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Performed by musicians from the

Kentucky Center for Traditional Music


KENTUCKY MOUNTAIN MUSIC Performed by musicians from the

Kentucky Center for Traditional Music Authentic traditional music from our region helps define our culture. Traditional music belongs to those who love it. Whether you were born and raised in a metropolitan area, or a small community in the hills of Kentucky, Europe, Asia or anywhere else, if you love this music, it becomes part of you and you become part of our musical community. All of the music on this recording has history within a radius of 200 miles around Morehead, Kentucky. It is regional music with universal appeal. The Kentucky Center for Traditional Music exists to preserve, help develop, make available, and teach this significant part of our culture. Raymond McLain, Director Kentucky Center for Traditional Music Morehead State University


KENTUCKY CENTER FOR TRADITIONAL MUSIC


1

“Dance In Old Kentucky”

2

“Kentucky Waltz”

3

“Fastest Rabbit Dog In Carter County Today”

4

“Kentucky”

5

“Kentucky Mountain Banjo”

6

“Morehead Theme”

Raymond McLain, John Hartford, Michael McLain - Mike Stevens Music (BMI)

Bill Monroe - APRS/Bill Monroe Music (BMI)

Tom T. Hall - Sony/ATV Acuff Rose (BMI)

Karl Davis - Warner Bros Music (ASCAP)

Raymond McLain - Mike Stevens Music (BMI)

Raymond McLain, Diane McLain - McLain Family Music (BMI)

7

“All I Ever Loved Was You”

8

“Molly and Tenbrooks”

9

“Gold Watch and Chain”

Dorothy Skaggs - ZAP Publishing Co (BMI)

Bill Monroe - Bill Monroe Music (BMI)

A.P. Carter - Peer International Corp (BMI)

10

“Satisfied”

11

“When My Time Comes To Go”

12

“Boatin’ Up Sandy”

Martha Carson - Sony/ATV Acuff Rose (BMI)

Molly O’Day - Sony/ATV Acuff Rose Music (BMI)

Jesse Wells - Poplar Holler Music (BMI)


OLIVE HILL, KY LOUISVILLE, KY

2

ROSINE, KY

8

MOREHEAD, KY

BEREA, KY

6

7

4

BLAINE, KY

11

5 HINDMAN, KY

MT. VERNON, KY

3

PIKE COUNTY, KY

1

NEON, KY

10 12

HILTONS, VA

JENKINS, KY

9


Top row - left to right: Raymond McLain, Jesse Wells, Beau Lambert Second row - left to right: Stephanie Jeter, Nathan Kiser, Sarah Wood Photos - c John Flavell - www.johnflavellphotography.zenfolio.com


1. Dance in Old Kentucky (3:05)

7. All I Ever Loved Was You (3:17)

Vocals: Tyler Mullins, Ruth McLain Smith, Linda Jean Stokley, Raymond McLain Old Time Banjo, Fiddle: Jesse Wells Bluegrass Banjo: Tyler Mullins Guitar, Fiddle, Dance Calls: Raymond McLain Bass: Beau Lambert Dancing: Drema Cole

Vocals: Nathan Kiser, Tyler Mullins, Raymond McLain Fiddle: Jesse Wells Mandolin, Guitar, Bass: Raymond McLain

8. Molly and Tenbrooks (3:04)

Vocal: Thomas Albert Fiddle: Jesse Wells Banjo: Beau Lambert, Tyler Mullins, Michelle Canning Guitar, Bass: Raymond McLain

2. Kentucky Waltz (3:37) Vocal: Linda Jean Stokley Fiddle: Jesse Wells Banjo: Tyler Mullins Guitar: Raymond McLain Bass: Beau Lambert

3. Fastest Rabbit Dog in Carter County Today (2:09)

9. Gold Watch and Chain (5:17)

Vocals: Beau Lambert, Ellen Kearney, Ruth McLain Smith Fiddle: Jesse Wells Banjo: Beau Lambert Mandolin, Guitar, Bass: Raymond McLain

4. Kentucky (2:24)

Vocals: Wayne D. Andrews, Tyler Mullins, Beau Lambert, Michelle Canning Banjo, Guitar, Bass: Raymond McLain

5. Kentucky Mountain Banjo (2:36) Banjo: Tyler Mullins, Michelle Canning Mandolin, Lead Guitar: Clay Hess Rhythm Guitar, Bass: Raymond McLain

Vocals: Beau Lambert, Sarah Wood, Raymond McLain Fiddle, Banjo: Jesse Wells Autoharp: Stephanie Jeter Lead Guitar: Thomas Albert Rhythm Guitar, Bass: Raymond McLain

10. Satisfied (3:29)

Vocals: Wayne D. Andrews, Jill Andrews, Becki Alfrey, Ruth McLain Smith, Beau Lambert Fiddle, Lead Guitar: Jesse Wells Banjo, Rhythm Guitar, Bass: Raymond McLain

11. When My Time Comes to Go (3:34) Vocals: Tyler Mullins, Ruth McLain Smith, Raymond McLain, Beau Lambert Old Time Banjo: Sarah Wood Bluegrass Banjo: Daxson Lewis Fiddle, Guitar, Bass: Raymond McLain

12. Boatin’ Up Sandy (2:37) Fiddle, Banjo: Jesse Wells

6. Morehead Theme (1:17)

Vocals: Thomas Albert, Linda Jean Stokley, Raymond McLain Fiddle, Guitar, Bass: Raymond McLain Banjo: Tyler Mullins


Left to right: Beau Lambert, Thomas Albert and Raymond McLain Photos - c Becky Baker Photography


John Rodgers

Left to right: Sarah Wood and Montana Hobbs

Thomas Albert


Left to right: Jesse Wells, Thomas Albert and Nathan Kiser Photos - c Becky Baker Photography taken at the Carter Family Fold


Nathan Kiser

Michelle Canning

le Canning, Justin Harrison, Left to right: Beau Lambert, Raymond McLain, Michel and Sarah Wood Jesse Wells, Linda Jean Stokley, Stephanie Jeter


Dance in Old Kentucky Verse 1: I’m driving fast & running late. I’m all worked up I’ve got a date. My pretty girl don’t want to wait. There’s a dance in Old Kentucky. Chorus: Clear the hallway sweep the floor. Find you a partner & couple up four at the dance in Old Kentucky. Verse 2: My gal likes to cause a stir. She likes to dance & swish her skirt. My oh my, that girl can flirt at the dance in Old Kentucky. (Chorus) Verse 3: Allemande left with your left hand, around that floor with a right & left grand. Kiss your partner & thank the band at the dance in Old Kentucky. (Chorus) Verse 4: The old folks sit & pat their knee. Young folks holler whoopee.


I hold my honey close to me at the dance in Old Kentucky. Bridge: Some rowdy boys are coming in. It’s Bill Monroe and all of them. You just wait & they’ll begin to stir up some excitement. What’s all that stuff they’re bringing in? Hey, someone’s got a mandolin. I love the way they pick & grin at the dance in Old Kentucky. Clear the hallway sweep the floor Find you a partner & couple up four. Square dance call: Up Town, Down Town first old couple comes up town brings that other couple down pick up, lay em down separate, move on around Tyler Mullins

Verse 5: The time has come to say goodnight. Feet are tired but our hearts are light. We’ll get home before daylight from the dance in Old Kentucky. (Chorus)


Dance in Old Kentucky Producer’s Notes

Square dances have been an important form of recreation in our mountains for generations and dance callers were very important to these gatherings. Growing up, I used to play music for country dancing with my father. This song describes one of those dances. I would like to dedicate the recording of this song to some of the great callers that I had an opportunity to play for when I was young.

Raymond Kane McLain


With bass: Raymond Kane McLain Calling at microphone: Ethel Capps With fiddle: Auto Wood


Kentucky Dance Callers Richard Jett – Superintendent of Schools in Wolfe County for many years, Richard Jett led weekly dances for the public at Hoe Down Island at Natural Bridge State Park near Slade, Kentucky, for more than 40 years. He also coached square dancing groups which he took to perform in many states on prestigious stages like the world famous “Grand Ole Opry.” Auto Wood – Auto Wood could do singing calls as well as calling standard square dance figures. He was an early inspiration for me as a dance caller and as a fiddler. His wife, Marguerite, accompanied him on piano. I can still hear him walking to the stage barking in a loud voice as he went, “Square Dance. Square Dance, everybody. Square Dance.” Ethel Capps – For many years, Ethel Capps was director of recreation extension at Berea College in Berea, Kentucky. She developed the Berea College Country Dancers into a near professional quality performance group that later went on to perform at the White House when John F. Kennedy was president, and in many countries in Latin America. She worked with composer Phillip Rhodes and Raymond Kane McLain to develop countrydance sequences appropriate to be performed with the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, which the orchestra did in Cincinnati and in towns across Kentucky, Ohio and Indiana.


Auto Wood and May Gadd

Richard Jett

Left to right: Doug Hutchins, Ann Leach and Ethel Capps


Left to right: Pat Napier, (Raymond W. McLain partly visible), Donna Lamb and Lewis Lamb

Left to right: John Ramsay and the Berea College Country Dancers


Kentucky Dance Callers Pat Napier – Pat Napier has always been one of my favorite callers to play for. He knows the old calls, the old figures and is a terrific storyteller! Gib Gilbert – Although he lived in Colorado, Gib Gilbert did quite a fair amount of calling in Kentucky and across the country. He frequently brought dancers from Colorado to perform exciting Western routines. John Ramsay – Succeeding Ethel Capps as director of the Berea Country Dancers, John Ramsay taught many Kentuckians to love and call dances. He took his dancers to perform in many countries, hosted dance teams from all over the world and encouraged country dancing all over the southern mountain region.

Gib Gilbert (Calling)


Kentucky Dance Callers Raymond Kane McLain – My father, Raymond Kane McLain, was not only a great dance leader and dance organizer, but he was a brilliant musician, entertainer, teacher, songwriter and bandleader. He went with Ethel Capps as the dance troupe’s music director to perform on overseas tours and to the White House. For more than 20 years, he led The McLain Family Band on a career that included performing in all 50 of the United States, many provinces in Canada, 62 countries, an impressive list of television and radio appearances, over 250 performances as soloists playing bluegrass music with symphony orchestras and, for 11 years, producing one of the finest bluegrass music festivals in the country. Beatrice “Bicky” McLain – My grandmother, Bicky McLain, who was also a folklorist and singer, led dances in Kentucky and also as far away as England. She established the Southern Regional Folk Life Center at the University of Alabama. Along with Frank Smith, May Gadd and Pat Napier, she founded the Christmas Country Dance School at Berea College during the 1940s when she lived in Lexington, Kentucky. Raymond McLain Director, Kentucky Center for Traditional Music


After performing at the White House, Raymond Kane McLain shaking hands with President John Fitzgerald Kennedy. Looking on, from right to left: Auto Wood, Lucille Gault, (partly hidden: Margurite Wood) and the Berea College Country Dancers


Kentucky Waltz We were waltzing last night in Kentucky beneath that beautiful harvest moon. I was the girl who was lucky but it all ended too soon. As I sit here alone in the moonlight I can see your smiling face. And, I long once more for your embrace and that beautiful Kentucky Waltz.

From left to right: Jesse Wells, (Ruth McLain, partly hidden) Beau Lambert, (Raymond McLain, partly hidden, ), Tyler Mullins and Thomas Albert


Left to right : Linda Jean Stok

ley, Raymond McLain, Beau Lam bert and Thomas Albert

Kentucky Waltz Producer’s Notes

The Kentucky Waltz is one of Bill Monroe’s best-known compositions. He was very proud to be a Kentuckian. I feel that he would have loved to hear Linda Jean Stokley sing his song.


Fastest Rabbit Dog in Carter County Verse 1: Get out the skillet boys some flour and some grease. We’re gonna have us a rabbit to eat. Blues got a big un and he’s headed this way. He’s the fastest rabbit dog in Carter County today. Chorus: Run Blue run. Billie get your gun and listen to what I say. Run Blue run. Billie get your gun. He’s the fastest rabbit dog in Carter County today. Verse 2: Dogs from Rowan County boys, they can’t hold a light. Blue run that rabbit all day and night. Redbone, Blue Tick and part Bass they say. He’s fastest rabbit dog in Carter County today. (Chorus)


Verse 3: Get all them dogs out from under that porch, Ol’ Red and Junior and Big Wheel and Sport. Kick that ol’ brush pile I’ll prove what I say. He’s the fastest rabbit dog in Carter County today. (Chorus) Beau Lambert

Fastest Rabbit Dog in Carter County Producer’s Notes

Tom T. Hall grew up in Carter County. As a young man, he worked on the Morehead radio station as a disc jockey. His legendary accomplishments as a songwriter, entertainer and country music star are universally acknowledged. He was awarded an honorary doctorate by Morehead State University in 1997.


Kentucky Kentucky, you are the dearest land outside of heaven to me. Kentucky, your laurel and your redbud tree. When I die, I want to rest upon some peaceful mountain so high. For that is where God will look for me. Kentucky, I miss the old folks singing in the silvery moonlight. Kentucky, I miss the hound dogs chasing coons. I know that my mother dad and sweetheart are waiting for me. Kentucky, I will be coming soon.

Kentucky

Producer’s Notes This song was written by Karl Davis, member of the Renfro Valley Barn Dance duo, Karl and Hardy. I feel it is the perfect song for Morehead State University President Wayne D. Andrews to sing with our students as it expresses appreciation for the commonwealth, the region and our people. In production, I couldn’t help quoting from the Osborne Brothers iconic arrangement of this song.


Kentucky Mountain Banjo Producer’s Notes

In some parts of Eastern Kentucky, the banjo is as much a mainstream instrument as the guitar or fiddle. Tyler Mullins and Michelle Canning take turn about playing improvisational runs on this banjo instrumental and Clay Hess lays down some solid mandolin and guitar leads.

Morehead Theme If you need an education for the road that lies ahead, And, you want to run life’s race like a Kentucky thoroughbred, For much more opportunity, come to Morehead State. And, you’ll be flying like an eagle when you spread your wings to soar, Morehead State, Much More!

Morehead Theme Producer’s Notes

In the old-time style of a singing commercial half way through the program: “Morehead State, Much More!”


From left to right: Nathan Kiser, Jesse Wells, Tyler Mullins, Beau Lambert, Raymond McLain, Thomas Albert and Justin Harrison


Dancing: Stephanie Jeter and Sarah Wood


All I Ever Loved Was You Chorus: All I ever loved was you. You broke a heart that cried for you. I’ve wasted all my tears on you. For all I ever loved was you. Verse 1: Go out and find somebody new. You’ll be sorry if you do. You’ll never find a love so true. For all I ever loved was you. (Chorus)

Nathan Kiser

Verse 2: Buy her rings and diamonds too. You’ll be sorry if you do. You’ll never find a love so true. For all I ever loved was you. (Chorus) Tyler Mullins


Left to right : Tyler Mullins, Nath an Kiser and Raymond McLain

Michelle Canning

All I Ever Loved Was You Producer’s Notes

As we recorded this, we had fond recollections of memorable performances of this love song sung by Keith Whitley and Ricky Skaggs when they played with Ralph Stanley. The song was written by Dorothy Skaggs, mother of “Grand Ole Opry” star, Ricky Skaggs. Ricky was awarded an honorary doctorate from Morehead State University in recognition for his artistic and professional accomplishments in the field of traditional music.


Molly and Tenbrooks Run old Molly run, run old Molly run. Tenbrooks gonna beat you to the bright and shining sun, To the bright and shining sun oh Lord, to the bright and shining sun. Tenbrooks was a big bay horse. He growed a shaggy mane. He run all ‘round Memphis and he beat the Memphis train. Beat the Memphis train oh Lord, he beat the Memphis train. Out in California, Molly done as she pleased. Come back to old Kentucky, got beat with all ease. Beat with all ease oh Lordy beat with all ease. Tenbrooks said to Molly, what makes your head so red? Running in the hot sun got a fever in my head. Fever in my head oh Lordy fever in my head. Molly said to Tenbrooks, you’re looking mighty squirrel. Tenbrooks said to Molly I’m leaving this old world. Leaving this old world oh Lordy, leaving this old world. Women’s all a-laughing, the children all a-crying. Men’s all a-hollering old Tenbrooks is flying.


Old Tenbrooks is flying oh Lordy, old Tenbrooks is flying. Kiper, Kiper, you’re not riding right. Molly’s beating old Tenbrooks clear out of sight. Clear out of sigh oh Lordy, clear out of sight. Kiper, Kiper, Kiper my son, Give old Tenbrooks the bridle and let old Tenbrooks run. Let old Tenbrooks run oh Lordy, let old Tenbrooks run. See that train a-coming? It’s coming round the curve. See old Tenbrooks running. He’s straining every nerve. Straining every nerve oh Lordy, straining every nerve. Go and catch old Tenbrooks and hitch him in the shade. We’re gonna bury Molly. The coffin’s ready made. Coffin’s ready made oh Lordy, coffin’s ready made. Let old Tenbrooks run, oh Lordy, let old Tenbrooks run!


Molly and Tenbrooks Producer’s Notes

Bill Monroe sometimes introduced this song as “Molly and Tenbrooks, The Kentucky Racehorse Song.” The song grew from an actual race that was run in 1878 in Louisville on the track that was later named Churchill Downs, home of the world famous Kentucky Derby.

Beau Lambert

Stephanie Jeter

Photos - Raymond McLain


Left to right: Jesse Wells, Maddie Rae Wells, Sarah Wood, Nathan Kiser, Thomas Albert, Linda Jean Stokley, Beau Lambert, Tyler Mullins, Michelle Canning and Raymond McLain

Linda Jean Stokley

Left to right: Thomas Albert, Beau Lambert, Raymond McLain, Dancing: Samantha Grimes, (Drema Cole, hidden), Christina Grimes and Stephanie Evans


Gold Watch and Chain Verse 1: Darling, how can I stay here without you? I have nothing to cheer my poor heart. This old world would seem sad, love, without you. Tell me now that we never will part. Chorus: Oh I’ll pawn you my gold watch and chain, love. And I’ll pawn you my gold wedding ring. I will pawn you this heart in my bosom. Only say that you’ll love me again. Verse 2: Take back all the gifts you have given, But a ring and a lock of your hair, And a card with your picture upon it. It’s a face that is false but is fair. (Chorus) Sarah Wood


Verse 3: Tell me why that you do not love me. Tell me why that your smile is not bright. Tell me why you have grown so cold-hearted. Is there no kiss for me love tonight? (Chorus) Verse 4: The white rose that blooms in the garden, It grows with the love of my heart. It broke through on the day that I met you. It will die on the day that we part. (Chorus) (Chorus) Only say that you’ll love me again. Left to right: Ruth McLain, Raymond McLain and Thomas Albert

Beau Lambert


Gold Watch and Chain Producer’s Notes

Alvin Pleasant “A.P.” Carter and the Carter Family became some of the first country music superstars and changed country music history forever when they first recorded in 1927 in Bristol, Tennessee/Virginia. A.P. Carter wrote one of the Carter Family’s most recognized songs when he felt particularly heartbroken. In all good music, emotion can be felt regardless of how many years have passed since the original composition.

n), Left to right: Jesse Wells (partly hidde Linda Jean Stokley and Beau Lambert

Thomas Albert


Sarah Wood standing beneath paintings of Maybelle Carter and Sarah Carter


Satisfied Bridge: I’ve got that old time religion, got that old time religion. That is why I’m satisfied. Verse 1: Well you ask me if I’m happy, if I have peace within, If I’m worried about tomorrow when I reach my journey’s end. Well I’m satisfied with my Jesus. When he knocks I’ll let Him in. He’ll go with me through the valley for I know He is my friend. Chorus: Satisfied, satisfied. No trouble can ever get me down. When my eyes are closed in death, with my Jesus I’ll be at rest. Then you’ll know I’m satisfied. (Bridge) Verse 2: If my friends they all forsake me and they turn me from their door, If they sow no seeds of kindness, make the thorns in my path grow. It won’t matter over yonder when I reach that other side. Cause I’m gonna sit down by my Jesus, satisfied, satisfied.


(Chorus) (Bridge) Chorus 2: Satisfied, satisfied. No trouble can ever get me down. Although my eyes are closed in death, with my Jesus I’ll be blessed. Then you’ll know I’m satisfied. (Bridge)

Jill Andrews

Beau Lambert


Satisfied

Producer’s Notes Martha Carson, born Irene Amburgey in Letcher County, Kentucky, was one of the Amburgey Sisters, early stars of the Renfro Valley Barn Dance. Her dynamic performances and singing style heavily influenced many entertainers including Elvis Presley and Connie Smith. Singing Martha Carson’s best known composition is MSU President Wayne D. Andrews and his daughter, Jill Andrews, a very well-respected singer and songwriter in her own right.

Morehead State University President, Wayne D. Andrews


Back row, from left to right: Nathan Kiser, Jesse Wells, Raymond McLain, and Beau Lambert Front row, from left to right: Linda Jean Stokley, Tyler Mullins, and Thomas Albert Photo by Tim White, host of Song of the Mountains


When My Time Comes to Go Chorus: When my time comes to go, when my time comes to go, I want to lay my head on Jesus’ breast when my time comes to go. Verse 1: Well, I may be lame and I cannot walk, may be blind I cannot see. But I’ll fly away on the wings of love when he comes after me. (Chorus) Verse 2: Oh, the road is rough and the way is long. Forever faithful I’m gonna be. And, I’ll make it through by the grace of God and he’s gonna stand by me. (Chorus) Verse 3: Oh, I want to hear Him say, well done. My faithful servant I’ll set you free. There’s a crown of life waiting just for you if you’ll come unto me.


(Chorus) (Chorus) (Chorus) I want to lay my head on Jesus’ breast when my time comes to go.

When My Time Comes to Go Producer’s Notes

Born Lois LaVerne, the Pike County, Kentucky, native went on to change her name to Molly O’Day. She recorded for Columbia Records in the ‘40s and early ‘50s, playing the five-string banjo in the old-time style and singing with an enthusiastic lead voice that moved audiences and inspired many to emulate her. Songs she wrote, including this one, have become standards in traditional music.

Left to right: Raymond McLain and Ruth McLain

John Rodgers


Boatin’ Up Sandy Producer’s Notes

Jesse Wells learned this traditional Kentucky fiddle tune from Paul David Smith from Hardy, Kentucky. For many years, Jesse played with Paul in the band Kentucky Wild Horse, all the while absorbing tunes from this master fiddler. Paul learned this and many other tunes directly from fiddlers like Owen ‘Snake’ Chapman and Kenny Baker and their fathers, Doc Chapman and Thaddeus Baker. In a conversation with Jesse, the great Kentucky fiddler Kenny Baker expressed a desire to remember and play more tunes of his father, Thaddeus Baker. Kenny passed before Jesse had the opportunity join him and play this tune. It is included here as a tribute to Kenny Baker, Paul David Smith and to Jesse’s father, Jamie Wells, a very fine old-time fiddler!

Jesse Wells

Left to right: Jesse Wells and Drema Cole


Jesse Wells


Left to right: Linda Jean Stokley, Tyler Mullins, Thomas Albert, Beau Lambert and Raymond McLain


Left to right: Raymond McLain, Ruth McLain and Michelle Canning


Photo Credits John C. Flavell - www.johnflavellphotography.zenfolio.com David Slone - www.IDigBluegrass.com Gib Gilbert - photos courtesy of the Gilbert family archives. Tim Holbrook - Office of Communications & Marketing, Morehead State University Guy Huffman - Office of Communications & Marketing, Morehead State University Rebecca Baker


Left to right: Brock O’Cull (partly hidden), Beau Lambert, Sarah Wood, John Rodgers and Nathan Kiser

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Performed by musicians from the Kentucky Center for Traditional Music

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