Page 1

M OT E M A R I N E L A B O R ATO RY

2020 Vision & Strategic Plan VERSION 2.0

Mote Marine Laboratory 1


For generations, we have been taking from the sea. Now, it’s time to start giving back.” — William R. Mote

2 2020 Vision & Strategic Plan 2.0


C O NT ENT S Letter from the Chairman of the Board .......................................... p. 4 Letter from the President & CEO ..................................................... p. 6 Foreword ............................................................................................... p. 10 Mote Marine Laboratory: A Vision for 2020 ................................ p. 14 Mote Marine Laboratory: Our Mission .......................................... p. 16 Strategic Priorities

World-Class Research ........................................................... p. 18

Next Generation ..................................................................... p. 20

Translate & Transfer for Impact ......................................... p. 22

Public Service ......................................................................... p. 24

Enabling Strategies ............................................................................. p. 26 Foundations: Highlights from Mote’s Past .................................... p. 28 Mote Marine Laboratory: Today ...................................................... p. 33 Appendices

Vital Statistics ......................................................................... p. A3

Comparison of Peer Institutions ........................................ p. A5

Mote Marine Laboratory 3


4 2020 Vision & Strategic Plan 2.0


L E T T ER Dear Friends, The information presented in this document provides an update to the 2020 Vision & Strategic Plan that was first presented — with unanimous endorsement by the Mote Board of Trustees — in 2010. The Board unanimously supports this update. The Lab’s future builds upon a successful foundation of marine research, outreach and educational endeavors. This Strategic Plan places the Lab on the sound financial footing needed to advance marine and environmental sciences into the 21st century and beyond and will lead to greater understanding and sustainability of our oceans. Today, we know that hundreds of marine species are in danger of extinction, coral reefs are in peril, fish populations are collapsing worldwide and oceans face previously unforeseen threats. Mote Marine Laboratory is at a critical juncture in our history as we bring all of our resources to bear in addressing these unfortunate realities. We know the challenges facing the world’s oceans are enormous and Mote’s Board of Trustees is unanimously investing in supporting Mote today so that the Lab will be able to continue its work to better understand, restore and conserve our oceans for tomorrow. Our core principles and strategic priorities remain intact with this update providing a refined course to ensure the successful future of Mote Marine Laboratory. I invite you to join us in our mission by embracing our 2020 Vision for the future.

Eugene H. Beckstein Chairman, Board of Trustees

Mote Marine Laboratory 5


6 2020 Vision & Strategic Plan 2.0


L E T T ER Dear Friends, The story of Mote Marine Laboratory is one built on a foundation of three pillars: passion, partnership and philanthropy. First, there was the passion for research held by our founding director, Dr. Eugenie Clark, when she created the lab in 1955. Then, there was her partnership with the community, which joined in many of her efforts. Importantly, there was also the philanthropic support provided first by Ann and William Vanderbilt and, later, by William R. Mote. Without their generous contributions and the support of so many other donors over the years, Mote Marine Laboratory would not be the world-class marine research institution it is today. We have traveled a long way since these early visionaries joined forces to lay a foundation for ocean research that we continue to build upon 60 years later. From the beginning with one Ph.D. scientist working in a one-room laboratory, we are now more than 200 employees strong, including 35 Ph.D. scientists, and have six campuses and field stations extending from Sarasota to Key West. We conduct groundbreaking research not only in our home community of Southwest Florida, but on all of the world’s seven continents. Throughout our history, Mote research has helped to protect and save endangered species and their habitats, solve emerging ocean-related problems and educate millions of children, adults and policy makers about conserving and sustainably using our precious marine resources. In 2010, a vision and strategic plan for the future of this great organization was established and implemented in 2011 with the unanimous support of Mote Marine Laboratory’s Board of Trustees. Since then, we have been guided by our 2020 Vision & Strategic Plan, in which Mote has four priorities:

Mote Marine Laboratory 7


• Significantly increase our ability to conduct world-class research with an emphasis on marine conservation and sustainable use; • Ensure the long-term prosperity of our research enterprise through focused nextgeneration staff recruitment and professional development; • Translate and transfer our science and technology for the betterment of society and the marine environment; • Provide continued public service to our communities.

Since we implemented our Strategic Plan, we have joined forces with colleagues in Israel and Jordan to address the challenges of ocean acidification and climate change and its predicted impacts on the world’s coral reefs. We have partnered with Japan’s Research Institute for Humanity and Nature to show how scientists can work with grassroots community groups to restore depleted species. Our Marine Biomedical, Immunology and Microbiology Research Programs have taken significant steps in developing potential therapies for human cancer and new antibiotics to fight MRSA. We have grown into 24 distinct research programs and implemented the Mote Postdoctoral Fellowship Program to recruit and mentor future scientific leaders of the world. These are significant steps forward toward achieving our 2020 Vision, but Mote must remain independent with the freedom to nimbly create new opportunities and strengthen our foundation for the future if we are to continue to address the real-world challenges facing our oceans. This is why, during our 60th Anniversary Year, we are pleased to share this updated “Version 2.0” of our 2020 Vision & Strategic Plan. Its core principles and strategic priorities remain the same as those outlined in 2010. However, we now present a refined course of action in our final five-year thrust for achieving, with your support, an excitingly aspirational, yet fully achievable vision for the future. Mote’s 2020 Vision & Strategic Plan incorporates bold goals for growth in the impact of our research enterprise and in our ability to help develop the same passion for the oceans in the public — in you — that we ourselves hold dear. Yet, it is also a vision that is built on the three founding pillars of what has made Mote such an incredibly productive institution for 60 years — passion for our science, partnership with the community and philanthropic support to maintain our independence and freedom in order to address the grand challenges facing our oceans.

8 2020 Vision & Strategic Plan 2.0


We ask you to imagine for a moment a world where Dr. Clark and the Vanderbilts never came together to establish that first one-room laboratory in partnership with a local fisherman, or where Bill Mote never invested so much of his energy and wealth to help build this institution that now rightfully bears his name. Without their support, and that of so many others, Mote would never have been able to be one of the vital ecological first responders to the environmental disaster of the BP oil blowout, never have developed innovative ocean engineering to serve as early warning systems for red tide, never have developed sustainable aquaculture technologies that can help feed the world, never have developed methods to literally re-skin massive dead 1,000-year-old corals in a matter of years to restore coral reefs and never have been such a wonderful place for your children and grandchildren to learn about our marine environment. Mote Marine Laboratory is at a critical juncture in our history. The challenges facing our oceans are enormous and the investment needed to understand, restore and protect them is no less significant. We will continue to address these grand challenges and we ask for your support as we do so. The historic success of Mote and its future independence and freedom rely in great part on philanthropy and community partnership as fuel for the passion of our research and education enterprise. Sincerely,

Michael P. Crosby, Ph.D., FLS President & CEO

ship

• P h i l a nt h

ro

py

P a ssi o n

•P

ar

t

r ne

Mote Marine Laboratory 9


10 2020 Vision & Strategic Plan 2.0


F O RE WO R D Mote Marine Laboratory was founded in 1955 as an independent marine research institution supported by philanthropy and embraced by the community. Through the years, Mote has distinguished itself through the seamless integration of its diverse research enterprise with education, public outreach and public policy programs. Mote’s range of programs and services is a keystone attribute defining its uniqueness among its peers. While marine and coastal research has always been Mote’s core function, our endeavors continue to emphasize the need for this research to have a positive impact on the conservation and sustainable use of marine resources for the benefit of our local, national and international communities. It is this global vision that gives Mote the ability to define its scientific mission as both local and worldwide in scope. Many of today’s leading marine scientists, oceanographers and ecologists who are helping to solve pressing problems facing our oceans today received their early scientific spark at a public aquarium or marine laboratory. Since we opened our doors, Mote has invited, and supported, thousands of young researchers’ investigations of the marine world, exciting their passions for the oceans for the betterment of us all. Our unique public outreach and education programs have also inspired and educated millions — young and old alike — to become better stewards of the coastal environment.

A Rare Gem The overwhelming majority of marine laboratories around the world are either part of universities or owned by national or state governments. Few are like Mote — independent, nonprofit organizations able to nimbly respond to rapidly evolving local and regional needs and threats related to marine resources. This entrepreneurial spirit is strongly embedded in Mote’s culture. It is fuel for effectiveness and critical to attracting high quality staff and scientists. In this regard, Mote Marine Laboratory is indeed a rare gem. According to the National Association of Marine Laboratories, there are an estimated 120 marine research laboratories in the United States. While Mote is not as large as institutions with major endowments such as Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution or the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, it is still considered one of the larger and highly productive independent marine research laboratories.

Mote Marine Laboratory 11


Historically, Mote’s strengths have included a close bond with Southwest Florida’s communities, along with a national and international reputation for excellence in scientific research unencumbered by university and agency politics or bureaucracies. Although this is a valuable quality to be maintained and preserved, it requires focusing Mote’s entire enterprise on those strategic initiatives that advance its mission, impact and reputation in the scientific community and in the public sector. Unlike most of its peers that have an umbilical connection of dependency to government funding for operations, Mote is solely responsible for securing financial resources for its operations. Our scientists are highly successful entrepreneurs in securing competitive research grants, but have no guarantees of university tenure. Given the changing landscape for government grants and the increasing cost for scientific research, it is imperative that Mote further leverage its unique and special qualities to expand and strengthen its fundraising position among individuals, foundations and corporations.

Envisioning the Future Mote Marine Laboratory’s long history of success has been based on the three pillars that Mote was founded upon: The passion for science that Dr. Eugenie Clark brought with her when she created the Laboratory; the philanthropic support provided initially by the Vanderbilt family and later by the Mote family; and our partnership with the community in so many of our endeavors. Our staff today share Genie’s same passion for the marine science essential for wisely conserving and sustainably utilizing our shared ocean resources. We remain empowered by strong support from our community and our fully engaged Board of Trustees, Advisory Committees and more than 1,600 volunteers. 12 2020 Vision & Strategic Plan 2.0

Throughout Mote’s history, generous donors have played a vital role in providing muchneeded support, especially for infrastructure. We are now facing the significant — but not uncommon — challenge faced by all successful research institutions: succession planning for the next generation of scientists and the need to continue and expand upon a highly productive and respected research enterprise. As an independent, nonprofit, mission-based organization, Mote’s greatest strength has been its ability to define its own agenda and research based on our communities’ needs and our scientists’ expertise. A main challenge is the necessity to raise funds for even basic operations. In a university or governmental setting, such funds would be available through legislative appropriations or educational revenue. For Mote to remain a strong and independent nonprofit organization able to fulfill its mission, it is imperative to build a robust endowment of at least $40 million by 2020. Mote must also secure aggressive new goals in corporate, foundation and individual philanthropic funding for targeted programs, research and science infrastructure initiatives.

Road Map for Success When we first presented the Mote Marine Laboratory 2020 Vision & Strategic Plan in 2010, it was designed to be a road map for the future, identifying key priorities and goals for the institution. We also outlined strategies to be undertaken that would lead to success. Our goals — integrated across the entire organization — remain essentially the same; reaching them will enable Mote to remain competitive and in a leadership position in the following areas:


• Marine and coastal research, especially as it relates to conservation and sustainable use of resources; • Attracting, nurturing and retaining high-quality, professional staff members; • Positively impacting human society and the marine environment; • Adapting to a changing economic and social environment in the 21st century; • Capitalizing on intellectual property products; • Securing resources needed for financial stability.

Since we first developed this guiding document for the future, we have celebrated many successes in achieving — and even exceeding — key benchmark milestones in our progress toward our 2020 goals. Among them: Our Mote Postdoctoral Fellowship Program has been implemented and we have supported six Fellows as they begin their scientific careers. We have developed new international partnerships with colleagues in Israel and Jordan that are achieving great success in understanding — and finding solutions to respond to — worldwide problems such as ocean acidification. Our partnership with Japanese colleagues is also looking at the knowledge transfer that occurs between grassroots community groups and the scientific institutions in those communities to show how groups like Mote and our community partners work together to restore depleted species. We are also collaborating with the Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences — China’s national fishery science research institution — for studies of restocking and aquaculture.

We’re expanding our outreach to decision makers to ensure that management of limited marine resources has a strong base in the best scientific knowledge and understanding available. In 2014, we completed the sale of our sturgeon and caviar operations, marking the first major private business spin-off from Mote research. This achieves a major goal for our 2020 Vision & Strategic Plan and is a great example of how our basic research has led to innovations in water recirculation technology and a new private business based on Mote’s intellectual property. We have also expanded the number of underserved students participating in our informal science education and outreach programs so that we may continue our efforts to develop a more ocean-literate society. Yet even as we celebrate our success in reaching many of these benchmarks, we recognize the importance of evaluating our progress in reaching our 2020 Vision & Strategic Plan goals; but equally important is evaluating our priorities and the strategies we are undertaking to implement them. For this reason, we are presenting this updated version of our Strategic Plan. When the plan was unveiled in 2010, the Mote Marine Laboratory Board of Trustees unanimously believed that fully implementing this plan by 2020 would enable the comprehensive and integrated success of Mote. Today, we remain committed to this course. By bringing together the best minds for inquiry, discovery, innovation, teaching and policy development, Mote Marine Laboratory in the 21st century will be among the most creative and fruitful research enterprises in the world. Mote Marine Laboratory 13


14 2020 Vision & Strategic Plan 2.0


V ISIO N Mote Marine Laboratory: A 2020 Vision for the 21st Century As a foundation for Mote Marine Laboratory’s growth and prosperity, enhanced quality of programs and profound respect for the marine environment, this Strategic Plan is built upon attaining the following vision by the year 2020: Mote Marine Laboratory will be a leader in nationally and internationally respected research programs that are relevant to conservation and the sustainable use of marine biodiversity, healthy habitats and natural resources. Mote research programs will positively impact a diversity of public policy challenges through strong linkages to public outreach and education.

We envision a comprehensive and integrated enterprise with research, innovation and public education and outreach programs that are among the most creative and fruitful in the world. Mote’s diversified enterprise in 2020 must be supported by a technologically capable workforce, yet be agile and resilient to the external forces of economic conditions. The core values of the Lab in 2020 will continue to be those it has maintained during its first halfcentury of significant accomplishments: • Leadership in marine resource conservation and enhancement; • Integrity and ethics in all endeavors; • Creativity, collegiality, collaboration and partnerships as foundations for achieving goals; • Responsible stewardship of both natural resources and fiscal assets; • Service to our local, state, regional, national and international communities.

Mote Marine Laboratory 15


16 2020 Vision & Strategic Plan 2.0


M ISSIO N The advancement of marine and environmental sciences through scientific research, education and public outreach leading to new discoveries, revitalization and sustainability of our oceans and greater public understanding of our marine resources.

A holistic institutional focus on the strategic priorities, goals and enabling strategies articulated in the following sections of this document is essential for Mote to fulfill its mission with the unprecedented responsiveness and clarity of purpose required for success in the 21st century. The Mote Marine Laboratory Board of Trustees fully endorses this strategic plan and believes that successfully implementing the following enabling strategies and achieving the specific goals presented herein will enable the Lab to achieve our shared 2020 Vision.

The challenges we face in managing our oceans effectively also present opportunities for innovation, collaboration, and actions. Our oceans are held in public trust, and we must act together to secure the future of our oceans and health and wealth of our nation.� — Charting the Course: Securing the Future of America’s Oceans, Joint Ocean Commission Initiative, 2013 William Ruckelshaus and Norman Mineta, Co-Chairs

Mote Marine Laboratory 17


I wouldn’t take a thing away from what we’re doing with space exploration and I applaud it. But we should have an equal commitment to exploring this part of space — this aquatic planet that does happen to be the only place that we know in the universe that’s suitable for 6 billion people.” — Dr. Sylvia Earle, Oceanographer, National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence, Mote Trustee

18 2020 Vision & Strategic Plan 2.0


S T R AT EG IC P R I OR I T Y 1 WORLD-CLASS RESEARCH Significantly increase Mote’s ability to conduct world-class research with an emphasis on conservation, sustainable use and environmental health of marine and coastal biodiversity, habitats and resources.

1. Increase the level of funding for annual research operations.

2. Increase annual donations supporting research programs.

3. Increase the total number of multiinstitutional and multidiscipline national/ international marine research initiatives. 4. Increase the total number of institutionlevel (i.e., university, agency, NGO, corporation) research partnership agreements.

$7M

$10M

$16M

2010

2015

2020

$1M

$3M

$7M

2010

2015

2020

0

2

8

2010

2015

2020

surpassed 2015 benchmark

0

5

10

2010

2015

2020

5. Increase the endowment on an annual basis by adding an amount equal to at least five percent of the Lab’s total annual operational budget, each respective year, beginning in 2011.

Mote Marine Laboratory 19


We love our oceans for their beauty and majesty, and for their intrinsic power to relax, rejuvenate and inspire. Unfortunately, we are starting to love our oceans to death.� — Admiral James D. Watkins (Ret.), former Chair, U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy

20 2020 Vision & Strategic Plan 2.0


S T R AT EG IC P R I OR I T Y 2 STAFF RECRUITMENT / NURTURING Ensure long-term prosperity of research enterprise through focused staff recruitment and nurturing programs. 1. Increase the total number of new and continuously 0 rotating two-year Postdoctoral Fellowship positions with 2010 full salary/fringe/start-up costs. 2. Increase the number of Ph.D. research staff to receive 25 percent salary support for the purpose of conducting scholarly and service activities.

7

2015

2020

0

8

15

2010

2015

2020

3. Expand the competitively 0 awarded Eminent Scholar program by increasing the 2010 total number of Ph.D. research staff to receive 50 percent salary support for a period of three years. 4. Increase the internally competitive travel/training/ conference fund to support professional development for Mote staff.

4

3

5

2015

2020

$0

$25K

$50K

2010

2015

2020

5. Finalize at least two full-time research staff sabbatical awards (i.e. inter-governmental personnel agreement) from a federal or state agency by 2020.

Mote Marine Laboratory 21


I urge you to consider some form of legacy gift to this outstanding marine research organization and its dedicated staff. Whatever you give to support Mote today will live on long after you — and do the world a power of good.” — Dwight Davis, Mote Legacy Donor & Volunteer

22 2020 Vision & Strategic Plan 2.0


S T R AT EG IC P R I OR I T Y 3 TRANSLATE AND TRANSFER Translate and transfer science and technology development to positively impact human society and the marine environment. 1. Increase the number of marine science and coastal ecosystem public forums organized by Mote.

1

3

6

2010

2015

2020

surpassed 2020 goal

2. Increase the annual number of marine and coastal ecosystem public policy-oriented publications by Mote from four in 2014 to 16 by 2020. 3. Increase public experiences for marine conservation connections and impressions to maintain Mote Aquarium’s position as the No. 1visited attraction in Southwest Florida by increasing the number of visitors from ~325,000 in 2014 to ~555,000 in 2020. 4. Increase the total number of advanced technology interactive science education stations for public use at Mote Aquarium. 5. Increase the total number of new science and technology intellectual property products (i.e., patents, patent submissions, commercial enterprise spinoffs) that benefit society and provide potential sources of revenue).

3

10

20

2010

2015

2020

6

2010

10

20

2015 2020 surpassed 2015 benchmark

Mote Marine Laboratory 23


Having grown up participating in Mote Marine Laboratory’s outreach programs, I’ve seen first hand how Mote’s powerful combination of research, education and conservation is unlocking the secrets of the ocean and inspiring people of all ages to better understand and protect marine environments.” — Sean Russell, Youth Ocean Conservation Summit Director and former Mote High School Intern

24 2020 Vision & Strategic Plan 2.0


S T R AT EG IC P R I OR I T Y 4 PUBLIC SERVICE Deliver responsible marine conservation and sustainable-use focused public service to local, regional, state, national, international communities. 1. Increase the annual number of Mote-organized presentations by scientists, educators, policy-makers and Mote representatives to local, regional, national or international community groups.

8

10

15

2010

2015

2020

surpassed 2020 goal

2. Increase the total number of participants served by Mote’s structured, informal education programs (i.e., distance learning, field trips, campus programs) from ~30,000 in 2014 to ~35,000 in 2020. 3. Increase the percentage of historically underrepresented or underserved population participants (as defined by the National Science Foundation) in programs that are specifically designed to meet the needs of these populations to 50% of total educational program participants by 2020. 4. Increase the annual number 8 of testimonials and briefings provided by the Lab’s 2010 scientists to elected officials and government representatives.

10

12

2015

2020

surpassed 2020 goal

Mote Marine Laboratory 25


26 2020 Vision & Strategic Plan 2.0


E NAB L ING S T R AT E G I E S These Enabling Strategies, designed to build upon and reinforce Mote’s existing strengths, are concrete actions that will position the Laboratory to achieve the measurable goals that support one or more Strategic Priorities.

ENABLING STRATEGY 1 Conduct a comprehensive review and improvement of current Mote Marine Laboratory organizational structure and its operations with a goal of identifying any modifications required for optimal efficiency and effectiveness in achieving the 2020 Vision & Strategic priorities.

ENABLING STRATEGY 2 Take a national and global leadership role in implementing a new paradigm for improved interactions between and among often-disparate communities of science, public policy and education/outreach.

ENABLING STRATEGY 3 Enhance and expand Mote research and infrastructure to support leadership in the development and implementation of innovative multi-discipline and multi-institutional research partnerships and initiatives in order to address grand challenges in marine and coastal science at regional and international scales.

ENABLING STRATEGY 4 Expand career pathways for Lab staff that attract, nurture and retain a highly skilled and diverse workforce through provision of professional development opportunities, a robust culture of individual creativity, collaboration and mentorship and the incorporation of strategic “next generation” succession planning.

ENABLING STRATEGY 5 Design and implement a 2020 Comprehensive Campaign that will utilize a diverse mix of philanthropic strategies to raise $50 million by 2020, including an additional $30 million to enhance Mote’s endowment. Mote Marine Laboratory 27


FO U ND AT I ON S 1955

1967

Ca pe

Philanthropist Anne Vanderbilt becomes fascinated with the idea of starting a small marine lab after reading Dr. Eugenie Clark’s book, Lady with a Spear, and the description of a small laboratory where Clark had worked in Egypt. In 1954, William Vanderbilt approaches Dr. Clark about starting a similar lab in Placida. In 1955, the Cape Haze Marine Laboratory is born. e Ha

z

The Lab moves to Siesta Key in 1967 and many changes occur — including a change in leadership as Dr. Clark takes a professorship in Maryland. William R. Mote becomes Chairman of the Board and recruits internationally acclaimed shark scientist Dr. Perry Gilbert to lead the Lab.

1978 Erosion at Midnight Pass, Siesta Key, leads the Lab to consider a move back to Placida. Instead, the City of Sarasota and the Arvida Corporation offer seven acres on City Island. Mote Trustees embark on a fundraising campaign and the new campus is dedicated in October.

1980 Mote dedicates the Marine Science Center — its first major public outreach facility. It officially establishes a volunteer training program and advisory board. Today, Mote volunteers donate 200,000 hours of support annually to Lab operations.

1981 Mote makes crucial scientific investments. Among them: a renewed commitment to studies of red tide and marine biomedicine, especially research on the immunity of sharks, skates and rays to cancer. 28


1983 Bio

An external committee of distinguished scientists ed convenes at Mote to create ic Mote raise the level of our educational al R ese arc h a blueprint for growth that activities. is later endorsed by the Board of Mote leads the way in nominating Sarasota Trustees and serves to guide activities. The committee recommends future research Bay for inclusion in the Environmental directions and strengthening public support. Protection Agency’s National Estuary With its strong foundation, Mote is poised Program and hosts it on campus. for extraordinary growth and the change from total dependency on grants to being 1991 supported by a variety of sources, including The Martin-Selby donors, members and Mote Aquarium, Science Education in addition to grants from governmental agencies and private foundations. Center opens with seating for more 1986 than 400 people. This facility Mote Senior Scientist Dr. Kumar Mahadevan allows Mote to host is appointed CEO. Under his guidance, Mote numerous scientific convenes distinguished scientists to develop m al a blueprint for growth and to guide the conferences. Re hab Lab’s research. ili t a t i o n m

M a ri n

eM

am

M ote

Aq

ua

1988

r iu

m

With the opening of a 135,000-gallon aquarium, the Marine Science Center is re-named Mote Aquarium. It continues to showcase the Lab’s scientific research.

1989 Mote expands programs for K-12 students and the JASON Project helps

1993

The City of Sarasota provides an additional 3.5 acres to Mote’s City Island leasehold, which allows for new facilities to be built to expand marine mammal research and rehabilitation efforts.

1995 The Charlotte Harbor National Estuary Program is established, largely due to the strong nomination case for inclusion made by Mote scientists. Mote Marine Laboratory 29


1996

1999

Priscilla Breder and Bill Mote establish the Charles M. Breder Chair to support the study m ra g of the biology, behavior and Pro S e a Tr e k conservation of fishes. Mote Aquarium begins its own distance learning program utilizing state-of-the-art videoconferencing technology. This program became known as SeaTrek.

1997

Bill Mote and Sanford Reis establish the Perry W. Gilbert Chair in Shark Research to support a resident scientist in the field of shark biology.

Mote acquires property on Summerland Key for new research efforts that expand Keys-based operations from a small field station opened in 1993 to a full-fledged Tropical Research .M Laboratory. ot r

1998

2000

M

Sylvia and Mel Levi establish the Endowed Chair for Ecotoxicology. Donna Steigerwaldt and Jockey International support a new 200,000-gallon lagoon for marine mammal rehabilitation efforts. Jane and David Allen support a new habitat for resident manatees Hugh and Buffett in the Ann and Alfred Goldstein Marine Mammal Research and Rehabilitation Center.

Mote dedicates the new three-story building connecting Mote Aquarium and the Laboratory research building.

e

Mr. William R. Mote, the Lab’s namesake, passes away. Mr. Mote was a Tampa native, a successful transportation executive and an avid fisherman.

2003 Mote develops the capability to file for patents to protect discoveries developed by staff.

2004

Re

se a

rc h

With the support of Ed and Elaine Keating, Mote’s Keating Marine Education Center opens, allowing for expanded educational programming.

ar

k Sh

30 2020 Vision & Strategic Plan 2.0

Mote strengthens its coral reef research programs through the new Florida “Protect Our Reefs” specialty license plate.


Mo

2006

te

Mote Aquaculture Fa rm r Park, now fully ia -R a av i C s e d evolved into a stateof-the-art commercial demonstration project innovating filtration and animal husbandry techniques to grow marine and freshwater species, produces and sells caviar for the first time.

i

nc

:A

n

Mote Aquarium is again accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums. The “Sudakoff Shark Zone” opens, highlighting shark research and ground is broken for the Barry J. Kingman exhibit, “Sea Turtles: Ancient Survivors.” The Deep Sea Diner celebrates its first full year, adding value for visitors.

Dr. Michael P. Crosby is appointed as Mote Senior Vice President for Research. Mote begins a new visioning process, evaluating all aspects of the organization — from scientific research to education programs and aquarium operations — in o rs v iv r u order to chart tS n e a course for the future. les

ea

2008

Mote hosts a public forum to discuss the Deepwater Horizon oil disaster in the Gulf of Mexico and help provide answers to the community’s questions about the spill. It also convenes a national scientific symposium on the spill that ends with recommendations for a unified research and monitoring effort.

Tur t

Oc

Mote’s Marine Policy Institute, created in 2006 to improve the connection Te ch between scientific no lo g y research and policy, especially for decision makers and stakeholders, releases its first report, “An Assessment of Florida Red Tide.”

A meeting of U.S., Mexican and Cuban scientists convenes at Mote to create a formal plan of action designed to improve the health of the Gulf of Mexico and western Caribbean through a collaborative approach to management and conservation issues.

S ea

2007

2010

Mote Marine Laboratory 31


Crosb y k

&

2011

ah

ar

M

ad

e v a n , E a rl

e,

C

l

Implementation of Mote’s 2020 Vision & Strategic Plan begins in 2011 after being unanimously approved by Mote’s Board of Trustees in 2010.

2013

on

C it

y Is la

nd

32 2020 Vision & Strategic Plan 2.0

lR

us

The study indicates the need to expand and enhance our research C u r re n t M o t e C infrastructure at our am p City Island campus. To provide us with enough space, a new science education center and aquarium at a mainland location would be required.

ra

Discussion at Mote continues about the need to expand research and informal science education programs as called for in our 2020 Vision & Strategic Plan, and Mote begins the first phase of a new study to determine how to best grow.

Mote and the Interuniversity Institute for Marine Sciences in Eilat, Israel sign a new memorandum of understanding (MOU). Through the MOU, the world-class marine science organizations agreed to work together on new research endeavors designed to understand the impacts that climate change will es ea have on coral reefs rc h and find ways to restore and protect reefs worldwide. Co

Mote transitions to new leadership when Dr. Kumar Mahadevan announces his retirement as President & CEO, after leading Mote for 27 years. The Board of Trustees unanimously appoints Dr. Michael P. Crosby as President & CEO.

2014

Mote announces the sale of the nonprofit organization’s Siberian sturgeon and caviar production operation. This marks the first major private business spin-off from Mote research.

2015 Mote celebrates its 60th Anniversary and announces the public launch of a comprehensive fundraising effort — “Oceans of Opportunity: The Campaign for Mote Marine Laboratory.” The Campaign is designed to fulfill a carefully formulated plan to ensure Mote’s future for generations to come.


T O D AY Mote Marine Laboratory and Aquarium now operates with annual budgets in excess of $22 million, garnered through public grants, contracts and private donations. The institution carries approximately $33.9 million in total assets and has a professional workforce of 198, including 81 researchers (35 with doctorates), 35 Aquarium staff members and 20 educators. In 2014, Mote hosted 209 undergraduate and graduate interns from around the world. Mote enjoys the crucial support of more than 1,685 dedicated volunteers who contribute 212,337 hours annually to Lab and Aquarium operations. Mote has more than 9,000 individual members, more than 160 corporate partners and enjoys the patronage of more than 300,000 Aquarium visitors annually. The Laboratory has experienced phenomenal growth since it moved to Sarasota’s City Island in 1978 and now has a visible presence along the entire Southwest Florida coast and in the Florida Keys. In Sarasota County alone, Mote generates an estimated direct annual economic impact of $69.5 million. The Lab has a regional/statewide impact of $86.8 million. During its history, the research accomplishments made at Mote have been tremendous. Visiting investigators played the primary role in the early years (1955–1978) but today our own resident scientists take the lead. Scientific successes are clearly articulated in more than 3,300 publications that are today gathered in the series Collected Papers from Mote Marine Laboratory (Vols. 1-17) and the Mote Technical Reports (Nos. 1-1,859). Today, Mote has 24 diverse research programs. The hallmark of Mote Marine Laboratory has been the staff ’s longevity of service, ingenuity, teamwork, camaraderie, entrepreneurship and emphasis on quality — traits that will support us well in the coming decades.

Mote Marine Laboratory 33


A1 2020 Vision & Strategic Plan 2.0


A P P E N DI C E S Mote Marine Laboratory A2


V ITAL STAT I S T I C S RESEARCH

77

RESEARCH STAFF

35

DOCTORAL LEVEL

EDUCATION

25

EDUCATION PROGRAMS

20

EDUCATION STAFF

$86.8 million

After School Programs • Birthday Parties • Breakfast at Mote • College Internships • Educational Travel Programs • Field Trips • Gills Club High School Internships • High School Volunteers • Home School Programs • Kayaking with Mote • Mommy & Me • Mote Science Cafés • Outreach Programs • Partnership Schools • Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) • Scout Workshops • SeaTrek Digital Learning • SeaSnooze Overnights • Shark Encounter • Special Lecture Series • Summer Camp Programs • Teacher Workshops • Traveling Exhibits • Volunteer Opportunities

MEMBERSHIPS

VOLUNTEERS & STAFF

NET ASSETS

$21 million LAB ~$15 million

FOUNDATION (ENDOWMENT)

ECONOMIC IMPACTS

REGIONAL / STATEWIDE

9,000+

INDIVIDUAL

160+

CORPORATE

210 TOTAL STAFF

1,685

VOLUNTEERS

CONTRIBUTING MORE THAN

212,337

HOURS A YEAR

PROPERTIES & FACILITIES MAIN CAMPUS

Sarasota, FL 10.5 acres (Long Term Lease, City of Sarasota)

MOTE AQUACULTURE PARK Sarasota, FL 200 acres

BOCA GRANDE FIELD OFFICE Boca Grande, FL

CHARLOTTE HARBOR FIELD STATION Demere Key, FL

A3

MOTE TROPICAL RESEARCH LAB Summerland Key, FL 1 acre

LIVING REEF EXHIBIT NOAA ECODISCOVERY CENTER Key West, FL

31 320,049

TOTAL BUILDINGS & STRUCTURES

TOTAL SQUARE FEET


AQUARIUM

35

8

AQUARIUM STAFF DOCTORAL OFF-SITE LEVEL AQUARIUMS

1

300,000+ VISITORS TO THE AQUARIUM

MOTE MOBILE EXHIBIT

300,000 VIEWERS

60

EXHIBITS RELATING TO MOTE RESEARCH

1 DOLPHIN, WHALE & SEA TURTLE HOSPITAL

(co-managed with Research Division)

PEOPLE SERVED*

25,218 Grades K-12

209

College Level

* INCLUDES IN-SCHOOL, DIGITAL LEARNING AND ON-CAMPUS PROGRAMS

INCORPORATED AS A 501(C)(3) NONPROFIT IN 1955

24 RESEARCH PROGRAMS Behavioral Ecology & Physiology • Benthic Ecology • Chemical Ecology • Coral Reef Restoration • Coral Reef Science • Dolphin Research • Ecotoxicology • Environmental Health & Monitoring • Environmental Laboratory for Forensics • Fisheries Habitat Ecology • Manatee Research • Marine & Fresh Water Aquaculture Research • Marine Biomedical Research • Marine Immunology • Marine Microbiology • Marine Stock Enhancement • Ocean Acidification • Ocean Technology • Phytoplankton Ecology • Sea Turtle Conservation & Research • Sensory Biology & Behavior • Shark Biology & Conservation • Spotted Eagle Ray Conservation • Stranding Investigations

F LO R I DA S P E C I A LT Y L I C E N S E P L AT E PROTECT OUR REEFS | EST. 2003

$945,000 TO SUPPORT CORAL REEF RESEARCH, RESTORATION & EDUCATION IN 2014

SEAWATER SYSTEMS

RESEARCH

1,224,152

EXHIBITS

614,680 Mote Marine Laboratory A4


C

O M PA R I S O N O F P E E R I N S T I T U T I O N S ( 2 0 1 2 )

Institution

PhD Scientific Staff

Non-PhD Scientific Staff

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

192

Mote Marine Laboratory

Total Staff

Annual Operating Budget

Endowment

Grants / Contracts Income

232

852

$221,928,692

$370,305,446

$167,047,737

31

74

192

$20,508,431

$13,760,360

$8,892,435

Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences

29

30

87

$8,442,200

$1,274,151

$4,271,419

Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute1

27

103

220

$85,996,000

$80,879,570

$7,359,000

Bermuda Institute of Ocean Science

22

26

141

$14,202,223

$13,418,829

$8,410,739

Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute2

9

29

65

$5,301,536

$2,749,801

$3,545,190

Gulf of Maine Research Institute

7

16

63

$8,321,574

$1,352,474

$3,408,207

Alaska Sea Life Center3

6

11

95

$8,442,200

none

$4,454,219

New England Aquarium3

5

11

347

$42,614,000

$16,184,900

$4,970,400

Mystic Aquarium/ Sea Research Foundation3

4

10

300

$25,714,462

$1,203,794

$3,537,514

The David and Lucille Packard Foundation supports 75 percent of the institution’s annual budget, represented in the Endowment column, as well as provides funds for new facilities. 1

HSWRI and SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment represent a corporate and non-profit alliance. While a separate entity with its own operating budget, HSWRI is housed in a SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment facility 2

3

Predominantly public outreach/education institutions

A5 2020 Vision & Strategic Plan 2.0


Publications

Public Aquarium Visitors

Grants as % of Operating Budget

Operating Budget per PhD

Grants Income per PhD

Endowment per PhD

Publications per PhD

528

150,000

75.3%

$1,155,879

$870,040

$1,928,674

2.75

85

352,270

43.4%

$661,562

$286,853

$443,883

2.74

40

N/A

50.6%

$291,110

$147,290

$9,337

1.38

86

1,888,899

8.6%

$3,185,037

$272,556

$2,906,037

3.19

9

N/A

59.2%

$645,556

$382,306

$609,947

0.41

10

N/A

66.8%

$589,060

$393,910

$305,533

1.1

22

N/A

40.9%

$1,188,769

$486,887

$193,211

3.14

48

132,612

48.1%

$1,542,222

$742,370

N/A

8

31

1.37 million

11.7%

$8,522,800

$994,080

$3,236,980

6.20

29

729,522

13.8%

$6,428,616

$884,379

$300,949

7.25

Please note that the 2012 data displayed in this comparison chart was collected from public documents or web sites published by the individual institutions represented and is intended only as general information of relative comparison for Mote’s strategic planning purposes.

Mote Marine Laboratory A6


MOTE MARINE LABORATORY & AQUARIUM 1600 Ken Thompson Pkwy Sarasota, FL 34236 (941) 388-4441 RESEARCH STATIONS

MOTE AQUACULTURE PARK 874 W.R. Mote Way Sarasota, FL 34240 (941) 388-4541

CHARLOTTE HARBOR RESEARCH STATION Demere Key, FL (941) 388-4441

TROPICAL RESEARCH LABORATORY 24244 Overseas Highway Summerland Key, FL 33042 (305) 745-3554 PUBLIC OUTREACH

BOCA GRANDE OFFICE PO Box 870 Boca Grande, FL 33921 (941) 855-9251

MOTE LIVING REEF EXHIBIT AT THE NOAA ECO-DISCOVERY CENTER 35 East Quay Road Key West, FL 33040 (305) 296-2325

Mote Marine Laboratory 2020 Vision & Strategic Plan Version 2.0  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you