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CONTRIBUTORS Genevieve Diesing Just Desserts, page 32

Genevieve Diesing is a Chicagobased writer, editor and chef. She has written about music, food and healthcare for outlets such as the Chicago Tribune, Atlantic.com, Chicago Sun-Times, Crain’s Chicago Business and more. Writing about historic Chicago desserts for this issue of Where Chicago was fascinating, and now she wants to recreate them all for her friends. When she’s not writing, she’s likely eating, cooking or hosting dinner parties.

Jay Gentile

All About Town, page 40 Jay Gentile is an award-winning journalist and Chicago expert who has written for a variety of publications including SPIN, VICE, Chicago Tribune, The Guardian, Lonely Planet, Outside Magazine, Thrillist, Huffington Post, Chicago Reader and many others. He is also the editor/founder of local music magazine Chicago INNERVIEW and digital marketing specialist with Consequence of Sound. Jay is recognized as a leading authority in a wide array of topics including travel, music, entertainment, food/drink, events and nightlife.

Anthony Settipani

Post, among others in the U.S. and beyond. When he’s not busy diving into long-forgotten Chicago lore, he enjoys dreaming up new ways to house his ever-expanding collection of tea.

Trashhand

A Holy Place, page 22

Trashhand is a Chicago-based photographer that specializes in architecture and lifestyle. After starting his career being selftaught with just an iPhone, he quickly gained a large following on Instagram that propelled him into the professional photography world. Whether it is capturing modern architecture from new perspectives or dilapidated locations never seen before, trashhand continues to showcase his unique perspective from his lens.

Genevieve Diesing

Trashhand

Lisa White

Laugh Factories, page 36

Lisa White is a writer and editor based in Chicago. Her work has appeared in the Chicago Reader, DNAinfo Chicago, Time Out Chicago, Chicagoist and Gapers Block. Writing has led her on such adventures as co-writing a hot dog column (no ketchup, of course) to interviewing a slew of musicians, fulfilling her teenage rock journalist fantasy. She works in publishing and lives in Logan Square with her partner Justin.

Jay Gentile

Lisa White

The World’s Stage, page 28

Anthony Settipani is a freelance writer and graduate of the Medill School of Journalism in Evanston, Illinois. His work has been featured in the Chicago Tribune, Time Out Chicago and Huffington 14

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Anthony Settipani


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CONTENTS 18

FIRST LOOK The “city that works” does so with an urban landscape full of green space, riverwalks, museums and attractions.

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A HOLY PLACE Chicago’s St. Mary of the Angels Church has stunning architecture that’s nothing short of miraculous. PHOTOS BY TRASHHAND

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THE WORLD’S STAGE The 1893 World’s Fair happened 125 years ago, but there’s still relics everywhere you look in Chicago. BY ANTHONY SETTIPANI

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JUST DESSERTS Chicago has a sweet history as the birthplace of the Twinkie, brownie and more. BY GENEVIEVE DIESING

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LAUGH FACTORIES We quiz the city’s best standup and improv comedians on what is so funny. BY LISA WHITE

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ALL ABOUT TOWN In addition to the city itself, Chicago has plenty of worthwhile day trips. BY JAY GENTILE

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DINING Hot dogs, Italian beef and deep dish pizza aren’t the only things we’re dishing up.

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MUSEUMS & ATTRACTIONS Everywhere you look in Chicago, history abounds. Our cultural museums and attractions have rare artifacts and famous artworks you can’t find elsewhere.

SHOPPING Whatever your personal style may be, Chicago’s unique boutiques have goods to match.

ENTERTAINMENT When the sun goes down, the city really lights up with comedy clubs, nightclubs and plenty of live music.

GALLERIES & ANTIQUES Chicago’s bustling urban landscape has inspired many artists whose work is on display in these treasured galleries.

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HELLO, SUE! The Field Museum’s famous T. Rex goes back on display in her new permanent home as of December 21.

ON THE COVER: A NEW VIEW OF “FLAMINGO” THAT STANDS AT THE FEDERAL PLAZA, BY ALEXANDER CALDER ©JOE DANIEL PRICE / GETTY IMAGES INSIDE COVER: CHICAGO’S STUNNING SKYLINE, AS SEEN FROM AN AERIAL VIEW AT NIGHT ©FURKAN DEFNE / EYEEM / GETTY IMAGES


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FIRST LOOK

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Since the time of Mayor Richard J. Daley, Chicago has been known as the “city that works.” That reputation continues with an urban landscape that creates one unified metropolis.

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“Eventually, I think Chicago will be the most beautiful great city left in the world.” FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT, the famed architect on the majestic presence of Chicago’s towering skyline. His own style is featured in numerous homes and studios, particularly in the community of Oak Park.

Riverwalk

Chicago’s outdoor paradise is a sight to see in all seasons. This 1.25mile stretch of walkway was purpose built for pedestrians to enjoy the terrain and all its features, including six scenic coves. In recent years, new opportunities for dining and lounging have opened up, including City Winery (with heated domes in the winter). There’s also charter boats as well as the McCormick Bridgehouse & Chicago River Museum to enjoy. Chicago River, from Lake St. to Lake Shore Drive.

WHERE GUEST B OOK

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This historic institution celebrated its 150th anniversary in 2018. It’s known to be one of the oldest zoos in North America (and remains one of the few free zoos), first opened in 1868, with the gift of two pairs of swans to the city of Chicago from Central Park in New York. Today, Lincoln Park Zoo is committed to conservation efforts for some of the world’s most endangered species and hosts regular school groups who get to learn about its many exotic creatures. 2001 N. Clark St., lpzoo.org

Cultural Center

Buckingham Fountain

Not to be confused with Buckingham Palace (though this ornate fountain is just as regal), the official Chicago landmark is named for its donor, local philanthropist and art patron Kate Sturges Buckingham who paid for its creation as a memorial for her brother. Its detailing is courtesy of French artist Marcel Loyau. The fountain has 133 jets and a 1.5 million gallon water capacity and features light shows and water displays every day from May to October. 301 S. Columbus Dr. 20

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One of the first things patrons notice when stepping foot inside this treasured Chicago building are two giant stained glass domes, one of them in fact the largest Tiffany stained glass dome in the world. In addition to beautiful decor, the Cultural Center (established in 1897 as Chicago’s first public library) is also a beacon of the arts with hundreds of free performances from global artisans and musicians all year long. 78 E. Washington St.

(FACING PAGE) ©CHANGYONG LEE/CC

Lincoln Park Zoo

(CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT) ©CHRISTOPHER ARNDT/ISTOCK; ©SONGQUAN DENG/SHUTTERSTOCK; ©MARY LYNN STRAND/SHUTTERSTOCK

FIRST LOOK


Adler Planetarium

PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT

Chicago’s famed astrology museum is simply out of this world. Established in 1930, it was the first planetarium in the western hemisphere. Today, the National Historic Landmark hosts exhibitions, displays medieval astronomical tools and has the 360-degree Grainger Sky Theater. There’s also the Doane Observatory with hidef telescopes and the Galileo Café with gorgeous skyline views. 1300 S. Lake Shore Dr., adlerplanetarium.org

WHERE GUEST B OOK

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A full view of St. Mary’s of the Angels nave, also known as the central part of the church featuring the center aisle that extends to the altar and rows of pews.

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A HOLY PLACE Chicago’s St. Mary of the Angels Church has stunning architecture that’s nothing short of miraculous. PHOTOGRAPHY BY TRASHHAND

In Chicago’s Bucktown neighborhood, this towering and reverent building is home to one of the most beautiful churches in the city, St. Mary’s of the Angels. With ornate domed ceilings, twin bell towers, arched windows and Roman columns, the church is a prime example of the Polish Cathedral style that is modeled after the elaborate St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome. It is a visible presence even from the I-94 Expressway as visitors make their way into the city. Inside the views are just as breathtaking, with a grandiose pipe organ and majestic religious paintings done by John A. Mallin, a Czech-American mural and fresco painter residing in the Chicago area who painted many of the Archdiocese of Chicago churches in the 20th century. Though St. Mary’s of the Angels was first established in 1899 as a place of worship for the large population of Polish immigrants settling into Chicago, today it hosts a robustly diverse congregation.

WHERE GUEST B OOK

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(From left) A closer look at the exquisite hand paintings in the church, done by local Chicago muralist John A. Mallin at the turn of the 20th century.


(Clockwise) The church features several reflection spots; a closer look at the towering pipe organ; more of Mallin’s work.


THE WORLD’S STAGE It was 125 years ago that Chicago hosted the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition, but there are still remnants around today.

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©BUSARA/SHUTTERSTOCK

PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT

BY ANTHONY SETTIPANI

Head to the Chicago Field Museum’s “What Is An Animal?” exhibit and you’ll find a giant octupus hanging overhead. With its tentacles splayed out in ferocious form, it looks like it could probably crush a ship, though it’s just a prop, made of nothing more than expertly fashioned layers of paper and glue. It is also 125 years old. The octopus and its partner, a similarly titanic squid floating nearby, are both remnants of the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition, held in Chicago—and exclusive members of the Field Museum’s original collection. “It was originally a prop [for the Fair],” says Mark Alvey, the Field Museum’s academic communications manager, regarding the history of the eight-armed spectacle. “But now that it’s so old, it’s become an artifact.” Alvey explains that many ages-old pieces like these fill the halls and chambers of the Field Museum, which actually owes its existence to the 1893 World’s Fair, an event orchestrated to celebrate the 400th anniversary of Christopher Columbus’s arrival in America in 1492 and to showcase humanity’s latest advancements. At the conclusion of the five-month-long event, Chicago department store magnate Marshall Field put down $1 million to start a museum and ensure that the artifacts left over from the Fair were given a safe home for prosperity. The then-named Palace of Fine Arts in Jackson Park (now the home of the Museum of Science and Industry) was originally chosen to house and display the more than 50,000 remnants. “The main hall [of the museum] was filled with statuary, a lot of it being of Columbus,” says Alvey. “It was very dramatic, [the room was] WHERE GUEST B OOK

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(CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE) THE FIELD MUSEUM’S OCTOPUS; THE ART INSTITUTE LIONS GUARDING A RELIC OF THE FAIR; THE MUSEUM OF SCIENCE AND INDUSTRY IS ONE OF THE MOST PRISTINE BUILDINGS REMAINING FROM THE EXPOSITION; A LOOK AT THE PALACE OF FINE ARTS IN 1893; A DRAWING OF ORIGINAL FESTIVALGOERS.


(BOTTOM LEFT) COURTESY FIELD MUSEUM (THIS PAGE) ©ANTHONY SETTIPANI

COURTESY FIELD MUSEUM (BOTTOM RIGHT) ©THOMAS BARRAT/SHUTTERSTOCK

(TOP LEFT, RIGHT AND CENTER) ©ANTHONY SETTIPANI; ©DEATONPHOTOS/SHUTTERSTOCK;

sunlit from above because they didn’t have electric lighting at the time, and it was full of white statuary.” By 1905, the museum had rebranded itself from the Field Columbian Museum to the Field Museum of Natural History, and in 1921 it was moved to its current location on Chicago’s downtown Museum Campus. Much of that founding collection is now in storage behind-the-scenes, but several items still remain on display—for those who know where to look.

“You’re looking at the same thing the Fairgoers saw. This is what they would have experienced.” —Kathleen Carpenter, co-director of the Chicago Architecture Center, on peering back in time at the Museum of Science & Industry.

A FIELD TRIP “What I recommend to people that are interested in the Fair,” says Kathleen Carpenter, co-director of the Chicago Architecture Center’s popular “Devil in the White City” tour (based off the book by Erik Larson set at the World’s Fair) “is to go to the Field Museum and go on a scavenger hunt. Look into the exhibit cases and see which ones say 1893 on it, because those [are] the [items] from the Fair.” From the towering totem poles in the entry hall to the stunning Sun God Opal in the Museum’s Gem Hall to a sample of lava from Mt. Vesuvius in Italy, there is no shortage of objects on display that first came into the museum’s possession by way of the Columbian Exposition. “One of the things that people may think about fairs is that they’re relatively unimportant because they’re transitory,” says Robert Rydell, a history professor at Montana State University. Rydell authored the book All The World’s A Fair, and is a prominent authority on the history of American World’s Fairs. In his view, some of the most important legacies of the 1893 edition were the Field Museum, Art Institute of Chicago and the Museum of Science and Industry that all trace their roots back to the Columbian Exposition. According to Carpenter, looking at the Museum of Science and Industry from the parking lot on the property’s south side is like peering backwards in time. “You’re looking at the same thing the Fairgoers saw, except the Fairgoers’ building was painted white,” she says. “You can almost block out everything around you and say, ‘This is what they would have experienced.’”

WALK BACK IN TIME From the Museum of Science and Industry, those who wish to walk back in time across the grounds of the Fair can do so either by traversing south, past the lagoons and wooded island sculpted by Frederick Law Olmsted (the site designer for the Fair), or west through Midway Plaisance Park, where the world’s first Ferris Wheel made its global debut at the Columbian Exposition. More than just physical reminders, however, something about the 1893 World’s Fair remains indelibly etched into the very culture of Chicago. “There have been books written that are set at the Fair—a whole genre of detective novels set there. There was also music inspired by the Fair,” says Diane Dillon, a curator at Chicago’s Newberry Library, which, in 2018, is featuring a gallery called “Pictures from an Exhibition,” displaying The Newberry’s extensive collections of original maps, paintings and other documents remaining from the Columbian Exposition. THE FAIR IN POP CULTURE Dillon also adds that the Joffrey Ballet’s planned rendition of “The Nutcracker,” which will set Tschaikovsky’s famous ballet within The White City will be a major attraction during the 2018 Christmas season. And like the octopus hanging in the Field Museum, the Fair has many tentacles that reach into current pop culture. The Fair gave the world the first Ferris Wheel, gave Chicago its first elevated train and introduced Cracker Jacks and the Chicago-style hot dog. The awardwinning video game BioShock Infinite, released in 2010, modeled its world directly on the aesthetics of the Fair. The story of the Exposition itself was also famously immortalized in Erik Larson’s The Devil in the White City, which boasts several onstage adaptations and a feature film (in the works). “So [the Fair] still very much serves as a creative spur for artists in many different mediums,” Carpenter says, with many more years to come of influencing new generations. WHERE GUEST B OOK

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JUST DESSERTS From becoming the candy capital of the country to the birthplace of the ice cream sundae, this is the history of sweet home Chicago. BY GENEVIEVE DIESING

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(OPPOSTITE PAGE) ©JACOB LUND/SHUTTERSTOCK

Food historian Bruce Kraig, who contributed to the above book, says Chicago’s sweet advantage was its railway hub.

From its very beginnings, Chicago has had a sweet spot. Not long after the city was incorporated in 1833, the booming metropolis put itself on the map at the center of the country’s dessert scene, thanks to its proximity to local dairies, easy access to sugar and the ingenuity of its bustling immigrant populations. Back then, Chicago was the most rapidly growing city in the world. Its strategic location between the Great Lakes and Mississippi River Watersheds attracted a diverse pool of immigrants, resulting in rich and varied culture—and plenty of recipes from the homelands, where desserts were an established fourth meal. As the flourishing civilizations and ample resources melded, this Midwestern river town soon became the candy capitol of the world, as well as the birthplace of nationally beloved desserts such as Eli’s Cheesecake, Twinkies, malted milkshakes, sundaes, Spumoni and so much more. A CITY OF CANDY Chicago’s association with sugar began in 1848, following the debut of the Illinois and Michigan Canal, according to Chicago: A Food Biography (Rowman & Littlefield, 2015). The canal connected Chicago to the Mississippi River and thus made it a prime traffic stop. In the first year the canal opened, Chicago received five million pounds of sugar from sugar cane plantations in Louisiana and Cuba, and four years later that number grew to more than 15 million pounds. The city’s confectionaries proliferated, and Chicago had a growing industry until the widespread destruction from the Great Chicago Fire in 1871. As the city got back on its feet, so did its candy business. In addition to its close resources, Chicago’s strategic infrastructure played a key role in it becoming a sweet powerhouse, says Carol Haddix, Chicago food expert and former longtime dining editor at the Chicago Tribune. Chicago was a national railway hub at this point, and as food historian Bruce Kraig, culinary historian and contrib-

uting editor to The Chicago Food Encyclopedia (University of Illinois Press, 2017) puts it, the city was “the great food collecting production distribution center of the nation.” The Windy City became the true candy capitol of the world around the turn of the 20th Century, with easy access to corn syrup from Midwestern corn crops, and new beet sugar from Michigan, chocolate from New Orleans, as well as from easy access to Wisconsin for dairy products. Those railways also made it easy for manufacturers to ship product to the farthest reaches of the country. As a result, candy companies such as Brach’s Candy, Ferrara Pan Candy Co. (the company behind the famous Lemonheads), Fannie May, Mars Candy, Wrigley chewing gum and more all played a part in making Chicago the nation’s number-one candy producer. Although many manufacturers have since closed or moved their headquarters, Chicago remains an essential candy city. The scent of chocolate wafting from the Blommer Chocolate Company—the largest and oldest independent cocoa bean processor in North America—can still be smelled in the Loop on any given day as a reminder. THE IMMIGRANT INFLUENCE Chicago’s incredible ethnic diversity has been instrumental to its sweetness from the get-go, says Kraig. Notably, Germans and Scandinavians brought their great baking traditions to many local bakeries and restaurants. “We had a lot of Eastern and Southern Europeans coming [to Chicago] at the end of the 19th century and the 20th century,” Kraig says. “And so we had a lot of Eastern European treats and Hungarian desserts, [as well as] sweets from Poles and Bulgarians and Greeks.” The same goes for Italian immigrants. Spumoni can even be traced back to the Lezza family, who emigrated to Chicago from Southern Naples in the early 1900s. By 1900, approximately three quarters of the city’s population were immigrants, says Kraig. WHERE GUEST B OOK

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MORE BAKING TRADITIONS In addition to its candy prowess, Chicago had quite a robust baking scene. It was the central flour and wheat distribution center in the world in the 1880s, Kraig says, and also had plenty of dairy resources at its disposal. Cattle were rampant throughout the city—as anyone who has heard the rumor about Miss O’Leary’s cow might suspect— making milk, cream and butter plentiful. It makes sense, then, that this dairy-centric town would later come to prize cheesecake as its most iconic dessert. 34

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(BOTTOM) COURTESY OF THE CHICAGO HISTORY MUSEUM. ICHI-85002; WALTER A. MCDOUGALL

FINE HOTELS MAKE FINE DESSERTS In addition to creating a major trading post, the dawn of Chicago railways also made the city a temporary destination for high-profile entertainers passing through during national tours and created a bustling business center in an otherwise largely unincorporated town. Both developments merited the construction of fancy hotels and restaurants. Chefs with French, German and Central European training flocked to the city to cater to the new business elites. Even with neighborhoods still in their infancy, extravagant hotels sprang up near Wolf Point—where the North, South and Main Branches of the Chicago River converge— as early as 1837. According to Kraig, these were the city’s first public dining rooms (with independent restaurants later cropping up in the 1850s) and they served sponge cakes, wine jellies (an ancestor of Jello), puddings, pies and French desserts such as crepe suzettes and Charlotte Ruse. Bertha Palmer, Chicago socialite, woman’s rights activist and wife of Chicago hotel magnate Potter Palmer (who founded the Palmer House Hotel), even created the very first brownie in 1893 when she collaborated with the Palmer House’s pastry chef on a compact dessert for a ladies’ luncheon during the World’s Fair. The hotel still serves the original version of this famous brownie (with an apricot glaze) in its Lobby Bar.

(TOP) COURTESY OF THE CHICAGO HISTORY MUSEUM, ICHI-85006; PAULINE CAMPBELL.;

Greeks in particular came to dominate the candy making industry. “In the early 20th century, virtually all the candy makers and chocolate makers in the Midwest and around the country were trained in Chicago by Greek candy makers,” he adds.


COURTESY OF LAKE COUNTY (ILL.) DISCOVERY MUSEUM, CURT TEICH POSTCARD ARCHIVES

(FROM LEFT) ©RAMON ANTINOLO/SHUTTERSTOCK;

Specifically, Eli’s Cheesecake, which Eli Shulman invented as a sweet course at his restaurant: Eli’s, The Place for Steak, which he founded in Chicago’s Streeterville neighborhood in the 1940s. The restaurant was a celebrity hot spot, attracting famous folk such as Frank Sinatra, but Shulman’s cheesecake gained even more renown. The iconic dessert—which is still available in a range of flavors—has been served at everything from the city’s 150th birthday party to four presidential inaugurations. Chicago went on to house many famous commercial bakery operations, too, such as Sara Lee Corporations and was even the home of the Twinkie. You can still visit some historic retail family bakeries, such Dinkel’s Bakery in Lakeview or Roeser’s Bakery in Humboldt Park, the latter of which is Chicago’s oldest family-owned retail bakery.

(From left) Chicago is known as the home of the Twinkie and Ferrara Pan Candy. (Opposite) A look at some of the city’s retro soda shops and sweet vendors.

SUNDAE BEST Ice cream also became very popular in Chicago, where several historians claim the sundae was invented. Perhaps the most iconic place to eat a sundae in the city continues to be Margie’s Candies, in the Bucktown neighborhood, which Peter George Poulos opened in 1921. The dessert shoppe welcomed its most famous guests on August 20, 1965 when the Beatles paid a visit after playing at Chicago’s Comiskey Park in front of 50,000 fans. “After the show, George, John, Paul and Ringo sneaked over to Margie’s with five lucky girls,” Chicago food historian and writer Amy Bizzarri writes in her 2016 book Iconic Chicago Dishes, Drinks and Desserts (American Palate). “They ordered several Atomic Sundaes before

calling it a night.” In fact, Margie’s still keeps Beatles memorabilia in its glass display cases as a reminder of that unforgettable night. Malt powder was also invented in the City of Big Shoulders in the 1800s, first used for baby formula due to its nutritional properties, Haddix says. It wasn’t until 1922 that a Walgreens soda jerker first experimented with putting the sweet powder in a milkshake when the first malted milkshake was born. FOREVER SWEET To this day, Chicago has maintained one of the most prominent food scenes in the nation and dessert is part-andparcel of that phenomenon. It’s hard to think of Chicago dessert today without considering Mindy Segal, one of the most acclaimed pastry chefs in the country. Segal opened Mindy’s Hot Chocolate restaurant in 2005 after working in some of Chicago’s finest restaurants and was later awarded the James Beard Foundation Award for Outstanding Pastry Chef. Haddix, who has seen plenty of sweet innovation from her three-decade career as the dining editor at the Chicago Tribune, says there have been too many glorious dessert moments over the years to count, but she is partial to Hoosier Mama Pie (with locations in Chicago and Evanston) and Floriole Café & Bakery in Lincoln Park as modern examples of the city’s sweet heritage. “There are so many wonderful restaurants doing wonderful desserts,” she says, the cherry on top of the city’s sweet legacy. WHERE GUEST B OOK

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Q&A

LAUGH FACTORIES These four funny folks have played an essential role in Chicago’s rich comedy scene, from stand-up to improv and every laugh in between. BY LISA WHITE

I think, happily, that most of us choose to laugh.

The Executive Director at Second City began his career with the

Do you think there is a divide

storied company in 1988, and

between stand-up and improv

has produced such talent as Tina

comedy in Chicago?

Fey, Amy Poehler, Seth Meyers

I started producing at Second City in 1992 and there was an imaginary line between stand-ups and sketch performers, and very few people crossed over. The style and format of stand-up comedy is quite different than the work we do. But as the comedy world has gotten bigger, the art form has gotten smaller in the sense you’re recognizing that you aren’t just doing one thing. No one is just one thing anymore. And that was kind of our deal at Second City. This work was the gig economy before anyone ever called it the gig economy.

and Stephen Colbert. Leonard authored the book “Yes, And,” and is co-lead in a partnership with the University of Chicago that studies behavioral science through the lens of improvisation. You started taking improv classes at iO while still in high school. What made you want to get involved in the Chicago comedy scene?

It has a lot to do with why we call ourselves the Second City. I think in general, comedy comes from a lot of great people who are in a second position. And Chicago’s got that. We’re not New York, we’re not LA. We’re not necessarily sexy, we’ve got terrible weather, our sports teams were forever rotten. All of that means one of two things: You can either cry or laugh, and 36

W H E R E G U E ST B O O K

a class. One thing we’ve learned in our behavioral science work is that most people’s default position is to do nothing or say no. Our work is directly opposite of that. Our work is that you have to say “yes, and” to everything that’s in front of you.

It’s my hometown, so I have some affection and pride for Chicago. I think also it’s a really challenging place to perform. People want you to have artistic integrity and a commitment, there’s a real sense of community and a strong sense of taste. It’s a demanding city, but in a good way.

CAMERON ESPOSITO If someone wants to experience a Los Angeles-based come-

really good night of Chicago com-

dian, actor and writer Cameron

edy, where should they go?

Esposito began her stand-up

I started the open mic night that still happens on Wednesday nights at Cole’s. That’s an amazing place to feel the Chicago vibe because it’s an archetypical Chicago dive bar. There are pictures of Lincoln on the wall, and the Tamale Guy is gonna come through.

career in Chicago, performing regularly at beloved local haunts The Lincoln Lodge, The Hideout and co-hosting comedy nights at Cole’s. Esposito has since headlined national tours, is the co-creator and co-star of the television series “Take My Wife” and her latest stand-up special raised

What do you think is the future

Any advice for someone want-

proceeds to benefit RAINN, the

direction of Chicago comedy?

ing to get involved in the Chicago

largest anti-sexual violence orga-

comedy scene?

nization in the U.S.

I hope the future of Chicago comedy is that it doesn’t change. Because it really is a nearly perfect incubator for performers. Sometimes people talk about whether it would be better if Chicago had

Do it. Don’t talk about it, don’t go online and Google it. Get out of your seat, get out of your home, put your phone away and go take

What made you dive into the Chicago comedy scene instead of somewhere else?

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KELLY LEONARD


“Pullquote from 30wds.text would go here Iiqui eril dolor si. Lor si

PHOTO CREDIT GOTHAM BOOK 5.5/9PT

Giam diam ea ad euguerosto consent lor ill”

Kelly Leonard

WHERE GUEST B OOK

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more industry here, if folks could just stay forever. But I think that it would be antithetical to the whole vibe of the scene. What makes it great is that Chicago has this DIY mentality that makes the performers coming out of here so strong and driven. So if I had a wish for Chicago’s comedy scene, it’d be that it stays how it is right now.

tion of “Saturday Night Live” and joined as a writer and cast member for three seasons starting in 1981. Kazurinsky also has acted in numerous television and film productions, including the “Police Academy” films, and is a screenwriter and stage actor who has appeared on Broadway. Does improv help you prepare

TIM KAZURINSKY Tim Kazurinsky became a main stage member at The Second City in 1978 and studied with prolific actor and teacher Del Close. He eventually caught the atten-

38

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Tim Kazurinsky

make a fool of yourself. It makes you more comfortable when something goes off the rails. You don’t fall apart, you manage to maintain your goal. I prefer a live audience. With acting on film, it’s stop and go. You wait a long time for your laughs. When you’re in a live show, you go out and it’s all there, and nobody can tell you what to do.

What’s your favorite memory while

for scripted acting?

Improv is learning how to play, and play fair. We forget how to play, we get scared and embarrassed and don’t want to make a fool of ourselves, and that’s the point of improv, it’s fun to

because they weren’t listening, learning and following the rules of improv. He was a tough cookie, but he was super brilliant. He regularly said things that slammed doors open in your mind, really revelatory stuff. He really was a great teacher, that’s why he’s so adored. I felt very privileged to study with him.

What was it like working with

performing in Chicago?

Del Close?

I would probably say my favorite scene was with George Wendt, Bruce Jarchow and I—we used to do this scene at Second City called “Cowboys.” It was back in the day

Del was amazing, but he did not suffer fools gladly. If people didn’t take direction, he’d take them apart brick by brick

(FROM LEFT) ©ROBYN VON SWANK; COURTESY SECOND CITY

Cameron Esposito


with just a bare stage, six chairs and a piano. The idea was to see how long you could be on the stage and try to do nothing, have fun with how long the audience would tolerate it. We were lonesome cowboys riding imaginary horses on the stage, and doing that cowboy scene every night was as much fun as we ever had. If someone wants to experience a really good night of Chicago comedy, where should they visit?

People coming into town for a comedy weekend should see a show at either the Main Stage or E.T.C. at Second City. You’d want to catch a show at Annoyance Theatre. Then go see what’s happening at iO. See if anybody you’re dying to see is at Zanies doing stand-up. That should fill your comedy and improv agenda.

You started taking improv classes at iO while still in high school. What made you want to get involved in the Chicago comedy scene?

From a young age, I knew I wanted to be a comedian. At the start of my high school senior year, a teacher of mine, Aaron Carney, suggested I take improv classes at iO Chicago. It would’ve taken me way longer to find the improv scene if it wasn’t for his suggestion. I was very nervous to take classes, and worried that my classmates would think I was boring since I was just a kid by comparison, but they were very accepting and brought me into the fold. What do you think makes Chicago such a great town for comedy and improv? What makes it unique or different compared to LA and NYC?

LAUREN LAPKUS Born and raised in Evanston, Illinois, Lauren Lapkus first cut her teeth taking improv classes at the iO Theater. Since, Lapkus has acted in such shows as “Orange is the New Black,” and films like “Jurassic World” and the upcoming “Holmes & Watson” (with

COURTESY SECOND CITY

fellow Chicagoan John C. Reilly). She also hosts multiple podcasts including “With Special Guest Lauren Lapkus,” where the guests determine the subject of the show and what character Lapkus will play without telling her in advance.

Chicago has such a rich comedy history and has brought so many amazing comedians to TV and film. I think that Midwestern sensibility goes a long way. There’s something special and hopeful about people who grow up in the middle of the country. NYC and LA are, without a doubt, two of the coolest cities in the world, but Chicago is right up there with them. The audiences in the three cities are really different, which is something that surprised me with each cross-country move I made. Different cities laugh at differ-

Lauren Lapkus

ent things. But they all laugh at something, so it all works out in the end. If you could do a Chicagothemed episode of “With Special Guest Lauren Lapkus,” who would be your dream Chicago

guest to invite on the show?

Susan Messing! She was my level two improv teacher at iO and she blew my mind with her bold, positive, go-for-it style. She’s hysterical. She also taught me to stand up straight, a skill I am still honing. WHERE GUEST B OOK

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ALL ABOUT TOWN While Chicago makes a great destination in itself, there are worthwhile day trips to enhance your experience. BY JAY GENTILE

EVANSTON Located just north of the city along Lake Michigan, Evanston is most famous as the home of Northwestern University, one of America’s premier academic institutions which offers the actionpacked Ryan Field on college football Saturdays. The downtown district also features a wealth of shops and restaurants buzzing with activity, as Evanston boasts one of the finest dining scenes outside the city. Just a short walk from downtown, Centennial Park and Clark Street Beach offer unobstructed views of the lake, with additional beaches like Lighthouse Beach offering plenty of opportunities for recreation. How to get there: Take the CTA Purple Line north to South Blvd., Main, Dempster, Davis, Foster, Noyes, Central stops; or Metra UP-N Line north to Main Street, Davis Street, Central Street stops

life. With historic homes and buildings dating to the 1800s paired with cobblestone paths dotted with lush gardens, Long Grove’s downtown is meant to be explored by foot. Pick up souvenirs from the downtown gift shops, boutiques and art galleries, or relax with friends at one of the town’s popular local restaurants like Paddy’s on the Square. And if you like food festivals, Long Grove has you covered with its annual strawberry, chocolate and apple festivals held every summer and fall. How to get there: Take the I-94 Expressway north to IL 22/Half Day Road West

OAK BROOK This affluent community located about 20 miles west of downtown is perhaps most known for its sprawling Oakbrook Center shopping mall and movie theatre, but there’s also the iconic Drury Lane Theatre that has been performing Broadway shows for decades. The town is also a golfer’s paradise with five courses (including the world-renowned Butler National Golf Club.) Oak Brook also sits next to Bemis Woods, a 480-acre forest preserve featuring its own treetop zipline. How to get there: Take the I-290 Expressway west to I-88 Expressway west to IL-83/Kingery Highway

LONG GROVE This quaint bedroom community located about 35 miles northwest of Chicago offers a unique small-town country charm that seems far removed from the hustle and bustle of fast-paced city 40

W H E R E G U E ST B O O K

NAPERVILLE Illinois’ third-largest city is also one of the most active, with a thriving downtown scene offering a wealth of activity. You can ex-

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From quaint small towns with a country feel to bustling mid-size cities with more than 150,000 people, there’s a lot to see and do. And with Illinois celebrating its bicentennial in 2018, there’s never been a better time to get out and explore the state.


© ROBERTA PETERSON/SHUTTERSTOCK; ©MARIO SAVOIA/SHUTTERSTOCK

plore much of the town by strolling the 613 buildings that make up the Naperville Historic District or walking the famed Naperville Riverwalk alongside the DuPage River, which passes through many of the town’s main attractions including Centennial Park (which includes a small public beach) and several downtown bars/restaurants. Naperville is also home to well-attended summer festivals including the massive Naperville Ribfest, held every Fourth of July weekend. How to get there: Take the Metra BNSF Line to the Naperville stop

ROSEMONT Visitors arriving to Chicago from O’Hare International Airport won’t have to travel far to reach Rosemont, located along the airport’s eastern boundary. The main activity here centers around sprawling entertainment complexes like the Allstate Arena and the Donald E. Stephens Convention Center, which host a dizzying array of live concerts and conventions every year. More recent attractions include the nearby Rivers Casino (located in neighboring Des Plaines) and Impact Field, home of independent league baseball club the Chicago Dogs, plus the Fashion Outlets of Chicago. Rosemont’s Parkway Bank Entertainment District also includes a movie theatre, music venue and dining options. How to get there: Take the CTA Blue Line west to the Rosemont stop; or Metra UP-NW Line west to the Rosemont stop

HIGHLAND PARK This posh lakefront suburb located about 25 miles north of downtown offers a little something for everyone, from high-end dining to live music at the beautiful outdoor summer music venue Ravinia, the oldest continually-running outdoor music festival in America. You can also explore the neighborhood by driving Sheridan Road along the lakefront to ogle million-dollar homes and panoramic lakefront views. Immediately south of town, discover the 385-acre Chicago Botanic Garden. How to get there: Take Metra UP-N Line north to the Braeside, Ravinia Park, Ravinia or Highland Park stops

OAK PARK With famous residents Frank Lloyd Wright and Ernest Hemingway, this lively suburb located along Chicago’s western border has long been a gathering place for artists and creatives of all types. In addition to hosting a stunning array of turn-of-the-century Frank Lloyd Wright homes, the diverse community also features a strong food scene with 150-plus restaurants. How to get there: Take the CTA Green Line west to the Ridgeland, Oak Park, Harlem/Lake stops; or Metra UP-W Line west to the Oak Park stop Stroll the Dupage River in Naperville (left) and see Frank Lloyd Wright homes in Oak Park (right). Facing page: Enjoy Evanston’s beaches.

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GALLERIES & ANTIQUES Something To See Chicago's bustling urban landscape and waterfront views have inspired many artists, from worldrenowned architects that have assembled a stunning skyline to the homegrown talents that have decorated city streets with public art and murals. The city's galleries have more inspired works (that you can take home, too).

BROADWAY ANTIQUE MARKETCL008145 One of Chicago’s finest antiques destinations, located just 20 minutes north of the Loop, this 20,000-square-foot market with more than 75 top dealers showcases the best in mission, art deco and mid-century-modern furniture and accessories. M-Sa 11 am-7 pm, Su 11 am-6 pm. 6130 N. Broadway, 773.743.5444. www.bamchicago.com. EVANSTONIACL008152 This antiques and restoration shop specializes in 19th- and early 20th-century American and European pieces, all lovingly displayed. Its 10,000-square-foot showroom is conveniently located on the North Side near other attractions. Find Queen

Anne-style and Chippendale dining room tables and chairs, Victorian and French Empire-style sofas, elegant period mirrors and much more. M-Sa 11 am-5 pm, Su by appt. 6417 N. Ravenswood Ave., 773.907.0101. www.evanstoniaantiques.com. ★ THE GOLDEN TRIANGLECL008154 Occupying an 18,000-square-foot space in the historic Reid Murdoch Center on the north bank of the Chicago River, this is one of the nation’s largest antiques galleries. Golden Triangle focuses on British Colonial furniture and rare finds from China, Thailand and Burma, as well as art deco pieces from Europe. An in-house gift shop has pieces under $200. Open M-F 10 am-6 pm; Sa 10 am-5 pm. 330 N. Clark St., 312.755.1266. www.goldentriangle.biz.

TIFFANY STAINED GLASS, LTD. CTiffany Stained Glass is a custom design and fabrication art glass studio featuring beveled glass, stained-glass windows, illuminated ceilings and Tiffany reproduction lighting. Antique restoration available. Will ship worldwide. 428 Des Plaines Ave., Forest Park, 312.642.0680. www.tiffanystainedglass.com.

CLASSICS/MASTERS BARTLOW GALLERYCL003754 Modern and contemporary art by national and international artists is this River North gallery’s specialty, with a particular focus on abstraction and photorealism. The gallery also buys and sells masterworks from the likes of Chagall, Matisse, Picasso and Brainard. Appointments suggested

Tu-Sa 11 am-5:30 pm. 11 N. Wabash., 312.337.1782. www.bartlowgallery.com. EXPRESSION GALLERIES OF FINE ARTCL00871 Co-owned by Tim DeWine and Eva Jaroszewicz, this gallery focuses on significant 19th- and 20th-century master prints by Picasso, Chagall, Miró, Renoir and others, as well as contemporary American works by Harold Altman and Robert Kipness. River North Gallery open: M-Tu, ThSa 11 am-6 pm; Hinsdale Gallery open: Tu-F 11 am-6 pm, Sa 10 am-5 pm. 708 N. Wells St., 312.274.9848. Tu-F 11 am-6 pm; Sa 10 am-5 pm. 18 W. First St., Hinsdale, 630.986.9848. www.expressiongalleries.com. HILDT GALLERIESCL008719 Located in the arcade of the historic

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ANTIQUES


Drake Hotel, Hildt Galleries specializes in fine original 19th and early 20th century through the present day British, European, and American oil paintings. M-Sa 11 am-5:30 pm. Drake Hotel Arcade, 140 E. Walton St., 312.255.0005. www.hildtgalleries.com. H JOEL OPPENHEIMER, INC.CL0081 Boasting an unsurpassed selection of rare antique and limited edition fine art prints from the golden age of natural history art, this gallery places particular emphasis on the works of John James Audubon. You will also find outstanding works by John Gould, Pierre-Joseph Redouté, Basilius Besler and other, plus custom archival framing and art conservation services. M-Sa 10 am-6 pm. 10 E. Ohio St., 312.642.5300. www.audubonart.com. MONGERSON GALLERY America’s era of westward expansion comes to life at Mongerson Gallery. Visitors can expect to see works concerning sporting and wildlife and American impressionists, in addition to modernists from the Chicago area. By appointment only. 875 N. Michigan Ave., Suite 2520, 312.943.2354. www.mongersongallery.com.

CONTEMPORARY ARC GALLERY The not-for-profit gallery operated by a collective of women artists isn’t just a place to display artwork; it’s also an educational foundation that works to improve artistic opportunities for underserved communities. W-Sa noon6 pm, Su noon-4 pm. 1463 W. Chicago Ave., 312.877.5760. www.arcgallery.org.

CORNELIA ARTS BUILDING The Cornelia Arts Building houses dozens of open artist studios at various times throughout the year that introduce visitors to a local neighborhood setting and dozens of local artists. Roam the two floors, browse paintings, photography, jewelry, sculpture and more, have some food and drinks, and chat with the artists in person, like Kevin Swallow whose paintings showcase Chicago. 1800 W. Cornelia Ave., www.corneliaartsbuilding.com. FIRECAT PROJECTS Chicago artist Tony Fitzpatrick converted his studio into this exhibition space in 2010 with his partner Stan Klein. Stan runs it now, featuring works of Fitzpatrick as well as exhibits by other emerging local artists. Firecat takes no commission from these artists, making money instead to support them by selling books, posters and T-shirts, and producing plays. M-Sa 10 am-4 pm and by appt. 2124 N. Damen Ave., 207.249.9486. www.firecatprojects.org. H LOTTON GALLERYCL00913 Set in the 900 North Michigan Shops along the Mag Mile, this gallery is celebrating its 20th year in business and features handblown glass created by members of the Lotton family, whose patriarch, Charles Lotton, has been called “The Tiffany of the Twenty-First Century.” Along with bowls, vases and various glass objets d’art by the Lottons and other featured glass artisans, you’ll find paintings by a variety of world-renowned artists. M-Sa 10 am-7 pm, Su noon-6 pm. 900 North Michigan Shops, 900 N. Michigan Ave., Sixth Level, 312.664.6203. www.lottongallery.com.

ZHOU B ART CENTER The Chinese-American duo of DaHuang and ShanZuo Zhou has been creating art together since the 1970s. With international acclaim already following them, they left China in 1986 and opened this Bridgeport art center in 2004. The first floor features quarterly exhibits of the Zhou brothers’ art, while the second floor serves as an event space and rotating gallery. On the third Friday of each month, the center hosts a family-friendly open house. M-Sa 10 am-5 pm. 1029 W. 35th St., 773.523.0200. www.zhoubartcenter.com.

EXHIBITIONS BRIDGEPORT ART CENTERCL0075324 Formerly the Spiegel Catalog warehouse, this multi-use space houses artist studios, work areas, event rooms and the 3,000-square-foot 4-E Gallery, which showcases works in all media by in-house artists. M-Sa 8 am-6 pm, Su 8 am-noon. 1200 W. 35th St., 773.843.9000. www.bridgeportart.com. CENTER ON HALSTEDCL005384 Housed in a light-filled three-story space in the heart of Boystown, this community center is the headquarters for many of Chicago’s LGBT groups, and also sponsors regular exhibitions of work by local artists. Daily 8 am-9 pm. 3656 N. Halsted St., 773.472.6469. www.centeronhalsted.org. EVANSTON ART CENTERCL00916 Housed inside this ample, renovated 20,000-square-foot mid-century building (a former office space), this not-for-profit arts organization offers classes on art education and appreciation, as well as hands-on workshops

for artists of all ages. M-Th 9 am-10 pm, F 9 am-9 pm, Sa-Su 9 am-4 pm. 1717 Central St., Evanston, 847.475.5300. www.evanstonartcenter.org.

FINE CRAFTS EVE J. ALFILLE GALLERY AND STUDIOCL00916 Evanston-based jewelry artist Eve J. Alfillé operates this gallery and studio, in which she creates all her designs. Featuring rare pearls, precious gems, and gold and platinum, Alfillé’s works are inspired by, as she describes it, the “poetry of life.” M-Sa 11 am-6 pm, Th 11 am-8 pm. 623 Grove St., Evanston, 847.869.7920. www.evejewelry.com. LILLSTREET ART CENTERCL00918 The country’s oldest and largest urban ceramic center, Lillstreet features contemporary functional and sculptural pieces. Works by emerging and established artists from across the country are represented. The center’s printmaking department offers a variety of courses in print media, including relief, intaglio, monoprint and litho transfers. M-Th 10 am-7:30 pm, F-Sa 10 am-6 pm, Su 10 am-5 pm. 4401 N. Ravenswood Ave., 773.769.4226. www.lillstreet.com. VALE CRAFT GALLERYCL00201 Vale Craft Gallery features contemporary American fine craft by both local and national artists. Ongoing group exhibitions of works in clay, fiber, glass, metal and wood, plus unique jewelry. Tu-F 10:30 am-5:30 pm, Sa 11 am-5 pm. 230 W. Superior St., 312.337.3525. www.valecraftgallery.com.

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

JOEL OPPENHEIMER GALLERY Specializing in rare and collectible natural history art, Joel Oppenheimer Gallery offers an unrivaled selection of original works by Audubon, Besler, Gould, Redouté, Thornton, and many other important artists from the golden age of natural history art. We also offer museum-quality framing and complete conservation and restoration services. Discover this beautiful oasis of art within easy reach of the North Michigan Avenue shopping corridor. Open Monday through Saturday 10–6. 10 E. Ohio St., Chicago, IL

312.642.5300

LOTTON GALLERY Located on Michigan Avenue in the Bloomingdale’s building, Lotton Gallery is celebrating its 20th year in business. Foundations of the gallery collection are the timeless glass creations of the Lotton family, headed by grandfather Charles, sons David and Daniel and grandsons Tim and Robert. Making this lineage of artists a true American legacy of three generations. Additions to the glass artist stable are Rick Satava, Will Dexter, Geoffrey Beetem, Donald Carlson and Michael Hopko. The gallery also represents worldwide modern day master painters including Yana Movchan, Tang Wei Min, Dmitri Danish, Vakhtang, Gyula Siska, Gianni and Francesca Strino, Mary Alayne Thomas, Marina Marina and Aydemir Saidov. Open 362 days a year, Mon– Saturday 10 am– 7pm, Sun 12- 6pm.

www.audubonart.com 900 N. Michigan Ave., Level 6, Chicago, IL

312.664.6203

www.lottongallery.com

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SHOPPING

What's In Store Whatever your personal style may be, Chicago's boutiques and famous department stores have unique goods to match. From Macy's on State Street to Water Tower Place and the one-of-a-kind spots along Armitage Avenue, find clothing, jewelry, home goods and gifts everyone will love. APPAREL

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AKIRACL00067 Edgy styles, affordable prices and local design characterize this collection of these fashion-forward boutiques, each dedicated to a specific gender or merchandise type. Hours vary. Akira Women’s: 1814 W. North Ave., 312.438.4762. 2357 N. Clark St., 773.898.0459. Westfield Old Orchard, 4999 Old Orchard Center, Skokie, 847.510.3744. 835 N. Michigan Ave., 312.639.8264. 1539 E. 53rd St., 312.515.8266. 122 S. State St., 312.579.7773. www.akirachicago.com. BARNEYS NEW YORKCL005217 In a striking building on Oak Street, Barneys New York features a wide variety of merchandise from designers like Paul Smith, Jil Sander, Balencia-

ga and Lanvin. M-Sa 10 am-7 pm, Su 11 am-6 pm. 15 E. Oak St., 312.587.1700. www.barneys.com. E STREET DENIMCL0083714 These denim destinations in Chicago’s North Shore suburbs attract shoppers from all over the Chicago area to browse its impressive 12,000 pairs of jeans from more than 60 vendors. The options cover kids fits, too. There are also dressier outfits, home and body products and lingerie. M-F 10 am-6 pm, Sa 10 am-5:30 pm, Su noon-5 pm.1876 First St., Highland Park, 847.433.8338. 908 Greenbay Road, Winnetka, 847.784.8805. www.estreetdenim.com. FJALLRAVEN Established in 1960, the Swedish her-

itage brand is just starting to open stores stateside. Find innovative, functional yet stylish outdoor camping gear, durable apparel, waxed day packs and more fit for men, women and children. M-Th 10 am-7 pm, F-Su 10 am-8 pm. 1708 N. Damen Ave., 773.661.0227. www.fjallraven.us. UNIQLO Chicago was the lucky recipient of the Midwest’s first UNIQLO store, right on the Magnificent Mile. The Japan-born fast-retail chain calls its clothing “LifeWear” because it’s simple, wearable, long-lasting and classically modern. And did we mention budget-conscious? Nothing much is over $100. M-Sa 10 am-9 pm, Su 11 am-8 pm. 830 N. Michigan Ave., 877.486.4756. www.uniqlo.com.

BEAUTY & SPAS FLOAT SIXTY Our days are full of noise, so we’re leaving it all behind and trying Float Sixty for the ultimate getaway. In this therapy/sensory-deprivation studio, a session literally entails floating in 10 inches of water filled with Epsom salts for an allotted time (60/90 minutes), allowing the body to completely relax in an environment free of distraction. Daily 8 am-10 pm. 303 W. Erie St., Lower Level, 844.356.2860. www.floatsixty.com. HALO [FOR MEN]CL00916 Guys can lounge on the inviting leather couch before appointments, and watch sports or movies on plasma TV. Services include haircuts, hand grooming and waxing.

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SHOPPING M-F 10 am-7:30 pm. 70 W. Madison St., 312.606.4256. Tu-Th noon-9 pm, F 10 am-7 pm, Sa 9 am-6 pm, Su 10 am-5 pm. 1655 N. Damen Ave., 773.342.4256. M-F 10 am-7 pm. 500 W. Madison Ave., 312.575.0102. Tu-Th noon-9 pm, F 10 am-7 pm, Sa 9 am-6 pm. 1351 S. Michigan Ave., 312.929.2933. www.halochicago.com. Q BROTHERS Chicago pharmacy staple Merz Apothecary opened this men’s grooming division focusing on wet-shaving products, including U.S.-made artisanal shaving creams and specialty razors. The shop also carries fine fragrances. M-Sa 9 am-6 pm. 4718 N. Lincoln Ave., 888.811.6611. www.qbrothers.com. RUBY ROOM Escape the chaos of downtown at this boutique New Age spa. Focusing on the power of positive energy through an alchemic style, the Ruby Room allows guests to focus on their inside and outside beauty as one. Tu-F 10 am-7 pm, Sa 9 am-7 pm, Su 10 am-6 pm. 1743-45 W. Division St., 773.235.2323. Tu-Sa 11 am-7 pm, Su 11 am-6 pm. 110 E. Delaware Place, 773.235.2323. www.rubyroom.com. STIL SALON & SPA Perched above Oak Street, this European salon offers everything from traditional manipedis to facials, waxing and eyebrow treatments. They even offer more unconventional services like glycolic treatments that will leave skin glowing and feeling refreshed. T-F 9 am-7 pm, Sa 8 am-6 pm, Su 10 am-5 pm. 34 E. Oak St., Fourth floor,

312.337.7845. www.stilsalonandspa.com.

JEWELRY/WATCHES ★ NA HOKU Na Hoku, Hawaii’s Finest Jewelers since 1924, captures the essence of Hawaiian lifestyle and tradition in its collection of fine jewelry. Hawaiian for “stars,” Na Hoku carries unique fine jewelry designed and made in Hawaii. You’ll find original pieces set with Tahitian pearls, diamonds and colored gemstones, as well as collections by renowned designers such as Kabana, LeVian and Effy. M-Sa 10 am-9 pm, Su 11 am-6 pm. Woodfield Mall, 5 Woodfield Shopping Center, Schaumburg, 847.995.0594. M-Sa 10:30 am-5:30 pm, Su 11 am-5 pm. Magnificent Mile, 600 N. Michigan Ave., 312.475.1182. www.nahoku.com. ★ PANDORACL006281 Find hand-finished bracelets, rings, earrings, necklaces and Pandora’s iconic charm bracelet in Sterling Silver, 14-Karat Gold, Pandora Rose and Pandora Shine. M-Sa 10 am-9 pm, Su 11 am-6 pm. Multiple locations. Water Tower Place, 835 N. Michigan Ave., Seventh Floor, 312.915.0647. 533 N. Michigan Ave., 312.453.0649. www.memorablecharms.com. ★ SWISS FINETIMING/ATELIER JEWELLERSCL004123 Chicago’s premier luxury watch retailer for decades, Swiss FineTiming/ Atelier Jewellers is the place to go for high-end, hard to find exclusive brands including Audemars Piguet, F.P. Journe and Breguet, to name a few. Fine European jewelry, collectible writing instruments by Krone, watch accessories and winding boxes

from Underwood, and fine handmade custom order watch straps are also well represented in both of their spacious and inviting boutiques. Tu-Sa 10 am-5 pm. 1915 Sheridan Road, Highland Park, 847.266.7900 M-Sa 10 am-6 pm. 70 E. Walton St., 312.337.4700. www.swissfinetiming.com.

LINGERIE ★ ENCHANTECL00413 Setting the standard for luxurious European lingerie for over 30 years, Enchanté offers a variety of sleepwear and underpinnings for every day, as well as seductive bedroom attire. The boutique carries coveted European brands such as Lise Charmel, Luxxa, Ajour and Celestine. The knowledgeable sales team can help you make selections and complimentary alterations are available. M-Sa 10 am-7 pm, Su noon-6 pm. The 900 Shops, 900 N. Michigan Ave., Third Floor, 312.951.7290. www.enchantelingerie.com. LA PERLA La Perla, the upscale Italian brand, resides on one of the poshest of Chicago shopping strips, Oak Street. Marble floors, blue velvet-lined fitting rooms and silk carpeting hint at the luxurious fabrics, textures and designs behind the collection of lingerie, swimwear and sleepwear. M-Sa 10 am-6 pm, Su noon-5 pm. 34 E. Oak St., 312.494.0400. www.laperla.com.

SHOES ★ HANIG’S FOOTWEARCL004182 One of Chicago’s premier sources for men’s and women’s shoes, boots and sandals, Hanig’s offers a wide range of

sizes and styles from top designers including Thierry Rabotin, BeautiFeel, Samuel Hubbard and more. Open M-F 10 am-7 pm; Sa 9 am-7 pm; Su 11 am-6 pm. 875 N. Michigan Ave., 312.787.6800. Open M-Sa 10 am-6 pm; Su 11 am-5 pm. Plaza del Lago, 1515 Sheridan Road, Wilmette, 847.256.3545 www.hanigs.com. LORI’S DESIGNER SHOESCL004187 Lori’s offers an extensive selection of brand-name shoes, jewelry, socks and hosiery for all occasions at 10-50 percent off the retail price. M-Th 11 am-7 pm, F 11 am-6 pm, Sa 10 am-6 pm, Su noon-5 pm. 824 W. Armitage Ave., 773.281.5655. M-W 10 am-5:30 pm, Th 10 am-6 pm, F-Sa 10 am-5:30 pm, Su noon-5 pm. 585 Central Ave., Highland Park, 847.681.1532. M-W 10 am-5:30 pm, Th 10 am-6 pm, F-Sa 10 am-5:30 pm, Su noon-5 pm. 311 Happ Road, Northfield, 847.446.3818. www.lorisshoes.com. MEZLAN Who says men’s footwear has to be boring and practical? Located in the 900 North Michigan Shops, Mezlan caters to the man who wants to up his shoe game and look good doing it. Choose from a number of styles handcrafted in Spain while using supple leathers from Italy and genuine exotic skins. M-Sa 10 am-7 pm, Su noon-6 pm. 900 N. Michigan Ave., 312.962.8871. www.mezlan.com THE FRYE COMPANYCL004902 Born in Marlboro, Massachusetts, this retailer is known for its quality materials, creative patterns and even inventing shoemaking machinery

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that resulted in styles worn by factory workers and soldiers. Today, the lexicon of handmade leather goods encompasses staples for all seasons: handbags for women (and men), pumps and flats, men’s loafers and sneakers, wallets and cuffs and, of course, its signature boots. M-Sa 10 am-7 pm, Su 11 am-6 pm. 1007 N. Rush St., 312.642.3793. www.thefryecompany.com.

SHOPPING CENTERS 900 NORTH MICHIGAN Located on the north end of Michigan Avenue, the 900 North Michigan Shops offer six chic levels of shopping, anchored by Bloomingdale’s. The shopping center also includes designer stores like Gucci and Max Mara, specialty stores like Sur La Table and boutiques like J. Toor. M-Sa 10 am-8 pm; Su 11 am-6 pm (some stores may have extended hours). 900 N. Michigan Ave., 312.915.3916. www.shop900.com. BLOCK 37CL006825 The Loop’s chic urban mall is home to a variety of popular shops, perfect for outfitting the entire family. Look for Anthropologie, L’Occitane en Provence, Sephora and Zara, as well as staple Chicago boutique Akira. Hungry? There's plenty of options, from Magnolia Bakery, Au Bon Pain and Which Wich to Godiva Chocolatier. M-Sa 10 am-8 pm, Su 11 am-6 pm. 108 N. State St., 312.261.4700. www.blockthirtyseven.com. THE SHOPS AT NORTH BRIDGECL00510 Spread out over a six-block area, this upscale shopping center is home to 50 stores such as Kiehl’s Since 1851, Vosges Haut-Chocolat and more. In

addition to a dozen upscale fast-food options, restaurants include Eataly, Eddie V’s Prime Seafood and Shake Shack. It’s also known for its Nordstrom department store and standalone Nordstrom Spa. M-Sa 10 am-9 pm, Su 11 am-7 pm. 520 N. Michigan Ave., 312.327.2300. www.theshopsatnorthbridge.com. WATER TOWER PLACECL00510 Considered the first vertical mall in the country when it opened in 1976, Water Tower Place’s seven levels of shopping feature Macy’s, American Girl Place and Broadway in Chicago’s Broadway Playhouse, as well as boutiques such as Lacoste, AKIRA and Abercrombie & Fitch. Dining options include Harry Caray’s 7th Inning Stretch, Wow Bao, Freshii and Foodlife. M-Sa 10 am-9 pm, Su 11 am-6 pm. Some stores and restaurants have extended hours. 835 N. Michigan Ave., 312.440.3580. www.shopwatertower.com.

SPECIALTY STORES CAT AND MOUSE GAME STORE Looking for a new diversion for your family game night, a clever gift or a new set of juggling balls? It’s all what makes this shop tick. Find games galore, a slew of puzzles, construction and science toys, along with brainteasers and one of the largest selections of Yo-Yos around. M-Sa 10 am-7 pm, Tu 10 am-8 pm, Su 10 am-5 pm. 1112 W. Madison St., 312.465.2178. www.cat-n-mouse.com. DYLAN’S CANDY BAR Daughter of fashion designer Ralph Lauren, Dylan Lauren has style in her veins. She channels it into this name-

sake candy emporium. First opened in New York City, Chicago’s sweet-treat heaven includes endless confections, including chocolate bars galore, bagyour-own sections, a fudge counter, nostalgic candies, candy-themed merchandise, an ice cream bar, a fullon cafe with grown-up candy-inspired cocktails and a 3D gummy printer. 663 N. Michigan Ave., 312.702.2247. www.dylanscandybar.com. FOURSIDEDCL00418 The perfect place when you’re stumped for a gift, this local chain stocks small-press greeting cards with a handmade feel, unique wrapping papers, candles, notebooks, picture frames, vintage prints and more. M-W 11 am-7 pm, Th-Sa 10 am-7 pm, Su 11 am-6 pm. 5061 N. Clark St., 773.506.8300. 2958 N. Clark St., 773.244.6431. 2929 N. Broadway St., 773.248.1960. www.foursided.com. GOORIN BROTHERSCL00971 Stylish gents know that it’s not all about the clothing—a truly head-turning ensemble also involves pitch-perfect accompaniments. Whether you’re in the market for a fedora, a newsboy cap, a baseball hat or a knit skullcap, this chic boutique can help you top off your look with the perfect cranial accessory. Su-Th 10 am-7 pm, F-Sa 10 am-8 pm. 1533 N. Milwaukee Ave., 773.384.4287. www.goorin.com. SHINOLA What do watches, pet accessories, leather goods, journals and bicycles have in common? They’re all made in the U.S. by Detroit-based Shinola. The brand’s sleek bicycles are hand-assembled in the factory; the

leather goods are designed and developed there; the paper for the journals is sourced from sustainably managed North American forests. M-Sa 11 am-7 pm, Su 11 am-6 pm. 1619 N. Damen Ave., 773.904.2417. www.shinola.com. SHUGA RECORDS With a massive selection of both new and used records, CDs, cassettes and other recordings, Shuga Records is a must-visit for music lovers of all kinds. You can browse the 20,000 records here or look online and pick up in the store. Plus, find used turntables, vintage posters and audio equipment. The store features commissioned murals, DJ booths and listening stations and also purchases music. M-Sa 10 am-10 pm, Su 10 am-8 pm. 1272 N. Milwaukee Ave., 773.278.4085. www.shugarecords.com. SPEX In addition to an always updated array of designer glasses, this local chain of eyewear stores also offers advanced eye exams by certified optometrists. Open M-Th 10 am-7 pm, F 9 am-6 pm, Sa 9 am-5 pm. 3760 N. Broadway St., 773.975.2020. www.spexoptical.com. TIMBUK2CL00452 Get your fix of the San-Francisco-made handbags, messengers, backpacks and accessories at this Bucktown shop. Don’t miss the chance to design your own made-to-order goods at the creator’s station in the shop. M-Sa 11 am-7 pm, Su 11 am-6 pm. 1623 N. Damen Ave. 773.661.4433. www.timbuk2.com.

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LOOK BOOK From luxury watches, artwork and antiques to shoes, apparel and unique Chicago souvenirs, this is your guide to extraordinary, out-of-theordinary items for you or someone special. PISTACHIOS Located half a block west of Michigan Avenue, Pistachios is a delightful gallery featuring the hand crafted work of some of the most well established metalsmiths and the hottest emerging artists today. This impeccably curated collection of stunning artist made work is always on the cutting edge with pieces that incorporate everything from silver, gold and platinum to steel, aluminum and rubber. Don’t forget to take a look at their cool hand blown glass and one-of-a-kind textiles! Pictured: hand fabricated “Cage” necklace by J. Byczewski, 18K Yellow Gold, Steel, and CZ’s. 55 E. Grand Ave. at the Northbridge Shopping Center (ground level of Nordstrom), Open daily. 312.595.9437, www.pistachiosonline.com

P I S TA C H I O S

SWISS FINETIMING/ATELIER JEWELLERS Angelus is a luxury watch brand based in La Chaux-de-Fonds, the heart of Swiss watchmaking. Founded in 1891, Angelus has been one of the most influential horological manufactures of the last century. Connoisseurs of high-end watchmaking have universally hailed Angelus’ pioneering, in-house developed movements and timepieces, which today continues to be coveted by collectors all over the world.

GOLDEN TRIANGLE A visually stunning 18,000 square foot showroom of internationally sourced furnishings, antiques, and gifts, nestled in the historic Reid Murdoch Center just blocks from Michigan Avenue. Personally curated for beautiful living, collections range from ancient artifacts and Asian antiques to European Art Deco, British Colonial, MidCentury Modern and Chicago artisan-made furniture. Important Shan Burmese Buddha Figure, Gold Leaf and Lacquer, c. 18th Century. Open Monday - Friday 10am - 6pm; Saturday 10am - 5pm. 330 North Clark Street, 312.755.1266, www.goldentriangle.biz

SWISS FINETIMING/ AT E L I E R J E W E L L E R S

SWISS FINETIMING/ATELIER JEWELLERS Since the brand name was registered for Hans Wilsdorf, founder of Rolex, in 1926, TUDOR has benefited from Rolex’s outstanding watchmaking expertise, quality control, and service. TUDOR has a legacy of producing 100% Swiss-made, high performance tool watches for over half a century. The brand draws on a rich watchmaking heritage and continues to bring ageless, mechanical utility with outstanding quality and value to new generations of watch enthusiasts. SWISS FINETIMING/ AT E L I E R J E W E L L E R S

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SWISS FINETIMING/ATELIER JEWELLERS Since its birth in 1960, Grand Seiko watches have demonstrated a consistent commitment to the pure essentials of watchmaking. Precision, legibility and beauty are the attributes that have always defined Grand Seiko and embody the true essentials of watchmaking. Grand Seiko has won high praise for the durability of its high precision and sophisticated design, made possible by the fact that the company is one of the few fully integrated watch manufacturers in the world.

JOEL OPPENHEIMER GALLERY

SWISS FINETIMING/ AT E L I E R J E W E L L E R S

JOEL OPPENHEIMER GALLERY

Chicago’s landmark art gallery offers a stunning selection of natural history art, custom archival framing, and nationally recognized art conservation and restoration services. We feature rare antique and limited-edition prints by Audubon, Redouté, Gould, Besler, and many others. The gallery’s dramatic interior provides an ideal setting for viewing this world-class collection. Pictured above: a limited-edition miniature of John J. Audubon’s watercolor, White Pelican, New-York Historical Society Edition, available at the special price of $350, including archival framing. 10 East Ohio Street, 312.642.5300, www.audubonart.com

SWISS FINETIMING/ATELIER JEWELLERS Audemars Piguet is the oldest fine watchmaking manufacturer still in the hands of its founding families (Audemars and Piguet). Since 1875, the company has written some of the finest chapters in the history of Haute Horlogerie, including a number of world firsts. In the Vallée de Joux, at the heart of the Swiss Jura, numerous masterpieces are created in limited series embodying a remarkable degree of horological perfection, including daring sporty models, classic and traditional timepieces, splendid ladies’ jewellery-watches, as well as one-of-a-kind creations.

SWISS FINETIMING/ATELIER JEWELLERS

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SWISS FINETIMING/ AT E L I E R J E W E L L E R S

Breguet, the standard bearer of haute horology since 1775, is the true measure of a prestigious timepiece. Credited with countless watchmaking innovations such as the tourbillon, the first wristwatch, the self-winding watch, the touch watch and gong-springs for repeaters, it has contributed more to horology than any other brand in history. With a roster of legendary clients that include Napoleon, Marie-Antoinette, Winston Churchill, Tsar Alexander I and Rossini to name a few, it has earned the reputation of being the king of watchmakers and watchmaker to kings. This spirit of innovation continues with its contemporary products which capture the essence of Abraham-Louis Breguet’s passion for fine watchmaking.

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SWISS FINETIMING/ATELIER JEWELLERS Laurent Ferrier offers alternatives to all devotees of classic mechanical watchmaking. The House develops movements crafted in harmony with the finest traditions, while enriching them with highperforming and genuinely innovative technical attributes. Designed for devotees of pure values, it updates horological fundamentals – a renewal of origins that positions Laurent Ferrier as a wellrespected member of the exclusive circle of mechanical Haute Horlogerie.

PANDORA With a focus on empowering women, PANDORA offers unique jewelry to celebrate every woman’s style. PANDORA’s hand-finished jewelry made from high-quality materials creates an affordable luxury for women everywhere. This worldwide brand features charms, earrings, rings and necklaces in stunning Sterling Silver and dazzling 14K gold. Water Tower Place 835 N. Michigan Ave., Level 7, 312.915.0647 and Magnificent Mile, 533 N. Michigan Ave., 312.453.0649, memorablecharms.com

SWISS FINETIMING/ATELIER JEWELLERS Audemars Piguet is the oldest fine watchmaking manufacturer still in the hands of its founding families (Audemars and Piguet). Since 1875, the company has written some of the finest chapters in the history of Haute Horlogerie, including a number of world firsts. The famous 1972 octagonal Royal Oak, the first luxury watch to be made of stainless steel, is widely recognized as one of the most important innovations

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in watchmaking.

SWISS FINETIMING/ATELIER JEWELLERS Since 1865, Zenith has been guided by authenticity, daring and passion in pushing the boundaries of excellence, precision and innovation. Famed for its legendary 1969 El Primero calibre, the Manufacture has since developed over 600 movement variations including 1/100th of a second timing with the Defy El Primero 21. Energized by newly reinforced ties with a proud tradition of dynamic, avantgarde thinking, Zenith is writing its future… and the future of Swiss watchmaking.

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PISTACHIOS This German made go everywhere bracelet is made of 80 strands of steel cables with sterling silver “pods”, giving it a full, wide body look-but leaving a soft and light feel. Magnetic clasp makes it easy to put it on and off. Located at Shops at Northbridge, ground level on Grand Avenue between Rush and Wabash. Open Daily. 55 E. Grand Ave., 312.595.9437, www.pistachiosonline.com

SWISS FINETIMING/ATELIER JEWELLERS RESSENCE is a unique horological company creating innovative mechanical fine-watches. They represent an independent way of thinking about fine watchmaking - no less expertly hand-crafted, but with an industrial design philosophy that seeks to be progressive with a clear, graphic aesthetic that is decidedly 21st century. All watches share the same inimitable DNA. Their sub-dials continually revolve, as does the main disc into which they are set - like moons in orbit around a planet. This means that the watch’s uncluttered dial is ever-changing - as is everything in Time.

P I S TA C H I O S

SWISS FINETIMING/ATELIER JEWELLERS Breguet - Creator Of The First Wristwatch. The first wristwatch in the world was delivered in 1812 by AbrahamLouis Breguet to Napoleon’s sister, the Queen of Naples. Because of her, the most ubiquitous men’s accessory began with a watch fit for a queen. Today, Breguet’s Reine de Naples 8918BR represents one of the most iconic ladies’ mechanical timepieces - part of a collection befitting the queen in every woman.

ENCHANTÉ SWISS FINETIMING/ AT E L I E R J E W E L L E R S

Setting the standard for luxurious European lingerie for over 30 years. Enchanté offers a variety of sumptuous sleepwear and underpinnings for every day, as well as seductive bedroom attire. Carrying coveted European brands such as Lise Charmel, Luxxa, Ajour and Celestine. Stop in and let the knowledgeable sales team help you make the perfect selection! 900 N. Michigan, 3rd Level, 312.951.7290, www.enchantelingerie.com

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ENCHANTÉ

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CHICAGO HELICOPTER EXPERIENCE Go above Chicago and beyond amazing, with a full immersion in all that’s chic, sexy and thrilling about our city. That’s what Chicago Helicopter experience delivers. There’s simply no other experience like it. It starts the moment you enter the luxe lounge in our private heliport on the Chicago River. The anticipation heightens as you step out onto the helipad and are led to one of the state-of-art ASTAR helicopters in our fleet. After slipping into your luxurious seat, you put on your Bose headset to hear your pilot share stories as you take off for the most breathtaking, mind-blowing views of Chicago. Think you’ve seen Chicago? Not until you’ve seen it like this. Call us today to schedule your experience! 2420 S. Halsted St., Chicago, IL

312.967.8687

www.chicagohelicopterexperience.com

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MORTON’S THE STEAKHOUSE Morton’s The Steakhouse – home of “The Best Steak Anywhere” – is enjoyed in several massive cities worldwide, yet there’s something a little extra special when it comes to its hometown locations. Originally named Morton’s of Chicago, Morton’s The Steakhouse has been a favorite in the Windy City since opening its doors in 1978. From its Signature Cut Prime New York Strip to Center-Cut Filet Mignon, Morton’s prides itself on serving USDA Prime-aged steak in addition to fresh seafood, delicious appetizers and decadent desserts. Matched with superior service, Morton’s is the prime spot for cocktails after work, a romantic dinner, a business function or anything in between. For a dining experience sure to leave a lasting impression, visit Morton’s. Downtown (State St.)

Wacker Place

Naperville

312-266-4820

312-201-0410

630-577-1372

Northbrook

Rosemont

Schaumburg

847-205-5111

847-678-5155

847-413-8771

MASTRO’S STEAKHOUSE Regarded as one of the nation’s best restaurants, Mastro’s Steakhouse in Chicago features a legendary selection of high-quality steaks and perfectly-prepared seafood. A cosmopolitan, entertaining atmosphere sets the stage for an unforgettable culinary adventure. From the Bone-In Filet to the Alaskan King Crab Legs and Live Maine Lobster, our chefs have perfected the art of fine dining. After dinner, enjoy a medley of exceptional sweets and dessert wines – including the famous Warm Butter Cake. Dinner is served daily from 5pm to midnight. An eclectic selection of award-winning wines and innovative cocktails complement the steak and seafood. Mastro’s Piano Bar, open from 4pm to 2am, offers an ideal space for an evening of dancing to live music or a place to relax with a unique, hand-crafted libation. Mastro’s combines atmosphere, comfort and elegance, creating the perfect setting for a romantic dinner for two, a sophisticated celebration or any occasion. 520 North Dearborn St., Chicago, IL 60654

312.521.5100

mastrosrestaurants.com

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HANIG’S FOOTWEAR Experience Chicago’s unique stores for men and women, featuring expert service, innovative designs and a comfortable fit. Come visit our landmark location at 875 North Michigan Avenue and try on the very latest from Thierry Rabotin, Samuel Hubbard, Mephisto, Arche, La Canadienne and many more. 875 N. Michigan Ave. Delaware Entrance

312.787.6800 1515 Sheridan Rd. Plaza del Lago, Wilmette

847.256.3545 www.hanigs.com

SWISS FINETIMING / ATELIER JEWELLERS Chicago’s premier luxury watch retailer for decades, Swiss FineTiming / Atelier Jewellers is the only place to go for high-end, hard to find exclusive brands including Audemars Piguet, F.P. Journe & Breguet, to name a few. Fine European jewelry, collectable writing instruments by Krone, watch accessories & winding boxes from Underwood, and fine handmade custom order watch straps are also well represented in both of their spacious and inviting boutiques. Chicago – North Shore, 1915 Sheridan Road, Highland Park

847.266.7900 Chicago – Downtown, 70 East Walton Street, Chicago

312.337.4700 www.swissfinetiming.com

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SLURPING TURTLE Slurping Turtle is the original River North ramen shop. We make our homemade ramen noodles in house as well as offer a variety of quality sushi dishes. Slurping Turtle takes traditional Japanese ramen and sushi dishes and through unique ingredients, recipes and presentation, add our own twist. Join us for weekday Happy Hour, Sunday Brunch, or enjoy our signature Tan Tan Men, Duck Fat Fried Chicken, Hamachi Tacos and extensive sake menu. 116 West Hubbard St, Chicago, IL

312.464.0466

www.slurpingturtle.com/chicago


DINING Tastes of Chicago Hot dogs, deep dish pizza and Italian beef may be the first foods of Chicago but they're not the only cuisine you can find. The culinary scene in the Second City is second to none with comfort foods and authentic ethnic dishes perfected by a range of fine dining restaurants and popular dive spots. Many are even James Beard nominated; the national award show takes place in Chicago again this May. BUCKTOWN/ WICKER PARK

©KONDOR83/ISTOCK

BIG STARCL006198 Mexican. This buzzing dive bar and taqueria boasts a serious pedigree, with a menu by James Beard Award winner Paul Kahan (Blackbird, avec, The Publican). Expect a country vibe, plenty of American whiskeys and a see-and-be-seen crowd overflowing onto the massive seasonal beer garden. Late-night dining. L, D (daily). 1531 N. Damen Ave., 773.235.4039. www.bigstarchicago.com. CLUB LUCKYCL00601 Italian. The flair of the ‘40s meets the 21st Century at this popular Bucktown/Wicker Park restaurant and unique cocktail lounge that serves up traditional, family-style Italian cuisine with a helping of supper-club

atmosphere. Menu highlights include daily specials and generous portions of traditional Italian specialties including fresh vegetarian antipasti, housemade pastas and eggplant parmigiana. Private parties available, as is catering and delivery. In nice weather, also enjoy the outdoor patios. L (M-F), D (nightly). 1824 W. Wabansia Ave., 773.227.2300. www.clubluckychicago.com. KIZUKI RAMEN & IZAKAYA Japanese. Originating in Japan, this restaurant brings a true izakaya experience ( a Japanese pub). L, D (daily). 1482 N. Milwaukee Ave., 773.270.4150. www.kizuki.com. LE BOUCHONCL000261 French. One of Bucktown’s favorite restaurants, this teeny French bistro

gives off the feeling of being plucked straight from Parisian streets. The elegant and upscale menu scores with classics like French onion soup, bouillabaisse and steak frites. L, D (M-Sa). 1958 N. Damen Ave., 773.862.6600. www.lebouchonofchicago.com. LILLIE’S QCL006953 Barbecue. Chef/owner Charlie McKenna creates first-rate, award-winning barbecue at this comfortable Wicker Park hangout. Musttry dishes include pulled pork, tri-tip and baby back ribs, of course with the signature housemade rubs and sauces. Craft beers aplenty as well as creative cocktails. L, D (daily). 1856 W. North Ave., 773.772.5500. www.lilliesq.com. PIECECL00610 Pizza. Wicker Park pizzeria and

brewery (a favorite of visiting rock stars) serves excellent hand-tossed, New Haven-style pizza and a selection of award-winning, house-brewed beers. Choose from red or white sauce for your pie and add all your favorite toppings. L, D (daily). 1927 W. North Ave., 773.772.4422. www.piecechicago.com.

GOLD COAST FIG & OLIVECL0045691 Eclectic. This small, exclusive chain has locations including New York and Newport Beach. The Oak Street branch is an elegant, 10,000-squarefoot space with open kitchen and light color scheme, meant to feel a bit like the French Riviera. Along with the south of France, flavors hail from Italy and Spain in dishes—where olive oils replace butter—like truffle risotto

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DINING and Riviera salmon. Purchase more than 30 gourmet olive oils in the main floor retail space. L (M-F), D (daily), Br (Sa-Su). 104 E. Oak St., 312.445.0060. www.figandolive.com. GIBSONS BAR & STEAKHOUSECL000613 Steak. The steaks and chops are prime, and so is the people-watching at this buzzing restaurant in the heart of the Gold Coast. On-the-prowl singles eye each other in the bar, while power players angle for prime booth seating in the packed dining room. Servers? They’re smart, smooth and unfazed by the hubbub. L, D (daily). 1028 N. Rush St., 312.266.8999. 5464 N. River Road, Rosemont, 847.928.9900 2105 Spring Road, Oak Brook, 630.954.0000. www.gibsonssteakhouse.com. ROSEBUD ON RUSHCL00456 Italian. Just a few blocks from the Mag Mile, this Gold Coast eatery stays true to classic Italian fare with housemade pastas, a substantial wine list and prime people watching from an outdoor patio. L, D (daily); Br (Sa-Su). 720 N. Rush St., 312.266.6444. www.rosebudrestaurants.com.

LAKEVIEW CHICAGO DINERCL00023 Vegetarian. This completely vegetarian, natural-foods restaurant draws an eclectic, casual crowd of locals and celebs (Madonna, the Red Hot Chili Peppers and Indigo Girls have popped in) to sample vegan and vegetarian specialties. The international menu offers dishes like “chicken wings,” a seitan Reuben, and country fried “steak.” To drink, fresh-

squeezed juices, natural beers and organic and vegan California wines. Vegan, dairy-free bakery. L, D (daily), Br (Sa-Su). 3411 N. Halsted St., 773.935.6696. 2333 N. Milwaukee Ave., 773 .252.3211. www.veggiediner.com. MIA FRANCESCACL000246 Italian. This perpetual hot spot specializes in the cuisine of Rome served in a casual setting. Pastas, risotto, fresh grilled fish and thin-crust pizzas are featured on the daily-changing menu. D (daily), Br (Sa-Su). 3311 N. Clark St., 773.281.3310. www.miafrancesca.com. TANGO SURCL00619 Steak. One of the city’s best steak deals is this BYOB Argentine gem on the Southport strip, which offers starters like ham and cheese empanadas and prosciutto with melon, along with prime cuts of Argentine rangegrown beef, all in a buzzing but romantic candlelit atmosphere. L (SaSu), D (daily). 3763 N. Southport Ave., 773.477.5466. www.tangosur.net. UNCOMMON GROUNDCL00615 American. The two locations of this restaurant each feature a full menu, cocktails, local art on the walls and acoustic music in an intimate performance space with music nightly. Each also boasts a front bar/lounge area decked out with couches and two fireplaces, a great place to linger over coffee or cocktails. The Devon location features the first certified organic rooftop farm in the country. B, L, D (daily). 3800 N. Clark St., 773.929.3680. 1401 W. Devon Ave., 773.465.9801. www.uncommonground.com.

RIVER NORTH ★ BARTON G. THE RESTAURANT CHICAGO American. Opening in February and new to the Chicago market, Barton G. caters to adults craving new experiences and quality food. Their mission is to shock and awe your senses and push the boundaries of your imagination and culinary expectations. 415 N. Dearborn St., 312.260.5050. www.bartong.com. ★ HUBBARD INN Eclectic. Hubbard Inn features European-inspired dishes, including seared duck breast, pomegranate lamb shank and tandoori-charred Amish chicken. The tri-level spot also features mid-century cocktails and eccentric interiors inspired by global travel, including floor-to-ceiling Moroccan tiles, Persian rugs and black crystal chandeliers. 110 W. Hubbard St., 312.222.1331. www.hubbardinn.com. KATANA Sushi. Upscale interior meets fresh plates at Chicago’s upscale sushi restaurant and robata bar. In addition to traditional sashimi and nigiri and other Japanese delicacies, Katana offers tempting skewers from the robata grill, including premium A5 wagyu beef. L (M-F), D (daily). 339 N. Dearborn St., 312.877.5544. www.innovativedining.com. ★ NOYANE Japanese. Atop the Conrad Chicago, Noyane offers contemporary Japanese cuisine in a sleek atmosphere, with stunning views. L, D (daily). Rooftop of Conrad Chicago, 101 E. Erie St., 312.667.6796. www.noyane.com.

★ THE SLURPING TURTLE Japanese. Slurping Turtle is the original River North ramen shop. In addition to traditional ramen noodles (made in house), the restaurant offers a variety of quality sushi dishes, all made with unique ingredients, recipes and presentation. Some of the signatures include Tan Tan Men, Duck Fat Fried Chicken and Hamachi Tacos. Check out happy hour and Sunday brunch menus, too, as well as an extensive sake selection. L, D (daily). 116 W. Hubbard St., 312.464.0466. www.slurpingturtle.com. THE TORTOISE CLUBCL00446 American. The Tortoise Club serves up supper-club fare and live jazz music (Fridays and Saturdays) channeling the likes of Dean Martin and Bobby Short. Its camel-brown leather booths, timeless cocktails and a menu with American favorites (think maple-glazed Berkshire pork chop and cherry pie) make it feel like a classic already. In the parlor, find a cozy fireplace and more than 300 leather-bound books from local gem The Newberry Library. L (M-F), D (daily). 350 N. State St., 312.755.1700. www.tortoiseclub.com. ★ UNTITLEDCL00401 American. Slink past two unmarked doors to find a whole world of nightlife awaiting in this cavernous space that pays homage to the Prohibition era. Craft cocktails, beer and the largest collection of American Whiskey in North America complement supper club fare reimagined for today’s palette. Although it’s underground, the eatery is as wide as it is long with soaring ceilings, oversized mirrors and booths built for VIPs. Live music and weekly burlesque entertainment lend to the speakeasy vibe. D (M-Sa).

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111 W. Kinzie St., 312.880.1511. www.untitledchicago.com.

SOUTH LOOP ACADIACL005961 American. On a quiet stretch of Wabash, this upscale, understated room is drawing foodies for smart, contemporary American fare from chef Ryan McCaskey (Tizi Melloul, Courtright’s). D (W-Su). 1639 S. Wabash Ave., 312.360.9500. www.acadiachicago.com. ★ ELEVEN CITY DINER Delis/Sandwiches. Classier than your average diner, this Jewish deli caters to Chicago’s corned beef-, latke- and lox-loving crowd with handcut meats, fresh soups and a variety of salads and sandwiches. An in-house soda jerk whips up served-with-thetin classic egg creams, phosphates, shakes and malts. Breakfast is served all day. B, L, D (daily). 1112 S. Wabash Ave., 312.212.1112. www.elevencitydiner.com. MERCAT A LA PLANXACL0027135 Spanish. At this South Loop Spanish hot spot in the historic Blackstone Hotel, signature plates include paella and roasted suckling pig. The dining room boasts an open kitchen, winding central staircase and views of Grant Park and Lake Michigan. D (daily), Br (Sa-Su). 638 S. Michigan Ave., 312.765.0524. www.theblackstonehotel.com/dine/ mercat-a-la-planxa.

THE LOOP CINDY’S American. Atop the Chicago Athletic Association Hotel, Cindy’s affords some of the best views of Millennium

Park from its outdoor deck. Inside, groups gather at oversized wooden picnic-table-type tables or at the glittery bar. The volume level is high, but the food quality makes up for any difficulty in conversation. Without a reservation, expect wait times to be high, especially for the outdoor seating in warm weather. L (M-F), D (daily), Br (Sa-Su). 12 S. Michigan Ave., 312.792.3502. www.cindysrooftop.com. LATINICITY Latin American/Mexican. Located in State Street’s Block 37 indoor mall, this mega food hall is the Latin street food answer to Italian-focused Eataly. It includes eight different kitchens, a coffee café, bar, market and lounge. L (daily), D (M-Sa). 108 N. State St., Third Floor, 312.795.4444. www.latinicity.com. PRIME & PROVISIONS Steak. You can tell Prime & Provisions is a cut above the standard chop house. With decor that has a little flair to it (like the zebra print booths), the two-story restaurant also features a wine bottle tower and an intimate upstairs area. The menu is all about the meat, but don’t overlook the veggies— the roasted beets and pickled purple cauliflower are just as excellent. L (MF), D (daily), Br (Su). 222 N. LaSalle St., 312.726.7777. www.primeandprovisions.com. THE BERGHOFFCL0060598 German. One of Chicago’s oldest restaurants, this classic 1898 bar and downstairs café is a popular spot for lunch, dinner and after-work drinks. At today’s Berghoff, diners will find lighter and more contemporary dishes (including many that are

certified gluten-free) alongside treasured old world favorites. Under the helm of fourth generation Peter Berghoff, The Berghoff Group includes the historic Berghoff Restaurant, Berghoff Café, and Berghoff Café O’Hare. L, D (M-Sa). 17 W. Adams St., 312.427.3170. www.theberghoff.com.

WEST LOOP AVECCL000624 Wine Bar. This modern, minimalist room draws a sophisticated crowd with a smart wine selection and small plates like roasted butcher’s steak with charred leeks grilled prawns and housemade pasta. Cedar walls and a rear glass wall of wine give a spa-like feel. L (M-F), D (daily), Br (Su). 615 W. Randolph St., 312.377.2002. www.avecrestaurant.com. CITY WINERYCL004089 Wine Bar. The West Loop sister of the New York original finds a natural home in Chicago, a city that loves its food, music and wine. The loft-style operation has the capacity to churn out about 100,000 bottles a year— and puts on live music to boot. Learn about the winemaking process from grape crushing to production. L, D (daily), Br (Sa-Su). 1200 W. Randolph St., 312.733.9463. www.citywinery.com/chicago. GIRL & THE GOATCL007981 Eclectic. In a handsome open space that manages to be both boisterous and intimate, “Top Chef” winner Stephanie Izard and her squadron of cooks turn out tasty small fish and meat plates along with vegan and vegetarian options. D (daily). 809 W. Randolph St., 312.492.6262. www.girlandthegoat.com.

MOMOTARO Japanese. The Boka Restaurant Group revives a former warehouse into a destination for what the Japanese eat every day. The menu features sushi and sashimi, in addition to items from the coals including Alaskan king crab and A5 Miyazaki steak. A world-renowned firm designed the space, including the lower-level lounge and party room. D (daily). 820 W. Lake St., 312.733.4818. www.momotarochicago.com. MONTEVERDE Italian. When you win multiple Michelin stars, compete on “Top Chef” and have tenure at the famed Spiaggia, heads will turn and mouths will water. Luckily, Sarah Grueneberg brings all of that along with her affinity for Italian cooking to her first restaurant, Monteverde. This West Loop spot offers traditional methods mixed with modern flavors. Begin with stuzzichini (snacks) like the octopus spiedino, then dig into a pasta dish such as the sheep’s milk ricotta agnolotti, followed by a shared meat like bone-in rib-eye. L (Sa-Su), D (Tu-Su). 1020 W. Madison St., 312.888.3041. www.monteverdechicago.com. NELLCOTECL0053241 Eclectic. In an opulent, orange-accented space inspired by the Cote d’Azur mansion where the Rolling Stones recorded “Exile on Main Street,” a sexy crowd sips craft cocktails and nibbles on European-inspired, decadent small plates—think hamachi crudo, hand-cut pasta with sausage and broccoli rabe. D (daily). 833 W. Randolph St., 312.432.0500. www.nellcoterestaurant.com.

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ENTERTAINMENT & NIGHTLIFE

Night Watch When the sun goes down, Chicago really lights up with a nightlife scene that has a little something for everyone. There's no shortage of dance clubs with signature drinks, comedy clubs with plenty of laughs, gaming emporiums with team spirit and independent movie theaters with rare flicks. And when it comes to music, Chicago is home of the blues and so much more. BLUES & JAZZ

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BUDDY GUY’S LEGENDSCL005914 Owned by seven-time Grammy Award winner and Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee Buddy Guy, this blues mainstay features performances by contemporary blues legends, as well as top local talent. A menu of Louisiana-style Cajun and soul food is available. M-Tu 5 pm-2 am, W-F 11 am-2 am, Sa noon-3 am, Su noon2 am. Cover charge Su-Th $10, F-Sa $20. Call for performance times. 700 S. Wabash Ave., 312.427.1190. www.buddyguy.com. THE GREEN MILLCL00614 Al Capone once frequented this former 1920s speakeasy, which has been restored to its art deco splendor and features great local jazz musicians in a hip atmosphere. Open Su 11 am-4

am; M-F noon-4 am; Sa noon-5 am. Cover charge $6-$12. 4802 N. Broadway St., 773.878.5552. www.greenmilljazz.com.

e.t.c. theatre, Donny’s Skybox Theater and The deMaat Studio Theatre at 1608 N. Wells St., 312.337.3992. www.secondcity.com.

COMEDY/IMPROV

DANCE CLUBS

THE SECOND CITYCL006123 Since opening its doors as a small cabaret theater in 1959, Chicago’s own Second City has grown into a comedy empire, launching the careers of John Belushi, Joan Rivers, Bill Murray, Gilda Radner, Tim Meadows, Chris Farley, Tina Fey, Steve Carell, Amy Poehler, Stephen Colbert and more. The theater’s three resident stages offer shows seven nights a week, with Saturday and Sunday “Best of The Second City” matinees for the earlybirds. Mainstage at 1616 N. Wells St., 312.337.3992.

BERLINCL00612 Mohawked punks pogo side by side with preppies and drag queens in gogo boots at this fabulous freak show of a nightclub in the heart of Lakeview. Hot nights include Saturdays with DJ Larissa; Fridays with fave local DJ Greg Haus; and the massively popular “MadonnaRama” on the first Sunday of the month. Su-Th 10 pm-4 am, M 10 pm-2 am, F 5 pm-4 am, Sa 5 pm-5am. Cover charge varies. 954 W. Belmont Ave., 773.348.4975. www.berlinchicago.com.

STUDIO PARIS There’s a reason it’s notoriously difficult to get into River North’s Studio Paris— it’s one of Chicago’s hottest places to see and be seen. The beautiful crowd flocks to grab booths and bottle service, while the resident DJs play into the early morning. W-F 9 pm-2 am, Sa 9 pm-3 am. 59 W. Hubbard St., Second Floor, 312.377.9944. www.studioparisnightclub.com.

MUSIC & DANCE JOFFREY BALLETCL00413769 Founded in 1956 by Robert Joffrey and having enjoyed successful residencies in New York and Los Angeles, the Joffrey Ballet has called Chicago home since 1995. Auditorium Theatre, 50 E. Congress Parkway, 312.386.8905. www.joffrey.com.

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MUSEUMS & ATTRACTIONS History In Action

ATTRACTIONS 360 CHICAGOCL00719 More than 1,000 feet above Chicago, this 94th-floor observatory features Tilt, an enclosed glass platform allowing visitors to extend out and over the Magnificent Mile and the famous Chicago skyline, a self-guided multimedia tour, cafe bar and gift shop. Daily 9 am-11 pm. General admission $22; ages 3-11 $15; under 3 free. Fast pass express entry $44; Sun and Stars pass (re-entry within 48 hours) $26.50. Tilt admission varies and is in addition to the cost of regular admission. 875 N. Michigan Ave., 888.875. VIEW(8439). www.360chicago.com. ★ BUCKTOWN/WICKER PARKCL00206 Wicker Park seamlessly melds into Bucktown, its neighbor to the north,

which got its name at the turn of the last century, when many immigrant families kept goats in their front yards. Today, trendy boutiques, coffeehouses, restaurants, galleries, nightclubs and storefront theaters are centered around the intersection of Milwaukee, Damen and North avenues, and create a vibrant atmosphere. 773.384.2672 www.wickerparkbucktown.com. ★ CHICAGO HELICOPTER EXPERIENCE One too many traffic jams prompted Trevor Heffernan to get his helicopter-pilot license. A few amazing aerial images later and friends were clamoring to hitch a ride. This, in turn, led him to launch Chicago Helicopter Experience and the first private downtown heliport. From this spot, visitors lift up into the wild blue yonder for a flight along the lakefront,

over Lake Michigan and north to Wrigley Field while enjoying climate-controlled, seats and bubble windows. Check website for schedule. $158-$400. 2420 S. Halsted St., 312.967.8687. www.chetours.com. LINCOLN PARK ZOOCL008102 This 49-acre zoo in the heart of the city is one of the nation’s oldest, with more than 1,200 animals throughout the grounds. The 14-acre Nature Boardwalk provides a haven of native trees, plants and animals and the opportunity to be immersed in an interactive ecosystem. Open 365 days a year. Open May 28-Sept. 5: M-F 10 am-5 pm, Sa-Su 10 am-6:30 pm; September-October, April-May: daily 10 am-5 pm; November-March daily 10 am-4:30 pm. Free; parking $20-$35. 2001 N. Clark St., 312.742.2000. www.lpzoo.org.

MAGGIE DALEY PARK Named for the former mayor’s wife who was deeply committed to improving the lives of children, Maggie Daley Park provides 28-acres of green space with lake and skyline views in the middle of downtown. The park features a Skating Ribbon for winter ice skating and summer roller blades, a climbing wall, an expansive and creatively themed playground, mini golf and plenty of space to relax and have a picnic. There’s a reason our city motto is “Urbs in Horto,” or “City in a Garden”—we just love getting outside! Maggie Daley Park, 337 E. Randolph St., 312.552.3000. www.maggiedaleypark.com. MAGNIFICENT MILECL002071 Boasting some of the city’s ritziest hotels, shops—including three malls— galleries and restaurants, Chicago’s

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Everywhere you look in Chicago, history abounds. There is the beginning of the iconic Route 66 in the Loop, the site of Fort Dearborn along the Chicago River and even Navy Pier has its roots as part of notable architect Daniel Burnham's "Master Plan" for Chicago. At the city's many gilded museums, visitors of all ages can revel in a piece of the past, from famous artwork to rare artifacts.


famed “Mag Mile” runs along North Michigan Avenue from Oak Street on the north to the Chicago River on the south. Cultural gems include the Museum of Contemporary Art, Lookingglass Theatre and Loyola University Museum of Art (LUMA). Landmark Mag Mile architecture includes the Wrigley Building, the Tribune Tower and the Historic Water Tower, one of the only buildings to survive the 1871 Chicago Fire. www.themagnificentmile.com. SOLDIER FIELD Located next to the Museum Campus, this iconic stadium is home to the Chicago Bears. When a game isn’t going on, the world’s best artists sell out concerts, and festivals take to the field to show off the best food and drink in the city. Tours offered. 1410 S. Museum Campus Drive, 312.235.7000. www.soldierfield.net. WRIGLEY FIELDCL004163 Built in 1914, Wrigley Field is the second oldest ballpark in Major League Baseball, behind Boston’s Fenway Park (1912). Famed for its brick exterior and ivy-covered outfield walls, Wrigley is the site of numerous historic moments, including Babe Ruth’s called shot during the 1932 World Series, and Pete Rose’s 4,191st hit in 1985, which tied him with Ty Cobb for the most hits in baseball history. The Friendly Confines recently added on with more attractions including the Gallagher Way, which offers green space before and after games as well as big screens to watch all the action. Ninety-minute tours are available to the public most days; call or see website for schedule. 1060 W. Addison St., 773.404.2827. www.cubs.com.

MUSEUMS ADLER PLANETARIUMCL008104 This lakefront attraction on the Museum Campus features loads of otherworldly exhibits. The $14 million, ultra high-res, 360-degree Grainger Sky Theater features the sky show “Planet Nine,” all about the search for a new ninth planet. Permanent exhibit “Planet Explorers” offers hands-on learning for budding astronomers. Follow Apollo 12 Captain James A. Lovell Jr. to the moon and back in the “Mission Moon” exhibit, featuring the Gemini 12 spacecraft that Lovell and Buzz Aldrin flew in 1966. Daily 9:30 am-4 pm. General admission (does not include shows) $12; children 3-11 $8. The All Access Pass allows access to all exhibitions and shows: $34.95; children $29.95. 1300 S. Lake Shore Drive, 312.922. STAR(7827). www.adlerplanetarium.org. ART INSTITUTE OF CHICAGOCL008107 A world-class museum, the Art Institute boasts one of the nation’s largest permanent collections of Impressionist paintings and an extensive display of Asian art. The 264,000-squarefoot, Renzo Piano-designed Modern Wing features an extensive collection of 20th- and 21st-century art, including modern European paintings and sculptures. Daily 10:30 am-5:30 pm, Th 10:30 am-8 pm. Admission $25 (Illinois residents $22, Chicago residents $20); students and seniors $19 (Illinois residents, $16, Chicago residents $14); children under 14 free. Free family programming daily. 111 S. Michigan Ave., 312.443.3600. www.artic.edu.

★ CHICAGO ARCHITECTURE CENTERCL008109 For more than 50 years, Chicago Architecture Center (CAC) has been celebrating Chicago’s magnificent architecture. The foundation offers 85-plus docent-led tours, including Chicago’s most popular river cruise and many downtown walking tours that depart from its current location above the CAC River Cruise dock. The center is an exciting destination for visitors and Chicagoans alike, with new exhibits, a lecture hall, a design studio and a gift shop. M, W, F-Su 9:30 am-5 pm, Tu & Th 9:30 am-8 pm. 111 E. Wacker Drive, 312.922.3432. www.architecture.org. FIELD MUSEUMCL0081 This museum focuses on science, environment and culture, and is famously home to Sue, the restored and mounted skeleton of the largest and most complete T. rex ever found who will be back on display in 2019. Ongoing exhibit “Robert R. McCormick Halls of the Ancient Americas” takes visitors back 13,000 years and the interactive Crown Family Playlab is geared to kids ages 2 to 6. Plus, check out the 3D movie theater. Daily 9 am-5 pm (last admission 4 pm). Basic admission $24; seniors and students $21; children ages 3-11 $17; children 3 and under free. 1400 S. Lake Shore Drive, 312.922.9410. www.fieldmuseum.org. ★ ILLINOIS HOLOCAUST MUSEUM This sleek, 65,000-square-foot facility just north of Chicago honors survivors and victims of the Holocaust through world-class exhibitions. Experience the first interactive 3D exhibit of its kind at Illinois Holocaust Museum, where visitors ask questions and hear answers from holograms of real Holocaust Survivors.

Abe and Ida Cooper Survivor Stories Experience is a 2018 Chicago Innovation Award winner and one of Smithsonian’s 12 must-see exhibits worldwide (Fall 2017). Daily 10 am-5 pm, Th 10 am-8 pm. Admission $15; seniors $10, students $8; children 5-11 $6. 9603 Woods Drive, Skokie, 847.967.4800 www.ilholocaustmuseum.org. MUSEUM OF SCIENCE AND INDUSTRYCL008129 MSI—the largest science museum in the Western Hemisphere—is home to more than 400,000 square feet of hands-on exhibits designed to spark scientific inquiry and foster curiosity. Discover a World War II submarine ot take in a show on the five-story movie screen. MSI is open 9:30 am–4 pm every day except Thanksgiving and Christmas. Extended hours, until 5:30 pm, are offered during peak periods. 5700 S. Lake Shore Drive, 773.684.1414. www.msichicago.org. SHEDD AQUARIUMCL008137 From belugas and bluegills to stingrays and sturgeons and sea stars and sea otters, the Shedd Aquarium is home to an array of fascinating aquatic animals from around the world. Other highlights include the Wild Reef shark habitat and the Caribbean Reef exhibit, where divers hand-feed fish and sharks in a 90,000-gallon aquarium. The Behind the Scenes Tour (F-Su; 11 am, 1 pm, 3 pm; extra admission required) gives visitors a rare peek into the workings of the aquarium. M-F 9 am-5 pm, Sa-Su 9 am-6 pm. General admission $39.95; children 3-11 $29.95. 1200 S. Lake Shore Drive, 312.939.2438. www.sheddaquarium.org.

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Hello, Sue! SUE, THE FIELD MUSEUM’S POPULAR T. REX (ONE OF THE LARGEST AND MOST COMPLETE SPECIMENS IN THE WORLD), RETURNS TO PERMANENT DISPLAY ON DECEMBER 21, 2018 IN THE GRIFFIN HALLS OF EVOLVING PLANET, AFTER UNDERGOING COMPREHENSIVE UPDATES TO MAKE HER GOOD AS NEW.

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Guestbook Chicago Dec 2018  

Guestbook Chicago Dec 2018