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A B O U T

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M E

This portfolio displays a progression of undergraduate work during my time at The University of Nebraska-Lincoln, obtaining a Bachelor’s of Science in Design for Interior Design. Each project created an opportunity to solve a design problem through focused typologies or issue-based questions. Commencing each design with research, conceptual thinking, and a continuous layering of analog and digital analysis, I aim to create conscious designs centered around human need and lasting experiences. As client needs are evolving alongside advancements in the design discipline, I hope to further my career in commercial interior design by developing a strong understanding behind the ways sustainability and research can foster responsible design decisions.


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C O N T E N T S.

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T H E C R E AT I V E C L A SS I N R U R A L N E B R A S K A Restaurant Utilizing Native Nebraska Ecologies 4,960 square feet

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UNIT 125 Artist-In-Residence 3,920 square feet

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T H E CO Co-Working Office + Makerspace 16,264 square feet

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C A P S TO N E ( i n p ro g re s s ) Sustainable Urban Eatery 19,500 square feet

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A rc h i t e c t u r a l Ty p o lo g y + S t r u c t u r e

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T H E C R E AT I V E C L A SS I N R U R A L N E B R A S K A Restaurant Utilizing Native Nebraska Ecologies 4,960 square feet My intention is to create a culinary-rich experience entirely disconnected from the food scene, where non-traditional micro and macro scale food sources inform the program of the built environment, generating a desire for the creative class to indulge in the philosophy of food. Focusing on hyper-local ecologies and atypical ingredients, users will experience the value of food through an edible palate of Nebraska’s landscape. The craft of creativity is a reflection of one’s experiences, therefore a literal taste of Nebraska created by academic chefs will be the lead role in this program. Creating a stand-alone restaurant nested in the Sandhills will allow for local and statewide resources enveloped in a raw experience. The hyper-seasonal local ingredients will reflect the exterior and interior of the building from growth to consumption. A raw wooden exterior shows the state of food in the stage of growth and collecting, a raw and natural state. In contrast, a modernized interior composed of glass, travertine, and natural details will represent the journey of food in the chef’s perspective from raw to final artistic presentation. The mimicked volumes reflect a philosophy of journey and transformation. As guests enter the space, they are immediately enveloped in and exposed to a frame of the unique landscape for the entirety of their dining experience.

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1. Bee Fa r m s

2 . O r g a nic Fa r m s

3 . G ra pe Fa r m s

4. Laye re d E co lo g i e s

5 . C I R Veget a t ion M a p

5 . N E S a nd hills Reg ion

7. Di st a n ce To Gro ce r y Store s

8. C rea t ive C la s s in N E

9. L ayered M a pping

N E E co lo g i e s , Ve ge t a t i o n + C r e a t i ve C la s s


W i ld l i fe The NE Sandhills are most widely known for the Sandhill Cranes that populate the region, as well as cattle for farming and agriculture.

We t l a n d s + P ra i r i e s In between roaming sand dunes and prairies are valley wetlands, where much of the Sandhill flora and fauna live and grow.

O g a l l a l a A q u i fe r Spanning the length of 8 states, the Ogallala Aquifer exists aids in providing ground water to the region.

N E S a n d h i l l s L a n d Fo r m a t i o n

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Trave r t i n e Co r r i do r + G u e s t D i n i n g As guests enter the space, they are immediately enveloped and exposed to a frame of the unique landscape for the entirety of their dining experience. In order to give guests a suspenseful experience of wonderment, unknowing of the artistry and research of ecologies which occurs behind the scenes, the guest dining and kitchen spaces are separate. Excavating the lower level gives opportunity for an entire program of kitchen, storage, food research and staff spaces. Located directly above, guests are invited into reception and further onto their dining experience. Each space is thoughtfully laid out with consideration of staff needs and a seamless guest experience in mind.

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Fa r m to Ta b l e


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S to ra ge Wa l k- i n Fr i d ge Ro o t Ce l l a r K i tc h e n Plating Saucier Staff Dining Re s t ro o m O f f i ce

Guest Dining

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Ground Level 1 0 . Re s e a rc h O f f i c e 1 1 . S t a f f L o c k e rs

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Re ce p t i o n / H o s t Wo m e n ’ s Re s t r o o m M e n ’ s Re s t ro o m Coat Check Tra ve r t i n e C o r r i d o r Guest Dining

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Guest Dining A barn, a commonly abandoned architectural typology, gives home to the program at this remote restaurant. The hyper-seasonal, local ingredients will reflect the exterior and interior of the building from growth to consumption. A raw, wooden exterior shows the state of food in the stage of growth and collecting, a raw and natural state. In contrast, a modernized interior composed of glass, travertine and natural details represents the journey of food through the chef’s perspective to the final artistic presentation. The mimicked barn volumes reflect a philosophy of journey and transformation.

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A rc h i te c t u ra l Ty p o lo g y S t r u c t u r e + P r o g r a m m i n g

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Guest Dining + Landscape View


K i tc h e n , Ro o t C e l la r + Re s e a r c h O f f i c e s

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S t u d i o + G a l le r y Vo l u m e t r i c V i g n e t t e s


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UNIT 125 Artist-In-Residence Tadao Cern http://www.tadaocern.com/index.html 3,920 square feet

Unit 125 is the former 1950’s Typewriter Building nested in the core of downtown Lincoln, Nebraska. The previous tenant and preceding Dean of Architecture Hall, Cecil Steward, has veiled this street-level residence with elements of Japanese architecture and reminders of his own architectural creations. My design implementation allows 4 artists per year to inhabit this shell as if it were a blank canvas where they will create, install, and display their artwork. Public visitors will be invited to the site to explore the artist’s process from start to finish, and add to a continuous conversation about art. Creating planar and volumetric programming, I designed each space for ever-changing art installations. The conversation of art will be carried from entry to exit of this inspiring, craving, purposeful, and reflective experience. The ‘Blank Shell’ concept creates a unique opportunity for each residing artist to quite literally leave their own mark on the space. Being reserved but conscious with material choices and color application gives the building an almost completely blank interior. Polished concrete makes up for the entire building’s floor material while matte white walls contrast and juxtapose. The use of color plays in to emphasize certain elements from entry to exit such as the single column and the yellow transitional hallway. With each artist that comes and goes, the building slowly changes. Every artist will continuously create a new sense of materiality for the space as they leave a trace of the artistic process during the time in which they created, installed, and displayed their work for tasteful reflection and interaction.

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E n t r y S t u d i o + G a l le r y S e c t i o n V i g n e t te The entry condition and process studio greets visitors and marks the start of the continuous conversation about art. The single standing, yellow column is an existing and artistic component from the original building that continues to act as a structural art piece. This entry space is used as an artist process studio during their time of creation, but can be revamped into a gallery space for install and public viewing. Because this is a process studio, traces of artist process will began to change the materiality of the space and will be visible to guests during gallery exhibitions.

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1 . P h o t o g ra p hy D a r k Ro o m

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Entry Studio K i tc h e n B a t h ro o m Pa n t r y S to ra ge P u b l i c G a l le r y

A r t S t u d y L o u n ge Artist Suite Bathroom Fr e i g h t E lev a t o r Private Studio Ro o f t o p Te r ra c e

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P u b l i c G a l le r y + P r i va te A r t i s t S t u d i o S e c t i o n V i g n e t t e - " H a n g i n g Pa i n t i n g s " 2 0 1 7, " B la c k B a l lo o n s " 2 0 1 6


E n t r y P ro ce s s S t u d i o + G a l le r y S e c t i o n V i g n e t t e - " C o m f o r t Z o n e " 2 0 1 3

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E n t r y S t u d i o - " I n i t i a t i o n s " 2 01 7


P r i va te A r t i s t S t u d i o + P u b l i c G a l le r y - " H a n g i n g Pa i n t i n g s " 2 01 7, " B la c k B a l lo o n s " 2 0 1 6

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Co -Wo r k i n g + M a ke r s p a ce S ke t c h


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T H E CO Co-Working Office + Makerspace 16,264 square feet

Designed to be located in the Old Market in Omaha, Nebraska, The Co serves to anchor, support, and harvest a diverse membershipbased workspace where various groups of workers and independent professionals join together in a shared, communal setting. The Co, a Co-Working and Maker Space in West Tennessee wanted to see techies, entrepreneurs and makers together at one table, knowing that much good could come of it. My intention was to create a space that merged all of these ideas into one. To design a space that allows literal and visual communication between the disciplines hosted at The Co. Open vertical connections in the floor will strengthen the gap between entrepreneurs, makers and creatives. I carefully chose commercial finishes and furnishings to promote an industrial feel while complimenting the idea and comfortability of working together in a space that caters to sleek office workspace and maker workshops. The CO has a distinct importance for bringing entrepreneurs, techies, and makers alike to the same space. I wanted to exaggerate this idea by connecting the disciplines at The CO through open cavities in the 6th floor. Office workers above are able to communicate and view the process of making happening below. Reversely, makers are able to communicate to the shared space and interaction happening above. This connection quite literally merges the two groups of creatives and gives the space a sense of character unlike any other.

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Wo r k C a fĂŠ + A l l H a n d s E ve n t S p a ce Located directly adjacent to the level 2 co-working studio, the work cafĂŠ and all hands event space doubles as a mobile collaboration space as well as a place to take a break for both disciplines at The Co. Further, the makerspace and I.T. lab are located directly underneath the work cafĂŠ allowing for noise levels to be directed toward the south facade. This mobile zone is conveniently located near a majority of the co-working desks, but still provides a connection space for both groups of creatives.

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Re ce p t i o n Co -Wo r k i n g S t u d i o Phone Booth Co n fe re n ce Ro o m We l l n e s s Ro o m I .T. B a r

O f f i ce L e v e l 2 7 . Co f fe e B a r 8 . M a ke rs p a ce L o u n ge 9 . M a ke rs p a ce S t u d i o

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C o -Wo r k i n g S t u d i o M e e t i n g Ro o m C o n fe r e n c e Ro o m C o f fe e B a r Wo r k C a fĂŠ Prep Kitchen

7 . A l l H a n d s / E ve n t Space

M a ke rs p a ce P r i v a te Wo r k s p a ce Re n t- a b le Co -Wo r k i n g S p a ce

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L eve l 1 Re c e p t i o n + C o - w o r k i n g S t u d i o


L eve l 2 C o -Wo r k i n g C o l la b o r a t i o n S p a ce

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E x p e r i e n t i a l P r o g r a m + C i r c u la t i o n


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C A PS TO N E ( i n p ro g re s s ) Sustainable Urban Eatery 19,500 square feet

Humankind has deterred their relationship with social, economic, and environmental factors in regards to a healthy relationship with food. The built environment has an opportunity to replenish the connection between the human mind and body and these three factors of sustainability. A growing need for food, lack of nutrition, greenhouse gases caused by meat production, lack of education and food waste are all social, economic, or environmental factors contributing to the failed connection between society and food.

“How can an urban eatery utilize sustainable food types as a medium to provoke environmental mindfulness?�

The solution to a disintegrated relationship with social, economic, and environmental factors through food is a sustainable eatery in an urban setting focused on a progression of the anatomy of taste. This solution will add to a body of knowledge surrounding sustainability, materiality, alternative nutrition and educationintegrated design. Educating through design and creating a sustainably-conscious project aiming to bring atypical, nutritional ecologies to the lives of many individuals will address and aspire to solve the lost connection many individuals have with food while additionally creating an experiential food journey. The end goal will be to reduce food waste, utilize local and alternative food types and create materially sustainable design with a lasting experience.

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Hot dogs of the Future IKEA SPACE10

Sebastian Cox & Ninela Ivanova Mycelium + Timber

Hydroponic Farm IKEA SPACE10

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S u s t a i n a b i l i t y Re s e a r c h


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Entry

15 %

Sweet

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Salty

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Bitter

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Sour

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Umami

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Rooftop

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Back of House

Q u a n t i f i e d P ro g ra m In order to create an atmosphere that provokes environmental mindfulness in regards to sustainable food types, a range of specified and quantified program has been developed. The Entry and Roof experience is mimicked as an atmosphere of all 5 basic tastes, Bitter, Salty, Sweet, Sour and Umami. After passing through the entry condition, users ascend to each individual space horizontally and vertically. Allocated percentages are given to each space in order to delineate how users are encouraged to interact, behave, and feel. A time line is associated with each space, allowing users the opportunity to sit, stand, lounge or circulate through a space at each point in time. Once a user has circulated through each room, they will reach the rooftop and envelope themselves in all 5 tastes before descending back to the entry.

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Sw e e t


Co n c e p t + Pa le t te : Swe e t In typical food rituals, sweet tastes are the last step in balancing the palette. To contrast this normality, sweet is the first taste sensation that guests will test through this curated dining experience. Sweet tastes are comforting, leaving the mind in a state of contentment.. The concept and material palette consists of plush materials contrasted by terrazzo with pastel aggregates. Light-washed wood and minimal frosted glass will cohesively tie together the airy, pale space. With little transparency into the kitchen, guests are limited in their interaction with staff within this first room. Finally, a varied floral landscape will hang overhead on the ceiling to further envelope guests in a sweet, but natural atmosphere. Here, guests will lounge anywhere from 15-30 minutes.

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Salty


Co n c e p t + Pa le t te : S a l t y To juxtapose the intense sweetness experienced in the first room, Salty will act as the perfect counterbalance. Unlike the elegant bar and lounge in the previous space, the next furniture type will consist of low seating upon cushions or low sofas accompanied by low tables. Japanese cooking and culture is highly influenced by that of salt, therefore touches of Japanese architecture and design will be utilized in this room. Back-lit paneling along the walls, soft woods and gold detail with further tie the space together into a quick, salty journey. Guests are expected to spend anywhere from 10-15 minutes in this space.

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Bitter


Co n c e p t + Pa le t te : B i t te r Bitter is the third room along this progressive dining experience. Acting as a neutral circulation space, bitter will leave guests with a lingering taste on their tongue. This space mimics that of an exhibition design, where food will be displayed through built-ins or pedestals scattered strategically along the length of the room. A monochromatic yet deeply saturated palette will serve as a backdrop to the food journey here. Guests are expected to spend 5-10 minutes within Bitter to enjoy their food and circulate onward. Interaction between staff increases here where there is now a stronger visual into the preparation occurring beyond the core.

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Sour


Co n c e p t + Pa le t te : S o u r The fourth experiential room is Sour. Being that this is another room where guests are expected to circulate for only 10-15 minutes, the palette must create a vibrant and exciting atmosphere. Utilizing various glass transparencies to reflect an intricate lighting design, the Sour space gives off an impression of dynamic mystery. The palette becomes experimental in this space, using materials such as mesh, color-dyed leathers as well as mirrors and metals. Booths and communal dining will create a shared experience for all guests encompassing this space at a particular time.

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U m a m i / S a vo r y


Co n c e p t + Pa le t te : U m a m i / S avo r y The final room in the progressive taste journey is Umami, otherwise known as Savory. This taste characteristic will take place along the entirety of one full floor, giving opportunity to provide open seating and a variety of seating arrangements through booths, a bar and communal dining. This space will encompass warm, earthy tones with raw textures and finishes. Guests have now reached one of the most staff interactive spaces besides the rooftop space above. With complete visibility into the kitchen, guests become fully integrated into the dining experience. Rich fabrics, tactile textures and natural stones will complete the material palette for the final dining room.

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N o r t h Fa c a d e P r o c e s s S ke t c h e s


D i n i n g E x p e r i e n c e P r o c e s s S ke t c h e s

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Profile for Morgan Novacek

Morgan Novacek Undergraduate Interior Design Portfolio  

Morgan Novacek Undergraduate Interior Design Portfolio  

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