. onetangibeachraces.co.nz 24-27, THURSDAY AUSTRALIAN GRAND PRIX Catch the action in Melbourne as the Formula One drivers return to the Albert Park circuit. Thousands of Aussie fans will be cheering on homeboy Mark Webber as he battles his Red Bull teammate and world champion Sebastian Vettel. grandprix.com.au 26, SATURDAY DUBAI WORLD CUP It’s a thoroughbred affair as the world’s best horses and jockeys gather at Meydan Racecourse for a day of fashion, celebrity spotting and the world’s richest horserace. dubaiworldcup.com 31, THURSDAY SEHER IL-PUNENT-GHARB FESTIVAL The Maltese city of Gharb braces itself for 24 hours of art, music, culture and fun at this cultural fiesta. Enjoy the arts and crafts, enchanting re-enactments of village life, entertainment and great fair food. visitmalta.com


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welltravelled

Rainer Becker

From master chef to global restaurateur, Rainer Becker is the embodiment of a successful cosmopolitan career – a German chef trained as a French cook, serving contemporary Japanese cuisine with an Indian business partner. Nick Rice meets him in Zuma, his ever expanding hit restaurant.

PHOTO: GULF PICS/NAVEED AHMED

C

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asual, open and affable, Rainer Becker is refreshingly down to earth for someone who regularly hosts the world’s A-List celebrities in his restaurants. A fan of food since he was kneehigh to his mother and helping in the kitchen, it was Becker’s many years spent travelling the world and experiencing different cultures and cuisines that paved the way to his huge success with Zuma and Roka. Becker, 48, began his real culinary journeys in 1988 when he joined the Hyatt Hotel group. Beginning in Cologne as head chef of Hyatt’s East Meets West restaurant chain, Becker travelled the world for 14 years working as an executive chef and launching awardwinning restaurants in Sydney, Tokyo and London. It was his six year stint at the Park Hyatt in Tokyo that lit his passion for Japanese culture and cuisine. Recalling this vital time in his life he says, “When I came to Japan from Australia I was taken to this great Japanese restaurant but I couldn’t get a kick out of it. It all tasted the same and it was a little bland. But after three months your palate adjusts and I started to appreciate the subtleties and complexity of Japanese flavours. I really started loving the flavours and realising what I could do with them.” It was not only the food that inspired Becker in Japan, but the culture as a whole, with specific elements of Japanese aesthetics and design informing a crucial part of how his businesses are managed, embracing consistency and pride in performance. “The Japanese mentality is remarkable I think. The taxi driver is proud to bring you from A to B, as is a waiter to serve you. The whole perception of doing something is different. There is no tip system in Japan, so what is the motivation, where is it coming from? When you talk to people they are just proud to do a thing, it’s incredible.” After his time in Japan Becker moved back to London, which he regards as “the culinary centre of Open Skies

Becker is piling on the frequent flyer miles as he looks after his growing restaurant empire.

Europe” and decided to launch his own concept restaurant, based on the casual ‘Izakaya’ style of dining in Japan, characterised by drinking and eating a steady flow of dishes. He devised the concept by simply taking the Japanese food he loved so much and enhancing it with seasoning for the Western palate. “When I went back to my origins and my culture, I wanted strong flavours, like steak with garlic and pepper. So what I did was to season, flavour and combine Japanese ingredients and spices in the way I like to eat it. That’s it.” Zuma first opened in Knightsbridge in 2002, and was followed by sister restaurant, Roka, in 2004. Since then the accolades and awards have arrived thick and fast and the restaurants have become known worldwide for their signature style, exquisite dishes and thriving atmosphere. Becker may not be in the kitchen as much anymore as he oversees his growing global empire, but the travelling still continues as he checks in on existing sites in London, Arizona, Hong Kong, Istanbul, Dubai and Miami – as well as scouting out locations for more openings. The next places on the map to maybe get a Zuma? Becker suggests it could very well be Abu Dhabi and Beirut. ❖


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PERSEVERANCE

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stylecentral

What Have You Got Me? Some inspired stylish gift ideas for the month of love.

Céline Enjoy the ultimate workto-weekend style bag with Céline’s signature ‘wave’ front and flexible sides. celine.com

Marc by Marc Jacobs Marc Jacobs goes technological with an exclusive collection of bright neon headphones. marcjacobs.com

L’Occitane L’Occitane’s range of solid perfumes is a sweet reminder of this special time of year. loccitane.com

Dior Elegant Dior Rose jewels put a classic-chic twist on your finger. dior.com

COMPLIED BY HILDA D’SOUZA

Longchamp Make a present of some Longchamp chic with this classic cuff bangle. longchamp.com

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Prada Prada’s unique Infusion d’Iris perfume collection is as desirable as the brand’s stylish clothing. prada.com

Open Skies


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myworld

TEMUCIN CIL

TURGAY HILMI, FRENCH HORN VIRTUOSO

Born in Nicosia, Cyprus, and based in Nuremberg, Germany, Turgay Hilmi is a world class French horn player. He was 11 when his music teacher handed him a French horn and said: ‘This is probably the most difficult instrument to play but you have the ear and the necessary sense of rhythm to make a success of it’. Now in his fifties, Hilmi has indeed made a success of this capricious brass instrument. He has performed with famed orchestras such as the Nuremberg State Opera and Ballet Orchestra; Vogtland and Jena Philharmony; Thuringen Opernhaus; Cologne and Saarbrucken Radio Symphony Orchestra plus the Augsburg, Kaiserburg and Cornetto Brass Quintets. Hilmi, a truly globetrotting performer, has delighted crowds at classical music festivals across Europe, the USA, Canada, China, Japan and Kuwait and played with all of Turkey’s major orchestras, reports Martin Gani. Is the French horn really that difficult to play and how did you master it? Playing an instrument is like being an Olympic athlete as it involves incessant training. lf you don’t train, the performance you dream of is just in your brain but not in your body. Or as Charlie Parker put it, ‘Music is your own experience, your thoughts, your wisdom. If you don’t live it, it won’t come out of your horn.’ The French horn is very difficult to play as few musical instruments have more bends and curves. It measures over 3.5 metres and it’s difficult for the intended note to find its way out after such a long trip. There is a funny but true joke about the French horn: ‘Why is the French horn a divine instrument?’ ‘Because a man blows in it, but God only knows what will come out!’

Turgay Hilmi is a French horn player in the Nuremberg Opera and associate professor of music at the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg in Germany. He gives concerts all around the world, solo, and with the opera.

How did your musical journey start? My mother, who played the piano, introduced me to music. Aged five I began banging on the piano keys and enjoying the ‘noise’ I was producing. My mum arranged lessons with a professional piano player and I soon started playing simple tunes. I found it extremely gratifying when the listeners applauded my ‘performance’. So much so that in primary school I made up my mind that I was going to be a musician, but little did I know that my music teacher would hand me a French horn which would accompany me for the rest of my life. After high school I won a scholarship to the Ankara State Conservatory, Turkey, where I spent six years learning music theory, composition and growing into a French horn specialist along the way. February 2011

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myworld How did you become a world-class player and soloist? I went to the Nuremberg Music Academy in Germany where I spent three years learning to be a soloist. I also did a stint in Stuttgart where I received expert tuition from Mahir Cakar, an accomplished French horn player with a considerable discography to his credit. During my second year at the academy I was chosen from some 30 contenders to join the Nuremberg Symphony Orchestra. Only then could I call myself a professional French horn player and take on the world stage. At what stage of your career were you described as a ‘virtuoso’? Occasionally, quite out of character for a classical musician, I turn into a showman with a comic side. No, I don’t tell jokes but I have played a garden hose with a funnel attached to the end of it. Spectators were quite amazed to see and hear me play Leopold Mozart’s Concerto for Strings and Horn with such a rudimental instrument. Sometimes I turn up with an alpenhorn and play Swiss composer Jean Daetwyler’s famous work Dialogue With Nature for Alpenhorn and Orchestra, and people love it. Those were labelled virtuoso performances. You also teach at the University of Friedrich Alexander in Nuremberg. Do you prefer to teach or play? I’ve been teaching for 25 years and I enjoy it as much as doing concerts. But for teaching you need special skills as it’s not enough to be a good or even great performer yourself. I see straightaway if someone has talent and the ear for music. If they’re not cut out for it, it’s best to be honest and tell them to try something else. Does anything ever go wrong before or during a concert? Yes, of course. Once, when I was still a student, I had a concert in Nuremberg. I was very excited about it but when I walked into the concert hall it was empty. As I walked back to the train station with a broken heart I checked the programme date and realised I was a day late! Quite recently I grabbed my horn and dashed to the concert hall, but when I opened the case the horn wasn’t in it. I’d forgotten it at home. Luckily one of my students, who lived nearby, was at the concert. He rushed home and brought me his horn, thereby saving the day. Moral of the story: Always check your case. 20

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Above: Turgay Hilmi with the brass section of the Nuremberg Opera in front of Weikersheim Castle.

Now that you have played everywhere and taught hundreds of accomplished musicians around the world, what else do you want to do? I still enjoy playing concerts and teaching but I’ve also opened the Cyprus Art Music and Ballet School where anyone, especially very young children, can learn to play an instrument, take singing lessons, ballet classes or even try their hand at painting and sculpting. I’ve put together a team of experts in their fields to help me out. We also have an international youth choir that travels around the world to gain experience. In recent years the choir has performed in France, the USA and Italy, where the young singers performed before the Pope. I also often organise big musical events for charity. In 2009, I convinced the 70 members of the Nuremberg Lehrergesangverein Choir, one of the largest and oldest choirs in Germany, to perform Carl Orff’s masterpiece Carmina Burana at an amphitheatre in Kyrenia, Cyprus, together with 25 members of our young choir. Some 3,000 people packed into the amphitheatre to enjoy the concert, which raised over €25,000 for charity. Of all my professional achievements, the Carmina Burana concert event will always stand out. ❖


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celebritycities

PHOTO: RICHARD DUEBEL

ANISSA HELOU, MY BEIRUT

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I have known and loved Beirut all my life – only now that love is tinged with regret for what has been lost. I love it because I was born in Hamra and that was where I spent my youth. Hamra was where everything that mattered happened. We lived near the sea so we would go to the beach. When the weather got blisteringly hot we migrated into the mountains. It is the mountains that inspired my mother’s cooking and I’ve definitely inherited her obsession with food. As a child enjoying good food was just normal every day life. Both my mother and grandmother were exceptional cooks and the recipes in my first book, Lebanese Food, were all taken directly from them. The food they prepared so lovingly was based on traditional food from the mountains around Beirut – kibbeh, stuffed vegetables, tabouleh and special ma’mul biscuits. Eating in restaurants was also part of my informal education. Now, when I walk through Beirut, I recall that time when there were no supermarkets or malls – only small shops selling the freshest of fruits and vegetables. Everyone knew the character of each shop and shop owner in the neighbourhood. Nowadays I love strolling through my favourite districts, something Beirutis rarely do. I walk along the seaside and head for one of my favourite shops, Les Artisans du Liban. It is quite an eccentric shop as it sells dresses, bags, fabrics, jewellery and shoes, but also chairs and exquisitely made musical instruments. The owner, Nadia El Khoury, is a perfectionist and everything in the shop reflects her special taste. I suppose I’m slightly old fashioned as I like the feeling that things haven’t changed that much. But there have been new additions to the city that don’t appeal to me, especially the way many old buildings are being replaced by modern, impersonal high-rises. Luckily there are still places that I love. The Café Rawdah remains a lovely place to sit right by the sea. Sometimes I stop at Le Palace, which is close by. It doesn’t have Rawdah’s garden but the tables are right by the sea and I love sitting there, sipping


a lemonade, and watching the mostly local clientele. Casablanca, one of my favourite restaurants, is on the Corniche and serves excellent Asian fusion food made with fantastic local ingredients. Another fabulously fancy restaurants is Burj Al Hamam in the Movenpick Hotel on the Corniche. This is where I go for a great Lebanese meal. For seafood you can’t go wrong with Chez Sami on the Maameltein coastal road or Silver Shore in Tripoli, which has delicious food and a wonderful atmosphere. Hamra always evokes nostalgia for my teenage years when I spent most of my free time in the many cafés and cinemas, which are almost all gone now. There’s still Café Younes, just off the main street, where today’s youngsters go; Bread Republic in a pedestrian alley is an ideal place to eat organic food; and Café Laziz offers a modern take on the typical Lebanese breakfast of manaqish, labneh and olives. Saifi village is where all the smart shops are. Nada Debs’ designs for home accessories are quite gorgeous, as is the furniture at Bokja where they upholster 1950’s and ’60’s items with vintage fabrics. The Artisans du Liban also sell furniture at Souk An Najjarin, which is also run by Nadia El Khoury. It’s a very large space and she’s kept the original structure with stone vaults and a paving floor that add to the special atmosphere. Nadia has managed to combine the absolutely modern with very traditional designs and the result is something quite unique. My only problem with Saifi is that it’s like a Hollywood rendition of old Beirut. Nearby Gemmayzeh is much more authentic and it is now the centre of Beirut’s epic nightlife. I’m no longer a night owl, but I love walking around Gemmayzeh during the day to look at the old buildings and how the various restaurants and bars have converted the vaulted spaces that were once shops. Here you also find the latest and smartest shopping emporium, Ginette, where Oslo has a counter selling divine ice-creams and cakes. Arabic ice-cream is different from Italian as it doesn’t contain eggs, just milk or cream and salep, which is dried orchid tuber and is used as a thickening agent. It gives the ice-cream a lovely chewy texture. Naturally, you do get Italian-style ice-cream, often made with rose water and pistacchios, or when they are in season mango or strawberries. When people ask me where to stay in Beirut I usually recommend Hotel Le Gray. It’s located in the historic downtown heart of the city and has cool, modern interiors and wonderfully spacious rooms and suites, which overlook the Mediterranean and Mount Lebanon. Another good choice is Le Vendôme, which

WHERE TO EATAA CHEZ SOPHIE This family-run restaurant in Mar Mkhayel Street mixes contemporary French and Italian cuisine with a touch of Mediterranean inspiration. chezsophie-lb.com BURJ AL HAMAM This institution has been around since 1958 and is known for its wide range of Lebanese home cooking and fresh seafood. burjalhamam.com CHEZ SAMI This meeting place for businessmen, politicians and all seafood lovers is situated on the famous Jounieh Bay, 20 kilometres north of Beirut. chezsamirestaurant.com WHERE TO SLEEPAA LE GRAY This five-star hotel in downtown Beirut offers stunning views from its rooftop restaurant Indigo and the famous Bar ThreeSixty. campbellgrayhotels.com/le-gray-beirut LE VENDÔME This centrally situated InterContinental hotel offers 73 guestrooms situated right on the famous Corniche within walking distance of several attractions. ichotelsgroup.com WHAT TO DOA CORNICHE No visit to Beirut is complete without a walk along the famous Corniche and having a meal or a drink while enjoying the sea view. Naturally, taking a picture of Pigeon Rock (Raouché) is a must. NIGHTLIFE Beirut is famed for its after dark action and the centre of it is in Gemmayzeh. Many of the clubs and restaurants are in beautifully restored Ottoman houses. SHOPPING Just about everything is available in Beirut’s shops and street markets. Traditional crafts, high fashion, jewellery or everyday goods are easy to find in the Mar Elias area, Hamra Street, Rashid Karamé Street and Furn el-Shebback.

has long hosted royalty, celebrities and dignitaries. It is on the Corniche and an easy walk or taxi ride from the National Museum of Beirut, Beirut city centre and shopping on Hamra and Verdun streets. Beirut is changing everywhere. Mar M’khael is also slowly being gentrified with old flats converted by cool Lebanese designers, artists and architects. Some of the beautiful Ottoman spaces now boast restaurants like Chez Sophie where Sophie Tabet, who studied at Paul Bocuse and worked at l’Astrance, serves up delicious French and Italian dishes. Papercup, in a narrow street off the beaten track, is probably Beirut’s funkiest art bookshop and salon. And, of course, I love walking in Achrafiyeh. Not where the smart shops and restaurants are but rather in the streets that have not been touched by development as yet. It is here that I enjoy the Beirut I knew as a child and teenager. Whenever I’m there I go to Hanna in Mar Mitr Street for the best Arabic ice-cream ever. ❖ As told to Sylvia Smith February 2011

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Helena Bonham Carter has evolved from corseted period actress into Tim Burton’s zany muse. Of the two, she likes her latest incarnation the most, reports Janice Turner.

February 2011

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PROFILE

JANICE TURNER/THE TIMES MAGAZINE/THE INTERVIEW PEOPLE

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er polka-dot red iPhone vibrates and Helena Bonham Carter, amid a family crisis, must take this call. “Yes, he’s passed two now,” she says. “There’s another one to go. They’re small but you’d think they were as big as children! Haha! Yes, he’s at home now…” She hangs up and apologises, but it was the family GP: her partner Tim Burton has been trying to disgorge kidney stones all week. In the end, a surgeon had to blast them down to size. All this is relayed with such cheery, unembarrassed candour that one wonders what Burton would be doing if he could hear. Glaring or rolling his eyes? Or is this just their essential dynamic: the taciturn, withdrawn director and his garrulous, open-hearted muse? If so it has distinct parallels with Bonham

Open Skies

Carter’s latest role in The King’s Speech, in which she plays the late Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, as a young woman, trying to support and find a cure for her husband, the stammering, tongue-tied, reluctant King George VI. “I talk,” she says of Burton, “and he tends not to. When I first met him he hardly spoke at all. I’ve always said there should be a home for the abandoned sentences of Tim Burton because he would start one and it would just end. Wouldn’t end, rather.” Helena Bonham Carter is startling in the flesh: the chiaroscuro colouring, the woodland creature hair and eyes. I suppose, since her default tabloid story line is ‘Another Crazee Outfit for Bonkers Carter’ we’re used to paparazzi snaps of Bonham Carter, specs askew in mad-auntie attire, as if perennially trying to downplay her beauty. But today, thanks to her hairdresser/stylist/publicist/best friend Carol, Bonham Carter’s look is ‘designer Goth’. At last year’s Bifas (British Independent Film Awards) she received a lifetime achievement award.


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“I know,â€? she says, “was it a hint to stop? Because I feel I’m only beginning to know how to do this.â€? Her career began as the go-to girl for well-bred, corseted virgins: Lady Jane Grey, Lucy Honeychurch in A Room with a View; later she starred in Howards End and The Wings of the Dove, for which she was Oscar-nominated. Her attempts to break free, to be edgy and dĂŠclassĂŠe, to drop her plummy vowels for Cockney, or Noo Yoik in the indie hit Fight Club, always seemed awkward and ill cast. Only when she met Tim Burton a decade ago was she allowed to leave the 19th century, not for the modern age, but his dark, imaginary places, where her otherworldly looks belong. At the Bifas she thanked him for such great roles as “a chimpanzee and a queen with a big headâ€?, referring to his Planet of the Apes remake and Alice in Wonderland, in which she plays the Red Queen. They have worked on six films together, including Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and Sweeney Todd. I ask if it is refreshing not to work with her boyfriend for a change. “Yes, it is!â€? she says warmly. The King’s Speech, directed by Tom Hooper, vibrates with Oscar potential, and was nominated for seven

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Above: Bonham Carter has been in six films directed by Tim Burton. Their first movie together was the remake of Planet of the Apes where she was cast as a chimpanzee.

Golden Globes, including Bonham Carter for best supporting actress (she didn’t win). It is intriguing to see the young Queen Mum take centre stage, since drama and history usually relegate her and George VI to bit players in the constitutional coup de foudre of Edward and Wallis. Her lodestar for playing the role was an observation by Cecil Beaton that Queen Elizabeth was a ‘marshmallow, but one made on a welding machine’. Charming, socially dextrous, bold enough to scurry around London incognito seeking out a cure for her husband, she nonetheless had an icy shard of ruthlessness if crossed. “It was undisputed that he could not have been king without her,� Bonham Carter reflects. “She was as born for public life as he wasn’t. She had a basic self-confidence he didn’t have.� Bonham Carter says she herself took many years to acquire similar assurance. “I’m a slow developer,� she says. “I didn’t reach adolescence until I was 30.� That was the age she finally left her parents’ home. Her comfortable Hampstead liberal childhood, while happy and warm, was not without challenges: her mother had a nervous breakdown when she was five (she subsequently trained as a


PROFILE

psychotherapist); her late father, a stockbroker, was confined to a wheelchair by a stroke when she was 13. Straightaway Bonham Carter – a dreamy child, given to bedroom dressing-up – decided to seek for herself an escape, a happy ending, and rang up an acting agent. But she never relished being the Merchant-Ivory ingénue. “All the older people got the funny lines. I felt in Room with a View like I’d got the dead part. I mean everything happens around me. The parts I am getting now are much more to my taste and I feel much more comfortable in them. And it took me years to get some sort of personal confidence. It’s difficult when you’re so young having everybody comment on what you’re like. It’s hard not to buy into it. When I was younger, I’d read things written about me. I was looking for definition. So I was vulnerable. Now I know not to read what people write about me.” Getting older, she has stopped worrying about public opinion, brushes off criticism of her dress sense. So how did she react to making the 2010 Vanity Fair best dressed list? “It made me laugh because I thought it was a joke when I found out. But when I saw the article, I thought, ‘Oh, the photos they’ve chosen are as bad as the ones they print when I’m worst dressed.’” The famously odd outfits are, she says, an extension of acting: she likes becoming someone else even to go to the shops and is disappointed when reality doesn’t measure up to her inner fantasy. “I wasted an enormous amount of time on things that I now don’t care about.” Like what? “The size of my legs. I had thin legs. I had concave thighs. I used to have many more phobias about what I looked like. At the Bifa thing they showed clips of my old films and I thought for the first time I’d looked rather sweet. Like my son. Now I see my son in me, I’m kinder to myself.” She is happier as a woman than a girl. Partly it is enjoying, with Burton, 52, a long and settled relationship and motherhood. It is hard to think of a celebrity couple whose union is more logical. “I think there is an aesthetic,” she says. “I’m pale with dark eyes and he likes drawing people who are pale with dark eyes. People say I could have been drawn by him.” He drew you into being? “Yes! And now he’ll rub me out!” She lets out a cackling laugh. “Actually, he could shave a bit off these thighs!” When they first met, after he cast her as a chimp, he told her the only place he’d ever felt at home was Hampstead, where she grew up and where he 30

Open Skies

Above: There’s a huge buzz that The King’s Speech is an Oscar contender. Bonham Carter has been Oscar and Golden Globe nominated before but hasn’t won yet.

stayed while making Sleepy Hollow. And when she took him to meet her mother, she suddenly saw her slightly Gothic childhood home with new eyes: “I thought, ‘It is rather Tim Burton.’ ” There was no suggestion they relocate to California, which Burton, raised in Burbank, always loathed. “When we finally went out, he said, ‘Shall I just come and try living in Belsize Park?’ I wanted us to do that anyway. And the man loves rain. I mean, it’s perverse. You can see that he’s not a sun worshipper, and he loves winter. He loves hibernation weather. I think he has always felt at home in England.” I’d been wary of asking too many questions about Burton, thinking it might be insulting. Yet she can barely stop talking about him, gushing with pride and love, but also amusement at his eccentricities. “They should give him a knighthood,” she declares.


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“An honorary one would be fine. He has done so much for Britain, he’s employed so many people. Practically all his movies are made here because he loves British craftsmanship.” Since he had a difficult relationship with his own late father – and his first marriage to actress Lisa Marie was childless – she had assumed he didn’t want a family. “When we first started going out, I did say to him, ‘Are you going to be like the Philip Larkin poem where the parents messed you up, and you don’t want to have children?’ And he said, ‘No, quite the opposite. I’d love to.’ And he is a fantastic father. He is a great player; he obviously has a fantastic imagination. But he’s just really whole, emotionally. Everyone thinks we’re sort of weird and wonderful, but we’re not really.” Intrigue about their relationship focuses on their North London home, or rather homes, since it is two connected houses: separate domains with their own décor and cable TV systems. The arrangement, typically, is eccentric yet practical and eliminates the source of 90 32

Open Skies

Above: Bonham Carter was known as ‘the corset queen’ or ‘English rose’ because of her early work. She’s much happier with the roles she’s being offered today.

per cent of marital rows. Burton is an insomniac and snorer, who likes to watch movies all night. Bonham Carter relishes quiet. “And if he is in a bad mood, or I am in a bad mood, you can remove yourself.” Finding out how to live together was easier than figuring out a working relationship. They forged the ground rules on the set of Sweeney Todd, a film freighted with importance: it was Burton’s first musical; Bonham Carter had never sung on screen before and had to audition for the part, ultimately in front of Sondheim himself. “It was terrifying, like being on reality TV. When Stephen phoned up and said it was me, Tim walked over to me, solemnly – he’s very good at drama – and he burst into tears.” Then, while filming, Bonham Carter discovered she was pregnant. Worse even than her system swimming with hormones was not being able to drink caffeine. “I love my caffeine,” she says. “When you are waking up at five and have all these difficult things to get right, that’s my prop.” Indeed, she is peculiar about drinks, always having three on the go at the same time: today she has water, Coca-Cola and a succession of healthy smoothies. She sips each one in turn. Having to sing, lip-synch and hit the right mark time and again while simultaneously baking meat pies drove her to tears and fury at Burton. Johnny Depp would vanish during the rows, or polish his razors for hours. If she had a suggestion, she’d ask Depp to make it for her, knowing that way Burton would declare it a great idea. After the Sweeney quarrels, the couple drew up a list of working commandments. “The relationship that you have at home obviously doesn’t necessarily have the same dynamic. Politically it is totally different. At home he calls me Chief and I make the decisions. But on set, I would never expect to make the decisions.” So the first commandment was, “I keep shtoom and watch my mouth. Just be silent. I talked and would interfere with his concentration.” The second was that Burton not take her for granted, and give her directions in a more positive way. “So, compliment me as you would any other actor. I mean, a direction is basically a criticism… so you have to couch it in words that will not knock my confidence.” It worked: making Alice together a few years later was a far smoother experience. So they have subtly changed each other over the years? “Yes. I don’t know if it’s me,” says Helena Bonham Carter, sipping one of her three drinks, “but Tim talks non-stop now. He never shuts up.” ❖


BUSINESS

These Boots Were Made for Walking El Paso, Texas, is the spiritual home of the cowboy boot. Here you can pick up a designer pair that will seriously hurt your bank balance or settle for something a bit more realistic, reports Jeremy Hart.

Above and right: Lucchese is the oldest cowboy boot maker in El Paso. They produce everything from expensive custom made boots to ready to wear footwear such as their 1883 range.

he American Wild West is still wild. Ford pick-ups may have largely replaced horses but on the streets of frontier towns, like El Paso in Texas, the windows in the woodfronted buildings reflect the sight of people sporting Stetson hats and the sidewalks echo to the sound of cowboy boots. Guns, of course, are still a right of passage. El Paso, on the Texas/Mexico border, was founded by Spanish conquistadors in the 1600s and survived the Apache and subsequent Comanche wars. Naturally, this border town attracted its fair share of desperadoes, who by

the 1800s had evolved into the original cowboys of Western fame. With the arrival of the railroads in the 1880s the town boomed and attracted so many lawless types that it became known as the ‘Six Shooter Capital’. In the 1920s and ’30s the town had another brush with the law when it became a centre for Prohibition era bootlegging. Today El Paso is a jumble of adobe houses, a curious mixture of the dilapidated and the chichi, where the crickets buzz loudly under the neon lights in the sultry evenings and the occasional distant whistle of a train adds a haunting

February 2011

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sense of nostalgia. There’s still a sense of adventure in the air (Mexico is just across the border, which adds a certain edge), and with all that wild space around the town you feel like the Lone Ranger. There’s no doubting El Paso’s Western credentials so it may come as no surprise that the city is the global hub for one of the most iconic pieces of footwear on the planet. Cowboys out on the Texas range still rely on them to do their original job, but cowboy boots are no longer exclusive to the John Waynes and Clint Eastwoods of the world. From Rodeo Drive to the desert malls of Dubai, cowboy boots have become and remain chic. El Paso is full of places to clad your feet in the finest quality boots, each with its own quirk. We kicked off with the

oldest and most venerable outfitter, Lucchese. Founded in 1883 by an Italian immigrant, Sam Lucchese started out making custom boots for the Texas cavalry and ranchers. Now the company has grown into a thriving operation and has made boots for everyone from Johnny Cash to John Wayne (of course) and that old cowboy, former President George Bush. It’s a pretty slick operation. The visitors’ room is covered with sepia-toned pictures of celebrities with their boots and letters of thanks. Boots are everywhere, including a series of 50 State boots, one for every state in the union. The workshop floor is a buzzing hive of activity, where master craftsmen cut, trim, stamp, punch and craft leather into elegant footwear – and the smell of

Top left: Tres Outlaws is famed for their attention to detail and the fact that they’ve made some of the world’s most expensive cowboy boots. Top right: Rocketbuster Boots, as well as their competitors, can boast of many satisfied celebrity clients. Above: The type of leather selected by the client has a huge impact on price and quality. Nile crocodile leather is extremely durable, looks good and doesn’t break the bank.

Founded in 1883, the company has grown into a thriving operation and has made boots for everyone from Johnny Cash to John Wayne (of course) and that old cowboy, former President George Bush.


BUSINESS

leather is mouth-watering. A pair of Lucchese boots doesn’t come cheap as they can run well into the thousands of dollars. But then they do take almost two months to make, and nobody said that ostrich and alligator skins are easy to come by. Skins are hand tooled, hand painted and shaped to fit perfectly – take good care of them and they’ll last. “We’ve had people who’ve had their boots for 40 years,” boasts Mario Vega, the director of marketing. “And if the leather sole wears out, we’ll replace it for you.” Tempting, but we hadn’t finished yet as next on the list was the Tres Outlaws boot company where co-owners Scott Emmerich and Jerry Black (the third outlaw “we hung” jokes Emmerich) supply their boots to everyone from Madonna to Bruce Springsteen. Whilst not known for being a cowboy on the silver screen, Arnold Schwarzenegger apparently boasts 37 pairs of boots from the company (clearly 38

Open Skies

Above left: The master craftsmen at Lucchese look the part and wear their boots proudly. Top right: Rocketbuster Boots boasts a huge range. The average cost is $900 a pair but the top end reaches $4,000. Above: A pair of custom boots at Lucchese is totally hand made and it takes two months to complete a pair.

he’s a cowboy boot fan) and while we don’t know exactly how much he paid for his footwear, Tres Outlaws has a reputation as the most expensive cowboy boot maker in Texas. The Mexican, a pair of boots inlaid with 22 rare Mexican coins and intricate hand tooling, costs $75,000. Despite the prices, Tres Outlaws is a distinctly modest outfit, where a small group of craftsmen build about 15 pairs of boots a week – so don’t expect a glitzy tour. If you like a bit of quirk to your boot buying experience, however, it is worth taking a visit to Rocketbuster Boots, our last port of call. A relative newcomer to the scene, the company, run by husband and wife team Nevena Christi and Marty Snortum has only been going 20 years, but they’ve already made an impact by creating the largest pair of cowboy boots in the world, which has held the Guinness record since 1999. But then what would you expect from a guy who swapped his 1953 Cadillac hearse and life


Above: Nevena Christi and her husband Marty Snortum have been running Rocketbuster Boots for 20 years.

as a photographer for a cowboy boot company? The showroom, a kitschy jumble of leather cowboy cushions, zany belts and lavishly decorated, brightly coloured boots has music blaring in the background, retro signs all over the place and, of course, a wall of happy customers featuring everyone from Tom Hanks to Sharon Stone. When we visited, they were working on a custom pair for the singer Sheryl Crow. An average pair costs around $900 – so not too bad (compared to The Mexican) and again, you know your feet will be pampered in the process. We finished our tour, with boots buzzing round our heads. What to go for – a classic pair of tancoloured goatskins, for scuffing up and swaggering? Or something a little more zany, perhaps with a rhinestone or two? The only thing the boots all have in common is that whilst they will all have been created in El Paso in the heart of the Wild West, it is unlikely that the boots will ever touch a horse, let alone be worn by a cowboy. ❖


CULTURE

CITY OF FRAGRANCES The city of Kannauj is the capital of the Indian perfume industry. In the same way that Europeans associate the French town of Grasse with both lavender and perfume, the name of this city evokes the smells of sandalwood and other mesmerising fragrances, reports Catharine Billiau.

© CATHARINE BILLIAU/TCS

W

e enter Kannauj aboard a horsedrawn cart, the only form of public transport that its narrow streets will accommodate. Clouds of sensual fragrances waft out from the many perfume stores that dominate this area, some located in beautiful old houses. Customers are sitting on the floors between cupboards filled with perfume bottles made of metal, cut glass and handsomely tooled leather. It is easy to see why Kannauj’s perfume industry is

the largest in India. This modest-looking town generates a turnover of Rs 800 million ($17.5 million) annually, a major chunk of which is through exports to Gulf countries. Yet perfume making is almost a cottage industry here with every second house making some form of aromatic material. The entire town appears to be involved in the trade and over 100,000 people are employed in the perfume industry. But things aren’t that rosy. Kannauj’s attar industry

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Left: Perfume house Beniram Moolchand sells an incense powder called ‘aroma dust’. This specialty of the house is very popular in Buddhist countries.

was almost on the verge of closure after artificial perfumes hit the Indian markets in the early 1990s. “The flower-based attar, manufactured the traditional way, is very costly when compared to the chemical based perfumes. When cheap perfumes entered the market, the perfume business was slowly pushed back,” Surendra Goswami, a perfume manufacturer, told us during our trip. And then came the global recession, which further impacted the industry. But, looking at the busy streets, it is difficult to see the dark cloud hanging over this centuries old industry. One of the vendors calls us over. He dips cotton swabs into various bottles and waves them before us. “Take your pick,” he offers, “roses, jasmine, or even earth”. The latter turns out to be a Kannauj specialty, produced from baked earth and used in fertility festivals. It’s also a popular gift on occasions to mark a new start in life such as getting married, moving house or giving birth.

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The perfumes we try are rather oily, and their smell quite pervasive. “These are attars, the perfumes that have made Kannauj world famous,” the seller explains. “Attar is the naturally scented oil that results from the hydro-distillation of flowers, roots, spices and herbs into sandalwood oil. The difference between an attar and a Western perfume is that it is made up only of natural ingredients, and does not contain any alcohol.” The salesman produces a large, old-fashioned key to open one of the shop’s cupboards. He retrieves a small bottle and beams: “Attar of roses, top of the line.” This fragrance is even more intense and it feels like I’ve buried my nose in a rose. Having said that, we certainly don’t enjoy every smell on offer. Some tend to be quite penetrating, and reminiscent of a pharmacy. Subash Gupta, director of the Beniram Moolchand perfumery, shed some light on the matter. “You are not that far from the truth,” he said. “Attars are not merely used as perfumes; they

Above: The banks of the Ganges are perfect for growing the flowers that fuel Kannauj’s perfume industry. Above left: A mixture of water, flowers and herbs is distilled in large copper kettles. Cold water is added to the reservoir that traps the oils for efficient distillation.


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also play an important role in ayurveda, India’s oldest traditional medicine. The smells have a medicinal effect. Attars and other natural oils are also used to enhance flavours and smells in the pharmaceutical, food, cosmetics and tobacco industries.” Strange as it may sound, it is actually the tobacco industry that has kept Kannauj going by consuming 80 per cent of attar. The cosmetic industry accounts for the other 20 per cent. Small heaps of fragrant incense powder – another house speciality – dot the floor. Gupta says his European market is mainly made up of aromatherapy products. His family has been running this perfumery since 1885 and the walls of the reception area, which resembles a temple, are covered with portraits of his ancestors. They watch sternly over his operation, as if wishing to ensure that he doesn’t spill any family secrets. Every perfumery in Kannauj guards its recipes and uses production methods that haven’t changed for centuries. But the town’s history as India’s

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perfume capital dates back even further. “In the seventh century,” Gupta explains, “Kannauj was already playing an important role in the world of Indian perfumes, when the town was the capital of the land ruled by Harsha Vardhan. One reason is that the fertile soil along the Ganges is perfectly suited for growing flowers.” Gupta takes us to the fields of flowers located just outside Kannauj. It is a sea of violets, jasmine bushes and roses – interspersed with workers who skilfully remove the flowers from their stems. These flowers are then put into large baskets and brought to a truck that transports them to a distillery in town. The contrast between the colourful fields of flowers and the distillery’s dark innards is striking. The only light inside is intermittently provided by the flaming wood fires that burn under large copper kettles filled with water, flowers and herbs. Bamboo pipes connect the kettles to a reservoir of sandalwood oil that traps the fumes. Sweating men with bloodshot eyes stoke the fires and control the

Clockwise from top left: The attars are sold in beautiful bottles. It is estimated 100,000 people are employed by Kannauj’s perfume industry; Mr. Mostquin is one of the few craftsmen who is still making the leather bottles used to store the attars; the only form of public transport in Kannauj’s narrow streets are horsecarts. Opposite page: Attars are also used in ayurveda, India’s oldest traditional medicine.


temperature. In order to cool the reservoir, they pour water onto it, releasing great clouds of steam. It’s a relief to escape back into the fresh air of the distillery courtyard. This is where the cooled oil is manually filtered before being distilled again using a new batch of flowers or herbs. “The more this process is repeated, the higher the proportion of essential flower oil, and the more valuable the final product,” explains Fauzan Malik, manager of Yacub Perfumers. His flashy manager look, white shirt and shiny shoes are a far cry from the distillery’s interior. Together, we return to the modern world of his computer filled and air-conditioned office. In a corner stand the large leather flasks that contain the attar. The leather allows the last traces of water to evaporate, leaving behind pure perfume oil. Like wine, attar needs time to age. Malik carefully opens a flask and lets us smell its contents. “This is Shamama, a mixture of saffron, musk, and dozens more ingredients. It has taken almost one month to create this.” The price tag reads like a confirmation: these exclusive products fetch up to $21,000 a litre, which would seem to reserve their use for the likes of sheikhs and Bollywood stars. We limit ourselves to the purchase of a pretty bottle of ‘attar of roses’, anticipating the pleasure of pouring a few drops into the bathtub back home, and so being transported back to the City of Fragrances. ❖


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Y E K R TU AXA "Turkey; an essential and reliable partner and one of the most promising markets in the world." Henri de CASTRIES, Chairman & CEO

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INSPIRATION

Last year saw 59-year-old Tommy Hilfiger clock up 25 years with his own label. The American guru of casual fashion has had some rough patches in the past quarter century but his clothes have become synonymous with living the classic sport’s lifestyle, reports Scott Adams.

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orn in upstate New York, Hilfiger was the eldest of nine children and remembers that this meant he had to be “a sort of parent” to his younger brothers and sisters. “My father was a watchmaker and we were a normal working class family. I had to help out a lot at home and with the other kids,” he fondly remembers. His early life gave him valuable

lessons in responsibility and working as a team. A slender, preppy young man in the early 1970s, Hilfiger had no inhibitions about becoming a fashion designer, something he says developed partly because he couldn’t find anything he really liked in the stores. “At school I started decorating and altering my own jeans,” he recalls. While still in his early twenties, he opened his own shop called The People’s Palace, in downtown Elmira. It was the beginning of a

Above: Hilfiger started working in retail at 18. By 25 he had tasted both success and failure as his first shop, The People’s Place, went under. In 1984, he founded the Tommy Hilfiger Corporation that grew to revenues in excess of $1.8 billion.

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Left: Hilfiger’s upmarket store in New York. The designer has created 10 different product lines through his career, including collaborations with celebrities.

lifelong career in fashion. Determined to make a go of it himself and full of youthful ambition, Hilfiger was just 25 when he decided to move to New York City. Although broke, he turned down jobs with already established designers, Calvin Klein and Perry Ellis, to start his own company. Hilfiger started designing under his own name in New York in 1985. “I introduced my first signature collection accompanied by a huge billboard advertising campaign right in Times Square,” he says. “I was subsequently named one of the four, great, American fashion designers for men.” The stellar publicity worked, and Hilfiger was catapulted into the international fashion spotlight. Today he is best known for his classic, Americancool garments. “I want my brand to be preppy and effortlessly sophisticated,” he explains. In person, Hilfiger exudes a laidback, but friendly, manner which is a reflection of the clothes he so admires. He gives quick, one-sentence answers, punctuating each swiftly-made point with a beatific, close-lipped smile. His lean muscled body exudes an inner peace and Zen calm, the result, he says, of daily yoga sessions. While he may spend a great deal of time in the fashion spotlight, as he gets older, he has shown that he has a big heart and is particularly interested in improving the lives of those who are 48

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less fortunate around the world. In early 2010, he travelled to Uganda, partnered by Millennium Promise, a non-profit organisation founded in 2005, to help those suffering from extreme poverty. “Over the next few years the company will donate around €1.5 million to help those in need,” he explains. “Our efforts will be focused on projects in the impoverished village of Ruhiira in Uganda, and I really want to return there regularly to

Above: School children in Ruhiira welcome Hilfiger. His company will donate €1.5 million over the next few years to help alleviate poverty in the Ugandan village.


see how the villager’s lives are improving.” Hilfiger’s benevolent side shone through again in 2010 when he joined forces with his friend and model Milla Jovovich to create a limited edition handbag. “I am very excited to work with Milla and also to develop our partnership with Breast Health International,” says Hilfiger of the plan to donate 50 per cent of the proceeds of the handbag sales to ‘Fund for Living’, a Breast Health International initiative. While the past few years have been difficult for all those in business, Hilfiger has learnt some valuable lessons. “In times of crisis, people are more interested in quality,” he says. “Despite the economic challenges, the world is still expanding and there are more opportunities to be had, but you have to offer a good product.” Expanded he has and 2010 was an exceptional year for the rugged blond designer’s business. February saw the opening of a new flagship store in Cork, Ireland. In March, he opened a massive store in Frankfurt; the second largest in Europe, and in October there were more opening celebrations in Toronto, Canada. Lovers of the Hilfiger style are spoilt for choice with stores in the UAE and around the world. Dedication to his work is a key factor of his success. “I believe in working hard and playing hard,” he admits with a smile. “I have always been very dedicated and it has taken years to get where I 50

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Above: Clean cut lines with a casual, comfortable fit are the hallmark of Hilfiger’s designs.

am today.” The peripatetic designer spends a lot of time flying around the globe on business and places a lot of importance on looking good and feeling comfortable. “When away from home, I always pack a white Oxford shirt, a navy blazer and a pair of jeans,” he says. He particularly loves going to his European headquarters in Amsterdam. He admits that the Dutch city radiates the type of ‘cool’ which is part of his image. “Amsterdam is a refreshing city to visit, and of course I have my favourite haunts there,” he says. “I always find time to go to the restaurant De Kas for a meal. It’s in an old greenhouse hidden away in a beautiful park, and is very much my sort of place. They grow most of their own vegetables and herbs organically in a kitchen garden, and the food is always fresh and inspirational.” As part of his 25th anniversary collection he included garments which took their inspiration from some of his personal style icons, such as Steve McQueen, Grace Kelly and James Dean. “As a kid I was greatly inspired by film, but also by rock stars such as Mick Jagger, Pete Townshend and David Bowie,” he says. “Their style pushed me to follow a career in fashion. If it weren’t for rock ‘n’ roll I wouldn’t have become a designer. Music has always been my inspiration, but I like to base my success on FAME - Fashion, Art, Music and Entertainment.” The past 25 years haven’t all been plain sailing; in fact, there have been a few rough patches for the brand. During the early 90s the designer managed the seemingly impossible, out-Ralph-Laurening Ralph Lauren, and selling an even cleaner, preppier Hamptonsish glamour to the masses. For a while, every shopping mall in America was crowded with kids wearing Hilfiger’s easily identifiable designs. But then, in the later part of that decade, the brand strayed from the safe ground of crisp polo shirts, and into the bolder and baggier fashions of the rap music world. In the short term, this was a boon for the company as the likes of Snoop Dogg and Coolio were seen in Hilfiger gear on stage and in magazines. “The Hilfiger brand had reached saturation point. It was everywhere,” explains Hilfiger with a combination of pride and regret. But the music industry, and particularly rap stars, are fickle in their tastes and, as they abandoned the red, white and blue baggies, the company turned back to its core audience only to discover that the prepsters had moved on to other labels. Looking for a way out of the darkness, they developed a new line, H, which was promoted by singers David Bowie and


INSPIRATION

Iman, but this variation on the classic Hilfiger style never really took off. In the late 90s, there were some who questioned whether the Hilfiger name could ever be returned to its former glory. Throughout this dark period, there was one sign of hope as in Europe, the Hilfiger name continued to enjoy a certain level of cachet. Without a rap subculture to affect it, Hilfiger’s brand remained at its original level of exclusivity. “We decided to take the essence of Europe’s continued interest in the brand and implement it in the rest of the world,” he explains. “The product in the US was broader and more mainstream, but in Europe it was more upper class,” he says. “So we got rid of all the big logos, and made a new collection that is today much more sophisticated and refined.” Appealing to those with higher spending power, Tommy Hilfiger’s clothes are now only stocked in up-market department stores, such as Macy’s in the US or Harrods in London, as well as in his luxuriously decorated Tommy Hilfiger stores in most cities worldwide. After more than 25 years in the fashion business, Hilfiger has strong ideas and plenty of advice for

those who wish to emulate his greatness. When asked what young people should do if they want to go into the fashion business, he is very clear. “Don’t ever give up. Keep your dream alive. A successful fashion designer is not only a really creative person, but also a good businessperson. Always remember that to get to the top you need to start from the bottom. That’s the beginning of the path for every fashion designer.” As part of the ongoing 25th anniversary celebrations, Hilfiger has joined forces with the prestigious French publishing house, Assouline, to create a limited edition, linen-bound scrapbook with more than 200 illustrations and photos covering his career. The 1,000 copies are available at leading Tommy Hilfiger stores for around €500 each. This is set to be a big year for the label. Tommy Hilfiger has created a dazzling array of clothes which feature patterns on patterns and neon-bright colours. “The coming season is dedicated to travel, city and chic,” he says. For a man always on the move, this could be his best year yet. ❖


SEYCHELLES

DREAMING OF GOLD DUBLOONS

Every tropical island paradise deserves a good treasure story. In the case of Seychelles it is the French pirate Olivier Levasseur who delivers the goods, reports Tony Karacsonyi.

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Right: Olivier Levasseur (or Le Vasseur) was known as La Buse – ‘the buzzard’ – for his fast and ruthless attacks on ships. He was hanged on Réunion in 1830.

he eyes of the world focused on the Seychelles last year when Somali pirates seized two ships in the island republic’s waters. This was a case of history repeating itself as Seychelles has a rich pirate history dating back to about 1685. In those days these beautiful granite mid-ocean islands were uninhabited, but they were ports of call on Europe’s maritime trade routes with East Asia. In fact Seychelles, Mauritius, Réunion and Madagascar were all pirate lairs with their many bays, islands and largely uncharted waters providing the perfect place to repair ships, resupply and count booty in peace. Pirates began sailing Indian Ocean waters north of Madagascar from 1685 onwards. William Kidd, Robert Culliford, Henry Every and Thomas Tew were some of the more notorious ones. Two illustrious French pirates were Captain Mission and Olivier Levasseur, with the former famous for establishing the pirate utopia of Libertalia in northern Madagascar. From their strategically situated island bases the pirates plundered shipping off the Indian, African and Arabian coasts. The godfathers of Indian Ocean piracy were Edward England (an Irishman), John Taylor, and Levasseur known as La Buse – ‘the buzzard’ – because of the speed and ruthlessness with which he always attacked his prey. The three eventually joined forces and pulled of some of the most audacious and profitable piracy acts in history. Levasseur had been given a ship by the French government in 1715 to attack enemy shipping as a

privateer during the War of the Spanish Succession. When the war ended he refused to go home and joined the Benjamin Hornigold Pirate Company instead. But by 1719 he had parted company and two years later he teamed up with Taylor and England. England and Taylor, together with Jasper Seager, had already made their name when with three ships and 750 men they sailed for the Comoros Islands. There they found the Cassandra, an East Indiaman, near Anjouan Island and took her after a prolonged fight. But Levasseur and Taylor were yet to do their most profitable piece of work. England, who apparently got on the other two captains’ nerves, was out of the picture as he had been marooned on February 2011

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Mauritius – the dream of many a tourist nowadays! The pirates found a Portuguese galleon, which is listed as either the Senhora Do Cabo – ‘Our Lady of the Cape’, or Virgem do Cabo – ‘the Virgin of the Cape’ at Réunion in 1721. Luck smiled on the pirates as she had been disabled in a storm and the crew had tossed 72 cannons overboard to stay afloat. Moreover the Bishop of Goa was aboard with all his treasures. The pirates took the ship easily, which was filled with gold and silver bars, golden guineas, pearls, diamonds, silk, and the famous ‘Flaming Cross of Goa’, which was made of gold, diamonds, rubies and emeralds. Today the treasure would be worth at least £100 million. Each pirate was paid 5,000 gold guineas and 42 diamonds, while Levasseur chose bullion and the Flaming Cross, which reputedly took three men to carry. But that is when Levasseur’s luck ran out. He reappeared on Isle Sainte-Marie in 1722 and refused the offer of a pardon, which called for the surrender of his treasure. He was caught eight years later 54

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when he was lured onto the navy vessel Medusa by a French captain posing as a trader near Fort Dauphin, Madagascar. Levasseur was hanged on Réunion in 1730. According to legend he was wearing a necklace containing a parchment with a cryptogram of 17 lines, which he threw into the crowd while exclaiming: ‘Find my treasure, ye who may understand it!’ Like all good pirate stories it is difficult to separate fact from fiction, and what happened next depends on whom you read. The broad outline is that a rare storm hit Seychelles in 1923, eroding many beaches. After the storm a woman called Rose Savoy, who lived close to Bel Ombre beach on the island of Mahé, found stones with carvings of a staring eye, snake, turtle, dog, horse, fly, keyhole, two joined hearts, a woman’s body and a man’s head. According to one version of the story, Savoy wrote her nephew, who worked at the national archives in Réunion, with news of the discovery. He thought

Clockwise from top left: Site of the treasure hunt excavation on Mahé’s Bel Ombre beach; the cryptogram that is believed to be part of Levasseur’s treasure map; Pirate captain Edward England was marooned on Mauritius by his colleagues; the grave of Levasseur on Réunion. Opposite page: John CruiseWilkins is still on the treasure hunt started by his father. He’s pointing at some of the inscriptions that are attributed to Levasseur.


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the markings might be related to a set of 200-year-old papers kept in the archives – the papers, it’s believed, that La Buse had flung at the crowd before his execution. The nephew sent the papers to Savoy, which included the cryptogram and four letters, each thought to offer different clues to the treasure. The plot thickened when a 1735 map found in Réunion indicated that Levasseur had owned the Bel Ombre land. Furthermore, excavations near the staring eye found two coffins with pirate remains inside them. In 1947 a neighbour of Rose Savoy, Reginald CruiseWilkins, studied the documents. At Bel Ombre he found a staircase leading uphill to an enormous piece of granite, and the entrance to an underground cavern nearby was blocked. He became convinced that Levasseur had set out an elaborate game, based on the Greek legend of the 12 labours of Hercules and astronomy. This is not as far fetched as it sounds as Levasseur was a Greek and Latin scholar, and well versed in free masonry. Cruise-Wilkins died 27 years after starting his treasure hunt but his son, John, a Seychellois history teacher, continues the search. John has spent much of his life searching, as has his former partner Robert Graf who has spent $450,000 of his own money. The Seychelles tourist board is naturally not complaining about having a legendary treasure hidden somewhere on its shores. Pirates plus islands and beaches always make a good combination. But maybe it is best to totally ignore the vortex of mystery and intrigue. The real treasure in Seychelles is its pristine beaches, coral reefs and Creole culture. Plus there’s the Aldabra Atoll, which was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Status Site in 1982. Today, there are some 150,000 giant land tortoises and about 2,000 green turtles living in the Aldabra Group. It is the only place on earth, other than the Galapagos, where giant land tortoises can be seen living in the wild. Now that’s something to treasure. ❖ Composite

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CUISINE

A TASTE FOR ALL SEASONS

Scotland is an incomparable, inspiring place and home to some of the finest food produce in the world. Nick Rice savours the sights and digests a healthy sample of the great Scottish larder.

Above: Craig Sandle (background) of the Number One restaurant at the Balmoral Hotel in Edinburgh, plates up another appealing dish.

It’s a dilemma we’ve all faced at some point. If something is tasty – do you really need to know what it’s made from? Surveying a plate of ‘haggis, neeps and tatties’, I opted for ignorance. I knew that neeps and tatties were simply colloquialisms for turnips and potatoes, but I suspected haggis had something to do with an animal’s stomach. I wasn’t sure what exactly, but it was just so delicious I decided I didn’t need to know. Had someone revealed it was a sheep’s heart, liver and lungs boiled in its own stomach, I may not have eaten as much as I did. Scruples aside, haggis is a rich and flavoursome dish, but it is something of an outof-date cliché on the subject of Scottish food. There are many uniquely Scottish dishes that are equally

delectable and more suitable for the squeamish. The Scots have always known how to make the best of what nature handed them, and that means a lot more than the humble sheep. The magnificent Scottish coastline and its icy lochs teem with sea life, while verdant pastures provide grazing for the famed Aberdeen Angus cattle. Rolling hills, meadows and moorlands are home to many indigenous game species and the rich soil is perfect for fruits and vegetables. As Nick Nairn, who has been one of the country’s premier chefs for the last 25 years attests, “The thing about Scotland is our resources and production. Take fish, we have unpolluted cold waters full of nutrients, so there’s access to amazing wild fish February 2011

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– mackerel, turbut, skate, sole, flatfish, monkfish – and I would say they are the best in the world. And on land, in terms of meat… lamb, beef and of course game… venison and grouse, it’s the best you'll ever get.” Yet despite this abundance, the United Kingdom doesn’t exactly enjoy an international reputation for excellent food. Quite rightly this is now changing, and with Scotland acting as trailblazer there has been a culinary renaissance in the last 15 years. One of the main reasons for this growing food revolution is a shift away from intensive mass production – a model rooted in the fact that the UK is an island nation and one that endured two World Wars where quantity, not quality, defined 58

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food production – to a new appreciation and respect for sustainability. One simple yet incredibly effective way to ensure food is fresh, tasty and sustainable is to cook with the seasons. Roy Brett, a multi-award winning chef for over 23 years and owner of Ondine, Scotland’s seafood restaurant of the year, says: “For me seasonality is common sense. I mean you wouldn't get strawberries in Scotland in February; you could get them in the supermarket, but we wouldn’t have them on the menu. We only have what's available, what we can get from the local farmers. The goodness isn’t in the supermarkets, it’s through supporting local businesses.” Nairn, 51, who is a self-taught chef and in 1990 was the youngest person to be awarded a Michelin Star in Scotland, agrees with Brett wholeheartedly as

Clockwise from top left: A stunning view of Edinburgh seen from the excellent Tower restaurant, situated atop the National Museum of Scotland; The Prestonfield Hotel boasts lavish suites and grand historical rooms, and houses the decadent Rhubarb restaurant; Chef of the Year 2010, Roy Brett; Interior view of the renowned Witchery at the Castle restaurant.


CUISINE

Right: Nick Nairn at his cook school in Port of Menteith, Stirling. Below: After the masterclass, the sublimely delicious result.

both men continually emphasise the importance of the journey from nature to plate. “Fifteen years ago there wasn't the awareness of how important seasons are and how important local production is. In Scotland we are working towards having more local production and sourcing, better relationships between suppliers and restaurants. As a chef you have to work with your suppliers to know when stuff is best. For instance, my fishmonger says to me 'well at this time of year you should be buying monkfish because it has migrated into a different feeding ground which will make it taste better. And you shouldn’t buy scallops this month because they’re going through a breeding cycle.’ Now unless I talk to the guy regularly I’ll never get that information. It's incredibly important to develop and nurture these relationships. Twenty-five per cent of every great dish is the produce.” After discussing how crucial seasonality is with Nairn I put the knowledge into practice by signing up for a masterclass at his school. Located in Stirling, the Nick Nairn Cook School has taught more than 20,000 students in the past 10 years using an approach that clearly works. Still I was somewhat daunted by the thought of trying to learn a little of that instinctive, sensory art that cooking is, especially from someone so accomplished. But 60

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any nerves are eased as the whole team at the school teach in a very relaxed and straightforward manner. On the menu were freshly caught, handdived scallops and from de-shelling (or shucking) to precise preparation and presentation, the whole experience was more enjoyable and easier than one might think. And the final taste-test was well worth the concentration. Nairn had repeatedly stressed the importance of suppliers and recommended some establishments where I could sample some first rate wares, so a whirlwind tour around Glasgow, Galloway and Dumfries and Edinburgh was called for. First stop was the renowned cheesemongers I.J. Mellis in Glasgow. Established by husband and wife team Iain and Karen in 1993, Mellis stores have become institutions for the finest cheese available. Mellis

Above left: I.J. Mellis in Glasgow and Edinburgh sells the best cheese available. Above right: A plate of Haggis, neeps and tatties.


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CUISINE

MENU purveys his cheeses himself, visiting farms to taste the products, ensuring all are handmade and pasteurised. It would have been easy to lose hours in the shop trying sample after sample but after buying a fat hunk of cheddar it was onwards to Galloway and Dumfries and the ‘food town’ of Castle Douglas. With a population of 4,500, Castle Douglas is distinct from the friendly bustle of Glasgow and the more reserved, yet visually stunning splendour of Edinburgh. This is a quiet town that celebrates food. Around 25,000 visitors use the town regularly for its mix of independent local produce and food shops, farmers market, cafes, restaurants, food festival and cattle market. In each store the story was the same – locally sourced, seasonal food of the highest quality. Luckily for visitors, the whole area of Galloway and Dumfries is world-famous for outdoor pursuits, handy for combating over indulgence. Next up was a visit to a renowned Italian specialist food shop in the capital. Valvona & Crolla is one of the UK’s longest-established food stores and known to all in Edinburgh. Husband and wife Phillip and Mary Contini run the family company, which was founded in 1934 by Mary’s grandfather, who actually walked all the way to Britain when emigrating from Italy. Mary’s aim is to stock the very best from Italian and Scottish producers and all the food is sourced directly from organic vegetable farmers, dairies and fishermen, thereby avoiding wholesalers and guaranteeing freshness. The family are well known for their books on cookery and one title elaborates on where they

Above left: Mary Contini of Valvona & Crolla – her grandfather founded the store in 1934 after walking to Britain from Italy. Top right: Freshly-dived scallops from the Isle of Mull.

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Starters Cullen Skink A thick soup of smoked Finnan haddock, potatoes and onions Cock-a-Leekie Traditional chicken and leek soup garnished with a julienne of prunes Hotch Potch Hearty stew of lamb, cauliflower, turnips, carrots, spring onions and broad beans Baud Bree Hare broth with mixed vegetables, caraway seeds and Oatmeal, seasoned with Worcester sauce

Main Cabbie Claw Platter of cod ringed with mashed potato and garnished with chopped egg yolk, parsley and cayenne pepper Crappit Heid A large cod’s head stuffed with oats, suet, onion and liver, boiled in seawater and served with potatoes and seasonal root vegetables Skirlie Oatmeal, suet and onion pan fried and seasoned with salt and pepper, served with grated raw carrot and cabbage Howtowdie with Drappit Eggs, Rumbledeethumps & Curly Kail Braised chicken and poached eggs served on a bed of spinach and accompanied with potatoe, cabbage and onion

Dessert Tipsy Laird Scottish trifle served with Drambuie Clootie Dumpling A traditional pudding of flour, breadcrumbs, sultanas and currants, suet, sugar and spice bound with golden syrup Soor Plooms A serving of sharp flavoured, green boiled sweets


CUISINE

TRAVEL INFORMATION GETTING THERE EMIRATES flies between Dubai and Glasgow daily. Visit emirates.com or emirates-holidays.com for details. WHERE TO EAT THE WITCHERY BY THE CASTLE Stunning place from Scotland’s best-known restauranteur, James Thomson. Castlehill, The Royal Mile, Edinburgh EH1 2NF, Tel: +44 (0)131 225 5613. THE TOWER Spectacular view from sophisticated restaurant on the roof of the National Museum of Scotland. 1 Chambers St, Edinburgh EH1 1JF, Tel: +44 (0) 131 225 3003. RHUBARB The grand opulence of the Prestonfield Hotel houses the refined decadence of this unforgettable restaurant. 5 Priestfield Rd, Edinburgh, EH16 5UT, Tel: +44 (0) 131 225 1333.

buy their food, encouraging the general public to do the same. The shop itself is a wonderful emporium of goods and incredibly diverse, something Mary revels in. “Diversity is great,” she says. “Our favourite restaurant is the Loon Fung. So you’ve got Italians, living in Scotland, eating Chinese – great,” she laughs. Having worked up an appetite the next stop was a meeting with two of Valvona & Crollas regular customers: Tom Kitchin – one of Scotland’s top chef’s who featured prominently in the Great British Menu TV series, and his peer and long-time friend Dominic Jack, chef and patron of Castle Terrace, a magnificent new restaurant nestled underneath Edinburgh Castle. Both Scotsmen met at a young age and shared a flat in Paris where they cut their teeth working in Michelin starred restaurants. Through these years they dreamed of creating a restaurant that celebrates Scottish food using French techniques. Now they actively encourage each other’s careers and work closely together as they realise their dream with The Castle Terrace and the Michelin starred restaurant, The Kitchin. Both chefs couldn’t be more committed to cooking sustainably and in harmony with the seasons. In Kitchin’s own words, “It's all about seasonality and an appreciation of the best quality ingredients available from Scotland's fantastic natural larder.” If you are what you eat, then Scotland is definitely on the winning track as you can easily forge an intimate bond with your food by knowing where it’s from, who grew it or caught it, and how. Well, that’s if you can figure out what you’re eating. For some holiday destinations you need a phrasebook to communicate, in Scotland you need one just to decipher the menu. A set menu could plausibly offer Cullen Skink and Cock-a-leekie, Hotch potch or Baud bree, followed by Cabbie claw, Crappit heid, Skirlie, Collops or Clapshot. Or you might go for Howtowdie with Drappit eggs with rumbledeethumps and Curly kail, concluding with either Tipsy Laird, Clootie Dumpling, Festy cock or Soor plooms for dessert. Regardless of your choice one thing is guaranteed. It will be fresh, tasty and sustainable. ❖ 64

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CASTLE TERRACE Superb place presenting Scotland’s finest produce in sleek and smart surroundings. 33/35 Castle Terrace, Edinburgh, EH1 2EL, Tel: +44 (0) 131 229 1222. THE DOUGLAS ARMS HOTEL An excellent menu in a warm and friendly atmosphere. King Street, Castle Douglas, Dumfries and Galloway DG7 1BD, Tel: +44 (0) 155 650 2231. ONDINE Winner of the best seafood restaurant in the Scottish restaurant awards. 2 George IV Bridge, Edinburgh EH1 1AD, Tel: +44 (0) 131 226 1888. NUMBER ONE Head Chef Craig Sandle prepares a flawless menu fusing the finest Scottish produce. The Balmoral Hotel, 1 Princes St, Edinburgh, EH2 2EQ, Tel: +44 (0) 131 557 6727. WHERE TO STAY HOTEL DU VIN A gorgeous boutique hotel favoured by celebrities such as Madonna, timeless design and excellent service. Doubles from £250. 5 Devonshire Gardens, Glasgow G12 0UX, Tel: +44 (0) 141 339 2001. MALMAISON With great views across the Union Canal in the heart of Leith, the suites are gloriously Scottish. Doubles from £210. 1 Tower Place, Edinburgh EH6 7DB, Tel: +44 (0) 131 468 5000. BALMORAL HOTEL Preferred choice of royalty, this unique and contemporary luxury five-star property is located in the very heart of Edinburgh. Doubles from £132. 1 Princes Street, Edinburgh EH2 2EQ, Tel: +44 (0) 131 556 2414. THE PRESTONFIELD An exquisite historical hotel set amidst glorious countryside yet only 10 minutes from the city centre. Doubles from £150. Prestonfield House, Priestfield Road Edinburgh, EH16 5UT, Tel: +44 (0) 131 225 7800.

Above left: Chef Patron Dominic Jack and Tom Kitchin prepare lunch at Castle Terrace restaurant.


SOME DREAMS ARE BEST EXPERIENCED AWAKE. At The Ritz-Carlton, we understand that getaways aren’t so much about escaping, but connecting with the people that matter most. And we offer a host of incredible experiences to ensure just that. Imagine enjoying exquisite cuisine overlooking romantic city lights, or a shopping itinerary or museum tour customized to your liking. Along with our legendary service, what you’ll ultimately discover and create are moments you’ll treasure for a lifetime. And whatever city you are exploring, you can enhance your stay with our Reconnect® package and enjoy valuable hotel credits you can use toward a host of unforgettable experiences. For reservations ENJOY A

H OTEL OR R ESORT C REDIT

or more information, please contact your travel professional or

With our Reconnect ® packages.

visit us at ritzcarlton.com/reconnect.

Discover

Rates are valid per room/per night, based on single or double occupancy, exclusive of taxes, gratuities, fees and other charges; do not apply to groups; and cannot be combined with any other offer. Advanced reservations are required. Offer valid through April 30, 2011, subject to availability. Some hotels may require a weekend stay and/or a minimum length of stay. Credit may not be applied toward room rate, has no cash value and must be used during the dates of the reservation. ©2011 The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company, L.L.C.


48hours

AMSTERDAM There’s never a dull moment in one of Europe’s most vibrant and cultured cities, reports Luciano Di Gregorio. WHY GO? Sporting the elusive appearance of a small town but the vibe of an epic metropolis, Amsterdam is the pulsating heart of Dutch culture. Few cities have so rapidly evolved from a sleepy fishing village to a distinguished world centre of social liberalism. From its time as the wealthiest and most important port in Europe during the Middle Ages, Amsterdam has welcomed and fostered all conceivable elements, and with just cause. Water may be the determining factor of Amsterdam life but a propensity towards all things wild and wacky is its driving force. Throw into the mix impossibly picturesque canals dotted with crooked ancient buildings, an arts scene to cherish and a dining experience to knock your socks off, and Amsterdam becomes the ideal destination for an all-encompassing getaway catering to an eclectic range of tastes. From the delights of slow-food cafés framed by 16th-century houses and world-class museums to the fast paced and convivial nightlife, it’s all waiting for you in the Dutch capital.

ISTOCK PHOTO

Below: Amsterdam is famed for its many architectural styles. The landmark gabled buildings are all found inside the old city which is ringed by 17th century canals known as the Grachtengordel.

WHAT TO DO Don those walking shoes and bicycle clips and beat the bumpy waterside pavements. Amsterdam is a rewarding walking and cycling city full of nooks and crannies begging to be explored. Start your day on Damrak, across the road from Amsterdam’s Central Station, and become enthralled in the fastpaced spectacle of life as the locals sit down for breakfast and the smell of freshly brewed coffee lingers in the air. Damrak, dotted with restaurants, museums and backpacker haunts, is an arterial lifeline of Amsterdam and can become quite busy in

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the evenings but look past this and admire the city’s unique architecture. If Damrak is the artery, then Dam Square (or simply ‘The Dam’), some 700 metres from Central Station, is the heart of the city as it is here where all Amsterdam experiences inevitably converge at some point. Spend some time appreciating the opulent Royal Palace, a former city hall converted into a royal residence early in the 19th century. The Nieue Kerk (New Church), built in the 14th century, is found beside the Royal Palace and is one of the most important buildings in the city. No longer used for church services it now hosts a variety of museum exhibits. The opposite side of the square is flanked by the National Monument, a war memorial erected in 1956. Leave the buzz of the Dam and wind your way to Nieuwendijk, a narrow street running parallel to Damrak. Its history stretches back to the 12th century, making it one of the oldest shopping districts in Amsterdam. Nieuwendijk is brimming with quirky boutiques and high street chain stores that will easily part you from your hard earned cash. Once you’ve finished spending your entire holiday fund head to Herenstraat for a spot of canal life before heading southwest to the Anne Frank House. Located on Prinsengracht, the famous house-turnedmuseum made famous by the popular Diary of Anne Frank, is perhaps one of the most worthwhile and sobering cultural experiences to be had in Europe. The bedroom of Anne Frank, with a number of her posters and pictures still adorning its walls, evokes both a sense of sadness and inspiration. Leave the droves of visitors behind and immerse Opposite page (clockwise from top): The best way to see the city is with a canal cruise; Traditional Dutch porcelain for sale at a stall in Waterlooplein market; A multi-storey bicycle parking lot near Central Station; Photo opportunity in front of the ‘I Love Amsterdam’ sign at the Rijks museum; Amsterdam fans out south from Central Station; Poached egg with hollandaise sauce over asparagus is a popular local dish; The 17th-century Royal Palace is found on Dam Square; Damrak is Amsterdam’s oldest shopping street; Self-portrait of the artist at the Van Gogh Museum.


GRAPHEAST

GRAPHEAST

48hours


48hours France, Dutch historians believe it was conjured up on Dutch soil. Accompany the dish with a variety of Dutch cheeses and finish off your meal with a warm apple pie.

yourself in Amsterdam’s unrivalled café culture at Spanjer & Van Twist, one block north of the Anne Frank Museum. Sitting at a waterside terrace is a favourite pastime of all locals and it is the best vantage point for watching the real Amsterdam at play. Amongst the splashes of water in the canal and the pink-haired mohawks of Dutch teenagers whizzing past in flashes of colour, you will notice the Amsterdam Tulip Museum, across the canal from the famed café. Here, you can gaze wistfully at the much loved flower and delve into its complicated history. Next, hop on a bike and wind your way through the narrow laneways lined with chocolate shops and framed by old bridges to the area around the National Museum. A stroll through the greenery of Vondelpark is a must before delving into the country’s most treasured display of art and historical artefacts at the Rijksmuseum and the amazing collection of paintings at the Van Gogh Museum.

Above: Tourists, trams and street musicians all meet at the outdoor cafés on Rembrandt Platz in summer.

WHERE TO STAY For airport convenience, stay at the excellent value Hotel Ibis at Amsterdam International Airport. The rooms may be of the no frills variety, but they are comfortable. Prices start at around €69 and the hotel provides a free and frequent shuttle service to the airport, from where Amsterdam city centre is easily reached by train. Alternatively, Sofitel’s The Grand, right in the thick of the action, lacks very little. The opulent common areas complement the wonderful rooms. Prices average around €250 per night. WHAT TO EAT AND DRINK Whilst the neighbouring Belgians may not agree, some of the best French fries in Europe are to be had along Damrak. Keep an eye out for a vendor, and do smother the fries in the city’s popular mayonnaise. To wash it all down, head to the canal-side De Gekraakte Ketel (The Cracked Kettle), a pub specialising in over 500 beers from all corners of the globe. For a classy dinner, go to D’Vijff Vlieghen (The Five Flies), a quirky Dutch institution frequented by the who’s who of Amsterdam. There are some who claim the Dutch only have food – not cuisine. They are mistaken. There are a number of staple Dutch dishes to try, most of which include filling portions of meat and potatoes. But for a different kind of culinary experience try a dish such as asparagus hollandaise. Whilst it is widely thought that the sauce originated in 68

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TRIP TIP Driving in central Amsterdam is a nightmare and therefore the city is a cyclist’s haven. Avoid walking on dedicated cycling lanes, which are clearly marked throughout town. MUST DO Water is intrinsic to Amsterdam life and so a canal cruise is a definite must. Amsterdam Canal Cruises (amsterdamcanalcruises.nl) offers a comprehensive circuit of the historical city centre for just €13. For around an hour and 15 minutes you can observe the spectacle that is Amsterdam life slowly passing you by. ❖

TRAVEL INFORMATION Whilst Amsterdam does experience very cold winters, its position close to the coast means that temperatures are moderated by the sea. December to January can be wet and cold. For sunny days and pleasant temperatures visit between May and September. Autumn is a particularly striking time in Amsterdam as the trees shed their leaves and the canals seem to become wider and more visible. The official currency is the Euro (€1 = $1.33 approximately). GETTING THERE EMIRATES flies daily between Dubai and Amsterdam. Visit emirates.com or emirates-holidays. com for further information. RESOURCES The Dutch tourist board’s I AM AMSTERDAM website (iamamsterdam.com) contains a wealth of information including accommodation options, places to visit, shopping guides and canal cruise bookings. FURTHER READING The GET LOST! COOL GUIDE TO AMSTERDAM explores the quirky side of Amsterdam and highlights various options for a wild and wacky holiday. Try the ROUGH GUIDE AMSTERDAM for a comprehensive look at everything the city has to offer. FAST FACT Amsterdam is a hive of cultural buzz as the city boasts the world’s highest number of museums per square kilometre. Officially, there are over 50 museums in Amsterdam. The city also has more bicycles (around one million) than people, with its population of around 750,000.


For more information call 16656 or visit www.newgiza.com

From spacious interiors to high ceilings and wide terraces, NEWGIZA residences are inspired by the beauty and charm of the past, while integrating the modern-day conveniences. NEWGIZA offers a range of design concepts and residential options, from opulent villas to exclusive apartments, each radiating with comfort and tranquility. Their warm colors and elegant designs whether modern or classic seamlessly blend in with their surroundings, creating a unique streetscape for NEWGIZA.

REVIVING THE CHARM OF THE PAST

A SENSE OF FREEDOM WITH SPACIOUS INTERIORS

THE WARMTH OF A SUN-FILLED TERRACE

THE STRANGELY SOOTHING COMFORT OF PRIVATE GARDENS


dubaidiary

THE HOT LIST The best nightlife, spas and restaurants.

UPCOMING EVENTS

SPAS Ritz-Carlton Spa This beautifully appointed spa blends Eastern expertise with European techniques and offers a broad array of healing treatments. The Ritz-Carlton Signature Massage is guaranteed to leave you utterly relaxed. Ritz Carlton, DIFC, Dubai, Tel: +971 4 399 4000

Taj Spa Tucked away in the centre of bustling Deira this spa is a complete haven from the speed of city life. The signature grape treatment will lull you off into a rejuvenating calm and leave your skin silky smooth. This is a great spa with excellent staff and facilities. The Taj Palace Hotel, Deira, Dubai, Tel: +971 4 223 2222

Spa InterContinental With an excellent fitness centre and exceedingly polite and skilled staff, this is a top spa in the city. The expansive range of luxurious treatments includes Natura Bisse products as well as the organic range, Just Pure, and the local brand Shiffa. Intercontinental Hotel, Festival City, Dubai, Tel: +971 4 701 1111

BRUNCHES Thai Kitchen One of the finest Thai restaurants in Dubai, it has a great terrace from which to enjoy a superb Asian lunch overlooking the marina. The duck noodle soup is renowned, as is the rest of the menu. Park Hyatt Dubai, Deira, Dubai, Tel: +971 4 317 2222

AOC French Brasserie The Sofitel proudly offers its French Riviera BBQ Brunch so you can have that ‘Cote d’Azur’ feeling in Dubai. Head down to The Sofitel on The Walk to enjoy an array of grilled seafood, prime cuts, fruit skewers, crepes station, live rotisserie and culinary cocktails. Sofitel Dubai Jumeirah Beach, 12.30-4pm, Dhs275, Tel: +971 4 484 848

Dusit Thani This hotel has three great restaurants. For Thai there’s Benjarong, for Italian PAX, and The Californian for international, all situated with superb views over the city from the 24th floor. This outstanding brunch offers cuisine across all three restaurants and is guaranteed to please. Dusit Thani, Sheikh Zayed Rd, Dubai, 12pm-4pm, Dhs265, Tel: +971 4 343 3333

RESTAURANTS Sicilia There are many great Italian restaurants in Dubai and it’s a challenge to be a top contender, but newly opened Sicilia has all it takes to be up with the best. Fresh, high quality ingredients presented perfectly and cooked with flair and precision. Sicilia is set to become very popular. Ibn Battuta Gate Hotel, The Gardens, Dubai, Tel: +971 4 444 0000

Armani/Amal Indian cuisine from an Italian icon may not sound ideal at first, but there is no disappointment in the glorious dishes served at this superb restaurant. The location is as impressive as the food, with a sweeping view over Downtown and the Dubai Fountain. The Burj Khalifa, Downtown Dubai, Tel: +971 4 888 3444

Rhodes Twenty10 With a celebrity chef already overseeing one successful restaurant in the city, the second had to be good to match the mark. A different kind of steakhouse, with sharing plates and all manner of tantalising sides, Twenty10 excels. Le Royal Meridien Beach Resort & Spa, Dubai Marina, Tel: +971 4 399 5555

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GULF BIKE WEEK FEBRUARY 10-12 Taking place at Dubai Festival City, this huge weekend will feature the largest motorcycle and off-road exhibition in the Middle East and to help celebrate the fact, international superstars Pharrell Williams with his band NERD and Amy Winehouse will supply the musical entertainment. gulfbikeweek.com THE SKYWARDS INTERNATIONAL JAZZ FESTIVAL FEBRUARY 1-18 First established in 2003 by Chillout Productions, the inaugural Skywards Dubai International Jazz Festival was well received in the city and attracted a record crowd of over 8,000 music fans. Since then the festival has thrived, every year growing in scope, size and duration. Music fans across the GCC are eagerly awaiting performances by Jools Holland, Macy Gray and Alison Moyet, to name just a few of the stars. dubaijazzfest.com THE DUBAI DUTY FREE TENNIS CHAMPIONSHIPS 2011 FEBRUARY 14-26 The stars are back for the 18th anniversary of this hugely popular event held at the Dubai Tennis Stadium. Expect the usual roll call of the biggest names in the sport with all the excitement and drama of their on court clashes. dubaidutyfreetennischampionships. com

WRITTEN EXCLUSIVELY FOR EMIRATES MAGAZINE. BY THE EDITORS OF


coolstuff

TECHNO-TRENDS

Time moves fast in gadgetland, and a new year means all new tech. Here are five things that will rock the techno-world this year...

1

3D TELLY... WITHOUT THE GLASSES

TOSHIBA REGZA 20GL1

Ask your mum what she thinks of 3DTV and she’ll grumble about the price, before grumbling a lot more about the glasses. The boffins behind the big manufacturers are developing 3D that works without the silly nose furniture. Sony has already demoed glasses-free 3DTV with no restrictive viewing angles, so you won’t have to sit directly in front of the TV, while Toshiba has promised to bring its own flatscreen to market in June.

2

Everyone said glasses-free 3DTV couldn’t be done, but Tosh went ahead anyway. This 20in screen is covered by a clear sheet of lenses that create the 3D effect sans glasses. Expect more from the likes of Sony and Samsung this year.

APPS FOR ALL

The app revolution is in full swing, and won’t be stopping at your phone and laptop. Expect Widget-friendly TV in 2011, followed by cars with their very own apps. Probably not Twitter, mind, but you’ll be able to watch YouTube on your way to work, or have messages sent to your phone when the roast is ready.

4

MOTOROLA XOOM

5

SMART TV WILL RULE

Moto’s tablet packs an HD-quality screen, a powerful 1GHz dual-core processor and a speedy 1GB of RAM under its svelte hood. There’s even two cameras – a 5MP rear-facing one and a 2MP webcam. Take that, iPad.

You might think your telly is already pretty smart, but it’s about to join the maths club. Look out for a generation of TVs that browse the web, flitting between live TV and YouTube, on-demand video, download stores and network streaming. Plus, they’ll search the whole lot at once, which makes looking for that DVD a thing of the past.

3

MULTIDIMENSIONAL HOME MOVIES

YouTube supports 3D and has been begging for some decent, affordable kit to arrive so you can film your cute, cuddly kittens in 3D before sticking it online for the world to see. Panasonic made an early sprint for the top spot last year, with its HDC-SDT750. Also watch out for Sony’s twin-eyed TD10 and pocket Bloggie 3D.

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LG SMART TV UPGRADER ST600 Smart TV could be the breakthrough story of 2011. The ST600 promises to add next-gen video on demand, internet browsing, apps and media streaming capabilities to any TV with an HDMI port.


departure

Jabal Umm Fruth Bridge, Wadi Rum, Jordan

CORBIS/ARABIAN EYE

CO-ORDINATES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATIVE PURPOSES ONLY.

LATITUDE: 29° 28’ 7.11” N LONGITUDE: 35° 26’ 57.05” E

● Amman

JORDAN

● Jabal

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Umm Fruth Bridge

K

nown as ‘The Valley of the Moon’ the Wadi Rum landscape exudes an otherworldly appeal with its spectacular desert landscapes, towering cliffs and sandstone bridges. Jabal Umm Fruth Bridge is one of the several sandstone bridges that dominate this landscape. Adventurous hikers are rewarded with a 360-degree view of the ever changing desert from this rock bridge. And as if to mark this memorable experience the soft rocks are found liberally covered in graffiti, silent witnesses to the several thousand sturdy hikers who visit this magical desert yearly. ❖


NEW JOH N N I E WALKE R DOU B LE B LACK 速

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DISCOVE R A MOR E I NTE NSE TASTE OUR MASTER BLENDER INTRODUCES A DEEPER, SMOKIER AND MORE INTENSE WHISKY, BY EXPERTLY BLENDING THE MORE POWERFUL, NATURALLY SMOKY WEST COAST FLAVOURS WITH THOSE MATURED IN CHARRED OAK CASKS. THESE FLAVOURS ARE HARNESSED TOGETHER TO CREATE AN EXCEPTIONAL RESULT. A BOLD NEW ADDITION TO THE JOHNNIE WALKER 速 BLACK LABEL速 FAMILY.

P L E AS E D R I N K R E S P O N S I B LY W W W.D R I N K I Q.C O M

The JOHNNIE WALKER, BLACK LABEL and DOUBLE BLACK words, the Striding Figure device and associated logos are trade marks. 息John Walker & Sons 2010.


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Š2010 A licensee of Thrifty Rent-A-Car System, Inc.. All rights reserved.

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Emirates News ■

Emvironment

Comfort in the Air

U.S. Customs & Immigration Forms

Route Map

Consciously Healthy Health conscious passengers in Emirates’ premium cabins can now indulge in exciting new dishes designed especially for them. Some years ago, Emirates introduced low calorie dishes for the weight conscious; now the airline has added new, healthy meals in a further enhancement of its inflight dining delights for First and Business Class customers. All food offered in all classes on Emirates flights is meticulously prepared with the greatest attention to detail. These new healthy dishes are no exception. They are prepared with the latest techniques used by

Michelin chefs around the world to ensure that all the ingredients retain their flavour even though no fat – or hardly any – is added during cooking. The techniques used include sous vide, a process in which food is slow cooked in airtight plastic bags placed in hot water; and dry frying, used to extract the flavour of the ingredients by frying them without fat in a heavy-bottomed pan over high heat, occasionally shaking the pan to avoid burning. The healthy meal options extend to selected flights across destinations in the Sub Continent, Asia, Europe, Middle East, Africa and North America.

Below: Healthy and delicious – Lobster tail with avocado timbale – one of the new additions to the Emirates inflight menu.

February 2011

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Emirates news

Jeddah’s Second Superjumbo Passengers to Saudi Arabia now have the benefit of two Airbus A380 flights each day to Jeddah. The airline first introduced the superjumbo to the route in February last year and business and leisure travellers immediately gave it the thumbs up. The second A380 service has a capacity for 517 passengers in a three-class configuration.

Emirates operates a total of 42 flights per week to four cities in Saudi Arabia: Riyadh, Jeddah, Dammam and Al Medinah al Munawarah.

Emirates Wins in China Emirates has been named the Best International Airline at the China Travel Service Awards, organised by Sohu.com, mainland China’s leading on-line portal. The award was given by a jury of travel industry experts plus millions of Chinese-speaking ‘netizens.’ China is one of Emirates’ most important markets and the airline is keen to ensure that customers receive the best service from onboard products to the airline’s global network of destinations. Currently, Emirates offers double daily non-stop services from Dubai to Beijing, Shanghai and Hong Kong and daily services to Guangzhou. Emirates’ Airbus A380 operates daily from Beijing and Hong Kong to Dubai. Left: Adam Li, Emirates’ Beijing Sales Manager (right), received the Best International Airline 2010 award from Fang Jun, Director of Lifestyle & Culture Centre of Sohu.com.

Welcome to Copenhagen Emirates will add a new European country to its ever expanding route network with the launch of non-stop, daily flights to Copenhagen on 1st August. Copenhagen, Denmark’s capital, will become Emirates’ 112th international destination and the 27th destination in Europe. “Copenhagen is an important hub for the whole of Scandinavia and the launch of our non-stop service will open up a new market for Emirates. It will also offer Denmark’s businesses easy connections to previously untapped markets,” said His Highness Sheikh Ahmed bin Saeed Al-Maktoum, Chairman and Chief Executive, Emirates Airline & Group. EK 151 will leave Dubai each day at 0830hrs and arrive in Copenhagen at 1310hrs. From 78

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Copenhagen, EK 152 will depart at 1455hrs, arriving in Dubai at 2315hrs. Emirates will be operating an Airbus A330-200 on the route in a three-class configuration. Copenhagen is the third new route announced by Emirates for 2011, following Basra on 2nd February and Geneva on 1st June.

Above: Copenhagen will be Emirates’ first destination in Scandinavia.


Emirates news

Look – No Paper!

The Dubai Mall’s Fashion Avenue.

Pick Up a Package or Two The 15th annual Dubai Shopping Festival is in full swing, but there is still time to take advantage of Emirates’ offer of a free night’s accommodation in one of a wide range of local hotels. The fun-filled festival ends on 20th February. Emirates has teamed up with beach and city hotels to offer a free night’s stay during the festival. Travellers who book a four-night stay will receive one free night. Bonus nights are also available for longer stays (eight nights for the price of six nights, 12 nights for the price of nine and 16 for the price of 12). Prices start at just $55 per person, per night, based on double occupancy. Packages include a choice of hotels, airport transfers and buffet breakfast.

The festival offers tax-free shopping, discounts of up to 50 per cent on a wide variety of items, the chance to win prizes in daily draws, and events ranging from live jazz to cartoon shows. Just a few days remain in which to take advantage of a package for another great Dubai event – the Dubai Desert Classic golf tournament, played from 8th to 13th February. It includes a Desert Classic Season Pass. Prices start at $102 per person per night, based on double occupancy and a four-night stay. All packages for the Dubai Shopping Festival and the Dubai Desert Classic can be purchased through travel agents and Emirates offices worldwide.

Emirates SkyCargo recently achieved its first completely paperless flight, ie, one in which every cargo shipment on board had been processed electronically instead of using paper documents. The flight was EK702 from Mauritius to Dubai, operated with a Boeing 777-300ER, which carried bank notes, flowers, fresh fruit, clothing, textiles and courier items in its hold. Despite the diversity of shipments, every one had been processed the same way – electronically. The air cargo industry aims to remove all paper documentation by the end of 2014 and Emirates SkyCargo, a leader in the drive towards e-freight, is on track to meet that target. The benefits are more efficiency, increased speed and reduced costs.

On Top of the World Leading Italian team AC Milan were on top of the world during their Winter Tour of the UAE, sponsored by Emirates. The world-famous players managed to kick a football around on the top of the world’s tallest building, the Burj Khalifa. Pictured at the top are Brazilian stars (from left) Pato, Robinho and Thiago Silva. AC Milan’s six-day tour gave local fans a feast of football, the climax of which was a 2-1 victory over Dubai’s Al Ahli Club in the Emirates Challenge Cup. The team’s training sessions at Al Ahli’s Rashid Stadium and on the beach at Al Mamzar were open to the public and attracted thousands. 80

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Comfort in the air To help you arrive at your destination feeling fine and refreshed, Emirates have developed this collection of helpful travel tips. Regardless of whether you need to rejuvenate for your holiday or be effective at achieving your goals on a business trip, these simple tips will help you to enjoy your journey and time onboard with Emirates today. BEFORE YOUR JOURNEY

DURING THE FLIGHT

❖ Consult your doctor before travelling if you have any medical concerns about making a long journey, or if you suffer from a respiratory or cardiovascular condition. ❖ Plan for the destination – will you need any vaccinations or special medications? ❖ Get a good nights rest before the flight. ❖ Eat lightly and sensibly.

❖ Sucking and swallowing will help equalise your ear pressure during ascent and descent. ❖ Babies and young passengers may suffer more acutely with popping ears, therefore consider providing a dummy. ❖ Get as comfortable as possible when resting and turn frequently. ❖ Avoid sleeping for long periods in the same position.

AT THE AIRPORT

WHEN YOU ARRIVE

❖ Allow yourself plenty of time for check-in. ❖ Avoid carrying heavy bags through the airport and onto the flight as this can place the body under considerable stress. ❖ Once through to departures try and relax as much as possible.

❖ Try some light exercise or read if you can’t sleep after arrival at your destination. It generally takes the body’s biological clock approximately one day to adjust per time zone crossed.

SMART TRAVELLER

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Rehydrate with water or juices frequently. Drink tea and coffee in moderation.

Loosen your clothing, remove your jacket and avoid anything pressing against your body that constricts your blood circulation.

Light exercises on your lower legs and calf muscles encourages blood flow and helps reduce muscle fatigue and swelling in the feet.

Carry only essential items that you will need during your flight.

Cabin air is drier than normal therefore we recommend that you wear glasses during flights.

Apply a good quality skin moisturiser to ensure your skin doesn’t dry out due to the drier cabin air.

Open Skies

FOR MORE TIPS AND ADVICE TO HELP YOU TO ENJOY YOUR FLIGHT AND ARRIVE AT YOUR DESTINATION FEELING FRESH, LOOK OUT FOR MESSAGES ON AIRSHOW, OR REFER TO YOUR INFLIGHT ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE FOR PROGRAMME DETAILS.


Under the Patronage of

H.H. Sheikh Hamdan bin Rashid Al Maktoum Deputy Ruler of Dubai and UAE Minister of Finance

WETEX 2011

Expanding the Future's Horizons

WETEX 2011

In Water, Energy Technology & Environment Exhibitions

WETEX 8 -10 March 2011 Za’abeel, 1 and 2 Halls, Dubai Convention and Exhibition Centre WETEX 2011 brings National and International companies closer to the latest technology and management solutions, aside from becoming a regional resourcing platform to access the latest developments in the Gulf region in the field of Water, Energy and Environment. Tel +971 4 324 44 44 Fax +971 4 324 81 11 - 324 49 22 email wetex@dewa.gov.ae

www.wetex.ae Main Sponsors :

WETEX 2011 A perfect place to meet largest number of Institutional investors all the Regional Water and Electricity Authorities. The region is witnessing phenomenal growth in water, energy and environment activities offering lucrative business opportunities. A cost effective and targeted medium to meet senior level decision makers. An opportunity to renew and reaffirm contacts within a large exhibition environment.

Co Sponsors :


Guide to US customs & immigration forms Whether you’re travelling to, or through, the US today this simple guide to completing the US customs and immigration forms will help to ensure that your journey is as smooth and hassle free as possible. The Cabin Crew will offer two forms when nearing your destination. Here we provide simple guidelines on correctly completing the forms. CUSTOMS DECLARATION FORM All passengers arriving into the US need to complete a Customs Declaration Form. If you are travelling as a family this should be completed by one member only. The form must be completed in English, in capital letters, and must be signed where indicated.

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� Complete the forms prior to landing. � Use a pen and write in capital letters. � Complete every line. � Ensure you write in the correct space. � If you are in transit through the US, write ‘transit’ in the address field. � If you make a mistake ask a member of Cabin Crew for a fresh form.


IMMIGRATION FORM The IMMIGRATION FORM I-94 (Arrival/Departure Record) should be completed if you are a non-US citizen in possession of a valid US visa and your final destination is the US or if you are in transit to a country outside the US. A separate form must be completed for each person, including children travelling on their parents’ passport. The form includes a Departure Record which must be kept safe and given to your airline when you leave the US. If you hold a US or Canadian passport, US Alien Resident Visa (Green Card), US Immigrant Visa or a valid ESTA (see below) YOU ARE NOT REQUIRED to complete an immigration form.

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If you are an international traveller wishing to enter the US under the Visa Waiver Programme it is now mandatory to apply for electronic authorisation (ESTA) at least 72 hours prior to your departure.

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ESTA Facts: â?– Children and infants require an individual ESTA.

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â?– The online ESTA system will inform you whether your application has been authorised, not authorised or if authorisation is pending.

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â?– A successful ESTA application is valid for two years, however this may be revoked or will expire along with your passport.

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Cabin Crew will be happy to help if you need assistance completing the forms.

Nationalities eligible for the Visa Waiver*: Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brunei, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxemburg, Malta, Monaco, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, San Marino, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom**. *Subject to change. **Only British Citizens qualify under the Visa Waiver Programme.

February 2011

87


Routes emirates now flies to more than 100 destinations GREENLAND GREENLAND GREENLAND GREENLAND

Western Western Western Europe Europe Europe Gothenburg Gothenburg Gothenburg Gothenburg

Kristiansand Kristiansand Kristiansand Kristiansand SCOTLAND SCOTLAND SCOTLAND SCOTLAND

Varnamo Falkenberg Varnamo Varnamo Falkenberg Falkenberg Falkenberg

Varnamo

DENMARK DENMARK DENMARK DENMARK Copenhagen Copenhagen Copenhagen Copenhagen Glasgow Glasgow Glasgow Glasgow Edinburgh Edinburgh Edinburgh Edinburgh Newcastle Newcastle Newcastle Newcastle Sunderland Sunderland Sunderland Sunderland Nykobing Nykobing Nykobing Nykobing

N. IRELAND N. N.IRELAND IRELAND N. IRELAND ENGLAND ENGLAND ENGLAND ENGLAND Leeds Leeds Leeds Leeds IRELAND IRELAND IRELAND IRELAND Liverpool Liverpool Liverpool Dublin Dublin Dublin Liverpool Dublin NETH.

Echo Bay Echo EchoBay Bay Echo Bay Baker Lake Baker BakerLake Lake Baker Lake

Lugo

Rankin Inlet Rankin RankinInlet Inlet Rankin Inlet

neau

Juneau Juneau

Juneau

Fort Chipewyan Fort FortChipewyan Chipewyan Fort Chipewyan

Churchill

Churchill Churchill

Kamloops

Churchill Inukjuak

Fort McMurray Fort FortMcMurray McMurray Fort McMurray Bear Bear Bear Lake Lake Dawson Lake Creek Dawson DawsonCreek Creek Dawson Creek Thompson Thompson Thompson Grande Prairie Grande GrandePrairie Prairie Grande Prairie Flin Flon Flin FlinFlon Flon Flin Flon Prince RupertPrince PrinceRupert RupertPrince Rupert Prince Albert Prince PrinceAlbert Albert Prince Albert Prince Prince Prince Prince George George George Red Deer George Red RedDeer Deer Red Deer Saskatoon Saskatoon Saskatoon Saskatoon Bear Lake

Kamloops Kamloops

Williston Williston

Spokane Spokane Spokane Spokane Seattle Seattle Seattle Butte

Butte Butte

Vigo

Vigo Vigo

Porto

Porto Porto

Marseille

Naples

Duluth Duluth

Duluth

Amos

ATA LA TAT LA LNATAT LN N IC ATT N II CCT I C

B MONTENEGRO MONT MON

A Tunis Tunis Tunis Athens Tunis At Malta Ma Ma

Casablanca Casablanca Casablanca Casablanca Ouargla

Tampa

Reggane

Araouane

Manaus Manaus Manaus Manaus Belem Talara

Lima

Middle Middle Middle East EastEast Sochi

Sochi Sochi Ordzhonikidze Sochi Ordzhonikidze Aqtau Ordzhonikidze Aqtau Aqtau Ordzhonikidze

TbilisiPoti Tbilisi Poti TbilisiPoti Poti Tbilisi Zonguldak Zonguldak Zonguldak Zonguldak Istanbul Istanbul Istanbul Istanbul Ankara Bursa Ankara Bursa Bursa Ankara Bursa Ankara Yerevan Yerevan Yerevan Yerevan

Izmir

TURKEY TURKEY TURKEY TURKEY

Izmir Izmir Antalya

Izmir

Antalya Antalya Adana Nicosia

Antalya Adana Adana Aleppo

Adana Aleppo Aleppo Mosel

Nicosia Nicosia SYRIANicosia SYRIA SYRIA

Tabriz

Aqtau Nukus

PERU PERU

Trujillo Trujillo

Lima Lima

Nukus Nukus

PERU

Trujillo

Sao Goncalo Sao SaoGoncalo Goncalo Sao Goncalo Recife Cachimbo

Iraklion Iraklion

Iraklion

SYRIA

Mashhad

Mashhad Mashhad

Aswan

Neuquen

SAUDI ARABIA SAUDI SAUDIARABIA ARABIA SAUDI ARABIA OMAN OMAN OMAN

Atbara Atbara

SUDAN SUDAN SUDAN SUDAN

AlAlFashir Fashir

Neuquen

Al FashirMekele

OMAN

Atbara

Al Ghaydan AlAlGhaydan Ghaydan Salalah Al Ghaydan Salalah Salalah Sana’aSana’a Sana’a Sana’a

KhartoumKhartoum Khartoum Khartoum Asmara Asmara Asmara Asmara YEMEN YEMEN YEMEN YEMEN Al Fashir

Neuquen Neuquen

EGYPT

Port Sudan Port PortSudan Sudan Port Sudan Atbara

Al Mukalla AlAlMukalla Mukalla Taizz Taizz Mekele Mekele TaizzMekele Taizz Aseb Aseb Aseb Aseb

Djibouti Djibouti Djibouti Djibouti

Al Mukalla

K

Dem. o GABON GABON GABON GAB CONGO Brazzaville Brazzaville Brazzaville Br

O CO OE CC AOEENC AA EN NA NLuandaLuanda Luanda Luand

Recife

Huambo Hua Hu

ANGOLA ANG ANG

NAMIBIA NAMIBIA NAMIBIA

BOTSW

WindhoekWindh Wind Walvis Bay Walvis WalvisBay Bay Walvis

Johannesbu Johan Johan Luderitz Luderitz L

Luderitz

Bloem

Porto Alegre Porto PortoAlegre Alegre Porto Alegre

Bandar AbbasBandar BandarAbbas Abbas Bandar Abbas Valdivia Valdivia Valdivia Valdivia Dammam Dammam Dammam Dammam Bahrain Bahrain Bahrain Bahrain Al Medinah Al Al Medinah Medinah Al Medinah Aswan Aswan Aswan Doha Doha Doha Doha Riyadh Riyadh Riyadh Riyadh Muscat Muscat Muscat Muscat Mecca Mecca Mecca Mecca Comodoro Rivadavia Comodoro ComodoroRivadavia Rivadavia Comodoro Rivadavia Jeddah Jeddah Jeddah Jeddah Al Khaluf AlAlKhaluf Khaluf Al Khaluf

EGYPT EGYPT

Bilma Bilma

Kinshasa Kin Kin

Recife Recife

Nukus

Mashhad

Suef El-Minya Suef El-Minya El-Minya Suef El-Minya Suef

EGYPT

Bilma Araouane

E

Barreiras Barreiras BRAZIL BRAZIL BRAZIL Barreiras BRAZIL Barreiras Lima BOLIVIA BOLIVIA BOLIVIA BOLIVIA Salvador Salvador Salvador Salvador Brasilia Brasilia Brasilia Brasilia Cuiaba Cuiaba Cuiaba Cuiaba La Paz La LaPaz Paz La Paz Goiania Goiania Goiania Goiania Sucre Sucre Sucre Sucre Belo Horizonte Belo BeloHorizonte Horizonte Belo Horizonte

Bakhtaran Bakhtaran Bakhtaran Bakhtaran BeirutBeirut Beirut Beirut Herat Herat Damascus Damascus Damascus Damascus IRAN IRAN IRAN Herat IRAN Herat Rosario Rosario Rosario Rosario Amman Amman Amman Amman URUGUAYURUGUAY Baghdad Baghdad Baghdad Baghdad Santiago Santiago Santiago Santiago URUGUAYURUGUAY Esfahan Esfahan Esfahan Esfahan ARGENTINA ARGENTINA ARGENTINA ARGENTINA Jerusalem Jerusalem Jerusalem Jerusalem Alexandria Alexandria Alexandria Alexandria Buenos Aires Buenos BuenosAires Aires Buenos Aires IRAQ IRAQ IRAQ Basra IRAQ Basra Basra Basra Port Said Port PortSaid Said Port Said Montevideo Montevideo Montevideo Montevideo Kerman Kerman Kerman Kerman JORDAN JORDAN JORDAN JORDAN Concepcion Concepcion Concepcion Concepcion Suez Cairo Suez Suez Suez Cairo Cairo Cairo Zahedan Zahedan Zahedan Zahedan Shiraz Shiraz Shiraz Kuwait Kuwait Kuwait Kuwait Bam Shiraz Bam Bam Bam Beni Beni Beni Beni

Iraklion

Araouane Araouane

EQUATORIAL EQUATORIAL EQUATORIAL GUINEA EQUATORIAL GUINEA GUINEA GUINEA SAO TOME &SAO SAO PRINCIPE TOME TOME&&SAO PRINCIPE PRINCIPE TOME & REPUBLIC PRINCIPE OF REPUBL REPUB Libreville Libreville Libreville Libr CONGO CONGO CONGO Sao Tome Sao SaoTome Tome Sao Tome

São Paulo São São Paulo Paulo São Paulo

Tehran Tehran Tehran Tehran Mosel

LIB LI

Djanet Al Jawf

LagosLagos Abidjan Abidjan Abidjan AbidjanLagosLagos AccraAccra AccraAccra Yaounde Yaounde Yaounde

Rio RioDe DeJaneiro Janeiro Rio De Janeiro PARAGUAY PARAGUAY PARAGUAY PARAGUAYRio De Janeiro Antofagasta Antofagasta Antofagasta Antofagasta Baku Baku Baku Baku Curitiba Curitiba Curitiba Curitiba TURKMENISTAN TURKMENISTAN TURKMENISTAN TURKMENISTAN AsuncionAsuncion Asuncion Asuncion CHILE CHILE CHILE CHILE Ardabil Ardabil Ardabil Ardabil AshgabatAshgabat Ashgabat Ashgabat Tabriz Tabriz Tabriz

Aleppo Mosel Mosel

Djanet Djanet

Nouakchott Nouakchott Nouakchott Nouakchott NIGER NIGER NIGERCHAD NIGERCC SENEGALSENEGAL SENEGALSENEGAL Niamey Niamey Niamey Niamey Bamako Bamako Bamako Bamako GAMBIA GAMBIA GAMBIA GAMBIA BURKINABURKINA FASO BURKINAFASO BURKINA FASO NIGERIAFASO NIGERIA NIGERIA NIGERIA N’Djamena N’Dj N’D GUINEA BISSAU GUINEA GUINEABISSAU BISSAU GUINEA BISSAU GUINEA GUINEA GUINEA GUINEA BENIN BENIN BENIN BENIN Abuja Abuja GHANA GHANA Abuja GHANA Abuja Conakry Conakry Conakry ConakryGHANA TOGO TOGO TOGO TOGO COTE COTE COTE COTE Freetown Freetown Freetown Freetown Porto Novo Porto PortoNovo Novo CENTRAL Porto Novo CENT CENT AFRI D'IVOIRE D'IVOIRE D'IVOIRE D'IVOIRE SIERRA LEONE SIERRA SIERRALEONE LEONE SIERRA LEONE RR Lome Lome Lome Lome REPUBLIC CAMEROON CAMEROON CAMEROON CAME LIBERIA LIBERIA LIBERIA LIBERIA Malabo Bangui Malabo Malabo Malabo

Belem Belem Belem Fortaleza Fortaleza Fortaleza Fortaleza

Porto Velho Porto PortoVelho Velho Porto Velho Cachimbo Cachimbo Cachimbo

Sabhah Sabha

MALI

DakarDakar DakarDakar

COSTA RICA COSTA COSTARICA RICA COSTA RICA

Trujillo

MALI MALI

MAURITANIA MAURITANIA MAURITANIA MAURITANIA

GUATEMALA GUATEMALA GUATEMALA GUATEMALA NICARAGUA NICARAGUA NICARAGUA NICARAGUA EL SALVADOR EL ELSALVADOR SALVADOR EL SALVADOR Caracas Caracas Caracas Caracas

PERU

Sabhah Reggane

LIBYA Djanet

CUBA CUBA CUBA CUBA DOM. REP. DOM. DOM.REP. REP. DOM. REP. JAMAICAJAMAICA JAMAICAJAMAICA BELIZE BELIZE BELIZE BELIZE HAITI HAITI HAITI HAITI HONDURAS HONDURAS HONDURAS HONDURAS

Talara Talara

Reggane Reggane

WESTERNWESTERN WESTERNWESTERN SAHARA SAHARA SAHARA SAHARA

THE BAHAMAS THE THEBAHAMAS BAHAMAS THE BAHAMAS Havana Havana Havana Havana

Talara

Ouargla TripoliTripoli Tripoli Tripol

Ouargla Ouargla MOROCCO MOROCCO MOROCCO MOROCCO

Canary Islands Canary CanaryIslands Islands Canary Islands ALGERIAALGERIA ALGERIAALGERIA

Georgetown Georgetown Georgetown Georgetown VENEZUELA VENEZUELA VENEZUELA VENEZUELA PANAMA PANAMA PANAMA PANAMA Paramaribo Paramaribo Paramaribo Paramaribo Bogota Bogota BogotaGUYANA BogotaGUYANA GUYANA GUYANA FRENCH GUIANA FRENCH FRENCHGUIANA GUIANA FRENCH GUIANA SURINAME SURINAME SURINAME SURINAME COLOMBIA COLOMBIA COLOMBIA COLOMBIA QuitoECUADOR Quito Quito Quito ECUADOR ECUADOR ECUADOR

Varna Burgas

Vaa

Gibraltar Gibraltar Gibraltar Gibraltar Algiers Algiers Algiers Algiers TUNISIA TUNISIA TUNISIA TUNIS Rabat Rabat Rabat Rabat

Mexico City Mexico MexicoCity City Mexico City

Varna Varna Burgas Burgas

Ostersun Ostersu

Frankfurt Frankfurt Frankfurt Fran Paris Paris Paris AUSTRIA AUSTRIA AUSTRIA Munich Munich Munich Munich Zurich Zurich Zurich Zurich Nantes Nantes Nantes Nantes Vienna Vie Vie RO SWITZ. FRANCE SWITZ. SWITZ. SWITZ. FRANCE FRANCE FRANCE Venice Milan Venice Venice Buc Milan Milan Milan Bayonne Bayonne BayonneNice BayonneNice Nice Nice ITALY ITALY ITALY SERBIAITA

MALI

Varna Burgas

Ostersund

Ske Sk

MACE Zaragoza Zaragoza Zaragoza Zaragoza Rome Rome Rome Rome Madrid Madrid Madrid Madrid Naples ALBANIA Naples Naples PORTUGAL PORTUGAL PORTUGAL PORTUGAL GRE SPAIN SPAIN SPAIN SPAIN Ponta Delgada Ponta PontaDelgada Delgada Ponta Delgada Lisbon Lisbon Lisbon SevillaLisbon Sevilla Sevilla Sevilla

Atlanta

Tampa Tampa Tampa Houston Houston Houston Houston

O CO OE CC AOEENC AA EN NA N

Lulea

Paris

Jacksonville Jacksonville Jacksonville Jacksonville New Orleans New NewOrleans Orleans New Orleans

P A PPC AAI P FCCIAIICFFCIIICCF I C

SWEDEN SW S Skelleftea

NORWAY NORWAY Torshavn Torshavn Torshavn Torshavn NORWAY NORWAY YUGOSLAVIA YUGOSLAVIA YUGOSLAVIA YUGOSLAVIA Hel Oslo Oslo Oslo Oslo Naples Naples Stockholm Stockholm Stockholm Taranto Naples Taranto Taranto Taranto Tallinn

MontrealOttawa Montreal Montreal Montreal Ottawa Ottawa

Ottawa

Dallas Dallas Dallas Atlanta Atlanta Atlanta Birmingham Birmingham Birmingham Birmingham

MEXICO MEXICO MEXICO MEXICO

Kiruna

Gothenburg Gothenburg Gothenburg Gothenburg SCOTLAND SCOTLAND SCOTLAND SCOTLAND DENMARK DENMARK DENMARK DENMARK Copenhagen Copenha Copenh Glasgow Glasgow Glasgow Glasgow LITHU

Moosonee

Amos Amos Timmins

ToledoToledo ToledoToledo New York New New York York New York

Dallas

A

Newcastle Newcastle NewcastleNewcastle N. IRELAND N. N.IRELAND IRELAND N. IRELAND Gdansk ENGLANDENGLAND ENGLAND ENGLAND Hamburg Hamburg Hamburg POLANDHambu POLA POL NETH. NETH. NETH. NETH. Manchester Manchester Manchester Manchester Birmingham Birmingham Birmingham Birmingham U. K. U. U.K. K. U. K. War IRELAND IRELAND IRELAND WALES IRELAND WALES WALES WALES GERMANY GERMANY GERMANY GERMA London London London London Dusseldorf Dusseldorf Dusseldorf Dussel Krakow

Toronto Toronto Toronto Toronto

Tucson

Gdansk

RomeRome RomeRome

Zaragoza Zaragoza Zaragoza Zaragoza Porto Madrid Madrid Madrid Madrid S P A I N SS PPAA I I NN S P A I N

MilwaukeeMilwaukee Milwaukee Twin Falls Twin TwinFalls Falls Twin Falls DetroitMilwaukee Detroit Detroit Detroit Buffalo Buffalo Buffalo BostonBuffalo Boston Boston Boston Scottsbluff Scottsbluff ScottsbluffChicago ScottsbluffChicago Chicago Chicago Omaha Omaha Omaha Omaha Provo Provo Provo Provo Reno Reno Reno Reno BaltimoreBaltimore Kansas City Kansas KansasCity City Kansas City BaltimoreBaltimore Philadelphia Philadelphia Philadelphia Philadelphia Denver Denver Denver U. S. A. Denver U. U.S. S. A. A. St. U. A. St. Louis Washington Oakland Oakland Oakland Oakland Washington Washington D. C. Washington D. D.C. C. D. C. St. Louis St.S. Louis Louis Norfolk Norfolk Norfolk Norfolk Charlotte Charlotte Charlotte Charlotte Albuquerque Albuquerque Albuquerque Albuquerque Memphis Memphis Memphis Memphis Las Vegas Las LasVegas Vegas Las Vegas

Tucson Tucson Tucson San DiegoSan SanDiego Diego San Diego

Marseille Marseille

Labrador CityLabrador LabradorCity CityLabrador City

Minneapolis Minneapolis Minneapolis Minneapolis

an Francisco San San Francisco Francisco San Francisco Los Angeles Los LosAngeles Angeles Los Angeles

Marseille

Valencia Valencia Valencia Valencia PORTUGAL PORTUGAL PORTUGAL PORTUGAL Valdepenas Valdepenas Lisbon Lisbon Lisbon Valdepenas Lisbon Valdepenas

Inukjuak

Moosonee Moosonee

Brandon Amos Timmins Timmins Timmins Williston Grand Forks Grand GrandForks Forks Grand Forks Duluth

Gdansk Gdansk

V

Moosonee

Butte

Portland Portland Portland Portland

Lugo

Burgos Burgos Burgos ANDORRA Burgos ANDORRA ANDORRA Vigo ANDORRA

Thompson

Swift Current Swift SwiftCurrent Current Swift Current Brandon Brandon Brandon Williston

Seattle

Inukjuak Inukjuak

Lugo Lugo

CANADA CANADA CANADA CANADA

Calgary Calgary Calgary Kamloops Calgary

Vancouver Vancouver Vancouver Vancouver

Gdansk

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Salalah

Port Stanley Port PortStanley Stanley Port Stanley

SOUTH A

Cape Town Cape Cape Town Town Cape


A R AAC RRT ACC IC RTT C II CCT I C

O CO OE CC AOEENC AA EN NA N

Down Under View

Alta

Alta Alta

Alta Murmansk Kiruna

Kiruna Kiruna

As a relief pilot seated in the jump seat Khatanga for flight EK425 from Perth to Dubai Khatanga Khatanga Volochanka (we use relief pilots for everyVolochanka flightVolochanka over Volochanka 10 hours, to provide the operating crew Norilsk Norilsk Norilsk Norilsk Dudinka Dudinka Dudinka some rest) I tookAntipayuta this Dudinka photo takeoff Antipayuta Antipayuta after Antipayuta from Runway 21. Air traffic control Vorkuta Vorkuta Vorkuta Vorkuta usually vectors the flight along the Igarka Igarka Igarka Igarka Swan River, flying over Fremantle and Rottnest Island to the west of the city.

Murmansk Murmansk

Murmansk

SWEDEN WEDEN SWEDEN Lulea Lulea

kelleftea elleftea

Lulea Skelleftea

Archangelsk Archangelsk Archangelsk Archangelsk FINLAND FINLAND FINLAND und ndFINLAND Ostersund

asa

Vaasa Vaasa

Vaasa Syktyvkar

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Syktyvkar Syktyvkar

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m Stockholm nm Tallinn Tallinn ESTONIA

Vologda Vologda Vologda Tallinn St. St. Petersburg St.Petersburg Petersburg St. Petersburg

ESTONIA ESTONIA ESTONIA Novgorod Novgorod Novgorod

Vologda Kirov Kirov Kirov

Ust-Olenek Ust-Olenek Ust-Olenek Ust-Olenek Khatanga

Belaja Gora Belaja BelajaGora Gora Belaja Gora

Batagay

Sangar

R U S SRRI U A U SS SSRI I A U AS S I A Mirnyj

SyktyvkarOfficer David Behar First Nizhnevartovsk Nizhnevartovsk Nizhnevartovsk Nizhnevartovsk Boeing 777 Flying with Emirates for 4 years and 2 months Kirov

Mirnyj Mirnyj

Batagay Batagay

Sangar Sangar

Batagay

Sangar

Mirnyj Jakutsk

Jakutsk Jakutsk

Jakutsk

Magadan

Magadan Magadan

Magadan

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Almaty Almaty Almaty Almaty

Istanbul Istanbul Istanbul Istanbul

Athens thensAthens alta alta Malta Larnaca Larnaca Larnaca Larnaca

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Beijing Beijing Beijing Beijing SeoulSeoul SeoulSeoul

Bagram Bagram Bagram Bagram Peshawar Peshawar Peshawar Peshawar KabulKabul KabulIslamabad KabulIslamabad Islamabad Islamabad

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Shanghai Shanghai Shanghai Shanghai

Lahore Lahore Lahore Lahore Delhi Delhi Delhi Delhi

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Mecca Mecca

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Canberra Canberra Canberra Canberra

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NjȮſȚǍȮȮű ȝȚȤƾȮȮžȁȚ ȰNjȮȮƶȮȮź ǠȮȮŮȢ ǠȮź ǙȮƄȮƸȮȮŮ

your home in dubai

‫ﻳﻘﻊ اﻟﻔﻨﺪق ﻓﻲ ﻗﻠﺐ اﻟﻤﺪﻳﻨﺔ‬

sheikh zayed road, Dubai

‫ﻳﺘﻮﺳﻂ ﻗﻠﺐ ﻣﺮﻛﺰ دﺑﻲ ﻟ�ﻋﻤﺎل‬ ‫ دﻗﺎﺋﻖ‬٥ – ‫ﺑﺮج ﺧﻠﻴﻔﺔ ودﺑﻲ ﻣﻮل‬ ‫ﻣﺤﻄﺔ اﻟﻤﺘﺮو أﻣﺎم اﻟﻔﻨﺪق‬ ‫ دﻗﻴﻘﺔ‬٤٥-‫ﻣﻄﺎر أﺑﻮ ﻇﺒﻲ‬ ‫ دﻗﻴﻘﺔ‬١٥-‫ﻣﻄﺎر دﺑﻲ‬ ‫ دﻗﺎﺋﻖ‬٥-‫ﺷﺎﻃﺊ اﻟﺠﻤﻴﺮا‬ ‫ دﻗﺎﺋﻖ‬١٠-‫ﺳﻜﻲ دﺑﻲ‬/‫ﻣﻮل ا�ﻣﺎرات‬

Our Location

‫ دﻗﺎﺋﻖ‬٥-‫ﻣﺮﻛﺰ دﺑﻲ اﻟﻤﺎﻟﻲ اﻟﻌﺎﻟﻤﻲ‬ ‫ دﻗﺎﺋﻖ‬٥-‫ﻣﺮﻛﺰ دﺑﻲ اﻟﺪوﻟﻲ ﻟﻠﻤﺆﺗﻤﺮات‬ ‫ ﻣﺮﻛﺰ رﺟﺎل ا�ﻋﻤﺎل وﻗﺎﻋﺎت اﻻﺟﺘﻤﺎﻋﺎت‬،‫ أﺟﻨﺤﺔ‬،‫ ﻏﺮﻓﺔ‬٥٠٠ ‫ﺳﺒﺎ وﺣﻤﺎم ﺳﺒﺎﺣﺔ ﺧﺎرﺟﻲ‬ ‫ﻟﻠﺘﺮﻓﻴﻪ وا�ﻋﻤﺎل‬ Located in the heart of Dubai Centre of Dubai’s business district Burj Khalifa and Dubai Mall – 5 min. Metro Station in front of Hotel Abu Dhabi Airport – 45 min. Dubai Airport – 15 min. Jumeirah Beach – 5 min. Mall of the Emirates/Ski Dubai – 10 min. Dubai International Financial Centre – 5 min. Dubai International Convention Centre – 5 min. 500 rooms, suites, business centers & meeting rooms Spa & outdoor Swimming Pool. For leisure & business

150 $ Starting Rate, Terms and conditions apply

‫ ﺗﻄﺒﻖ اﻟﺸﺮوط وا�ﺣﻜﺎم‬.ً‫ دوﻻرا‬١٥٠ ‫ﺗﺒﺪأ ا�ﺳﻌﺎر ﻣﻦ‬

P.O. Box 32161, Dubai, United Arab Emirates Tel: +971 4 323 0000 I Fax: +971 4 323 0003 reservation@emiratesgrandhotel.com


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CAPTURING THE JOURNEY OF THE UAE IN 1600 PICTURES The United Arab Emirates has moved from sand dunes to skyscrapers; from building dhows to building man-made islands; from camels to Ferraris. Gulf News has captured this journey in ‘The Rise of a Nation’ – a book that tells you the fascinating story through a rare collection of pictures. These speak to you about the news, events and everyday moments of people who have contributed to this phenomenal growth – giving you a lasting memento of the country you live in.

Available at all leading bookstores across the UAE for AED 200. For more information, call 800 4585.


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