Page 1

InsideOu

THE RESOURCE GUIDE TO OUR ISLAND

OAHU

J U LY + A U G U S T 2 0 1 7

Made in Hawai‘i Festival Buy local and help support our local entrepreneurs

THROWDOWN

Chefs compete in a culinary battle during Mangoes at the Moana

TREE OF LIFE

Visiting exhibit traces its roots across the globe

HOBO BOWLING

Striking out against a serious issue


Contents D E PA RT M E N TS I SL AN D L I F E

8 Hobo Bowling The Blue Gardenia Foundation brings awareness to teen suicide. M OR S EL S

10 HI on Veggies VegFest O‘ahu encourages island residents to adopt a plant-based diet.

20

14 Liquid Assets Locally produced rums are the perfect mix for the classic mai tai. MUSINGS

16 Branching Out Visiting exhibit plants its roots at the East-West Center Gallery.

26

18 Creative Arts The Hale‘iwa Art Festival celebrates its milestone 20th anniversary.

20 Events and Celebrations Mark your calendars for these fun events: ‘Ukulele and Greek festivals; and Duke’s Oceanfest. MA U K A T O MA K A I

30 Poetry in Motion The 40th Annual Prince Lot Hula Festival changes its venue to ‘Iolani Palace. INS AND OUTS

32 Not to Miss The Waikīkī Steel Guitar Festival comes to the Royal Hawaiian Center. And it’s not too early to register for the Honolulu Century Ride.

F E AT U R E S 22 Made in Hawai‘i Festival More than just booths of mochi crunch and rubbah slippahs, this annual festival has transformed a new generation of local products. by Kristen Nemoto Jay 26 Food Fight Some of O‘ahu’s top chefs will again compete in a friendly Throwdown during the ninth annual Mangoes at the Moana on July 15. by Simplicio Paragas 4

IN SIDE O UTHAWAII .COM

|

JULY +AUGUST 2017

32

(CLOCKWISE, FROM LEFT) ©STEVE CZERNIAK; COURTESY HERB OHTA, JR.; COURTESY HAWAI’I BICYCLING LEAGUE

O U T A N D A BO U T

12 Class Act Kaimukī High School students train for the restaurant industry.


9

Open daily from 5:00 to 10:00pm.


MVP | HAWAI‘I | ADVERTISING & CIRCULATION William A. Moore III GROUP PUBLISHER

buddy.moore@morris.com Leianne Pedro HAWAI‘I SALES DIRECTOR

leianne.pedro@morris.com Courtney Fuhrmann REGIONAL VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES

Brandy Aylward, Bob Kowal, Donna Kowalczyk ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

955.2378 Alice Gustave SALES COORDINATOR

alice.gustave@morris.com Sidney Louie CIRCULATION & MARKETING DIRECTOR

sidney@insideouthawaii.com

MVP | EDITORIAL Simplicio Paragas SENIOR EDITOR

simplicio@insideouthawaii.com Kristen Nemoto EDITOR

SUSHI... THEN SOME. Enjoy new wave sushi and such signature dishes as King Crab Ramen, Panko-Crusted Ahi Sashimi and our Foie-Gras Nigiri Sushi Call for reservations and dining specials.

kristen@insideouthawaii.com Rizza Cosio EDITOR-AT-LARGE

rizza@insideouthawaii.com

MVP | CREATIVE Haines Wilkerson CHIEF CREATIVE OFFICER

Teri A. Samuels ART DIRECTOR

teri@insideouthawaii.com Cher Wheeler PUBLICATION MANAGER

MVP | EXECUTIVE Donna W. Kessler PRESIDENT

MORRIS COMMUNICATIONS William S. Morris III CHAIRMAN

William S. Morris IV CEO AND PRESIDENT

Waikiki Beach Marriott Resort & Spa 2552 Kalakaua Avenue | 931-6286 3 Hours of FREE self-parking with validation Oahu | Maui | Big Island | Seattle | DKRestaurants.com

6

INSIDE O UTHAWAII .COM

|

JULY +AUGUST 2017

InsideOut Magazine (ISSN 2158-494X) is produced by Morris Visitor Publications (MVP), a division of Morris Communications Co., LLC, 725 Broad St. Augusta, GA 30901. Annual subscription rate is $18 or $32 for two years. To subscribe, email: miao@insideouthawaii.com. Copyright 2017. All rights reserved. Reproduction of the whole or any part of content prohibited without written permission. InsideOut Hawaii will not accept responsibility for submitted materials that are lost or stolen.

Follow us on:


ED ITOR’S L ETTER

Lucky We Live in Hawai‘i

©MOANALUA GARDENS FOUNDATION

For several years now, “Keeping It Local” has been the common mantra among island residents. This is most evident at the Made in Hawai‘i Festival where more than 400 local vendors will share their locally produced food, art, crafts and fashions. Organizers of two foodie events will place their emphasis on local fruits and vegetables. During Mangoes at the Moana, growers, chefs and mixologists will incorporate the aromatic summer fruit in desserts, entrees and cocktails. Meanwhile at the second annual VegFest O‘ahu, attendees will learn about plant-based diets and their positive consequences for our bodies and the environment. Speaking of environment, after losing her daughter to suicide last year, Kailua resident Jodi Beaty wants to create a safe haven for teenagers who are suffering silently — and alone — from depression and anxiety. Her Blue Gardenia

Now in its 40th year, the venerable Prince Lot Hula Festival has become Hawai‘i’s largest and oldest non-competitive hula event, featuring more than 20 hālau.

Foundation is holding its Hobo Bowling Tournament to spread awareness about these two mental health issues. A visiting exhibit at the East-West Center Gallery also aims to branch out to the community, educating members about the multiple meanings of the Tree of Life in different cultures and religions. The culture of dance is steeply ingrained in the Prince Lot Hula Festival, which will, for the first time in its history, move to the grounds of ‘Iolani Palace. Held for the past 19 years on the North Shore, the Hale‘iwa Arts Festival is a blissful union that consists between one’s love for art and the tight-knit community of Hale‘iwa, according to the festival’s executive director Kathleen Ells.

ON THE COVER One of last year’s vendors featured bamboo stamps, used to print on tapa (cloth). This year, the 23rd Annual Made in Hawai‘i Festival will feature more than 400 exhibitors who will share their locally made arts, crafts and, of course, onolicious food. ©Tina Mahina

Simplicio Paragas SENIOR EDITOR J U LY+ AU GU ST 2 0 1 7

|

INSIDE O UTHAWAII .COM

7


IS LA ND L I F E

Bowling for Awareness Annual tournament brings the subject of suicide to the forefront by Gina Bailey

Thankfully, current research has identified multiple paths to help alleviate two of the most stigmatized mental health issues in our society today — anxiety and depression. Some of these lanes include: healthy social networks, physical activity, purpose, belonging and 8

IN SIDE O UTHAWAII .COM

|

JULY +AUGUST 2017

bowling. Yes, bowling, as it encompasses all of the above and, in this specific case, it’s also for a good cause. Scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 16 (registration deadline is Sept. 2 ) at the Pali Lanes in Kailua, the second annual “Hobo Bowling Tournament” will help

increase awareness of these afflictions, which touch many of our lives and can potentially end in tragedy without some form of professional intervention. This fundraiser is organized by The Blue Gardenia Foundation, a nonprofit that was founded by Jodi Beaty, who lost her 21-yearold daughter, Amanda, to suicide after years of attempting to shield her struggles with anxiety and depression from her

©KRISTEN HOOK


family. When speaking with several of Amanda’s friends, who knew more intimately of her challenges than her family at that time, Beaty asked, “Why didn’t you talk with me or someone about this?” They all replied that they didn’t know what to do or where to turn. “It was at that moment I knew I had to do something and create a supportive resource,” Beaty says. “That interaction was the birth of The Blue Gardenia Foundation, [so named] as blue was Amanda’s favorite color, gardenia her favorite flower and ‘Hobo’ was the name she gave to herself.” Beaty’s foundational goals are to decrease the continued lack of knowledge and resources to cope with anxiety and depression; to provide a safe place to explore these issues; and to bring awareness, in a positive way, through advocacy, education, research and community support — especially for children and young adults who are most at risk. According to a 2016 report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, suicide is the second leading cause of death for 10-24 year olds and the 10th among all adults. In 2016, The

New York Times reported that the suicide rate had reached a 30-year high. A leading spokeswoman for suicide prevention, Dr. Lena Pearlman encourages friends and family members to reach out immediately and contact mental health professionals and foundations, like The Blue Gardenia, if someone they know begins to show signs of anxiety, depression or suicidal ideations.

“Our goal here at Habitat is to be able to provide a decent place to live for those who are in great need, and bring the community together while doing it.” Yet, what are these signs? Ironically, the set of symptoms tends to take two distinct paths but with the same underlying theme: Withdrawal from family, friends and normal activities and/ or the turning away and alienation from “self.” These warning signs are more noticeable when a person isolates himself/ herself, has dramatic mood swings and talks about personal harm and/ or injury. Conversely, the less obvious symptoms are exhibited by a person who is considered the “life

of the party” but whose impulse control quickly degenerates and whose boundaries slowly begin to blur. In general, the latter type of behavior occurs when a person experiences a significant loss in his or her life but cannot express it outwardly due to societal or cultural norms and expectations. In other words, the façade of normality remains the same regardless of external circumstances. Depression can be viewed as not caring about anything, and anxiety as caring too much. When combined, a person lives in a perpetual exhaustingly, high-strung nightmare. Help is available but we need to get the word out. The “Hobo Bowling Tournament” accomplishes this while also removing archaic stigmas and preventing unnecessary loss of life. It does indeed take a village to increase awareness and decrease the deadly silence surrounding these issues. Sept. 16 is the day to partake in being a member of our village and as Beaty’s life and work implore, “Do something and choose love while doing it.”

HOBO BOWLING TOURNAMENT Families and friends will gather at Pali Lanes in Kailua to help support The Blue Gardenia Foundation.

For more information, email bluegardeniafoundation@ gmail.com or visit thebgf. wixsite.com/bowling.✽ J U LY+ AU GU ST 2 0 1 7

|

INSIDE O UTHAWAII .COM

9


M O R SE L S

HI on Veggies Second annual VegFest O‘ahu advocates a plant-based diet by Simplicio Paragas

“For all the SPAM that we consume in Hawai‘i, I was shocked,” says Waters, VegFest O‘ahu producer and a self-described community activist. “So I thought the least we could do was have a VegFest that would showcase how little changes in our diets could make a positive impact on our wellness

When the activist group People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) ranked Honolulu #7 among the top-10 friendliest-vegan cities across the nation, Joy Waters knew it was the right time to introduce her plant-based-diet philosophy to the mainstream.

10

IN SIDE O UTHAWAII .COM

|

JULY +AUGUST 2017

and our environment.” Scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 2 at the Frank Fasi Civic Grounds near Honolulu Hale, from noon to 5:30 p.m., VegFest will feature food booths, cooking demonstrations, a Speaker Series, Literature Tent and plenty of free plant-

based food samples. The event also aims to dispel some misperceptions about plant-based diets, namely that they are expensive, bland and lacking protein. “These are myths that we always come up against,” Waters says. “I consider myself a junk food vegan in the sense that I can fry, sauté, grill and prepare my food in the same way that someone would prepare meat. The food industry has grown considerably over the years and there are now many alternatives for meats and cheeses. And you’re still getting your flavor and all your protein.” VegFest O‘ahu’s director Michael Wall believes it’s important for people to know there are dietary choices that help the environment while simultaneously improving one’s health. “I’m forever optimistic that if people know that they have better and healthier options, they would accept them,” says Wall. “We had a huge turnout last year and it definitely exceeded our expectations. So it was super gratifying to see the number of people who were interested in plant-based diets.” For more information about VegFest, visit positivemediahawaii.com. ✽

COURTESY VEGFEST O‘AHU


M O R SE L S

Class Act

Kaimuki High School students prepare for culinary pathway by Simplicio Paragas

In an attempt to streamline a baking process, Maelani Iokepa made a “monster” mistake in her senior year at Kaimukī High School, miscalculating the ratio of oatmeal to flour in measuring the ingredients for a batch of cookies. It’s a story, she says, she will never “live down.” “Instead of a single batch of 200 cookies, we ended up with quadruple the amount,” says Iokepa, laughing about the Monster Cookie blunder. “I was eating like a bag every 12

IN SIDE O UTHAWAII .COM

other day and I never want to see another Monster Cookie ever again.” Iokepa is among the graduates who have successfully passed through Kaimukī High School’s culinary program, which is led by longtime teacher Angela Inouye. For 36 years, Inouye has mentored thousands of students, many of whom have gone on to work at such notable restaurants as Nobu Waikīkī and Orchids, and at Department of Education cafeterias. |

JULY +AUGUST 2017

As a sort of capstone project in their senior year, students are tasked with running a restaurant for five consecutive weeks, developing the menus, sourcing recipes, budgeting food costs, and running the front and the back of the “classroom.” It’s practical experience and one that provides these budding chefs a chance to show what they’ve learned during their junior and senior years. “At the beginning of each new semester, I tell the new incoming students

that they better like to clean and serve, and not just like to eat,” Inouye says. “They have to have a passion for this industry or they won’t make it.” Poised and polite, senior student Bailey Uehara aspires to be a chef but he’s realistic about the hard work and years of commitment it will require to achieve his goal. The 18-year-old Kaimukī resident gets a lot of hands-on practice at school, as well as at Duke’s Waikīkī where he is currently an intern. “I knew after taking Culinary 1 in my junior year that this was the pathway I wanted to pursue,” Uehara says. “I know it’s not like what’s shown on reality television programs but I’m ready to move forward.” Since 2005, the Kaimukī culinary program has been a feeder school for Duke’s Waikīkī where many of the alumni have established careers, working up from interns to line cooks. Iokepa was the first intern placed at Duke’s and she has since earned the title of sous chef at sister restaurant Hula Grill Waikīkī. “I worked at 103 different positions at Duke’s in the span of 10 Yauatcha years,” Iokepa asserts.

©CEDRIC RANCHEZ


“You name it I’ve done it, from food runner, pantry cook, line cook and positions that even no longer exist.” According to Inouye, the program not only teaches students about restaurant operations, it also helps them develop work ethics and offers a few other life lessons. “I take great pride in seeing their growth,” she says. “They gain self-confidence and they learn to think for themselves, to anticipate what might happen.”

“Each semester I tell the new incoming students that they better like to clean and serve, and not just like to eat.” For Iokepa, the program — and Angela, as she now calls her — has been invaluable to her career, conceding that she wouldn’t be where she is now had it not been for her Culinary 1 class … even with the embarrassing Monster Cookie mishap. “I’ll admit that I wasn’t the greatest student,” says Iokepa, who recently left Hula Grill to become the sous pastry chef with ABC Stores’ Island Gourmet Markets. “And I wouldn’t be who I am today without Angela pushing me.”✽

LUNCH DELI MARKET TAKE OUT 847-2547

DINNER COCKTAILS MUSIC OYSTERS HAPPY HOUR 594-7445 675 AUAHI ST. SUITE 130 HONOLULU BEVYHAWAII.COM

Where do you want to go? Find the best of the city

J U LY+ AU GU ST 2 0 1 7

|

INSIDE O UTHAWAII .COM

13


LIQUI D A SSE T S

Spirit of Aloha Rums of Hawai‘i and Roots of Mai Tai by Alison Kent

A number of boutique distilleries have now launched throughout the Islands, with each creating signature craft spirits boasting remarkable flavor and terroir-driven appeal. This includes artisanal rums produced with heritage sugarcane varietals.

Located in Kunia, Manulele Distillers is home to superb Kō Hana Agricole* Rum. Handharvested Hawaiian-grown sugarcane is pressed and distilled to create smallbatch, pure cane rums, including White, BarrelAged and Cask Strength.

Also featured, the rich and deeply flavored Cacao & Honey Rum made from Hawaiian raw honey and pure cacao blended with premium cane spirit. From Kauai, awardwinning Kōloa Rum Company is an artisanal distillery producing premium, single-batch rums since 2009. Selections include White, Gold, Dark, Spice and Coconut — all are made with island-grown raw cane sugar and are distilled in a vintage copper-pot still using filtered water from Mount Wai‘ale‘ale. They also blend and bottle a ready-to-drink Hawaiian Mai Tai Cocktail. Speaking of the mai tai, a snippet on its origins and back history: Two men lay claim to having created this iconic Tiki cocktail. Donn “Don the Beachcomber” Beach, considered the founding father of Tiki culture, concocted his version in 1933 (called the Q.B. Cooler) while the mai tai by Victor J. Bergeron, aka “Trader Vic” of the Polynesian-style Trader Vic’s chain of restaurants, made its debut in 1944. The mai tai name itself comes from the Tahitian phrase, “Maita‘i roa ae!”meaning, “Out of this world!”

While similarities are apparent, Don the Beachcomber’s cocktail has additional ingredients, including Angostura bitters, for nuanced depth and complexity, and also Falernum — a sweet almond syrup spiced with ginger and cloves. Trader Vic’s version uses Orgeat syrup — also made with almonds yet without the warm spices. While there are now more versions floating around than you can shake a cocktail umbrella at, it’s worth getting back to the roots of this iconic drink and giving one or both of the originals a whirl. ✽

Ko Hana Mai Tai Makes: 1 cocktail The original mai tai is complex in flavor and subtle in color and sweetness. Kō Hana Rum pays homage with a version that harkens back to this. 2 ozs Kō Hana Hawaiian Agricole Rum – KEA 3/4 oz Dry Curaçao 3/4 oz lime juice 1/2 oz Orgeat syrup Shake and pour over crushed ice in a rocks glass. Garnish with a sugar cane swizzle stick and finish with a sprig of fresh mint, lime wedge or

*Rhum agricole is a style of rum made using sugar cane. In contrast, most rums use molasses. 14

IN SIDE O UTHAWAII .COM

|

JULY +AUGUST 2017

edible flower.

COCKTAIL RECIPE AND PHOTO COURTESY OF KŌ HANA RUM (MANULELE DISTILLERS, LLC)


NEW LOCATION OPENING IN JULY! KAHALA MALL

NEW LOCATION • SAME GREAT MENU • TAKE-OUT ONLY Crepes No Ka ‘Oi is proud to announce its second location at Kahala mall slated to open in the beginning of July! The take-out only location will serve the same amazing flavors you have come to love in Kailua. It’s been a lot of hard work and tens of thousands of crepes served since Chris and Rosario “Kakay” Tarvyd first had the idea for crepes at a Farmer’s Market in 2007. Back then, they didn’t know that they would open a restaurant. They just loved to cook…and eat! When they saw the success of several plate lunch vendors, they thought it looked hard, but certainly fun and rewarding, so they sought out an idea of their own. They’re not quite sure who came up with the idea of crepes as some of their first dates were in a creperie in Manila, Philippines, but they knew it would be a hit. At the time, nobody else was selling crepes at fairs and festivals on Oahu and at their first event they were met with an overwhelming response. Less than a year later, they opened their first store

808 263 4088 143 HEKILI ST, KAILUA, HI 96734

in Kailua and they quickly outgrew that location. In 2015 they moved to a new building next door to a space with over double the capacity at 70. Business is still popping and after numerous requests from folks that drive from across the island to enjoy their crepes, they decided that it was the right time to expand. Customers at Kahala will get to enjoy the same menu as Kailua with crepes such as: the Tiki Torch, made with homemade pesto, roasted chicken, spinach, tomatoes and sautéed onions, and the Ultimate Breakfast Crepe, with cheddar, potatoes, bacon, onions, a poached egg and homemade hollandaise. Roasted garlic butter, made in-house, adds a delicious touch to the Vegetarian and Get Mushy (full of mushrooms, cheese, and your choice of Black Forest ham or roasted turkey). The Banana Split Crepe, with bananas, macadamia nuts and dark chocolate, topped with a generous drizzle of house-made Hawaiian sea salt caramel is a perfect option to satisfy that sweet tooth!

KAHALA MALL SPACE G-19, NEXT TO JAMBA JUICE

@crepesnokaoikailua | www.crepesnokaoi.com | crepesnokaoi@yahoo.com


MUSI N G S

Branching Out Tree of Life exhibition comes to O‘ahu By Simplicio Paragas

The “Tree of Life” holds diverse meanings in different cultures and faiths. In Christianity, the Tree of Life appears together with the Tree of Knowledge in the Garden of Eden (mentioned in Genesis, the first book of the Bible); for the Babylonians, it was the tree with the divine fruit; and in Hindu mythology, it is the Cosmic Tree.

TREE OF LIFE (Above) Taiwanbased artist Huang Chen Mei’s “Tree of Life” lacquer painting; craftsman Ram Soni of India demonstrates Sanjhi (paper cutting) art. Exhibit through September 10 at the East-West Gallery.

16

IN SIDE O UTHAWAII .COM

|

JULY +AUGUST 2017

“Sacredness of trees is deeply rooted in our Indian beliefs and are an important part of our rituals,” says Manjari Nirula, a New Delhi-based guest curator of the “Tree of Life” exhibit at the East-West Center Gallery. “It is the Kalpavriksha, the wish fulfilling tree. It is Jivanvriksha, the life giving tree. The roots are linked with Brahma, the branches

with Vishnu and the trunk with Shiva.” In Malaysia, the Tree of Life is known as pohon budi, according to fellow guest curator Edric Ong. “It’s talking about a tree of culture, a tree of civilization, a tree from where mankind evolved,” says Ong, a distinguished Malaysian textile designer. “The exhibition builds bridges and healing with its message of peace and love.” According to organizers, this exhibition transcends borders to present diverse objects from 20 Asian countries portraying the Tree of Life motif. Although the primary emphasis is on textiles, there are also examples in an array of media, including paintings, ceramics, basketry, metal work, jewelry, lacquer, stone, wood and leather. “Most of the exhibits on display are made with natural materials, which are eco-friendly,” Nirula says. “The biggest advantage of using natural materials and using hand-spun and hand-woven textiles is that they carry the lowest carbon footprint among all textiles. We want to create awareness about the importance of ecology to stimulate creativity, as well as to highlight cultural sustainability.”✽

COURTESY EAST-WEST CENTER


Fine Oriental Carpets & Hawaiian Rugs

Oahu

Ward Avenue 550 Ward Ave. Honolulu, HI 96814 Ph: 808 596-7333 Na Lama Kukui 560 N. Nimitz Hwy #101 Honolulu, HI 96817 Ph: 808 524-7769

Kona

Old Industrial Park 74-5599 Luhia St. Kailua-Kona, HI 96740 Ph: 808 329-6500

Maui

259 E. Wakea Ave. Kahului, HI 96732 Ph: 808 877-7200

Weaving Exclusive Rugs For Hawaii’s Finest Homes & Resorts Free Continental U.S. Shipping (with Minimum Purchase)

www.HawaiianRugs.com


MUSI N G S

Artful Appreciations The 20th annual Hale‘iwa Arts Festival will celebrate its love for creative artwork and community. By Kristen Nemoto Jay

HELLO HALE‘IWA (This page, from left) Artists Colleen Wilcox and Bill Braden will be among the 140 talented artists at this year’s Hale‘iwa Arts Festival. (Opposite page) Art enthusiasts visit the tent displays.

18

IN SIDE O UTHAWAII .COM

|

JULY +AUGUST 2017


COURTESY HALE’IWA ARTS FESTIVAL

There’s a reason why Hale‘iwa Arts Festival’s executive director Kathleen Ells references her job to a wedding coordinator. Partly because there’s a lot of organization involved, but mostly because it’s about celebrating a beautiful union. A union that consists between one’s love for art and the tight-knit community of Hale‘iwa. And unlike some coordinators, once the festival approaches, Ells will let out a sigh of relief rather than cringe at the knees. “That day I can finally relax,” Ells says with a chuckle. “Because at the end of the day I’ve got 140 artists there and given exposure that they otherwise wouldn’t have. And it’s just a great way place for everyone to come together and enjoy our Hale‘iwa community.” Like many marriages, this love story of art and community began twenty years ago with like-minded individuals in the North Shore whom devoted their love to all things artful. The dedicated artists decided to organize into a formal group, forming a space where they can share ideas and emulate the beauty that they were seeing around

them into their artwork. Soon after the Hale‘iwa Arts Festival was formed, many other artists, of various mediums, joined into the mix and transformed it into a non-profit that strives “to promote education and public awareness of arts and culture, with emphasis on participation, for the betterment of the community.” With that mission statement, followed an establishment that sought to promote artistic talents and works within the Hale‘iwa community on a year-round basis. Fundraisers and special grants given to HAF goes back to the community by sponsoring

poster, T-shirt and tote bag designed by one of the participating artists from the festival—and live entertainment from local musicians every hour. Ells is especially looking forward to seeing the interaction between the local artists and the community, and the overall camaraderie that’s transformed into lifelong connections. “It’s a different experience when you’re actually interacting with the person who has made your piece of work,” Ells says. “It also helps our community become closer and know that we can count on each other when we need.”✽

local schools. Sponsors for HAF—which include the Kōkua Hawai‘i Foundation’s Plastic Free Hawai‘i and The Outdoor Circle— will have their own booths to inform the community on how to get involved. This year’s 20th annual festival will be held at Hale‘iwa Beach Park on Saturday, July 15 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. through Sunday, July 16 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Along with 140-juried visual artists with original works and limited editions of their pieces, there will be food vendors, games for keiki, merchandise and souvenirs—such as the annual

J U LY+ AU GU ST 2 0 1 7

|

INSIDE O UTHAWAII .COM

19


OUT A ND A B O U T

Events and Celebrations There’s a lot to see and hear this summer, from a colorful event celebrating Greek culture to the annual ‘Ukulele Festival Hawai‘i. Here’s a quick glance at upcoming events during July and August.

Strumming Along

IT’S “AG-TASTIC” July 15-16

July 16 Now more than just a free concert, the annual ‘Ukulele Festival Hawai‘i has aged into a festivity drawing people from across the globe to see, hear and appreciate the diminutive fourstring, two-octave instrument. For the 47th time on July 16, the lilting sounds and camaraderie among the festival’s attendees will fill the very place that inspired festival founder Roy Sakuma’s dreams. For more information, visit ukulelefestivalhawaii.org.

The Hawai‘i State Farm Fair returns to Kualoa Ranch. The two-day event will feature food, education exhibits, entertainment and keiki rides. hawaiistatefarm fair.org

Joy of Sake

Founded in 1969 by the Kailua Chamber of Commerce, the Kailua Fourth of July Parade has become an annual celebration of patriotism and pride for laid-back Kailua residents. The parade starts at 10 a.m. kailuachamber.com

FLYING HIGH July 24

The Pacific Aviation Museum celebrates the 120th birthday of Amelia Earhart. Enjoy free cake and juice for the family. pacificaviation museum.org 20

August 7 Rice wine enthusiasts won’t want to miss this event that will showcase an extensive line of premium sake styles in the junmai, ginjo, daiginjo and kimoto categories. These include sakes which have received silver and gold awards from the U.S. National Sake Appraisal, a rigorous blind tasting conducted by 10 judges from the U.S. and Japan held every year in Honolulu. JoyofSake.com

IN SIDE O UTHAWAII .COM JULY +AUGUST 2017

In Honor of Duke

August 19-27 Held each summer, Duke’s Oceanfest pays honor to the legendary Duke Paoa Kahanamoku. Scheduled competitions for this ocean sports festival will be held at Waikīkī Beach and will include surfing, paddle boarding C4 Stand-up and Legends contests, as well as beach volleyball. Proceeds from the events will go to the Outrigger Duke Kahanamoku Foundation. dukesoceanfest.com

Ode to a Grecian Fest August 26-27 Combine souvlaki, baklava and dancing then throw in some arts and crafts and you’ve got the ideal Greek Festival at Ala Moana Park. greekfestival hawaii.com

(CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT) COURTESY HERB OHTA, JR.; COURTESY DUKE’S OCEANFEST; COURTESY GREEK FESTIVAL HAWAII; ©JOY OF SAKE

LIVELY KAILUA PROCESSION July 4


waikiki beach walk

®

Celebrating a Decade of Dining & Distinction 10th anniversary

V i s i t a n y o f Wa i k i k i B e ac h Wa l k’ s f i n e e s ta b l i s h m e n ts t o e n t e r -t o -w i n m o n t h ly p r i z e s v i s i t wa i k i k i b e a c h wa l k . c o m f o r m o r e i n f o r m at i o n a n d o f f i c i a l r u l e s

Open 365 Days, 10am–10pm Located on Lewers Street between Kalakaua Avenue and Kalia Road +1 808.931.3591

WA I K I K I B E AC H WA L K .C o m |


©ASDFULLA FEUISMO DIGNIAM

22

IN SIDE O UTHAWAII .COM

|

JULY +AUGUST 2017


Buy Local, For Locals

The 23rd Annual Made in Hawai‘i Festival returns with the spirit of entrepreneurial support and community By Kristen Nemoto Jay | Photos By Tina Mahina

I

t’s as if the history of consumerism has come full circle these days. As Farmers’ Markets and online craft websites, such as Etsy, have taken off in popularity, customers are taking a closer look at the products they’re purchasing and reaching more toward items that will support their local neighbor. This has been the very reason for the success of the annual Made in Hawai‘i Festival, which will again open its doors at the Neal Blaisdell Exhibition Hall and Arena from August 18 through 20. The festival’s executive director Amy Hammond is excited to see new and old vendors lined up throughout the arena as it’s a reminder that there’s still a sense of community among local businesses.

“It’s a great way for everyone to network and get to know each other,” Hammond says. “After three days of selling next to each other, the local exhibitors get to know one another and swap ways to help each other ... You could have a business that’s in need of jars for their products and another who has stickers for you to place on the jars, or someone who has access to lots of lilikoi for your jam. It’s amazing to see everyone come together and help one another succeed.” Along with local businesses cooperating with each other comes a “trickle down effect,” Hammond says, of customers wanting to buy what’s familiar and personable to them. J U LY+ AU GU ST 2 0 1 7

|

HOMEMADE GOODIES Chef Kai Cowell of Kaiulani Spices demonstrates how to cook with her product. (Above) A variety of the festival's locally made products.

INSIDE O UTHAWAII .COM

23


BUY LOCAL Open from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 18 and Saturday, Aug. 19. On Sunday, Aug. 20, the festival will be held from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. General admission costs $6, and free for children aged 6 years and younger.

24

“The customers like to put a face to a name,” Hammond points out. “They want to know where it comes from, and they especially want to help our local economy. That has been the success formula for a lot of our exhibitors here at the festival.” First established as a small business marketing tool, as well as to give local businesses a chance to showcase their products, the Made in Hawai‘i Festival has grown into a 45,000-attendee and 400-exhibitor event that showcases everything from food products to jewelry and artwork. Adding on to the theme of local talents will be live stage performances by Jerry Santos, Maunalua, Raiatea Helm and Led Ka‘apana. There will also be special cooking demonstrations by chefs Ray German from

IN SIDE O UTHAWAII .COM

|

JULY +AUGUST 2017

the Four Seasons Resort O‘ahu at Ko Olina’s Fish House and Lee Anne Wong from Koko Head Café. Returning again as an exhibitor is Jimmy Chan — Hawaiian Chip Company’s general manager — who is especially excited to see his theory of “supply and demand” come to life for local businesses that would have otherwise been left in the dust for success. “Customers are willing to spend the money on a product if it has value to it,” Chan says. “Once I started to concentrate on our local market [rather than on the Mainland] ... it helped us grow tremendously.” However, Hawaiian Chip Company’s success is not without its share of hard work and determination. Chan laughs about it now but he still remembers the heat he felt from the fryer when he and his friends would make 50 pounds worth of taro chips a day to sell at the Aloha Stadium’s swap meet or a local Farmers’ Market. Today, their storefront makes up to 500 pounds of chips a day and collaborates with companies such as Longs Drugs, Wal-Mart and Costco. Although the exposure factor for Hawaiian Chip Company is not necessarily needed at the Made in Hawai‘i Festival, Chan still looks forward to return as it keeps his company well versed in their customers’ wants. “The customers that we meet at the Made in Hawai‘i Festival have been a tremendous help for my company because they’re certainly going to give you their opinions whether you ask for it or not,” Chan laughs. “But most importantly, it helps us to stay engaged with our customers and [learn] what they like and what will sell. It’s getting to know our supply and demand, and I’m very grateful for the opportunity.”✽


©ASDFULLA FEUISMO DIGNIAM

J U LY+ AU GU ST 2 0 1 7

|

INSIDE O UTHAWAII .COM

25


Food Fight

Chefs compete in a “Throwdown” during Mangoes at the Moana

MANGOES AT THE MOANA Chefs will offer demonstrations on how to peel and serve mangoes, as well as how to prepare mangoinfused dishes. 26

W

ill it be a repeat for Michelle Karr-Ueoka? Or will Lee Anne Wong regain her “Queen of Mangoes” title? Victory for either, though, won’t come easy, as a field of talented chefs will again compete in the friendly “Ultimate Mango Throwdown” during the annual Mangoes at the Moana. “It’s a chef-driven event,” says Ryan Loo, Moana Surfrider’s food and beverage director. “This event has definitely gained in popularity. Locals come down for the day and our hotel guests get a taste of Hawai‘i.” Not native to Hawai‘i, the mango found its way to the islands like many of our other favorite foods — via ship. In Hawaiian Annual and Almanac for 1909, Thomas G. Thrum writes that Captain John Meek of the brig Kamehameha brought the first mango trees to Honolulu from Manila in 1824. The Rev. Joseph Goodrich and Don Francisco de Paula Marín, a Spanish immigrant and talented horticulturalist,

IN SIDE O UTHAWAII .COM

|

JULY +AUGUST 2017

(OPPOSITE PAGE) STEVE CZERNIAK; COURTESY MARRIOTT - WAIKIKI COMPLEX

By Simplicio Paragas


J U LY+ AU GU ST 2 0 1 7

|

INSIDE O UTHAWAII .COM

27


28

IN SIDE O UTHAWAII .COM

|

JULY +AUGUST 2017


received these trees, which were the source of a mango strain known today as the Hawaiian race. Thrum further notes that in 1885, O‘ahu businessman Joseph Marsden imported some seedling mango trees and grafts from Jamaica. By 1929, G. P. Wilder and S. M. Damon had imported a number of new mango genus from other countries. Later the Hawai‘i Agricultural Experiment Station of the U. S. Department of Agriculture introduced several new varieties, including Hawai‘i’s most popular backyard tree, the Haden. While Haden and Pirie are perhaps the two most familiar mangoes, participating cultivators hope to expose attendees to the Mapulehus, Gouveias and Rapozas, mango varieties that are named after their owners. Each mango type possesses a distinct flavor and finish, much like a Pinot Noir red grape differs from a Cabernet. “The Rapoza, for example, is unique to Hawai‘i and I simply tell people that it melts in your mouth,” explains Makaha Mangoes’ Mark Suiso, who started this event eight years ago in Makaha to draw more attention to our local fruit trees. “Others are milder in flavor and have different tastes characteristics and profiles.” The daylong event will also feature a Farmer’s Market, cooking demonstrations by Moana Surfrider’s chefs David Lukela and Nanako Perez-Nava, “Best Mango” contest, mango-centric cocktails, seminars, and a pop-up bake shop with pastry chef Carolyn Portuondo and silent auction to benefit the Culinary Institute of the Pacific.✽

MANGO MADNESS (From left) Beachhouse at the Moana's chef Nolan West slices through a mango; Koko Head Café’s Lee Anne Wong drizzled mango sauce over her mango-andricotta-stuffedmalasadas during last year’s Throwdown.

MANGOES AT THE MOANA July 15 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

COURTESY MARRIOTT - WAIKIKI COMPLEX

Mango Throwdown 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Participants include chefs James Aptakin (Turtle Bay Resort), Andre Le (Pig and the Lady), Robin Maii (Fête Hawaii), Hiro Mimura (Taormina), Ronnie Nasuti (Tiki’s Bar & Grill), John Salcedo (RumFire) Wade and Michelle Ueoka (MW Restaurant) and Lee Anne Wong (Koko Head Café). General admission is $60 at the door or $55 if purchased before July 14. For pre-sale tickets, visit tickets.honoluluboxoffice.com/e/mangoes-at-themoana. For more information about the event, call 922-3111 and ask for the concierge desk. J U LY+ AU GU ST 2 0 1 7

|

INSIDE O UTHAWAII .COM

29


M AUK A T O M A K AI

Poetry in Motion Halau will perform kāhiko and ‘auana hula. by Hula’s evolution as a storytelling art has survived for centuries, thanks in part to Prince Lot Kapuāiwa who revived the once-forbidden art in Moanalua in the late 1800s. In a fitting tribute 39 years ago, the Moanalua Garden Foundation (MGF) established what would become the largest and oldest non-competitive hula festival in the state. This 30

IN SIDE O UTHAWAII .COM

year, more than 20 hālau are expected to participate in the 40th Annual Prince Lot Hula Festival at ‘Iolani Palace, Saturday, July 15, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and Sunday, July 16 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. “When we do the hula, we are using our bodies, our feet, our faces, our hands; we are using our minds,” says kumu hula |

JULY +AUGUST 2017

Gina Bailey

Puake‘ala Mann. “We’re helping to tell our stories in the simplest way possible.” Themed “Laukanaka Ka Hula…Throngs of Hula People Gather,” the festival reflects Moanalua Garden Foundation’s commitment to perpetuate the traditional oli (chants) and hula of Kamananui (Moanalua). The festival, though, will change venue,

moving from Moanalua Gardens to ‘Iolani Palace. “We can’t think of a better place than ‘Iolani Palace to showcase two days of great hula performed by some of Hawai‘i’s premier hālau hula,” says Alika Jamile, MGF executive director and president in a released statement. “We invite the entire community to join us for this first ever celebration of the Prince Lot Hula Festival at the palace.” This year, MGF will honor noted chanter Cy Bridges with its inaugural Namakahelu Oli Award. The foundation’s highest honor given only once every five years, the Kukui o Lota Award will go to Senator Daniel K. Akaka, Charles M. Cooke, IV and Kumu Hula Vicky Holt Takamine. Leimomi I Maldonado and her brother Milton I will receive MGF’s Malia Kau Award given solely to Kumu Hula who have advanced our hula traditions. Admission is free, however, attendees are encouraged to buy a souvenir button to help support this annual festival. Visit moanaluagardensfoundation.org or call 839.5334.✽

©MOANALUA GARDENS FOUNDATION

“Hula is for everyone,” says Puake‘ala Mann. “All we need to do is to take care of it.”


INS A ND O U T S

Not to Miss

Mark your calendars and enjoy an exciting carnival in Kaimukī; a weeklong concert with some of the island’s top steel guitarists; a yearly concert series in Waimea Valley; and all the kim chee you can eat.

COMING SOON ALOHA FESTIVAL September 9 The 2017 Aloha Festivals celebrates the love for Hawai‘i’s children and future with “He Lei Aloha Ke Keiki — Children Are Our Garland of Love.” alohafestivals.com

GOT RICE?

Raspy Riffs

September (TBA) The eighth Annual Rice Fest will offer a full day of activities, including friendly cooking and eating competitions, live entertainment, plenty of ono food and much more. rice fest.com

Concert Series

Carnival Time

July 29, August 26

July 14-16 The carnival returns to Kaimukī High School,

The sound of birds won’t

where attendees will be able to nosh on various food,

be the only acoustical

go on rides and listen to live music. Admission is free.

element heard in Waimea

An E. K. Fernandez Shows Fun Pass will be required for

Valley this summer. A

the rides, and to purchase food and beverages at the

list of Hawaiian artists

Fernandez food concessions. ekfernandezshows.com

is scheduled to take the main lawn during the fifth annual summer concert

CENTURY RIDE

series “Hoi Hou Mai —

September 24 Register now for the 36th Annual Honolulu Century Ride, which allows cyclists to choose their own comfortable distances: 25, 50, 75 or 100 miles. hbl.org/honolulu centuryride

Waimea Return to the Valley.” Scheduled artists include Kapena, Weldon Kekauoha, Keauhou, Ekolu and Hapa. Tickets cost $15 for adults and $10 for keiki/senior. waimeavalley.net

32

IN SIDE O UTHAWAII .COM

|

JULY +AUGUST 2017

K-Fest

August 12 The 16th Annual Korean Festival will showcase the best of all things Korean, including music, dance, martial arts, food, historical and cultural displays, arts and crafts, and K-pop entertainers. koreanfestivalhi.com/en/

(CLOCKWISE, FROM TOP) ©DON ROSTOW; COURTESY KOREAN FESTIVAL HAWAII; ©HAWAII BICYCLING LEAGUE

July 10-15 The twangy sound of the kī hō‘alu (steel guitar) will resonate throughout the Royal Hawaiian Center during the weeklong “Waikīkī Steel Guitar Festival.” All events at the Royal Grove are free and open to the public. royalhawaiiancenter.com


Best Oahu Restaurant Top Write-In

k 2016 2016 2016 2015 2015 2015 2014 2014 2014 2013

Best Italian Silver

Awards Star Advertiser Hawaii’s Best Italian - 1st place Hale ‘Aina Awards ‘Ilima Awards Pacific Business News Award Hale ‘Aina Awards ‘Ilima Awards Hale ‘Aina Awards Honolulu Magazine Award ‘Ilima Awards ‘Ilima Awards

aran ino at The Kahala

arancino at the kahala

the kahala resort and hotel

ground floor

808 380 4400

www.arancino.com

InsideOut Magazine July-August 2017  

Made in Hawai'i Festival: Buy local and help support our local entrepreneurs. THROWDOWN: Chefs compete in a culinary battle during Mangoes...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you