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VECTOR for the Moreau Catholic Community Winter/Spring 2016

INSIDE: The Moreau Catholic Pioneering Bioprinting Curriculum Mallory Lee ’11 Volunteers in Moria Refugee Camp In Loving Memory, Mary Capurro —and much more

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LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT Dear Mariners, In his book, Praying from the Heart of Holy Cross Spirituality, Brother Joel Giallanza, CSC, writes, “Basil Moreau was committed to preparing the world for better times than ours precisely because he believed better times were possible and would indeed come if people cooperated and collaborated in making the necessary efforts and sacrifices. That he inspired so many men and women to live the same commitment was good news during bleak times. It still is. Transformation is always possible; there is always cause for hope. Today that transformation and hope are nurtured by the religious of Holy Cross and by those who minister with them in schools and universities where a quality education is provided.” Photo: Renee Jankowski

This is the stuff of Holy Cross education—preparing our students for their future, and connecting the Gospel values and the Holy Cross mission to help them see how our world can be better if we work together, collaborate, innovate, create, inspire, engage, and love. Our call to educate hearts and form minds is answered with a Catholic, college-preparatory education, committed to outstanding achievement, and focused on transforming our students into people who will change the world.

This issue of The Vector has many examples of this transformation that Father Moreau foresaw. In our innovative, 21st century Biotech curriculum, with our new Advanced Placement course offerings, in the moving stories of how our alumni are putting their faith, their education, and their compassion into action, helping others and really changing our world, one person at a time—these are examples of how Moreau Catholic students and graduates are unique and make a difference. We hope that sharing these powerful stories with you connects you to the larger Mariner community, and perhaps gives you a moment to reflect on how your Moreau Catholic education helped foster these values. Perhaps you have a powerful story we can help share in a future issue?

As we approach springtime, we march toward the end of another school year, where we celebrate the Class of 2016 and honor their achievements with awards, honors, banquets, and graduation. At the same time, we welcome the incoming class of 2020 at Spring Welcome Night. It is the circle of life here in a high school. As alumni, you made that journey. As always, I invite you to continue that journey with us by reconnecting, attending a reunion, volunteering, watching an athletic or arts event, supporting the school financially with a gift, and continuing to be a proud Mariner and supporter of Moreau Catholic High School.

Thank you, and may God continue to bless you and your loved ones. Peace and best wishes,

Terry Lee President

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PRESIDENT Mr. Terry Lee PRINCIPAL Ms. Lisa Tortorich DIRECTOR OF ADVANCEMENT Mr. Christopher Ruetz EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Mr. Christopher Ruetz CONTRIBUTORS Kim Capurro Diana (Straggas) DeFrance ’76 Monica Lander Jasmine Partida Terry Lee Christopher Ruetz MCHS Photographers: Evan Embrey ’16, Luke Zakedis ’16

St. Clement Catholic School students and their Moreau Catholic siblings, after the The Feast of Blessed Basil Moreau Mass—a happy annual tradition.

F E AT U R E S

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Pioneering BioPrinting Curriculum

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Letter From the President

8 Mallory Lee ’11 Volunteers in Moria Refugee Camp 11 Finding Her Voice Soncerrae Walker ’16

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In Loving Memory: Mary Capurro

16 Funding Hopes and Dreams, Holy Cross Scholars Program

Cover photo of Candice Yung ’16 by Luke Zakedis ’16 (center) and Evan Embrey ’16, with Jordan Mansfield ‘17. We will miss Luke and Evan’s contributions to Moreau Catholic and wish them well when they graduate in May and go on to fulfill their many talents professionally.

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Coach Ben Puts His Mariner Family First

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Clash of the Titans, Raise Funds for Literacy

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Congratulations Johnny!

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2016 Read-A-Thon

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Event Scrapbook

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Mariner Weddings

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Mariners Making Waves

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Alumni Events Calendar

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Alumni Reunion Calendar

BOARD OF TRUSTEES Mr. Dennis Mastrantonio ’71, Chair Mrs. Barbara Hemenez, Vice-Chair Mr. Eugene Ashley Sr. Ramona Bascom, OP Ms. Cynthia Bath Mrs. Maritza Ilario Mr. Rick L’ Heureux Mr. Terry Lee Ms. Marta Leon Sr. Christopher Miller, OP Fr. Paul Minnihan ’84 Br. William Nick, CSC Ms. Lois Quilalang Mrs. Charlene Raimondi Mr. Ed Raney Mr. Kevin Sweeney ’72 Ms. Lisa Tortorich Mr. Quang Trinh ’88 ­­T HE VECTOR is published three times a year by Moreau Catholic High School 27170 Mission Boulevard Hayward, CA 94544 Phone: 510.881.4300 www.moreaucatholic.org

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PIONEERING BIOPRINTING C

CANDICE YUNG ’16 (left) and SIDNEY NGUYEN ’16 using gel electrophoresis equipment in Ms. Kerrie Gibson’s biotechnology class.

CANDICE YUNG ’16 “I am very interested in attending Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, Cal Poly Pomona, or CSU Fullerton, and working towards a biology degree focused on pre-optometry.”

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utting edge biotechnology joins the innovative and technological offerings in the classrooms at Moreau Catholic High School. Partnering with SE3D Education, the school’s science department is introducing a pilot program featuring bioprinting curriculum and industry-relevant projects. The Redwood City based company, SE3D, specializes in creating bioprinting classes for high school and colleges to support teachers and schools to integrate more handson learning activities and industry-relevant projects that inspire students. The bioprinting curriculum covers applications in the biomedical, healthcare and biofuels industry. “I’m very excited to work with SE3D Education this spring,” says Science Department Chair Kerrie Gibson.

“Students at Moreau Catholic will be using technology that is currently reshaping the biomedical and biotechnology industries. Anytime you can bring real-world applications into the classroom, it’s a big win.”

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“Students will be working with Bioprinters and learning about how this state-of-the-art technology is currently being used in industries such as biomedical, pharmaceutical and green technology,” says Gibson. “Students will also be printing cell cultures and conducting research experiments that utilize proteins, enzymes and bacteria,” she adds. “The curriculum will enhance 21st century learning by giving students the opportunity to work with technology that is going to change so many aspects of our lives in the very near future,” says Gibson. “Bioprinted organs and human tissues are in our future. Being able to expose our students to this type of technology is exciting.” She adds, “today’s students are tomorrow’s scientists who will be working with this technology and making these amazing advancements.”

SIDNEY NGUYEN ’16 “I hope to go the University of Washington or the University of the Pacific to earn a doctorate in pharmacy. I find biotechnology fascinating and love using the equipment especially the micropipettes and gel electrophoresis.” Winter/Spring ‘16 | The Vector

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Students will go beyond reading about how scientists are using bioprinting to printing stem cells to study disease, or printing human tissues such as blood vessels and skin. Biotechnology curriculum is the latest addition to Moreau Catholic commitment to innovative advances that has included and was first to introduce the 1:1 laptop program in 2007; a TV studio and editing lab in 2009; and design and creation of a 21st century library in 2009 which led to the school being named an Apple Distinguished School in 2010 followed by the opening of the Maker Lab with 3D printing in 2012. More recent technological advances include the addition of 30 specialized research databases and six new AP course offerings. Moreau Catholic will offer a total of 20 Honors and 22 AP courses for the 2016-17 school year including Honors Anatomy that utilizes Anatomy in Clay at Manikins in the life science course that prepares students for challenging careers in the medical professions, biological studies, biomedical engineering and other health careers. The AP Environmental Science course is the equivalent of a one-semester, introductory college course in the subject in which students engage in the scientific principles, concepts and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world. Environmental science is interdisciplinary, embracing topics from geology, biology, chemistry and geography in addition to environmental studies and science. “I am always looking for and researching curriculum that will 6

“I am always looking for and researching curriculum that will enhance the learning experience for Moreau Catholic students.” “Creating authentic, real world science experiences in the classroom is an ongoing endeavor and essential in the preparation for students to be college and career ready.” — Kerrie Gibson

enhance the learning experience for Moreau Catholic students,” says Gibson. “Creating authentic, real world science experiences in the classroom is an ongoing endeavor and essential in the preparation for students to be college and career ready.” This spring, Bioprinting will be a unit taught in the current Biotechnology class. The bioprinter is a tool that enables printing biological materials in 3D. This means that proteins, cell and DNA can be printed onto a physical structure. Much like a 3D printer, the model generated on a computer defines what will be printed on the bioprinter. The application of the Bioprinting technology is expansive and includes many industries from biomedical to biotechnology and many disciplines. For example, with 3D bioprinting, doctors can now create customized implants for their patients such as a bioprinted nose or dental implant. “Providing educational experiences that prepare students to work in jobs and careers that might not even exist today is essential for the 21st century learner,” says Gibson. Moreau Catholic is one of 10 schools that will be participating in a pilot program this spring with SE3D Education. Gibson says the vision is to also add Bioprinting units to the Honors Biology and Honors Anatomy and Physiology courses by next year. — Monica Lander

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34th Annual

CATHOLIC Golf Classic

Benefiting the Brother Gary Stone Memorial Scholarship Fund

SEQUOYAH COUNTRY CLUB

June 27, 2016 Sponsorship opportunities are available. Call: Diana (Straggas) DeFrance ’76 Events Program Manager 510.881.4330

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ddefrance@moreaucatholic.org

Register online today at MoreauCatholic.org/golfclassic2016

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Mariner MALLORY LEE ’11

volunteers in Moria Refugee Camp Vector – Mallory Lee

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allory Lee, ’11 (above center) couldn’t sit back and do nothing. Moved by the image of a three-yearold Syrian boy washed ashore on a Turkey beach, Lee left her new job in high tech and headed to Greece to volunteer and help at a refugee camp. The image of the little boy put a face on the refugee crisis. Like many Syrians and Iraqis, Aylan Kurdi’s family was fleeing to the Greek island of Kos when the family’s boat capsized. Aylan’s older brother died too. Lee said she started following the refugees’ plight during a senior seminar class in college. “I had read articles about it all summer and mistakenly assumed that it was on most people’s radars,” she said in a phone interview. She attended Wagner College in New The short and long-term volunteers provide clean clothes, medical help, York City on a diving scholarship and graduated with food/tea, and place where the people can pray. a degree in English and double minors in Spanish and 8

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journalism and went to work. “I was struck with Westerners reaction to the crisis,” she says. “One moment it seemed our nation was sympathetic and the next moment people were calling for borders to be closed. There was and is a lot of ignorance.” She arrived on the island of Lesvos about 10 days before Christmas and is planning to stay through mid-February. Lee volunteers at ‘Better Days for Moria’ a grassroots organization that is located on rented land next to Moria Refugee Camp. The short and long-term volunteers provide clean clothes, medical help, food/ “You become emotionally attached to people you will never see again, and tea, and place where the people can pray. (yet) have only known for a few days.” —Mallory Lee ’11 Moria is a transit camp where the refugees get registration papers before continuing Commissioner for Refugees) and the on their journey into Europe. They usually Danish Refugee Council (DRC) to make stay two to four days before getting on a I care about people sure everyone has a place to sleep. ferry to Athens. She makes up tents and serves food in and I had the time “I care about people and I had the time Skipchen, a field kitchen that works to to give, so I felt it to give, so I felt it was my duty to come provide hot meals and chai for people was my duty and do what I could in whatever way that immediately after they arrive in Moria. meant,” Lee says. “I also recognize the The hardest aspect of her work, says to come and do privilege I am born into as an American Lee, is “in the 15-hour shift, you expewhat I could in and I wish that somehow I could make it rience a wide range of emotions, and whatever way right with everyone who does not have the because of this, your relationships with that meant. same fortune.” people become intimate very quickly.” “There’s no normalcy,” Lee says. The She adds, “mix this with the reality that situation changes daily based on the it’s a very transient place (because) refuday, weather, or just the attitude of local gees come and go and the retention rate authorities and Foxten, which manages of volunteers is short, and you become the boarder. The reception center, a former emotionally attached to people you will military base, is funded by the Greek govnever see again, and (yet) have only ernment and the EU (European Union), but known for a few days.” volunteers play a major role in processing She recalls a particularly windy night the more than 2,000 refugees who arrived when she helped a Syrian family from daily. Damascus put up a tent, a task she adShe begins work around midnight for mits is challenging for her on good days. the overnight shift and welcomes famiWhen they built it, the tent started movlies with dry, donated clothes and shoes. ing in the wind. “The grandpa looked Many are still wet from their raft ride at me and laughing said, ‘I’m going to along the Turkish coast. She also finds end up back in Syria. Bye Greece. Hello proper housing for new arrivals coordiSyria.” She adds, “the people are really nating with UNHCR (United Nations High lovely and they fill my heart with so

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much love.” She later found out this family made it to Belgium. Many of the Syrians and Iraqis speak English, says Lee, and there are some volunteers who translate for those who speak Arabic. “But we need Farsi translators and I’m hoping someone in Fremont sees this and contacts me,” she says. “Friendships built around few words, much laughter and in a setting of total desperation are something unexplainable.” Lee adds that every day the volunteers are met by new surprises at the camp and must find new solutions to new problems. “We have to find ways to continue to be effective and efficient.” Meanwhile, back home, “support looks like people going into their community and volunteering with immigrants and refugess,” says Lee.

“Support is combating ignorant and misguided fear and looking to find long-term solutions to a problem that will not go away any time soon.” On her Gofundme.com page Lee adds, “I hope that as we allow the walls around our hearts to crumble, so too will the walls being built on the borders.” Lee says she wishes her friends knew just how incredible the people are. The people, she says, come for political, economic and other reasons and arrive in various emotional states. But, what stands out is “the overwhelming sense of pride that many of these refugees have for their homeland and (feelings of) sadness if they were to leave it behind.”

The refugee camp is filled with contradictions, says Lee and can be heartbreaking one moment and joyous the next and sometimes both at the same time. “It’s a place where desperation and hope intersect and while I will never share the same experience as these refugees, we are able to connect because we are all humans,” she says.

“It’s a gift to work here,” she adds. “My mind has been opened in ways unimaginable.” —Monica Lander

To donate to Better Days for Moria, Lee has set up a gofundme account. She has already passed her goal of raising $2,500 within two weeks to cover the cost of her rent, but additional funds are always needed to help the camp. Visit www.gofundme.com/87j6c6c4 10

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FINDING HER VOICE

Soncerrae Walker ’16

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oncerrae Walker has found her voice. Once unable to speak up in class, or ask her teachers for help, this 17-year-old senior is using her newfound confidence to address the CEO and executives of a major corporation. She spoke at the celebration of Black History Month event at the headquarters of a major corporation in mid February. Her journey from timid to an articulate and poised teenager began in the freshman study skills course and landed her in the Moreau Catholic Learning Center. She tributes the Center’s Mariner Mentor program and the mentorship of Learning Center Coordinator, Dani Lorta ’89, Manager Jon Norfolk and Counselor, Jim Patterson for helping her find the tools, like time management and organization that she needed to be a successful student. The Learning Center, says Norfolk, offers among other things guided study, study skills, and tutoring. Students receive one-on-one attention to move from a fixed mindset, or habits that create barriers to learning, organization and planning, to a growth mindset where they are open to new ideas and built confidence. “The biggest milestone,” Walker says, “was to learn to be her own advocate and learn how to ask for help, something she never had to do in grade or middle school. The challenges of high school came out of nowhere, she says, and thrust her out of her comfort zone.” Meanwhile, Walker continued her involvement in the Oakland-based Cinnamongirl, Inc. where she has been active since she was a fifth grader at St. Elizabeth’s Elementary School. Cinnamongirl, Inc. is an organization dedicated to mentoring young women of color ages 11 to 17 through a schedule of workshops and forums that focus on leadership, financial literacy, health and wellness, science, technology, engineering, arts and math (STEM) education and college preparedness. Walker says she has benefitted from being involved in this organization which also gave her the opportunity to spend a day at Google.

Soncerrae Walker ’16 and Learning Center Coordinator Dani Lorta ’89 review an assignment. Photo: Renee Jankowski

“My self confidence has increased and I got vocal,” she says. “I form my own opinions and have become my own person. It’s important to be our own unique selves and appreciate ourselves.” Along the journey, Walker says she has learned that teachers are here to help their students and everyone is willing to help, “but it’s up to you. You’re the pilot of your life. Have a plan,” she adds, “but don’t go crazy if it doesn’t work out.”

She advises others, “always be willing to get out of your comfort zone. You learn a lot that way,” Public speaking and addressing a group of corporate executives was not in her plan when she was a freshman, but she adds, “I’m right where I’m supposed to be.” The youngest of eight, Walker says there are a number of people who have been impactful in her life but calls her mom her “cheerleader” for encouraging her and telling her “I can do whatever I want as long as I work hard and be myself.” While she awaits college acceptance letters from California to the East Coast, Walker says, “Whatever I do, I want to have an impact on other people.” —Monica Lander

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MARY CAPURRO 12

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legacy of family, commitment and faith— that’s what Mary Capurro has left her family and what her Moreau Catholic family will remember best about her. Mary Capurro died peacefully on Christmas Eve at the age of 96 just a little over a year since Capurro Family Plaza outside the new football field was dedicated to her and her late husband, Vernon, for their dedication and support to Catholic education and MCHS. Mary married Vernon Capurro in 1944 and raised 10 children, six of whom graduated from Moreau Catholic between 1972 to 1979. She is survived by nine of her children; 18 grandchildren (seven graduated from Moreau Catholic from 2002 to 2010); and 12 great grandchildren. Described as a “woman of faith,” she was one of the original parishioners of The Church of the Assumption in San Leandro.

“Words cannot express what a wonderful woman Mary was and what a void she leaves in our lives,” her obituary read. “We were so blessed to have her for so many years.”

Mary Capurro 1919-2015

“As far back as I can remember, there was an expectation from both parents that all the children would go to college and yet I don’t remember any major drama or concern if your grades weren’t at a certain level,” recalls Dave. More important to his parents, he says was “the type of people we would become as adults.” Because of this upbringing, he says, “I see why so many in our family are teachers, instructors and coaches and much of these endeavors are done as volunteers.” Mary Angela Anderson was born to Fred and Nora Anderson in Oakland on November 9, 1919 and graduated from Presentation High School, attended Holy Names College and received her nursing degree from St. Mary’s Hospital in San Francisco. She worked for more than 20 years at Fairmont Hospital in San Leandro and was head nurse when she retired from full-time work. She continued to work part time. As a member of The Church of Assumption, she attended daily mass, participated in many parish ministries and activities and will be remembered for her great cooking, hosting large family gatherings into her 90s, and sharing her pesto, focaccia, and homemade treats with neighbors and friends.

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Her life of service began at a young age as she helped care for elderly relatives, drove family members and the sisters at the convent on errands, became a registered nurse and tended to friends and neighbors in need. Devoted to her family, she taught by example and built strong family bonds through her actions and through the large family gatherings she had at her home almost monthly. She was there for the birth of every grandchild, helping with everything from meals to baby care. She continued to attend as many activities as she could for all of her grandchildren, being the favorite guest on many a “Special Friends Day.” She took great pride in the fact that she never missed an 8th grade, high school or college graduation. “Words cannot express what a wonderful woman Mary was and what a void she leaves in our lives,” her obituary read. “We were so blessed to have her for so many years.” Her life was celebrated at a funeral mass at The Church of the Assumption in San Leandro on December 31, 2015. —Monica Lander

Mary Capurro and husband Vernon were married for 44 years at the time of his passing in 1988.

“The college preparatory curriculum was necessary, but more important to the subject matter were (the) components of social justice and service learning that became a part of our formation as individuals.” Dave Capurro ’77

The Capurro family, left to right: Joe ’72, Dave ’77, Mary Ann, Rob ’73, John, Margaret ’79, Mary, Steve ’75, Janet, Vince ’77, and Mary Capurro

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Wine Club www.bishopsvineyard.org/wineclub 5% of your purchase will benefit Moreau Catholic High School. Use promotional code Moreau2015 ENJOY: $10 off first Wine Club purchase 20% discount on all wines 25% discount on 12 bottles or more

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ishop’s Vineyard, owned by the Catholic Diocese of Oakland, began growing their own grapes in 2006 when Robert Seelig, the Diocese’s executive director of cemeteries, was tasked with beautifying the hills surrounding the Holy Sepulchre Cemetary in Hayward. Seelig calculated that it was less expensive to grow an acre of grapes than to plant an acre of grass. It cost the Diocese about $15,000 to $20,000 per acre for the vineyard versus $50,000 for grass with a full irrigation system. Vineyards also use a lot less water and end up providing fruit. Local wine experts, including a former Wente Vineyards manager, analyzed soil conditions, variations in climate and certain trends in the industry, and put together a growth plan for three different cemetery sites. Three acres of chardonnay, pinot noir and primitivo were planted at Holy Sepulchre; six acres of cabernet sauvignon and zinfandel were planted at Holy Cross in Antioch; and finally, six acres of pinot noir and sangiovese at St. Joseph’s in San Pablo. East Bay winemaker, Shauna Rosenblum of Rock Wall Winery, in Alameda partnered with Seelig. Initially all of the varietals were blended together into a sacramental rosé, to be used by various parishes within the Diocese of Oakland as altar wine. However, when Rosenblum tasted the varietals individually, she knew there was something special there. “They were blending the wine at first,” said Rosenblum. “There were some lots that we encouraged them to let us make as stand alones because they were great fruit.” Due to the undeniable quality, she convinced Bishop’s Vineyard to make a line of reserve wines and the rest is history. Now, you too can enjoy these award-winning wines by joining the Bishop’s Vineyard Wine Club.

The 2013 Bishop’s Vineyard Cabernet Sauvignon and 2013 Zinfandel won Silver Medals in the 2016 San Francisco Chronicle’s Wine Competition.

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Keynote Speakers, Katia Gomes ’05, Devin Saxon ’08 and Oscar Ibaceta ’16 took to the stage to inspire patrons to pay it forward and provide students with the opportunity to receive a Holy Cross education at Moreau Catholic.

FUNDING HOPES AND DREAMS Holy Cross Scholars Program

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nvesting in stocks is a risky venture, but investing in tuition assistance is an investment in so many possibilities, said Katia Gomez ’05, the keynote speaker at the seventh annual Funding Hopes and Dreams luncheon. Grateful for the opportunities that Moreau Catholic offered them, Gomez and fellow speakers, Alumnus Speaker Devin Saxon, ’08, and Oscar Ibaceta, ’16 encouraged others to help provide those same opportunities to all students. According to Dennis Mastrantonio  ’71, chair of the Moreau Catholic Board of Trustees, about $630,000 in tuition assistance, need-based scholarships, was provided to 18 percent of the student body the first year. That figure has increased to $1.7 million in 2015-16 provided to 29 percent of the students. “Stepping up financially makes a tangible impact on so many lives,” said Gomez. Inspired by her own experience at Moreau Catholic to “pay it forward,” Gomez has been named one of Newsweek’s “Top 25 women under 25 in the world to watch.” A Global Fellow for Ashoka, the

largest worldwide network of social entrepreneurs, Gomez is also executive director of Educate2Envision International, whose focus is to empower young men and women through education and entrepreneurship. Since a high school trip to Honduras, Gomez has worked feverishly to create access to high school for its students living in one of the poorest countries in the Western Hemisphere. To date, her organization has helped build six high schools, graduate 120 students, start kindergartens and taught adults to read and write. During her first trip to Honduras, she said she asked a group of young girls aged 11 and 12 what they wanted to be when they grew up. Their answer was a resounding silence. She knew then that she wanted to work hard and make sure everyone would have an answer to that question and “To know what you’re capable of and know in your heart what you can accomplish.” She recalls her years at Moreau Catholic and as a member of the cross-country team as the best experience giving her a feeling of

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community and unconditional love. “Investment is a risk,” added Gomez, “but the payoff is worthwhile.” “A lot of who I’ve become is because of Moreau Catholic,”, said Alumnus speaker Devin Saxon, ’08. Encouraging people to invest in tuition assistance and enabling other students to benefit from a Moreau Catholic education, Saxon recalls how his own experiences “taught me to be self sufficient, always challenging myself.” He relied on these tools as a student at Harvard. A star defensive back, Saxon played for the Crimson and helped take them to two Ivy League championships during his four years. He accepted the challenge of balancing studies with a rigorous practice schedule and kept moving forward. While is did not receive tuition assistance at Moreau Catholic, he says he does appreciate how important that financial help is to students.

Ignacio (Iggy) Martinez is a devoted supporter of the most important event to fund tuition support for Moreau Catholic students. Peter Peabody, retired teacher, has never missed a Funding Hopes and Dreams Luncheon.

“Good is the evil of great,” Devin told the luncheon crowd. Tuition assistance can give a student the opportunity “to push yourself to that great level.” Ibeceta joined Gomez and Saxon is recognizing the importance of a Catholic education in a young person’s life. He applied late while his family struggled to figure out how to pay for the tuition. The subsequent tuition assistance, he said, has enabled him to “grow as a person and an athlete.” “I hope you will provide the opportunity (to others) and make dreams come true,” he said. “I am a proud Mariner ready to conquer the world.”

Moreau Catholic Director of Admissions Jennifer Rillamas ’11, a former speaker at Funding Hopes and Dreams, attended the luncheon with her mother, father, and grandparents: Lisa, John, and Janet and Ben Jordan.

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Coach Ben ’00 and Mariner pole vaulters (left) Mariah Lark ’17 and Alexis Aquilizan ’18

COACH BEN puts his Mariner family first

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ife lessons can be taught on the track and field and specifically in the pole vault court. It’s a leap of faith, heading feet first and upside down as you maneuver a 10-foot pole of fiberglass, hurdle over a bar and land in a pit of mats. You are learning to fly. “You’re going to fail, but you’re going to get up again,” says Ben Greenbaum, ’00 head track and field coach at Moreau Catholic. Heading into his first season as head coach of the approximately 150 student athletes, this one-time HAAL champion can hardly contain his excitement for the season and his passion for the sport. “There’s a challenge to it (pole

vaulting),” says Greenbaum. The goals are always changing based on successes and failures. You’re going to fail and this constant challenge pushes athletes to go further.” Seeing the students develop and break their personal records puts a smile on their faces and his. He hopes they take away from the experience those lifestyle skills like personal responsibility, showing up, being punctual, hard work, time management, a better drive and work ethic. Greenbaum says his passion for the sport is because “it is so diverse and yet so family oriented. If you don’t succeed at one thing, you can try another. Everyone’s success is not just being first, but also by beating yourself. Being the best you can

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be is determined by the individual. You dictate your own success.” Among his many proud moments as a coach for the past 10 seasons since the 2000-01 season right after he graduated from Moreau Catholic, Greenbaum says he is particularly proud of the girls pole vault program and the “pure number of kids I get to come out and pole vault.” He started with 3 or 4 students and now has about 20 students willing to grip that pole and take a leap. Achievements by students include Mariah Lark ’17 who last month jumped 11 feet at the UCS National Pole Vault Summit at Reno, Nevada, and sophomore Alexis Aquilizon ’18 who set a school record in her freshman year. Pole vaulting is not something most people say “I’m going to do,” says Greenbaum, but “once they give it a shot, they love it.” Growing up in Hayward with three sisters, two who are Moreau Catholic alumnae, Greenbaum was intent on becoming a police officer. He graduated from UC Davis and immediately applied to the San Jose Police Department’s academy with his cousin. His joy at being accepted to the academy, however, was short lived due to budget cuts. He went home that day to find his acceptance letter to grad school in the mail. “A door opened and I took it,” he said. His sister who had planned to become a teacher ended up being a police officer. “Bottom line,” he adds. “I wanted to help others. I’m a people person.” Assistant Principal Ryan Brusco describes Greenbaum as “a man of faith who is diligent, hardworking and honest. “The kids love his student-centered

approach and he always puts the students’ needs ahead of his own. He is a true renaissance man and is very dedicated to Moreau Catholic,” he adds. Greenbaum went on to earn masters degrees in history and education and is a catechist. He longed to return to Moreau Catholic as a teacher, and says that the support he got as a student was the same support he felt coming back as a teacher four years ago. He currently teaches Freshman Theology, is part of the campus ministry team, and coordinates retreats. With the start of the track and field season this month, Greenbaum says this year is a growth year and he hopes to get more students to signup and stay with the program. He will be supported by a complete coaching staff including Enrique Henriquez, Distance Coach; Josh Oliveira, Sprints Coach; Ericka Serrano, Pole Vault Coach; Hugo Barraza, Assistant Sprints Coach; Melissa Smith, High Jump Coach; Alana Knight, Throws Coach; Bill Irwin, Throws Coach; possibly Rich Lacay, Long and Triple Jump Coach; and Katie Hansan ‘08, who will coach at home meets.

Mariah Lark ’17 soars skyward and clears 11 feet.

“When I went to Moreau Catholic, track was a family. We supported each other just like today’s cross country team.” Coach Ben looks to create a “small family feeling, being together as one” and giving his athletes a conviction that they matter and that they belong to something.

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With that in mind, he created the Green and Gold Scrimmage held on Saturday, February 27th and followed by a team barbecue. He randomly divided the athletes between two teams to compete in all the track and field events and encourage them to cheer for each other, build unity and support. “We want chaos. We want loudness,” he enthusiastically says. The scrimmage also served as a benchmark for the season and a chance for coaches to see the athletes’ abilities. While the new track and facility is “phenomenal”, Greenbaum says the improvements are bittersweet and remembers training and competing on the old track. Yes there were hardships and challenges on the old track, he says, “but they built character.” Weather will definitely not be factor and won’t stop practice on the new track and facilities. He adds, it’s with a sense of pride that they take to the new track with new equipment like hurdles, pole vault pit, and high jump pads. Practice began on February 8th with the first match scheduled for March and the MVAL championship at James Logan High School in May and hosted by Moreau Catholic. Pumped up from talking about the athletes and the events, Greenbaum adds “I’m very excited for the new season. I don’t know what to expect.”

Coach Ben ’00 found the perfect bamboo vaulting pole while in Japan. He was the chaperone for Moreau Catholic students’ trip to Funabashi, Japan, Hayward’s sister city, and to Moreau Catholic sister school for the last 25 years, Ichifuna Municpal High School.

—By Monica Lander

Owen Chapman ’18, Keena Brescia ’19, and Coach Ben ’00 participated in a traditional tea ceremony during their visit to Funabashi, Japan.

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CLASH OF THE TITANS

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ur Mariners defeated the highly regarded Sacramento High School squad in the MLK Classic game 77-67. A contributor to that victory—Dvan Molden ’17 (left) has been on the basketball team since his freshman year when he started on Moreau’s state championship team. Coach Frank Knight described him as playing a significant role that usually goes unnoticed. “Dvan rebounds, blocks shots and plays hard! He is our Dennis Rodman.” Dvan performed an outstanding job in the Sacramento game guarding the Iowa State bound Solomon Young.

© Photo: Greg Jungferman

CONGRATULATIONS JOHNNY!

Johnny Den Bleyker ’16, Army All American, signed with UCLA as a long snapper for football. As one of the best long snappers in the country, he will recieve a full 4-year scholarship to UCLA and take over as the team’s long snapper immediately as a freshman.

Julius Chong ‘16, seated Andrew Gatdula ‘16, Johnny Den Bleyker ‘16, Standing JR Marcelo ‘16

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2016 READ-A-THON raises funds for literacy

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his year’s 24 hour Read-a-thon was in support of a community organization that is working to eliminate childhood illiteracy, the Jewish Coalition for Literacy (JCL). In partnership with the Moreau Catholic social justice program, the Director of JCL, Randi Fields, visited Moreau Catholic and spoke to students about JCL’s work and how Mariners can address the problem while raising funds for this exemplary organization. Read-a-thon participants raised a total of $3,110.00 and competed in teams of two to try and read for 24 hours (3:30 p.m. on Friday, January 15 - 3:30 p.m. on Saturday, January 16). Student volunteers led small challenges on the top of every hour and prizes, often donated by teachers, were awarded to the winners. By the 23rd hour, four teams remained so a final challenge was used to break the four-way tie. The Culinary Arts Club made a delicious breakfast for dinner complete with pancakes, waffles, eggs, bacon, sausage, and hash browns. At 11:00 p.m., pizza was delivered for all and by 6:00 a.m. students still awake enjoyed a bagel breakfast generously donated by Noah’s Bagels and delivered by Ms. Shawna Martin.

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Teams transported all the comforts of home to the Library and Learning Commons so that they could sustain their energy for a full 24 hours of reading.

Bailey Galloway, Diana Garcia-Colmenarez, Natalie Rebello, Joedi Brown, Curtis Kosic, Mitchell Slivinsky, Adam Slivinsky, Ethan Wiese, Rebecca Prisk, Laura Kurtz, Erin Graham, Nicholas Fortune, Riley Chasteen, Navdeep Kharodh, Katelyn Olsen, Evan Prisk (not pictured)

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THANK YOU

Read-a-thon participants for making this event a success and for raising a total of $3,110.00 for the Jewish Coalition for Literacy (JCL)! Joedi Brown ’19 Riley Chasteen ’18 Diana Garcia-Colmenarez ’16 Nicholas Fortune ’17 Bailey Galloway ’16 Erin Graham ’19 Curtis Kosic ’16 Navdeep Kharodh ’17 Laura Kurtz ’19 Katelyn Olsen ’17 Evan Prisk ’18 Rebecca Prisk ’16 Natalie Rebello ’19 Adam Slivinsky ’19 Mitchell Slivinsky ’16 Ethan Wies ’19

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MARINER SCRAPBOOK

Winter Fun

THE BOOSTER CLUB PRAWN FEED AND AUCTION A ROARING SUCCESS. Due to the neurotoxin contamination of the ocean waters in California and Oregon, the annual Crab Feed had to be modified into a Prawn Feed, which turned out to be a delicious and satisfying solution. Many of the patrons expressed that they liked the prawns even better than the crab since they are easier to peel and provided a great main course to the customary delicious pasta and salad. One of the most popular additions to this year’s event was a professional auctioneer, Franco Finn, who is the arena announcer for the Golden State Warriors. He got the crowd going. The auction brought in over $45,000.00, with some exciting items including a Warriors package with a signed basketball, an African Safari, and the biggest event of the evening, 2 dinners for 10 guests with Principal Lisa Tortorich and her husband Mark in their Half Moon Bay home, which garnered the stongest bidding of all the items! The lucky winners were Board of Trustees member Richard L’Heureux and wife Jeannie, and Board of Trustees member Barbara Hemenez and her husband William. Over 200 volunteers including current and former parents, student athletes, coaches and faculty and staff pulled together to provide another memorable evening for the crowd. The Prawn Feed planning was in the excellent hands of Booster President Kari Cardana and Assistant to the Athletic Director, Heidi Muhr who, as always, made the event come off without a hitch.

Tony Mirenda, building industry veteran and a devoted supporter of Moreau Catholic Crab Feed and the Moreau Catholic Golf Classic, enjoyed a moment of magic wearing the Warriors NBA Championship ring.

Diana (Straggas) DeFrance ’76 received a bear hug from Tom Spillner ’71, DDS who is blinging the impressive Warriors NBA Championship ring.

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Coach Cotter calls him, “Our heart and soul.” Jullen Booda Ison ’17, a Mariner force in basketball and football and Alexandra Farhangui ’16, recipient of a Merit Scholarship Letter of Commendation, shared a moment during the Lady Mariner Bowl.

GOLDEN MARINERS

Get Your Glow On— A Glow Fest Dance warmed up a January night in the Ivaldi Student Center. Campus events this winter included a Sadie Hawkins dance, and Mehfil, a celebration of Indian dance and culture. On any given night, there is something to celebrate or an athletic event to

Moreau Catholic alumni who work with the NBA champions, the Golden State Warriors, (clockwise) Brett Yamaguchi ’92, Janet Fong ’00 with head coach Luke Walton and point guard Shaun Livingston.

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MARINERS Celebrate Weddings

00s

Christine (DeFrance) Todd ’05 Christine (DeFrance) Todd ’05 married Michael Todd on December 12, 2015 at The Bridges Golf Club in San Ramon. They met freshman year at CSUEB and got engaged in San Francisco on New Year’s Eve 2014. Christine is a high school counselor and Mike is a sales rep for a tech company.

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Laura (von Rothstein) Weiman ’05 Alumna Laura (von Rothstein) Weiman ’05 married husband Kevin Weiman at a beautiful ceremony in the San Ramon hills at Canyon View on September 26th, 2015. Laura and Kevin are enjoying being newlyweds. They hope to start a family together within the next year or two.

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90s

Kristy McCaffery-Pardee ’98

70s

Kitty (Kovacich) Chandler ’73 Kitty celebrated her daughter Christina’s wedding on October 9, 2015. According to Kitty, “It was a perfect day in every way, to welcome our new son-in-law, Cody, to the family. Although, he was well part of our family long before their wedding day.” Kitty expressed her congratulations and good wishes, “May God bless you both in every way, and may you have

After coaching softball at MCHS for the last 17 years, Kristy decided to hang up her cleats. She hopes to come back to MCHS sometime soon to pick up where she left off. A recent promotion at work left Kristy unable to coach softball for the 2016 season. “I will miss spring time at Moreau and all of my wonderful athletes. I have been working for the Hayward Area Recreation and Park District in the Sports Office for the last 15 years and was recently promoted to the position of Program Leader III,” she stated. On September 19, 2015 Kristy married her husband Anthony Pardee on Monastery Beach in Carmel, CA. She currently lives in San Leandro where she is helping to raise Savanah (14), Makayla (11), and Elijah (7).

Christine (DeFrance) Todd ‘05 Alumni Photo Left to right: Selene Sizar ’08, Joselyn Yuson ’84, Megan O’Connell ’09, Dominica (Garcia) Sizar ’84, Georgette (Kristof) Jackson ’84, Marisol Galaviz ’15 Kayla Wilder ’13, Emilo Galaviz ’12, Matthew Stream ’98, Fran Warmerdam ’73, Christine (DeFrance) Todd ’05, Phil Rombs ’02, Janice Rombs ’05, Jennifer DeFrance ’02, Diana (Straggas) DeFrance ’76, Sean Stream ’00, Alisha Guzman ’05, George Straggas ’78, Kate Parisotto ’05, Sam Rombs ’05, Alicia Mendoza ’05, John Cabrera ’05, Briauna Johnson ’05, Edgar Calero ’05, Eric Hansen ’05, Ryan Thomas ’05, Ryan Safreno ’05, Katie Hansen ’08, and President Terry Lee.

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MARINERS making WAVES

90s

Cheryl (Liem) Shoemaker ’90 Cheryl and her husband returned to the Bay Area after 14 years on the Big Island of Hawaii with their daughters Alexandra (9) and Phoebe (7). “I am also fortunate to be returning to my career with Hilton Hotels Worldwide and will be based at the DoubleTree hotel in San Jose. I can’t wait to attend the next Class Reunion,” Cheryl enthused.

Sisters Phoebe and Alexandra Shoemaker

Andrew Wells ’98 moved to Vivian, Louisiana in 2004 and married a girl he’d known since she was only 6 years old. He became a registered nurse in 2008. His wife, Vivian, retired after teaching 1st grade for 7 years so she could be a stay at home mom. He is currently a nurse at the V.A. Medical Center in Shreveport, Louisiana. Andrew and his wife have 5 precious children and they give God glory and praise for all their blessings. Our man in blue, LAPD Officer Dominick Reichmuth ’07 28

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Dominick Reichmuth ’07 graduated from the Los Angeles Police Department Academy on October 02, 2015. Dominick is currently working patrol for the LAPD at the Devonshire Station.

Connect BECAUSE YOU’LL ALWAYS BE A MARINER!

Daniel Connolly ’09 graduated with honors

Saturday, April 2, 2016 Alumni Boys Volleyball Reunion

from California State University East Bay. He received his Bachelor of Science in business adminstration with an option in accounting. In his sophomore year at Moreau he started a property care business which he later sold.

Main Gym 6:00 p.m. Registration 7:00 p.m. Game Time This event is complimentary for alumni participants. Families and guests are $5.oo each, or $15.00 for 4+ attendees.

Please pay at the gate.

To register for the Boys Volleyball, please contact Christine Krisman ckrisman@moreaucatholic.org Diana (Straggas) DeFrance ‘76 ddefrance@moreaucatholic.org Reconnect during a conversation, or participate in a spirited game with your Mariner teammates. Update your contact information at www.moreaucatholic.com/updatecontactinfo

Mericien Venzon ’09 (’09 Valedictorian, Class president 2005-2008, ’09 ASB President) Mericien graduated from UCLA in 2014 with a degree in biology and minor in evolutionary medicine and served as commencement speaker at her departmental graduation. She is currently interviewing for MD-PhD programs and hopes to pursue a career in translational biomedical research. Mericien was recently honored as a notable alumnus in UCLA’s Optimist campaign and featured on campus banners for her work in founding UCLA’s figure skating team, scientific research as a Howard Hughes Research Scholar, and clinical research as a member of UCLA’s Emergency Medicine Student Stroke Team. She is mentioned alongside other famous Bruins like Jack Black, Jackie Robinson, and John Wooden.

Or contact: Diana (Straggas) DeFrance ’76, ddefrance@moreaucatholic.org or (510) 881-4330 for more information.

00s

Katherine Valencia ’05 (right) remained best friends with Laura Von Rothstein-Weiman ’05 after their graduation from Moreau Catholic and was proud to be part of her beautiful wedding. Winter/Spring ’16 | The Vector

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MARINERS making WAVES

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Ben Jackson ’12 is finishing up his final year at UC Berkeley and pursuing degrees in molecular and cell biology, English and a minor in music. After graduation he will be entering a MD/PhD program to pursue a career in transitional biological research.

Chris Jackson ’12 is a senior chemistry major with a math minor at St. Edwards University. He is a resident assistant, teaching assistant, Asian Student Association president and American Chemical Society President. He joined the NCAA div. II varsity cross-country team and will be competing in the Austin and Boston marathons this spring. In addition, he will be leading a service break experience trip to Jamaica this January. In December he was selected as one of 8 American students to serve as an observer at the United Nations Conference on Climate Change in Paris.

Lisa Machado ’12 is studying digital media management at St. Edward’s university. During the past summer she worked in the Moreau Catholic marketing department as a digital media assistant. This semester she is involved in student life on campus and as a social media intern with a local agency in Austin, TX. Next semester she will be studying abroad in Angers, France and will have a marketing internship with the University of Angers.

Karina Sanchez ’12 is a senior at Santa Clara University and will earn her degree in marketing with minors in Spanish and international business from the Leavey School of Business in June. She stays busy working at the university finance office and is in her second year as the captain of the ‘Salsa Clara Dance Team.’

Jack Alcott ’15 is striving for a career in mechani-

Chris Jackson ’12, American Chemical Society President, in the chemistry lab at St. Edwards University.

IN MEMORIAM Please pray for the souls of— John Patrick Asvitt ’83 Marie Sacco Button Mary Capurro Darin Clayton ’96 Mary Cumming ’86 Marilyn Mascsak Jesus Mendoza Ron LaPlante ’71 Thomas Lee

John Pettinichio Nick Piva Shirley Prisk Marilyn Quebbeman Dianne Staszkow Beatrice Vasquez Erwin Villanueva ’09 Hazel (Cruz) Woon ’91

cal engineering. Jack is completing his first year at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo.

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10s

Julian Chicoine ’13 is a digital media management major at St. Edwards University with 3.5 GPA. He recently worked as a resident assistant and program coordinator on campus. Currently he is completing a service project for underprivileged kids in Chicago.

Connect BECAUSE YOU’LL ALWAYS BE A MARINER! Reunion planning for classes ending in 1’s and 6’s 1971, 1976,1981, 1986, 1991, 1996, 2001, 2006 and 2011

Save the Date

Dylan Mackin ‘15 finished a five game inter-

Class of 1976, 40-Year Reunion

squad team world series and pushed through his finals to finish the semester on a good note at St. Edwards. He is looking forward to his first season of college baseball in the Spring.

Date: Saturday, August 20, 2016 Location: Moreau Catholic High School Chair: Eric Dettenrieder ’76 Contact: eric.deti@gmail.com 925.339.5688

Gerald Robinson ‘15 is pursuing medical school and working with sports trainers on campus at Arizon State University.

Savannah Rosales-Brand ‘15 just completed her first semester at Menlo College and is looking forward to receiving a kidney transplant in 2016!

Anthony Bailey ‘15 finished his first year of college football at Lewis and Clark in December. He has decided to major in economics and is planning to study in Europe.

Class of 1986, 30-Year Reunion Date: Saturday, October 8, 2016 Location: Marriott Pleasanton Chair: Lea (Gambina) Pecora ’86 Contact: lea@wonderfullyhuman.com

Reunion chairs are needed for the following:

Class of 2001, Class of 2006, Class of 2011

Thank You! The following alumni have volunteered to be chairs:

Steve Avolicino ’71 scino@earthlink.net

DeeDee (Howard) Valdez ’81 deev63@hotmail.com 925.250.7968

Mae (Reyes) Bustonera ’91 maebustonera@yahoo.com 510.504.4377

Kathryn (Segarra) Otico ’91 kat.otico@gmail.com 510.909.3932

Stephanie (Nethercott) Ubungen ’96 stephanie.ubungen@gmail.com 510.866.5673 Contact: Diana (Straggas) DeFrance ’76, Event Program Manager ddefrance@moreaucatholic.org or 510-881-4330 for more information Howard Wu ’12 and Ben Jackson ’12 come back to the Moreau Catholic campus to host information sessions on applying to UC Berkeley.

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27170 Mission Boulevard Hayward, CA 94544-4194

NON-PROFIT ORG US Postage PAID HAYWARD, CA PERMIT NO. 851

Change Service Requested

EXPLORE, make friends and have fun! The Moreau Catholic summer camps are a great way to try out something new or to get better at something you already love! Special early bird pricing for Vector readers! Mock Trial Camp

Explore the thrill of courtroom drama by recreating a complete trial. Open to students entering grades 7-9 in 2016-2017. June 13 - June 17, from 8:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. Apply now: moreaucatholic.org/mocktrialcamp

Mariner Explorers Camp

Explore Filmmaking, Art, Drama, Dance and our popular Maker Lab along with Robotics. Open to students entering grades 6-8 in 2016-2017. June 20 - June 30, every weekday from 8:00 a.m. – noon Register now: moreaucatholic.org/explorers

This information applies to both camps: Early Bird Pricing – Register by March 8, 2016. to receive an early bird price of $225. Cost is $300 beginning March 9, 2016. Contact Samantha Wainwright, Summer School Director swainwright@moreaucatholic.org 510.881.4300

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