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Moore's newly renovated, premier office/retail suites

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• Great visibility & easy access • 1,000 to 30,000 square feet • Security system with integrated cameras-exterior • Security systems in each suite • New LED lighting - inside and out • New custom window treatments in all suites • New fencing - west of building • Landscaping with sprinkler system

• New signage • Resurfaced sidewalks • New parking lot • New roof • New landscaping • New flooring in all suites • Many available for "build to suit"

Judy Hatfield

C: (405) 640-6167 O: (405) 364-5300

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VOL. 12 • NO. 6 • JUNE 2017

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Summer is about more than just vacation, it's adventure time! Our Summer Events Guide will help you Explore Moore and get the most out of your summer.

The Warren Theatre has become one of Moore's top destinations. Now it's changing owners.

Interstate 35 is one of the nation's busiest highways and that's particularly true in Moore. Find out what the City of Moore is doing to be proactive about I-35's future.

From the Editor Summer is finally here and all across the area children are rejoicing. For parents and other guardians, there's a real need for some direction in helping kids get the most out of their vacation time. With that in mind, feel free to dig in to our annual Summer Events Guide for a long list of activities that will provide fun, education, and growth.

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The OKC Thunder's Enes Kanter has had quite a month, including a close call with Turkish authorities who cancelled his passport. But what really makes the NBA star's motor run fast is his passion for seafood.

Moore Monthly Team

We're also keeping an eye on two stories that are of vital interest to local residents: a study of I-35 and the sale of the Warren Theatre to a Tennesseebased theater chain. Enjoy the June issue of the Moore Monthly. - Rob Morris Editor

Editors Rob Morris Brent Wheelbarger Staff Writers Beverly Ferree Rob Morris Katie Roberts Donna Walker Brent Wheelbarger Contributing Writers Henry Dumas L.T. Hadley Mike Rush Kathleen Wilson Vona Bowling Christian Potts Aisa Trice

Art Jeff Albertson Kenna Baker Shelly Irvin Yamini Krishnan Andrew Lovell Shelbi Rosa Photography Yamini Krishnan Rob Morris Shelbi Rosa Fred Wheelbarger Augmented Reality Patrick Glueck Copy Editing Katie Roberts

Advertising Sales Donna Walker Distribution Fred Wheelbarger Chief Financial Officer Ennie H. Neeley For comments, contribution, or just to say ‘Hi!’ rob@mooremonthly.com For ad placement, specifications and rates donna@mooremonthly.com 405.793.3338

201 N. Broadway, #100, Moore, OK 73160 • 405.793.3338 • trifectacomm.net

Moore Monthly is a monthly publication by Trifecta Communications, serving Moore, South OKC & North Norman. Moore Monthly is free to the public. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. Moore Monthly is not responsible for the care and/or return of unsolicited manuscripts, artwork, photography, books, or any other material submitted for possible publication.

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FESTIVALS Celebration in the Heartland When: Tuesday, July 4, 10:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. Where: Buck Thomas Park, 1903 NE 12th St, Moore, OK What to Expect: Food vendors, children’s tent, inflatables, the happy train, children’s sand pit, arts and crafts vendors and wineries. Helicopter Rides: DWTA will offer helicopter rides at $40 per person. Open Car Show: Car, Truck and Bike Show from 8:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Go to www. showyourridez.com for more information. Musical Entertainment: Located at the South Pavilion Reminder: Dogs are not allowed in the park for this event. Fireworks Show: The City of Moore is excited to conclude this event with a huge Fireworks Show on the 4th at dark. Tune into radio station 89.9 for fireworks music.


SCHOOL AGE PROGRAM The YMCA OF GREATER OKLAHOMA CITY is the area’s largest provider of school-age childcare, providing care for more than 1,400 children each day who would otherwise be home alone after their school day ends. This program provides care before and after school for boys and girls ages 5 to 12. Children are given the opportunity to express their individual talents in a safe and well-supervised atmosphere and parents are free from worry about their children’s care while they are at work. The entire experience for the children is built around activities that challenge them to accept and demonstrate the Y’s values of caring, honesty, respect and responsibility.

Now Registering

YMCAOKC.ORG/BA JUNE 2017 | MOORE MONTHLY | 9


EVENTS Summer Nights Concert in the Park When: Every Friday in June at 7 p.m. Where: Central Park Amphitheater, 700 S. Broadway What to Expect: Sponsored by the Moore Public Library, these concerts are sure to bring in large crowds. Admission is free, but make sure to bring your lawn chairs or blankets. Call 793-5100 or go to www.cityofmoore. com for more information

The Farmers Market at Central Park

June 2, Banana Seat Recognized as one of the top musical acts in the Southwest Region, Banana Seat pays tribute to the greatest artists and songs from the 1970s

When: The Farmers Market will open every Thursday evening

June 9, Black Water Bridge With some of the best musicians, vocalists and performers in the Oklahoma City area, this band provides the best in vintage rock, blending in the most current new country, and adding a mixture of pop tunes

What to Expect: Promoting the sale of garden-related products and produce. We are taking applications for vendors for our Farmers Market. You must sell garden-related products to be a vendor. For more information, please call 793-5090 or e-mail Whitney Wathen at wwathen@ cityofmoore.com (link sends e-mail)

June 16, Boulevard Brass Boulevard Brass was formed by OU alumni in the summer of 2011. They play a variety of styles, mixing a lot of fun, popular music and jazz pieces in with standard brass quintet repertoire June 23, Nicnos From Central Oklahoma, this is a five-piece, high energy, folk-rock band that plays original music with hints of influence from The Black Crowes and Dave Matthews Band

Daddy Daughter Dance When: Saturday, June 17, from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Where: The Station at Central Park, 700 S Broadway Ave. What to Expect: For dads and their daughters, ages 4 to 14. Tickets will be pre-sold online only at www.cityofmoore.com/fun for $10.00 per person or sold the day of the dance for $15.00. There will be dancing, cookies, punch and door prizes. T-shirts are available for $10.00.

Dive-In Movie When: Saturday, June 10, from 8:30 p.m. to 11:00 p.m. Where: The Station Aquatic Center. What to Expect: Bring your entire family to the Aquatic Center to watch a movie while swimming. $5.00 per person. No outside food and drink allowed. Movie: Moana

now until September 2, from 3:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. and Saturday mornings from 8:00 a.m. to noon. Where: Moore Central Park Multi-Purpose Pavilion, 700 S. Broadway

Food Truck Fridays When: Every Friday from May 19 through September 29, from 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Where: Moore Central Park Multi-Purpose Pavilion What to Expect: Join us on Fridays for music and lunch at Central Park. We will have food trucks in the park, serving food from Mexican and barbecue to hot dogs and hamburgers. Take an hour away from work and join us at Central Park for Food Truck Fridays.

Kids Fishing Derby When: July 29, 7:30 a.m. Where: Little River Park, 700 SW 4th St. in Moore What to Expect: Kids ages 5-15 get your fishing poles ready! Catch it, you keep it, but only four fish per family. Admission is free, but you must bring your own pole and bait. The OK Wildlife Department will be on site at 8:00 a.m. for safety, knot tying, fish ID, fish cleaning and ethics training. Kids must be accompanied by an adult. Preregister online at www.cityofmoore.com or call 793-5090 for more details.

Miles 4 Smiles 17th Annual Bike Ride When: Saturday, June 17, at 7:00 a.m. Where: Baptist Children’s Home, 16301 S. Western What to Expect: On-site registration begins at 6 a.m. at Emmaus Baptist Church, 16001 S. Western (north side of Baptist Children’s Home campus). Call 691-7781 for more details.


Moore War 5K Run When: Saturday, August 26, at 7:30 a.m. Where: The starting line is at Moore High School, 300 N. Eastern Avenue

What to Expect: Registration is $30 and includes an official Moore War Run tech t-shirt ($5 extra for XXL). Students under the age of 18 can register for $15 each. Go to www.moorewarrun.com for more information. Pre-Race Pasta Party: Bring your family and friends to The Pre-Race Pasta Party at Westmoore High School from 5:30 p.m. to 8:00 pm Friday, August 26, for a delicious meal of pasta, salad, rolls and beverages for only $8. Booster groups will be on hand at the packet pick up on Friday night selling Jaguar, Lion and Sabercat gear!

Movie in The Park When: August 11; activities start at 7:00 p.m. Where: Central Park Multi-Purpose Pavilion and Amphitheater, 700 S. Broadway Ave. What to Expect: Bring the entire family for a night under the stars. Popcorn, music, and candy and drinks for sale. For more information please go to www.cityofmoore.com/centralpark. Movie: The Secret Life of Pets

Play in the Park When: Every Friday in June through part of July Where: Various parks throughout Moore What to Expect: Supervised summertime activities for children ages 6 to 14. An adult must accompany children. There will be games, snacks, and arts and crafts. Call 793-5100 or go to www.cityofmoore.com for more information.

Scavenger Hunt at the Parks When: June 2 to July 7 Where: Each Saturday morning, a new list of clues will be found online at the City of Moore Facebook page, www.facebook.com/mooreparks. What to Expect: Participation is free, but you must register your team by June 2 at www.cityofmoore.com/fun. Clues will be posted by noon on Saturday each week of the hunt. Print off the list, grab your camera, family and friends and scavenger the parks to see what you find. At the end of the 6-week hunt, submit your findings to The Station Recreation Center and the teams with the correct findings will be entered in a drawing for prizes.

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CAMPS

E D U C AT I O N A L

Gizmo's, Gadgets & Thangs Camp Presents Robotics & Rockets

When: June 19 to June 23, 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Where: The Station Recreation Center

All Aboard Kids Club When: Summer Break, Mondays through Fridays, May 26 to August 18, 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Where: The Station Recreation Center What to Expect: Designed especially for Kids 7-12 years of age. Depending on the day, kids can play various sports and games in the gym ranging from basketball, soccer, dodgeball to arts and crafts and board games. This club is open to pass holders and non-pass holders. Go to www.cityofmoore.com for more details.

Arts & Crafts Camp When: June 5 to June 9 and July 10 to July 14, 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Where: The Station Recreation Center Activities Room What to Expect: For children ages 6 to 12, this camp includes painting, drawing, printmaking and sculpture. Registration is $95 and includes all supplies and snacks, plus a t-shirt. Kids will create colorful paintings, sculptures, jewelry and more. Go to www.cityofmoore.com for more details.

What to Expect: Designed for ages 7 to 14, the camp is $95.00 per customer. Students will get to build and create their very own robot that will do multiple things. They will also build and launch rockets that they can take home at the end of camp. Go to www.cityofmoore.com for more details.

Magic Camp When: June 26 to June 30, 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Where: The Station Recreation Center What to Expect: Designed for ages 7 to 14, this camp is $175, which includes a t-shirt and $80 worth of magic tricks. This camp is taught by Discover Magic, with some of the top performers in the region. Your child will learn the eight traits that make up a true magician with a hands-on learning experience. Kids will use awesome magic props, top secret file folders, bonus online videos, and receive a graduation wand, certificate and a t-shirt. Go to www.cityofmoore.com for more details.

Magic Camp II When: August 7 to August 11, 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Where: The Station Recreation Center

Extreme Animals June Summer Camp When: June 12 to June 16 and July 17 to 21, 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Where: The Station Recreation Center, Activity Room What to Expect: The camp is for students 6 to 12 years old. The cost is $125, t-shirt included. Get up close and personal with endangered species, creepy crawlies and more! You will also learn about different habits and create different types of arts and crafts that relate to those species and their habitats. Go to www.cityofmoore.com for more details.

What to Expect: Designed for ages 7 to 14, this is the second part of the Discover Magic program. Kids will learn more advanced tricks not taught in the first Magic Camp. It is a prerequisite to have participated in the first Magic Camp. This camp is taught by Discover Magic, with some of the top performers in the region. Your child will learn the eight traits that make up a true magician with a hands-on learning experience. Kids will use awesome magic props, top secret file folders, bonus online videos, and receive a graduation wand, certificate and a t-shirt. Go to www. cityofmoore.com for more details.

Mathnasium When: Monday to Thursday, 2:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.; Friday 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.; Saturday 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. and games at 2:00 Where: 1031 SW 19th St, Moore, OK What to Expect: From math fairs and game nights to presentations, we make math fun and engaging for people of all ages! Come join us to learn math, have fun, and discover more about what makes Mathnasium different. And Saturday is GAME TIME! On top of sharpening mathematical abilities, Mathnasium offers kids the opportunity to participate in games, team challenges, and contests that are not only fun but thought-provoking! We have game time each Saturday from 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm. New games and competitive challenges will be played each week in addition to old favorites. Please contact us at 412-8758 for more information.

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CAMPS

SPORTS All N 1 Sports Camp When: June 5 to June 9, 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Tennis Camp When: May 30th – June 2nd Where: Buck Thomas Tennis Courts Cost: $75 per person Instructor: Kendra Milligan, Moore High School Tennis Assistant Coach

Where: The Station Recreation Center

Volleyball Camp

Cost: $85 per person

When: June 19 to June 22

Instructor: Athena Mathis, Apple Creek P.E. Teacher

Where: The Station Recreation Center Cost: $75 per person

Basketball Camp When: June 5 to 9 Where: The Station Recreation Center

Instructor: Janet Brannon, Southmoore Volleyball Head Coach

Cost: $85 per person

Blazers Ice Centre Summer Camps

Instructor: Scott Hodges, Westmoore Basketball Head Coach

When: May 30 to August 19 Where: Blazers Ice Center, 8000 S. Interstate 35 (I-35 and I-240)

One Day Basketball Camp: Offensive Skills

When: July 6, 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. Where: The Station Recreation Center Cost: $25 per person Instructor: Scott Hodges, Westmoore Basketball Head Coach What to Expect: This camp is for anyone looking to enhance their offensive skills, including dribbling techniques, passing and shooting.

Cost: $25 per day; $125 per week; $115 per week with four-weeks advance payment What to Expect: The Blazers have offered a summer camp for six years now. It’s a relaxed and fun environment, with a theme incorporated into activities each week. There will be drinks, snacks, daily ice time, crafts, games, water fun, and indoor and outdoor activities. Go to Blazersicecentre.com or call 631-3307 for more information.

One Day Basketball Camp: Shooting Skills

When: July 31, 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Where: The Station Recreation Center Cost: $25 per person Instructor: Scott Hodges, Westmoore Basketball Head Coach What to Expect: This camp is for anyone looking to improve their shot from anywhere in the gym. This camp will focus on jump shots and low post moves. Emphasis will be placed on shooting form and the proper way to make lay-ups.

Football Camp When: July 10 to July 11 Where: Buck Thomas Park South Front Field Cost: $95 per person Instructor: Lorenzo Williams, Westmoore Football Head Coach

Golf Camp When: June 12 to June 16 Where: Earlywine Golf Course Cost: $85 per person Instructor: Mike McConville, Southmoore Golf Head Coach

Soccer Camp When: July 17 to 21 Where: Buck Thomas Park South Front Field Cost: $85 per person Instructor: Robert Williams, Westmoore High School Soccer Head Coach

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CAMPS

PERFORMING ARTS Artworks Academy of Performing Arts 3251 Market Place, Suite 130, Norman, OK 73072, (405) 397-1824

Polynesian Adventures Dance Camp: 3-9 Year Olds When: Monday through Thursday, June 19 to June 22, 3 pm to 5 pm What to Expect: Tuition is $95. The camp is a high-energy dance camp themed around your favorite Polynesian themed Disney movies! In this camp, 3-9 year-old students will learn the basics of ballet, tap and theatre movement - all while dancing to songs from Moana and Lilo and Stitch! Each day students will also make a craft and a snack will be provided. The camp will culminate in a short performance for friends and family.

Trolls Dance Camp: K-5th Grade When: Monday through Thursday, July 10 to July 13, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.+ What to Expect: Put your hair in the air! We don't care! This summer we will have a blast learning various styles of dance, including jazz, hip hop, ballet and tap, all while dancing to music from the Trolls soundtrack! The camp will culminate in a short performance for friends and family. Tuition is $125

Disney’s Winnie the Pooh KIDS will be August 4-5, 2017. Performance times and number of performances will be announced once enrollment is finalized. It is possible the K-3rd grade campers and the 4th-7th grade campers will be in different performances. Tuition is $250.

Summer Dance Intensive: 6th-12th grade When: Monday to Thursday, July 10 to July 13, 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. What to Expect: Use it or lose it! Don’t lose your dance skills over the summer. Join us for this intensive and work on skills in ballet, jazz, tap and lyrical. Students will also learn how to choreograph a dance! Tuition is $125.

Oliver Features K-12th grade students When: June 9-11 What to Espect: Performances are at Randall University (formerly Hillsdale College) Cost: Tickets are $10 and can be purchased at the door or online at www.ArtWorksAcademy.com

A Chorus Line – High School Edition Features 7th-12th grade students When: June 16-18 What to Expect: Performances are at Randall University (formerly Hillsdale College) Cost: Tickets are $10 and can be purchased at the door or online at www.ArtWorksAcademy.com

Summer Musical Revue

Alice: A One Act Fantasy: 4th-8th grade When: Monday to Friday, July 17 to July 21, 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. What to Expect: Join us for a one-week theatre camp as we produce the one act play, Alice. This one-act dramatization of Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass is distinguished by the inventive manner with which Jerome McDonough handles Alice's various changes in size and the numerous changes of setting, with no breaks in the action. This is a straight play and NOT a musical. Every student who auditions will be cast. Auditions will be on Saturday, July 15 at 10:00 am at ArtWorks Academy. Enroll in the camp and we will email information about auditions prior to the audition date. If you are going to be out of town during the auditions, please let us know in advance so we can schedule an earlier audition time. Tuition is $175. Performances: Alice will be July 21-22, 2017 at the ArtWorks Academy studio.

Disney's Winnie the Pooh KIDS: K-3rd grade and 4th-7th grade When: Monday to Friday, July 24 to August 4, 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. What to Expect: Disney's Winnie the Pooh KIDS is a delightful show based on the beloved characters of A.A. Milne and the 2011 Disney animated feature film. Featuring favorite songs from the film, as well as new hits by the Academy Award-winning Robert and Kristen Lopez (Frozen), this honey-filled delight is as sweet as it is fun. We will have auditions for roles on the first day of camp and everyone who auditions will be cast in the production. Performances:

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(featuring songs from contemporary musicals) Features 13-24 year olds When: August 11-13 What to Expect: Performances are at Randall University (formerly Hillsdale College) Cost: Tickets are $10 and can be purchased at the door For more information visit www.ArtWorksAcademy.com

NATIONAL DAY OF DANCE

Join us for free dance classes on Saturday, July 29 to celebrate the National Day of Dance. Visit www.ArtWorksAcademy.com for more details.


SIX-WEEK CLASSES Classes run from June 26-August 4. All classes with grade requirements are based on the grade the student will be in during the 2017-2018 school year. Enrollment in classes with age requirements should be determined based on how old your child will be by the first day of class. Visit www. ArtWorksAcademy.com for more details

MASTER CLASSES ArtWorks Academy strives to bring professional artists to the studio to teach students in every aspect of dance, music and theatre. Master classes give students a unique training experience and expose them to new techniques and varied teaching styles.

Modern Dance with Perpetual Motion

Art Classes

For 12-18 year olds Check www.ArtWorksAcademy.com for date and time

Mousterpieces Art (4-6 year olds) - Tuesdays 5:30-6:00 pm Mousterpieces Art (1st-3rd grade) - Mondays 6:00-6:45 pm Mousterpieces Props & Costumes (4th-8th grade) - Tuesdays 6-6:55 pm Face Painting (4th-8th grade) - Mondays 5:15-6:00 pm

Classical Vocal Technique with Darin and Aubrey Chapin

Music and Theatre Classes Improvisational Acting (5th-12th grade) - Mondays 6:00-6:55 pm Private Voice Lessons (10-18 year olds) - Times vary Audition Prep (8th-12th grade) - Mondays 4:30-6:00 pm Summer Musical Revue - Audition Only (8th-12th grade) - Mon./Thur. 6:00-8:30 pm (runs through August 13)

Dance Classes Parent and Tot (18 months-2 years) - Tuesdays 5:30-6:00 pm Pirates and Princesses Dance (3-5 year olds) - Tuesdays 6:00-6:45 pm Pirates and Princesses Dance (3-5 year olds) - Thursdays 5:30-6:15 pm Ballet/Tap Combo (K-2nd grade) - Thursdays 6:15-7:10 pm Hip Hop (1st-5th grade) - Tuesdays 7:00-7:45 pm Ballet/Jazz/Tap Combo (3rd-6th grade) - Thursdays 6:15-7:45 pm Tap (6th-12th grade) - Tuesdays 5:30-6:00 pm Hip Hop (6th-12th grade) - Tuesdays 6:00-6:55 pm Ballet Leaps and Turns (6th-12th grade) - Tuesdays 7:00-7:55 pm Contemporary Jazz (6th-12th grade) - Thursdays 5:00-5:55 pm Advanced Ballet (6th-12th grade) - Thursdays 7:15-8:10 pm Zumba (12 year olds and up) - Mondays 8:30-9:25 pm Adult Tap (18 years and up) - Thursdays 7:45-8:15 pm Adult Jazz (18 years and up) - Thursdays 8:15-9:10 pm

Saturday, July 8 from 2:00-4:00 pm For 12-18 year olds For more information visit www.ArtWorksAcademy.com

Hip Hop and Musical Theatre Dance with Hui Cha Poos Saturday, July 15 from 2:00-4:30 pm For 12-18 year olds For more information visit www.ArtWorksAcademy.com

Improv Acting with Greg Castle Saturday, July 22 from 2:00-4:00 pm For 12-18 year olds For more information visit www.ArtWorksAcademy.com

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AMUSEMENTS Andy Alligators Fun Park Where: 3300 Market Place Dr., Norman, Oklahoma, 321-7275 What to Expect: Nothing says 'family' like a fun-filled day of quality time, attractions and food! Attractions include go-carts, bumper cars, an indoor and outdoor climbing wall, batting cages, mini-bowling, gator golf, a game room and laser tag. Contact Andy Alligators at 321-7275 for more details.

ONE-DAY CLASSES All classes with grade requirements are based on the grade the student will be in during the 2017-2018 school year. Enroll for all classes online at www.ArtWorksAcademy.com

Cupcake Decorating Where: At ArtWorks Academy When: Tuesday, June 20 from 6:00-7:00 pm (2nd-5th grade) Whem: Tuesday, June 20 from 7:00-8:00 pm (6th-12th grade)

Andy Alligators Water Park Where: 3300 Market Place Dr., Norman, Oklahoma, 321-7275 What to Expect: Nothing says “family” like a fun-filled day of quality time, attractions and food! Water park attractions include a lazy river, Cowabunga Cove, Banzai Pipeline, Riptide Racer and Bubbler’s Beach. Contact Andy Alligators at 321-7275 for more details.

Elevation Trampoline Park Where: 1431 N Moore Ave, Moore, OK What to Expect: You’ll enjoy jumping on over 5,000 square feet of trampolines on our Main Court, playing dodgeball and basketball on one of our three Sports Courts and getting airborne at the Air Bag. Our goal is to make your party SIMPLE, EASY and FUN! Call Elevation Park at 759-2288 for more details.

HeyDay Entertainment Center Summer Camps Where: 3201 Market Place, Norman, OK When: June 19 to June 30 and July 10 to July 28, Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Cost: $29.99 a day or $109.99 for a 5-day session What to Expect: HeyDay's summer camp is an awesome way for your kid to spend the summer. Between the extreme heat and the long days, a time for FUN can turn into hours spent in the house without much to do. Let the kids spend their summer at HeyDay making friends and having the best summer ever! Our summer camp sessions include breakfast, lunch, and all of HeyDay's amazing attractions!

Orr Family Farm

What to Expect: Students will learn different cupcake decorating skills as they decorate their own cupcakes.

Scrapbooking and Pizza Where: At ArtWorks Academy When: Friday, June 30 from 6:00-8:00 pm (6th-12th grade) When: riday, July 7 from 6:00-8:00 pm (2nd-5th grade) What to Expect: Students will bring their own pictures and learn how to create their own pages in a scrapbook. Pizza will be served and materials will be supplied.

Dreamcatcher Make and Take Where: At ArtWorks Academy When: Friday, July 14 from 6:00-8:00 pm (6th-12th grade) What to Expect: Come have a fun night with your friends! Students will learn to make their own dreamcatcher and pizza will be served.

LIBRARY Pioneer Library Systems Summer Reading Program Where: 225 S. Howard, Moore, OK When: Online registration runs now through August 1 What to Expect: Summer is the time to let your imagination and desire to explore run wild. Whether it is a family vacation travel guide, camp activities to learn rules for a game, or a relaxing read in the shade - the world is filled with numerous reading opportunities. This summer, your hometown Pioneer Libraries are offering you hundreds of events, thousands of books, and endless hours of reading - both in the libraries and remotely. All you need is your library card. Call the library at 793-5100 for more details.

Where: 14400 S. Western Ave, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma When: June 13 to June 16 and June 27 to June 30, 9 am to 2 pm daily Cost: $170 per child; includes all lunches, snacks, drinks and a camp t-shirt What to Expect: Designed for kindergarten through sixth grade (ages 5 to 11), the camp includes educational opportunities to learn about farm animals, animal care and agriculture and instructional time on topics such as pony care, animal care, petting and feeding techniques, how to fish and how to milk a cow. Activities include pony rides, fishing, animal barn visits, challenging games and more. Call Orr Family Farm at 799-3276 for more details.

Note: We make every effort to ensure the accuracy of this information, but things change. Always call ahead to confirm dates, times, location and other information.

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Warren Sells Theaters to Regal By Rob Morris The Moore Warren Theatre is one of seven theaters sold by Bill Warren to the Tennesseebased Regal Entertainment Group. Warren confirmed the sale today in an interview with The Wichita Eagle newspaper. The deal is effective immediately. The sale includes Warren’s theaters in Wichita, Kansas along with theaters in Moore and Broken Arrow. It does not include two new theaters Warren is building in the Oklahoma City area. 18 | MOORE MONTHLY | JUNE 2017

Regal is an American-owned company and the country’s second-largest theater chain with more than 7,000 screens at 559 theaters. The company’s headquarters is based in Knoxville, Tennesse. Prior to the sale the only Regal theater in the Oklahoma City metro area was the Regal Cinemas Spotlight 14 at I-35 and Robinson in Norman. There’s no word yet on the impact the sale of the Moore Warren Theatre will have, but theatre

trade magazines have been tracking a growing trend toward a more a more luxurious moviegoing experience. In 2013 the AMC Penn Square renovated their 10-screen theater, adding power reclining chairs and new concession options. Texas-based Cinemark Theaters recently began adding “Luxury Loungers” to some of their theaters, though the OKC Cinemark Theater has yet to see those changes.


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Being a Meteorologist in Oklahoma: KOCO’s Damon Lane Discusses His Career Choice By Rob Morris and Beverly Ferree

Photo by Rob Morris of the May 20, 2013 tornado

B

eing a meteorologist in Oklahoma is a stressful career. People demand information from them. They rely on them. So, when KOCO Chief Meteorologist Damon Lane made his way to Oklahoma, he knew expectations were high. “To be a meteorologist in Oklahoma is a huge deal,” explained Lane. “It’s by far the biggest weather market in the entire world. It’s fun to be in that avenue of watching new things happen.” In fact, Lane read an article once in the New York Times that described the feelings Oklahomans have for weather, “I read that the two most popular people in Oklahoma are Thunder players and meteorologists.” Lane lives in Moore, but he grew up outside of Washington D.C., went to school in Virginia, and moved his way to Moore. He admits, there’s a delicate balance to juggling family and work during tornado season. “There are a lot of times when it’s job number one and family number two,” said Lane, who explained to his wife and children

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that there will be some long hours, but it’s only temporary. “Come June to mid-July, things will start settling down.” Until then, there is information people expect from him in order to feel prepared for severe weather season. “There are expectations that come with the job. People want to know the weather. They want to know what will happen,” said Lane. “You can have some weak tornados, but even if it’s an EF1, that could be the worst tornado they will ever experience.” Lane described the changes he’s seen in tornado coverage since he’s moved to Oklahoma, “A couple of years ago, to have a helicopter flying around a storm was unheard of. Now we expect it. We are front and center of what broadcast meteorologists are doing, and that’s fun to be a part of.” But with all the breakthroughs in technology, it is the storm chasers that are still vital to storm coverage. “People out here react to pictures,” explained Lane. “I’ve been in areas where they’ll say, ‘we


didn’t know how bad the tornado was until we saw it on television.’ May 20, 2013, when they saw the storm moving into Moore and how big it was, it allowed people to gather things.” The pictures help tell the story, but it also helps people find ways to survive the storms. “Storm chasers are vital,” said Lane. “Otherwise, we are no different than any other meteorologists out there.” And what is it like on the road for those guys? “The first things we tell our storm chasers is to obey all traffic laws, but at the same time there is a lot more competition nowadays. There is increasing traffic out there. But what really sets apart the storm chasers are the small days,” said Lane. “Chasing the big days is easy, but for storm chasers nowadays there is increasing competition. There are storm chasers in it for the money, some for the research and some for providing those pictures for television. You can’t tell a new storm chaser ‘you can’t do this.’ In a decade from now, he could be the next inventor that will save lives. It’s up to the storm chaser community to be those coaches and teachers, to tell them ‘I want to help you do this smart and safely.’” Lane explained that the best way to become an experienced storm chaser is to reach out to storm chasers.

“Reach out to them on Facebook,” said Lane. “There are storm chasers who would love to do that.” So, what’s on the horizon for storm chasing, “I think we talk about storm chasing on the ground and in the air, and we’ve seen now as Oklahoma City expands that we are now realizing the only effective way to storm chase is in the air.” And for those of you who want to dabble in drone storm chasing, there may be a market in the future. But Lane offers a warning, “Pay attention to the laws. The FFA requires certification.” Lane describes how one meteorologist cannot do it all, “It starts way before the storm develops. We have a conference call with all of our storm chasers and helicopter pilots. Really, it’s a waiting game. Once the storms develop, we have at least a minimum of three meteorologists, including a radar meteorologists and a meteorologist solely dedicated to working with the storm chasers, making sure they know where to go, and working with the helicopter pilot. We have to keep our chopper at a minimum of 5 miles away from a thunder storm. There always has to be constant communication with storm chasers. It’s a well-greased wheel and we need to make sure everyone is doing their part and no one person is doing it alone.”

JUNE 2017 | MOORE MONTHLY | 21


Citizens Share Ideas Over I-35 Corridor By Beverly Ferree

Representatives from the cities of Moore and Norman and the Oklahoma Department of Transportation met with citizens in May to hear public commentary about the Interstate-35 corridor. At an open-house held at The Station at Central Park in Moore, maps displayed aerial photos that highlighted the entire route so citizens could take a closer look at the interstate through Moore and Norman. The meeting was designed to receive input about the I-35 corridor just north of 5th Street in Moore to Robinson in Norman. Each map highlighted the main roads along the corridor, including Robinson Street, Rock Creek Road, Tecumseh Road, Franklin Road and Indian Hills Road in Norman and SW 34th, SW 19th and SW 4th Street in Moore.

22 | MOORE MONTHLY | JUNE 2017

“It’s critical to the future development of our community and our safety,” said Moore Assistant City Manager Stan Drake when asked about the importance of the meeting. “I-35 is not getting any wider, so we are looking at alternative methods to move traffic through that corridor and to make it safer.” Citizens were asked to write down on the yellow sticky notes any problems they observe and on green sticky notes any possible solutions they would like the city and ODOT to consider. “We’re just trying to pick the driving public’s brain and gather some information from them about priorities that they see for this corridor,” said Kevin Bloss, Division Engineer for the Department of Transportation. “Our consultants are going to gather that information, put it all together in a

handy dandy report, they’re going to digest it, hand the report off to us, and we’ll see where our budget fits into the solutions and recommendations.” Drake said the design of the 34th street overpass will play a critical role in the congestion on I-35, “Our traffic engineer tells us that it should pull 25 percent of the traffic off of 19th street. If that happens, that will be a significant benefit to the flow of traffic through that corridor. I-35 is as wide through this corridor as it will be. That’s what the engineers at ODOT have told me. So, we have to look at alternate traffic patterns. We can’t add another lane. So, they’ll be looking at one way service roads and maybe relocating some on and off ramps. Anything the engineers see that could be beneficial to the flow of the traffic will happen as soon as the funding becomes available.”


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interchange and the 34th Street overpass, which is basically under construction as we speak. They’re moving utilities on it right now. So, any other improvements that we make would have to be added to either the construction work program, which is an eight-year process, or it would have to be added to our maintenance -budget, which is an annual budget, and that depends on the funds the legislature appropriates our way.” So how important is your feedback as citizens of Moore? “We take all the feedback seriously,” said Bloss. “None of us has that ability to think of everything. The more minds you have looking at the system the better. The local folks travel it day-in and day-out know the system better than anyone, so we really need and want to listen to them.”

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So, if you’re from the city of Moore, what can you do as a resident about the roads? “I would welcome any input the community may have or anything they’ve experienced that they consider to be dangerous,” said Drake. “Our goal is to improve the quality of life. And if you can cut five minutes off your commute back and forth to work, then that’s ten minutes a day you can spend with your family. It’s a quality of life issue and a safe environment issue. We want that roadway to be safe in both the mainline, all the ramps and the service road as well. I don’t know what the end-result will be, but hopefully we’ll implement improvements as soon as funding becomes available.” “We have an eight-year construction work program at the DOT,” explained Bloss. “And the only thing currently on that program is the Indian Hills


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Sketches of Moore

Moore: The Bedroom City

BY KATHLEEN WILSON

During much of its history, Moore has been described as a “bedroom city,” often accompanied by a smirk that inferred that Moore was just a place where people stayed all night while doing the important things of life somewhere else. Jobs are important, education is important, the availability of materials and supplies is important. But these are all dependent upon having a place to live, a place to go to at the end of the day for the blessing of peace and rest.

The first brick house in Moore.

In the earliest years, Moore was fairly self-contained, mainly because the expectations of the residents were simple: the main concerns were food, shelter from the elements and a way to make a living. In fact, by the end of the first day after the settlement, there was a shack where bacon, sugar and coffee could be bought and horses rented. But there were also people camping in tents and the beginnings of a few houses. The building lots were 25 feet wide by 125 feet long. Many people took only one and built a small, one-room house that served as kitchen, living area and bedroom; but it met the needs. Most of the floors were dirt, pounded solid, with earth mounded on the outside to keep rainwater out. By the turn of the century, times were better and the homes were improving with several rooms, glass windows and wooden floors. But they were still the headquarters for living, even for those who went to the other towns for employment.

Dr. Nail’s House

There were a few grand houses in Moore. Dr. Nail lived in a house at North Broadway and Second Street with several upstairs rooms. The grounds were beautifully kept and the cedar trees he planted lasted through the 1980s. The Nails had no children, but schoolteachers and high-school students boarded with them.

Banker Smith’s house at South Broadway and Second was two-storied and had a basement with a furnace as big as a small locomotive that warmed the house and a small greenhouse attached on the south side. It was a famous landmark for years, but was principally the home and castle of a family. In 1930, Mel Dyer built the first brick house in Moore for his wife, Sally. It is located on the corner of West Main and Classen. They raised their daughter there and it was Sally’s home for 70 years, until she died within a few months of 100 years of age. Through all the activities of the family, this was their refuge from the elements and from the noise and confusion of the world. At time went on, housing styles changed: bungalows, ranch style houses, split levels, duplexes, apartments, mobile home parks, houses of brick and stone and wood, cottages and grand manors, but all had the same purpose—a home, a place to stay all night. Moore has expanded into a metropolis with every imaginable business, and there continues to be houses built. There is no stigma to being a “bedroom city,” no reason for the smirks. It simply means homes, places to raise and nurture children, an environment for being refreshed and energized for the day ahead. It is a place to go into at night, shut the world out, kneel beside the bed and be thankful for the wonderful gift of freedom that permits us to have a home of our own.

Note: This edition of Sketches of Moore was first published in a previous issue of Moore Monthly.

JUNE 2017 | MOORE MONTHLY | 25


Senior Living

Drink Up How much water should you drink each day? That is a simple question with no easy answer. Studies have produced varying recommendations over the years, but in truth, your water needs depend on many factors, including your health, how active you are and where you live. Water is your body’s principal chemical component and makes up about 60 percent of your body weight. Every system in your body depends on water. For example, water flushes toxins out of vital organs, carries nutrients to your cells, and provides a moist environment for ear, nose and throat tissues. A lack of water can lead to dehydration, a condition that occurs when you don’t have enough water in your body to carry out normal functions. Even mild dehydration can drain your energy and make you tired. Dehydration can cause serious problems in older adults. Older adults are at the greatest risk of dehydration and its potentially life threatening consequences. People between 85-99 years of age are six times more likely to be hospitalized for dehydration than those aged 60-65 years. Chronic dehydration constitutes a serious problem and is associated with an increased risk of falls, urinary tract infections, dental disease, brochopulmonary disorders, kidney stones, constipation and impaired cognitive function. Most everyone has heard the advice “Drink eight 8-ounce glasses of water a day.” Although the “8 by 8” rule isn’t supported by hard evidence, it is popular because it’s easy to remember. Just keep in mind that the rule should be reframed as: “Drink eight 8-ounce glasses of fluid a day” because all fluids count toward the daily total. If you are concerned about your fluid intake or have health issues, check with your doctor. A doctor can help you determine the amount of water that’s right for you.

26 | MOORE MONTHLY | JUNE 2017

BY KATHLEEN WILSON

Now that the hotter weather will be arriving it is especially important to think about staying hydrated. If you are having trouble staying hydrated, try these ideas for upping your water intake. 1. Make water your beverage of choice. It is just a good idea. 2. When you are eating your meals each day, drink in between each bite. Follow this same routine when you are snacking. 3. Try using a small glass or a shot glass to get some water down quickly. 4. Look at drinking water in the same way you look at taking your medicine each day and be sure to drink plenty of water throughout the day. 5. Keep a refillable water bottle with you at all times. 6. In the case of water, it is always OK to drink and drive, try to finish a bottle of water while you are running your errands. 7. In the morning while you are waiting for your coffee to brew, try chugging a glass of water. 8. Place a pitcher on your dinner table to encourage more water drinking. You can spruce it up by adding cut citrus fruit or cucumber slices. 9. If you are fond of sodas, you might want to try seltzer water. Get the unsweetened kind. 10. Set an alarm every hour or so to remind you to drink a glass of water. 11. Always order water first when you’re eating out. 12. Keep track: record how many glasses or bottles of water you drink daily. 13. If you participate in an exercise program, guzzle a glass as part of your pre and post ritual.


Senior Living

June Features Special Opportunities In The Metro Area For Senior Adults

BY KATHLEEN WILSON

On Friday, June 9th from 9:00am until 2:45pm, Areawide Aging Agency, Concordia Life Care Community, Home Instead Senior Care, Mercy Hospital and Sunbeam Family Service will host the 19th Annual Caregiver Survival Skills Conference. The conference will be held at the Church of the Servant in their Community Hall. The church is located at 14343 North MacArthur Blvd. in Oklahoma City. There is a $10 suggested donation (payable to Mercy Outreach) to attend the conference. The conference will feature numerous presentations on topics of special interest to caregivers. A light breakfast and lunch will be included. There will also be lots of door prizes given away at the conference. You must register to attend by calling 405-936-5821 and leaving a message. If you wish to attend, please call now; registration ends June 1. On Thursday, June 15th from 8:30am until 12:15pm, the Oklahoma Insurance Department will host the 2017 Senior Fraud Conference. The conference will be held in Oklahoma City at the Tower Hotel, located at 3233 N.W. Expressway. The conference is free and open to area senior adults. This conference will teach seniors how to protect themselves from scams, frauds and crooks. Topics to be covered include Medicare fraud, insurance fraud, investment fraud and banking fraud. Knowledge is power and knowledge is the best protection. The conference will feature a free breakfast beginning at 8:00am. You must register to attend. Call 1-800-763-282 to register. Registration will be open until 24 hours before the conference date but space is limited so if you wish to attend, call and register now. Please plan to take advantage of these excellent learning opportunities available in our area during the month of June.

301 N Eastern Ave. Moore, OK 73160 • 405-799-9919

On Wednesday, June 7th from 9:00am until 2:00pm, McFarlin Memorial United Methodist Church in Norman will host the 5th Annual Senior Options Seminar. This Seminar might literally be a life saver. Developed by McFarlin Senior Adult Coordinator Carol Dean Schreiner, the conference features both booths and live presentations from 25 to 30 local providers of services and programs for senior adults. You will learn about retirement communities, assisted living centers, skilled nursing facilities and why each of these facilities offers different services for different levels of care. You’ll also learn about providers of a variety of in-home services that can help you stay put and continue to live on your own in your own home. The seminar will include lunch and there will be lots of door prizes giveaways. The seminar is free and open to area seniors. You need to RSVP to attend by calling 405-321-3484 as soon as possible as pre-registration cuts off 5/31.

Moore's Assisted Living Community

This year the month of June will feature numerous opportunities for area seniors to learn about topics of special interest to them.


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Calendar Sponsored by

Brand Senior Center June Activities 10:00 a.m.

June 6

Country Music House Singer

10:00 a.m.

BP checks provided by Walgreen’s

10:30 a.m.

June 8

Mustang Ramblers

10:00 a.m.

June 13 Wii Bowling 10:00 a.m. Library 10:00 a.m.

BP & Sugar checks by Loving Care

10:30 a.m.

June 15

Volunteer Appreciation Party

11:00 a.m.

June 16

Father’s Day Party

12:15 p.m.

June 20

Country Music House Singers

10:00 a.m.

June 21

Fresh Cobbler

11:45 a.m.

June 22

Sheryl Presley speaking on Home Safety 10:00 a.m.

BP checks provided by Arbor House

10:30 a.m

June 23

BINGO with Pattie

12:15 p.m.

June 26

MCOA Board Meeting

10:00 a.m.

June 27

BINGO with Allegiance Credit Union

10:00 a.m.

AARP Monthly Meeting & Potluck Dinner 6:00 p.m.

June 29

NSO Dentist Quiz with Heather

10:30 a.m.

BP checks by Nurses on the Go

10:30 a.m.

Exercise: Mon, Wed, & Fri 10:15 Line Dancing Lessons: Wed 12:15 Wood Carving Thurs 9:00-11:00, Dominos, Card games, Jig-Saw puzzles, Pool, Quilting & Volunteer work to assist the homebound or work is available at the Brand Center Moore Council On Aging Bus Service: 799-3130 Seniors may have transportation anywhere in the city of Moore for errands or appointments 8am to 3pm, Monday through Friday Moore Senior Citizen Nutrition Site Brand Center 501 E. Main Reservations for meals: 793-9069 Donation for a meal for seniors 60& above: $2.25 Required cost for guests Under 60: $5.00

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Calendar of Events & Performances ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT The Cultivated Connoisseur: Works on Paper from the Creighton Gilbert Bequest, Ellen and Richard L. Sandor Photography Gallery. On display Creighton Eddy Gilbert (1924-2011) was a renowned art historian specializing in the Italian Renaissance and was one of the foremost authorities on Michelangelo. The Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, 555 Elm Avenue, Norman, OK. Journey Toward an Open Mind, on display through June 19, 2017. “Our journey has now be-come your journey. As you travel through this exhibition, you also travel through our minds.” The works in this gallery express a range of emotions that reflect this process, but ultimately create a powerful statement about hope and the art of finding yourself. On display in the Education Gallery. The Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, 555 Elm Avenue, Norman, OK.

stage, screen, television and radio. Founded by Burbridge Foundation Board Chairman Bobbie Burbridge Lane, the event is a project of the Burbridge Foundation. The Follies is proud to announce this year’s King of the Follies, Dick Sias, presiding over the show. Directed by Terry Runnels, the star-studded program will feature incredible scenes and costumes, not to mention the performance of the fabulous “Ziegfield” Fol-lies Beauties. For tickets visit the OCCC Performing Arts Center webpage: http:// tickets.occc.edu/upcoming-events or call (405) 682-7576. Yellow Rose Theater is proud to “Motown Magic”, Starring Michael Andeaus, James “The Honeycat” Morris & The Andreaus Five! Come celebrate 58 years of legendary Motown Music with us. Special Guest star Tasha Sanders. Shows begin on June 2 and run through July 1. Tickets include dinner and show. Call (405) 793-7779 for tickets. CHURCH & SPIRITUAL CONNECTION

Joe Andoe: Horizons, on display through September 10, 2017. “Our journey has now become your journey. As you travel through this exhibition, you also travel through our minds.” Contemporary artist Joe Andoe (b. 1955) was born and came of age in Tulsa, surrounded by churches, trees, highways, and horses, motifs that recur in his paintings and prints. At the University of Oklahoma, where he completed an MFA in 1981, he eschewed the colorful, vertical abstractions popular in the art department at the time. Instead, he painted a 45-foot-long black landscape for his thesis project. On display in the Ellen and Richard Sandor Gallery. The Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, 555 Elm Avenue, Norman, OK. Picher, Oklahoma: Catastrophe, Memory, and Trauma, on June 13 – September 10. On May 10, 2008, a tornado in the northeastern Oklahoma town of Picher struck the final blow to a onetime boomtown. The lead and zinc mining that had given birth to the town had also proven its undoing, earning Picher the distinction of being the nation’s most toxic Superfund site in 2006. Todd Stewart’s photo essay Picher, Oklahoma: Catastrophe, Memory, and Trauma explores the otherworldly ghost town and reveals how memory can be dislocated and reframed through instances of environmental trauma. • Public Closing Reception Thursday, Sept. 7 at 7 p.m.: Public Closing Lecture Mary Eddy and Fred Jones Auditorium Displaced Memories in Picher, Oklahoma. Join Alison Fields, the Mary Lou Milner Carver Professor of Art of the American West and Assistant Professor of Art History, as she leads a talk about Picher, Oklahoma: Catastrophe, Memory, and Trauma. Members at the Supporter level and higher may reserve seating in the auditorium for this public lecture by calling (405) 325-2297. 8 p.m.: Public Closing Reception Sandy Bell Gallery Following the lecture, stay for the public reception featuring complimentary hors d’oeuvres from El Toro Chino, a cash bar, and live music. Prompted: A Writing Workshop 2-4 p.m. Friday, Sept. 1 Nancy Johnston Records Gallery and Sandy Bell Gallery Jumpstart your creativity during this drop-in writing workshop guided by creative writer and OU graduate student Matt Jacobson. Writing prompts will be drawn from images and artifacts in the Picher, Oklahoma exhibition, and photographer Todd Stewart will provide an overview as well as his inspiration for the show. After the event, share your stories, poetry, and ideas over complimentary coffee and bagels. 2017 Oklahoma Senior Follies Friday, June 9 and Saturday, June 10 at 7:00 p.m. Sunday, June 11 at 3:00 p.m. What is Oklahoma Senior Follies? It’s a Ziegfeld-Inspired Event Planned To Raise Money and Awareness for Central Oklahoma Seniors. Oklahoma Senior Follies Stars Re-nowned Oklahoma Senior Performers. With a nod to the “Ziegfeld” Follies, the Oklahoma Senior Follies was created both to revitalize Oklahoma’s senior citizens and help Central Oklahoma Seniors by raising funds and public awareness for the nonprofit. The Oklahoma Senior Follies will star some of the state’s greatest senior talents of

Special Needs Hero Central VBS @ Southern Hills United Methodist Church - June 17th, 2017 10:00am-12:00pm Enroll online at: 2017.cokesburyvbs.com/specialneedsatSHUMC Children with any type of disability is invited. Feel free to stay with your child to help them through each activity. This event is quiet and designed for kids that can not handle the loud music and lights that normally go with VBS. Each child gets to go at their own pace and do the things that they are comfortable with. Everything is in one room, making transitions easier! Southern Hills United Methodist Church 8200 S. Penn OKC OK 73159 Hero Central VBS @ Southern Hills United Methodist Church June 12-16th, 2017 5:30-8:30pm. Enroll online at: http://2017. cokesburyvbs.com/southernhillskids Join us for Hero Central VBS as we discover our own Super Powers! Enjoy music, lights, dinner, crafts, science, and so much more while learning how God is the ultimate Super Hero! Southern Hills United Methodist Church. 8200 S. Penn OKC OK 73159 Fresh Start Community Church Food Pantry, open the third Thursday of each month, 5:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m., 309 N Eastern Avenue, West Campus-Family Life Center. Canned and dry goods available. Must be a resident of Moore (please bring an ID). Soul Food Community Dinner, Wednesdays, 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Moore First United Meth-odist Church, 201 W. Main St. Food, fun, fellowship and friends. Menu at moorechurch.com. CITY MEETINGS AND EVENTS City Council Meetings, Monday, June 5 and 19 at 6:30 p.m., Moore City Hall, 301 N. Broadway, Moore. Parks Board Meeting, Tuesday, June 6, 7:00 p.m., Moore City Hall, 301 N. Broadway, Moore. Board of Adjustment Meeting, Tuesday, June 13, 5:30 p.m., Moore City Hall, 301 N. Broadway, Moore. Planning Commission Meeting, Tuesday, June 13, 7:00 p.m., Moore City Hall, 301 N. Broadway, Moore. Moore Economic Development Authority Meeting, Monday, June 19, 6:30 p.m., Moore City Hall, 301 N. Broadway, Moore. Play in the Park, Fridays, 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. Free program: Supervised summertime activities for children ages 6 - 14 years of age. An Adult must accompany children. Games; Snacks; Arts and Crafts. A different park each week: June 2 Central Park, 700 S. Broadway Street June 9 Apple Valley Park, 4401 Melrose Drive June 16 Buck Thomas Park, 1903 NE 12th Street June 23 Veterans Memorial Park, 1903 NE 4th Street June 30 Little River Park, 700 SW 4th Street Food Truck Fridays, 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Come join us on Fridays beginning in May and running through September 29th for lunch at Central Park: BBQ, Hot Dogs, Hamburgers, music,

32 | MOORE MONTHLY | JUNE 2017

and more. Food Truck Fridays. The food trucks will be set up at the Multi-Purpose Pavilion. For more information visit www. cityofmoore.com/centralpark or call (405) 793-5090. Rock the Park, Saturday, May 27 from 6:00 p.m. to 10 p.m. at the Central Park Multi-Purpose Pavilion and Amphitheater. Activities start at 7:00 p.m. and The Secret Life of Pets starts approximately at dusk. Bring the whole family for a fun night under the stars. For more information visit www.cityofmoore. com/centralpark or call (405) 793-5090.

... (cont.) *Free to the general public *First 25 registrants receive a goodie bag, including dash plaque *Top 15 Southern Thunder Picks *Door prizes *50/50 cash drawing *Family Fun Presenting Sponsors: Friends of Chris Kannady, Home2 Suites, Outback Steakhouse, Voorhees Voorhees & Byers Attorneys at Law, and Walnut Square Shopping Center. For more information contact Angela Fusselman at (405) 634-1436.

COMMUNITY CONNECTION Hot Dogs & Cool Cats Adoption Event + Pop-Up Shops & Food Trucks July 8th 10 am – 2 pm FNB Community Bank Moore Branch 601 N Broadway St. Moore, Ok 73160 Join FNB Community Bank for a pet adoption extravaganza! Hot Dogs & Cool Cats will include many local shelters and rescues with adoptable pets, as well as food trucks and pop-up shops. Animal shelters include: Moore Animal Welfare & Adoption Center, Midwest City Animal Welfare, Oklahoma City Animal Welfare. Food Trucks include: Kona Ice, Chris' Grill, Upbeat Treats, & The Healthy Hippo. Pop-Up Shops include: Young Living Essential Oils, Lularoe, and Paws & Claws Custom Collars & Leashes. We hope to see you at our Moore branch on July 8th. Come meet your new furry friend or just enjoy some yummy food and shopping! Adopt-A-Pet, Moore Animal Shelter, S-I35 Service Road. Open Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Saturday 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m., closed on holidays. For additional information call (405) 793-5190. Big Trash Pick Up, Moore residents will be allowed two FREE big trash pick-ups a year and one free voucher to the city landfill for each physical address in Moore. Call (405) 793-5070 to schedule your trash pick-up. Neighborhood Watch Program, Moore Police Dept. is starting a Neighborhood Watch Program. If you’re interested in helping your neighborhood reduce crime, contact Sgt. Jeremy Lewis, (405) 793-4448. South OKC Chamber of Commerce Seriously Fun Networking: St. Paddy’s Poker Run Event. Thursday, June 1 at Victoria’s Pasta Shop, 2000 SW 104th Street, OKC. Join the Seriously Fun Networking Group where we mix some fun in with our work! In addition to the round of self-introductions, we continue with our special event to go out and visit stops to meet other Chamber members and collect a playing card for the St Paddy's Poker Run. No fee for Chamber members. Event Coordinator and Co-Chair: Linda Richardson, HMI promos - Tel. (405) 473-8008 Co-Chair: Karen Proctor, Village on the Park, 1515 Kingsridge Drive, Oklahoma City, OK 73170 (405) 692-8700 Summer Reading Kickoff at the Southwest Oklahoma City Public Library. Thursday, Thursday, June 1 4:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m., 2201 SW 134th Street. Celebrate Summer Reading 2017 with a huge come and go event for all ages. Come aboard the Maker Mobile, sign up for Summer Reading, make fun "Build a Better World" crafts, meet mascots like Garfield and more! No registration required. Free admission. Call 979-2200 for details. South OKC Chamber of Commerce Southern Thunder Car Show, Saturday, June 10, Registration from 8:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m., show from 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m., awards presented at 1:30 a.m. Show will be held at the Walnut Square Shopping Center, 2201 West Interstate 240 Service Road. Join us for the Southern Thunder Car Show, presented by the South Oklahoma City Chamber of Commerce and sponsored by Friends of Chris Kannady, Home2 Suites, Outback Steakhouse, Voorhees Voorhees & Byers, and Walnut Square Shopping Center. The Best of Show is sponsored by Republic Bank & Trust. Booth space is available for members and non-members for purchase to showcase your business. Contact the Chamber for more information and to purchase your booth today at (405) 634-1436.

Moore Chamber of Commerce Business Before Hours, Thursday, June 8 at 8:00 a.m. at Broadway Florist, 638 N. Broadway. This event is a business networking opportunity for Moore Chamber of Commerce Members. Attendees can make meaningful connections that can result in successful business leads. Food and beverages are served. No cost to attend. Visit www.moorechamber.com for more information. Moore Chamber of Commerce Networking Lunch, Tuesday, June 13 at 11:45 a.m. at the Moore Chamber of Commerce, 305 W. Main. Cost is $10. Visit moorechamber.com/ to register. South OKC Chamber of Commerce Seriously Fun Networking: St. Paddy’s Poker Run Event. Thursday, June 15 at Victoria’s Pasta Shop, 2000 SW 104th Street, OKC. Join the Seriously Fun Networking Group where we mix some fun in with our work! In addition to the round of self-introductions, we continue with our special event to go out and visit stops to meet other Chamber members and collect a playing card for the St Paddy's Poker Run. No fee for Chamber members. Event Coordinator and Co-Chair: Linda Richardson, HMI promos – Phone (405) 473-8008 Co-Chair: Karen Proctor, Village on the Park, 1515 Kingsridge Drive, Oklahoma City, OK 73170 – Phone (405) 692-8700. Eggs n’ Issues – Legislative Recap, Wednesday, June 21 at 8:00 a.m. at the Moore Chamber of Commerce, 305 W. Main. Cost is $10. Representative Mark McBride and Freshman Representative Kevin West will discuss the 2017 legislative session. RSVP is required. Visit www.moorechamber .com to register. Moore Chamber of Commerce Business After Hours, Thursday, June 22 at 5:00 p.m. at Andy Alligator’s Fun Park, 3300 Market Place, Norman. This event is a business networking oppor-tunity for Moore Chamber of Commerce Members. Attendees can make meaningful connections that can result in successful business leads. Food and beverages are served. Visit http://www.moorechamber.com/ for more information. South OKC Chamber of Commerce Fourth Friday Tasting by Nosh at Catering Creations Restaurant, Friday, June 23, 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. The end of the month will never be the same. Introducing 4th Fridays Tastings, hosted by Nosh. For just $8 ($6 in advance), you get samplings of appetizers and take and bakes, live music and an electric atmosphere. Pre-order your tickets with the cashier. Contact Cathy Hanselman for more information. South OKC Chamber of Commerce Coffee with Councilman Todd Stone, Thursday, June 28, 7:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. at Frontier State Bank, 5100 South I-35 on the 4th Floor of New Loan Center. Come enjoy a morning of coffee and networking with Ward 4 Councilman Todd Stone. For more information call (405) 634-1436 or email lizcromwell@southokc.com. FITNESS AND DANCE CLASSES Bootcamps: •Morning Bootcamp is available at First Moore Baptist Church every Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 10:00 a.m. Ages 13 and up. The class is $2. Call (405) 793-2600 for more information. •Evening Bootcamp is available at First Moore Baptist Church


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every Tuesday and Thursday at 6:00 p.m. Ages 13 and up. The class is $2. Call (405) 793-2600 for more information. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu & Judo, classes held Monday – Sunday at 117 Skylane Drive in Norman for ages 7 and up. A nonprofit organization, all classes are offered in a family friendly environment. Fees are $20 per month for an individual or $40 per month for a family. Discount uniforms are available. For more information, call (405) 465-1925 or send an email to fiftyonefif-tybjj@yahoo.com. Adult Salsa Classes, every Wednesday 7:00 - 8:00 p.m. Adelante Dance Studio (Inside Moore Old School) 201 N. Broadway, Suite 201. $10 per class or $35 a month. Call (405) 586-0201 for more information. First Moore Baptist Church of Moore Community Life/ Recreation Center, The Link is open Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays, 6:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m.; Wednesdays and Fridays, 6:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.; and Saturday open 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Two basketball courts and racquetball courts, fitness center and walking/running track. For more information, call (405) 735-2527. Karate, First Moore Baptist Church, every Tuesday from 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. and Saturday 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. The classes are free for anyone ages 8 and up. Uniforms available at a discounted rate. Call (405) 793-2600 for more information. Morning Fitness, First Moore Baptist Church, every Monday at 9:00 a.m. Ages 40 and up preferred. The class is $2. Call (405) 793-2600 for more information. Christian Life Center Zumba, Mondays at 7:15 p.m. at the Christian Life Center located at 201 W. Main St. $3 fee per class. KIDS’ CORNER Agape: First United Methodist Church Moore, Wednesdays, 4:00 p.m., 201 W. Main. Homework and Hangout for Youth (7th–12th grade). Community Dinner at 5:30 p.m. (cost is $1 for dinner), Family Activities & Church School at 6:00 p.m. Menu can be found at www.moorechurch.com. Afterschool Matters, First Moore Baptist Church, Tuesdays from 3:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. This program helps students work towards academic success. Available to 1st – 6th grade. Contact director Carissa Taylor at carissa.taylor@fbcmoore.org to learn more about enrolling your child or to volunteer. Boy Scouts Meetings, Mondays, 7:00 p.m., Moore First United Methodist Church, 201 W. Main St. Children’s Chimes, Moore First United Methodist Church, Wednesdays, 6:15 p.m. - 7:45 p.m., 201 W. Main St., children 4th – 6th grade will learn to read music. Cub Scouts Meetings, Tuesdays, 7:00 p.m., Moore First United Methodist Church, 201 W. Main St. Girl Scouts Meetings, Tuesdays, 7:00 p.m., Moore First United Methodist Church, 201 W. Main St. LEAP (Learning Enrichment Arts Program), Moore First United Methodist Church, Wednesdays, 4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m., 201 W. Main St. Open to kindergarten – 6th grade. Choir, life skills games, snacks and help with homework.

MUSIC/ARTS Southern Hills School of Fine Arts, 8601 S. Penn, Oklahoma City. Enrolling children and adults for private lessons in piano, voice, guitar, bass, drums, strings, brass and woodwinds. Call Sarah Gee at (405) 735-6387. RECOVERY AND SUPPORT GROUPS Celebrate Recovery: • Faith Crossing Baptist Church Celebrate Recovery, Mondays, 13701 S. Pennsylvania, Oklahoma City. • First Moore Baptist Church Celebrate Recovery, Thursday nights, 6:30 p.m., First Moore Baptist Church, 301 NE 27th Street. Call (405) 793-2600 for more information. Support and help for those struggling with addiction. • Fresh Start Community Church Celebrate Recovery 12 Step Program, Tuesday nights, 6:30 p.m., 309 N Eastern. Call (405) 794-7313 for more information. Dementia/Alzheimer’s Support Group, Village on the Park, 1515 Kingsridge, Oklahoma City. Contact Karen Proctor at (405) 692-8700 for meeting times and details. Divorce Care, First Moore Baptist Church, Wednesday nights, 6:15 p.m., 301 NE 27th Street. Support group for those going through a divorce. Call (405) 793-2600 for more information. Grief Share Support Group, First Moore Baptist Church, every Monday night at 6:30 p.m., 301 N.E. 27th Street. Support group for individuals and family members struggling with life events such as death, divorce, and disappointments and learning healthy ways to cope with life. Call (405) 793-2600 for more information. Grief Share Support Group, Fresh Start Community Church, every Wednesday, 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m., 309 N. Eastern, Moore, Fresh Start Community Church Fireside Room. We offer help and encouragement after the death of a spouse, child, family member or friend. Please contact the office at (405) 794-7313, Lyn Jacquemot at (405) 326-5554, or ladylyn1941@gmail.com to register or participate. HOPE Addictions Recovery, every Wednesday, 6:30 p.m., Beth Haven Baptist Church, 12400 S. Call Pastor Rick Carter at (405) 691-6990 for information. SENIOR CONNECTION AARP, the fourth Tuesday of every month, 6:00 p.m., Brand Senior Center, 501 East Main Street, Moore. Programs are on subjects of interest to persons 50 years and over. Potluck dinner follows the program each month. For more information, contact Mary at (405) 826-2315.

Transportation: • Metro Transit will provide van service for age 60 and older on Tuesdays and Thursdays from the Moore area to Oklahoma City for medical appointments. Call Jackie at (405) 297-2583. • Moore Council on Aging. Seniors may have transportation anywhere in the city of Moore for errands or appointments. 8:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m., Monday – Friday. Call (405) 799-3130 at least one day in advance. • “Share-A-Fare” for age 60 and over or disabled. Purchase taxi fare at 40% off. SERVICE, COMMUNITY CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES American Cancer Society seeks volunteers who would like to help drive patients to their cancer treatment and/or volunteer with our local Relay for Life event. For more information visit www.relayforlife.org/mooreok or contact Mel Rogers at (405) 841-5817 or mel.rogers@cancer.org. Blue Star Mothers of America. Moore City Hall is a donation drop-off for items for our service members overseas. For needs, see www.bsmok6.org or go to City Hall.

American Legion Meetings, every Wednesday, 12:00 p.m. 4:00 p.m., 207 SW 1st St., Moore. Open for all veterans. Call (405) 794-5446 for more information.

Help Deliver Meals to Moore homebound residents. Volunteer drivers needed. Call Darlene Carrell, (405) 793-9069, Brand Center.

Malcolm Hunter Chapter of Daughters of the American Revolution, the second Wednesday of each month, Hillcrest Presbyterian Church, 6600 S. Penn, at 1:00 p.m. For more information, contact Pat Towns at (405) 376-5653.

The Hugs Project, a non-profit organization, puts together care packages for our troops in the Middle East. For more information, call (405) 651-8359 or TheHugsProject@cox.net.

Moore Horseshoe Pitching Club, every Thursday, 6:00 p.m., Fairmoore Park. For more infor-mation, contact (405) 237-1171. Moore Old Town Association, the fourth Tuesday of every month, First United Methodist Church. For more information, contact Janie Milum at cjmilum@sbcglobal.net. Moore Rotary Club, Wednesdays at Moore Chamber of Commerce. Moore Rotary Club is a civic organization dedicated to contributing and volunteering in our community. Moore Toastmasters, every Thursday, 7:00 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 201 W. Main St., Moore. Become the speaker and leader that you want to be. Join our group as we practice Toastmasters’ proven learn-by-doing program. The Oklahoma Women Veterans Organization, the third Saturday during the months of Feb-ruary, April, June, August, October and December, 11:00 a.m., Sunnylane Family Reception Center, 3900 SE 29th St., Del City. If you need directions, call (405) 445-7040. South Oklahoma City Rotary Club, every Friday, 12:00 p.m., Southwest Integris Cancer Center, SW 44th St. and S. Western, Oklahoma City. A civic organization dedicated to contributing and volunteering in our community. VFW Bruce January Post 8706, the second Thursday of every month, 7:00 p.m., Lynlee Mae Event Center, 501 W. Main St., Moore. All veterans welcome. Call Mike Eaton at (405) 831-4405 or go to www.vfwpost8706.org for more information.

Moore Senior Citizen Nutrition Site, Monday – Friday, 11:30 a.m., Brand Senior Center, 501 E. Main, (405) 793-9069. Call by 1:00 p.m. the day before to request a meal. Donation for a meal for seniors 60 and above is $2.25. Required cost for meal for guests under 60 is $5.00.

VFW Bruce January Post 8706 Auxiliary will have its first meeting at the Lynlee Mae Chapel, 507 E. Main St. Meeting time is 7:00 p.m. For the institution of the VFW Auxiliary and election of officers, Joyce Caldwell, Department President will be at the meeting. For more information call Judith Lewis at (405) 300-9244 or email flowergirl9806@gmail.com

P.A.L.S. Program for Seniors. Seniors are assigned to a buddy who will call every day to check on you. Sign up with Sgt. Lewis, Moore Police Dept., (405) 793-4448.

Women: Moms Club of Moore, the second Thursday of the month, Westmoore Community Church. Go to www.momsclubsofmoore.com for more information.

Moore Food Resource Center, a part of the Regional Food Bank of Oklahoma, allows volunteers to help fight hunger in Moore. Volunteers at the Moore Food Resource Center will assist with a variety of tasks, including serving as client shopper helpers, assisting with loading and unloading vehicles, sorting and shelving food items and cleaning. The Moore Food Resource Center is located at 2635 N. Shields. For more information on becoming a volunteer, contact Alex Strout at astrout@regionalfoodbank.org or (405) 600-3186. Oklahoma Ducks Unlimited. Volunteering for Ducks Unlimited is a great way to have fun, meet new people and support Ducks Unlimited’s critical waterfowl habitat conservation mission. Whether you want to sell event tickets, gather donations, secure sponsorships or help put on a successful party and fundraising event, there are many opportunities that will fit your needs to support your local community. For more information about volunteering, please contact Mr. Nathan Johnson, Regional Director for Oklahoma Ducks Unlimited at (405) 315-0093 or Mr. Randall Cole at (479) 220-9735. Serve Moore. Are you looking for a way to help others? Serve Moore is looking for volunteers to help with disaster relief and renewal projects. If you would like to volunteer or need volunteer help, visit www.servemoore.com/help to submit a request. You can also visit the Serve Moore headquarters located inside the Community Renewal Center at 224 S. Chestnut Avenue in Moore. For more information, visit www.servemoore.com or call (405) 735-3060. To keep up with the events and opportunities that are being added throughout the month, log on to mooremonthly.com and click on the Calendar link at the top of the home page. You’ll find an updated calendar for this month and the rest of the year.

Project Return Home for Alzheimer’s Patients in Moore, For information about enrolling a loved one, contact Virginia Guild at (405) 793-4478 or Sgt. Jeremy Lewis at (405) 793-4448.

YMCA Before and After School Care, Moore Community Center. Call (405) 378-0420 for participating schools and more info.

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Summer Treats at Bahama Buck’s By Beverly Ferree One sure sign of summer is the traditional snow cone stands that pop up throughout the city. But one new business on 19th Street in Moore will now offer that treat year-round, and with a twist. Bahama Buck’s Original Shaved Ice Company, located at 761 SW 19th St., not only offers traditional snow cones with shaved ice, but brings together a one-stop shop of summertime delights like island smoothies, frozen espressos, and paradise fruit drinks. These drinks will whisk your taste buds away to a tropical beach in paradise. Bahama Buck’s is a Texan-born company, and the one in Moore is the first and only Bahama Buck’s in Oklahoma! They provide some of your classic favorites with 91 flavors of shaved ice or “sno”, like blue coconut, tutti-fruit and their new popular Jolly Rancher Sno. They also have smoothies, including a new one just released called Pineapple Dream Smoothie. For those of you who like to throw those summer parties, Bahama Buck’s provides a “Paradise Party Pack,” which includes everything you need to enjoy Bahama Buck’s sno in your own backyard. One of the most popular items on the menu is called Boomer Sno, which has a charitable twist. Part of the money you spend helps support the Children’s Miracle Network. Owner Sue Tapp explains, “When anyone orders a Boomer Sno, one dollar goes to the Chldren’s Miracle Network, and the money stays here in Oklahoma.” But that’s not the only charity Bahama Buck’s is involved with, “We’re also sponsoring Camp Blue Hawk this summer in Guthrie, which is the Oklahoma City area diabetic camp for children. Bahama Buck’s has a line of product they call Thin Ice, which is sugar free, and we will be serving it at the camp on registration day.” Tapp fell in love with the product 12 years ago when she visited her first Bahama Buck’s in Amarillo, Texas, “We fell in love with Bahama Buck’s, the island theme, and until I had Bahama Buck’s in Amarillo, I was used to the crunchy ice that is typical of snow cones. This was different.” So, what brought them to Moore? “Moore was chosen for us. Corporate did all their homework and said that 19th Street in Moore is the best place in Oklahoma for you to start,” explained Tapp. No need to worry about indulging in a Bahama Buck’s Shaved Ice. “We have a line of sugar-free products,” said Tapp. “And, of course, everything is gluten-free and nut-free. We also have a line of natural flavors, with no artificial flavors or colors.” Bahama Buck’s has 110 stores nationwide and in Puerto Rico, and the Moore location is currently in the top 25 nationwide. It might be the incredible taste. Maybe the variety of choices. And it could be how Tapp runs the store. My guess is it’s a bit of all three.

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Best Family Reunion in the Galaxy Directed by: James Gunn Written by: James Gunn, Dan Abnett Starring: Chris Pratt, Zoe Zaldana, Dave Bautista, Vin Diesel, Bradley Cooper, Michael Rooker, Karen Gillian, Kurt Russell, Sylvester Stallone All photos courtesy of Marvel Studios.

“Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2” is the rare sequel that improves on the original and it does so with a perfect blend of action, comedy, and drama. This is no small feat especially when you consider what writer/director James Gunn accomplished with GOTG 1. He took an obscure Marvel comic book that most had never heard of and shepherded the story to nearly universal applause. The fact that GOTG 2 is claiming the coveted “Summer Blockbuster Kickoff ” weekend is a testament to just how much is riding on this return to the world of Peter Quill and his seemingly-mismatched team. After a brief prologue that partially answers the biggest question from the first GOTG movie (Who is Peter Quill’s father?), Gunn playfully recreates the fantastic opening credits sequence that had Chris Pratt dancing his way through a deserted city to Redbone’s “Come and Get Your Love.” That sequence set a playful tone for the movie that Gunn and his ensemble held true to, taking an obscure comic book title and 36 | MOORE MONTHLY | JUNE 2017

By Rob Morris

turning it into what many believe is the best Marvel movie to date. What Gunn does with the opening credits of GOTG 2 shows that he not only understands the pressure he’s under to recreate the magic of the first film, he has clearly embraced that challenge with creative gusto. It’s a confidence that you see in nearly every scene. This time around, the Guardians have been hired by a powerful race of golden aliens, called the Sovereign, to protect their batteries from an energy-devouring monster. Even though the Guardians are successful in their task, things go astray in the aftermath and the team of Starlord (Chris Pratt), Gamora (Zoe Saldana), Rocket (Bradley Cooper), Drax (Dave Bautista), and Groot (Vin Diesel) find themselves being pursued by the Sovereign as well as their old friends Yondu (Michael Rooker) and his band of Ravagers. In the midst of this pursuit, a mysterious man named “Ego” (Kurt Russell) shows up, claiming to be Quill’s father. Before you know it, the entire galaxy is in danger again.


While the old saying, “You don’t get to choose your family” is true, nearly all of us has experienced the bonds of family that develop through close friendships. In his second go-round at the helm of Marvel’s “Guardians of the Galaxy” franchise, Gunn does a masterful job of exploring familial themes against a backdrop of colorful aliens, frantic battles, and perfectly-timed one-liners. The ensemble cast has a great screenplay to work with and they breathe life into each scene, giving their relationships depth and familiarity that just doesn’t feel like a family, it feels like they’ve been through dozens of adventures together. Like all families, they know the best ways to irritate each other and push that irritation right up until the point of explosion. But the depth of affection they have for each other is always there, just beneath the surface, rising up when one of their members is threatened. When a movie can make you laugh out loud and wipe away a tear, all while weaving together live action and believable computer generated images…you know you have something special. Just when you think Marvel has peaked, along come the Guardians of the Galaxy to raise the bar again. And best of all, they’ve done it with another Awesome Mix of great music.

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JUNE 2017 | MOORE MONTHLY | 37


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Let the Hunt Begin! Folk Secrets is a county-wide treasure hunt. It’s presented as a TV show on Facebook and you can take part by hunting for treasure with an app...all focused on where we live. Season 1 begins June 30th. Find out more and get the app at FolkSecrets.com.

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JUNE 2017 | MOORE MONTHLY | 41


Activities at The Station YOUTH SPORT CLASSES BASKETBALL & ME Introduce yourself and your Toddler to the great game of Basketball. As you and your child will participate in our fun and age appropriate activities, your child will be developing their large motor and socialization skills. The fun happens on the court – parents are part of the action for this 8-week class. All 8 classes included in each Session. Price includes 1 parent and 1 child to participate. WHEN: July 1st - August 19th Sat Mornings (8 Classes) TIME: 9:00 A.M. - 10:00 A.M. & 10:00 A.M. - 11:00 A.M. WHERE: The Station Recreation Center Gym AGES: 2-4 year olds REGISTRATION PERIOD: May 1st-June 30th for July & August Classes COST: $85 per session includes parent and child JR. CHEER SQUAD Yell It Loud! Yell It Proud! Join us for this fun and engaging class that will introduce your child to the sport of cheerleading. The Cheerleaders will learn fun and basic cheerleading skills. Don’t miss out on the action and join today for this awesome 8-week class. WHEN: July 1st - August 19th Sat Mornings (8 Classes) TIME: 11:30 A.M. - 12:30 P.M. WHERE: The Station Recreation Center Gym AGES: 4-8 year olds REGISTRATION PERIOD: May 1st - June 30th for July & August Classes COST: $85 per session includes parent and child

YOUTH DANCE CLASSES COMBO DANCE CLASS This is a class where we combine Ballet, Tap, and Jazz throughout the class so the student can get an even mix of the 3 styles of dance. High energy and fun. All Classes will have a Recital. Recitals to be Determined. WHEN: June 7th - June 28th Wednesday Nights (4 Classes) July 5th - July 26th Wednesday Nights (4 Classes) August 2nd - August 23rd Wednesday Nights (4 Classes) TIME: 6:30 P.M - 7:15 P.M. WHERE: The Station Recreation Center Activity Room AGES: 4-8 year olds REGISTRATION PERIOD: April 1st - June 6th For June Classes May 1st - July 4th For July Classes June 1st - August 1st For August Classes FEE: $45 per session INSTRUCTOR: Amy Shipman HIP HOP/JAZZ DANCE CLASS This uses popular and current music the kids will know and recognize to learn dances and choreography with different elements. Age appropriate music that is clean and not derogatory All Classes will have a Recital. Recitals are to be determined. WHEN: June 8th - June 29th Thursday Nights (4 Classes) July 6th - July 27th Thursday Nights (4 Classes) August 3rd - August 24th Thursday Nights (4 Classes) TIME: 6:30 P.M - 7:15 P.M. WHERE: The Station Recreation Center Activity Room AGES: 4-8 year olds REGISTRATION PERIOD: April 1st – June 6th for June Classes May 1st - July 4th For July Classes June 1st - August 1st For August Classes FEE: $45 per session BABY BALLET Without mom and dad, the child gets to learn the basics of Ballet through music, movement, and balance. Fun, positive, and appropriate for the little ones. All Classes will have a Recital. Recitals are to be determined. WHEN: June 8th - June 29th Thursday Nights (4 Classes) July 6th - July 27th Thursday Nights (4 Classes) August 3rd - August 24th Thursday Nights (4 Classes) TIME: 5:30 P.M. - 6:15 P.M. WHERE: The Station Recreation Center Activity Room AGES: 18 months - 3 year olds

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REGISTRATION PERIOD: April 1st - June 6th For June Classes May 1st - July 4th For July Classes June 1st - August 1st For August Classes FEE: $45 per session

SUMMER BREAK Dates: May 26th - August 18th (M-F) Time: 9:00 A.M.-4:00 P.M.

TODDLER DANCE CLASS Toddler will learn the basics of Dance all while having fun and making new friends in the process. All Classes will have a Recital. Recitals are to be determined. WHEN: June 7th - June 28th Wednesday Nights (4 Classes) July 5th - July 26th Wednesday Nights (4 Classes) August 2nd - August 23rd Wednesday Nights (4 Classes) TIME: 5:30 P.M - 6:15 P.M. WHERE: The Station Recreation Center Activity Room AGES: 3-5 year olds REGISTRATION PERIOD: Classes April 1st - June 6th For June Classes May 1st - July 4th For July Classes June 1st - August 1st For August Classes FEE: $45 per session INSTRUCTOR: Amy Shipman

MARTIAL ARTS Whether your interest is to become more knowledgeable in self-defense, karate, judo or you just want to be in better physical health try our Martial Arts Class. Here you will learn the basics and have a blast while doing it. WHEN: June 6th - June 28th, Tuesday Nights (4 Classes) TIME: 7:00 P.M. - 8:30 P.M. WHERE: The Station Recreation Center Activity Room AGES: Youth & Adults 5+ REGISTRATION: April 1st - June 5th For June Classes FEE: $55

YOUTH ART CLASSES BEADS & STRINGS In this class you will create, make, mold and build different art using beads and string. WHEN: Sept 5th - 26th Mon & Tues Nights (7 Classes) TIME: 3-5 Year Olds (4:30 P.M. - 5:30 P.M.) 6-12 Year Olds (5:30 P.M. - 6:30 P.M.) WHERE: The Station Recreation Center Activity Room AGES: 3-5 and 6-12 year olds REGISTRATION PERIOD: TBA FEE: $55 INSTRUCTOR: Tara Kerby YOUTH CLAY WORKS & CRAFTS In this class you will create, make, mold and build different art using clay. WHEN: Oct 2-24 Monday & Tuesday Nights (8 Classes) TIME: 3-5 Year Olds (4:30 P.M. - 5:30 P.M.) 6-12 Year Olds (5:30 P.M. - 6:30 P.M.) WHERE: The Station Recreation Center Activity Room AGES: 3-5 and 6-12 year olds REGISTRATION PERIOD: July 1st - October 1st FEE: $55 INSTRUCTOR: Tara Kerby YOUTH ARTS & CRAFTS A class where kids get to use their imagination in a different ways, making a variety of projects they get to take home. WHEN: Aug 7-29 Monday and Tuesday Nights (8 Classes) TIME: 3-5 Year Olds (4:30 P.M. - 5:30 P.M.) 6-12 Year Olds (5:30 P.M. - 6:30 P.M.) WHERE: The Station Recreation Center Activity Room AGES: 3-5 and 6-12 year olds REGISTRATION: May 1 - Aug 6 For August Classes FEE: $55 per Session INSTRUCTOR: Tara Kerby ALL ABOARD KIDS CLUB: ARTS-CRAFTS-BOARD GAMES Designed especially for kids 7-12 years of age. Kids play various sports and games in the gym ranging from basketball, soccer, dodgeball and much more. There will also be days and times where the youngsters can expand their minds mind participating in arts and crafts as well as having fun playing board games. This Club is open to Pass holders and Non-Pass holders. We hope to see your kiddos come out and enjoy the fun as The Station really is a place for everyone. When: January 1st - December 31st Time: Varies by day Mondays 4:30 P.M.-7:30 P.M. - Board Game Fun Tuesdays 4:00 P.M.-8:00 P.M. - Youth Gym Activities Thursday 4:30 P.M.-7:30 P.M. - Arts and Crafts Saturdays 11:00 P.M.-3:00 P.M. - Youth Gym Activities Where: The Station Recreation Center Ages: 7-12 year olds Cost: Free for Pass Holders and Day Pass Holders Instructor: The Station Staff

SPECIAL INTEREST CLASSES

GUITAR LESSONS Ever thought about learning how to play guitar but just never got around to it? Learn how to count music, read music, and even play some songs in this class. It is recommended to bring a guitar but it is not a requirement. WHEN: July 6th - August 24th TIME: 7:30 P.M. - 8:45 P.M. WHERE: The Station Recreation Center Activity Room AGES: 12+ REGISTRATION: March 1st - July 5th FEE: $65 per session GRILL MASTER 101 Summer Time brings Sun, Fun, and BBQ. In this class you will learn how to prepare and grill your favorite meats. All foods and supplies are included in the price. All you will need is to bring an open mind and an appetite. Don’t miss out on this fun Summer Class and join today. WHEN: June 6th - June 27th, Tuesday Nights (4 Classes) July 11th - August 1st, Tuesday Nights (4 Classes) August 8th - August 29th, Tuesday Nights (4 Classes) TIME: 6:30 P.M. - 7:45 P.M. WHERE: The Station Catering Kitchen AGES: 15+ REGISTRATION: March 1st - June 5th for June Classes March 1st - July 10th for July Classes March 1st - August 7th for August Classes FEE: $65 per session PERSONAL TRAINING The goal of our personal trainers is to help you identify your goals and achieve them by creating a personalized fitness plan. When you join The Station, you will receive a free fitness orientation with one of our certified staff members. During the fitness orientation you will learn how to use the fitness equipment for your needs, set personal goals to achieve a healthy lifestyle and most importantly learn how fitness is fun. SMALL GROUP SESSIONS: Work out with a partner (2 or more participants required at registration) $40 per 1 hour session $250 for 5 sessions $450 for 10 sessions For more information visit the front desk to schedule your Personal Training session today! PARENTS NIGHT OUT WHEN: Once a month on Fridays, parents can enjoy a night out on the town alone while their children are having fun and being watched by our trained staff. Depending on the age, the child will either be in the child watch room or the activity room. Check in is at 6pm and you must pick them up by 10 pm. Pizza is provided for dinner. If your child has a food allergy this will be accom modated as well. You will check your child in the Child Watch Room for ages 3-6 & the Activity Room for ages 7-11. WHEN: June 2nd, July 7th, August 4th, September 1st TIME: 6:00 P.M - 10:00 P.M. WHERE: The Station Recreation Center Activity Room & Child Watch Room AGES: 3 Years-11 Years Old


...REGISTRATION PERIOD: August 1st through the first day before Parent’s Night Out. FEE: $15 per child INSTRUCTOR: The Station Staff CLASS MAXIMUM: 10 children (3 years-6 Years) 20 children (7 years-11 Years) Schedule of Events Ages 3-6 6:00 P.M.-7:30 P.M. - Child Watch Room 7:30 P.M.-8:00 P.M. - Activity Room-Dinner 8:00 P.M.-10:00 P.M. - Child Watch Room/Movie Ages 7-11 6:00 P.M.-7:30 P.M. - Activity Room- Board Games/Art 7:30 P.M.-8:00 P.M. - Activity Room-Dinner 8:00 P.M.-9:00 P.M. - Gym- Sports Games 9:00 P.M.-10:00 P.M. - Activity Room- Educational Activity/Movie - Schedule Subject to Change

FAMILY FUN EVENTS PING PONG MANIA Whether you want to play just for fun or have a more competitive game, this is for you. Our team will also have a tutorial on how to play. WHEN: June 22nd, September 21st, October 26th TIME: 7:30 P.M. - 9:30 P.M. WHERE: The Station Recreation Center AGES: Anyone - Kids 6 & Under accompanied by an adult. No Registration and FREE to come FAMILY GAME NIGHT Open for families of all ages with a variety of different games from Monopoly to card games like Go Fish and Ping Pong. WHEN: July 27th, August 24th TIME: 7:30 P.M. - 9:30 P.M. WHERE: The Station Recreation Center Activity Room AGES: Children 6 & under must be with by an Adult. COST: Free REGISTRATION: No Registration free to come INSTRUCTOR: The Station Staff

EDUCATION CLASSES SPANISH 4 ADULTS Adult classes will teach the basics of understanding and be able to use basic Spanish in the real world. WHEN: Sept 6th - Oct 25th Every Wednesday (8 Classes) TIME: 6:15 P.M. - 7:15 P.M. WHERE: The Station Recreation Center Activity Room AGES: 6-13 year olds REGISTRATION PERIOD: July 1st - September 5th COST: $65 per session INSTRUCTOR: Rocie Petchprom SPANISH 4 KIDS Children will learn basic Spanish speaking skills. WHEN: Sept 6th - Oct 26th Every Wed & Thu (16 Classes) TIME: 5:15 P.M. - 6:15 P.M. WHERE: The Station Recreation Center Activity Room AGES: 6-13 year olds REGISTRATION PERIOD: July 1st - September 5th COST: $85 per session INSTRUCTOR: Rocie Petchprom CONTINUATION SPANISH 4 ADULTS For anyone who has completed Spanish 4 Adults at the Station or is interested in refreshing their Spanish. WHEN: September 7th - October 26th Thurs (8 Classes) TIME: 6:30 P.M. - 7:30 P.M. WHERE: The Station Recreation Center Activity Room AGES: 15+ year olds REGISTRATION: May 1st – Sep 6th COST: $55 per session INSTRUCTOR: Rocie Petchprom SIGN LANGUAGE Sign Language is a system of communication using visual gestures and signs. In this class you will learn the basics of how to use and interpret sign language. WHEN: July 11th - August 29th Tues Evenings (8 Classes) TIME: 6:45 P.M. - 7:45 P.M. WHERE: The Station Recreation Center Activity Room AGES: 12+ year olds COST: $65 per session REGISTRATION: Apr 1-Jul 10 INSTRUCTOR: Torie Sangie

DOG TRAINING CLASSES

PUPPY CLASS Build a strong relationship with your puppy based on trust and cooperation. All training is gentle and fun, and you will learn how to help your puppy blend into your family. WHEN: July 15th - August 19th Sat Mornings (6 Classes) September 9th - October 14th Sat Mornings (6 Classes) TIME: 10am-11am WHERE: Buck Thomas Dog Park AGES: Dogs up to 4 months old. Puppies must have had 2nd round of puppy vaccination shots (Distemper/Parvo, DHLPP). Copy of shot records must be brought to the Station and turned into the Front Desk before 1st class. REGISTRATION: Mar 1-Jul 14 for July & August Classes April 1- Sep 8th for Sept & Oct Classes FEE: $95/session BASIC MANNERS CLASS The focus of this class is to begin to build understanding and communication between dog and owner (guardian) by introducing the concept of positive reinforcement training. WHEN: July 15th - August 19th Sat Mornings (6 Classes) September 9th - October 14th Sat Mornings (6 Classes) TIME: 10am-11am WHERE: Buck Thomas Dog Park AGES: Dogs 4 months old and older. Vaccinations: We do require that your dog is current on Rabies, Distemper and Bordetella. Copy of shot records must be brought to the Station and turned into the Front Desk before 1st class. REGISTRATION: Mar 1 - Jul 14 for July & August Classes April 1st - September 8th for September & October Classes FEE: $95 per session

ADULT DANCE CLASSES LINE DANCING Learn how to do a variation of multiple line dances. Get a new experience every class! WHEN: July 5th - August 23rd TIME: 7:30 P.M. - 8:45 P.M. WHERE: The Station Recreation Center AGES: Adults 18+ REGISTRATION PERIOD: April 1st - July 4th FEE: $55/session or $8/class INSTRUCTOR: Claudia Clark ADULT SWING DANCING Learn how to Swing Dance and its many variations. Before you know it you will be able to scoot across the dance floor like a pro. WHEN: Sept 6th - Oct 25th Wednesday Nights (8 Classes) TIME: 7:30 P.M - 9:00 P.M. WHERE: The Station Recreation Center Activity Room AGES: Adults 15+ REGISTRATION: July 1 - Sept 5 For Sept & Oct Classes FEE: $55/session or $8/class INSTRUCTOR: Bob Gates

ADULT ART CLASSES ADULT MORNING PAINTING & DRAWING CLASS Use several drawing media and various techniques in this class. All supplies included. Class taught by a certified art instructor. WHEN: August 14th - Sept 25th Mon Mornings (6 Classes) No Class on September 4th-Labor Day TIME: 10:30 A.M - 12:00 P.M. WHERE: The Station Recreation Center Activity Room AGES: 15+ REGISTRATION: April 1st - July 9th FEE: $65 per session for March and June Classes INSTRUCTOR: Donna Barnard ADULT PAINTING CLASS Use several drawing media and watercolor. All supplies included. Class taught by a certified art instructor. WHEN: June 5th - June 26th Monday Nights (4 Classes) September 11th - September 25th (3 Classes) TIME: 6:45 P.M. - 8:15 P.M. For March and September Classes 7:30 P.M. - 8:45 P.M. For June Classes WHERE: The Station Recreation Center Activity Room AGES: 15+ REGISTRATION: Mar 1-Jun 5 For June Classes June 1st - September 11th For September Classes FEE: $55 per Session For March and June Classes $45 per Session For Sept Classes INSTRUCTOR: Will Wilson

ADULT DRAWING CLASS Use several drawing media and various techniques in this class. All supplies included. Class taught by a certified art instructor. WHEN: July 10th - July 31st Monday Nights (4 Classes) TIME: 6:45 P.M - 8:15 P.M. WHERE: The Station Recreation Center Activity Room AGES: 15+ REGISTRATION: Apr 1-July 9 For June Classes FEE: $55 per June Class INSTRUCTOR: Donna Barnard CARTOON ART 4 ADULTS Ever thought it would be fun to draw your favorite cartoon characters? Now you have the chance to draw your favorite comic book character. Learn new and exciting techniques in this specialized class. WHEN: August 7th - August 28th Mon Nights (4 Classes) TIME: 6:45 P.M. - 8:15 P.M. WHERE: The Station Recreation Center Activity Room AGES: 15+ REGISTRATION: May 1st - August 6th FEE: $55 per session INSTRUCTOR: Tara Thompson

SUMMER SPORTS CAMPS Most summer sports camps run Monday-Friday 9:00 A.M.– 12:00 P.M. unless specified differently upon sign up. Sports camps are open to boys and girls ages 7-13 years old. Each participant in a week-long camp will receive a t-shirt. Snacks will be provided in all camps. Parents are asked to make sure campers bring proper attire. Camps are set up to teach basic fundamentals and skills with game like scenarios. Space is limited. Sign up today! GOLF CAMP WHEN: June 12th – 16th WHERE: Earlywine Golf Course COST: $85 per person INSTRUCTOR: Mike McConville, Southmoore Golf Head Coach BASKETBALL CAMP WHEN: June 5th – 9th WHERE: The Station Recreation Center COST: $85 per person INSTRUCTOR: Scott Hodges, Westmoore Basketball Head Coach SOCCER CAMP WHEN: July 17th – 21st WHERE: Buck Thomas Park South Front Field COST: $85 per person INSTRUCTOR: Robert Williams, Westmoore High School Soccer Head Coach TENNIS CAMP WHEN: May 30th – June 2nd WHERE: Buck Thomas Tennis Courts COST: $75 per person INSTRUCTOR: Kendra Milligan, Moore High School Tennis Assistant Coach VOLLEYBALL CAMP WHEN: June 19th – 22nd WHERE: The Station Recreation Center COST: $75 per person INSTRUCTOR: Janet Brannon, Southmoore Volleyball Head Coach ALL N 1 SPORTS CAMP WHEN: June 5th – June 9th (1PM-4PM) WHERE: The Station Recreation Center COST: $85 per person INSTRUCTOR: Athena Mathis, Apple Creek P.E. Teacher

Schedules may change and more camps or classes may be available. Please check out The Station's website for details. Website: cityofmoore.com/centralpark Phone Number: (405) 793-5090 Registration website: cityofmoore.com/fun

JUNE 2017 | MOORE MONTHLY | 43


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Moore Entrepreneurs: Multi-Generational Work Force Spurs Unique Communication Challenges It is the first time in history that our workforce includes workers from five different generations. While this diversity is something to celebrate, it can pose challenges for engaging employees as well as collaborating with other colleagues. In the spirit of seeking first to understand, then to be understood, here are general descriptions and expectations from each generation. While there are certainly exceptions, it is helpful to understand what experiences shaped these generations, what they value, how they prefer to communicate: Traditionalists (pre-1946) – After decades in the workforce, this generation has abundant knowledge and are often described as the most loyal and dedicated age group of workers. Highly devoted but risk averse, their values were shaped by the Great Depression, World War II, and the postwar boom years. Their willingness to conserve, sacrifice and save money to recover from the financial impact of the postwar era resulted this group becoming the most affluent elderly population in U.S. history. Baby Boomers (1946-1964) – This is the first generation to actively declare a higher priority for work over personal life, which resulted in the term “workaholics”. Very competitive, they generally distrust authority and large systems. Their values were shaped primarily by a rise in civil rights activism, Viet Nam, and inflation. They associate work and status with self-worth and prefer face-to-face communication. They suffered layoffs and lost some or all of their retirement as a result of the “dot.com” bust and ensuing recession and are reluctant or unable to retire. Generation X (1965-1976) – This generation was the first to challenge the status quo. They are not company-loyal and believe respect and loyalty are earned. They tend to dis-

agree with the standard office hierarchy and are not automatically loyal to their employer. They value a workplace that is charitable, eco-friendly, and offers volunteer work during office hours. Training opportunities are appreciated as are monetary awards based on individual performance. They are independent workers, as many were “latch key kids” raised by parents who both worked outside of the home. They have experienced politicians’ lies exposed through abundant media coverage and have seen their parents lose jobs during economic downturns. There are fewer Gen Xers than Baby Boomers or Millennials. Millennials or Generation Y (1977-1997) – They are currently the largest generation in the workplace. Job status or titles do not impress them. They believe respect is earned through performance. If a better opportunity presents itself, they will readily change employers. They choose lifestyle over income and believe employment is a means to an end. They are tech savvy, adaptable, focused on self-improvement and determined to grow in their particular fields. They like constant communication with their peers and managers, seek feedback about their work and value opportunities for training. They prefer working for organizations that are active in the community and that offer volunteer opportunities during office hours. They are very optimistic and highly energetic. Generation Z (after 1997) – This up and coming generation of workers does not know life without technology. Social medial is their primary communication channel and is preferred over face-to-face communication. As they enter the workforce, they will require more structure and predictability at work in order to be effective.

• Conduct a generational audit – be clear how your current employees line up in terms of number and levels within the five generations. • Send your managers to class so they can learn to recognize and adapt to generational differences. We cannot change others, but a motivated manager can change their own response to generational differences. • Facilitate cross-generational mentoring/ coaching to encourage more interaction. • Ask each staff member how they prefer to communicate, in person, by phone, via email, other. • Offer different working options like telecommuting and working offsite. Focus on the results employees produce rather than on how they get it done. • Accommodate different learning styles, from a traditional classroom setting to online training. Companies who are able to attract, retain and engage the most talented workers have a tremendous competitive advantage. This begins with understanding the generations at work, their unique perspectives and bringing out the best in individuals and teams is a winning corporate strategy.

Henry Dumas Small Business Management Coordinator Moore Norman Technology Center 405-809-3540 www.mntc.edu

Strategies to help these generations leverage their strengths, communicate effectively, stay engaged and improve retention:

JUNE 2017 | MOORE MONTHLY | 45


Ask the Tax Guy! Dear Tax Guy: Are there things from a purely financial POV that will help folks with the changing environment in medical insurance? Dear Reader: Healthcare touches us in our most vulnerable, irrational aspects. Yet, in dealing in with it, we must be our most cold-blooded, rational selves. Health insurance, like other types of insurance, is, in essence, risk management. What is risk management? One way of looking at it would to be realize that before the recent spate of earthquakes in Oklahoma, hardly one in 100,000 homeowners felt the need to take out insurance covering home damage caused by earthquakes! People did not perceive the need to insure themselves against this risk. Insurance is spreading the risk among a large( r ) group of people to spread the costs amongst each other. Some years, you have an event, others don’t. They pay in premiums that you use in covering yourself. Other

years, you pay in premiums that you don’t use, others get reimbursed for their event. People instinctively get this in regards to house insurance, auto insurance, etc. Yet, we typically refer to our system as health care, rather than health care AND health insurance. Yet, to me, if we are to traverse this landscape, we should acknowledge the distinction. In one of the Harvard Medical School alumni newsletters in the 1930s, it was advised that if someone wanted to make money, they should NOT go into medicine. Doctors got ‘paid’ in eggs, produce, if they got paid at all. Most health ‘events’ occurred at home, including child birth and the death of aged parents with the doctor in attendance at critical moments. As we have moved from an agrarian society to an urbanized, technological society, many tasks that we used to do ourselves have been assumed by others. This isn’t right or wrong, but, I think, there needs to be an understanding of how we got

46 | MOORE MONTHLY | JUNE 2017

here to understand some of what is happening. That may be just me; I’ve always wanted to understand not just the What, but also the Why. Prior to World War II, health insurance was a rarity, an outlier, if you will. During World War II, employers, unable to raise wages because of government-imposed wage and price controls, offered ‘benefits’ to entice scarce workers. Among these benefits was health insurance to help pay for health care. Thus began the modern worker’s expectation of employer-provided coverage ending in the Affordable Care Act’s provision that employers with fifty or more workers MUST provide health insurance or pay a penalty. Health care was ‘primitive’ by today’s standards, thus, employers were purchasing insurance on our behalf for fairly constrained choices and consequences. If you got heart failure, the symptoms would be managed, but you would die. Today, we keep really sick people alive for significant periods of time. We replace their hearts, liv-

ers, etc. This has costs. I read somewhere recently that 20 percent of the population accounts for 80 percent of health care spending. In many ways, we got ‘spoiled’ by the old system. Cheap co-pays, etc. The cost of the insurance was being covered by our employer, etc. But, the ground shifted. [Employers changed (in some ways due to the same dynamics driving our current topic) from employer-paid pensions to 401(k)s.] Employers had to deal with large premium increases. They countered with opting for plans that offered less benefits and higher deductibles and co-pays. This was the genesis, if you will, to lifetime limits, exclusion if you had a ‘pre-existing’ condition. Health insurance companies, the government, employers were trying to manage health care costs that were being reimbursed by insurance.

Mike Rush, CPA Mrush11@cox.net Tel: 405.833.0780


JUNE 2017 | MOORE MONTHLY | 47


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NBA Athletes Know to Play Their Best, They Need to Eat Well Off the Court Oklahoma City—Whether it’s on the basketball court or on the sidewalks of your neighborhood, regular physical activity is imperative to living a healthy life. Paired with a balanced diet, it can lower the risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes and some types of cancer – and give you more energy, focus and drive. In honor of National Physical Fitness and Sports Month, Seafood Nutrition Partnership has asked some star basketball players how they eat to play their best – because they know that training must go hand-in-hand with healthy eating and proper nutrition. “We have huge challenges ahead of us to get healthy as a nation,” said Detlef Schrempf, three-time NBA All-Star and founding board member of non-profit Seafood Nutrition Partnership. “When we were raising our two boys we were very busy, but took the time to educate ourselves on what the right food choices were. It took a conscious effort not settling for the convenient fast food option, because we’re all tired at the end of the day, but rather to plan ahead to prepare nutritious meals for our kids.” “When I was playing,” said the 16-year NBA veteran, “part of my success, was really living a healthy lifestyle and eating well. I hope I can inspire young people to make healthy choices that will have lasting impacts.” Oklahoma City Thunder center Enes Kanter has also realized that good nutrition impacts performance. “My first year in the NBA I was a really bad eater,” said Kanter, who helped bring his team to the NBA playoffs that year. “I was up to over 280, so I started a diet of just seafood and vegetables, and I lost over 40 pounds in one summer. I came back in my second season and I felt

just so much better. I was running down the floor better, I was moving better. It impacted my performance, too.” He is putting that life lesson to use impacting the community through his work with the Regional Food Bank of Oklahoma, where he works to bring healthy food to those in need. To raise funds for the food bank, he’s combined his passions and created an online cooking show, Kitchen 11 with Vast Chef Kevin Lee. Also taking it digital, Schrempf recently paired with NBA Cares to create a series of videos encouraging healthy eating choices and for people to take the Healthy Heart Pledge. “Take it from an athlete,” he starts in one video, “maintaining a healthy heart and brain is easy when you add seafood to your diet. Seafood is rich in healthy fats known as Omega-3s and full of lean protein.” You can join these NBA stars by taking the Healthy Heart Pledge at seafoodnutrition.org. For every Oklahoman who takes the pledge, one meal will be donated to the Regional Food Bank. About Seafood Nutrition Partnership Seafood Nutrition Partnership (SNP) is the leading 501(c)3 non-profit organization in the U.S. building awareness of the health and nutritional benefits of seafood. SNP is addressing the country’s public health crisis through education programs that inspire Americans to incorporate more seafood and omega-3s into their diets for improved health as per USDA Dietary Guidelines. In October 2015, SNP launched a national public health education campaign. For more information, visit SeafoodNutrition.org. JUNE 2017 | MOORE MONTHLY | 49


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r CLASS ACT: a e Y e h t f o e t e l h t A s p a C r o Female l y a r T t i e n u rt o F s ' e r o o M s r o n o H h t i W r a e Y r Senio

hen senior Fortuneit Traylor of Moore High School was in middle school, she decided to try throwing the shot put. What she learned rather quickly was that she was very good at it. Fast forward to her senior year in high school, where she has found herself placing among the top athletes everywhere she competes. In just this year alone, Traylor placed second in conference in discus throw and first in shot put. In regionals, she placed third in discus and second in shot put. And at state this year, she finished fourth in discus and third in shot put. And in addition to that, Traylor was also named the Central Oklahoma Athletic Conference (COAC) Female Field Event Athlete of the Year. Traylor had just left the stadium to get her prom dressed fixed when the award for COAC Female Field Event Athlete of the Year was announced. “I got a call from my coach,” said Traylor “I was so surprised! He presented the award to me on Monday at school. My team was so excited and supportive, too!” Traylor’s interest in field events started in middle school when she was entered in her events and won. When she was a freshman, she kept winning. It didn’t take long to figure out that she was doing well against girls older than her. And with the encouragement and support of her parents, Traylor continued to win.

52 | MOORE MONTHLY | JUNE 2017


“My mom and dad are like the presidents of my supporting me. Trying to get things right for me. They were always telling me to start applying to colleges, to make sure I was taking the right classes and getting my credits.” Traylor began contacting schools herself, letting them know she threw discus and shot put at Moore. Informing them that she has a 3.78 GPA and a competitive ACT score. But after all the campus visits, Traylor settled on

“I’ll be attending Langston University in the fall,” said Traylor. “I’ll be throwing shot put and discus for them. I visited other places, but Langston just felt like home.” Traylor always wanted to attend an HBCU, Historically Black Colleges and Universities, “When I would go to homecoming games, it was always so exciting with the band and the majorettes and the dancing. It felt like a small school, but it was bigger than that.” The small Langston campus appealed to Traylor. “I loved how the entire campus was about as big as Moore High School. I also visited OU and UCO, and they have beautiful campuses, but I will just have to admire them from a distance.” Traylor had her heart set on Langston, where she will be studying for a career as a certified nurse anesthetist. Traylor will carry her memories of Moore with her to college. “Our team is like a family. We encourage each other and pick each other up, but we’re also very honest with each other. I’m going to miss them.”

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fan club!” said Traylor. “They are always helping and


54 | MOORE MONTHLY | JUNE 2017


Celebrate Our Hometown Heroes

This story sponsored by

Richie Splitt, President & CEO Norman Regional Health System

The event will take place from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, June 10, 2017, at Norman Regional Moore, 700 S. Telephone Road. I ask that you, please nominate a first-responder or Hometown Hero as well. Norman Regional is honoring the nominees at the event with a prize basket! Simply enter this web address into your internet browser and nominate your choice. https://www.surveymonkey. com/r/MooreHometownHeroes or visit NormanRegional.com and click the ‘Hometown Heroes’ sliding banner on the homepage. Children who attend the Hometown Heroes celebration will have a chance to get their very own superhero cape! Our Emergency Department at Norman Regional Moore is proud to work alongside Moore Police and Fire. Also, EMSSTAT, the City of Moore’s ambulance provider is owned and operated by Norman Regional Health System. Like our favorite movie superheroes, Moore’s first responders work alongside each other every day. They are Moore’s own Justice League or Guardians of the Galaxy!

You'll also find superheroes in our imaging department – where they truly do have ‘x-ray vision.’ Our diagnostic imaging services include CT, heart and lung scans, ultrasound, x-ray, and MRI. Same day/next day imaging appointments are available at Norman Regional Moore, call 405-307-2290 today to schedule your appointment. Our laboratory services are open from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. and perform a wide variety of tests to assist physicians in the diagnosis, treatment, and management of disease and illness. In most cases, lab results are even available the same day. After 6 p.m. many of our laboratory services are also available through our ER. Outpatient physical, occupational and speech therapy are also available at Norman Regional Moore. These services even have their own convenient entrance for patients located on the north side of the building. Norman Regional has been honored to be in the community of Moore for the last decade and is committed to continuing as your hometown healthcare provider for many years to come. Keep an eye out for additional announcements as we continue to offer even more things to love at Norman Regional Moore.

700 S Telephone Rd, Moore, OK 73160 405-793-9355 • normanregional.com/nrmoore

So summer is the perfect time to celebrate these Hometown Heroes. Join Norman Regional Health System as we acknowledge the one-year anniversary of Norman Regional Moore and the decade mark of providing healthcare in Moore. We will also recognize our first responder Hometown Heroes!

Norman Regional has proudly been serving the communities of Moore and South Oklahoma City from this location for the past ten years. Norman Regional Moore continues to offer the lifesaving care you’ve come to know and trust from Norman Regional. Norman Regional Moore features an 18-bed Emergency Room or ER which is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week and can treat various levels of illness and injury. The ER also has a fast track for minor illnesses and injuries. In instances where a patient needs to be transported to another Norman Regional facility from Norman Regional Moore provides that ambulance ride free-of-charge.

Where the Healing Begins

Summer is here, and movie theaters are filled with blockbusters featuring superheroes with superpowers saving the world. Moore has its own heroes, not on the screen, but in our community. They don’t save people with superpowers, but brainpower, strength, and determination. They are our police, fire, paramedics and EMS, and healthcare professionals.


At Rambling Oaks and Rambling Oaks Courtyard, we are passionately committed to providing the best service and personal care for you or your loved ones. We offer larger, homey apartments, delicious homemade meals, and fun daily activities all in a familyoriented and pet-friendly environment.

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56 | MOORE MONTHLY | JUNE 2017


What is the "Whole 30" Diet?

This story sponsored by

Aisa Trice MS, RD/LD

that whole grain helps with reduction of inflammation lowers the risk for heart disease and type 2 diabetes. Whole grains also increase the good bacteria in the gut. The Whole 30 also eliminates legumes except green beans, sugar snap peas, and snow peas. This means beans of all kinds, peas, chickpeas, lentils, and peanuts. Peanut butter is also eliminated in this diet. Beans provide great health benefits that include being a good source of fiber and antioxidants. Beans also help regulate blood sugar, lower cholesterol and are good source of protein. Eliminating dairy can be extremely healthy. However, research shows that fermented dairy products like yogurt and raw milk cheeses can help stimulate the gut. Dairy is also a good source of vitamin D, which helps regulate calcium and phosphorus in the body thereby helping maintain bone health. Intake of dairy can also reduce the risk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes.

The purpose of the Whole 30 is to eliminate the common problem of craving-induced blood sugar disrupting, gut-damaging, inflammatory food groups for a full 30 days. Whole 30 claims to let your body rest and recover from the effects of those food groups while jump starting a new healthy lifestyle. Some of the food groups that are not allowed on this diet for 30-days include grains, legumes, dairy, and added real, or artificial sugar. Would you recommend this diet? With all diets, there are pros and cons. It’s best to know and understand both the pros and cons before starting. An understanding of this will

allow you to make an educated decision if the diet is the best for you. PROS As far as the PROS, the diet does encourage the use of unprocessed foods while emphasizing fruits and vegetables. However, encouragement of total elimination of complete food groups should raise a red flag. CONS Grains are one the food groups that the Whole 30 eliminates. Elimination of grains under the premise that gluten is a problematic protein also discourages whole grains. Research shows

If we were to compare the Whole 30 to MyPlate, 3 of 5 food groups have, for all practical purposes, eliminated from the diet. The body needs vitamins and minerals that are provided by all food groups. It is important to incorporate a variety of different foods from each food group to build a balanced diet. Although the Whole 30 does encourage the elimination of processed foods, a diet that eliminates whole food groups that have proven to have significant health benefits, in my professional opinion is not a diet I would recommend. For nutritional counseling, Norman Regional Health System offers the guidance of registered dietitians. Those interested can schedule an appointment for an assessment with a referral from their family physician. For further information feel free to contact 405.307.5730.

JUNE 2017 | MOORE MONTHLY | 57


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Noisy Night Author: Mac Barnett Illustrator: Brian Biggs Publisher: Roaring Book Press Reviewer: Vona Bowling, Children’s Library Associate, Moore Public Library “Noisy Night” is a fun way to practice prediction and inferencing in stories. “Noisy Night” follows the occupants of an apartment building where everything from above can be heard in the apartment below. The cover itself gives clues on who lives in the apartment by the lit up windows. The story begins on the bottom floor with a little boy at bedtime wondering what he is hearing above his head. The book moves up the 10-story building and end with a grumpy man wondering who’s making all the noise that he can hear.

Start the Summer with a Summer Reading Parade By Christian Potts The library’s annual Summer Reading Program begins in a way unique to any library in the state of Oklahoma – with a Summer Reading Parade. And this isn’t a parade to watch but one instead to be part of. Participants will gather outside Moore's City Hall the morning of June 1, with the parade beginning at 10 a.m. The parade route follows a police escort and winds past Central Elementary School, down Howard Avenue and across Main Street before ending up at the library. Then the SRP festivities really get started, with games, crafts, snow cones and signups for the Summer Reading Program inside the library itself. Activities are planned throughout June and July for children, teens and adults, as well as several intergenerational events for all ages. This year’s Summer Reading Program theme is “Build a Better World,” and will be celebrated through a variety of programs that build community, inspiration and in some cases, help participants build actual things. Sponsors for this year’s Summer Reading Program are the Anne and Henry Zarrow Foundation, Friends of the Library groups, Hitachi Computer Products of America Inc., the Institute of Museum and Library Services, Oklahoma Arts Council, Oklahoma College Savings Plan, Pioneer Library System, Pioneer Library System Foundation, SONIC, the Oklahoma Department of Libraries and The Oklahoman Newspapers in Education. 58 | MOORE MONTHLY | JUNE 2017

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This book includes a combination of noises that are fun to read and say. The pictures are bright, detailed and give another peek into what’s above by showing the feet of the occupant above. Between the sounds and the pictures clues, your child will love guessing who is making all the noise. “Noisy Night” is recommended for grades pre-school to 3rd grade. If you love “Noisy Night,” you may enjoy other books by Mac Barnett such as “Caldecott Honor Book Extra Yarn,” “Battle Bunny,” “Sam & Dave Dig a Hole” or “President Taft is Stuck in the Bath.” For more book recommendations stop by the children’s desk at your local library or call 793-4347. For other library events and information visit www.pioneerlibrarysystem.org.


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Children

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Summer Reading Kickoff and Parade: Thursday, June 1 – 10 a.m. STEAM Fridays: Museum of Osteology: Friday, June 2 – 11 a.m. Peter Piper Pizza SRP Kickoff Party: Friday, June 2 – 5 p.m. Viva GLART! Grow a Learner Through Art: Saturday, June 3 – 11 a.m. Story Time at Kiwanis Park: Monday, June 5 – 10 a.m. Community Helpers Story Time: Tuesday, June 6 – 10 a.m. Science Unites!: Tuesday, June 6 – 2 p.m. Barks, Books & Buddies: Tuesday, June 6, 20 – 6:30 p.m. Lapsit Story Time: Wednesday, June 7, 14, 21, 28 – 10 and 10:45 a.m. At the Movies: Wednesday, June 7, 14, 21, 28 – 2 p.m. Pre-K Play: Thursday, June 8, 22 – 10 a.m. STEAM Fridays: Building Day: Friday, June 9 – 11 a.m. Story Time at Central Park: Monday, June 12 – 10 a.m. Kid’s Club: Monday, June 12 – 4:30 p.m. Doughnuts With Dad Story Time: Tuesday, June 13 – 10 a.m. Build a Magical World: Tuesday, June 13 – 2 p.m. STEAM Fridays: Science Museum Oklahoma: Friday, June 16 – 11 a.m. Family Story Time: Saturday, June 17 – 11 a.m. Story Time at Little River Park: Monday, June 19 – 10 a.m. Community Helpers Story Time: Tuesday, June 20 – 10 a.m. Cimarron Opera and the New Kid: Tuesday, June 20 – 2 p.m. Sensory Story Time: Wednesday, June 21 – 4 p.m. STEAM Fridays: Creation Stations: Friday, June 23 – 11 a.m. Ben Franklin Live!: Friday, June 23 – 6 p.m. Story Time at Buck Thomas Park: Monday, June 26 – 10 a.m. Tween Scene: Rock Art: Monday, June 26 – 4:30 p.m. Community Helpers Story Time: Tuesday, June 27 – 10 a.m. Evening Story Time at Central Park: Tuesday, June 27 – 7 p.m. STEAM Fridays: Egg Drop: Friday, June 30 – 11 a.m.

Toddler Story Time & Play: Thursday, June 1, 7, 15, 22, 29 – 10 and 11 a.m. Summer Reading Kickoff: Thursday, June 1 – 4:30 p.m. Peter Piper Pizza SRP Kickoff Party: Friday, June 2 – 5 p.m. Family Story Time and Craft: Monday, June 5, 12, 19, 26 – 10 and 11 a.m. Baby Lapsit: Tuesday, June 6, 13, 20, 27 – 10 a.m. Build a Better World: Legos: Tuesday, June 6 – 3 p.m. Magic of Storytelling with Author David Roper: Wednesday, June 7 – 10 a.m. Safety and a Craft: Wednesday, June 7 – 3 p.m. Ben Franklin Live!: Friday, June 9 – 6 p.m. Build a Better World: Build Like an Egyptian: Tuesday, June 13 – 3 p.m. Safety and a Craft: 3 p.m. Wednesday, June 14 – Family Movie: Thursday, June 15 – 2 p.m. Build a Magical World: Friday, June 16 – 3 p.m. Build a Better World: Inventions: Tuesday, June 20 – 3 p.m. Lego Party: Wednesday, June 21 – 1 p.m. A Better World with Boulevard Brass: Friday, June 23 – 6 p.m. Build a Better World: Recycling Crafts: Tuesday, June 27 – 3 p.m. Safety and a Craft: Wednesday, June 28 – 3 p.m. Cimarron Opera and the New Kid: Thursday, June 29 – 3 p.m.

Teen/Adult Afternoon Movie: Thursday, June 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 – 2 p.m. Zumba: Thursday, June 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 – 6 p.m. Summer Nights Concert Series: Banana Seat: Friday, June 2 – 8 p.m. Beginner’s Tai Chi: Saturday, June 3, 10, 17, 24 – 9 a.m. Intermediate Tai Chi: Saturday, June 3, 10, 17, 24 – 10 a.m. Teen Movie Making 101: Monday, June 5 – 1 p.m. Beginner’s Yoga: Monday, June 5, 12, 19, 26 – 6 p.m. Sand Art Votives: Tuesday, June 6 – 6 p.m. Summer Nights Concert Series: Blackwater Bridge: Friday, June 9 – 8 p.m. Teen Rube Goldberg Challenge: Monday, June 12 – 2 p.m. Summer Nights Concert Series: Boulevard Brass: Friday, June 16 – 8 p.m. Teen Reason for Mindfulness: Monday, June 19 – 2 p.m. Employment Law in a Nutshell: Tuesday, June 20 – 9:30 a.m. Cutting Credit Card Debt: Tuesday, June 20 – 5 p.m. On the Same Page Book Discussion: Wednesday, June 21 – 6 p.m. Summer Nights Concert Series: Nicnos: Friday, June 23 – 8 p.m. Teen Crafternoon: Monday, June 26 – 2 p.m. Science of Star Trek: Wednesday, June 28 – p.m. Maker Mobile Project for Teens/Tweens and Adults: Friday, June 30 – 5:30 p.m.

Teen/Adult Rilla Askew Author Visit: Monday, June 5 – 6 p.m. Pilates: Tuesday, June 6, 13, 20, 27 – 6 p.m. Penn Avenue Literary Society: Thursday, June 8 – 6:30 p.m. Teen Movie Making 101: Monday, June 12 – 2 p.m. Science of Star Trek: Friday, June 16 – 6 p.m. Teen KEVA Block Party: Monday, June 19 – 2 p.m. Tai Chi for All Ages: Monday, June 19, 26 – 6 p.m. Escaping the Wormhole: Monday, June 26 – 2 p.m.

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rly By Beve

Ferree

like we were going to get blown away.” Lynn explains that the El Reno tornado, also “It presented itself, and I continued to May 20, 2013, was a day that Moore will always remember, and for storm chaser Michael Lynn it was a day filled with emotion. Lynn began chasing storms in 1991, but on May 20, he was at the right place at the right time. “I was at home that day,” explained Lynn. “We had a PDS watch, which means particularly dangerous situation. I was alone and I decided I would go out west. I went to I-44 by Newcastle, and to the tri-city area, where the tornado came together. I’ve never seen anything like that. That tornado turned from a rope tornado to an EF5 in about 5 minutes.” Lynn said that chasing a storm like that is a storm chaser’s dream, but he was well-aware that it was heading to Moore, “I’m chasing the storm and I was the only one behind it. All I can remember saying is ‘It’s going through my town.” The storm got risky as Lynn chased the storm into Moore.

chase it up 149th,” said Lynn. “It was a chase

storms merged, stalled, and rolled south. There

of a lifetime. You only wish it could be out in

was traffic everywhere. Chasing is a rush, but

the open.”

you have to be careful. The El Reno storm

For some storm chasers in Oklahoma, the job is a profession. For many others, it’s a hobby. But regardless of the purpose, one thing is for

literally trapped us. I’m not going to lie, I was scared.” His advice for people interested in storm

certain. If you’re going to be a storm chaser, you

chasing, “Get well equipped, understand where

need to know weather, have equipment and be

the roads are and where you’re at all times

prepared, especially in Oklahoma.

because you can run out of road. Know your

"I fell into storm chasing years ago when

surroundings. Know the storms, how they move.

it was just a hobby," said Lynn. “I did a lot of

You need to have knowledge of the storm and

chasing in western Oklahoma. I had a love for

the signs of what they’re going to do.”

it. I had always wanted to be a meteorologist,

On May 20, Lynn was listening to Mike

and that didn’t happen, but I am a weather buff.

Morgan from KFOR as he was chasing the

I know quite a bit about the weather, the angles,

storm, “To be out there and not have anything is

where you need to be and where you don’t need

dangerous. You need a good computer, radar.

to be.”

You need to know when there are rain-

But Lynn warns others of the dangers associated with storm chasing. “There was an instance back in the late 90s

wrapped tornados. Don’t go driving in places when you just don’t know.” As he was chasing the May 20 tornado, Lynn

in Cordell, Oklahoma,” said Lynn. “We were

said he wasn’t scared for himself, “But I was

west of the rotation, but we were close, and the

scared for my family and everyone in Moore.”

tornado came down right in front of us. It felt like I was just about to get blown off my feet.” A different incident happened when Lynn was in Blanchard, “We were in the right position, but the tornado came down right in front of us, with 80 to 90 mile an hour winds. It felt

60 | MOORE MONTHLY | JUNE 2017

in May of 2013, was a unique tornado, “Three

So does Lynn have any advice for this storm season, “Be weather aware. Be ready for May. It’s not a matter of if, but when.”


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JUNE 2017 | MOORE MONTHLY | 61


The Old

Del Rancho is Now The Dining Room And is Still Serving Quality Food By Beverly Ferree el Rancho on 4th Street has always been a staple in Moore, so when owner Brandy JonesGoforth decided to branch out and start her own restaurant, she knew it would be a challenge. But it is also something she has wanted to do for a long time. Jones-Goforth separated from Del Rancho in March of 2017 and started her new restaurant called The Dining Room. “I just wanted to do something on my own,” said Jones-Goforth. “To be able to serve what I want to serve. I wanted to have total control over my restaurant.” Jones-Goforth’s parents started Del Rancho in 197273, and she took it over in 2004 and ran it as Del Rancho until March 31, 2017, when she opened The Dining Room. “The feedback we’ve received so far is that the customers love the new restaurant. I lost my previous phone number, so my call-in orders have dropped some, but we now have a new number, 794-4584,” explained Jones-Goforth. “And since I am from Moore and grew up in Moore, I was so happy to keep a 794 number.” But previous Del Rancho customers do seem to have one question for Jones-Goforth, “The consistent question I get is ’do you still have the steak sandwich?’ Absolutely we do. We legally cannot call it the steak supreme any longer because that is a trademark of Del Rancho. We also no longer buy our breading from Del Rancho.

62 | MOORE MONTHLY | JUNE 2017


We now use a recipe that my mom made for us when I was a child. She made it for me for as long as I could chew real food.” The new breading recipe is a little different than Del Rancho, but JonesGoforth assures that it still has that quality taste customers are accustomed to, "We make it in-house, and we’ve added a couple of secret ingredients, but customers say they can’t tell a real difference." The steak sandwich is really delicious,” said customer Tim Ferree. “It’s as good or better than the original Del Rancho sandwich.” And they’re adding new items to the menu as well. “Now that it is my own my own restaurant, I can run a special in October,” said Jones-Goforth, “So, every Wednesday starting in October, we will be making homemade chili. We’re going to make a big pot, and when it’s gone it’s gone. And I also make a wonderful pumpkin cake that we will feature in November and December. That’s something I could never do with Del Rancho. We also added catfish with homemade tarter-sauce and a theta burger with homemade theta sauce. Our breading is homemade.” Jones-Goforth is more interested in serving quality than quantity.

“We have more personalized food. We no longer take it straight from the freezer and throw it in the fryer. I would rather put out quality food, and that’s hard because people want a steak sandwich in McDonald’s time. And that’s hard to do.” When Jones-Goforth was trying to think of a new name for the restaurant, she thought about how most Del Ranchos don’t have a dining room, but this one did, “And that’s kind of how I came across this name. I was trying to think of a new name. And I wanted everyone to come in and feel happy and relaxed, like it’s their own dining room. I wanted everyone to have a little more personalization in their food. I’m still the same owner and we are still selling quality food.” And Jones-Goforth prides herself on still having the same friendly staff. “We’ve had the same staff for years. They love working here. They are very excited about the new restaurant. We are all excited about the new adventure.” But even though it’s a new business with a new name, Jones-Goforth will always have great memories of Del Rancho, “I remember my mom and dad having this building forever. My brother was a manager here at one point, and he’s ten years older than me, and he used to stand me on a pickle bucket in the back and make me peel potatoes. I have grown up here.” Jones-Goforth also feels that by going out on her own, she can better support the Moore community. “We are also going to eventually add picnic tables outside and beer to our menu. So, when you’re heading to the OU game, you can stop here and have a burger and a beer.” Or a steak sandwich, or chicken fried chicken and mashed potatoes, or a hickory Theta cheeseburger…But one thing is for sure, whatever you choose will be made fresh and served with served with a smile.

JUNE 2017 | MOORE MONTHLY | 63


64 | MOORE MONTHLY | JUNE 2017


Sports Gallery

JUNE 2017 | MOORE MONTHLY | 65


Jenna Noel Honored with COAC Singles Tennis Player of the Year Award By Beverly Ferree Sophomore Jenna Noel of Westmoore High School can add Central Oklahoma Athletic Conference (COAC) Female Single Player of the Year Award in tennis to her long list of accolades. She also placed third at state this year, finishing with a record of 26-3. And all of this while taking all pre-advanced placement courses at school and working with the school magazine and yearbook. Noel grew up in Moore and followed in the footsteps of her older brother, who also played tennis. “I wanted to be just like him,” Noel explained. “And my parents told me I could focus on academics and study all the time or pick a sport, and I’d just rather not be inside all the time!” Noel’s older brother and her parents are her biggest fans, and her parents are doing everything possible to help her narrow down her choices for college. “I do want to go to college on a tennis scholarship,” said Noel. “We’re looking at Texas Christian University right now.” Noel said a career in physical therapy might be on the horizon, “Majoring in physical therapy is a possibility. As an athlete, I’ve had numerous injuries I’ve been forced to deal with.” But Noel is very aware that her future means a lot of hard work. “My plan is to get physically stronger. I’m one of the smaller girls at only five foot two inches, so I have to work on my technique a lot. And hopefully I’ll be able to work my way up in state. Last year I got fourth place in state, and this year I finished in third, so maybe I’ll move up next year.” But getting physically stronger is not the only strategy for Noel, “Right now my coaches are also working on the mental side of tennis, which also helps.” Noel loves going to school at Westmoore and has found a support system both on the team and in the classroom. “I love my team and I love the students. They are both nice and welcoming, and the teachers are really helpful.” And being only a sophomore, Noel has plenty of time to make decisions about her future while leaving her stamp on her hometown high school.

66 | MOORE MONTHLY | JUNE 2017


Sports Schedule

SOUTHMOORE

BASEBALL May 4-6 Regional Tournament – Location TBD

BASEBALL May 4-6 Regional Tournament – Location TBD

BASEBALL May 4-6 Regional Tournament – Location TBD

SOFTBALL May 3 State Tournament@ Hall of Fame Stadium

SOFTBALL May 3 State Tournament@ Hall of Fame Stadium

SOFTBALL May 3 State Tournament@ Hall of Fame Stadium

BOYS GOLF May 1 Regional Tournament@Meadowlake May 8-9 State Tournament@Karsten Creek

BOYS GOLF May 1 Regional Tournament@Meadowlake May 8-9 State Tournament@Karsten Creek

BOYS GOLF May 1 Regional Tournament@Meadowlake May 8-9 State Tournament@Karsten Creek

GIRLS GOLF May 3 State Tournament@Ponca City CC

GIRLS GOLF May 3 State Tournament@Ponca City CC

GIRLS GOLF May 3 State Tournament@Ponca City CC

BOYS SOCCER May 2 State Tournament – 1st Round May 5 State Tournament – 2nd Round

BOYS SOCCER May 2 State Tournament – 1st Round May 5 State Tournament – 2nd Round

BOYS SOCCER May 2 State Tournament – 1st Round May 5 State Tournament – 2nd Round

GIRLS SOCCER May 2 State Tournament – 1st Round May 5 State Tournament – 2nd Round

GIRLS SOCCER May 2 State Tournament – 1st Round May 5 State Tournament – 2nd Round

GIRLS SOCCER May 2 State Tournament – 1st Round May 5 State Tournament – 2nd Round

TENNIS May 1 May 5-6

Regional Tournament – Location TBA State Tournament – OKC Tennis Center

TENNIS May 1 May 5-6

Regional Tournament – Location TBA State Tournament – OKC Tennis Center

TENNIS May 1 May 5-6

Regional Tournament – Location TBA State Tournament – OKC Tennis Center

TRACK May 6

Regional Meet – Location TBA

TRACK May 6

Regional Meet – Location TBA

TRACK May 6

Regional Meet – Location TBA

BAM. You found a shop.

WESTMOORE

2004 Crystal Drive, Moore, OK 73160 • 405.703.1104 • bamyoufoundashop.com

MOORE


Parting Shots The Station at Central Park hosted the Moore Police Department's Second Annual Chili Cookoff. The event featured celebrity judges and the tastiest chili in the area. Proceeds from the event will benefit the Oklahoma Law Enforcement Officer's Memorial.

68 | MOORE MONTHLY | JUNE 2017


WINNER Heidi Thomas

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4th Place Deidre Ebrey

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2nd Place Matt Morrow


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JUNE 2017 | MOORE MONTHLY | 71


MM June 2017  

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