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Innovation gold continues to grow o Now here’s something exciting. As the hospitality and tourism industries re-emerge from the ‘viral’ ashes, our very own Mornington Peninsula Vignerons Association has also risen to new heights with a forward-thinking rebrand that aims to expand our region’s winemaking capabilities. With a new name and brand mark, the former MPVA is keen to build on the core principles and values that have seen this dedicated group of grape-growers and exceptional winemakers deliver stellar product since its formation in 1982. Chief executive officer Olivia Barrie explains: “COVID-19 has given us an opportunity to think about things differently, like everyone else, and to start the re-build with a fresh approach. In a process which started over six months ago, we feel now is the ideal time to roll out our new branding. This was developed through a lengthy process of briefing, workshopping and rigorous debate. We’ve done a lot of research and the feedback from our members and our ever-expanding community has been

Produce Market Produce Only Only Market thethe full market backwhen when further full marketwill will be be back further Covid areeased eased Covidrestrictions restrictions are follow @mainstreetmarketmornington follow usus@mainstreetmarketmornington for updates updates for mainstreetmornington.com.au mainstreetmornington.com.au

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on Peninsula vines overwhelmingly positive. “We’ve begun promoting the new brand – Mornington Peninsula Wine – on our social channels and website, which is designed to encourage users to explore this incomparable region. It is imperative that we look outwardly and not only continue to provide Mornington Peninsula residents and businesses with premium wines but look farther afield both domestically and internationally. After 38 years of providing loyal and dedicated support to this outstanding winemaking community, we feel passionately about having a unique opportunity to share the stories of the region directly to wine lovers of all ages, backgrounds and

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locations.” We all know the past few months have been incredibly difficult for businesses across the region, and our wonderful wineries have felt the weight of closure just like everyone else. The absence of wine glasses clinking over robust conversation and the sampling of delicious locally grown produce has left its fiscal and socially barren mark on an industry that traditionally survives and thrives on its connection with the public. For what is wine and food if there is no one to drink or eat it? From vine to vine across our undulating green land, Mornington Peninsula grapegrowers and winemakers have continued

to work hard at fine-tuning their craft to deliver exceptional quality to the market by thinking outside the box during this time of enforced adaptation. The muchanticipated annual Winter Wine Weekend was postponed last month, although many wineries swung open their cellar doors for tastings over the long weekend – albeit with safety-first restrictions. Olivia continues: “Even though we weren’t able to celebrate our wines as we usually do, some of our wineries opened earlier in the week before the Queen’s Birthday and others on the weekend itself. We spent a lot of time getting our booking systems right and coaching people on how the whole process would work. Patrons were incredibly patient and well-behaved. Wineries offered timeslots whereby people would come in, taste, and carry on their visit of the region. Around 25 opened, which is half of the wineries in the region, and the result was consistently good across the board.

“Of course, there have been a lot of people in the industry who have been stood down as a result of COVID-19 as well, although the Government’s JobKeeper stimulus package has thrown a lifeline to many. MP Wine’s chair of the technical committee, Tyson Lewis, also organised a skills retraining program for staff who had lost their positions. Yes, many of our usual sales channels have been shut down due to COVID-19, but our focus now has to be on building the Mornington Peninsula’s reputation as Australia’s benchmark for pinot noir with a focus also on chardonnay, pinot gris and shiraz while ensuring the sustainability of our business and environment for the future. Our Mornington Peninsula Wine brand evolution is part of that. It’s time to move forward.” Cheers to that. And while you’re raising your glass, remember the new name. You’ll be seeing it everywhere. LIZ ROGERS

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CLEAN GREEN

Photos by Celeste de Vis

What Western Port means to family Celeste de Vis lives in an idyllic part of the world where weedy sea dragons, humpback whales, Australian fur seals, soldier crabs and multiple varieties of birdlife currently go about their business as if the world has stopped turning. Time moves slow here as the beauty of nature ebbs and flows. This single mother, who pulls on her gumboots every day to explore the rockpools with her 14-year-old daughter Charlotte or with any one of the foster children she takes care of, is worried. Worried about what is going on down Point Rd. Worried about how her neck of the woods will change if Western Port Bay is turned into a gas import terminal. Celeste explains: “We’ve been living in Crib Point since 2013 and moved to the area because of how beautiful ( 6 Everything we love about the peninsula, fresh every month

it is. My daughter has ASD and many of the kids I foster have disabilities or extra needs and respond well to the natural environment. They love it here. Western Port Bay is currently a wetland sanctuary. The depth of marine life along Woolley’s Beach Reserve to Golden Point Beach is wide and varied. Did you know that you get a view of everything that lives under the sea line once the tide is out? The whole soldier crab population is exposed. Many of the beaches here are relatively untouched and nature is thriving. You see sea snails, shrimp, sea stars and flatworms, and the stretch of sand I call Shelley Beach has a football field length of shells which would be at least 30cm deep.” She continues: “My daughter does really well in this environment. We identify a creature on the beach and then go home and research it. It is an incredible area for learning in the field. We chose to settle here for mental health and well-being reasons. That’s why I became part of the Save Westernport community-led group in 2016 which is against AGL’s plan to build one of Australia’s biggest gas import terminals at Crib Point. That would

mean huge liquefied natural gas tankers travelling through a narrow entrance to dock at a permanent floating storage and regasification unit.” AGL’s plans to develop the gas import terminal has got locals on the Western Port side riled up. There are concerns regarding noise, light and chemical pollution, not to mention the disruption to marine life. And that’s just the beginning. “The wetlands are really important environmentally and culturally.” After all, we are on Bunurong/Boon Wurrung Country here, people. “If AGL’s plan goes ahead, we would have to move out of the area, which would be heartbreaking. There are so many different species within the area and multiple worlds within a rock pool that could be affected,” concludes Celeste. Food for thought. Nearly 5000 people so far have pledged to boycott AGL should it go ahead with its gas import terminal plans. To find out more about Save Westernport, log on to www. savewesternport.org LIZ ROGERS

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Councils, MPs and community unite to fix region’s public transport We continue our coverage of the long-running proposal to extend the Frankston electric rail line to Langwarrin and the Mornington Peninsula. The proposed Frankston train line extension has been listed as one of Victoria’s six key nation-building projects by Infrastructure Australia. The independent organisation listed improving public transport to and through Frankston as a national infrastructure priority earlier this year – one of the top 200 projects in the nation – and then asked a local advisory committee to recommend a plan.

For 10 weeks the committee of Frankston and Mornington Peninsula people has been meeting online to consider 23 big ideas around the extension that will vastly improve public transport in the region and revitalise the economy, now even more important after coronavirus shutdowns. Its report recommends reworking the region’s entire public transport network around an extended rail backbone, supported by projects to improve car-to-train, bus-to-train, and pedestrian/cycle path-to-train connections. Frequent, safe and reliable public transport will, for example, enable commuters to more easily connect with trains to Melbourne. Young people will be more independent of their parents. The elderly will also benefit. The advisory committee has recommended to Infrastructure Australia that the region needs a dual-track rail extension from Frankston to Langwarrin at a minimum. It will be part of an integrated bus and train system, with cars also playing a part. The extension would have stations at Monash University’s Peninsula campus in Frankston and at Langwarrin. A second option is extending the track a bit further to Baxter. The advisory committee drew in experts and policy-makers in public transport from the region’s two councils as well as local politicians, business people and tertiary education leaders. Led by Committee for Greater Frankston, members included Liberal and Labor MPs, local council transport department heads, representatives of Monash’s Peninsula campus and Chisholm’s Frankston TAFE, and business and community group leaders. There was broad agreement that Frankston and Mornington Peninsula bus networks needed to be vastly improved to boost usage. However, more buses alone was not the answer. Committee for Greater Frankston chief executive Ginevra Hosking said two priority options called for a “minimum 15-minute train service”. “Both options allow a 15-minute service, a new Leawarra-Monash campus station for the growing Frankston health and education precinct (with estimated patronage making it the 15th busiest suburban station), and moving the main commuter parking outside Frankston’s CBD, freeing up the city centre for other users,” she said. Other recommendations include commuter park and ride facilities at Langwarrin and other stations, more express trains, better pedestrian/cycling paths, and improving roads near new and existing stations. There would be 2000-plus commuter car spaces for travellers from the Peninsula. First proposed in 1929, the extension has an initial budgeted federal commitment of $225 million, but the State Government has yet to financially support or commit to its construction. “Almost a century is too long to wait for any project,” said advisory committee chairwoman Christine Richards. “It’s time to extend the line, build the missing station carparks, fill the trains and run them fast to get public transport usage across the region back on track.” The full report is on the Committee for Greater Frankston’s website at www.c4gf. com.au Mike Hast is a freelance writer for the Committee for Greater Frankston and a former editor of Peninsula newspapers. The electrified and double-track rail extension to Langwarrin and Baxter would be built on the Stony Point line, currently an infrequent diesel service. Map courtesy Victorian Department of Transport

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Twin musos provide double the delight on The Voice Yes, you are seeing double – our May issue also featured an article about the talented twins from Bo’Ness, Callum and Jackson McPartlane. What we weren’t privy to at the time was that the pair were up to a lot more than releasing their debut single We Don’t Need This Town – they were also competing on The Voice on Channel 9. However, after hearing their phenomenal performance on the famous stage during their ‘blind audition’ in front of judges Delta Goodrem, Boy George, Kelly Rowland and Guy Sebastian, we forgive them for being so tight-lipped. Having introduced our readers to the Mornington Peninsula songsters in 2017, we’re impressed yet not surprised that their passion for music has led the 16-year-olds to this quest for a recording contract with EMI Music and $100,000 in prizemoney. constructive feedback from the other For Callum and Jackson, stepping on to coaches, who are some of the world’s that stage with so much at stake had greatest musicians. them feeling more nervous than they had ever experienced. Once they began “It was about growing throughout the to perform, their nerves settled and the show for us, as we strived to take on excitement crept in – reaching a peak board all of the advice and embrace the when both George and Kelly turned experience, which was amazing for a their chairs for the teens’ performance couple of young musicians,” said Jackson. of Dumb Things. In unison, the twins After experiencing bullying first-hand, the announced their preferred coach: “We twins are proud to be ambassadors for choose . . . Kelly!” Kind is Cool, an anti-bullying movement. Their godfather, country singer Adam On set, the wardrobe team transformed Brand, was there to support the pair, a pair of denim jackets by writing on with Delta dragging him up to join the them Kind is Cool. Delta really resonated boys in a rendition of New England with their ethos, so much so that she’s Highway. It was a surreal moment for the interested in working with them in the teens because Adam had regularly asked future to assist in their mission. Given them to join him on stage during his gigs. their kind hearts, Bo’Ness found that Growing up on the road with the likes The Battle component of The Voice of Adam, Shannon Noll, John Farnham introduced mixed emotions due to the and Jimmy Barnes was all thanks to their connections formed with the other mum and manager Sally, who works contestants – but they always showed within the Australian music industry, and empathy. their stepdad Pat, who is sound engineer. Their favourite part was the people and The twins spoke highly of the incredible community that they got to be a part of. coaching and remarkable sound checks “It was a great vibe,” said Callum. with Kelly. They described her as a Check out their sound on Facebook @ “pretty cool” and down-to-earth coach who truly helped them progress as artists BoNessmusic and catch them Sundays at 7pm and Mondays at 7.30pm on Nine, or and encouraged them to be present catch up on 9Now. on stage. They also received helpful KATE SEARS Issue 104, JULY 2020

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INVENTIVE learning replaces outdated approaches to schooling SPONSORED EDITORIAL

As students settle back into the classroom, Cornish College principal Nicola Forrest considers how sustainability, innovation and student-centred learning are shaping the college’s future. “Our passion is our desire for change,” says Nicola, pictured. “Discussions are starting to be had around why we need to change how we prepare young people for the world beyond school. Despite significant changes in our world, approaches to schooling remain largely the same as they were 100 years ago. At Cornish College, we are focused on designing a richer and more authentic curriculum that better prepares students for life beyond the classroom.” This is why Cornish College teachers design dynamic, relatable classes using the Australian Curriculum as a guide, but not as a limitation to what students are capable of learning. “Being innovative means bringing bigger ideas to the topics,” Nicola says. “For example, instead of just studying ancient history, let’s look at that through the lens of conflict and change. Students might not need to know details about ancient

Egyptians later in life, but they will need to apply broader, more conceptual understandings about change and conflict as they navigate their way through many aspects of life.” The Cornish curriculum is underpinned by concepts that help students learn beyond school, including sustainability. Nicola says this is integral for a better education – one that considers both personal well-being and the wider environment, including cultures, languages and political movements that allow societies to thrive. “We design our curriculum around four interlocking Rings of Sustainability: personal, natural, urban-technological and socio-cultural sustainability. If we were just a ‘green school’, we would be neglecting these other dimensions. We are ready to challenge outdated schooling norms and traditions, and instead transition to structures and curriculums that are responsive to the modern world and make a difference for our kids’ futures.” CORNISH COLLEGE A: 65 Riverend Rd, Bangholme T: 9781 9000 W: www.cornishcollege.vic.edu.au FB: CornishCollege INSTA: cornishcollege

Winter exposes the harsh reality of our homeless People are sleeping on the Rosebud foreshore in bitterly cold conditions because they have nowhere else to go, prompting Mornington Peninsula Shire to ask the State Government for help to support our growing number of homeless. Mayor Sam Hearn said it was unacceptable that vulnerable members of the community had found themselves in this predicament, and while the council had been working closely with Peninsula agencies to help homeless people transition into better accommodation, the lack of options was creating a significant impediment. “As we enter the coldest months of the year, camping on the foreshore exposes people who are sleeping rough

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to significant health risks,” Cr Hearn said. “There’s no shortage of local compassion, support and effort to find better accommodation for these people; it’s the lack of crisis and temporary accommodation and social and affordable housing on the Peninsula that is hampering these efforts.” Cr Hearn said the way the Government had reacted to the COVID-19 pandemic by accommodating and quarantining people in hotels was an example of how nimble and innovative thinking could provide immediate solutions. “The state’s major funding boost to reduce the incidence of rough sleeping and homelessness by giving more access to temporary accommodation has had a welcome impact, but the problem is not solved. The challenge is for more local accommodation with appropriate support so that people on the Peninsula

have the same opportunities as those who are closer to the city. “We have a number of ideas to help our homeless community but we need the support of the State Government to be able to explore these further and find some real, sustainable and immediate solutions. “While the Mornington Peninsula is known as a holiday destination with natural attractions, food, wine and recreational activities, what may not be apparent to many Victorians is the significant social and economic challenges faced by some of our residents. “One of the most confronting issues on the Peninsula is that 16 per cent of our homeless residents sleep rough every night – the sixth highest number per local government area in the state.”

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Making a difference today for a sustainable, thriving tomorrow Cornish College offers education of a different kind – one which inspires the heart, the mind and the person. Book now for a school tour General Excellence Scholarships Applications now open for Years 7 and 10 entry in 2022

For more information contact admissions@cornishcollege.vic.edu.au or call 9781 9000.

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OUR COVER

Left: Maggie Chretien, known online as The Peninsula Mumma interview on page 30. Photo by Rose Grace Photography. Top Row: Find a bed that’s just perfect for you at Makin Mattresses, read more on pages 2 & 70; See Walk on InOut of ISO featuring Collie Anne unique fashion, jewellery & inspirational giftware page 39. Bottom Row: Bounce back into safe socialising with Main Street EyeCare page 59; Recent re-brand from MPVA to Mornington Peninsula Wine aims to expand our region’s winemaking capabilities, read more on pages 4 & 5.

News & Interviews H Out of ISO - Walk on In Arts & Events The Business H Dental Health Week Health Beauty Fashion & Stars Food & Wine, Markets Property Home Decor incl Trades

3-37 38-41 42-45 48-51 52-55 56-62 63-68 69-84

Book by July 17 for our next edition, out August 3 PUBLISHER, EDITOR Lisa Walton lisa@mpmag.com.au EDITORIAL CO-ORDINATOR Geoff Scott geoff@mpmag.com.au CUSTOMER RELATIONS & SALES Molly Mitchell 0407 225 261 molly@mpmag.com.au Anna Georgiou 0401 598 613 anna@mpmag.com.au Chendelle Kolasa 0412 030 802 chendelle@mpmag.com.au JOURNALISTS & FEATURE WRITERS Kate Sears, Liz Rogers, Lisa Walton, Drew Cooper, Stephanie Johnson, Maurie Hutchinson, Nerida Langcake SOCIAL MEDIA Molly Mitchell & Jasmine Forecast DISTRIBUTION Archie and his band of helpers DESIGN Lisa Walton, Jasmine Forecast Note some staff on reduced hours during Covid-19

WE’VE GOT THE PENINSULA COVERED Reduced distribution due to covid-19 restrictions Look for our baskets across the Peninsula, greater Frankston and Melbourne -

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EatDrink Mornington Peninsula & Mt Eliza Village Magazine

Ph: 5906 5771 or 9708 8222 PO BOX 3554, Mornington 3931

www.morningtonpeninsulamagazine.com.au READERS AND ADVERTISERS look for our baskets to pick up your print copy and connect with us on social media and online for daily updates from all your favourites.

In Print, Online & on Social Media @MornPenMag @MtElizaVillageMag @eatdrinkMornPen

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Learn more about what Woodleigh School can offer your child at our July Enrolment Information Session. SPONSORED EDITORIAL

Woodleigh scholarship APPLICATIONS OPEN SOON At Woodleigh, we are searching for the next generation of Adventurous Minds – curious students who continuously question, searching for knowledge and understanding. We are seeking students with a love of learning; students who try their best every day, whose application, effort and engagement mean that they will find success in almost everything they do. Applications for Academic, Music and Principal’s Scholarships for entry into Years 5 & 7 in 2022 will open on Monday, July 13. Additionally, this year we are offering a limited number of Homestead Scholarships for students entering Years 5 through 12 in 2021. Academic Scholarships are awarded to the most highly able students. Students who display outstanding academic ability on the scholarship test will be invited to an interview with the Principal. Music Scholarships are awarded to students who show evidence of a high degree of talent in their chosen instrument/s. It is expected that applicants can perform to a minimum standard of AMEB Grade 3 (for Year 7 entry) or AMEB Grade 2 (for Year 5 entry), or a comparable level. Principal’s Scholarships are awarded based on sound academic potential, a strong desire to learn and the

willingness to fully participate in the co-curricular life of the school. Leadership skills, citizenship qualities, a commitment to community service, and a particular talent in Visual or Performing Arts, Music or Sport, are all key selection criteria. Homestead Scholarships for 2021 entry are awarded to students who do not currently attend Woodleigh School. Applicants should have sound academic potential, a strong desire to learn, and the willingness to give their best to Woodleigh’s extensive co-curricular programs. We seek young leaders who are committed to our community and work to better themselves and their peers through active contribution and service. All scholarship applicants are required to sit the Scholarship Examination on Saturday, September 12. Creative thinkers, who strive for excellence and are dedicated to their community, are encouraged to apply. Applications close on Friday, September 4, so don’t miss out. For more details or to apply, visit the Woodleigh School website, or contact our Enrolments Team on 5971 6100 or enrol@woodleigh.vic.edu.au DAVID BAKER – Principal WOODLEIGH SCHOOL A: 485 Golf Links Rd, Langwarrin South T: 5971 6100 W: www.woodleigh.vic.edu.au FB: woodleighschoo1 INSTA: woodleighschool

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Uni uses cutting-edge technology in search for COVID-19 vaccine

Has COVID-19 got you confused about how some people get really sick and others don’t? And how come it’s OK for our kids to go to school and sit on top of each other and yet they have to adhere to social distancing rules on the outside? And should we be concerned about fast-tracking a vaccine that hasn’t been tested repeatedly?

The above are just a few reasons why we spoke with Professor Colin Pouton, pictured, from Monash University’s Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences about his role in developing a vaccine to knock the highly contagious virus that causes COVID-19 on the head. With years of experience in pharmacology, this English-born Mornington Peninsula day-tripper enthusiast who entered his career as a

pharmacist before becoming an academic has a particular interest in drug discovery and delivery. His faculty, which operates out of Monash in Parkville, is developing a COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2) vaccine using something called messenger RNA – or mRNA – technology and he’s excited. Prof Pouton explains: “COVID-19 illustrates how viral infections caused by closely related viruses can have very different characteristics. SARS-CoV-2 is much more contagious than the SARS coronavirus but is less life-threatening. It is interesting that children are at such a low risk of developing COVID-19. There is a thought that because they have had less exposure to coronaviruses throughout their lifetime, they can neutralise it more readily and expel it quickly so they aren’t a risk to each other. They could also be the silent carriers, having little to no symptoms. Adults who have had more exposure to coronaviruses are perhaps more likely to develop non-neutralising responses and can’t get rid of it while

those with pre-existing health conditions are particularly at risk.” Prof Pouton says there’s been an urgent need to find new ways of developing vaccines because COVID-19 has progressed so quickly. That’s where mRNA technology comes in. He continues: “We’ve been working on mRNA technology for both therapeutic and vaccination purposes for a few years and think it’s likely that a COVID-19 vaccine will be the first mRNA product. President Trump has put a lot of money into five programs committed to finding a vaccine and three of those programs are mRNAbased. I don’t think there’ll be just one vaccine for COVID-19 as it’s such a huge problem. We are at least 12 months away and the virus can change quickly, plus there’s a huge variety and strength of symptoms. It doesn’t appear to remain in the system though.” Does Prof Pouton become frustrated working in an industry where as soon as one vaccine is found another virus

comes along? “Not at all. That’s the challenge. One thing is certain: we can’t assume we are going to get vaccines from somewhere else. We need to take control and dedicate ourselves to finding our own vaccines. We already have mRNA technology in development and we can take it into the clinic. We just need the money to do it.” LIZ ROGERS

Peninsula’s response to pandemic helps flatten the curve The past few months have been almost unprecedented in Australia’s history. Not since our own Quarantine Station at Point Nepean was the front line for combating the Spanish Flu pandemic have we seen a virus affect the global community in such a way. This has been a deeply stressful time for so many of us directly and indirectly affected by COVID-19, and there have been challenges, but the Mornington Peninsula and Australia have responded. Together, we have made great strides in combating this disease. This includes: • Reducing our rate of increase in new cases – from 25 to 30 per cent per day at the peak of the growth in cases at the end of March, to much less than 0.5 per cent a day now. • Conducting more than 1.7 million COVID-19 tests. • Expanding testing criteria to all people with respiratory symptoms, however mild, or with fever. I urge all those feeling unwell to get tested. • Establishing respiratory and fever clinics across the nation, providing dedicated and expert testing facilities

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and diverting people who have mild to moderate respiratory symptoms away from hospitals. • Building capacity across Australia’s primary health care, aged-care and hospital systems. • Establishing a new National COVID-19 Helpline supporting more than 815,000 callers. • In PPE, allocating 75 million masks, receiving 100 million and contracting for more than 500 million more. • Training more than 655,000 care workers in basic infection control, including more than 120,000 agedcare workers and almost 61,000 disability care workers. • Opening up home medicine deliveries to the broader Australian community, with more than 300,000 deliveries to people’s homes from more than 3600 pharmacies. There are many people to thank for the success so far of Australia’s COVID-19 response – from the Department of Health, to the National Incident Centre, to public health officers; frontline workers; and, fundamentally, you, the people of the Mornington Peninsula. GREG HUNT – Federal Health Minister and Flinders federal Liberal MP

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Don’t get into hot water on the bays this winter Water safety is something you might associate more with summer than the depths of winter, but the colder weather presents its own risks for Peninsula anglers and boaties. That’s according to two Victorian water safety agencies, which have asked residents to play it safe around the bays. Victoria experienced a lower-than-average drowning toll last summer than previous years, but an eagerness to return to some winter recreational water activities could see people at increased risk of drowning or sustaining aquatic injuries, Life Saving Victoria has warned. Principal research associate Dr Bernadette Matthews said all Victorians would do well to heed safety messages and take additional precautions around the water. “Recreating on or near the water in winter comes with its own risks, including the risk of falling into cold water,” Dr Matthews said. “Swimming and activities in cold water can lead to breathing difficulties, hyperthermia and drowning, while sudden falls into cold water can be fatal. Often over winter we see more boating and fishing incidents. Some simple actions to stay safe include always checking the weather or conditions before you venture out, knowing your limits, wearing a

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lifejacket, avoiding alcohol and going with a friend.” Maritime Safety Victoria director Cameron Toy asked boaters and paddlers to take adequate precautions before setting out. “Check for weather updates and ensure your craft is ready for a winter outing and seaworthy for the planned activity,” Mr Toy said. “If you do enter cold water, you will need to act quickly to raise the alarm, so carry a distress beacon or waterproof mobile phone on your person. Don’t hesitate to call for help – rescue agencies would choose an early start over a search in the dark every time.” Dr Matthews said it was also good to see people out enjoying fishing since COVID-19 restrictions had been eased. “Like with many water activities, there are risks whether you are in a boat, on the rocks or a riverbank,” she said. “To ensure you return safely to your family at the end of the day, check the Bureau of Meteorology website before going fishing and postpone your trip if the forecast is bad. Always let someone know where you are going and when you will be back, use the right gear – including a lifejacket – and if fishing from rocks and banks, wear nonslip shoes. “Never fish alone, and make sure someone is always watching the water for rogue waves or other hazards. Be prepared. Know what to do if you or your friend get swept into the water.”

Photo by Steve Brown

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Pandemic or not, there Always Will Be NAIDOC

Most of you would know that arts and culture have been hit hard as a result of the global pandemic, with the widespread closure or postponement of events resulting in a pathological celebration-free wasteland. NAIDOC Week, which is traditionally celebrated across Australia in July and can be traced back to the Aboriginal rights movement in the 1930s, has become yet another casualty of COVID-19 with its deferment. This year all states have postponed their celebrations of NAIDOC Week: Always Will, Always Will Be until November 8-16. The good news is Mornington Peninsula Shire will be doing a ‘soft’ celebration with some virtual events throughout July, as will Baluk Arts. Baluk Arts manager Nicole Chaffey says: “Many of the more remote centres involved in NAIDOC Week can’t travel so we have had to reimagine the delivery of NAIDOC Week celebrations.” As have other Indigenous groups and arts organisations across the Peninsula. Frankston Arts Centre will be live streaming A Musical Reconciliation by Spirit Lines via YouTube and FAC’s Facebook page on July 9. This is the third event in the FAC Digital Series, which has made the performing arts accessible to the community while COVID-19 restrictions are in place. The Glass Cube at Cube 37 Gallery is also welcoming works from MARS Gallery that are inspired by street art and hip-hop. You can view The Black and White Series by Indigenous multimedia artist Josh Muir via the street from June 30 until August 2. Mornington Peninsula Shire’s celebrations will also include the unveiling of the new Children’s Acknowledgement of Country, developed by the Shire’s Warringinee group, which promotes the understanding of issues facing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. You can also contact Willum Warrain Aboriginal Association in Hastings to see what it’s up to. How you decide to celebrate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture this July is obviously up to you. There may not be a gala dinner or an awards night to participate in, but you can still be entertained and engage, albeit remotely via the screen or through the glass while acknowledging Always Was, Always Will Be. LIZ ROGERS

Photo by Yanni (supplied)

Baluk Arts is a 100% Aboriginal owned and operated not-for-profit Arts Centre in Mornington. You are bound to connect with a story within the many handmade artworks and products in a range which includes works on paper, paintings, prints, jewellery, small sculpture, ceramics and carvings. Learn about and experience the diversity of contemporary Aboriginal stories by visiting the gallery, and support Baluk Arts through purchasing a unique, handmade piece or through tax deductible donation.

6 Bruce St, Mornington 5975 5000 www.balukarts.org.au ( 18

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Club rides out the restrictions wave Peninsula Surfriders Club president Sean McDevitt has been part of the club since 2006. During his 14 years he’s been a member and competitor, but it was a few years later that there was a shift as the club moved to have the younger surfers running it. “I jumped on the committee to help a friend who was nominated to be president,” said Sean. “I’ve been involved since then. I love the club. I’d always wanted to be involved in a boardriders club and take part in competitive surfing, even if it’s just at a club level.” Established in 1974, the Peninsula Surfriders Club is one of Australia’s premier boardriders’ clubs with a long tradition of success in national competitions and a strong focus on junior development. Its home break is Gunnamatta Beach and its clubhouse is at Truemans Rd, Fingal. “I grew up close to the city and attended boardriding events at Phillip Island with my friends. It was after high school that I joined the Peninsula club after moving down

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this way. I’ve travelled around the world, yet I still say that the Peninsula is the best. My roots are here.” Unfortunately, the club had to make the tough but necessary decision to put its 2020 season on hold when the COVID-19 pandemic struck. Sean tells us that the minute self-isolation restrictions were imposed, the surf turned on – Murphy’s law. However, the club is looking at the bigger picture and focusing on the community’s health and how members can jump back into action once they get the go-ahead from the government and Surfing Australia to be allowed to have 100 people outdoors. At the time the tide turned, the club had begun its 2020 competitive season but had held only one competition. The silver lining is that with four competitions remaining, there is still time for those who were sitting on the fence to sign up. Similarly, during winter the juniors’ events generally go on pause because school sports commitments take precedence. But this year they’ve had the chance to participate in cool activities while social distancing. Once the club members are back on their boards, they’ll start planning the competitions and presentation night

and prepare for the main event of the year, the Victorian teams titles. It’s a big event for the club with members jumping on a hire bus with their support crew and enjoying a much-needed catch-up with other clubs. “It’s one of the better days of the year,” said Sean. “It’s very social and a lot of fun.” With a slight decline in membership since the 1990s, Sean is eager to increase the sense of community involvement and encourage those interested to join in, compete and donate their time. The super-friendly club has hit 100 members and is encouraging more newcomers, extending a welcome to anyone who wants to come down and check it out or stop by while a contest is on to watch the action on the water. “We’re open to all age groups, especially kids called the super groms and pre-teen girls and boys. It’s time for the next generation to come through. Anyone who loves surfing on the Peninsula and who wants to meet other like-minded people, surf or compete should make themselves known to us and pop by.” KATE SEARS

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COLLECTIONS

Opposites attract the eye in July’s night sky

This month we will see our two gas giants at opposition: Jupiter on July 14 and Saturn on July 21. Opposition is when the sun is on the opposite side of the sky from the outer planet in question – or, to be more technical, when the sun and the planet are exactly 180 degrees apart in the sky. It is also when the planet is at its general closest position to Earth.

On July 5 we can see Jupiter shining bright close to the moon, with Saturn close to the moon the following night. July 11 will see Mars and the moon close together, with the bright star Aldebaran close by on July 12. Then on July 17 a thin crescent moon will be visible near Venus in the morning. Sitting high in the southern skies, Scorpius is easy to spot this month. Nearby is the constellation Sagittarius, which is famous for the ‘Teapot’ asterism formed by some of its brightest stars. When you look towards Sagittarius and Scorpius, you are peering towards the centre of the Milky Way galaxy. This whole region is full of rich and beautiful star fields, which are great to explore using binoculars. At this time of the year the constellation Sagittarius offers some exceptional deep-sky objects. The globular cluster M22 is visible to the naked eye if you have good observing conditions. The Lagoon Nebula, or M8, lying above the spout of the ‘Teapot’, is a glowing cloud of gas. Other famous deep-sky objects in Sagittarius are visible through a telescope, including the Trifid Nebula, or M20. Beside Sagittarius, Scorpius contains the bright open clusters M6 and M7, which remain high in the sky this month. To the north in the constellation Serpens Cauda, the Tail of the Serpent, lies the open cluster M16 in the much fainter Eagle Nebula. For further information about the Mornington Peninsula Astronomical Society, such as public stargazing nights, event bookings and membership, please visit the society’s Facebook page, or the website at www.mpas.asn.au NERIDA LANGCAKE, Mornington Peninsula Astronomical Society Pictured above: Left, Antares, the brightest object in the constellation Scorpius, is visible in the top left of this image of the Milky Way taken from a backyard in Mount Eliza. Photo by MPAS member Ben Claringbold Right, the magnificent Sombrero Galaxy M104, a lenticular galaxy in the constellation Virgo, is an estimated 29 million light-years from Earth. Photo by MPAS member Steve Wilkins Issue 104, JULY 2020

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Collaring the market in canine cool From catastrophic bushfires to a pandemic and the economic battering we’ve all copped as a result, it’s been a real howler of a year so far. But a Melbourne-based company has come to the rescue with a wonderful way to combine a love of craft with a love of dogs. It’s a DIY leather bow tie dog collar kit from Moo + Twig. Now you can get your Picasso on and hand-paint a customised dog collar and matching bow tie for your favourite four-legged friend. Founded by Sarah Chhan, Moo + Twig creates a range of oh-so-delightful collars, clothes, and accessories for the coolest of canines, and this latest release is here to spark your iso creativity and give you a reason to gather your mates for a ‘crafternoon’ this winter. Each DIY kit contains everything you need to handcraft your best mate’s new neck bling, including a leather collar and bow tie, monogrammed tag with stainless steel plate, assorted paintbrushes and four pots of paint. You even get to choose the colours at the online checkout – think dreamy pastels and bold metallics. The kits, which come in three sizes, are available from www.mooandtwig.com and cost $69.95. So what are you waiting for? Grab your mates and your pooch and unleash your inner artist. You’d be barking mad if you don’t.

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SPONSORED EDITORIAL

The better things in life Take a moment to imagine the things you love doing the most. Perhaps it’s visiting your grandchildren, spending time with the family, playing golf or hiking, exploring new places or enjoying a drink with friends at a gorgeous Mornington Peninsula winery. Retirement, getting older, an injury or perhaps a recent surgery shouldn’t hold you back from embracing the activities that make you happy. That’s why local in-home care provider Just Better Care helps people to enjoy the better things in life. “I love experiencing new things and meeting new people and firmly believe that everyone should be enjoying life to the fullest regardless of their age or situation,” says Just Better Care’s general manager, Callum McMillan.

“We’re here to provide personalised and flexible inhome care that suits any lifestyle. We all have different passions and preferences, and that’s why our service is so individualised. “For us it’s about providing the right support to enable our clients to spend their time doing what they love, whatever that might be.” Working with you, Callum will get to know how you love to spend your time – and the tasks you’d rather avoid – to put together a plan for Just Better Care to best support you. One single point of contact and support that you can dial up or dial down with life’s changes are just some of the ways Just Better Care helps. All so you can enjoy the better things in life. JUST BETTER CARE – MORNINGTON A: 2/346 Main St, Mornington T: 5972 1860 E: mailmm@justbettercare.com W: www.justbettercare.com/enjoybetter FB: jbc.mornington/ INSTA: jbc_mornington

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At the end of th roof

p “Sunsetsmaraetter what

that no y every da , s n e p p a h eautifully” can end b utler

Kristen B

Every sunset provides an opportunity to reset, so take a moment to reflect on the day that was. Given the current turbulent times, we can take solace in remembering that often the most beautiful sunsets require cloudy skies to show off their vibrant colours and intriguing patterns. It’s something you can count on, almost as if nature is saying goodnight in a peaceful fashion as it uses the blank canvas to create a painting of infinite beauty every night. It’s almost impossible to watch a tranquil sunset and not dream, as sunsets have a wonderful trait of colouring our dreams. The essence of their enchanted nature lies in their lifespan, as each sunset is so fleeting, the moment passes quickly, with the vivid sky shifting continuously as the sun says goodnight. Join us in being inspired by Peninsula photographer Steve Brown’s magnificent images of a picturesque sunset at Seaford Pier on Wednesday, May 27. Let it ignite a new habit of ending the working day with a relaxing walk along the beach as the sunset’s splendour doubles in intensity as it reflects over the water. KATE SEARS

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he day, it’s not all doom and gloom

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Welcome to your new home

SPONSORED EDITORIAL

The Bays Aged Care opened in May on the site of the original Hastings Bush Nursing Hospital. Carefully created to maintain the welcoming, homely feel that the previous home was known for, the residents can now enjoy ultimate luxury with cosy gas log fires, stunning artwork, multiple living spaces, a designated family room, and state-of-the-art aged care amenities. ( 28

All the rooms are beautifully designed with a selection of aspects to suit. Whether you prefer a sunny orientation with water glimpses or internal calming courtyard views, each private room, with its own ensuite, caters for a variety of preferences. The four dining and lounge areas are warm and inviting, each with its own servery and gas log fire. Beautifully designed to promote a sense of homely ambience, the co-ordinated artwork and colour schemes will be sure to resonate with residents and their loved ones. A key point of difference with The Bays Aged Care Hastings is that, as part of

Everything we love about the peninsula, fresh every month

The Bays Healthcare Group, the home is aligned with The Bays Hospital in Mornington. The professional staff, with their welcoming smiles, provide the best possible care for the residents. “We believe it will be recognised as one of the region’s finest aged care homes,” says general manager Gael Traa. The architecturally designed home exudes a sense of community and homeliness. Whether meeting friends in one of the sunlit sitting rooms, a cuppa at the onsite café, or just simply taking in the beautiful surrounds, the new home will be sure to delight. 

The Bays Aged Care Hastings is a fully accredited aged care provider. Trusted by the local community for more than 90 years, The Bays is independent, not for profit and community owned. For more information, phone The Bays Aged Care on 5979 0333 or email Welcome2Hastings@thebays.com.au THE BAYS AGED CARE HASTINGS A: 86 Victoria St, Hastings T: 5979 0333 W: www.thebays.com.au/aged-care/ aged-care/ FB: TheBaysHealthcareGroup INSTA: the_bays_healthcare

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ged care home in Hastings is opening soon.

t cater for singles and d filled with natural light. and inviting, each with rraces or courtyards to e a sense of homely

are, there are options for e care, memory support ed with The Bays Hospital rvices proudly delivered hcare Group.

We’ve been caring for the Mornington Peninsula community for over 90 years, with local staff and care teams to help you or your loved one feel at home. A limited number of places at The Bays Aged Care Hastings are currently available.

To find out more, call 03 5979 0333 or visit thebays.com.au/aged-care

The Bays Aged Care Hastings Trusted by generations for over 90 years 86 VICTORIA STREET, HASTINGS VIC 3915


Rose Grace Photography

In Conversation Fabulous chats with Peninsula people

Mumma mia! Maggie lays it all on the line Maggie Chretien is no ordinary Mornington Peninsula mum – she is The Peninsula Mumma. Her Instagram page has 16,100 followers, while her YouTube and Facebook are not far behind. Maggie tells Kate Sears how she manages it all while studying for a Certificate 3&4 in Fitness as well as acting, her media role and working at her parents’ bakery.

the things that women aren’t supposed to talk about in public, including miscarriage, sex, periods, my bowel and bladder prolapse, and the fact my legs and toes are hairier than my hubby’s. I’ve always been an over-sharer. And having a Bachelor of Performing Arts means it feels very natural to me to be in front of the

How did The Peninsula Mumma begin? I started the account because I was pregnant and honestly had no idea what I was doing or feeling. I hoped to connect with other women who were like me, who started sweating profusely when given a newborn to hold and who would much rather play with puppies than toddlers. For those not familiar with your Instagram page, how would summarise it? Mostly, I think I put a smile on people’s faces because I tell it how it is and I can laugh at myself. But I also talk about all

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camera. Sometimes that can be a great mix; other times it could probably get people into trouble. Having watched your powerful YouTube video about your journey to your son Jagger, would you mind sharing it with our readers? In 2016 we started trying for a baby. We got pregnant in the first month of really trying. We told friends and family. And then, a few days before Christmas, I started bleeding. I miscarried. I was utterly shattered. The next few months I became obsessed with getting pregnant. It was a cycle of us trying to conceive, me weeing on a stick every time I went to the toilet and then feeling devastated and unworthy when my period came. I felt like my body was failing; like I was failing. I then started seeing an acupuncture fertility specialist in Mornington who helped me emotionally and mentally get back on track. We experienced another miscarriage during this time, but I was able to cope better. I was able to breathe better. It was then, when my husband Brad and I were away on holidays, after copious amounts of cocktails and seafood that I realised I was late. I took a test, and

there on the bathroom floor of a hotel we found out we were pregnant with Jagger. What’s been the most memorable moment that your Instagram page has led to? Every time I get a message from a woman saying that she has booked in for a pelvic floor assessment after seeing me talk about my prolapse issues. To think I can help women focus on their health has been incredible. FYI: if you’re postpartum and you think it’s funny that you can’t jump without weeing yourself, it’s not. Book yourself an appointment with a women’s health physiotherapist. Do you have anything to add? To the mummas I have one thing to say: don’t ever be afraid to do what makes you smile, because what makes you smile will make your children smile even if it comes in the form of a tantrum. Your happiness isn’t something that will harm your children; it will only serve them. So fill your cup. It’s not selfish, it’s necessary. Follow Maggie on Instagram and Facebook @thepeninsulamumma and on YouTube at The Peninsula Mumma.

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Liverpool to Melbourne at a very rapid clip On July 13, 1854, the arrival in Port Phillip of the clipper Red Jacket from Liverpool in a time of 67 days and 10 hours was the cause of great excitement. Up to the late 1840s, a passage from Liverpool to Melbourne of 120 days was regarded as good, but a change in design and the choice of a very different route had led to a dramatic decrease in the average time for a passage. Until that era, sailing ship design had continued with little change for centuries, and the route from the UK to Australia was similar to that taken by the First Fleet. The China tea trade and the gold rushes to California and Victoria, however, led to a need for faster ships and the shipbuilders of the US northeast quickly developed the famous clipper design. At around the same time, the study of the prevailing winds and currents of the oceans and better sailing routes resulted in much faster passages. Taking a composite great circle route to Melbourne reduced the distance by at least 2000km. This was the route taken by the Red Jacket and all later sailing ships bound for Melbourne.

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The Red Jacket was launched at Rockland in Maine, US, late in December 1853. Sailed to Liverpool by her owners, she was chartered by the White Star Line for a voyage to Australia and bought on her return. She continued to bring migrants to Melbourne until she was sold in 1867. Larger than the average clipper ship, she was 76.5m in length with a beam of 13.4m. The ship was named after

Sagoyewatha, a Seneca chief who was called Red Jacket because he wore a British Army ‘Red-coat’ given to him after his tribe fought with the British in the American War of Independence.  Her first visit to Melbourne lasted only 12 working days, with 1000 tons of cargo being unloaded and 700 tons being loaded. On August 1 she was towed from Melbourne to a point six miles (9.6km) outside the Heads where she set sail for Liverpool. Included in her cargo was 59,408 ounces (troy) of gold, which is equal to more than 1.8 tonnes. At the present price – approximately $A2500 an ounce – that gold would be worth about $150 million. BY MAURIE HUTCHINSON President, Peninsula Ship Society T: Maurie Hutchinson 9787 5780 E: mauriehutch@gmail.com The Peninsula Ship Society will not be meeting until further notice. The clipper ship Red Jacket, whose figurehead was of Seneca chief Sagoyewatha in a feather war-bonnet wearing his ‘Red-coat’. Watercolour by C. Dickson Gregory, State Library of Victoria.

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Just kiddin’ around with Blaze We’re not kidding when we tell you that this little guy has to be the cutest goat around town. Blaze is two years old and his human mum, Tess Runting, was meant to foster him for a few weeks, but she knew she was kidding herself when she saw his face.

He was born prematurely at 11pm one night on a friend’s farm. Blaze’s mum was a maiden – a first-time mother – and she didn’t even look pregnant. His mum had no milk, and he was very tiny, sitting at just under a kilo. Given this, he was quite weak and wasn’t able to stand alone, so even if his mum could produce milk, Blaze couldn’t reach her udder. Unfortunately, his mum had absolutely no interest in him, in fact her mood lifted when they took Blaze away. Since then, Blaze has become besotted by his new mum and his big sister Lettie – a lamb that he was raised with. As babies, the siblings went everywhere

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with Tess – including once when Blaze rode Tess’s horse with her. We kid you not, his favourite outing is attending the sheep shows as the ultimate apprentice where he has the chance to walk around the show with Tess and meet everyone. He’s pretty protective of his sibling, and proceeds to push all of the other sheep away from the pile of hay, and invites Lettie to join him for a private dinner – he’s a gentlemen after all. “Blaze loves Weet-Bix, savoury Shapes, Doritos and Cottee’s cordial,” said Tess. “He has the cutest begging face. It’s very hard not to share your snacks with him.” Blaze loves to steal Tess’s hat – he thinks it’s hilarious. He also enjoys squeezing through gaps in fences. One day he gleefully met Tess in the driveway of the farm as she returned home. While Blaze was super proud of his mission, Tess wasn’t too impressed, despite the impressive feat of getting through five fences to get there. Luckily for Tess, this is his only typical goat trait, as he hasn’t picked up climbing or chewing – because he thinks he’s a dog, or a sheep or a human. Tess isn’t sure, and neither is Blaze. “Blaze knows his name and will chat to you if you call out to him,” said Tess. “And he can balance on his hind legs to give you a hug, but his best trick so far is shaking hands. Of course he hasn’t been doing much of that lately due to COVID-19, but it is his favourite trick to show off.” Blaze grew up on Tess’s farm where she breeds beautiful wool-producing sheep, but now he’s moved house to The Ranch Mornington Peninsula in Boneo where Tess works. He’s in his element here as he’s a popular part of the kids’ parties and school camp program. If you see this adorable lad, he’ll greet you and you can shake his hoof. Get to know Blaze by following him on Instagram at @ just__kiddin to admire his skills in posing for the camera. “He always does something cute or silly – or stops being naughty – when he sees my camera pointing his way,” said Tess. KATE SEARS

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Photo by Kate Sears

Air show delivers manna from heaven After the successful 2020 Tyabb Air Show that delighted aviation fans of all ages on Sunday, March 8, the Peninsula Aero Club proudly distributed nearly $60,000 it had raised through the event. It was presented to community groups via a virtual beneficiary event on Saturday, May 30, as part of PAC’s long tradition of giving back to the community. While the beneficiary day is usually celebrated with a fantastic community open day, this year with COVID-19 restrictions in place there was an online celebration via a group Zoom meeting. PAC president Jack Vevers was joined by Flinders federal Liberal MP Greg Hunt, South Eastern Metropolitan state Liberal MP Gordon RichPhillips, and two of the air show’s major sponsors who each had the honour of recognising the recipients of this year’s proceeds. Mr Vevers acknowledged the sponsorship from EastLink, IOR Aviation, Paul Bennet Air Shows, the work of PAC members and volunteers, and of course the aircraft owners, pilots and ground crews who donated their machines and time generously for no charge. HMAS Cerberus and Defence Australia were also acknowledged for their terrific participation and support. Mr Hunt presented $25,000 to Chasing Change, and $10,000 was presented to Tyabb CFA by Bryce Morland from IOR Aviation. Mr Morland pointed out the important community contribution the CFA had made throughout the recent devastating fire season. Representing EastLink, Doug Spencer-Roy presented the Mt Eliza Lions Club with $8000, which came on top of $4500 that was collected from carparking on the day. The Tyabb football and cricket clubs were each presented with $3000 by Mr Rich-Phillips, adding to the more than $5000 the footy club raised through fundraising at the air show. Finally, the Australian Air League received $1000. The PAC has raised more than $150,000 from its past three air shows, and half the organisations that have benefited from this money work with people from the Mornington Peninsula who deal with health adversity.

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Photo by Kim Butts

Filmmaker highlights Damien’s titanic anti-poaching efforts Damien Mander advocates for those who cannot speak. The former Padua College student is the founder of the not-for-profit International Anti-Poaching Foundation, an organisation dedicated to protecting some of the planet’s most endangered species. It’s a mission that he’s devoted his life to since returning from a dozen tours of duty in Iraq and struggling to rediscover his place in society. Damien saw a gap in the anti-poaching tactics employed across most of Africa – tactics that had remained largely unaltered for decades. Small groups of under-trained and poorly equipped rangers were sent out for days at a time to conduct patrols in dangerous and remote areas. With a structured approach to conservation and employing significant tactics and technology to defend wildlife from poachers within protected areas, the IAPF was established in 2009 and forms the first and last line of defence for Africa’s wildlife. The foundation also works alongside partners that focus on community development and engagement, research, biodiversity management and wildlife rescue. Their initiative not only fights wildlife crime, it protects community assets, creates jobs, promotes training and education and reduces habitat destruction.

It was in August 2017 that IAPF set out to recruit and train members for Akashinga, the first all-female anti-poaching unit in the world. Based in Zimbabwe, Akashinga employs marginalised women from rural communities who are educated and trained by IAPF to be rangers and biodiversity managers to protect large areas previously reserved for and financed by trophy hunting. The group made 191 arrests during its first two and a half years and helped reduce elephant poaching in Zimbabwe’s Lower and Middle Zambezi Valley by 80 per cent. Akashinga now patrols seven parks totalling almost 650,000ha and is in the process of training 240 more women for full-time positions as it grows towards 1000 rangers and a portfolio of 20 parks by 2025. This year’s highlight so far has been the world premiere of Akashinga: The Brave Ones at the EarthxFilm Festival, where it picked up two awards. Directed by Maria Wilhelm, the National Geographic short film was produced by three-time Academy Award-winning director James Cameron, who posted on social media: “Akashinga puts a spotlight on the International Anti-Poaching Foundation and the courageous women on the front lines of the battle for Africa’s wildlife, under greater threat now than ever before.” To find out more about the work of Akashinga and the International Anti-Poaching Foundation, visit www.iapf. org KATE SEARS

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Theatrical innovation thrives in isolation

With theatres closed for the foreseeable future and the world in lockdown, Woodleigh School asked the questions: How can we still create theatre in our school? And what might theatre made in isolation look like?

It turned out the answer was right under our noses. When Woodleigh first moved to remote learning, more and more classes were taking place on Zoom – which got staff thinking: is it possible to create theatre using this platform? Six weeks later we had the makings of a play. So Far Away was devised, written, performed and produced by 27 students and three staff, all in isolation. Making theatre in isolation followed a very different process to the usual method. Zoom had loads of potential. It allowed students to share screens and collaborate, and by using virtual backgrounds they could create fabulous locations. But it was soon discovered that there was both potential and pitfalls in this online medium. From the technical to the social, the issues faced were many and varied. When the return to face-to-face schooling was announced, the decision was made to bring the piece together in post-production. Ultimately, the cast and crew found themselves creating a performance that sits somewhere between theatre and film. The Zoom environment became a central character in the play. The feedback has been fantastic. One viewer from the UK wrote:

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Year 11 student James Ward wrote and recorded all the music for So Far Away.

“By participating in this production, I am certain the students will have gained a greater insight into drama and into their own artistic development. A real group learning experience against a uniquely difficult time. In short, a little bit of COVID history showcasing the talent of youth.”

So Far Away is devised, experimental theatre that redefines ‘school play’, and you can view it now on the Woodleigh School YouTube channel or Facebook page. ADAM LIDDIARD – Director of Community Relations, Woodleigh School

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OUT OF ISO

out of iso - walk on in

Let’s get back to business, well almost We’re out of isolation but keeping our social distancing practices on point and upholding the high hygiene standards that have kept our community safe these past few months. With Premier Daniel Andrews’ recent statement and restrictions easing slightly, Mornington Peninsula Magazine is beyond excited to showcase the businesses that are reopening their doors and welcoming customers inside, albeit in reduced numbers for the time being. It’s back to business for many businesses, so your long-overdue haircuts, nail appointments, family activities, dose of art, dinner dates and retail therapy can be booked into that empty diary that you no doubt have. We’re spoilt for choice with so many businesses able to open their doors again – but where to begin? We’re highlighting the best that are back in action in July and will keep you updated in our August feature too. It’s our way of saying “Welcome back!” and “Hey, let’s support each other!” As always, we’re passionate about supporting small and supporting local and we know you are too, so jump into our out-of-isolation feature. Let’s get our community booming again and back to its usual buzzing streets. KATE SEARS

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OUT OF ISO

Locked In fun that’s out of this world After weeks in isolation travelling at astonishing speeds, the crew of NOVA: Mission to Mars have started building a settlement on the Red Planet. Unfortunately, things aren’t all going to plan. Can you join the team of colonists and help solve the issues confronting them before it’s too late? NOVA: Mission to Mars is the newest and most exciting escape room game at Locked in Escape Rooms in Mornington, and you and your team of family or friends can

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be among the first to try to escape the looming disaster threatening the colonists. Owner and game designer Carolyn Parker says the new room provides a great challenge for larger teams and would be perfect for birthday parties. LOCKED IN ESCAPE ROOMS A: 2/2 Carbine Way, Mornington M: 0413 010 431 W: www.lockedinescaperooms.com.au FB: Lockedinescaperooms INSTA: lockedinescaperooms

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OUT OF ISO

Equine Assisted Therapy is back to make hearts happy Racing Hearts Equine Assisted Therapy is thrilled to be resuming face-toface sessions within social distancing guidelines. Based in Moorooduc, they work with a team of retired racehorses and staff with qualifications in counselling, psychology and certification in Equine Assisted Therapy (EAT) and Learning. EAT can assist a wide variety of people, including those who suffer from symptoms of a mental health diagnosis, as well as adults and young people who are struggling with the daily challenges of life, especially adjusting to changes throughout this COVID-19 pandemic. It works in a similar way to traditional counselling with sessions incorporating activities with the horses in a meaningful way.

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Research has shown that being able to see animals releases chemicals in our bodies associated with feeling good and relaxation. Horses are also powerful conduits for change, assisting clients by offering a non-judgemental relationship where the client can feel safe to express themselves. Horses can give feelings of love, touch, stability and security, which can help meet those needs in a client. Activities with the horses can also evoke important thoughts and emotions for the client that can then be processed with the practitioner. Availability is currently very limited, so don’t hesitate to get in touch. RACING HEARTS Equine Assisted Therapy A: 180 Coolart Rd, Moorooduc T: 0400 519 483 W: www.racinghearts.com.au FB: racingheartsaus INSTA: racing_hearts_therapy

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Ideas By The Bay is full of unique treasures and essential household items. Carrying staple kitchen utensils and products, as well as ecologically friendly essentials to help reduce harmful environmental impacts. We pride ourselves on carrying products of quality that will stand the test of time, without forfeiting aesthetic appeal and unique

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value. We have the biggest range of mugs for those looking for a quality piece and are building a following for the beautiful, UK-made Emma Bridgewater range. At Ideas we celebrate all things Australia, which includes a variety of gorgeous Australian-made items. Perfect for visitors and locals alike, our Australian section is brimming with treasures for all. We have products to suit most occasions and ages making gift buying a cinch. Come visit us in store or visit our new website at ideasbythebay.com.au and shop from the comfort of your own home. Explore a world that celebrates creativity. Winter hours are Tuesday to Sunday 10.30am to 5pm. IDEAS BY THE BAY A: 34 Main St, Mornington T: 5977 0708 W: www.ideasbythebay.com.au FB: IdeasByTheBay INSTA: ideasbythebay

Marlene Miller Antiques

OUT OF ISO

To delight and inspire‌

Specialising in antique and newly made jewellery by Melbourne’s top jewellers

128 Ocean Beach Rd, Sorrento t. 5984 1762 m: 0438 537 757 e:marlenemiller3@bigpond.com

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arts events leisure

arts events leisure Art classes resume If you’ve been missing your art classes at Oak Hill Gallery, here’s some great news: the gallery has been gradually reopening under strict COVID-19 health and safety regulations and is restarting some of its regular classes. Class sizes are limited to a maximum of eight people and everyone must be 1.5m apart. Hand and surface sanitisers will be available, temperature checks will be made, the name and addresses of all visitors entering the gallery will be taken, and anyone who is unwell will be not permitted to enter. There are also online classes for gelli printmaking and pottery. All classes must be booked and paid for in advance, so check the website for further details or call 5973 4299. OAK HILL GALLERY A: 100 Mornington-Tyabb Rd, Mornington T: 5973 4299 W: www.oakhillgallery.com.au FB: OakHillGallery INSTA: oakhillgallery

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Sleep In Your Car goes online Over the past months we’ve been facing COVID-19 while hunkered in our homes. But what do you do when home’s not safe or not an option? Fusion Mornington Peninsula will hold its sixth annual Sleep In Your Car on August 1 and hopes to raise $25,000 to provide support for those who don’t have what most of us take for granted: a safe and welcoming roof over our heads. This year, because of health restrictions, people can still sleep in their car but are asked to do so at home – or camp in the yard or crash on the couch – as well as jump online to join interactive experiences, guest speakers and artists performing live.  Register yourself or a team at www.sleepinyourcar.com. au FUSION MORNINGTON PENINSULA T: 5974 1442 W: morningtonpeninsula.fusion.org.au FB: fusionmornington INSTA: fusionmorningtonpeninsula

Fans go driving in to see the Saints go marching in The show goes on at Dromana Drive-in. With a collection of classic favourites and a reopening deal of $30 per car load, it’s time to get excited. On Sunday, June 14, St Kilda Football Club was delighted to have the Dromana Drive-in as its second home for its members with a free live screening of the Saints’ Round 2 match against the Western Bulldogs. Saints members received an exclusive online link and were able to book one car space each. The game was broadcast live on all three big screens and more than 1200 eager footy fans celebrated the long-awaited return of the AFL season with flashing lights and tooting horns as their beloved Saints beat the Doggies by 39 points at Docklands. Carloads of Saint fanatics rocked up and created a sea of red, white and black across the carpark. With social distancing measures in place, members were asked to remain in their cars unless they had to use the bathroom. The tasty US-style Shel’s Diner was operating via online orders with delivery straight to the car door. It was a full house for the unique event – and we can’t say we’re surprised. Dromana Drive-in hopes to screen another night game soon. Check out the website for further information at www.dromanadrivein.com.au and keep an eye on the Facebook page @dromana3drivein for updates.

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arts events leisure

Commission a unique artwork for your home No more digging around So you have moved into your new home or renovated your existing abode and have been for some time looking at the blank walls wondering what to put on them. Your walls need original artworks that will add vibrancy and elegance to your beautiful living areas, but how do you find the painting you love in the correct size and complementary colours? The answer is you commission the artist of your choice to create it especially for your home. Nissarana Galleries specialises in helping people to create the perfect painting to suit their tastes and this month is giving 20 per cent off all commissions of artworks from its 100-plus acclaimed career artists. So how do you take advantage of this great offer? First, call or come into the gallery at 211 Main St and discuss the

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to sea, From earth for abundance all to share

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paintings you like with the art consultants, who have many years’ experience in art and interior design. Also see the online ‘commissioning artists catalogue’ by clicking the link on the website. Then once you have decided on your favourite artist and the size of the painting you require, the artist will be commissioned to create your very special painting. You will be able to see the stages of the painting and have contact with the artist right through the creation process to ensure you are totally satisfied with the result. Delivery and professional hanging are included – it’s as simple as that! NISSARANA GALLERIES A: 211 Main St, Mornington M: 0474 496 222 E: info@ngmornington.com.au W: www.nissaranagalleries.com.au INSTA: nissaranagalleries

FOR ALL FOODIES!

only

You’re also able to access general information about the four cemeteries managed and maintained by the trust – at Mornington, Dromana, Flinders and Tyabb – including burial and cremation options currently available and a photo gallery of each of the cemetery locations. For inquiries regarding the four cemeteries, contact Mornington Peninsula Cemetery Trust’s cemeteries office on 5950 1284 or email cemeteries@mornpen.vic.gov.au

UNIQUE ART ESPECIALLY FOR YOU 20% OFF COMMISSIONS 2 1 1 M a i n s t, M o r n in gto n www.nissaranagalleries.com.au

0474 496 222

$9.99

Available now from eateries wineries or breweries Plus bookstores, newsagents, produce stores and Ritchies across the Peninsula, Frankston and Melbourne

SEE STOCKISTS eatdrinkmorningtonpeninsula.com.au Issue 104, JULY 2020

Finding where your deceased friends or relatives are buried on the Peninsula has been made a whole lot easier after Mornington Peninsula Cemetery Trust carried out a major upgrade of its cemeteries webpage. The improved page, which you can find on Mornington Peninsula Shire’s website at www. mornpen.vic.gov.au/cemeteries, includes interactive maps that allow you to search the name of a loved one and find out where they are buried or interred.

Colin Passmore

info@ngmornington.com.au

Instagram/nissaranagalleries www.morningtonpeninsulamagazine.com.au

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arts events leisure

It’s time to get the creative juices flowing Calling all writers on the Peninsula – PENinsula Journal is a new annual literary journal calling for submissions for its first issue celebrating writers from the Mornington Peninsula. PENinsula will include captivating nature writing, personal essays and short fiction published annually alongside stunning local landscape photography. The brains behind it include local residents Emily Westmoreland and Celeste Deliyiannis, pictured, who have written in stone the official release date. The inaugural issue will be available in October this year and we’re excited to say the least.

“We have a wonderfully creative community here on the Peninsula, particularly of writers, but it’s a relatively quiet one,” said Celeste. “We want to give writers a chance to showcase their talents, but more importantly their ideas, their feelings and their thoughts with one another. Community fosters creativity, as creativity does community.” Submissions are being accepted now for nature writing, short fiction, narrative non-fiction and personal essays of up to 2000 words that have a strong sense of place, are set on or feature the Mornington Peninsula. Emily and Celeste are after writing that portrays a strong connection to the local landscape. To view the full submission guidelines, you’re encouraged to visit https:// peninsulajournal.weeblysite.com/ submissions “I don’t know many other lit mags in Australia that celebrate landscape and nature writing, and a lot of other

literary journals are based in Melbourne,” said Emily. “It can be disheartening as a young writer from the Peninsula feeling like you have to travel into the city to have your voice have relevance. But the Mornington Peninsula has such a lot to offer, and I don’t just mean in terms of landscape.” Time’s ticking, so get that idea that’s been floating in the back of your mind down on paper before submissions close midnight Friday, July 31. Emily and Celeste ask that you email your submissions to morningtonpeninsulajournal@ gmail.com as a Word document or a PDF attachment with the subject as ‘SUBMISSION: [Your Name]’. Furthermore, you don’t need to be an established writer to partake in this exciting opportunity. Emerging artists are also encouraged to get involved. After all, the annual journal is all about celebrating writers from the Mornington Peninsula – you’ve got nothing to lose and everything to gain. “I completely reject that old trope of a tortured writer sitting alone in a quiet room. Community and conversation fosters creativity, and that’s what we’re hoping to amplify with our journal,” said Celeste. “We’re blessed with an imaginative, almost fairytale-like landscape down here, and there’s so many stories hidden in it. For many of us, where we live is a huge part of our identity, and I’m excited to see what we’ll uncover as a community by ruminating on that idea together for a little while.”

If you’re more a reader than a writer, or you are ever so keen to be a part of this initiative, you can pre-order your copy online via https://peninsulajournal. weeblysite.com/ “We’re hoping PENinsula will be a thing of beauty, something to do justice to the beauty we’re surrounded by every single day here,” said Emily. “Whatever the Peninsula means to you, we’d like to hear about it.” KATE SEARS

Stay safe, stay connected to your community with * Please note. There are no storytime sessions at Seaford Junior Library on the first Tuesday of the month.

visit library.frankston.vic.gov.au/whats_on or call 9784 1020

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Everything we love about the peninsula, fresh every month

P: 9708 8222 /MornPenMag www.morningtonpeninsulamagazine.com.au mornington PENINSULA

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Frankston City Council has drafted an Arts & Culture Strategic Plan for the next four years and is inviting you to have your say about artistic programs, events and opportunities within the municipality over the coming years. Frankston’s population of 140,000 is expected to increase to 160,000 by 2050. As the region evolves and becomes more of a destination for businesses, new residents and cultural tourists, the council is committed to innovate and offer fresh and contemporary art and culture that is inclusive and respectful of all community groups and our environment. During the life of the previous arts and culture strategy, the council upgraded Frankston Arts Centre and its infrastructure; built on sculpture and eclectic street art; and promoted the city’s reputation as an arts, festival and events destination. Incorporating Frankston Libraries, Frankston Major Events, Frankston Arts Centre

Issue 104, JULY 2020

and the council’s public art programs and commissions, the strategy aims to strengthen our community through learning, new experiences and engaging arts programs. If you have ideas for how to promote the city’s reputation as an arts, festival and events destination, your feedback is appreciated. To complete the online survey, visit https://bit.ly/arts-survey-frankston by 5pm on Friday, July 17. To request a hard copy of the survey via post, contact Frankston Arts Centre on 9784 1060. Everyone who completes the survey will go in a draw to win one of three $100 vouchers for Frankston Arts Centre. FRANKSTON ARTS CENTRE A: 27-37 Davey St, Frankston T: 9784 1060 W: www.thefac.com.au FB: FrankstonArtsCentre INSTA: the_fac

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arts events leisure

Have your say on arts and culture


education & parenting Chisholm helps mum focus on new career Mel Chamberlain spent 20 years working in the corporate world but ultimately found it didn’t fit with her values. Juggling three children with a demanding career was a challenge, and the busy mum wanted to find work that was more family-friendly and flexible. Ms Chamberlain had always loved taking photos and had even studied a photography course, but she had never worked as a photographer. Seeing the opportunity to utilise her snapper skills, she came up with an idea to set up a portable photo booth in a van to take to weddings and events. But how to get the business off the ground?

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Luckily, the Peninsula resident discovered the Federal Government’s New Enterprise Incentive Scheme. The program, delivered at Chisholm Institute of TAFE, provides free training and support for people who want to start their own small business and who are not currently employed or studying. Participants study the 13-week Certificate III in Micro Business Operations (BSB30315) and receive a year of mentoring from a small-business expert. Ms Chamberlain took part in the program in 2016 and hasn’t looked back. It helped her establish a business plan for her successful photo booth endeavour, which she has since sold, and she won a National Small Business Award in 2017. “NEIS was a turning point for me, providing really tangible and current information and tips about what really matters for a small business, and the financial support was really helpful to get

Everything we love about the peninsula, fresh every month

going,” she said. Ms Chamberlain has since started a successful wedding photography business, The Little Studio, which she said fit with her values much better than corporate work ever did. “Since doing NEIS I feel I’m living authentically and making choices that align with my values. I love that people now value what I’m doing, creating lifelong memories for them.” CHISHOLM INSTITUTE A: PO Box 684, Dandenong T: 1300 244 746 W: www.chisholm.edu.au FB: ChisholmInstitute INSTA: chisholm_institute

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It’s time for the kids to play In Hastings, there’s a fun place for kids of all ages to play and explore. Kidz Shed is an independent and locally owned and operated kids’ play centre whose owner, Lisa, is excited at the idea of opening her doors again soon after the easing of COVID-19 restrictions. In fact, moving forward she’s taking bookings for her popular birthday parties. “We’ve always been told by customers how impressed they are at just how clean we are, and now we’re increasing our already high hygiene standards to follow current restrictions and everchanging guidelines,” said Lisa. “We’ve always provided hand sanitiser, but we’ll be adding a stand at the entry and

adding extra staff.” The Kidz Shed hours are 9am-3.30pm on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, 9am-7pm on Fridays – which is ideal if parents want to sit back and enjoy a dinner – and 9am-5pm on weekends. With a variety of quality homemade hot and cold food, Lavazza coffee and gluten-free options, there is something for the whole family. Given the current unprecedented times, make sure to call before your visit or stop by the Kidz Shed website, Facebook or Instagram for updated information. KATE SEARS KIDZ SHED A: 222 Marine Pde, Hastings T: 5906 5900 M: 0409 875 944 W: http://kidzshed.com.au FB: KidzShed INSTA: kidzshed

SPECIALISING IN AFFORDABLE BIRTHDAY PARTIES PRIVATE VENUE HIRE AVAILABLE FOR SPECIAL FUNCTIONS Lots of yummy food & Lavazza coffee’s for parents to sit back and relax!

REOPENING SOON FOLLOWING COVID-19 CLOSURES FRIDAY BIRTHDAY SPECIAL! Book your party for after 3.30pm on a Friday and pay only $18 per child (normally $22 per child!)

www.kidzshed.com.au Tues-Thurs 9am - 3.30pm Friday 9am - 7pm (dinner available) Sat + Sun 9am - 5pm 222 Marine Parade, Hastings 5906 5900 0409 875 944

Issue 104, JULY 2020

CHECK OUR FACEBOOK, WEBSITE + INSTAGRAM FOR UPDATES AND OPENING DATE! WE CAN’T WAIT TO SEE YOU! Indoor play centre with a great outdoor play area and equipment, jumping castle, outdoor table, chairs & umbrellas www.morningtonpeninsulamagazine.com.au

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THE BUSINESS

the business

Future-proof your business With more than 30 years of combined experience, the friendly team at Better Accounting Solutions are qualified to handle all your accounting needs. As a cloud-based firm, they can complete your tax returns without the need for face-to-face appointments.

Their strong commitment to excellent customer service during the COVID-19 pandemic doesn’t waver as they focus now more than ever on high-quality business advisory services. These include cashflow forecasting, business continuity planning and future-proofing – all aspects that are highly relevant in the current economic climate. They acknowledge that while it is impossible to predict what is likely to happen in the future,

it’s vital to be prepared for the unknown – for example, the unprecedented times throughout the pandemic. Regarding this, the expert team suggest asking them to prepare a financial scoreboard so you can see your way through a difficult time if it arises. As leading accountants, they offer services for individuals, small to large businesses and SMSFs. For more information on becoming a client and to read their knowledgeable, regularly updated blog posts, please visit their website and Facebook page. KATE SEARS BETTER ACCOUNTING SOLUTIONS A: Level 1, 1379 Point Nepean Rd, Rosebud T: 5982 1714 W: www.betteraccountingsolutions.com.au FB: BetterAccountingSolution

MT ELIZA / MELBOURNE CBD / BRAESIDE MT ELIZA / MELBOURNE CBD / SANDRINGHAM

Specialists in Family Law Solutions

www.vicrajah.com.au Specialists in Family Law Solution www.calleyfamilylaw.com.au 9781 4222 info@vicrajah.com.au T. (03) 9781 4222 or E. calley@calleyfamilylaw.com.au

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Vic Rajah Family Lawyers specialises in all areas of family law and offers tailored advice on all family issues with the aim of achieving favourable and commercial outcomes. Experience and expertise are key at Vic Rajah Family Lawyers. Firm principal Vic Rajah is one of Melbourne’s leading family law practitioners and heads the team alongside well-respected Peninsulabased lawyer Helen Roach. Clients are their No.1 priority and their focus on attention to detail and quality of service is second to none. The firm prides itself as the leading provider of family law services on the Mornington Peninsula. By

consulting Vic Rajah Family Lawyers you are benefiting from a wealth of experience. Vic is proud of his team’s ability to provide unrivalled service to clients, and anyone who is in the separation process and is dissatisfied with their current representation should come for a 30-minute free consultation to see how Vic Rajah Family Lawyers can do it better. Vic Rajah Family Lawyers has offices in Mount Eliza, Melbourne CBD and Sandringham, so call today. VIC RAJAH FAMILY LAWYERS A: 1-3 Davies Ave, Mount Eliza A: 18/350 Queen St, Melbourne A: Suite 13, 1/296 Bay Rd, Cheltenham T: 9781 4222 W: vicrajah.com.au

THE BUSINESS

Family law service you can trust est. 1988

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THE BUSINESS

Lunch & Learn Social distancing may have relaxed, but businesses still have a long road ahead to repair the ripples caused by COVID-19. The Lunch & Learn workshops run by Mornington accounting firm SMART Business Solutions have become a much-coveted part of the small business landscape for local business owners for close to two years. They continue to deliver high-quality workshops through online webinars, designed to support small business through the challenges they are facing. The workshops are facilitated by firm director Shannon Smit and her highly trained team of accountants and business advisers, covering such topics as How To Process Government Income in Xero, Business Recovery Planning, Cash Flow Management, and more. They’re also leading the way with webinars explaining the continued changes to government support for small businesses and individuals in a way that’s easy to understand. Shannon’s position on the Australian Board of Taxation ensures the information delivered is accurate and actionable. Check out www.smartbusinesssolutions.com.au/events for the webinar schedule and register using the Zoom links in each event. SMART BUSINESS SOLUTIONS A: Level 1, 328 Main St, Mornington W: www.smartbusinesssolutions.com.au FB: SMART.SBS

WEBINARS

We can help you with your printing needs. Anything from business cards, brochures, flyers to banners and heaps more. 20% Off all website products if you enter the code ‘COVID-20%’ at the checkout. Refer to our website for our full range:

www.digitalreprographics.com.au

Check out our May Program

Business Coaching

Tel: 9781 0073

Shop 2, 415-417 Nepean Hwy., Frankston

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www.smartbusinesssolutions.com.au/events

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THE BUSINESS

- business coaching webinars

Do you have a Will? If not, or if your Will needs reviewing, let me help you.

Standard Will $200.00 (plus GST) each. Power of Attorney $150.00 (plus GST) each.

John D Crump Solicitor 1 Davies Avenue Mount Eliza Vic 3930 Tel. 9787 7222 Issue 104, JULY 2020

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Dental health week

The not-so-sweet truth about sugar and your teeth Smile – it’s Dental Health Week! The Australian Dental Association’s major annual oral health campaign this year runs from Monday, August 3, until Sunday, August 9, during which the ADA aims to educate Australians about the importance of maintaining good oral health. The association’s four key messages are: brush twice a day with fluoride toothpaste; clean between your teeth daily using floss or interdental brushes; eat a healthy, balanced diet and limit your sugar intake; and visit your dentist regularly for check-ups and preventative care. This year’s campaign focuses on the harm sugar does to our oral health. By asking ‘How much sugar is hiding in your trolley?’, the ADA aims to help Australians get ‘sugar-savvy’ by highlighting recommended daily sugar

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Everything we love about the peninsula, fresh every month

consumption levels, sharing information on the effect that sugar has on our teeth, and providing advice on how to read food labels to identify ‘hidden’ sugar. The unfortunate reality is that the oral health of many

Australians is not where it should be and not everyone is following good oral practices. In fact, less than 50 per cent of Australian adults have had a dental check-up in the past 12 months, 53 per cent only brush their teeth once a day, and almost 40 per cent admit that they never floss or clean between their teeth. In terms of sugar, the ADA says 73 per cent of Aussie children aged 14-18 are consuming too much, compared with 47 per cent of those over 18 years. Australian dental practitioners have the highest infection control standards in the world and the safety of their patients and their teams is a cornerstone of Australian dental practice. With dentists now at ‘Level 1’ restrictions during the COVID-19 climate, this means they may take extra precautions to ensure your visit is safe for you, the dentist and the staff, and if appropriate they will advise you of the safety measures they have put in place. So give those pearly whites some extra love and make it a goal to floss daily, check for hidden sugars in your food and drinks, and visit www.ada.org.au/Dental-HealthWeek-2020/Home for up-to-date information.

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Dental health week

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health beauty fashion

health beauty fashion

It’s been a big year for Big Girls

While many Australian businesses have been hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic, at least one has experienced a boom in sales. Big Girls Don’t Cry Anymore registered a 50 per cent increase in online sales of its lingerie during the crisis as women around the country embraced retail therapy to help them get through the lockdown. “Sales during COVID have really surprised us,” says Big Girls founder Karen Edbrooke. “I think women just want to feel good about themselves while dealing with COVID and treat themselves to a gorgeous new bra. Bras are such a great COVID antidote. Women now have more time to browse online and buy something nice for themselves.” Karen says her customers have been spending a lot of lockdown time reading, catching up on lifestyle trends

www.peninsulaendermologie.com

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continued from facing page and indulging themselves while dealing with the pandemic. “Lifestyle media including magazines are providing an important vehicle for women to stay connected and engaged. Many of our customers are telling us that COVID has given them the time to unwind, pick up a magazine or jump online with a glass of wine and search out new products and spend a bit of money on themselves. “As a result, sales in lingerie are soaring. Pretty, patterned and luxurious lingerie is selling really well. Our sales have increased so much that we have had to bring on board seven new staff to help us cope with our internet orders. “We have also expanded our online offerings to help women access products and services during COVID. We now have nine virtual fitting rooms open for extended hours to help women access bra fittings over the internet. My staff

are providing virtual fitting services full time to help women across the country access the bras they need while working or isolating at home. We are offering gift vouchers to the value of $30 to essential workers across the country to assist them to access bras with plenty of support while they are working long hours.” Karen founded Big Girls 28 years ago after she was seriously injured in a car accident, and the company has evolved from a small shop to become Australia’s largest independently owned lingerie and swimwear business. Its latest innovation is Big Girls TV, an online lingerie show for plus-size and curvy women that regularly attracts hundreds of thousands of viewers. Shows include live streaming of lingerie fashion parades and other informational segments using everyday Australian women as models.

T HE U LT IMAT E IN S O F T N E S S , LI G H TNES S & WA R M T H . Experience the wonderfully light and luxurious warmth of Australia’s finest Merino wool knitwear range from MerinoSnug. Our entire merino wool range is 100% Australian grown and made in Australia. Factory Outlet: 140 Colemans Road, Carrum Downs VIC 3201 Open Monday-Thursday 10am-4pm, Friday 10am-3pm Phone 9786 1113

www.merinoandco.com.au Issue 104, JULY 2020

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health beauty fashion

It’s been a big year for Big Girls


health beauty fashion

No doubt everyone’s adapting to post-isolation changes in routine – ultimately, we bet you’re missing the comfort of your work-from-home clothes and relaxed home schooling attire. But never fear, we have a solution: National Pyjama Day is on Friday, July 17, and not only do you get to jump into your favourite PJs, you’ll also be helping raise vital money for children in foster care – and that’s a double win in our books. Together we can support little kids with their big dreams while being toasty and warm. While the thought of wearing pyjamas at school and work brings a sense of light-hearted fun, its focus is on a more serious issue. The day is hosted by The Pyjama Foundation, which provides children in foster care the opportunity to change the direction of their lives with life skills, confidence and learning. It’s then through the Love of Learning program that volunteers – called Pyjama Angels – are recruited, trained, then matched with a child in care who they see once a week and focus on learning-based activities during their allocated time. Whether it’s helping children with their homework, playing educational games or reading books aloud with their child, it’s all focused on their enrichment. Essentially, the vital part of the volunteers’ role is to give foster children a chance to reach their potential despite their fragile beginnings. Children in care have the lowest education outcomes nationally, so for more than 15 years

The Pyjama Foundation has dedicated itself to improving these children’s learning skills and making a positive impact on their lives. Amid the current pandemic, the foundation has gone online to generate support for its work. This has included introducing a TikTok challenge to get more people

connected virtually while creating a buzz around the foundation’s mission, and to have fun creating videos with their friends and family to help raise awareness. You can also follow the foundation on social media and

post an image of yourself completing a challenge in your pyjamas with the hashtag #InMyPjs. Challenges include dancing, singing, teaching, and hosting a Zoom meeting – all simple tasks, just complete them in your PJs. “It’s quite different at the moment,” said Victorian regional co-ordinator Shannon O’Brien. “Normally we’d be out and about promoting National Pyjama Day in schools, which are some of the biggest supporters. We’re eager to get back out there.” Don’t sleep on your decision – let’s all get together in our Ugg boots and onesies to help the team hit Victoria’s sign-up target of 400 groups and make up for lost time. Within the Mornington Peninsula region alone, the foundation is supporting more than 20 families. Whether you’re a school, a business, or a community group, you’re all invited to the pyjama party. Anyone can sign up and everyone should by creating a fundraising page then encouraging their team, classmates and colleagues to raise much-needed money. Visit www.nationalpyjamaday.com to help children in foster care receive the emotional and educational support that they need to achieve their dreams and reach their potential. With a little confidence and encouragement, who knows what they can achieve? KATE SEARS

Ph 8753 5833 6 Station St Seaford, VIC 3198 www.flowhairdesign.com.au

Seaford's boutique hair salon flowhair_design info@flowhairdesign.com.au

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What better way to bounce back into socialising than with an exciting new pair of glasses. All the way from France, the brand Tarian provides statement style for both women and men – and it’s ready and waiting at Main Street Eyecare.

There’s endless variety to choose from with the full product range of colourful and modern styles on offer, so there’s bound to be a style to suit every face. There’s the edgy Graphic, the bright Rendez-Vous, the sleek Cyclades and the textured accents of the Ceramics collection. Or dabble with the subtle two-tone acetate in the Dolce range that celebrates colour and is on trend for both men and women.

health beauty fashion

All eyes on Main Street Eyecare

“We are thrilled to be stocking Tarian frames,” said owner/operator Kay Tyrie. “We’re also back in operation working within the stringent hygiene guidelines.” The team at Main Street Eyecare reopened midMay with interim trading hours, so check their social pages for updates before stopping by. They look forward to looking after all of your eyecare and eye health needs, but if you have any cold or flu-like symptoms, please contact the store by phone. KATE SEARS MAIN STREET EYECARE A: 57 Main St, Mornington T:  5975 3235  FB: mainstreeteyecare3931 INSTA: mainstreeteyecare

Eyewear as individual as you are...

MainStreet EyeCare

57 Main Street, Mornington (03) 5975-3235 Issue 104, JULY 2020

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health beauty fashion

How would you feel

if you lost 5kg? That feeling of pulling on your favorite jeans and finding them a bit too snug is a very common one – particularly as we find ourselves starting to enjoy the freedom of heading out a bit more and wearing clothes other than active wear to stay warm and comfy around the house. It only takes around 500 additional calories per day to gain ½-1kg a week. That’s the equivalent of around two standard glasses of wine and two rows of chocolate each day. Let’s be honest, a lot of us enjoyed this during the COVID-19 restrictions! Other than fitting into our ‘pre-COVID’ wardrobe, there are so many health benefits of losing those extra COVID kilos: • You will reduce your likelihood of health-related problems such as Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, liver disease, joint problems and sleep disturbances. • A weight loss of 5kg can reduce up to 20kg load on your knees. • Improved sleep quality. One study showed that people who lost 5 per

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cent of their total body weight slept for 22 minutes longer than they normally would. • Losing 10 per cent of body weight reduces the volume of fat around the liver by 14.7 per cent. • Losing just 3.3kg and following the Be Fit Food, Be Rapid program for one week has shown to reduce blood glucose levels and blood pressure. Most importantly, you will feel amazing. Don’t procrastinate. The best way to start is to just do it. If you’re unsure whether a weight loss program is suitable for you, we advise you to talk to your health professional, and you can speak with our Be Fit Food dietitians. Kate Save is the CEO and co-founder of Be Fit Food in Mornington. For more info, go to befitfood.com.au or phone 1300 2 MEALS (63257) BE FIT FOOD A: 2/49 Mornington-Tyabb Rd, Mornington T: 1300 263 257 W: www.befitfood.com.au FB: befitfoodaustralia INSTA: befitfoodaustralia

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The team at Mt Eliza Beauty Therapy are excited to be back in the salon seeing familiar faces and welcoming new clients. “While we have always practised high standards of hygiene and sterilisation within our salon, we have gone the extra mile to ensure everyone is safe,” say owners Lisa Lazzarotto and Susie Phillips. “Our professional team has been committed to upskilling and increasing our knowledge with exciting new products and treatments while we have been closed.” Lisa, Susie and the team are also delighted to introduce their newest team member, Julie, who was a familiar face at Mt Eliza Beauty from many years ago and has now returned, having worked on

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health beauty fashion

Back in business with a familiar face the Peninsula for several years. “We are very excited to have her back, bringing her experience and knowledge specialising in oxygen facials, peels and LED treatments. She will be working alongside our team performing electrolysis, waxing, eyelash lifts, tinting, manicures, pedicures and shellac, and specialising as a massage therapist.” As an introductory offer, any facial booked with Julie during July and August will receive a complimentary half-hour back massage. MT ELIZA BEAUTY THERAPY A: 3  2A Mount Eliza Way, Mount Eliza T: 9775 4785 W: www.mtelizabeautytherapy. com.au FB: mtelizabeautytherapy INSTA: mtelizabeauty

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health beauty fashion

your juLY STARS

Stephanie is an experienced Astrologer and regular contributor to

by Stephanie Johnson

Aries:

Your ruling planet Mars has moved into your Zodiac Sign, giving you a supercharged boost of energy. Drive and determination are the themes of the month. As a fiery Aries you are usually pretty energetic. Now you are turbocharged. So, decide on your priority and tackle it. Taurus: The theme for 2020 is money matters. July’s planetary alignment encourages you to stay positive, to keep those ideas flowing. Your mind is likely to be more active, plotting ways that you can boost your income or curb your spending habits. A short journey may help lift your spirits. Gemini: Last month was the height of Gemini Season with an Eclipse in your Sign and other planets lined up in Gemini. A makeover was in order in many areas of your life. This month sees you sorting through your options. You may still need to juggle a few areas of your life. Cancer: Feminine energy is strong in your life, meaning that women of all shapes and sizes – friends, family members and colleagues – are highlighted. It also means that it is time for you to nurture the feminine side of your own nature with spa treatments, massages, meditation, water activities and communing with nature.

Leo: This is your time of the year to slow down, count

your blessings and reassess how you can be of service to others. Every year, early July presents you with this opportunity. You could plan a health or luxury retreat. If this is not possible, then you can treat yourself at home. Virgo: Allies is an old-fashioned word, but this is what you need this month. This means you need friends or groups that are formally co-operating with you for a shared purpose, most likely – although not necessarily – a professional one. In other words, you need people who are on your side. Libra: A man – friend, lover, relative, colleague – challenges you as the feisty planet Mars moves into your opposite Zodiac Sign, Aries. Your usual equilibrium is tested. The trick is to stand your ground if necessary but avoid throwing down the gauntlet. Matters are likely to calm down by July 28. Scorpio: This is your month for big ideas. Usually this means planning a trip to a foreign country, but you may be restricted by the pandemic lockdown. Alternatives are sports, politics, spiritual inspiration, online conferences, academic study or cultural activities. You need to find activities that lift your spirits.

Mornington Peninsula Magazine.

For more info go to seeingwithstars.net or ph: 0411 2555 77

Sagittarius: July sees you examine the ways in

which you invest your time, energy and money. This is not about your personal habits but rather how you reach out to others. If you are married or in a business partnership then your joint resources may be under the microscope. Capricorn: Partnerships are highlighted this month. If you are single then you may reassess your situation and make moves to either partner up or shore up your personal alone time. If you are in a committed relationship then you may need to nurture your loved ones as events occur in their life. Aquarius: It is time to assess your work/life balance and make sure that you are maintaining a healthy balance. You may need to discard habits that no longer support your health and well-being, and adopt new ways of working or living. It is your daily life, the minutiae, that is highlighted. Pisces: Creativity is the theme. It’s time to let your artistic side out to play. The idea is to have fun – to play music, pick up a paintbrush, pen a poem or dance a jig. You don’t have to be perfect. Rather, follow the example of children who love to laugh and play.

Calm the mind and still the soul Tai chi improves co-ordination, balance and muscle strength, and it challenges the brain to work in different ways. It also stills the soul and calms the mind – especially in these trying times of isolation, uncertainty and fear of the unknown. Tai chi develops confidence in movement and improves posture. Rising Moon Tai Chi is a COVID-19-safe school, and business principal Jenny Harrison has resumed face-to-face classes, ensuring that all instructors and participants follow strict protocols of sanitising and social distancing. Numbers are limited to nine students per class, enabling everyone to enjoy a safe and enjoyable learning

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environment. Throughout isolation, Jenny improvised so her students could still enjoy tai chi at a time when it was most needed. Commencing Zoom classes online and starting a YouTube channel has provided an outlet for Jenny and her passionate students. The Zoom classes will continue, with two evening online sessions.

New students are welcome, so why not jump out of isolation and into a martial art. Visit YouTube and search for Rising Moon Tai Chi School to get a free taste of what tai chi is all about. RISING MOON TAI CHI T: 0418 566 216 W: www.risingmoontaichi.net FB: risingmoontaichi INSTA: risingmoontaichi

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Peninsula Made clean green local . . .

Local food for local tables #mornpenmagbizlove Throughout this COVID-19 crisis, we can’t help but focus on what we’re grateful for. We’re beyond spoilt for choice with amazing farmgates on the Mornington Peninsula. We’re also lucky to have access to fresh produce all year round – even during the current crisis. Given this, you may have noticed an increase in focus on Peninsula produce and businesses in our magazine and on our website and social media pages. We’ve started the hashtag #mornpenmagbizlove so we can assist small businesses by spreading the word while also helping our readers find the perfect Peninsula-based produce they’re after. Red Hill Truffles has been given the go-ahead to reopen trade for winter, so get those gumboots ready! Stop by to purchase black truffles, truffle and mushroom paste, truffle butter, truffle salt, truffle honey and truffle eggs – the options are endless. Furthermore, truffle hunts and tastings are back in full swing with a 10-person limit in place. They’ll be held during the weekends throughout July, so what are you waiting for? Book in for the thrill of the hunt with Jenny McAuley and her Issue 104, JULY 2020

dog, Thomas. Stop by the Instagram page @redhilltruffles for more information. Meanwhile, Somerville Egg Farm has been supplying farm-fresh produce for 40 years, so it’s got you covered for all your egg needs. Changes to the farm’s shopfront have been made, with card payments preferred and a request for customers to please respect social distancing – which is roughly three chickens of space between you

and others. You might even want to drop by when the staff are having a team meeting in the paddock with the chickens, alpacas, goats, emus and maremma dogs. Visit the farm’s Facebook page @SomervilleEggFarm for updates. It’s all about local food for local tables. KATE SEARS

FARM FREE RFRESH EGG ANGE WHOLSE AT ALE PRICES S!

Barn doo Monday r sales to 8am - 4 Friday :30 & Saturd pm 8am - 12 ays :30pm

BAGGED MANUR E $5

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EGG FARM LOCAL FOOD FOR LOCAL TABLES

5977 5405

220 Eramosa Rd West, Moorooduc Corner of Binnak Way E. admin@somervilleeggfarm.com.au www.morningtonpeninsulamagazine.com.au

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food wine produce Going nuts in the kitchen

During isolation, our cooking-at-home trends have grown from banana bread to use up over-ripe bananas to sourdough loaves made from our own starter. Then many of us moved on to pies, Anzac biscuits, soups, and cinnamon scrolls. Yes, iso-baking has been delicious. Well, let us introduce you to the next iso kitchen trend. With winter fully settled in, why not get stuck into some warming recipes by Mayver’s. Grab those pantry staples such as peanut butter and almond chia spread and put your newly acquired kitchen skills into practice to satisfy your passion for trying new recipes. Make sure to share your results on Instagram and tag @mornpenmag and @mayversfood

Almond Chia Spread Marinated Tofu Recipe by Ash from @innerpickle_ Time: 1 hour Serves: 3 Gluten-free/dairy-free/ vegetarian/sugar-free Ingredients For the tofu + marinade: 250g firm tofu, drained pressed for 30 minutes 3 shallots, finely chopped 1/3 cup Mayver’s Almond + Chia Spread 2 tbsp tamari (or soy sauce)

1 tbsp black bean sauce 1 tbsp sesame oil ½-1 tsp sriracha sauce 1 tsp minced ginger 2 tsp rice malt syrup Water to thin Cracked pepper to taste For the bowl additions: 2/3 cup basmati rice ½ tsp Chinese 5-Spice Cracked pepper Cucumber

Method Preheat the oven to 180C, and whisk together the ingredients above from the Mayver’s spread to the rice malt syrup in a small bowl. Add enough water to thin the mixture – roughly half to a full tablespoon. Chop the tofu into cubes and place in a shallow baking dish with the shallots. Pour the marinade over the tofu and shallots and gently stir to coat. Place baking dish in the oven for 25 minutes, flipping the tofu over after the first 15 minutes. While the tofu is cooking, prepare the rest of the ingredients for the bowls. Rinse the rice under cold water and cook as directed. Add the Chinese 5-spice and cracked pepper to the water at the beginning of cooking. Fluff and serve. Chop the cucumber into 3cm slices and quarter. Top the rice bowls with equal handfuls of cucumber, and, once cooked, finish off the bowls with equal thirds of the tofu. Serve.

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FOOD WINE PRODUCE

Taste the delights of Greater Dandenong

Discover the vibrancy and diversity of Greater Dandenong and enjoy the region’s rich array of culinary delights on one of the city’s acclaimed food tours. Join other food lovers for an authentic celebration of food and culture in one of Melbourne’s most celebrated and thriving food heartlands. A visit to the City of Greater Dandenong allows you to travel the world without the need for a passport. Now officially recognised as Australia’s most culturally diverse community, Greater Dandenong provides a rich tapestry of cultural experiences that will awaken the senses and leave you

wanting more. The perfect way to get your first taste of the city is on a Food Lovers or Cultural Tour. Explore Afghani culture in Dandenong’s Afghan Bazaar precinct or travel to South-East Asia in Springvale. Greater Dandenong’s celebrated twohour tours provide generous samplings of a rich array of cuisines and conclude with a delicious meal. Book one of the scheduled tours today or contact the City of Greater Dandenong to tailor one for a group of your closest family and friends. Go to greaterdandenong.com/tours or phone 8571 1666 and discover Greater Dandenong on a plate.

Greater Dandenong Tours

Have an authentic cultural experience without your passport!

Dumpli n a n d Dessert gs s

Afghaaanr Baz

Be introduced to the wonderful Afghan business community learning how traditional Afghan bread is made, visiting a traditional homewares shop, supermarkets and finishing with an Afghan banquet. Guarantee you won’t walk away hungry!

Who doesn’t like dumplings and desserts and on this tour you can indulge in both. You will be treated to a variety of dumplings along the way and finish with fabulous desserts.

Do you have a group of friends or colleagues and can’t make one of the scheduled dates? Did you know that we can organise group bookings for 8–16 people available upon request. For more information and bookings visit greaterdandenong.com/tours 8571 1666 or phone 8571 1377


FOOD WINE PRODUCE

Award-winning wines naturally

Dromana Estate winery has something for everyone, with seven varietals, 19 wines and three labels. The Mornington Estate wines are fresh and vibrant with distinctive regional characteristics, while the premium Dromana Estate range highlights the Peninsula’s extended, gradual ripening season that is ideal for producing award-winning wines from classic, cool-climate varietals. It is Dromana Estate’s belief that exceptional wines arise from great grapes and vineyard management with minimal intrusion and interference. Fungicides are kept to the absolute minimum and organic options are used when available, resulting in premium wines that are as sustainable and eco-friendly as possible, while the minimal use of preservatives allows the natural flavour of the wines to shine through. The cellar door is open 11am-4pm weekends. DROMANA ESTATE A: 555 Old Moorooduc Rd, Tuerong M: 0420 628 085 W: www.dromanaestate.com.au FB: DromanaEstate INSTA: dromanaestate

Natural Spring Water Peninsula Springs is a local, family owned and operated Natural Spring Water business, serving the Mornington Peninsula and Bayside Regions. We pride ourselves on providing great service and great tasting Natural Spring Water to our clients. Delivered Free to your door. Indulge in the taste of Peninsula Springs Natural Spring Water in 15 litre or 600ml size bottles.

For more information ring Peninsula Springs on 0413 996 317 or check the website at www.peninsulasprings.com.au

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FOOD WINE PRODUCE

Foodies and businesses sink their teeth into new app A community mobile app has been launched to help Frankston and Mornington Peninsula food businesses connect directly with their customers. Frankston entrepreneur and Bizz Apps founder Dave Wilton has created the Bite Local app to help restaurants and cafes go mobile and engage with a broader customer base at lower costs. “When COVID-19 hit, I was disheartened to hear how hard the restaurant industry was hit,” Dave said. “Two of my kids and many friends were working in hospitality and, like thousands of others, were stood down from their jobs. To compound the issue, food

Issue 104, JULY 2020

businesses are paying certain big-name delivery and app software companies up to 35 per cent commission for their takeaway/delivery services. I want to help the community support local business by buying direct.” Bite Local has a small monthly membership fee for restaurants that wish to be featured. This gives them their own page and menu on the app, food ordering/ receiving, online table reservation feature (if applicable) and a food ordering button added to their website or Facebook page. There is also an option to add delivery driver management software if required. All this is with no up-front cost, no commissions or other ongoing fees. Businesses that already have digital food-ordering capabilities can still be featured and linked into the app for a reduced monthly fee. “Dine-in is back on as an option, which is fantastic,

but consumer appetite for takeaway food will remain strong, especially as many people continue to work from home for years to come,” Dave said. “I really hope that everyone in the Frankston and Mornington Peninsula area, including tourists, download the app. This will encourage more restaurants to sign up, to help them drive sales and save on costs. It will be a win-win for our community.” Bite Local is free to download from the App Store or Google Play Store. BIZZ APPS A: Frankston South M: 0413 335 382 W: www.bitelocal.com.au FB: DaveBizzApps

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FOOD WINE PRODUCE

By Tom Portet T: 0490 145 144 E: tom@rhwinecollective.com.au www.rhwinecollective.com.au When fire ripped through a Ten Minutes by Tractor warehouse in February 2018, it marked a seismic rejuvenation of one of the Mornington Peninsula’s pre-eminent wineries. Not only would chef Adam Sanderson take charge in the restaurant kitchen, but the supremely talented Imogen Dillon was promoted to head winemaker, both under the stewardship of owners Martin and Karen Spedding. The rebuild, just down the road from our own shop, has been exhilarating to watch and it’s so very pleasing that the latest releases of wines are finding real purpose and consistency that will totally delight.

10XT Pinot Noir 2019 $34 You have to watch for 2019 pinot noir that were picked a little too ripe due to heat spike, but this is totally elegant and restrained.

Everything is in its place – including the price. It was the first wine made at their new Coolart Rd winery, 95 per cent in concrete tanks that promote savoury spice and real drinkability. It’s going to build depth, and the chewy dark tannin finishes suggest even some time ahead . . . but I’d drink it now.

10 Minutes by Tractor Estate Chardonnay 2018 $44 Winemaker Imogen Dillon had three years at Yabby Lake before taking charge of the whites program at 10XT, and the poise, precisions and all-important mid-palate weight thrive here – as you’d expect from the talents at Yabby. There is more tension in the nashi, pear and stone fruit

spectrum that makes it totally delicious and a very restrained oak that allows the vineyard (Osborne in Tuerong) to shine.

10 Minutes by Tractor Estate Pinot Noir 2018 $48 While we have to wait for the iconic singlevineyard releases of the estate, here is a great option ahead of that fanfare. It’s a combination of ‘up and down’ the hill, filled with wild fruit and raspberry, and black cherry from the Coolart Rd vineyard. Clearly a lot of care has brought the poise here, using some very special sites to create a very serious wine that has more drive, freshness, youth and ultimate vibrancy. Top notch!

A CHAT WITH OUR FOOD, WINE AND DINING EXPERTS Kate Save, Be Fit Food, 2/49 Mornington-Tyabb Rd, Mornington www.befitfood.com.au

As the founder of Be Fit Food and an accredited practising dietitian and exercise physiologist, could you tell us what makes Be Fit Food unique? The key selling point of the brand is that we’re scientifically approved. Our brand’s promise is to create change to our customers’ health and well-being. We’re not about the calorie counting, but instead delivering a product to help their overall health. Our recipes are created by our team of dietitians and are designed to bring the body into mild nutritional ketosis, which makes the body burn stored fat rather than carbohydrates and helps our customers to feel fuller for longer, have

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more energy throughout their day, sleep better and help towards other health benefits, such as lowered cholesterol and balanced blood sugar levels. Where does the inspiration for each meal come from? We have 70 lines currently, and we focus on feedback and surveying. We have a Be Fit Foodies private Facebook group of 4500 members who assist us by voting on flavours to try and their favourite meals. Tasting panels are used for our new products and we’ll complete two to three rounds of tasting. Could you tell us about production in your industrial kitchen? At any point in time we produce 20,000 meals a week. It’s always full steam ahead. We have the capacity to grow five times our size – we made that decision a few years ago when we expanded and followed our vision to change the health of Australia. And to do that we need to reach more lives, which we’re doing by delivering nationally. Is there anything exciting in the works that we can expect to see soon? Our new gluten-free protein bread has 15g of protein, less than 2g of carbs, three egg whites and around 100 calories for two slices! We’re updating our menu constantly, and now we’re introducing new winter meals like soups, Little Egg Bites, and Banana & Coconut Muffins.

What is your advice for improving everyday eating habits? I always say for your work day you should plan your meals and snacks the day before. You must be prepared a day ahead. Good intentions lead to good behaviour; you just have to act on them. Do you have a top three Be Fit Food meals that you’d recommend to a new customer? Everyone’s favourite and our No.1 one seller is the Wholemeal Beef Lasagne. But my personal favourite is the Trio of Green Soup. My third would be a draw between the Naked Burrito Bowl, Spicy Mexican Pulled Beef, and the Cauliflower Fried Rice & Chicken. Do you have any advice to those starting out on their Be Fit Food journey? I’d say just get started. Don’t overthink it. Just begin by placing your order, and trust that the process always works if you just stick to it. You must believe it will work, which you will after reading the testimonials, watching what others are doing and cheering each other on in the Facebook group. I’m a big believer in having your last hurrah if you need to; you shouldn’t feel like you’re depriving yourself. Instead, think to yourself that you deserve this change and that your body will appreciate it. You should feel ready and excited. And you’ll feel much better for it. KATE SEARS

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property home garden

Snug as a bug in a rug Jumping into a toasty warm bed during the chilly winter months is the epitome of cosiness, yet the secret to feeling fresh and revitalised each morning is actually a good night’s sleep. The Sandringham team at Makin Mattresses will make that dream a reality with a bed that’s just perfect for you. You and your body will know the difference when you experience their comfy-plus mattresses – so just add a fluffy doona and knitted throw and you’re set for winter.

The team are Bayside’s bedding specialists, and for more than 40 years Makin Mattresses has been Australia’s

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largest independent mattress manufacturer, so you just know that your restful and warm night’s sleep is in very capable hands. With 10 stores Australia-wide and six manufacturing sites, Makin Mattresses has a range of mattresses to suit everyone — including the two-piece Bellissimo range. Designed to provide long-lasting comfort, support and style, it has a seven-zone support system that cradles the parts of your body that need it most. Makin Mattresses is the only bedding manufacturer in Australia to have a micro coil machine that maximises mattress airflow to reduce heat and increase hygiene, which is helpful for those who sleep warm and in the summer months. This feature is essential not only for your body temperature but also the health of your mattress because sweat causes foam to degrade and

flatten over time. Makin Mattresses’ complete range of mattresses are double-sided, handcrafted and designed to be flipped and rotated to ensure an even sleep surface. This is vital because it doubles the life of your mattress. Makin Mattresses sells direct to the public, and clients can try before they buy. Now that’s something to dream about this winter. KATE SEARS MAKIN MATTRESSES A: 189 Bay Rd, Sandringham T: 9533 1113 W: www.makinmattresses.com.au FB: MakinmattressesAu

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Company ups the tempo of community support The Tempo Group has a long history of helping communities in need. Now the Mornington Peninsula building and construction company is stepping up again by offering the use of its Balnarring Village offices to pop-up and start-up ventures rent-free. Owner Ben Comelli, pictured, said many Peninsula businesses were coming together to support each other during the COVID-19 pandemic, and offering the use of Tempo’s newly built vacant retail/office spaces was one way his company could help the local economic recovery. “Businesses and individuals can take over these spaces for one day, one week or one month to launch products, sample markets, connect with customers, increase brand awareness, and create

Issue 104, JULY 2020

excitement and buzz,” Ben said. “The pop-up movement has been a huge success all over the globe. Now anyone

can have a shopfront presence without long-term, complex leasing.”

After seeing an opportunity to help out during a team-building tour of Cambodia in 2016, Ben established Tempo Build a Village in conjunction with Global Village Housing to provide struggling Cambodian families with free housing. Pop-up and start-up ventures wanting to take advantage of The Tempo Group’s offer are invited to email expressions of interest to media@thetempogroup.com. au

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The days are shorter, the nights are cooler and your home becomes the heart of your adventure in winter. Cosy on up with OZ Design Furniture’s winter collections inspired by international trends. You will find yourself immersed in comfort and entertaining in style this cooler season.

Issue 104, JULY 2020

There is something wonderful about winter and the importance of creating a sense of comfort and style in your interior space. The beauty that lies within this new-season collection is that it offers an abundance of rich textures, unique pieces and rich colour palettes. Textures such as wool, velvet and fur lie within the details while timber, glass and rattan still make a prominent appearance. Owned and operated by an Australian family, OZ Design recognises the importance of supporting the local community. The timeless Australianmade Kate sofa can be customised to suit your living space. Select from a range of timber leg stain options and thousands of fabric styles, and personalise the sofa details to make it uniquely your own. Style with cushions and throw rugs that are reflective of what you love and enjoy a sofa that’s been designed by you and is perfect for your space. Live OZ Design Furniture’s looks this season and love your space like you never have before. Shop at OZ Design Furniture Mornington. OZ DESIGN FURNITURE MORNINGTON A: Showroom D4, Peninsula Home, 1132 Nepean Highway, Mornington T: 8560 1137 W: www.ozdesignfurniture.com.au FB: OZDesignFurniture INSTA: ozdesignfurniture

Property Home Garden

Keep warm this winter with OZ Design Furniture

Refresh your

BATHROOM!! SERVICES INCLUDE: Leaking shower specialist

Indoor & outdoor tile cleaning & sealing Pre-sale makeovers Mouldy showers re-grouted Silicone seals replaced Damaged tiles replaced Cracked acrylic shower bases & Bathtubs repaired Find us on Facebook: Bayside-GROUT-Solutions

Jorg Melzer | Owner Operator 0424 843 358 | melzer1@bigpond.com

Choose the original and best

P: 9708 8222

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Order now to support local manufacturing Dollar Curtains + Blinds are a family-owned and operated Australian business that has been in operation since 1967. DCB have been proudly manufacturing their large range of Australian-made curtains, blinds and awnings for more than 53 years. DC+B manufacture these products locally in their workrooms in Victoria and also have a large range of exclusive Australian-made fabrics. DC+B are prouder than ever of their long-standing heritage of Australian-made craftsmanship and continuing this well into the future. They have always focused on creating a quality product, inspiring the aspirations of their customers. After 53 years, DC+B are proud to acknowledge the passion and expertise of their team, who ensure every single product is guided by a watchful eye and pride in work well done. Their longevity is a tribute to this attention to detail. From the cutter to the seamstress and the finisher, the products are carefully produced and tested through every stage, and most importantly are handcrafted in their own workrooms in Victoria. This also means you are purchasing direct from the manufacturer, which saves on hidden costs and ensures you receive value for money, high quality and durable window coverings that will last for many years to come. DC+B’s Australian-made quality not only provides long-term value but ordering now also helps support their local manufacturing. Furthermore, their range of block-out curtains and blinds insulate windows to keep rooms warmer through winter and reduce winter energy bills. Their block-out curtain lining is of exceptional quality and is able to regulate the temperature of a room by keeping the heat in during winter and keeping the heat out during summer. DC+B can come to you with their free measure and quote service. Contact their Mornington or Moorabbin teams today. DOLLAR CURTAINS + BLINDS A: Shop C4, Peninsula Home, 1128-1132 Nepean Highway, Mornington T: 5975 3655 A: Store 15, Kingston Central Plaza, 288 Centre Dandenong Rd, Moorabbin Airport T: 9566 8200 FB: dollarcurtainsandblinds INSTA: dollarcurtainsandblinds

It’s not rocket science Higher readership = better results

Choose the peninsula’s longest running, largest circulation glossy

InPrint • Online • On Social Media

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WE CLEAN OVENS

Oven Cleaning & Detailing Service Completely safe, Biodegradable & Caustic free

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Find your perfect sofa at Plush Frankston Have you ever stopped to think about how much time you actually spend on your sofa? Generally, it is one of the most used items of furniture in our homes. It’s where we kick off our shoes after a long day, where we catch up with friends over a coffee, and where we cuddle up with our loved ones for a movie marathon. A sofa can completely transform the look and feel of a room. It is one of the most meaningful purchases we will make for our homes, so it makes sense that it should be a perfect fit – a bespoke item. Our friends at Plush - The Sofa Specialists are here to help

you transform your home this season. All Plush sofas are handcrafted and feature Plush’s 10-year Peace of Mind Warranty®. With a variety of styles, configurations, and covers to choose from, it’s easy to build your perfect sofa in three simple steps. Head into Plush’s Frankston showroom to ask about Plush Shield® to protect your sofa from accidental spills; and Breatheclear® to provide your family long-lasting protection against common asthma and allergy triggers. Chat to a sofa specialist today at www.Plush.com.au, or head into the Plush showroom to feel real comfort. PLUSH — THINK SOFAS A: Frankston Power Centre, Shop 6, 111 Cranbourne Rd, Frankston T: 9770 2922 W: www.plush.com.au

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TRADES TO YOU

trades to you

your guide to local tradespeople

New Trades directory

every month

Last month, our Trades To You feature highlighted many of the Peninsula and Greater Frankston trade businesses that were still operating throughout the COVID-19 lockdown period and taking the upmost of care with their hygiene practices. Your response to the feature was so overwhelmingly positive that we’ve decided to make Trades To You a regular part of Mornington Peninsula Magazine in a directory format. With the cooler months now upon us and our isolation lockdown tasks still going strong – including DIY projects, home improvements, garden styling and house organisation – why not add some warmth to your home? Perhaps it’s time to introduce a little character with some updated furnishings, modern homewares or fancy fixtures. What about a touch of colour to get us through these gloomy winter days. If you’re after cosy nights and mornings that don’t chill you to the bone, now is the perfect time to add some heating, insulation, outdoor fire pits, or window furnishings. The options are endless. Or perhaps it’s simply a matter of ticking another task off that never-ending to-do list we all have. Whatever the job may be, we’ll have the trade for it – just keep your eye on our monthly Trades To You directory as the year progresses. And together we’ll support small businesses while getting our houses, gardens, cars and garages looking 11/10. If you are a tradesperson and looking to publicise your business to the Mornington Peninsula and Greater Frankston, give us a call. You will find we have great rates and options for editorial. Phone 9708 8222. KATE SEARS

• Caravan Servicing • Modifications & Repairs • Accident Repairs & Insurance • Spare Parts & Accessories • Reliable & Affordable • & Much more... 3/4 Satu Way Mornington | Ph: 5976 1269 | www.caravanrepairspecialists.com.au Issue 104, JULY 2020

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TRADES TO YOU

Crown expands its equipment line-up The team at Crown Lawn and Garden Services have added to their fleet of commercial mowers. A third Walker ride-on mower and a three-vehicle trailer will mean more efficient transportation of their machinery to work on large acreage mowing – from domestic and commercial properties to vacant blocks, paddocks, and sporting associations. Over the past 25 years, Greg and the team at Crown have ensured large-scale lawn areas across the Mornington Peninsula are not only neat and tidy, but also easy on the eye. Crown Lawn and Garden Services uses the latest in Walker zero-turn mowing equipment to provide a premium finish in both wet or dry conditions, and all ride-on mowers can cut within inches of trees and fences. Greg will tailor all services to offer a complete lawn care and maintenance service or individual garden services, from hedging and landscaping of small areas to overgrown backyard-blitz clean-ups – and of course large acreage mowing using either a catcher or throw cut. All services can be scheduled for weekly, fortnightly or monthly visits. CROWN LAWN AND GARDEN SERVICES M: 0417 415 417 E: info@crownlawnandgarden.com.au W: www.crownlawnandgarden.com.au

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Everything we love about the peninsula, fresh every month

mornington PENINSULA

Magazine


Issue 104, JULY 2020

www.morningtonpeninsulamagazine.com.au

TRADES TO YOU

Fire Pits & Chimineas by SLOT ME IN

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Promoting a clean, green peninsula

Planning for a liveable planet begins with us Remember how 2020 began? Chanting crowds marching across the globe and rallying the troops in response to climate change as bushfires raged out of control across Australia? Images of the next generation protesting with placards held high are indelibly etched in the minds of those who continue to support the environment-first fight. Many of these protestors have turned to activism online during lockdown, while plenty of people on the Peninsula continue to do their bit by reducing waste, recycling, and searching for sustainable alternatives. The global pandemic appears to have pushed these concerns to the back of the climate-crisis cupboard momentarily, but looks can be deceiving. Since launching a five-year plan to ensure its operations become carbon-neutral by next year and declaring a climate emergency in 2019, the Mornington Peninsula Shire has been working tirelessly towards a net-zero emissions municipality and is encouraging you to respond to its draft Climate Emergency Plan, which outlines how it is going to do it. The plan looks 20 years ahead. The first decade offers a map to guide us away from the threatening emergency situation

we already find ourselves in, while long-term targets include the reduction of community emissions by 80 per cent and net-zero emissions shire-wide by 2040. Global warming is real, folks, and the planet is heating up. The Shire’s draft Climate Emergency Plan points out that increasing temperatures, decreasing rainfall, extreme weather conditions and coastal inundation are happening across our region right now. That means you and me and our children are going to be affected unless we do something about it. Mornington Peninsula Shire believes the choices we make today will determine how we live tomorrow. Mornington Peninsula Magazine agrees. Mayor Sam Hearn said: “We are going to make a safer world, where people and nature thrive. Together. Now.” How? Through leadership and governance; increased climate advocacy; zero-carbon energy; resilient and adaptive communities; sustainable travel, transport and land use; and a circular economy with zero waste. There’s a long road ahead but starting is always the hardest part. Community consultation on the plan closes on July 15 so you’ve got plenty of time to have your say about our climate future. Just log on to www.mornpen.vic.gov.au/ climateemergencyplan, read through and give it a go. If not for yourself, do it for the generations to come. LIZ ROGERS

Photos: Steve Brown

COMMITTED TO A CLEAN GREEN PENINSULA Choose the peninsula’s longest running, largest circulation glossy To get your message to our readers call 9708 8222

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Everything we love about the peninsula, fresh every month

mornington PENINSULA

Magazine


All material published is copyright to Morn Pen Mag Pty Ltd ACN 621 041 512 www.morningtonpeninsulamagazine.com.au

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Mornington Peninsula Magazine JULY 2020  

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