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September 2020

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Bachelorette finds love down south

Paige on the set of The Bachelor Australia

What’s up with Network 10’s bachelor Locky Gilbert? Giving Frankston South beauty Paige Royal the boot with Nadine Kodsi has got us completely baffled, so we decided to have a chat with the model-come-make-up artist to get the full searching-for-love-on-TV goss. Paige is just about to head off to the doctor to check a nasty cough as she croakily chats over the phone. By the way, you may remember her from Mornington Peninsula Magazine’s early days, where she graced our pages as a young model. She explains: “I’ve been on antibiotics but they don’t seem to be doing anything. I had a COVID-19 test last week to make sure it wasn’t that. How weird is it at the moment? All my modelling and make-up work has stopped, although I still practise doing make-up on myself. I was shocked being the first to leave the mansion because Locky and I got along really well, but we all knew what we were signing up for. The experience was worth it though. I don’t regret anything. I applied in February and heard back within a few days. We began filming in March. It was fast, but I had a feeling I would get on. I was calm throughout the whole process until I was walking down to meet Locky. He’s very lucky because there are lots of beautiful and kind women in that mansion.” This 31-year-old animal-loving girl who grew up on a 4ha farm in Bittern, went to Tyabb Primary, Rosebud Secondary and Dromana College before embarking on a modelling career that has taken her to Colombia, Miami, New York, Osaka and South Korea, among other places, just loves the Peninsula. She has also found love locally. Paige continues: “I was single when I went on the show but have a partner now. Matthew (Sannen) is from Frankston. I want to bring up my own children on the Peninsula and have lots of animals. My poodle Lola lives with me, while my 100kg pet pig Mr Pickles and my goat Bambi live with Mum and Dad in Bittern. Mr Pickles is so smart. He has different tones to let me know how he is feeling and always says hello. When I have children, I want a baby moon goat instead of a baby moon gift every time I have a baby.” Paige has kept her sense of humour throughout her modelling career despite being bullied at school and becoming severely anaemic. She’s never walked a runway because she “doesn’t like walking in high heels because I have tiny feet. I can’t balance”. So what’s next for this Peninsula girl who left Season 8 of The Bachelor Australia before COVID-19 restrictions resulted in all the ladies going home and dating Locky virtually before returning to the mansion under strict guidelines? Get better. More modelling and make-up. Love. Bad luck, Locky! LIZ ROGERS

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Creativity is essential

SPONSORED EDITORIAL

The recent passing of brilliant educationalist Sir Ken Robinson has had me reflecting on some of the thoughts and ideas he left us with. “If you’re not prepared to be wrong, you’ll never come up with anything original” is one that resonates particularly strongly with me at this moment. I read this as a message about creativity – and the work ethic and resilience that is needed to progress and break through to new understandings.  News of scientists working at breakneck speed to develop a COVID-19 vaccine reminds us that creativity is not solely the preserve of the arts, nor indeed artists. Some of the most creative thinkers of the modern world are the scientists and researchers, engineers and entrepreneurs. To be creative does not mean one has

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Everything we love about the peninsula, fresh every month

to be able to draw, dance or carry a tune. Creativity is a form of intelligence, one that helps us to solve problems – and it can be taught. At Woodleigh School, we place a high value on creativity. From the play and inquiry-based programs in our Early Childhood Centres at Minimbah and Penbank, right through to our VCE years, ours is an environment that celebrates and supports original thoughts and adventurous minds. Innovation is encouraged, and permission is given for children and adolescents to make, reflect on, and learn from their mistakes. Staff and students work together to make our school a place where responsible risks are not baulked at, where students can escape the fear of being wrong, or looking silly in front of their peers and colleagues. As educators, our job is to encourage students to push the boundaries of expression, to step off the production line and respond in interesting and different ways to the many challenges we face in the world, and to be happy being themselves

while doing it. To find out more about what a Woodleigh education can offer your child, please contact our Enrolments Team on 5971 6100 or email enrol@woodleigh.vic.edu.au DAVID BAKER – Principal WOODLEIGH SCHOOL A: 485 Golf Links Rd, Langwarrin South T: 5971 6100 W: www.woodleigh.vic.edu.au FB: woodleighschoo1 INSTA: woodleighschool Reimagined as a radio play, Woodleigh’s Senior Campus production of The Crucible displayed the creativity, tenacity and adaptability of both students and staff. The final product was a triumph!

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Redesigned Nepean Highway ‘gateway’ to lead CBD revival BY MIKE HAST

Frankston’s northern gateway, the Nepean Highway, urgently needs a major redesign, says one of the city’s leading advocacy groups. The Committee for Greater Frankston says improving the gateway is a keystone of revitalisation of Frankston’s CBD. Committee CEO Ginevra Hosking said having a “people-friendly gateway precinct is the key to creating a main street of which our city can be proud”. “How the precinct looks and functions is strongly impacting on how people see the city’s commercial centre, and it is scaring off potential investors,” she said. “The vibe is wrong. It’s a bad

look when you drive into Frankston and see boardedup and empty premises. Our foreshore is great but the highway precinct isn’t a place where you would linger for a coffee.” Ms Hosking said the highway gateway concept was a crucial project being discussed by Frankston City Council, Frankston Revitalisation Board, VicRoads and the committee. She said the highway would be transformed into a vibrant boulevard with wide footpaths, street furniture including flower boxes and artwork, off-street parking, and pop-up spaces for a variety of uses. “The general concept has already received strong community support, with residents and enthusiastic candidates in the upcoming Frankston Council elections taking to social media to share their views.”

Ms Hosking said the highway precinct had been in decline for many years with businesses hampered by lack of parking for staff and customers, derelict buildings, narrow footpaths, and a lack of passing trade due to the “unwelcoming” nature of the precinct. A key suggestion is removing dilapidated buildings, some of which have been empty for many years and are now targets for squatters, graffitists and antisocial behaviour. Ms Hosking said renewal would enable residents and visitors to “reclaim the precinct”. “Imagine a summer’s day with the family at the nearby beach and then strolling up to get an ice cream or a snack, and later going for an early dinner.” She said many community members were disappointed Frankston Council and VicRoads could not agree on a 2014 proposal to improve Nepean Highway’s streetscape, which came with $1 million of state funding for proposed roadworks. “We as a community have the chance to fast-track this project. We’re calling on election candidates to declare their support for a signature project to renew the city’s gateway in the lead-up to the late October election. Then we want those elected to get behind the initiative and push hard. Our fast-growing health, business and education precinct is reinvigorating the CBD and it’s time to show this proudly to the rest of Melbourne.” Ideas from residents, shoppers and visitors posted on social media include: free parking for short-term and low cost for all-day; “imagine the precinct looking like Main St, Mornington, or Seaford Village with wide footpaths, colourful garden beds, cafes and boutiques”; shops selling clothing and shoes; trendy bars for nightlife; and good street lighting and street art. You can share your ideas by completing a survey at www.C4GF. com.au or by emailing them to info@C4GF.com.au Mike Hast is a freelance writer for the Committee for Greater Frankston and a former editor of Peninsula newspapers.

How to revive a boulevard Proposals and ideas for the Nepean Highway gateway include:

Revamping Frankston’s northern gateway, the Nepean Highway, would see wider footpaths for leisurely strolls, shopping and outdoor eating against a backdrop of street art and greenery. Photo from Frankston Revitalisation Ideas by Gilbert Rochecouste of Village Well

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• Remove long-empty and dilapidated buildings • Pop-up green spaces, trees and shrubs, and much-needed offstreet parking or angled parking • Restaurants, cafes, and chairs and tables for outdoor dining • Modern shops and galleries where people like to linger • Don’t need six lanes; replace some lanes with wider footpaths • A dedicated bicycle lane – a missing link of the Bay Trail – and pedestrian paths • More paths from highway to the foreshore and beach

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Connecting Culture through

deadly determination Kayla Cartledge is a proud Gurrindji woman. Born on Larrakia land up north, this 29-year-old innovator who is committed to providing a platform for Indigenous Australians to connect with Culture comes from strong beginnings. Spending the first eight years of her life surrounded by impenetrable Culture in the Top End, Kayla and her Indigenous mother, non-Indigenous father and sister moved to the Mornington Peninsula and things were different. Kayla explains: “Everything was different. Culture is everywhere in Darwin and the language is different too. No one knew what I was saying when I went to school at Eastbourne Primary in Rosebud. No one knew what ‘deadly’ meant. There were only a couple of Aboriginal people at

the school and Mum was about the only mother who would come into the classroom to help, which is what she did in the Northern Territory. “It was difficult because my parents were telling me how important it was to keep Culture alive and yet that wasn’t the message I was getting outside of the home. I spent a lot of time trying to find out who I needed to be in each situation and had to find a way to amalgamate the two different sides of myself. I felt quite isolated not having clear sources of Indigenous Culture around me while I was growing up. That’s where the idea for Our Songlines began.” Honoured to be living on Bunurong/Boon Wurrung land, this former Padua student’s desire for Indigenous traditional owners to be able to connect from coast to coast has resulted in something really special. Kayla continues: “A songline represents a verbal story that supersedes time or place but navigates one through land, lore and position within Indigenous Australia society. Different people within tribes have different songlines, which can be to do with practical/ knowledgeable things or spiritual things. We chose Our Songlines to be our name as we are inviting you into our culture and into our story. “We began building our Google Maps platform last year, which looks like an Indigenous language map covered with Indigenous symbols. You can click on a symbol and listen to the stories from the people of that area in English. It took about three months to develop the basis of the map and it comes from a healing perspective. There are Indigenous businesses and points of interest included on it, and any Indigenous or non-Indigenous Australian can hear, see, learn and connect with each other and Indigenous history. Down the track we’d like to include Indigenous languages.” Kayla is hoping to have the map launched by the end of October and is currently working part-time in cultural auditing within the youth sector. This beach, bush and book-loving Bachelor of Commerce mover and shaker who now lives in McCrae is ready, set, go. Deadly. To find out more, go to www.oursonglines.com LIZ ROGERS

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OUR COVER

Left: Meet Coco Heath, Coco was ‘born to ride’ read her story on page 20. Top Row: Slot Me In has firepits and so much more, see page 96; It’s Threatened Species Day on September 7 see page 27. Bottom Row: Odyssey Coffee Roasters is featured on pages 82-83; Enjoy The Art Of Dining In with Ten Minutes By Tractor on page 79.

News & Interviews H Local Lovin’ H Caring For Our Seniors Arts & Events The Business Health Beauty Fashion & Stars Food & Wine, Produce Property Home Decor incl Trades

3-39 40-47 48-63 64-67 68-71 72-77 78-85 86-100

Book by Sept 18 for our next edition, out October 2 PUBLISHER, EDITOR Lisa Walton lisa@mpmag.com.au EDITORIAL CO-ORDINATOR Geoff Scott geoff@mpmag.com.au CUSTOMER RELATIONS & SALES Molly 0407 225 261 molly@mpmag.com.au Anna 0401 598 613 anna@mpmag.com.au Chendelle 0412 030 802 chendelle@mpmag.com.au JOURNALISTS & FEATURE WRITERS Kate Sears, Liz Rogers, Lisa Walton, Drew Cooper, Tom Portett, Stephanie Johnson, Maurie Hutchinson, Nerida Langcake SOCIAL MEDIA Molly Mitchell & Jasmine Forecast DISTRIBUTION Archie and his band of helpers DESIGN Lisa Walton, Jasmine Forecast Note some staff on reduced hours during Covid-19

WE’VE GOT THE PENINSULA COVERED Reduced distribution due to COVID-19 restrictions Look for our baskets across the Peninsula, greater Frankston and Melbourne -

Mornington Peninsula Magazine

EatDrink Mornington Peninsula & Mt Eliza Village Magazine

Ph: 5906 5771 or 9708 8222 PO BOX 3554, Mornington 3931

www.morningtonpeninsulamagazine.com.au READERS AND ADVERTISERS look for our baskets to pick up your print copy and connect with us on social media and online for daily updates from all your favourites.

In Print, Online & on Social Media @MornPenMag @MtElizaVillageMag @eatdrinkMornPen

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Scruffy to the rescue Mount Eliza’s Treyvaud family were at a loss after their border collie Cooper and maltese shih tzu Lucy left this mortal coil. The house was devoid of paws pitter-pattering on the floor and tails wagging when they walked through the door. Sarah and Joel, along with their children Atticus, Alice and Solomon, just didn’t feel right. That’s when Sarah jumped online to search for a rescue dog. Sarah laughs: “I pushed to call Scruffy ‘Audrey’ but it didn’t quite stick. We were so sad to lose our old dogs. My husband and I bought them when we first moved in together and they were there on our wedding day. It was hard enough not seeing family and friends when the social distancing and gathering rules began. The house without a dog was surprisingly more than we could bear. We found Scruffy on The Lost Dogs Home website. She wasn’t in great shape when she first arrived there. She badly needed a groom, had to have lots of teeth removed and wasn’t de-sexed or microchipped, but The Lost Dogs Home organised it all.

“It only took one night to find her. We made the appointment the next morning and drove up to North Melbourne in the afternoon. The kids were so excited. All five of us were able to go because it was classed as an essential service. We had to wait in the car until our appointment due to COVID-19 restrictions and then had to sit still in the yard as she checked us out. We knew we wanted her as soon as we met.” Sarah always thought she wouldn’t be able to bond with a dog unless she’d had it since it was a puppy. She was wrong. Scruffy is her constant companion and at night this adored pooch is usually snuggling on one of the kids’ beds. Sarah concludes: “I think I love her more because she needed us and we needed her. She’s a great stress reliever and has melted our hearts.” You can still adopt an animal by appointment during Stage 4 restrictions, so jump online or pick up the phone and know this: if you’re feeling lonely, so’s someone else. Why not be lonely together? LIZ ROGERS

PICTURED: Left, Scruffy is Sarah Treyvaud’s constant companion; Alice, Atticus and Solomon shower Scruffy with affection.

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Issue 106, SEPTEMBER 2020

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Everything we love about the peninsula, fresh every month

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The sunrise at Hastings Jetty on Tuesday, June 16, caught the eye of Peninsula photographer Steve Brown.

Don’t mind us – as long as Mornington Peninsula photographer Steve Brown keeps taking stunning photographs of our pristine Peninsula, we’ll keep sharing them with you.

Issue 106, SEPTEMBER 2020

We’ve had readers exclaim how beautiful his shots are, so why not keep spreading the vibrant and tranquil photographs during this turbulent and gloomy time? Given the current need for isolation, it of course can be lonely – yet there’s nothing like stopping to admire a colourful sunrise, a remarkable stormy sky or an eyecatching sunset with strangers. When for just a minute you’re all connected through the mere beauty of what’s in front of you. Together, as you all silently take an image

or a mental picture, you’re connected in your admiration. It’s the little things. If you’re out and about, whether it be in our lush hinterlands, rocky outcrops, windy back beaches or wandering along your local pier, if you happen to take a remarkable photograph just like our friend Steve, please tag us on Instagram @mornpenmag KATE SEARS

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Safety Beach teen flies high How bad does Riley Dunshea want to fly? ‘Finding $350 for an hour-long flying lesson’ bad. ‘Working every weekend to have a flying lesson once every three weeks’ bad. ‘Scrubbing dishes while completing his studies at Padua College in Mornington’ bad. ‘Navigating a flight from the control seat with a map on his lap’ bad. But more about that later. It could be argued that learning to fly is a cashed-up person’s game, but that’s not going to stop this Safety Beach 18-year-old who has got the flying bug buzzing deep within his bones. The sky is where he wants to be, where his spirit roams free. Riley explains: Issue 106, SEPTEMBER 2020

“I started taking an interest in planes when I was about 10 and went on to play flight simulator games before Mum gave me a gift certificate to fly with a pilot at Tyabb airport. I was 13. I kept begging my parents to have lessons after that. I’d played footy since I was six with South Mornington Football Club and stopped at the end of 2017. That’s when my parents agreed to pay twothirds of the cost of the lessons and I’d find the rest.” Enter the world of dish pig and convenience food store service. He continues: “My flying instructor saw how keen I was and offered me a job in the airport office in 2018. I’m there alone at the moment and am currently not able to fly due to lockdown. I also help out in the maintenance hangar and am doing a Bachelor of Aviation Management at Swinburne University. I’ve got my recreational pilot licence, which means I can fly in the

local area and take up to three passengers with me, and my private licence, which means I can fly pretty much anywhere in the world with up to six passengers on board. Next comes my commercial licence, but you’ve got to do 200 hours of flying and seven written exams to get that. I’ve completed 125 hours so far.” Riley wanted to be an international pilot when he started flying but has now set his sights on the Royal Flying Doctor Service or perhaps flying chartered aeroplanes up north. Whichever he chooses, he’s certainly got the guts. Imagine searching for major roads, mountains, airports or antennas on a map while flying a light aircraft with no inbuilt GPS. Care factor zero, people. Riley can go wherever he wants because he’s free as a bird. Jealous much? LIZ ROGERS www.morningtonpeninsulamagazine.com.au

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Emily Nash has got a knack for it all

Having begun her career as a model at the age of 15, Emily Nash flourished in the industry after being scouted at 18. It wasn’t long until the creative arena inspired her to try her hand at roles on the other side of the camera as well. Kate Sears speaks to Emily about transitioning to become a creative multi-tasker, her most memorable shoots, and her passion for telling a story through images and design. How do you find modelling? I have absolutely loved it. I’ve met so many incredible people and have been able to experience many ‘pinch me’ moments, which I’m so grateful for. Last year I was lucky enough to be flown up to Broome to shoot for a resort. Being photographed just wining and dining, in the spa, getting massages and watching the sunset – it was a ‘tough’ few days! Your travel photos are stunning. What do you love about travelling? Thank you. What I love the most is doing it like a local. Getting bikes or hiring a car, finding hidden gems, shopping at op shops, markets, local spots to eat – things off the beaten track. It’s those little things I absolutely love. While browsing your portfolio, we noticed that often you’ve got your fingers in many pies, so to speak. How did the move from modelling to also handling styling, editing, photography, art direction and social media management transpire? Having been modelling since I was 18 – I’m now almost 27 – I’ve been around creative people for so long that I naturally became interested in the other side of the camera and the creative side of things. I’ve made some great connections and relationships through modelling that I then started to offer myself as a bit of a multi-tasker. I’ve always loved photography and creative direction and always thought that I’d take it up if modelling was an absolute flop. But now I get to do it all. What do you enjoy about creating content and how did you ignite this passion? I get a real kick out of creating mood boards, shooting a bunch of content and seeing it all come together aesthetically. It was really once I started travelling more, brands started to notice my content. I love telling a story through images and design. You’re talented both in front of and behind the camera. What’s next on the agenda? Thank you. Just building up my portfolio in both modelling and photography. I’ll continue to work with brands that are my vibe and working through ways I can create content in COVID times. I’m itching to travel again – as I’m sure all of us are – so I can finally create some travel coffee table books that I’ve been dreaming about for years. What do you love most about the Mornington Peninsula? I grew up in Langwarrin South. I spent most of my time down at Mount Martha beach – in my opinion the best beach on the Pen. I currently live in the city and as much as it’s fun and close to most of my work, I miss the Peninsula every day and cannot wait to get back down there. It’s the beaches, nature and feeling of big space that I love the most. Be entranced by Emily’s dreamy photographs on Instagram @emilyannenash

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Like many others in the hospitality industry, Andrew and Terryn Hickinbotham have pivoted their Hickinbotham Winery business to adjust to the COVID-19 restrictions. “Hospitality per se has been flipped on its head,” said Terryn. “We are now only doing take-home or delivered restaurant-quality meals. Our chefs have designed a menu that will survive the rigours of a 20-minute drive and still be delicious when they arrive at their destination.” While some of the younger wait staff have had to concentrate on their online studies at home, head waitress Amy has taken over the role of social media manager with gusto. Amy has focused on keeping their loyal customers aware of their offerings and reaching out to new potential clientele. Online courses have been undertaken by Amy to improve her already outstanding skills, and she’s thriving on the challenge of making everything look as tantalising online as it looks in real life. Plus they’ve had to become logistic experts as well. Even with five delivery drivers at the ready, their first Saturday night was very hectic. Terryn tells us that delivery driving is a totally new skill set, with the newly added destinations farther afield introducing an extra degree of difficulty to the already altered procedures. “I now have a lot more empathy for delivery drivers and understand the importance of detail in the address – for example, unit numbers and gate codes – especially when travelling down wet roads in the dark. Andrew said he has reached the pinnacle of his career: delivery boy!” And when you’re on a roll, why stop there? Hickinbotham Winery has also added a brandy-based hand sanitiser to its list of products. It not only smells delicious, it’s a nonsticky formula that spreads well. Andrew originally made the brandy due to his love of cognac, but now it has a dual purpose. “We would really love to thank everyone for their ongoing support through this,” said Terryn. “The locals have been amazing, drinking plenty, helping spread the word and our posts, and without whom we would have had to close the doors. Many have been actively driving from one local venue to another buying different products from each to spread the love. The locals are awesome.” KATE SEARS HICKINBOTHAM WINERY A: 194 Nepean Highway, Dromana T: 5981 0355 W: www.hickinbotham.biz FB: hickinbotham.biz INSTA: hickinbotham_dromana Issue 106, SEPTEMBER 2020

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At just five months old, Coco Heath first stood up on a board holding her mother Molly Heath’s hands while they were on a camping trip. This was just the beginning. By nine months old, Coco was riding along on her own and dropping in a bowl that was just under 2m – while holding hands with Mum, of course. Coco’s just turned two and there’s no doubt that she is a natural. With Molly surfing and skating while pregnant, Coco must have caught the board bug. As a winter baby, she’d make use of the forced inside time by forever rolling around on

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boards inside the house. Coco and Molly’s passion for skating has become a superspecial pastime they can share. “I guess when you grow up with certain activities as part of your family’s lifestyle, it’s just a natural thing to try,” said Molly. “Coco’s watched everyone around her play on boards since she was born. I could tell how much she loved it when she squealed with delight when I rolled her along on a skateboard as a baby.” Fashion is key for Coco – but it must be practical, so when it’s time to skate she prefers to wear shorts and a top because it’s easier for her to move around in. Off the board it’s a whole different story – the girl loves a good tutu, and it’s a look she owns. Despite her passion for fashion, she’s actually a down-to-earth nature

Everything we love about the peninsula, fresh every month

girl. If Coco isn’t at the skate park with Molly, she’ll be busy exploring. She’s got a passion for the outdoors, being creative and hanging out with her friends. When the first COVID-19 lockdown restrictions came into play, Molly noticed that Coco truly missed skating. For the second lockdown, Molly made sure they were better organised and created an impressive indoor space so Coco can continue learning new tricks and having a blast. Now the talented toddler has a mini-half-pipe and a tiny quarter-pipe to keep her occupied during isolation. And what’s in store for this minishredder’s future? “It’s hard to say,” said Molly. “She has incredible skill and can go really far with it, but I don’t push her or force her in any way. She may want

to take it to skate comps and compete, which she will have every opportunity to do, or she may only do it for fun. Or she may move on to something else and that’s totally up to her. But for now I will continue to encourage her and help her with these skills.” Professional Peninsula skate coach Craig Mitchell, who has coached Coco since she was 11 months old, told Molly he can see a great future ahead for Coco. A special friendship has formed between Craig and Coco, especially after he built her a skate ramp. Follow Coco and Molly on Instagram @cocoskatergirl and @mollyheath_ photography, and you can follow Craig on Instagram @progression_skate_sessions KATE SEARS

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Creating, directing and adapting a series over Zoom Community on track to benefit from level crossing removals Recent level crossing removal work on the Frankston line might have been frustrating for commuters, but for the community it has resulted in a range of new assets. A playground, interpretive trail, arboretum and shared user paths have been completed or are taking shape under a partnership between Frankston City Council and the Level Crossing Removal Project after the removal of three dangerous level crossings at Eel Race Rd, Seaford Rd, and Skye/ Overton roads. The partnership has delivered a new playground at Seaford, while the redevelopment of RF Miles Recreation Reserve is going ahead with money from the council as well as the State and Federal governments. New shared user paths will be constructed along Dandenong Rd between Cricklewood Ave and Beach St, and along Seaford Rd and Skye/Overton roads. Other projects will include the Kananook Creek Interpretive Trail and the Kananook Arboretum. Mayor Sandra Mayer said the projects would create new outdoor experiences for people to enjoy while better connecting Seaford to Frankston’s city centre. “This is a fantastic outcome for Frankston City residents and visitors who now experience safer and quicker commute times without dangerous level crossings and have more opportunities for outdoor recreational experiences,” Cr Mayer said. Find more information about the project at www.levelcrossings.vic.gov.au/

She’s got a bit of a thing for Shakespeare. Sally McLean is an actor, writer and director who fondly remembers the chilly winter days spent on her favourite Peninsula beach writing poetry. Building on the success of the previous two seasons of the multi-award-winning web series Shakespeare Republic (20152017), Sally has created, adapted and directed a new stand-alone season, Shakespeare Republic: #AllTheWebsAstage (The Lockdown Chronicles). Kate Sears speaks to Sally about creating the web series via Zoom during a global pandemic, with both established and emerging actors from all over the world, and what led to this moment.

How have you found the production process throughout COVID-19? Creating this series during a pandemic has been challenging, fascinating, a steep learning curve, hilarious and exhausting all at once. Directing via video conference calls is a whole different thing to what I’m used to. You need to project a lot more energy to the actors, plus also deal with the fact that they are not only focused on acting, but also, in most cases, being their own crew as well. It involves two different thought processes for both myself and the actor concerned as a result. But once we got into our stride, it has been relatively seamless as far as the production process goes – just a lot of juggling of a lot of things and time zones to get it completed. You’re a talented writer, director and actor. Which role would you say is your favourite and why? I’m still learning and growing and I hope it never stops. As far as which job is my favourite, when all is said and done I am first and foremost an actor. Everything ( 22 Everything we love about the peninsula, fresh every month

else I do in the business grew out of the desire to explore my creativity in as many ways as possible and gain a greater understanding of how the whole machine works. I announced that I wanted to be an actor at the age of four, so it’s something I’ve been drawn to as long as I can remember. My first stage appearance was at 10 years old, my first TV appearance was at 12, so I’ve been doing it for a while now. During my drama school training in London, we were actively encouraged to explore writing and directing as a way to support and further our acting skills and create our own work, so I made my first film as actor/writer/producer in the UK as soon as I graduated. It went on to premiere at Ealing Studios in London and got interest from the BBC for broadcast, which was amazing. What’s your most memorable moment? Starting from my career to date, Sir Nigel Hawthorne becoming my honorary patron was a highlight. I ran yelling around my home in Mornington when I got his letter, I was so overjoyed he said yes. And being awarded Best Digital Series at the 60th annual CINE Awards for Shakespeare

Republic. There’s so many more; I have been very blessed. How did growing up on the Peninsula shape who you are today? In my VCE year at Toorak College I began working with local theatre companies – particularly Panorama Theatre – performing musical theatre and working as an on-air presenter for radio station 3RPP-FM. I ended up doing the Drive Show twice a week and co-hosted the Breakfast Show every weekday. I also worked as on-air talent and as writer/ producer for a series of shows for one of the first community TV stations in Australia, Mornington Peninsula TV (MPTV), which ran for about four months around 1990. I would go on to work with PLOS and Rainbow Theatre. A couple of years later I left for the UK, but growing up on the Peninsula gave me a lot of opportunities to explore many avenues in the entertainment industry and I am so very grateful for it. For more information about Shakespeare Republic: #AllTheWebsAStage (The Lockdown Chronicles), visit www.allthewebsastage.com

Sally McLean, right, directs Michala Banas (Upper Middle Bogan), left, on set at Toorak College, Mt Eliza for Shakespeare Republic Season Two

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E H T N ! I E O J RIB T In Conversation Fabulous chats with Peninsula people

Stripping back beauty with Hillary Hillary Wilcox couldn’t imagine living anywhere else than our pristine Peninsula. What this beach-loving naturopath did imagine during her time studying Advanced Diplomas in Naturopathy, Nutrition and Herbal Medicine as well as a Bachelor’s Degree in Health Science in Naturopathy was MAAEMO. The 25-year-old started the certified organic skincare brand in response to her passion for wellness, health and appreciation for Mother Nature. Hillary shares an insight into her journey and her expert skincare tips with Kate Sears.

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What was the turning point that led you to becoming a naturopath? I think my journey with naturopathy began with an unhealthy relationship with food as a teenager. I spent a lot of time fixated with diets and negative eating habits, which led me to search for answers on how to live a healthier lifestyle. I loved educating myself on how to nourish and look after my body. I became really interested in nutrition and herbal medicine and wanted to be able to educate others on how to improve their own health and well-being too. It has been an amazing journey so far and a very rewarding one. How did the move from naturopathy to also being the director and founder of MAAEMO transpire? How was the transition from studying naturopathy to being the brains behind a business that has an Instagram following of almost 40k? Well, I actually started MAAEMO in my final year at university, which looking back seems like a crazy idea. I was so passionate about skin health and was really interested in studying herbs that had been proven to support the skin. I remember learning about these incredible, well-researched botanicals and would then

look for skincare products that contained them. But I really struggled to find any products that contained the ingredients I was looking for, so I started to develop my own products. Things took off, and then before I knew it I was juggling my final trimester and a business and a part-time job. Your gorgeous skincare products are certified organic, vegan and Australian. Could you expand on your passion behind this concept and why you started it? When I discovered how under-regulated our skincare industry is here in Australia, I felt really disappointed in the system. It became clear to me that the only way to know if a product was as natural and organic as it claimed to be was if it was certified organic. Obtaining our organic certification was a long and difficult process, but I think it was definitely worth it to be able to give our customers confidence and validation over how natural and organic the products in the MAAEMO range truly are. Is there any advice you would give your 13-year-old-self? I wish I could just tell myself to relax and enjoy being 13. Stop trying to grow up so quickly. Trust yourself and know that everything is going to work out as long as you work hard and be yourself. Could you share with our readers your best skincare tip for spring? Spring is a transitional season where we move from the harsh temperatures of winter and start to see more warmth and sun. Transitional weather can often irritate and leave our skin on the drier side. Make sure your skincare routine includes lots of antioxidants and hydrating ingredients; shea butter and hemp seed oil are some of my favourites. Also, make sure you are using an SPF daily if you are not already.

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It’s time to acknowledge our community achievers The Australia Day Local Awards recognise those who have made a noteworthy contribution to the Mornington Peninsula. Their contributions and community service can include such areas as: • Education; • Health; • Fundraising; • Charitable and voluntary services; • Business; • Sport; • Arts; • The environment; and, • Any area contributing to the advancement and well-being of the Mornington Peninsula. Here’s your chance to nominate someone who makes a real difference in your community and give them the opportunity to be

rewarded and recognised for their important contribution. There are three award categories: Citizen of the Year, Young Citizen of the Year, and Community Event of the Year. You can nominate a great community event held on the Peninsula that you have attended or helped organise for Community Event of the Year. Any individual or organisation can make a nomination, and all eligible nominees are acknowledged. Nominations open on Monday, September 7, and close on Friday, November 6. You can make your nomination online at mornpen. vic.gov.au/ausdayawards, or by phoning Christine Aslanidis on 5950 1137 or emailing christine. aslanidis@mornpen.vic.gov.au

Council elections cultivate diversity Looks like this ‘diversity’ thing is catching on. Mornington Peninsula Magazine already knows there’s a varied bunch of punters enjoying the south-of-the-city lifestyle. The proof’s in the pages of our monthly magazine, which supports and exemplifies the diverse group of region-loving locals who make our neck of the woods such a great place to be. Our magazine thrives on giving readers difference, and that’s just what Mornington Peninsula Shire and Frankston City Council are looking for in their councillors as they gear up for the October 24 elections. Frankston City Mayor Sandra Mayer explains: “Our local communities are diverse, and it is important that the councillors who will be representing these communities know them, are part of them and are therefore able to speak on their behalf. Frankston City comprises Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, people with a disability, a growing LGBTQI population and many from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. True representation only exists when there is diversity amongst leaders, so I strongly encourage anyone, young or old, who is thinking of running for council to throw their hat in the ring.” We agree. It’s certainly time to have representatives from diverse groups in positions where they can advocate for real change. After all, we live in a rich melting pot of multicultural and multi-talented people, so why not

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represent them? Cr Mayer continues: “A diverse council leads to more equitable, community-focused outcomes and policies, programs and initiatives that truly reflect the needs of all residents. One of my personal passions has been encouraging more women to run for local government, which is why I have supported the Tap Her on the Shoulder campaign, which has the goal of achieving 50 per cent female representation by 2024.” Mornington Peninsula Shire is on the same page: “Having a culturally diverse council is essential to meet the community’s needs in an inclusive way. If you are passionate about what happens in your local area, becoming a councillor is an exciting opportunity to make a positive difference and to represent the interests of your community.” There have been mixed feelings about holding the elections because of the pandemic, but as Cr Mayer says: “If COVID-19 has taught us anything, it’s that there are different ways of doing things.” Most candidates will now be promoting their candidacy solely on social media, and the voting will be conducted entirely by post. Nominations open on Thursday, September 17, and close at noon on Tuesday, September 22. Go to the respective council websites to find out more. Will you put your hand up for diversity? LIZ ROGERS

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Eye on the Peninsula

Full-time Councillor for Seawinds As a local media reporter, Debra Mar is at the forefront of local issues affecting our well-being and lifestyle. That’s why she is standing as a candidate for Mornington Peninsula Shire Council’s Seawinds Ward. “As an independent thinker, I will ensure council decisions reflect the best interests of our communities,” Debra says. Debra’s main focuses are families, communities and small business, especially post-COVID. “We need strong leadership and decisions that will support and protect these communities.” The increase of ‘big business’ interests such as AGL’s proposed gas import jetty and pipeline project at Crib Point, Hillview Quarries in Arthurs Seat and McDonald’s in Dromana is of concern to Debra. “These projects don’t belong here; they are threats to small business and detrimental to bushland, green wedge, wildlife and character of the Peninsula. “The way forward is to ensure your council provides adequate support to communities with commonsense advocacy to all levels of government, coupled with resources to effect change. That’s why I want to be your ‘Eye on the Peninsula’.” For more, visit facebook.com/debramar2020 or email debramarseawinds@gmail.com

Time to shine the spotlight on our threatened species

Australia is home to more than 500,000 animal and plant species, many of which are found nowhere else in the world. However, more than 100 species have become extinct over the past 200 years. Most species become threatened because of habitat destruction and the invasion of non-native species, but with effective management almost all can be protected. National Threatened Species Day on Monday, September 7, is designed to raise awareness of plants and animals at risk of extinction. Last June, the NSW Parliament estimated that a third of the state’s population of koalas were killed in the preceding summer’s devastating bushfires, and that the marsupial could become extinct in the state by 2050. It has been suggested that koalas should have their ‘vulnerable’ listing re-evaluated and lifted to ‘endangered’ in NSW and Queensland. Join us by raising awareness of plants and animals at risk of extinction, and help place a spotlight on how we can protect them into the future. National Threatened Species Day also celebrates the astounding work being done to save them by passionate conservationists, researchers, volunteers, and community experts. To find out more, visit http:// www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened

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A couple of babies: one-yearold Charlie with Boomer.

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Let’s set the stage The Forecast is it’ll reign cats and dogs for Father’s Day Boom – and just like that there’s now a zoo at the Forecast household. When you’ve dubbed your home the “mad house”, what’s one more? Mornington Peninsula Magazine’s graphic designer Jasmine Forecast and husband Brett have adopted a new furry friend called Boomer. He’s a loveable four-month-old labrador who has been welcomed into the family by their other labrador Hollie, cats Ellen and Isaac, Shelley the turtle and a whole lot of fish. And let’s not forget Boomer’s human brothers, one-year-old Charlie and five-year-old Connor, who’s the brains behind Boomer’s quirky name. “Connor has always had it in his mind that he would have a puppy called Boomer one day,” said Jasmine. “It ties in nicely to our North Melbourne AFL supporter history with one of their well-known players, Brent ‘Boomer’ Harvey. Another character we love is Boomer from Wentworth, so all of us were in agreeance.” With one baby in the house, why not add another? After putting their names on breeders’ wait lists, Jasmine and Brett’s patience was rewarded when this wee fluffball became available just before the second COVID-19 restrictions came in, which necessitated a mad fourhour dash to pick up their pre-arranged puppy in time. Labradors have always been a love of Jasmine and Brett’s because they’d both grown up with the agile and energetic yet affectionate dogs. Both admit they’re quite taken by their perfect mix of smart and lovable. Boomer has a passion for ‘zoomies’. You know what we’re talking about – it’s when dogs just go crazy for a bit and

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run around really quickly in short bursts. He’s also under the impression that he’s the next Kleenex toilet paper mascot because he continually tries to steal the toilet paper off the roll. “Clearly he doesn’t realise that months ago you couldn’t even buy toilet paper,” said Jasmine. “He’s run out through the lounge room with the roll unwinding behind him more than once. Despite this, we are very strict on training both Boomer and Hollie so they are both very well behaved.” This golden boy has taken to everyone in the mad house. He’s ever so gentle with the children, and Jasmine often wakes up with him tucked under the covers next to her enjoying a mum cuddle. Yet the setting sun sees Hollie and Boomer enjoying a siesta during golden hour. If it’s class time, Boomer’s eager to please because he’s very food-oriented and will eat anything. Typical labrador! While Jasmine’s the head of the pack and takes on the lead training role, Hollie is in great health and still has the stamina of a puppy. It’s surprised Jasmine how much Hollie has taken to Boomer. Her inner puppy comes out and it’s so sweet to witness. It’s easy to see why Boomer has the whole family vying for his attention. But wait, he gets cuter. Boomer has a cute puppy overbite, so when he sleeps his tongue pokes out. It’s adorable. And his favourite sport? Well, he’s made up his own, and he’s in the lead. Jasmine swears he’s got the fastest wagging tail that she’s ever seen on a puppy – but hey, mums are normally biased. Boomer is supplying the laughs and keeping his family busy during this challenging period, but they’re all smiles – and who wouldn’t be? Just look at the face. KATE SEARS

We can’t let Stage 4 restrictions due to COVID-19 get in the way of Dad’s special day. During these trying times, there’s no doubt that Dad has stood in as Mr Fix It, filled in as a teacher, and become a mediator for fights between siblings. So on Sunday, September 6, let’s celebrate fathers, father figures, stepfathers, grandfathers, soon-to-be-dads, and fur-dads. Why not jump online and purchase from a local business to have a special something delivered to Dad, or snap up a voucher so he can spoil himself. If the kids need a craft project to get them – and you – through the day, get them to create their own DIY Father’s Day cards from scratch – and get them to make one on your behalf as well so you can post one to your father too. If Dad is tech-savvy, jump on a Skype or Zoom video chat, or call, text, post a letter, use a carrier pigeon – just get in touch and make sure his day isn’t forgotten among the Stage 4 lockdown. Perhaps it’s time to get busy in the kitchen and discover a new recipe that will no doubt delight Dad’s tastebuds. Again, the children can get involved by preparing Dad a home-cooked meal or breakfast in bed. Make it a day to remember by introducing a theme night or moving lunch outside in the sun-filled garden for a picnic experience. We’re all in this together. We’ve got to keep Dad – and the greater community – safe by staying at home. And if that means waiting for Dad’s famous hug, then I think that’s the least we can do. KATE SEARS

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The Eagle has landed in our September skies

This month, be sure to enjoy the sights of Scorpius, Sagittarius, and Scutum before they disappear below the horizon. The most spectacular objects to look out for in these constellations include M8, the Lagoon Nebula; the open clusters M6 and M7; and the globular cluster M22. There are a few interesting targets in the sky at the moment in Aquarius. The globular cluster M2 appears as a fuzzy star through binoculars and is near the star Beta Aquarii. And the planetary nebula NGC 7293, the Helix Nebula, appears as a faint fuzzy disc through a small telescope. Another globular cluster, M15 in Pegasus, is thought to be 13.2 billion years old and can be picked out with binoculars, while a small telescope shows it clearly. With dark skies and a relatively large telescope you can spot M16, the beautiful Eagle Nebula in the constellation Serpens. This nebula is located 7000 light-years from Earth and spans 70 by 55 light-years. It is home to several famous cosmic structures, including the stunning Pillars of Creation, which stretch roughly four

M16, the Eagle Nebula, includes the stunning Pillars of Creation and Stellar Spire. Photo by MPAS member Nick Axaris

E H T N ! I E O J RIB T

to five light-years, and Stellar Spire, approximately 9.5 light-years or 90 trillion kilometres high. The globular cluster 47 Tucanae is a must-see target in the September southern skies, lying to the south of the constellation Tucana. It is visible to the naked eye as a hazy star, while a small telescope shows its bright centre and many of its glittering stars. This cluster is 15,000 light-years away. On September 22, the Earth is at Equinox, which is when the Sun shines directly on the equator and the length of day and night are nearly equal. September 24 will see the variable star Mira at its brightest, and on September 25 the waxing moon and Jupiter form a triangle with Saturn. For further information about the Mornington Peninsula Astronomical Society, such as public stargazing nights, event bookings and membership, please visit the society’s Facebook page, or website at www.mpas.asn.au NERIDA LANGCAKE, Mornington Peninsula Astronomical Society

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Entrants revel in Frankston film festival Different eyes see different things, especially within the inaugural Lockdown Short Film Festival, which provides a mental escape for entrants capturing lives as we entered or emerged from isolation. Light or night living rooms will be transformed as fervent filmmakers create sets for a three-minute entry and a shot at Frankston Council’s $2000 first prize. Online iPhone workshops have been offered, and with a second $1000 highly commended prize, there are sure to be many entries as the Frankston Arts Centre prepares to screen short-listed entries at Cube 31 in 2021. “We’re encouraging anyone aged 16 and over to create a short film, regardless of their experience with filmmaking,” said a spokeswoman. Frankston Mayor Sandra Mayer said resident feedback listed the arts as a healthy outlet. “With so many in our community impacted by the pandemic, it is important that we find safe, new ways to continue delivering this positivity,” Cr Mayer said. “The Lockdown Short Film Festival is one such example, and we hope it provides enjoyment at this difficult time.” Australian Directors Guild award recipient and former Neighbours director Scott Major, pictured, is one of many judges announced ahead of the October 18 entry deadline. Frankston Arts Centre says it isn’t ruling out future film competitions, but Lockdown will be the first, and you can learn more at artscentre.frankston.vic.gov.au CAMERON HOWE camhowe.com

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Get involved and join local dad to help find a cure for blood cancer Mark your calendars and save Sunday, September 27, to join local dad Geoff Nyssen for the annual MY Mount Eliza Run & Fun Festival and help raise funds to find a cure for the terminal blood cancer multiple myeloma. Get your friends, family or pet and join Geoff on the day from anywhere at any time between 8am and noon for a jam-packed virtual event hosted live on Facebook. Sadly, every 36 minutes someone in Australia is diagnosed with a blood cancer. Geoff himself was diagnosed with multiple myeloma in 2014, so he is determined to go ahead with the festival this year, even if

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it means having to go ‘virtual’ due to COVID-19. “We plan to ‘virtually’ engage and connect our community around core values of empowerment, wellness and community,” Geoff said. “For the event, we will ask our participants to don their MY Mount Eliza T-shirt and get active in the name of a good cause. Participants can walk, run, jump, cycle, but the main aim is to have fun.” The great thing about this event is that everyone can participate, all while complying with the applicable COVID-19 restrictions. The MY Mount Eliza Virtual Run & Fun Festival will be hosted on its Facebook page @ MyMountEliza and will include: • Live entertainment; • Fun challenges;

• Promotions; • Prizes; • A silent auction; and, • Physical activities. To find out more about Geoff’s personal story and to register for this inspiring, community event where wellness and empowerment are celebrated visit www. mymounteliza.org.au. Use #HelpGeoffTo80 to participate on the day or to support Geoff and the festival on social media. MY MOUNT ELIZA RUN & FUN FESTIVAL W: www.mymounteliza.org.au FB: MyMountEliza INSTA: mymounteliza

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A frightening welcome for Dutch migrants Had they sailed more than 20,000km from Amsterdam only to drown on the shore of their new home? On the afternoon of September 16, 1952, many of the Dutch migrants aboard the liner Johan Van Oldenbarnevelt must have had this thought in mind.

Cabins were bright and airy, and wide promenade decks were a feature. The ship was renowned for the high level of service and fine cuisine. She operated on the route between Holland and the Dutch East Indies (Indonesia) until World War II, in which she served as a troopship until 1945.

The ship had moored safely at Station Pier about noon but four hours later was struck by wind in excess of 110km/h. A sudden change of wind direction, with violent gusts, caused one mooring line to part and a mooring bollard to be torn from the pier. When more lines snapped and two more bollards were ripped from the pier, the ship was at the mercy of the wind. Her two bow anchors were quickly dropped, saving her from immediately going ashore. The fierce wind, however, caused her anchors to drag.

BY MAURIE HUTCHINSON President, Peninsula Ship Society T: Maurie Hutchinson 9787Â 5780 E: mauriehutch@gmail.com

Fortunately, three tugs were assisting the mooring of another liner on the other side of the pier. One of these, the

Chartered by the Australian Government from 1950 to 1958, she made 44 voyages to Australia with migrants. In 1958 she brought the 100,000th Dutch migrant to Melbourne. As a migrant ship her accommodation was altered to carry more than 1400 passengers.

The Peninsula Ship Society will not be meeting until further notice. Swiftness, left the task to the other two and rushed to the aid of the Johan Van Oldenbarnevelt. With the Swiftness at full power and straining at the end of a towing cable, the liner was held against the wind for half an hour. After three more tugs came to help, the Johan Van Oldenbarnevelt was moored safely at

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Station Pier by 6pm. When the Johan Van Oldenbarnevelt was launched in 1929, she was the largest diesel-powered ship to be built in the Netherlands. At almost 20,000 tons she was designed to carry 770 passengers with a crew of 360. Her public rooms were luxurious and beautifully decorated.

PICTURED: Nine months after the Johan Van Oldenbarnevelt was sold and renamed Lakonia, the liner caught fire in December 1963 and sank with the loss of 128 lives. Photo by Allan C Green, 1954; State Library of Victoria gr004914.

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Indigenous support continues through COVID-19 Star servicing doesn’t stop

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It takes more than a global pandemic to derail Mornington Peninsula Shire Council’s support for its community, and the Balee Group is no exception. While the Peninsula forges through the restrictions imposed under Stage 4 lockdown, the Indigenous program is powering through the pandemic and adapting to keep the service alive.

The Balee Group takes a holistic approach to enhance the social, emotional, physical and spiritual well-being of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community across the Peninsula. The program provides a range of activities that promote social connections, enhance individual health and well-being and support independent living at home and in the community. Members have received check-in phone calls and home visits where appropriate, information about community care packages and delivered meal provisions to keep people feeling safe and connected. The Balee Group’s community-based activities include arts and crafts, cultural and community events and connection to local gathering places. Monthly art packages have been delivered to group members, drawing inspiration from important events such as National Reconciliation Week and NAIDOC Week. Issue 106, SEPTEMBER 2020

Supported by Shire and Federal Government funding, the Balee Group is free for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 50 and over and for people with a disability, and in place of weekly meetings led by the Shire’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community and access support officer during COVID-19, members are still receiving support. “The Balee Group is just one of the ways we support and recognise the First People of what is now known as the Mornington Peninsula: the Bunurong/Boon Wurrung People of the Kulin Nation,” said Mornington Peninsula Mayor Sam Hearn. “We have an important role to play in promoting and celebrating Aboriginal cultural heritage, arts and cultures as part of the intrinsic identity and value of the Mornington Peninsula. We are proud to support our Indigenous community when they need us the most. This pandemic won’t stop us from celebrating and helping our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community.” For more information about the Balee Group, visit www.mornpen.vic.gov.au/ warringinee or contact the group on 5950 1108.

Regular maintenance and servicing is vital for the safety, smooth running and enjoyment of your bicycle. Peninsula Star Cycles is operating with COVID-19 safety, and under government guidelines for essential servicing, to receive, service and return your bike. Please call for advice and to book in, then leave it at the store by arrangement. Your bike will be sanitised and work quoted before the service is undertaken. When the work’s complete, contactless payment and pick-up will be organised with you.

Peninsula Star Cycles can even arrange local collection and delivery. Mention this article to receive 10 per cent off your service bill! You can browse online for bikes and accessories and call the shop to arrange contactless purchase and collection. Keep an eye on their website and socials. KATE SEARS PENINSULA STAR CYCLES A: 48 Playne St, Frankston T: 9783 2266 W: peninsula-star-cycles.myshopify.com FB: PeninsulaStarCycles

Mornington Peninsula Mayor Sam Hearn, Balee Group member Bob Kelly, Shire Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander access and support officer Kerry Fortuyn and Balee Group member Dawn Campbell. www.morningtonpeninsulamagazine.com.au

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Pre-order your next iso-read Created by two booksellers out of nothing more than a love of reading, writing and local art, the PENinsula Literary Journal is set for release in October and has opened for preorders. The journal, published and edited by Celeste Deliyiannis and Emily Westmoreland, will rely on pre-orders and community donations to fund its initial print run.

Help at hand when you’re hitting the books Home schooling just got a lot easier for Frankston students – there’s a new online resource that’s available to help them 24 hours a day and it’s free with their library membership.

Studiosity is a Frankston City Council initiative that allows first-year tertiary students and those in years 3-12 to access online help from a network of highly qualified subject specialists at any time of the day or night. It offers live help in English, maths and science, as well as providing essay writing feedback. There is also an option for job skills help and resume feedback. Mayor Sandra Mayer said Studiosity was an on-demand, one-to-one service that was personalised to suit a

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student’s specific problem or question. “We know that many families are struggling with home schooling and learning online, which is why we are investing in education and adding even more free resources and tools to our library website,” Cr Mayer said. “Studiosity will provide some relief to families struggling to help their children study while at home, and will also help university students who are craving personalised assistance with their coursework.” For more information about the free resources Frankston City has available to library members, visit www.library. frankston.vic.gov.au or phone 9784 1020.

“The local community and wider arts community have been overwhelmingly supportive of PENinsula,” said Celeste. “We feel we came at the right time for many people, with locals telling us they’re grateful to have something creative and positive to focus on during the past few months, and that they’re excited to see PENinsula go to print in October.” PENinsula will publish short fiction, nature writing, essays and photography that highlight the natural beauty and landscape of the Mornington Peninsula. The project has been a welcome morale boost for Peninsula creatives and has helped to strengthen a sense of community and connection here during these challenging times. “We’re confident in our community’s dedication to bring PENinsula to print,” said Celeste. “This has been, from the start, a collective project. We’re excited to present PENinsula to our community as something we all had a part in, whether monetarily, through the written word, through taking a few snaps on a daily iso-walk. This journal is for all of us and made by all of us.” Supporters can donate or pre-order a paperback copy of the inaugural PENinsula for $30 by visiting https:// peninsulajournal.weeblysite.com

Twelve-year-old Oliver is already a fan of Studiosity, a free online study resource being provided by Frankston City Council.

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Chisholm offers help for women in the age of COVID-19 Women have been hardest hit by the economic fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic, according to Chisholm Institute of TAFE’s higher instance education co-ordinator, Dr Ilsa Evans, pictured. Almost everyone has been touched by the pandemic in some way, but women have been disproportionately affected, Dr Evans said. “They form the majority of essential workers, and they are also in the lowest-paid jobs. At the same time, women are performing far more unpaid labour during lockdown, including the responsibility for education at home.” Statistics from Gender Equality Victoria revealed 55 per

Issue 106, SEPTEMBER 2020

cent of jobs lost due to the pandemic had been lost by women, while most of the casual workers unable to access JobKeeper payments were women, and females were depleting their superannuation at a higher rate than men. Dr Evans said all organisations should be aware of the short and long-term impacts on women and keep these in mind as they develop responses to the crisis. Chisholm has several programs that can help women who have lost jobs to retrain and improve their future employability. The Find Your Place pilot program, in partnership with The Placement Circle, is helping a group of women to study the Certificate III in Individual Support – Ageing, Home and Community CHC33015. The women benefit from peer support, subsidised training and placement opportunities. The New Enterprise Incentive Scheme is an option

SPONSORED EDITORIAL for those who want to start their own small business, providing a qualification, mentoring, income and rental assistance for eligible participants. Chisholm also offers a range of courses that are included in the State Government’s Free TAFE for Priority Courses program, with more courses added to the list this year. There are Free TAFE qualifications available in areas including allied health, mental health, alcohol and other drugs, education support, early childhood education, justice, accounting and construction. Find out more at www.chisholm.edu.au CHISHOLM INSTITUTE A: PO Box 684, Dandenong T: 1300 244 746 W: www.chisholm.edu.au FB: ChisholmInstitute INSTA: chisholm_institute

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Words, wheels and So our bricks and mortar libraries are closed again and the mobile library is also out of action. In response to some serious lack of fresh ‘bookish’ encounters, we thought we’d bring you the next best thing while you’re waiting for our story hubs to start operating again. Here’s a little tale about our region’s library service, including the wonderful mobile library that continues to deliver narratives – outside of COVID-19 restrictions – right across the Peninsula. Let’s talk words, wheels and wonderful willpower. The Mornington Peninsula Regional Library Service began in 1954 due to the resolve of a group of residents – they wanted a library service and, by jove, they were going to get it! With financial assistance from the Free Library Service Board and the State Government, this group of enthusiastic readers influenced the Shire of Flinders to provide a free library service operating out of Rosebud. The die was cast, and it was 12 years later that the mobile library service began operating under the Peninsula Library Service umbrella. Stories of love, hate, desire and triumph were taken on the road to Hastings, Flinders and Mornington to drop inside the minds of eager story-seekers ready to be educated and escape. The first vehicle to deliver books to hospitals and residents who were house-bound across the Peninsula was a station wagon. The first mobile library where people could actually select a book by stepping inside to peruse the 2400 titles waiting to be opened was a converted bus. This bus was replaced by the new-look ‘bookmobile’, which made its first appearance in Rosebud in 1982. The Mornington Peninsula Regional Library Service received a $6500 special projects grant from

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willpower the Library Council of Victoria in 1984 that enabled the mobile library to be connected by telephone to regional headquarters. This meant patrons could ask remotely about titles they would like to read. As a result, the Peninsula Regional Library Service was awarded the Victorian Association for Library Automation Award for innovative use of technology. Further State Government funding enabled the service to put a new semi-trailer mobile library on the road in 2000, and this current mobile library is stocked full of books, magazines, talking books, DVDs and music CDs available for loan. It visits 16 sites across the Peninsula each week outside of COVID-19 restrictions. The Mornington Peninsula Shire recently invited residents to have their say on how they envisaged the mobile library operating into the future. This integral part of our community, which connects people through words to create conversation and creative thinking, just keeps getting better. May the wheels keep turning. LIZ ROGERS

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8 MORE PAGES OF LOCAL BUSINESSES TO SUPPORT DURING COVID-19 CONDITIONS

Locals are keeping their spirits high While we all continue to deal with the challenges thrown at us by the ongoing Stage 4 lockdown, our community is still focusing on coming out the other side with gusto. From businesses that have pivoted their professional model to maintain trade throughout the challenging period to those community members who have focused on the positives and used their downtime wisely and concentrated on personal growth, we’re all in this together. The local community spirit has heightened as everyone appears to be focused on supporting small local businesses where they can. Many have made a ritual of trying a new restaurant via takeaway every date

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night, which adds interest to the monotonous days and makes a local eatery smile, while others have made an effort to inquire with local trades, experts, producers and sellers. In keeping with this outpouring of love for locals, Mornington Peninsula Magazine – as an enormous supporter of all businesses, especially those based on the Mornington Peninsula and in Frankston – decided to ramp up the focus on lovin’ local. In order to assist in any way we can, in our August issue we launched the Local Lovin’ feature. All of us at Mornington Peninsula Magazine have supported our community and will continue to focus on how we can help our local businesses during this second lockdown and out the other side of it. Please join us by following the hashtag #mornpenmagbizlove or by adding the hashtag to your posts so we can all support each other through these turbulent times. KATE SEARS

Everything we love about the peninsula, fresh every month

PHOTO: STEVE BROWN

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https://harcourtscentral.com/Home/landlords/property-management-during-covid-19

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TREASURY WINES AD

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Obtainium Antiques & Vintage Wares

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caring for our seniors

Take the time this month to celebrate our seniors Everything’s a little bit different this year, but it doesn’t mean we should skip the festivals – just alter them. This year, the 2020 Victorian Seniors Festival has been reimagined. In fact, the festival is coming straight to you via online story-telling, Zoom recorded interviews and performances. It’s a key event on the calendar, where the State Government focuses on celebrating older Victorians and the valuable contribution they make to our community. The important initiative is back for its 38th year and it provides a chance for our older Victorians to experience specifically created content just for them that they can listen to and watch. The festival has been running since May and will wrap up next month, and although there’s just two months left, there’s no shame in joining in on the fun now – better late than never! There have been weekly video performances and shared interviews, with radio entertainment planned this month and next. The clever team behind it have had a blast creating and reimagining the festival for our seniors. For more information, please visit www.seniorsonline.vic. gov.au Inspired by the online event, Mornington Peninsula Magazine has created this Seniors Festival 2020 feature to coincide with the pivotal event and to share with our readers and community the services available to our senior population. We’re absolutely spoilt for choice on the Mornington Peninsula with retirement living, health care, home and lifestyle assistance, exceptional carers, residential care, in-home support and assisted living options. It doesn’t stop there, with experienced civil celebrants, suppliers of linen and manchester especially for aged care, mobility, home living aids, talented dentists, and providers of custom home solutions. Our community truly cares and is ready to support our seniors. Please join us in celebrating our seniors, and support them as much as we can while maintaining our social distance by making a phone call to touch base, connecting over a video chat or waving when we pass by our elderly neighbour on our daily walk. Or pass the above event link on to them and share the feature. If you’re a senior yourself, what are you waiting for? These upcoming pages are just for you.

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caring for our seniors

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caring for our seniors

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caring for our seniors

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Caring for each other Chronos Care, as a residential aged care provider, believes it’s imperative to their residents that they provide support for everyday living, health care and accommodation – but what makes them different is embedded in their vision. Chronos Care aims to provide an ideal world for their residents by recognising that each resident has separate needs and may require specific care personalised to their unique life. Chronos Care can then build their ideal world. They achieve this by recruiting and educating their staff to understand the importance of building relationships, trust, communication and understanding of their residents – especially their past so they can provide them with a fulfilling future and offer independence. Chronos Care strives to create an environment that is shaped by their residents’ world to guarantee that they’re comfortable in their home. At Chronos Care, residents can expect that they are entering more than just an aged care home – they’re also joining a

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community where the Chronos Care team, residents and residents’ families come together to create what can only be described as a second family. Chronos Care also believe in going beyond the norm and exceeding the day-to-day expectations in all areas of their residents’ lives. At Chronos Care, their values are at the centre of everything they do. Their first value of respect is exhibited by listening without judgement and fostering the relationships with their community with both dignity and trust. Their second value of teamwork extends further than just to their immediate Chronos Care team; it includes the teamwork that happens daily with their residents’ families and the external community as well. Valuing learning is key, and Chronos Care encourages everyone to reach their fullest potential through consistent education. Finally, they acknowledge and honour the fundamental values and dignity of all individuals. Chronos Care believes that strength lies in differences, not in similarities. CHRONOS CARE A: 2 Mount Eliza Way, Mount Eliza T: 9787 5877 W: https://chronoscare.com.au FB: chronoscare INSTA: chronoscare

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It pays to be a local For Tahnee Schulz, being able to live and work in Mornington brings her the best of both worlds. She’s a registered nurse for Southern Cross Care’s Home Support Services in Mornington, and said she’s proud of her profession. “Nursing is a gift of love and care to help others, and that’s never been more important,” Tahnee said. “And I just love living on the Mornington Peninsula because it offers the freedom and lifestyle.” Tahnee’s training and experience are crucial in delivering home care packages to clients, especially the aspect of managing services. With more than 35,000 people in Victoria receiving a package, it’s continuing to be a common option for many. Those growing numbers of people receive a range of services, including help with household chores, personal care or transport. With considerable experience in this area and her training as a registered nurse, Tahnee does everything she can to help her clients. When she’s not at work, Tahnee’s focused on all types of sport and has represented Victoria in women’s Australian rules football. She’s also a very keen angler. “I have a passion and love for fishing, so I understand that people want to spend more time enjoying their hobbies,” Tahnee said. “So if I can help someone do that by getting them the best services that are just for right them, it would make me very happy.” SOUTHERN CROSS CARE (SA, NT & VIC) INC A: 150 Mornington-Tyabb Rd, Mornington T: 1800 852 772 W: www.themornington.com.au

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A new Lifestyle to counter isolation

One reflection shared throughout the COVID-19 lockdown is that we humans are truly social beings. We’re missing coffee (or wine!) catch-ups with the girls, live footy with other fans in the stands, and a quiet beer at the pub with a mate. Interactions over Facebook and waving from a distance does not quite compensate for the social isolation felt by many. However, homeowners at Lifestyle Communities are

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reporting far lower feelings of isolation throughout social restrictions. Each secure, gated community provides a vibrant environment, offering rich social connections with like-minded neighbours, serviced by on-site community managers who tend to a range of maintenance and administrative needs. Lifestyle Bittern and Lifestyle Hastings promise luxury living for over-50s at an affordable price. With the multimillion-dollar clubhouse and luxury resort-style facilities, now could be the perfect moment to consider a change of lifestyle for the better. Bursting with facilities such

as a swimming pool, gym, cinema, bowling green and gymnasium, Lifestyle Bittern and Lifestyle Hastings will provide the perfect space for a vibrant, active social life when restrictions ease. Personal ‘no contact’ appointments are available for people living locally, so why not arrange a visit today? If you’d prefer to stay in, virtual tours are also available. Simply call 1300 505 560 or visit www.lifestylebittern. com.au or www.lifestylehastings.com.au for more information.

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arts events leisure

arts events leisure

It’s more than a storybook When Andrea Rowe was diagnosed six years ago with rheumatoid arthritis, as a mother she yearned for a way in which her children could understand her chronic disease. The Mornington Peninsula-based writer decided to create her own children’s book because she struggled to find a storybook describing her condition. Andrea believes strongly that sharing stories about living with RA goes a long way in fighting misunderstandings and of

* Please note. There are no storytime sessions at Seaford Junior Library on the first Tuesday of the month.

visit library.frankston.vic.gov.au/whats_on or call 9784 1020

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course making sure that people suffering from RA never feel embarrassed about their condition. Determined to put an identity behind RA, it comes as no surprise that Andrea put herself forward as a spokeswoman to raise awareness for a new treatment for RA sufferers, Rinvoq by AbbVie, in the lead-up to National Pain Week in July. The move to create a children’s book to explain the invisible nature of her illness to her children was a smooth transition, because Andrea works as a copywriter and author. Reading children’s books to her children was always a way that Andrea helped her kids understand issues in the world. Now 50 and a mum of teenagers, she was first diagnosed six years ago. It was then that Andrea wrote the book to explain to her then primary school-aged children why some days Mum would look different. Josie’s Creaky Joints follows Josie as she learns to live with her condition and how to adjust “For me writing it, I was also explaining it to myself,” said Andrea. “I had ownership on how I was explaining it to my kids and to others. It was a healing activity and it helped me articulate how I was feeling all the while explaining chronic illness in an easy-to-understand manner. At bedtime, we’d read the book and have a chat. We’d focus on the fact that RA was real; even if you couldn’t see it, it is real. It was difficult as often I didn’t have physical signs.” It’s a valuable resource that Andrea has lent to others in her situation. It’s her hope that Josie’s Creaky Joints will find a

publisher soon so that others around the world can have a childfriendly manner in which to explain a complex ailment or disease. The support groups that Andrea discovered on the Peninsula were also a fantastic support in connecting her to others living with RA and she’s forever grateful that she was diagnosed at a time of modern medicine so she can work on preventing her joints going into further disrepair. “There are times where I can’t do things like tie a ponytail or put petrol in the car. When they were younger I would describe the flare-ups to my kids as like having lobster claws: hot, inflamed, and difficulty with my fine motor skills. No one who has RA looks the same. I used to think I could be the person who cured their RA. But with treatment and medication, I’m more realistic and hopeful for an active life with RA in it.”   Andrea’s thrilled to announce her next children’s picture book will be published by Little Hare this summer. Jetty Jumping will explore the unique nature of the Peninsula and coastal living, and focuses on the joys found both above and below the jetties. It’s a nostalgic reminder of how special coastal summers are, and conquering our fears to explore what lives below the surface. KATE SEARS

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When the Frankston Arts Centre called for submissions in April for its short story anthology Stories at the End of the Line, the global pandemic was relatively new, we were in the early weeks of staying home, and public spaces that exist to celebrate stories – such as the FAC and libraries – had temporarily closed. Proving that stories create community and allow us to see through the eyes of others, more than 140 stories poured in from writers ranging in age from 10 to 86. Unsurprisingly, a common theme was cancelled plans, or feelings of being physically distant from

THIS TIME, LAST YEAR

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SHORT FILM COMPETITION

friends and loved ones. There were non-fiction narratives of teenage lives forced into isolation, comedic adventures, and memoirs of our day-to-day lives. Stories at the End of the Line will be published in digital and printed formats and made available to borrow from the Frankston City Libraries or to buy later this year. Featuring a stunning cover design by Peninsula-based artist Helen Di Tomasso, it will be launched at a multi-disciplinary exhibition titled This Time, Last Year at Cube 37 in 2021. FRANKSTON ARTS CENTRE A: 27-37 Davey St, Frankston T: 9784 1060 W: www.thefac.com.au FB: FrankstonArtsCentre INSTA: the_fac

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arts events leisure

Written time capsule of this moment in time


arts events leisure

Photo by Steve Brown

Art and culture for everyone The Mornington Peninsula has a strong culture of creativity that connects shared and different identities, histories, insights and ideas. From the diverse arts and cultural practices of our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, to contemporary music, visual and performing arts, festivals, maker markets and more, our creative community is known for celebrating our spectacular natural environment. The community need for creativity contributed to the creation of the Mornington Peninsula Shire’s Arts and Culture Plan 2024, with more than 1000 residents providing feedback that has helped create an expansive and ambitious piece of work that sets out a vision for the advocacy, support and development of arts and culture on the Peninsula for the next four years. Through delivery of this plan, we will strengthen the capacity of our community and create an environment for the arts to flourish. This includes strategic regeneration of our places and spaces, advocacy for our arts and cultural practitioners, industries, events and activities, and breaking down existing barriers so that every resident can participate and enjoy the rich, inclusive and vibrant experiences that arts and culture can provide. As the coronavirus pandemic has impacted our community connections, we have increasingly turned to arts and culture for stimulation, engagement, learning and individual expression. When we can’t share our creations with each other face to face, we do so online. The next time you create something, make sure you include the hashtag #thethingswecreate for all of us to celebrate your creative contribution to life on the Peninsula. Check out the new Arts and Culture Plan 2024 at artsandculture.mornpen.vic.gov.au/ artsandcultureplan2024 PICTURED: Sheldon Headspeath’s dolphins mural on a Capel Sound foreshore beach box. Photo: Mornington Peninsula Shire, 2020.

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THE BUSINESS

the business

Save your bacon for mental health Mick Matthews is passionate about his work for Hope Assistance for Local Tradies, a men’s mental health charity he joined in June. Peninsula-born and raised, he completes the team that is focused on creating awareness about the importance of mental health. It’s a vital message that is close to Mick’s heart. Mick has drawn from his own mental health journey to support the recovery of others in our community. It was through his dad’s plumbing business that his dad assisted him in returning to paid employment after being

unwell. He’s ever so proud to be a part of a charity that is supporting tradies. “I studied teaching and had mental health struggles during my 20s,” said Mick. “It’s very rewarding to utilise my own experience to help others.” Founded in 2013 by Jeremy Forbes and Catherine Pilgrim, HALT is a national grassroots suicide prevention charity. Its Save Your Bacon events for students, apprentices and tradies across Australia were created to raise awareness of mental health. The presentations go for 20 minutes and they concentrate on opening up the conversation around mental health and suicide. Dropping the stigma is also essential, as is providing ideas for support which is established through the toolkits handed

out during the event and include everything about what to do next, what HALT is and what it does. With COVID-19 restrictions, HALT has adapted to online events to continue to provide its invaluable support with coffee and breakfast delivered after a Zoom call by the HALT team. Online chat has become an added bonus as a result of the current way of living, with questions asked confidentially in the chat box. HALT specialises in tailoring the presentation to the group in question and is branching out to schools, emergency services and sport groups. “We also discuss what mental health is and what becoming unwell can look like,” said Mick. “There is

est. 1988

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THE BUSINESS

often subtle shifts in our well-being, and unfortunately it’s common that people leave it too late. We provide information on what you can do if you’re struggling or know someone that is. It’s hard to hold a difficult conversation, so we provide information on how to have a tough convo with a mate and offer support to make the move and take action. All tradies – both male and female – are included, of course. Our toolkits also have resources to get started, highlighting the importance of seeing your GP to get a

referral for a mental health care plan.” These key events provide tradies, students and apprentices from all walks of life with the tools to take the first step and start a conversation about mental health and well-being. HALT encourages its audience to help their mates if they are struggling by educating them on how and where they can source support when needed, specifically during these challenging times when strategies and ideas to cope are key. “We make sure to use relatable language and a casual tone,” said Mick. “We break the ‘macho man’ and ‘man up’ stigma and instead provide engaging presentations that are sensitive to men’s needs whatever they may be.” Now more than ever it’s time to be reaching out to our community to let them know that there is support and services available. Find out more by visiting www.halt.org.au or by stopping by the Instagram page @haltaustralia and HALT South East Melbourne on Facebook. KATE SEARS

MT ELIZA / MELBOURNE CBD / BRAESIDE MT ELIZA / MELBOURNE CBD / SANDRINGHAM

Specialists in Family Law Solutions

www.vicrajah.com.au Specialists in Family Law Solution www.calleyfamilylaw.com.au 9781 4222 info@vicrajah.com.au T. (03) 9781 4222 or E. calley@calleyfamilylaw.com.au

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THE BUSINESS

Renovate your logo for lockdown With lockdown becoming a way of life and more businesses driven to online revenue, it’s more important than ever to be online-savvy and have your business presented at its most professional and competitive level. LogoLogix will review your identity and establish whether it needs a ‘reno’ or complete overhaul. Either way, LogoLogix creates standout logo identities and support graphics to promote your business and get it noticed. Priscilla believes a logo represents your business much like an advertising campaign, and with her invaluable years of experience as a creative director in advertising behind that theory, she now

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concentrates on identities that provide a mix of both visual appeal and marketing nous. In addition to logos, LogoLogix offers a comprehensive design service spanning business stationery, brochure design, signage, packaging, application to apparel and subsequent print management. And if you’re nice, Priscilla will do you a pretty good advertising campaign. LogoLogix caters to all sizes of business to complete your corporate identity needs. LOGOLOGIX E: contact@logologix.com.au T: 9598 6995 W: www.logologix.com.au FB: Logo Logix

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Applications are open for a range of State Government support programs for the hospitality sector. The Hospitality Business Grant Program provides grants of $25,000 to eligible businesses with a payroll of $3-10 million, plus $5000 for each additional premises, capped at $20,000. There will also be a further $20,000 for eligible businesses with premises in the CBD given the large and sustained shock that they have experienced to their trading environment. The eligible CBD postcodes are 3000, 3005, 3006 and 3008. The $10 million CBD Small Hospitality Grant provides support for CBD businesses that have previously received a grant from the Business Support Fund expansion program. Grants of $5000 are available to eligible businesses operating in Melbourne’s CBD with a food service of 11 to 100 seats and $15,000 for those with food service of 101 seats or more. The eligible CBD postcodes are 3000, 3005, 3006 and 3008. Licensed venues with an annual turnover of $50 million or more that operate as a business group and are not eligible for the Commercial Tenancy Relief Scheme can now access the Night-time Economy

Issue 106, SEPTEMBER 2020

Business Support Initiative. This program provides reimbursements of up to $20,000 per group for expenses incurred in obtaining specialist business and tenancy advice between March 29 and June 1 this year. Under this initiative, business groups that have attempted to negotiate with their landlord in good faith but have not been able to reach agreement may also be eligible for commercial rent hardship payments of up to $150,000. Visit www.business.vic.gov.au/support-for-yourbusiness/grants-and-assistance/business-supportpackage/support-for-victorian-hospitality-businesses to find out which of these programs is best for your business. If you feel like us that there should be more support for Mornington Peninsula and Frankston businesses, not just those in the CBD, contact our local ministers: Mornington: David Morris P: 5975 4799 david.morris@parliament.vic.gov.au Nepean: Chris Brayne P: 5986 6661 Chris.Brayne@parliament.vic.gov.au Hastings: Neale Burgess P: 5977 5600 neale.burgess@parliament.vic.gov.au Frankston: Paul Edbrooke P: 9783 9822 paul.edbrooke@parliament.vic.gov.au

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THE BUSINESS

Hospitality businesses invited to apply for government support


health beauty fashion

health, beauty, fashion

Online sales a big plus for Lisa’s Lacies

Lisa’s Lacies has been a strong presence in the plus-size lingerie business on the Mornington Peninsula for more than 26 years. Lisa started from humble beginnings from her sewing machine at home during the 1990s and she admits: “There have been trials and tribulations along the way as we strived to keep small business alive in the face of growing retail giants.” But ultimately she credits her longevity in business to their unique personal approach coupled with the ability to quickly adapt to changes in the marketplace – although nothing compares to the changes within the past few months since COVID-19. With strict regulations in place, Lisa has had to almost reinvent the way they do business and reports that, happily, it isn’t all bad. At first, during Stage 3 she introduced virtual fittings for bras and video tutorials on how to self-measure. And although shop sales were greatly impacted like many retailers, their online sales boomed and thankfully resulted in being able to keep on many of the casual staff. Lisa’s latest creation during Stage 4 has been the introduction of face masks, which are all handmade on the premises along with Lisa’s own personal clothing label. She said they can barely keep up with demand and are now receiving inquiries for bulk orders from government agencies and the private health sector. Lisa cannot wait to open again and see all her loyal customers, but until then you can still shop online at www.lisaslacies.com.au

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A pioneering approach to weight loss, which has helped transform the lives of nearly 9000 people across the globe, is celebrating its 10th birthday. The statistics are in, showing an average of 10kg weight loss per client globally. Mornington Peninsula-based hypnotherapist Gayle Dwyer has been using the program founded by Sheila Granger for nine years now and has worked with hundreds of clients. Many of Gayle’s clients have enjoyed a 20kg weight loss easily and naturally. “With virtual gastric band hypnotherapy, we are essentially convincing the brain that the stomach is full after a certain level of intake and that there is no need for

Issue 106, SEPTEMBER 2020

more food,” Gayle said. “You get to enjoy eating what you like. However, it enables you to eat smaller portions without the battles. It is not a diet. People don’t feel deprived, miserable or hungry – the key issues

health beauty fashion

Virtual gastric band hypnosis for weight loss proves a global success that cause so many diets and other programs to fail.” Gayle will tailor the sessions to your individual concerns, whether it be sugar cravings, comfort eating, or just eating too much out of habit. Gayle’s client Karina, who you may have seen featured in a previous issue, dropped two sizes – just short of 20kg – and two years on still she enjoys her success and finds it easy to stay on track. Hypnotherapy, EFT Tapping, and coaching are used online with great success. Call Gayle now to get $300 off your virtual gastric band weight loss program. TIME TO THRIVE M: 0414 714 644 W: www.timetothrive.net.au FB: TimetoThrivewithGayle INSTA: timetothrive_gayle

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health beauty fashion

Local flame in the hot seat

A simple recent re-run of an episode of Channel Nine’s Millionaire Hot Seat has seen the owner of Red Hill Candle Co., Ebony Flett, have her second taste of fame. When she was filmed in May 2019, Ebony’s nerves were at an all-time high, and having a laugh with show host Eddie McGuire was a surreal experience.

Used to feeling the heat, Ebony was quick at getting the answers out, yet candle-lovers were even quicker to jump on her website after Eddie spoke to Ebony about her Mornington Peninsula candle business and the flavour of the day – Champagne and Pomegranate. During their chat, Ebony told Eddie it was the most popular, which resulted in the scent in both candles and room sprays flying off the shelves. On deciding to audition for the show, Ebony recalls: “My brother had appeared on the show around three years earlier with some success, so my dad encouraged me to audition, suggesting my bubbly personality should get me through. It was just a day out of my life, and I had nothing to lose and everything to gain. Whilst I lost out on one question which I’ll never forget the answer to, at the end of the day it was well

worth the experience and great exposure for my little business.” While it’s been a short-lived double dose of five minutes of fame for Ebony, she is determined to

keep moving forward and working hard to grow her business – albeit without the extra million dollars in her pocket. KATE SEARS

Eyewear as individual as you are...

MainStreet EyeCare

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The domino effect – it’s not something you think of when you have a tooth removed. But the loss of a permanent tooth does have a follow-on effect. Teeth on either side of the newly made gap can lean into the empty space, and the movement creates spaces elsewhere that can trap food. Then food and plaque build-up in these areas can lead to cavity formation and gum disease. Additionally, the bone where the tooth was removed remodels and shrinks over time, which limits treatment options in the future. Having a tooth removed is sometimes unavoidable, but how and when you replace it is a choice you do have. You may think, “It’s a back tooth, it doesn’t matter”, and it might not matter for the appearance, but most likely it will be a concern for the overall function of the mouth. Humans have 32 teeth – including

wisdom teeth – that are purposedesigned. The back molars are flat for chewing and grinding food, while the front teeth are narrow and used for biting, speech and smiling. When the front teeth have to compensate for the missing back teeth, there is an overload. The fewer number of back teeth you have, the more load is put on the front teeth. Replacing a missing tooth might be the best option so you can stop the domino effect in its tracks. The prosthodontists at Bayside Dental Specialists can help your smile. BAYSIDE DENTAL SPECIALISTS A: 1022 Nepean Highway, Mornington A: 36 Chesterville Rd, Cheltenham T: 8256 9911 W: www.wakeupsmiling.dental FB: baysidedentalspecialists INSTA: baysidedentalspecialists

health beauty fashion

The truth behind the domino effect

Dr Philip Tan, from Bayside Dental Specialists.

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your SEPTEMBER STARS

Stephanie is an experienced Astrologer and regular contributor to

by Stephanie Johnson

Mornington Peninsula Magazine.

For more info go to seeingwithstars.net or ph: 0411 2555 77

Aries: Your ruling planet Mars is going Retrograde in

Leo: Money matters are highlighted for Leos in

Sagittarius: The focus is on your professional life.

Taurus: Children are the focus this month, either

Virgo: After a quiet period, you are now ready to

Capricorn: It’s time to look at the big picture. This can be a challenge in times of social distancing, lockdown and other limitations. Nevertheless, September sees you overlooking short-term setbacks and focusing on the long term. Use your imagination to expand your world. You may consider writing or publishing your own creative work.

your Zodiac Sign, indicating that it is time to complete unfinished business – anything connected to health, habits or your workday life. As an Aries you prefer forward movement, but you need to go back to something because the cycle is not complete.

your own or other people’s. It’s time to get creative, and taking notice of the youngsters around you is a good way to start. Your need for play is strong. If possible, take time out from your day job to rest and recreate.

Gemini: It’s time to put your home affairs in order.

Both the Sun and Mercury are in dutiful Virgo and the 4th House of your Solar Chart, calling forth your organisational abilities. Spontaneity is your usual modus operandi, but this month you need to knuckle down and attend to household matters.

Cancer: Upskill is your key word this month. What

does it mean? According to the Collins Dictionary: “To improve the aptitude for work of (a person) by additional training.” The key is that you need to improve your mind, and perhaps also your connections with those around you.

September. This is not your investments or joint finances, but rather your personal income. Of course, your financial investments may have changed, calling on you to revisit your personal budget. It’s time to reassess your own self-worth, both personal and financial.

express yourself more fully in one or more areas of your life. This can be anything from promoting yourself in the workplace to decorating your home in a way that expresses your own personality or pursuing activities that enhance your own health and happiness.

Libra: It’s so natural for you to inquire after other people, especially in this strange 2020 year. This month, however, requires you to indulge in some self-care. You need to withdraw. Rest, prayer, meditation, beauty treatments or an indulgent artistic project are all recommended to help you recharge your own energy.

Scorpio: Your ruling planet Mars is going Retrograde,

indicating that you are slowing down temporarily and reassessing how you expend your energy. Your focus may be on your primary relationship or relationship status. And it could be on your friendships. Your social calendar is likely to be full despite social distancing.

Perhaps you are reaping the benefits of past actions, or maybe you are planning ways to become more prominent in the future. Either way, it’s time to make sure that you are heading in the right direction in any public role.

Aquarius: Life is likely to trigger a change that prompts you to look at cycles. This could be something simple like your sleep cycles, or something deeper and more meaningful such as metaphysical matters. You are more attuned to profound matters, life and the universe rather than the minutiae.

Pisces: The focus is on your ‘one best friend’. This is the person closest to you. It could be a marital partner, a business collaborator, best friend, or perhaps a parent or child. Of course, you have many loved ones. This month, however, sees you engrossed with just one.

Stay safe & support local During COVID-19 we continue to showcase local business, their innovations and fabulous stories to keep us all busy and happy during COVID-19 conditions - in print, online and via social media. Tell our readers and followers what YOU are up to! #MornPenMagBizLove Call our friendly, professional team on 9708 8222

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The Carrum Downs Respiratory Clinic is urging people with even the mildest cold and flu symptoms to get tested for COVID-19. The clinic sees patients of all ages who are suffering from fever, cough, sore throat, tiredness/lethargy, runny nose, shortness of breath, loss of taste or smell, diarrhoea, nausea/ vomiting, headache, irritability/ confusion, muscular pain, chest pain, abdominal pain, joint pain, pneumonia or acute respiratory disease. “Please don’t dismiss even mild symptoms – get tested,” the clinic says. “The 5km restriction from home during Stage 4 lockdown does not apply when

attending the clinic for testing, nor does it apply when you need to see any health professional.” The Carrum Downs Medical Centre recommends that seeing your GP is still good for your health, and advises people to call their doctor if they’re feeling unwell. “We can offer both Telehealth and face-to-face consultations. You can still see your doctor for your usual care, and you can safely continue to have blood tests and other investigations as all these services have strict hygiene and social distancing measures in place. “It’s important to keep your usual medical appointments – don’t delay or avoid seeing your GP.” CARRUM DOWNS MEDICAL CENTRE CARRUM DOWNS RESPIRATORY CLINIC A: 113a Hall Rd, Carrum Downs A: 113b Hall Rd, Carrum Downs T: 9782 6666 T: 9782 6088

Creating beautiful smiles on the Peninsula for over 30 years Specialist orthodontic care for children, teens and adults. Highly experienced staff providing first class care, guidance and support to families and individuals on their orthodontic journey. Expertise in: braces, invisible braces, clear aligners, digital orthodontics, removable & fixed functional appliances No Referral Required - Interest free payment plans available! Enquire about your new smile today. 13 Beach St, Frankston 9783 4511 www.drpeterscottorthodontist.com.au Issue 106, SEPTEMBER 2020

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Feeling unwell? Then get tested for COVID-19


Peninsula Made clean green local . . .

Come on Peninsula, get cracking! FARM FREE RFRESH EGG ANGE WHOLSE AT ALE PRICES S!

Barn doo Monday r sales to 8am - 4 Friday :30 & Saturd pm 8am - 12 ays :30pm

BAGGED MANUR E $5

VILLE

EGG FARM LOCAL FOOD FOR LOCAL TABLES

5977 5405

220 Eramosa Rd West, Moorooduc Corner of Binnak Way E. admin@somervilleeggfarm.com.au

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Everything we love about the peninsula, fresh every month

Somerville Egg Farm has been supplying farm-fresh produce for more than 40 years, so it’s definitely got you covered for all of your egg needs. In light of the current COVID-19 restrictions, changes to the farm’s shopfront have been made and a request for customers to please respect social distancing – which is roughly three chickens of space between you and others. The Napolitano family produce and supply eggs to the retail and wholesale markets, and service not only the Mornington Peninsula community but also the greater Melbourne region. As an essential service and a primary producer, they’re still trading as normal – luckily because their girls are still laying. These freshly laid eggs are free from antibiotics and hormones. They’re carefully packed daily and available at the farmgate. Premium quality is what Somerville Egg Farm focuses on, which is evident through their happy ISA Brown chickens. The chickens produce barn-laid, freerange and cage eggs that come in a variety of packed sizes to cater for your needs. As it’s just around the corner, there’s no excuse to not love local and reap the

benefits of fresh produce for your iso-baking and proteinrich breakfasts. You can even pick up some duck eggs and pre-bagged chicken manure to fertilise your garden. You might even want to drop by when the staff are having a team meeting in the paddock with the chickens, alpacas, goats, emus and maremma dogs. Trading hours have remained the same so you can still visit this gorgeous family-run farm daily between 8am and 4.30pm. A contactless carpark service has been introduced where you can pull into the carpark and call 5977 5405 to have your goodies delivered straight to your car and complete your contactless payment. So mask up, sanitise, support local and stay safe, egg-lovers. KATE SEARS SOMERVILLE EGG FARM A: cnr Eramosa Road West and Binnak Way, Moorooduc T: 5977 5405 W: www.somervilleeggfarm.com.au FB: SomervilleEggFarm INSTA: somervilleeggfarm

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A CHAT WITH OUR FOOD, WINE AND DINING EXPERTS Adam Sanderson Ten Minutes by Tractor, 1333 Mornington-Flinders Rd, Main Ridge, Ph: 5989 2510 Your dishes look like delectable works of art. What’s your secret? I believe that a dish needs to look clean, alive and vibrant. Our producers do such an amazing job and the transition of their hard work all the way through to the guest is so important. I’m very often inspired by how things grow and look in their natural environment, so to get that across to the guest is also key. With current restrictions, what are you offering your customers? We have introduced The Art of Dining In, where customers can enjoy the Ten Minutes by Tractor dining experience in the comfort of their own home. Our home dining menu features the beautiful local produce that we look to champion at our restaurant and can be delivered contactless across the Mornington Peninsula. We’ve also got everything you need to bring the Ten Minutes by Tractor wine-tasting experience home to you. Each month, a member of our team is curating a selection of museum and new-release wines. The pack comes with specialised tasting materials, vineyard maps and food pairings. You can also visit our Instagram TV channel (IGTV) as we take you through each of the wines. We are also offering free delivery to our customers Australia-wide on all wines and tasting packs. If a customer asked you to suggest your favourite dish, what would it be? I’d have to say Mary’s Garden. Mary is one of our growers here on the Peninsula and someone that really opened my eyes up to such fresh, organically grown produce. We created a dish to resemble her garden, a walk around it, and the quality of just some of the amazing produce which Mary grows. The dish consists of roasted, smoked and whipped macadamia, fresh raw peas, broad beans, mixed radishes, flowers and fresh herbs dressed with brown butter and apple balsamic. Our grilled octopus with midnight blue potato and black garlic (pictured) on The Art of Dining In menu is also a favourite. The tender octopus juxtaposes perfectly against the pickled vegetables and black garlic. What’s your go-to trend to serve up that customers are loving? I don’t tend to really follow ‘trends’; however, I’m really driven by minimising waste, so using vegetable trim to make a tart case for a snack to sit in or using the whole bird in a duck dish or at least across our menu is a great challenge for myself and the team and something that our guests seem to really appreciate. Could you tell us a little about your industry experience? I started my career when I was 16 at The Marriott Hotel, Newcastle, England. Since then I’ve cooked through some of the best restaurants in Europe and the world, including Gary Rhodes in London, Heston Blumenthal’s The Fat Duck, Rene Redzepi’s Noma and Paul Cunningham’s The Paul. More recently here in Melbourne for Andrew McConnell at Cutler and Co. and Guillaume Brahimi at Bistro Guillaume before moving my family and me to the Mornington Peninsula. What’s your style in the kitchen and what do you love most about what you do? We have a beautiful open kitchen which faces into our dining room, and I love the occasion of a very busy service where you can look around at your team cooking well and enjoying what they do, then look out into the dining room and see people happy and fulfilled with great food and wine. KATE SEARS Issue 106, SEPTEMBER 2020

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FOOD WINE PRODUCE

food wine produce


FOOD WINE PRODUCE

Woodman Estate delivers luxury dining at home Woodman Estate’s award-winning dining is now available to enjoy at home. In a time when we are unable to dine out, this is the perfect way to bring a luxury dining experience home with you and savour all the classic traditions with a modern twist. For a truly luxurious treat for two, there’s Woodman Estate’s Signature High Tea at Home, including preserves, finger sandwiches, scones and estate-made wine. Beautifully packaged, it also comes with a signature three-tier cake stand to add that little touch of elegance to your high tea experience. If you’re thinking about a romantic dinner for two, the classically modern premium heat-to-eat Dinner at Home comes as a complete three-course meal. The exceptional slow-cooked Gippsland lamb shoulder is melt-in-yourmouth succulent. Combined with estate-made cauliflower soup, bread, roast veg, apple and rhubarb filo pies and a bottle of Woodman Estate Pinot Noir, it’s ideal for any special occasion. For those who might prefer a grazing platter, the Farmer’s Produce Feast definitely won’t disappoint. Generous amounts of cured meats, salads, soup, bread, artisan cheeses and country pie are all perfectly complemented by Woodman Estate Fine Foods condiments and a bottle of Woodman Estate Pinot Noir. This premium heat-to-eat experience is the ultimate celebration of gourmet food. With pick-up locations in Moorooduc and Highett and delivery also available, order 48 hours in advance either online or by calling the Woodman Estate team on 5978 8455.

Natural Spring Water Peninsula Springs is a local, family owned and operated Natural Spring Water business, serving the Mornington Peninsula and Bayside Regions. We pride ourselves on providing great service and great tasting Natural Spring Water to our clients. Delivered Free to your door. Indulge in the taste of Peninsula Springs Natural Spring Water in 15 litre or 600ml size bottles.

For more information ring Peninsula Springs on 0413 996 317 or check the website at www.peninsulasprings.com.au

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As the saying goes: “When life gives you lemons, you make lemonade.” Calling 2020 a lemon of a year would be a bit of an understatement, but the ability to dig out some of the region’s top springtime wines does make for one killer lemonade. It’s a fantastic time to enjoy the sun and a bayside breeze while coping with the challenges of our COVID lockdown. Here are some wines to help you along to quench your springtime thirst – like any great homemade lemonade.

Issue 106, SEPTEMBER 2020

Dexter Chardonnay 2018 $42 Looking for oyster shells and crisp citrus refreshment? Well, few can do it better or even know the rolling landscapes of the Peninsula better than Tod Dexter. With stints at Yabby Lake and Stonier and now making wine under this personal label, Dexter has mastered chardonnay and pinot noir. Pound for pound it’s hard to find a better chardonnay in the country, let along down on the ‘ninch.

Kent Farm Pinot Noir 2019 $34 Owned and farmed by Steven Spargo high on the Red Hill ridge, it also gets a helping hand from Lazarus himself: David Lloyd of Eldridge. It’s brilliantly elegant, drinkable, and silky in texture, all thanks to its impeccable

vineyard and winemaking pedigree. Just 751 bottles made, this is a nice little drop for your springtime platters.

Rahona Valley Gewürztraminer 2018 $30 This wine picked up the Best Alternate Variety Trophy at the wine show and it’s probably my pick of the entire Rahona range – although the sparkling wines are all excellent. It’s a total delight with fresh zest and true to its variety – honeyed spice and fresh lychee with some local ripe lime. It’s always a fun match to Asian cuisine, being luscious and textured, and gets very hard to say the more you drink.

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FOOD WINE PRODUCE

By Tom Portet T: 0490 145 144 E: tom@rhwinecollective.com.au www.rhwinecollective.com.au


FOOD WINE PRODUCE

The majority of us praise coffee every morning, and perhaps celebrate it every afternoon when that infamous 3pm slump hits. While caffeine can come in many forms, this feature celebrates International Coffee Day on Thursday, October 1. Every year on this day, the world comes together to celebrate and recognise farmers, roasters, baristas, coffee shop owners and at-home amateur coffee baristas. It’s on this day that you could probably get away with an extra shot of coffee or an additional cup of joe to celebrate in the name of coffee. As for the phrase “cup of joe”, its origin is uncertain. The first theory is that in 1914 Josephus Daniels, who was a Secretary of the Navy, banned US Navy ships from serving alcohol. As a result of this ban, the sailors began to drink more coffee. As Daniels was accountable for the ban, he therefore became partly to blame for the increased intake of coffee. The sailors then nicknamed the drink after him – Joe being short for Josephus. Another more plausible theory is that the word ‘joe’ can often mean ‘an ordinary man’, as in the term ‘an average joe’. It’s a term that is used to describe someone who is thought to be an everyday, ordinary kind of person. Therefore, by nicknaming coffee as a ‘cup of joe’, it indicates that it’s a drink for the average person or the common man. However, in our somewhat biased opinion, our Peninsula-made coffee and blends are far from average – they’re cool beans. This year we’re celebrating the entire coffee ecosystem and the connections that coffee allows us to make around the world and within our community. It goes without saying that coffee means so many things to so many people. It is energy, celebration, livelihood, friendship, joy and so much more. Local baristas, coffee suppliers, roasters, brewhouses, wholesalers, coffee shops and cafes have joined us this month to ‘espresso’ their love. So why not order some beans online to make your favourite coffee at home? Or stop by your local café that uses your beloved coffee blend and order your coffee hit while maintaining social distancing, and take your brew to go. Join us on October 1 for a cup of coffee – after all, it’s a ‘brewtiful’ day! KATE SEARS

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FOOD WINE PRODUCE

Believe it. You will be sitting with friends at one of your favourite local restaurants in the near future. You will be raising a glass while enjoying fresh local produce. You will be sampling some of Australia’s finest seafood, which you know has been caught just around the corner.

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How will you know where your seafood has come from? Because hopefully by then all food service seafood will have a ‘country of origin’ label, just like the food you buy from the supermarket. Seafood Industry Australia chief executive Veronica Papacosta says: “Seventy per cent of the seafood eaten in Australia is imported, and the majority of this consumption is in the food service sector. Many people do not realise this. Consumers assume their iconic seafood meals are made using iconic Australian seafood. However, we know this is often not the case.” The Australian seafood industry has repeatedly appealed to the Federal Government to make country of origin labelling in food service fixed. Ms Papacosta continues: “Consistently, Australians have said they want Australia seafood labelled in food service. More than 86,000 consumers have signed petitions asking for it, and two Senate inquiries have called for it.” As the Government begins an evaluation of legislation that came into effect two years ago, SIA is calling for consumers to support the expansion of the current Country of Origin Labelling (CoOL) laws to include seafood sold in food service. Ms Papacosta continues: “Now, for a fourth and hopefully last time, we need as many people as possible to express their support for the labelling to be expanded to cover seafood sold in food service. It’s been demonstrated that the current voluntary labelling system does not work. The change to mandatory, legislated labelling is wanted by consumers and is inevitable. We strongly urge the Government to take action this time.” George Koklas, who is the owner of The Peninsula Fish Co, says: “Restaurants use imported fish because it is available all year round and is usually more cost-effective, but customers should have the choice whether they buy Australian seafood or not. They have the right to know where it comes from.” What do you think? Fishing for an answer to where your flathead or prawns come from? Then take a squiz at the discussion paper and survey at consult.industry.gov.au, which can be viewed until September 11. LIZ ROGERS

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Taste the delights of Greater Dandenong

Discover the vibrancy and diversity of Greater Dandenong and enjoy the region’s rich array of culinary delights on one of the city’s acclaimed food tours. Join other food lovers for an authentic celebration of food and culture in one of Melbourne’s most celebrated and thriving food heartlands. A visit to the City of Greater Dandenong allows you to travel the world without the need for a passport. Now officially recognised as Australia’s most culturally diverse community, Greater Dandenong provides a rich tapestry of cultural experiences that will awaken the senses and leave you

wanting more. The perfect way to get your first taste of the city is on a Food Lovers or Cultural Tour. Explore Afghani culture in Dandenong’s Afghan Bazaar precinct or travel to South-East Asia in Springvale. Greater Dandenong’s celebrated twohour tours provide generous samplings of a rich array of cuisines and conclude with a delicious meal. Book one of the scheduled tours today or contact the City of Greater Dandenong to tailor one for a group of your closest family and friends. Go to greaterdandenong.com/tours or phone 8571 1666 and discover Greater Dandenong on a plate.

Greater Dandenong Tours

Have an authentic cultural experience without your passport!

Dumpli n a n d Dessert gs s

n a h g f A aar Baz

Be introduced to the wonderful Afghan business community learning how traditional Afghan bread is made, visiting a traditional homewares shop, supermarkets and finishing with an Afghan banquet. Guarantee you won’t walk away hungry!

Who doesn’t like dumplings and desserts and on this tour you can indulge in both. You will be treated to a variety of dumplings along the way and finish with fabulous desserts.

Do you have a group of friends or colleagues and can’t make one of the scheduled dates? Did you know that we can organise group bookings for 8–16 people available upon request. For more information and bookings visit greaterdandenong.com/tours 8571 1666 or phone 8571 1377


Property Home Garden

property home garden Lady tradie making waves on the Peninsula SG Coatings is owned and operated by house painter Sophie Grover, with 17 years’ and female painters who pride themselves on their experience in the industry. Based in Frankston, Sophie is quickly becoming known as “the workmanship and the delivery of beautiful residential female house painter on the Mornington Peninsula”. The business is made up of both male and commercial painting projects. Their recently completed project was at the Mt Martha Life Saving Club. The new club was completely rebuilt in 2015 and hadn’t received any painting work since then, so it was in much need of maintenance – especially because there is a large amount of exterior oiled timber that requires regular attention. Sophie and her team got stuck into recoating all of the timber with the same product that was previously used. It’s now got its sparkle back, thanks to SG Coatings. “My team is strongest with a balance of skill sets and personalities, whether that be male or female,” said Sophie. “Each of us bring different strengths to the job, and we all work hard to deliver a premium solution for our customers together.” Sophie manages and oversees each and every painting project at SG Coatings. She is often complimented on her punctuality, attention to detail, friendly service and cleanliness, and often associates her reputation to running the trade business as a successful woman. Plus, did you know that women can see more colours than men. Due to the level of testosterone receptors in the visual cortex of men, women have the upper hand when it comes to visual perception of colours. By engaging a woman painter, your colour consultation may be slightly more accurate, resulting in exactly what you had envisioned. Contact SG Coatings for an obligation-free painting quote or colour consultation across the Mornington Peninsula and the Bayside region. SG COATINGS M: 0468 390 058 W: www.sg-coatings.com E: sophie@sg-coatings.com

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It may not be the perfect scenario to be locked down on beautiful spring days, but it does give us extra time to get our edible gardens really going. Spring generally comes around pretty quickly most years, and we can find ourselves scrambling to prepare our vegetable beds to be planted. Things are a little more chilled though this year – for obvious reasons. And for those of us who enjoy getting out in the garden, this is blissful. Hopefully this more homely time has given you the opportunity to tick more gardening boxes than usual, and that you are super-prepared for planting your warm-season crops over the next month or so. You may have also had time this year to give your fruit trees the timely prune and feed they deserve. Too often these generous producers are left to fend for themselves and become overgrown, diseased and generally neglected. If it’s only once a year or every second year, your trees will overwhelmingly return the favour. We can grow a wide range of fruit trees successfully here on the Peninsula; stone-fruit, apples and pears, avocados,

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berries and figs can all thrive given the right care. Some thrive with minimal attention. However, the more time you put into your garden, the more you will get out both in quantity and quality. Now that the soil is warming after a pretty chilled winter, all that preparation you have been doing during COVID will have you ready to begin planting your vegetable seedlings. If you’ve been otherwise occupied during this fantastic gardening holiday and haven’t yet got to your garden prep, it’s not too late. Get your beds ready, though, as you’ll want to begin planting out in the next four to six weeks. If you haven’t already raised seedlings during the past month, there’s still time to do this also. Again, it’s probably worth getting on to it soon, otherwise it’ll require a trip to the local nursery to purchase seedlings. Tomato, eggplant, zucchini, cucumber, pumpkin and melons can all be sown in seed-raising trays now, along with corn, beans, leafy greens and salad veg. If you’d prefer, you can sow your bigger seeded veg directly into your beds. Be sure to mark them clearly and make a note of what date you sowed your seed. Now, you may be forgiven for thinking with all this lovely rain that your vegetable gardens and fruit trees are going to be fine without supplementary water. Well, probably

not. In particular in our ‘open’ coastal soils, the amount of growth, vibrancy and nutrition that irrigated crops exhibit well exceeds those that are not irrigated during the warm season. Even during winter, if it hasn’t rained and your vegetables don’t get a drink for a week, there is a marked diminishing of growth compared to their wellwatered neighbours. So if you do not have an irrigation system for your edible crops, it is highly recommended that you consider providing your gardens with the security of automated watering when required.

HAPPY GARDENING!

Drew Cooper, Edible Gardens www.ediblegardens.com.au

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Property Home Garden

Sleeping beauty gets a spring in her step With spring cleaning likely to have been completed during the first COVID-19 lockdown, why not use this second one to invest not only in your home but also your health by achieving that quality sleep you’ve been dreaming of. The Sandringham team at Makin Mattresses will make that dream a reality with a bed that’s just perfect for you. You and your body will know the difference when you experience their comfy-plus mattresses – we promise you’ll notice a spring in your step. Issue 106, SEPTEMBER 2020

Makin Mattresses is the only bedding manufacturer in Australia to have a micro coil machine that maximises mattress airflow to reduce heat and increase hygiene. This feature is essential not only for your body temperature but also the health of your mattress because sweat causes foam to degrade and flatten over time – so imagine how your current mattress is faring. We dare you to strip off that mattress protector and examine it closely. Makin Mattresses’ complete range of mattresses are double-sided, handcrafted and actually designed to be flipped and rotated. This practice is key to doubling the life of your mattress and ensuring an even sleeping surface.

For more than 40 years, Makin Mattresses has been Australia’s largest independent mattress manufacturer. With 10 stores Australia-wide and six manufacturing sites, Makin Mattresses has a range of mattresses to suit everyone. KATE SEARS MAKIN MATTRESSES A: 189 Bay Rd, Sandringham T: 9533 1113 W: www.makinmattresses.com.au FB: MakinmattressesAu

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Property Home Garden

Inspired by a warm, earthy and organic lifestyle, OZ Design Furniture’s new look this season is a real trend. Earthy and Organic creates a sense of relaxation, and offers a space inspired by both unique design and intriguing texture. Think farm-fresh produce and freshly pressed coffee, served within an earthy colour palette. Rattan is featured, along with dried florals and mango wood timber. It’s a look that’s been inspired by the laid-back lifestyle in Byron Bay. Shop new-season styles such as the Porter curved cabinet, a hero piece that’s practical and statement style this spring. Look for coffee tables, side tables and décor pieces that are organic in shape and textured in style. Adventure awaits. Destination home this spring with OZ Design Furniture Mornington. OZ DESIGN FURNITURE MORNINGTON A: Showroom D4, Peninsula Home, 1128-1132 Nepean Highway, Mornington T: 8560 1137 W: www.ozdesignfurniture.com.au FB: OZDesignFurniture INSTA: ozdesignfurniture

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Create a versatile outdoor room with ease at your home

Would you like to use your alfresco area all year round regardless of the cold and rain? With custom-made Ziptrak® blinds from Camerons Blinds & Awnings, you can. As Melbourne’s premier manufacturer and retailer of the award-winning Ziptrak® blind system, Camerons Blinds & Awnings can create a new indoor-outdoor room that’s perfect for spending quality time at home with your family no matter what the weather.

Also ideal for cafés, restaurants and pubs, made-to-measure Ziptrak® blinds are made in your choice of high-quality clear PVC or hi-tech mesh PVC that can block either 98 per cent of the sun and rain or even 100 per cent to make a private, weatherproof area. Offering protection from UV rays, sun, glare, wind and rain, you will be covered for every season with Ziptrak®. With a simple central lock mechanism, Ziptrak® blinds glide up and down with ease, stopping at any point you wish. Motorised blinds are operated with the touch of a button on your remote control or via Google Home or Amazon Alexa. Camerons Blinds & Awnings will offer all the advice and solutions required to turn your outdoor area into another room. You can choose from a huge range of colours and transparencies to control the elements and retain your view with their magnificent sunscreen mesh fabrics or marine-grade clear or tinted PVC. If you would like to try Camerons Blinds & Awnings’ Ziptrak® range, along with their huge range of awnings, blinds, canopies, shades and shutters, their showroom re-opens following stay at home restrictions on Monday, September 14, so you can visit them in Carrum Downs from 9am-5pm Monday

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to Friday. The team at Camerons Blinds & Awnings can also take your call if you would like to arrange a COVID-19 safe, no-obligation, free measure and quote for your home or business.

CAMERONS BLINDS & AWNINGS A: 3/700 Frankston-Dandenong Rd, Carrum Downs T: free call 1800 GOOD AWNING (1800 8787 7900) W: cameronsblinds.com.au

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Order your shutters now for pre-Christmas installation Now is the time to order your plantation shutters to ensure you have them installed before the pre-Christmas rush and the fastapproaching festive season. Dollar Curtains + Blinds shutters are an ideal choice for thermal insulation, which is a must coming into the warm summer months. Open the louvres to stream light into rooms and close to insulate, offering you a more energyefficient home through summer. Their PVC shutters have the added benefits of being UV, water and moisture-resistant, making them ideal for all high-use areas and wet areas such as kitchens, bathrooms and laundries. Extremely practical, you will have excellent control of light and airflow and also peace of mind with no cords making their shutters child and pet-safe. Adding shutters across your home’s front windows can also make a huge impact to your home’s façade and kerb appeal. Along with these aesthetic benefits, shutters also add sound insulation from outside road and traffic noise – a must if you’re now working from home or find yourself being woken up early. Dollar Curtains + Blinds has specialised in manufacturing custom window coverings for more than 53 years. Ensure

Refresh your

BATHROOM!! SERVICES INCLUDE: Leaking shower specialist

you opt for true custom-made shutters like those from DC+B, which are designed and handcrafted specifically to fit your window dimensions for a high-quality, durable shutter that will last for many years to come. DC+B can arrange your quote remotely. If you’re building a new home, DC+B can also assist you with free quotes off house plans. Contact their Mornington or Moorabbin teams today.

WE CLEAN OVENS

Indoor & outdoor tile cleaning & sealing Pre-sale makeovers Mouldy showers re-grouted Silicone seals replaced Damaged tiles replaced Cracked acrylic shower bases & Bathtubs repaired Find us on Facebook: Bayside-GROUT-Solutions

Jorg Melzer | Owner Operator 0424 843 358 | melzer1@bigpond.com

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Oven Cleaning & Detailing Service Completely safe, Biodegradable & Caustic free

1300 683 681

DC+B MORNINGTON A: Peninsula Home, Shop C4, 1128-1132 Nepean Highway, Mornington T: 5975 3655 E: mornington@dollarcurtains.com.au DC+B MOORABBIN AIRPORT A: Store 15, Kingston Central Plaza, 288 Centre Dandenong Rd, Moorabbin Airport T: 9566 8200 E: moorabbin@dollarcurtains.com.au

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Protecting the Peninsula as our population grows Mornington Peninsula Shire Council has adopted a strategy to deal with housing and population growth over the next 16 years. With the State Government projecting the Peninsula’s population to reach 200,360 by 2036 – a rise of more than 38,800 from 2016 – the Mornington Peninsula

Housing and Settlement Strategy: Refresh 2020-2036 outlines how this growth will be accommodated while ensuring the special values and character of the Peninsula are protected. The council has also resolved to begin amending planning controls to ensure development better respects the Peninsula’s valued neighbourhood character and to make it easier to build a new home or extend an existing one. “We have a significant role in managing the demand for housing and population growth on the Peninsula as well as ensuring the unique characteristics of the Peninsula are safeguarded,” said Mayor Sam Hearn. “However, our role is to also make sure our residents have the ability to stay in the townships they love for longer. As such, we’ve worked to improve the process of building or extending on the Peninsula to make it more streamlined for residents.” Planning services committee chairwoman Antonella Celi said the council would next seek authorisation from Planning Minister Richard Wynne to prepare a planning scheme amendment to formally introduce the proposed changes into the planning scheme. “A key part of this will be engagement with the community to ensure the proposed changes are understood by the community and enable the community to have their say,” Cr Celi said.

PICTURED: The Peninsula’s population is expected to reach 200,360 by 2036, prompting the adoption of a strategy to help deal with the effects of that growth. Photo by Steve Brown

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For your commercial plant needs there’s only one place – TJ’S Wholesale Plants. The wholesale nursery is based in Somerville on acreage. They specialise in supplying large quantity orders to their diverse range of clients. This client list consists of the likes of builders, developers, landscapers, housing estates, councils, commercial builders, as well as primary and secondary schools.

Ph: 8787 7865

Email: tjswholesaleplants@sandhurst.net.au

Their plants are competitively priced and hand-selected by highly experienced nursery staff. TJ’S variety of plants include natives, shrubs, ground covers, grasses, landscape lines, screening and hedging plants such as pittosporums, conifers and also ornamental trees. As specialists in the field, they work on large planting schedules and also supply plants at different levels of maturity. This family-owned business of 19 years boasts the ability to pull together an order quickly if needed, while they can also complete contract grown orders. Just speak to owners Troy or Kylie Jenkin via email or phone, or submit a website inquiry. KATE SEARS TJ’S WHOLESALE PLANTS: A: 59 Dandenong Hastings Rd, Somerville T: 8787 7865 W: www.tjswholesaleplants.com.au E: tjswholesaleplants2@bigpond.com FB: TJWholesalePlants INSTA: tjs_wholesale_plants

Summer flooring just got abstract with new watercolour designs from Atrafloor. Terrazzo has been a huge flooring trend for a while, but now there’s a new trend on the block – abstract watercolours – just in time for summer. Painting with watercolours is popular as a creative pastime associated with mindfulness, and Atrafloor’s collection certainly sparks feelings of calm with a summery palette of blues, yellows, reds and pinks in raw brush strokes, speckles and circles. Vinyl flooring is popular in bathrooms, where Issue 106, SEPTEMBER 2020

you can be bolder with decor choices and where using patterns and colour feels less daunting. The abstract watercolour collection is perfect for this environment, with its relaxing, mellow palette. Collection designer Jess Howard says: “The new abstract watercolour designs are a playful approach to flooring, using watercolour brush marks to create fun designs in a sophisticated, soft, primary colour-inspired palette.” Check out the designs at www.atrafloor.com/ vinyl-flooring/pattern-vinyl-flooring/ www.morningtonpeninsulamagazine.com.au

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Leave it to the professionals


TRADES TO YOU

trades to you Ads from $100 per month

your guide to local tradespeople

They’ve locked in a new security showroom for the Mornington Peninsula The professional team at Locksmith & Security Services in Mornington are still on a high after their smart new showroom was launched just six months ago. And as it’s the Mornington Peninsula’s first purpose-built complete security centre, we can’t help but be excited for them. Step inside to explore the extensive range of locks and door hardware, safes, security doors, CCTV systems and alarms, to name a few. As an essential service, they are able to provide an emergency service to secure your world, therefore their service centres and showrooms are open and following a strict COVID-19 safe plan. Your security is their business, whether you require their professional services for your home, commercial property or business. Plus, the locally owned and operated company has more than 40 years’ experience in the industry. It all began as Frankston Locksmiths in 1994, with this original branch still CONTINUES NEXT PAGE

Fire Pits & Chimineas by SLOT ME IN

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TRADES TO YOU

operating. For more than 25 years they’ve been providing our community with high-end security, including commercial and government work. They specialise in all aspects of physical and electronic security, including locks, automotive locks and keys, restricted master key systems, security screens, Wi-Fi integrated security, Bluetooth integrated security,

removable and fixed bollards, fire and cash-rated safes, CCTV, heavy duty external access point locking bars, alarms and electronic locking. They even stock a large range of builders’ hardware. With a fleet of eight service vehicles, they offer onsite service for the entire Mornington Peninsula and greater Melbourne. Furthermore, all staff are fully qualified and security licensed. They’re also members of the Australian Security Industry Association Limited and business members of the Master Locksmiths Association of Australasia. Whether you’ve got an urgent security issue or a necessary upgrade, call 1300 562 573 or visit their complete security showroom where their knowledgeable team can assist you with all of your lock and security needs. KATE SEARS LOCKSMITH & SECURITY SERVICES A: Unit 2, 3 Elite Way, Mornington A: Unit 1, 4 Rosella St, Frankston T: 1300 562 573 W: www.locksmithservices.com.au FB: Locksmith Services Pty Ltd

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Promoting a clean, green peninsula

Protect Earth’s biodiversity as if your life depended on it It’s time to focus on biodiversity. Biodiversity Month is held every September and it aims to promote the importance of protecting, conserving and improving biodiversity both within Australia and across the world. But what is biodiversity? Biodiversity has been described as the ‘web of life’ and ‘the different plants, animals and micro-organisms, their genes and ecosystems’. Or simply, ‘the variety of living things’. In fact, biodiversity encompasses every living thing on our planet and the environment in which they live, from the majestic blue whale to the smallest microbe; from the highest mountain peak to the deepest ocean trench. Thus, biodiversity forms part of an intricate and interdependent web of life of which we are all part. We depend on our planet’s biodiversity for our health, well-being, enjoyment of life, and sustenance. We derive all of our food and a majority of our medicines

Photo by Kate Sears

and industrial products from the domesticated and wild components of our biological diversity. It’s also a base for our tourism, recreation and of course our clean water. So it begs the question: what can we do at home and within our communities to help protect our local area and Australia’s precious biodiversity? For a start, you can create a natural habitat in your backyard by using plants that are native to your region to establish a sanctuary for local wildlife and birds. While you’re at it, get rid of weeds before they jump your fence and head into nearby bushland. Being a responsible pet owner is also key. Make sure to not release your pet into the wild if you can no longer keep it. This includes not releasing your fish into local streams or flushing them. Domestic cats can have a devastating effect on local wildlife, so owners should make sure their cat is desexed and either kept indoors or in an outdoor cat run. And, of course, remember those important three Rs: reduce, reuse and recycle. Perhaps look at how you could

reduce the amount of rubbish you create and which inevitably ends up in landfill and our precious waterways. In addition, many recyclable items that don’t go in your standard recycling bin, such as electrical goods, batteries and soft plastics, can be dropped off at special collection points. While you’re examining your waste, look into starting a compost bin. In terms of kitchen waste, make a point to only put water down the drain. Products such as oils and chemicals may leave your life via the kitchen sink, but they end up in our waterways. Natural cleaning products can be the easy switch. While we’re focusing on the kitchen, make an effort to be an informed seafood eater and don’t consume threatened species. And speaking of fish, whether you’re an avid angler or a novice, make a note to take your discarded fishing gear or other rubbish home with you. It starts with us. KATE SEARS

COMMITTED TO A CLEAN GREEN PENINSULA Choose the peninsula’s longest running, largest circulation glossy To get your message to our readers call 9708 8222

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All material published is copyright to Morn Pen Mag Pty Ltd ACN 621 041 512 www.morningtonpeninsulamagazine.com.au

Profile for Mornington Peninsula Magazine

Mornington Peninsula Magazine SEPTEMBER 2020  

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