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FACES OF THE FUTURE

Savea Kagan CONTEMPORARY DANCER

VENTURABLVD.GOLDENSTATE.IS

SIX DOLLARS

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“You’re there for them. We’re here for you.” Motherhood is an amazing journey. Whether you’re expecting a new arrival or have a bundle of joy already, the experts at Providence Cedars-Sinai Tarzana Medical Center are here for you and your little one every step of the way. Our obstetricians, maternal-fetal medicine physicians, pediatricians and specialized nurses work together to provide the best possible care, through birth and beyond. Equipped with a high-risk clinic and Level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, we are able to provide care for clinically complex pregnancies and babies with special medical needs. Through our Pediatric Unit and Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, we are able to provide ongoing and emergency care as your little one grows. Our Women’s Pavilion was established to provide a full spectrum of care all in one convenient location and is focused on family-centered care. We know you want the very best for your growing family. We do too.

Call 888-HEALING (432-5464) to schedule a maternity tour, find a physician or schedule an appointment.


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Upcoming Concerts featuring instruments from Violins of Hope

Violins of Hope Music has the power to heal, to transcend pain and anguish, and to bring hope. Even through humanity’s darkest chapters — music persists. Sixty violins rescued and restored from the Holocaust will make the journey from Tel Aviv to Los Angeles County.

LOS ANGELES JEWISH SYMPHONY VIOLINS OF HOPE DR. NOREEN GREEN, ARTISTIC DIRECTOR LINDSAY DEUTSCH, VIOLIN Supported By Cigna Healthcare, Jewish Community Foundation Los Angeles, Milken Family Foundation

Sun Mar 22 | THE SORAYA

Learn their stories at:

ViolinsofHopeLosAngeles.org Violins of Hope Los Angeles County Chair, Susanne Reyto Honorary Chair, Los Angeles City Controller Ron Galperin

ROTTERDAM PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA LAHAV SHANI, CONDUCTOR Beethoven Piano Conerto No. 4 Generously Sponsored By Earl S. Enzer ‘83 & Karen D. Enzer ‘82, The Lloyd E. Rigler-Lawrence E. Deutsch Foundation, Kathleen P. Martin

Wed Mar 25 | THE SORAYA LOS ANGELES LAWYERS PHILHARMONIC MUSIC DIRECTOR GARY S. GREENE, ESQ. Mar 29 | WILSHIRE EBELL THEATRE

Programs Supported By The Annenberg Foundation Los Angeles County Supervisor Sheila Kuehl Wilmington Trust

THE JERUSALEM QUARTET Onstage Sessions Chamber Music

Arts Education at The Soraya Generously sponsored by The Labowe Family Foundation and The Green Foundation

Niv Ashkenazi, the only individual musician in North America entrusted with one of the collection’s rescued violins, will take the storied instruments “on tour” to visit local students in grades K-12 at 40 public and private schools as The Soraya’s first Artist-in-Residence.

Generously Sponsored By Earl S. Enzer ‘83 & Karen D. Enzer ‘82, The Lloyd E. Rigler-Lawrence E. Deutsch Foundation

Sun Apr 5 | THE SORAYA NEW WEST SYMPHONY MUSIC DIRECTOR MICHAEL CHRISTIE APR 18 | THOUSAND OAKS CIVIC ARTS PLAZA

LONG BEACH SYMPHONY, MUSIC DIRECTOR ECKART PREU FEATURING NIV ASHKENAZI APR 25 & APR 26 | TERRACE THEATER, LONG BEACH

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18 SCREEN TIME An expert weighs in on how to keep the social media experience safe for kids.

22 FACES OF THE FUTURE Ten of the most impressive teenagers in the Valley.

38

54

IT TAKES TWO Soto, where daughters and their moms can shop, expands in Woodland Hills.

62

THE SAUCE 58

40

FIRST VERSE

HOOP DREAMS

A chic new supper club opens in Toluca Lake—

Meet the powerful trio on Sierra Canyon

helmed by some serious talent.

School’s championship-winning girls’ basketball team.

62 FIRED UP

54

Pitfire Pizza in NoHo takes it up a notch with a

LET’S TALK

dramatic indoor/outdoor expansion.

An effort by three local teens to get their peers to talk about protected sex before

78

AND THEN SOME...

having it.

44

64

SUMMER CAMPS

INSTRUMENTS OF CHANGE

A curated list of the best in summer fun

A group of Holocaust-era violins is helping

and education.

spread the message of “Never Again.”

86

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PROFILES

YOURS, MINE, OURS

A deep dive into the Valley’s best schools.

The family of actor Ed Asner opens a center to help families of people with

102

special needs.

REAL ESTATE Spectacular local listings.

COVER

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One of our 10

HIVE MENTALITY

122

“Faces of the Future,”

Meet Jake Reisdorf, founder of Carmel

LAST WORD

Savea Kagan;

Honey Company, and learn what he is

The lasting lessons from a night on the

photographed by

doing to teach people about the benefits

town, gone awry.

Michael Becker

of bees.


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OPEn HOuSE

Sunday, aPRIL 26 11:00 aM-1:00 PM RSVP westmarkschool.org/ openhouse

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

PUBLISHER

Linda Grasso

Robin Sanders 424-220-6340 | robin@goldenstate.is

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Michelle Villas

ADVERTISING

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR | Darren Elms

818-625-3515 | sue@goldenstate.is

DIRECTOR OF BRAND PARTNERSHIPS | Sue Williams COPY EDITORS | Bob Howells, Laura Watts GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

DIGITAL CAMPAIGN SPECIALIST | Sam Lee 424-220-6318 | sam@goldenstate.is

Yasmine Kahsai, Nikki Smith

MARKETING MANAGER | Kimberly Caltagirone

VB’S THE SAUCE ENEWSLETTER EDITOR

424-203-1291 | kimberly@goldenstate.is

Karen Young

GROUP PUBLISHER

CONTRIBUTORS

Jared Sayers

Michele Gerber, Heather David, Joshua Lurie, Hadley Hall Meares, Susan Spillman, Karen Jordan, Anne M. Russell, Price Stephens PHOTOGRAPHERS Michael Becker, Matthew Cooke, Tameka

Grades 2-12 Transforming the lives of students with learning and attention issues including dyslexia, dyscalculia, dysgraphia and other languagebased learning differences.

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MANAGING PARTNERS Charlie Koones

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MARKETING & OPERATIONS PARTNER/BRAND PUBLISHER | Emily Stewart PARTNER/MANAGING DIRECTOR, MEDIA & ANALYTICS | Warren Schaffer DIRECTOR OF DIGITAL | Charles Simmons DIRECTOR OF FILM & VIDEO | Bryce Lowe-White OPERATIONS DIRECTOR | Allison Jeackjuntra COMMUNITY MANAGERS | Jenni Aceret, Natalie Long DIRECTOR OF EVENTS | Danielle Price ACCOUNTING | Janet De La Cruz, Ljay Farris To learn more about us, visit thegoldenstatecompany.com.

5461 Louise Avenue, Encino, CA 91316

www.westmarkschool.org ©2020 Westmark School. All Rights Reserved.

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No part of this periodical may be reproduced in any form or by any means without prior written consent from The Golden State Company LLC. Any and all submissions to this or any of The Golden State Company LLC publications become the property of The Golden State Company LLC and may be used in any media. We reserve the right to edit. SUBSCRIPTIONS Email: info@goldenstate.is or phone: 310-376-7800. Subscriptions are $29 per year. TO OUR READERS Ventura Blvd welcomes your feedback. Please send letters to: Reader Response Department, Ventura Blvd at address below. Include your name, address and email. Edited letters may be published. 200 N. Pacific Coast Highway, Suite 110, El Segundo, CA 90245 Tel 310-376-7800 | Fax 310-376-0200 | goldenstate.is | venturablvd.goldenstate.is


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EDITOR’S LETTER

Pretending I’m a “Top Teen” at the photo shoot

Young at Heart There are so many things I wish I knew when I was younger. I wish I knew it was OK to be myself. I wish I knew that trying as hard as I could was enough, and that it was not just OK to fail but actually good to fail sometimes—because you learn. Our 10 finalists selected for this year’s “Faces of the Future” feature (begins on page 22), somehow, almost prematurely, seem to fully comprehend this. It was such a pleasure meeting the finalists for the annual feature that anchors our KIDS issue. When the VB team read their submissions (which we receive from schools as well as members of the community), all 10 sounded remarkable. But it was only in meeting them that we got the full POW! Sure, they are all smart and have stellar grades. But their drive to work hard, learn, and be the best at what they do, is astounding. Plus I noticed a lot of heart in this year’s finalists—all of the teens featured in “Faces of the Future” (formerly known as “Top Teens”) are students who truly care about others, and act with kindness and humility on campus and off. At the photo shoot, I always make sure to congratulate not just the teenagers, but the parents as well. And to all the schools, I want to take the opportunity here to congratulate you as well. It takes a village. Super interesting Q&A in this issue with an expert from the organization Safer Schools Together about how to keep the social media experience safe for kids (page 18). There are now so many apps, and just when you think you understand one, yet another emerges on the scene. The expert also singles out the social media apps he believes are particularly harmful for children. While we are on the subject of experts, don’t miss my SheSez podcast with Jamie Bakal this month (available wherever you listen). The highly sought-after, LA-based educational consultant offers advice for selecting the right school for your child—both academically and socially. This issue’s special Profiles section (page 86) offers a curated list of some of the Valley’s top educational institutions and Jamie’s SheSez interview is the perfect accompaniment for Happy spring everyone!

Linda Grasso Editor-in-Chief

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Follow me on Instagram @linda.grasso and my podcast @she_sez

PHOTOGRAPHED BY MICHAEL BECKER

parents going through the school selection process.


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MARCH/ APRIL 2020 Meet 10 teens to watch in our annual “Faces of the Future” feature. For more, go to page 22.


Screen Time AN EXPERT WEIGHS IN WITH SOME TIPS AND PRACTICES TO KEEP THE SOCIAL MEDIA EXPERIENCE SAFE FOR KIDS. Illustrated by Yasmine Kahsai

Monitoring a child’s social media experience and trying to

Children need to understand that privacy settings don’t

keep it safe is one of our biggest challenges as parents. For

always keep things genuinely private. Anything they share

our annual KIDS issue, VB editor Linda Grasso interviews

online will become a part of their digital footprint forever.

Nick Chernoff of Safer Schools Together, an organization aimed at promoting safety through the development of

SO IDEALLY, IT IS AN ONGOING CONVERSATION.

policy, protocols and programs..

Yes, remaining approachable could be the difference between whether they decide to come to you when issues or

WHAT’S A HEALTHY AMOUNT OF TIME FOR KIDS TO

uncomfortable situations arise, or go to their peers instead.

SPEND ON ELECTRONIC DEVICES? According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, for tod-

HOW CAN A PARENT PREVENT THEIR KID FROM GOING

dlers younger than 18–24 months, digital media should be

TO INAPPROPRIATE WEBSITES?

avoided other than video chatting. For preschool children

There is no absolute way. Parents can only keep the lines

(ages 2–5), it suggests limiting screen use to just one hour

of communication open, monitor what their kids are doing

a day of high-quality programming. For older children, en-

and always be there to answer their questions.

force moderation and balance instead of eternal prohibition.

Some measures can be put in place to ensure you minimize your child’s exposure. Especially for younger children,

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WHEN SHOULD KIDS BEGIN USING SOCIAL MEDIA?

we suggest parental monitoring apps that can help restrict

Social media apps generally state that you must be at least

specific apps from downloading. Some of these apps also

13 to join. Check the rules for each platform before letting

give you the ability to monitor incoming messages and

your child participate. Parents might consider other fac-

calls. At home, you can set up content blockers to restrict

tors. Ask yourself if your child is mentally ready.

access on your Wi-Fi.

WHAT FACTORS SHOULD PARENTS CONSIDER BEFORE

ARE THERE ANY CHILD-FRIENDLY SOCIAL

ALLOWING A CHILD TO USE SOCIAL MEDIA?

MEDIA OUTLETS?

Discuss the permanence of the things you post on the in-

No. Nearly all sites only allow children age 13 and over.

ternet and inappropriate sharing of images and or videos.

When you dive into the online world of social media, you’re

Share with them where to go to report worrisome content.

ultimately exposed to potential non-child-friendly content.

The reality is that their digital reputation and how they

The best place to start is by doing your homework. Down-

choose to represent themselves online is being evaluated and

load the apps first and play around with them. If your child

assessed by future employers and admissions departments.

already has the app or game, ask them to teach you about it.


WHAT ARE THE SOCIAL MEDIA OUTLETS THAT WE

can come to you with anything. Remember, they are using

WANT OUR KIDS TO STAY AWAY FROM?

your device, and you can take it away anytime you want.

The apps that generate the most negative feedback are those where the sole intention is to remain anonymous

WHAT HAVE WE LEARNED ABOUT CHILDREN AND

while providing strangers or friends feedback on how you

INTERNET USAGE? WHAT ARE THE LONG-TERM

feel about them. These include Whisper, After School, Tel-

EFFECTS OF KIDS BEING PLUGGED IN ALL THE TIME?

lonym, Lipsi and ASKfm.

Current studies show that the brains of children ages 3–5 years old who have more than an hour of screen time a day

WHAT DO YOU THINK OF SNAPCHAT AND TIKTOK,

had lower levels of development in the brain’s white mat-

WHICH SEEM TO BE TARGETED AT CHILDREN?

ter—the area of the brain involved with the development

The most significant danger with these apps is the over-

of language, literacy and cognitive skills.

sharing of personal information. Children will often put information such as the school they attend and their age in their bios, along with links to their other social media profiles. Even videos taken at home or in bedrooms can give away more information than we realize. What can be seen on the walls can give someone intimate knowledge about a child that can be used to exploit them. Parents need to be aware of the Snap Map feature in Snapchat that allows you to view on a map where your friends are right now. You can see exactly where they are and what they are doing. It is important for children to only connect online with the people that they know in person. Again, maintain an open line of communication; know your child’s passwords, and do spot-checks to help them avoid falling into such situations. HOW CAN A PARENT EFFECTIVELY MONITOR THEIR

“THERE COULD BE CORRELATIONS BETWEEN SCREEN TIME AND SELF-ESTEEM DURING PREADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT.” According to studies published by NYU, the amount of

CHILD ON SOCIAL MEDIA?

time spent in front of a screen during childhood and ado-

There is no foolproof way. We suggest you start the con-

lescence can be an alarmingly accurate predictor of obesity

versation about positive online use as early as you can. We

later in life. It has also been shown to affect sleep duration

have found that parents who are too strict and ultimately

and quality, two crucial factors for developing minds.

deny their child social media will eventually find their children have used a friend’s device behind their back. Set ground rules from day one. Talk about the positives

The study also found that when screen leisure time replaces face-to-face interaction, it inhibits children’s emotional development and that there could be correla-

and negatives of things they may see online. Discuss the

tions between screen time and self-esteem during preado-

sharing of personal information and how easy it is for people

lescent development. Researchers found that measures of

to pretend they are someone else online. Most importantly,

all screen time were negatively correlated with self-esteem

let your child know you love and care for them and that they

in preteens, particularly in female participants. ■

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s e s a c w o h S n g i s e D g n i r Sp ! g n i m o c ar e

For more information, contact our Marketing Manager at kimberly@goldenstate.is


faces of the future MEET 10 VALLEY TEENAGERS WHO ARE EXCELLING AND ACCOMPLISHING IN ASTOUNDING WAYS. FROM STEM TO THE SOCCER FIELD TO THE STAGE, THEY ARE PUSHING THEMSELVES TO REMARKABLE LEVELS —AND WE CAN’T WAIT TO SEE WHAT THEY’LL DO NEXT. Photographed by Michael Becker


OLIVER SALVATERRA, 16 MILKEN COMMUNITY HIGH SCHOOL With all AP courses except Hebrew, and a 4.0 GPA, Oliver Salvaterra’s academic credentials are beyond dispute. But he is also known on the Milken campus as a guy who never gives up and who regularly demonstrates kindness and compassion. Oliver led the Great Minds Robotics (club) team to first place in California two years in a row. The team has also won fourth and fifth place in the VEX Robotics World Championship competition in Kentucky. At one point, in the VEX IQ Challenge competition, his team’s robot broke down. Most students would have been overwhelmed by disappointment and simply walked away. Not Oliver. He calmly put the robot back together, allowing his team not only to finish, but place fourth. He is a member of both the Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth (CTY) program for gifted children and Mensa, the high-IQ society. PROUDEST ACCOMPLISHMENT The VEX World Championships. I was thinking I’m at the vanguard of this kind of building competition and I know what I’m doing and I’m good at it. SUPERPOWER My ability to recognize patterns and remember things—essentially my memory—and my analytical mind. VISION FOR THE FUTURE I want to be CEO of my own biomedical engineering company.


Xxxxxxx xxxxxxx xxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

ALEXANDRA “SASHA” STERN, 18 LOUISVILLE HIGH SCHOOL

xxxxxxx xxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxxx x xxx xxxx xx x x xxxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxx x x xx

Sasha Stern enrolled in Latin ballroom and

xxxxxxx xxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxxx

gymnastics classes at the age of 5 and excelled

x xxx xxxx xx x x xxxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxx x x xxxx

at both. But at 11, she decided to concentrate

xxxxxxx xxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxxx

on dance. Smart move.

x xxx xxxx xx x x xxxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxx x x xxxx

In 2018 Sasha was the world champion in

xxxxxxx xxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxxx

the youth Latin ballroom category, and in 2019

x xxx xxxx xx x x xxxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxx x x xxxx

she placed third in the amateur category. She

xxxxxxx xxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxxx

also has a first-place trophy from competing

x xxx xxxx xx x x xxxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxx x x xxxx

in the Junior Olympic Games.

xxxxxxx xxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxxx x xxx xxxx xx x x xxxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxx x x xxxx xxx xxxx xxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxxx x xxx xxxx xx x x xxxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxx x x xxxx xxxxxxx xxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxxx x xxx xxxx

Although she practices after school some 15 to 20 hours a week, Sasha still manages to take four AP courses, has a weighted GPA of 4.5 and is a member of the National Honor Society. When not dancing, Sasha acts as an ambas-

xx x x xxxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxx x x xxxx xxxxxxx xxx

sador for the RIDE Foundation’s Dance for

x x x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxxx x xxx xxxx xx x

Freedom, an organization combating human

x xxxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxx x x xxxx xxxxxxx xxx x x

trafficking. She is also a member of Education

x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxxx x xxx xxxx xx x x

Rocks, an organization that connects U.S.

xxxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxx x x xxxx xxxxxxx xxx x x x

children with those in developing nations to

xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxxx x xxx xxxx xx x x xxxx

assist with educational costs.

x x x xxxxxxxx x xxx x x xxxx xx ■ ■ SUPERPOWER My determination. I always want to prove to myself that I can do something. VISION FOR THE FUTURE My goal has always been to go into law. But I’ll always dance. GRATITUDE I feel super grateful to my mom and my coaches of the past 12 years from the Hollywood Academy of Dance—all of whom have taken a hand in raising me.

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DANIEL KHELBS, 18 VIEWPOINT SCHOOL

PROUDEST ACCOMPLISHMENT I’ve inspired some of the younger students who have seen me perform at Viewpoint to play cello. I love that.

Described by his counselor as “the most dynamic student of my college counseling career,” Daniel Khelbs is a critical

SUPERPOWER

thinker, an athlete and a student who truly loves learning.

My ability to get really engaged—almost obsessed—with

With a weighted GPA of 4.6, and the recipient of numerous awards and honor society inductions, Daniel is

something. I don’t question whether I should do something, but how I can make time to thoroughly learn it.

known around campus as a naturally inquisitive, positive and kindhearted guy. He is also the principal cellist of the Conejo Valley Youth Orchestra as well as the Viewpoint School Orchestra. Over the summers he has dived into research on deep brain stimulation as a treatment for people suffering from neurological disorders, and he is co-authoring a journal article on his findings.

VISION FOR THE FUTURE I see myself someday as the founder/CEO of my own tech start-up, maybe in green energy.


CHRISTOPHER KASSABIAN, 18 SIERRA CANYON SCHOOL

KAILAN MACKEY, 17 VIEWPOINT SCHOOL

Christopher Kassabian’s academic credentials

In her six years at Viewpoint School, KaiLan

are impressive. He has a weighted GPA of 4.5,

Mackey has won every award—not just those

has been inducted into the Cum Laude Society

voted on by the faculty—but also by the

(top 10 students in the class), and he’s the re-

students. With perfect SAT scores and early

cipient of the Wesleyan Book Award, awarded

admission acceptance by Harvard, KaiLan has

by the faculty for achievement in course of

demonstrated focus, tenacity and drive.

study, demonstration of independent thought and creative thinking. And then there’s his creative side. He is an

Although she is known on campus for being humble and even-keeled, KaiLan is fierce when it comes to playing soccer. She is start-

accomplished photographer who likes to shoot

ing forward for the LA Breakers (club) team,

architecture and outdoor spaces. He sells his

and this past season she qualified for the ECNL

photos from his website as works of art.

Champions League National Playoffs.

A dedicated volunteer, the senior has re-

At Viewpoint, KaiLan is co-captain of the

ceived the Presidential Service Award every year

girls’ varsity soccer team, which won the CIF

of high school. On Saturdays he donates his

Division Championship 2017 and Gold Coast

time to teach at an Armenian school, and on

League in both 2017 and 2018. KaiLan was the

Sundays he works a local farmers market where

recipient of the Gold Coast League MVP award

proceeds go to the nonprofit One Generation.

this past season.

PROUDEST ACCOMPLISHMENT

PROUDEST ACCOMPLISHMENT

I went to Ferrahian High School until third

That I’ve been able to try a lot of things. I’m

grade and I volunteer there to help teach

in the orchestra and I do AP sculpture. I’m

Armenian culture. I think it’s important to

not amazing at either but I’m proud that I’ve

know where you come from and how you can

taken the time to try things that I enjoy doing.

move forward. SUPERPOWER SUPERPOWER

I don’t get stressed too easily. My parents

Time management. Having a structure and

have kept me grounded, which is one of the

allotting time for different things and sticking

things that motivates and reassures me.

to my schedule. VISION FOR THE FUTURE

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VISION FOR THE FUTURE

I applied to Harvard as an undecided major. I

I’d like to study architecture, and someday

don’t see college as a way to have an interest-

create spaces in hospitality design—hotels

ing career. It’s more about learning how to

and restaurants.

learn—the sheer value of it.


ALYSSA WAGNER, 17 THE BUCKLEY SCHOOL Alyssa Wagner has always had a passion for knowledge. At age 4 she could read off all the countries on a map and at 6 she could recite the names of all the U.S. presidents. She started taking Mandarin in sixth grade and is now fully conversant. Not many were surprised when she was accepted for early admission at Harvard University. But she’s more than a brainiac. At Buckley, she is editor-in-chief of the yearbook and captain of the girls’ varsity tennis team. As a doubles player she has won CIF First Team All-League for the past four years. And she is a passionate activist. She founded and is president of Buckley’s Black Student Union and she is a student leader in Buckley’s Social Justice Symposia circuit. In addition, Alyssa is a member of the National Charity League. PROUDEST ACCOMPLISHMENT Being on the yearbook staff. It has been the most transformative experience of my life— teaching me about graphic design and how to collaborate. SUPERPOWER Knowing which ball to drop. Author Nora Roberts once said that there are plastic and glass ones. Knowing how to distinguish them is the key to prioritization. VISION FOR THE FUTURE To be a foreign service officer for U.S. embassies—getting to see the world while also helping others.


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EMMA BLANKSTEIN, 15 OAKWOOD SCHOOL Emma Blankstein has made a name for herself on Oakwood’s campus as an activist and educator. She has immersed herself into improving Oakwood’s carbon footprint by helping to put a long-term sustainability plan in place. Her accomplishments include revamping the hot lunch program to create less nonrecyclable waste, eliminating single-use plastic, incentivizing ride-sharing and use of electric vehicles, and adding more native plants to offset carbon. She is a member of the teen board at the Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust and she has made two short films on survivors. One of them, Many Angels, was selected for the Los Angeles Jewish Film Festival last year. Emma is also a youth advisory board member for an Oakwood student-founded nonprofit called The Pad Project, advocating for accessible, affordable menstrual products around the world. PROUDEST ACCOMPLISHMENT The film I did with 87-year-old Holocaust survivor Dorothy Greenstein—having her know that she was able to tell her story to a wider audience and that that will exist forever. SUPERPOWER I go all in on everything I do. I never do something 50%. SOMETHING ELSE I don’t do social media. Instead of watching people do things, I’d rather be out in the world doing them myself.


JATER WEBB, 17 CHAMINADE COLLEGE PREPARATORY

Lead Actor Finalist, and was the recipient of the National

When Jater Webb was a toddler, his parents would take

ing providing background vocals for a recording with Katy

him out for a night out at the Hollywood Bowl with a

Perry Tour. He has also sung with Musical Theater LA at

big bag of kiddie snacks and toys. Not necessary. All

Walt Disney Concert Hall.

Youth Arts Award for Supporting Actor in a Musical. In addition, Jater has recorded professionally, includ-

Jater wanted to do was sit at the edge of his seat, fixed on the performance. At 5, he got a role in a local theater

SUPERPOWER

production—and was forever hooked on dancing, sing-

I have a drive to get everything done and to create some-

ing and acting.

thing true and important.

As a member of the Chaminade Players, Jater has developed his craft to an elite level. Out of 7,000 ap-

VISION FOR THE FUTURE

plicants, he was named a winner of the 2020 National

I’d like to be directing, acting, writing in New York.

YoungArts Foundation honor for Excellence in Theater. He was flown to Miami for a week of master classes with

SOMETHING PEOPLE DON’T KNOW ABOUT ME

theater professionals.

I’m an avid outdoorsman. I’ve climbed four of the tallest

In 2019, he was recognized as a Jerry Herman Awards

peaks in California and hiked Machu Picchu in Peru.


AMANDA HOGAN, 17 VIEWPOINT SCHOOL

Amanda’s indisputable passion, though, is gardening. She has developed her own blog, GreenGirlGrow, with a mission “to empower girls through STEM and plants.”

An academic powerhouse, Amanda Hogan has taken 19 AP/Honors classes, 15 classes in STEM, and accelerated

SUPERPOWER

classes in math and English. She is also a member of

My speed. When I put on my spikes, I feel

three honor societies.

absolutely unstoppable!

It’s no surprise that she feels at home in a university lab. With her calm, approachable demeanor, Amanda has

HIDDEN TALENT

done intern research programs at Johns Hopkins, Duke,

I’m really into watercolor painting—and it’s so relaxing.

the University of Pennsylvania and UC San Diego, successfully navigating advanced-level genetics, nanotech-

PROUDEST ACCOMPLISHMENT

nology and biotechnology.

Setting up a Girls in STEM program at the Guadalupe

As captain of Viewpoint’s varsity track and cross country teams, Amanda has led her team to the CIF state finals in each sport. She is also an accomplished pianist and fouryear participant in Viewpoint’s Honors String Orchestra.

Community Services Center in Canoga Park. It’s really awesome to see these young girls so excited about science.


SAVEA KAGAN, 17 LOS ANGELES COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL FOR THE ARTS With her mom owning Degas Dance Studio in Encino, it was natural when Savea Kagan started dancing at 7. She had no idea, however, that dance would become the driving force of her life. The contemporary dancer (mix of jazz and ballet) and accomplished choreographer rises at 5 a.m. every morning to make the hourand-a-half drive from her Northridge home to downtown LA to attend LACHSA. After school she trains, not arriving home until 9 p.m. Known for her dynamic turns, sky-high extension and impressive strength and flexibility, Savea recently competed in the Youth America Grand Prix international competition, qualifying for the finals to be held in New York City in April. In the 2019 Grand Prix competition, Savea placed 1st in the contemporary dance and choreographed her performance. She was also chosen this year as a finalist in the elite YoungArts program, traveling to Miami for a week of intensive workshops. PROUDEST ACCOMPLISHMENT Transitioning from student to teacher and being able to teach younger generations to dance. SUPERPOWER My love of connecting with people. When choreographing, I’m not thinking about myself or even the dancers. I’m thinking about the message I want people to hear. VISION FOR THE FUTURE To travel in Europe as part of a professional dance company like Nederlands Dans Theater or Body Traffic. ■

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

PREPARING MINDS & HEARTS OAKS CHRISTIAN CELEBRATES ITS 20TH ANNIVERSARY WITH THE LAUNCH OF A NEW RESIDENTIAL BOARDING FACILITY, THREE ELITE INSTITUTES AND A MODERN IDEA LAB. PHOTOGRAPHED BY SHANE O’DONNELL

“P

The building—with three modern kitchens,

reparing Minds for Leadership and

new state-of-the-art dorm welcomed 41

Hearts for Service” isn’t just a slogan

students as its very first residents in August—

fitness room, lounge areas, computer study

at Oaks Christian School in Westlake

students from the United States

areas and top-notch dorm rooms—includes

Village. It is the school’s guiding prin-

as well as Indonesia, China, Ghana, Vietnam

gender-specific dormitory floors, a high-tech

and Brazil.

security system, movement and game rooms,

ciple, as it strives to shape the next generation of students for service as well as leadership. The goal of preparing students’ minds and

“I was nervous about coming here, but I am very happy here now,” shares Anna, a student

and a chapel. But beyond the bells and whistles, the

hearts is at the forefront of recent accom-

from Brazil. “The school is really welcoming,

residential boarding program provides a

plishments at the college preparatory school,

and the dorm parents are amazing. The fac-

unique opportunity for Oaks Christian to live

which serves grades 5–12 on its 25-acre

ulty and staff made me feel like they wanted

out its mission.

campus. This year Oaks Christian continues

to get to know me—not just as a student but

“This is also an opportunity for us to do life

to break new ground as it adds new residen-

as a person. Being in the dorm has already

on a deeper level than we can on the main

tial student boarding, a modern IDEA Lab

taught me a lot about being independent and

campus,” says Black. “We are going to be

and three elite institutes that rival college-

engaging with people.”

able to take students living in this building and

level programs. Oaks Christian School celebrates its 20th

Plans for the residential facility were spearheaded by OCS vice president and chief

engage them on a much deeper level—with each other as well as faculty and staff.” This phase features four family suites and

anniversary this year and has experienced

financial officer Kris Thabit—an original OCS

extraordinary growth and accomplishment

board member who was also instrumental

will eventually house 68 students. Phase 2,

in just two decades. Not only is the school an

20 years ago in finding the present location

which was recently approved by the school’s

athletic powerhouse, it also boasts impres-

for the school’s main campus. The residential

board of trustees and will be completed in fall

sive artistic and academic accomplishments.

program makes Oaks Christian one of the few

2021, will have a capacity of 152 students and

Graduates are admitted to top-tier universi-

national Christian secondary schools to offer

10 family suites.

ties every year.

both a day and boarding option. “No doubt, this is a milestone for the

GROUNDBREAKING PATHWAYS

A PLACE CALLED HOME

school—a brand-new building and a new

Another vanguard moment for Oaks

The culmination of a vision three years in the

place for student life to happen,” says head of

Christian is the launch of its three

planning, a new residential life building was

school Rob Black. “As I walk in here and see

ground-breaking institutes that will prepare

officially opened last spring. Representing

the smiles of the students, I know this will have

students for the 21st century: the Institute of

Phase 1 of the school’s housing project, the

a tremendous impact on their lives.”

Global Leadership, the Institute of Arts and

34

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Innovation, and the Institute of Engineering.

science. The Institute of Global Leadership

Each institute features real-world internships,

centers on finance, law, human behavior,

guest lectures and master classes by industry

global studies and entrepreneurship.

experts, outside-the-classroom educational opportunities and a capstone project com-

INNOVATIVE IDEAS

pleted in a student’s senior year.

Taking the school’s engineering curriculum to

The Institute of Arts and Innovation fea-

a new level is a brand-new IDEA (Innovation,

tures pathways for music production, vocal

Design, Engineering and Aeronautics) Lab—a

performance, songwriting and filmmak-

10,000-square-foot facility that gives students

ing. Dance and photography pathways

a jump-start on their STEM career paths.

are scheduled for fall 2020. The Institute of

The central hub of this new space is the

Engineering focuses on pathways in rock-

4,000-square-foot fabrication lab, housing

etry/aerospace, robotics, mechanical engi-

metal and wood fabrication machines, 3D

neering, electrical engineering and computer

printers and a variety of other useful tools

“NO DOUBT, THIS IS A MILESTONE FOR THE SCHOOL— A BRAND-NEW BUILDING AND A NEW PLACE FOR STUDENT LIFE TO HAPPEN.” |

35


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

typically reserved for college fabrication labs or industrial labs. The IDEA Lab includes five classrooms: physics, robotics, electrical engineering, computer science and a flex classroom. The facility also includes a reception area, conference room and faculty core room. “Coupled with our amazing faculty, this lab will provide our students with skills and talents that involve 21st-century critical thinking, a curious and innovative spirit, grit, collaboration and strong character,� says associate head of school for academics Dr. Matt Northrop. Nurturing students and developing their potential has always been the mission of Oaks Christian faculty and staff. The school is positioned now more than ever to continue to excel at this goal, thanks to the innovation of these new facilities and programs.

OAKS CHRISTIAN SCHOOL 31749 LA TIENDA DRIVE WESTLAKE VILLAGE 818-575-9900 OAKSCHRISTIAN.ORG

36

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Room For Two ONE OF THE RARE BOUTIQUES TO FLOURISH IN THE VALLEY, SOTO HEADS INTO ITS 15TH YEAR WITH A SPLASHY NEW OUTPOST IN WOODLAND HILLS. Written by Linda Grasso | Photographed by Tameka Jacobs

When Jodi Perlman and Pam Frank opened their first

merchandise aimed at tweens and juniors. But she

retail was in the dumps. “People were like, ‘You are

quickly spotted an opportunity. “Mothers would come

crazy to open a store right now.’ But it was hard to find a

in with their daughters and they wanted to shop, too.

boutique in the Valley where you could get old-fashioned

So I started including items that moms would like, and

customer service with good prices. We thought we had an

it caught on.” Pam, who has three daughters, describes

innovative idea,” Pam shares.

their clientele as “everyone from 16-year-olds to

Turns out she was right. That first Soto (which stands

mothers-in-law in their 70s.” In particular, she loves

for south of Topanga) was an overnight hit, and five more

well-done knockoffs. “We offer items based on value.

stores across the Valley followed, including Soto Lifestyle,

If I find something that looks like it could be a lot more

an offshoot in which they took on a partner. Today Soto

money, then it’s a great Soto item.”

has more than 50 employees. The women, close friends and both with retail backgrounds, felt their talents complemented each other. “Pam loves to buy, and I love to sell. We are the puzzle that fits together,” Jodi explains. This past fall the duo made their most ambitious move

with a lot of color. Think pink, blush and pastels.” Over the past 15 years, the landscape has changed. Jodi says, “We’ve both watched our own kids get older and our younger clients grow up. Some are now coming in with their daughters. But for Pam and me, the experience

Topanga Canyon (Soto and Soto Lifestyle) and reopening

has stayed much the same.

Valley Country Market shopping center. With high ceilings and a light-filled, airy vibe, the new stores have a combined square footage of 2,800 feet and offer everything from knockoff Golden Goose sneakers (instead of $500-600, they’re $100-150) to vintage, oversize pillows.

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For spring, Pam says the stores will carry “a lot of big, puffy shoulders, fitted bodies, romantic skirts, and prints

in a decade, closing the side-by-side original stores on more expansive versions in Woodland Hills at the new

38

When they first started out, Pam set her sights on

Soto boutique on Topanga Canyon Boulevard in 2006,

“We love it now as much as we did the day we signed our first lease in 2006.” ■


hoop dreams A TALENTED TRIO OF FEMALE BASKETBALL PLAYERS PUTS SIERRA CANYON SCHOOL IN THE NATIONAL SPOTLIGHT, INSPIRING YOUNG PLAYERS ACROSS THE VALLEY—AND BEYOND. Written by Karen Jordan | Photographed by Beau Ryan


It is a Monday afternoon, and the

The Sierra Canyon Trailblazers are dribbling toward a

athletic complex at Chatsworth’s

strong finish with hopes of another championship. As this

Sierra Canyon School is teeming with

issue was going to press in March, they were headed to

excitement. Students mill around

the state playoffs. However, the star players have already achieved some-

outside as well as inside, where the

thing of a victory this year. Ashley has committed to the

screeching of basketball players’

University of Texas. Alexis is headed for Boise State, and

sneakers can be heard sliding across the gymnasium floor.

Vanessa will attend Duke in the fall. The three players, all of whom received full scholarships, credit not just their work ethic but also their camaraderie. “I think it’s a very great dynamic when you have

Whether in practice or come game time, the Sierra

whose father is the head coach of the Sierra Canyon boys’

while simultaneously always having each other’s backs.

team and whose mother coaches Pierce College women’s

This is especially true for a trio of the team’s

work. Anytime you walk into the gym, you’ll probably

Ashley Chevalier, guard/forward Alexis Mark and guard

find one of us in there doing some type of workout. When

Vanessa DeJesus.

you have somebody on your team that you know is put-

Sierra Canyon. The team has won four state championships in the last seven years including one in 2019, and

ting in the same amount of work or even more work as you, it’s very comforting and you don’t feel alone.” “Most coaches can’t say that their best players are

is enjoying unprecedented success this year. “I would say

their hardest workers,” Alicia points out. “With these

it’s my most talented group of girls and probably one of

girls, all three of them are the hardest workers on the

my smartest group of girls in terms of their basketball

team, and it’s hands down.”

IQ and how well they do in the classroom,” coach Alicia Komaki says of the trio. The team is currently ranked as one of the top five

While she says her team is more talented than teams in previous years and is ranked nationally, the stakes have gotten higher. “This is the toughest California has ever

teams in the nation, according to ESPN and MaxPreps,

been, so we were open division champions last year, state

and began the current season as #1 in the state rankings,

champions last year, and this team’s even more talented,

according to Cal-Hi Sports.

but it’s even harder to win now.”

“We’re all talented, but we also play with heart and

Another challenge this year: the sudden deaths of Kobe

play with a purpose,” Alexis Mark says. “In practices,

Bryant, his daughter Gianna and seven others in a heli-

we’re always challenging each other, and then in games

copter crash in January. The tragedy weighed heavily on

we sacrifice a lot for each other. We’re very unselfish, and

the team, which had a game the next day.

we just play with one another.”

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basketball. “You don’t ever have to force us to get extra

standout players, all of whom are seniors: point guard

Together they’ve proved to be quite the dream team for

42

three people who work as hard as we do,” says Ashley,

Canyon girls’ basketball team is all about competing,

“It was just really hard to play,” Vanessa recalls. “We


Ashley Chevalier

all talked about it, and we knew Kobe wouldn’t want us to be down or anything. He’d want us to just play with respect and play with love. It was really hard, but we all supported each other and had each other’s backs.” Vanessa especially felt a close connection because the trio had an opportunity to meet the basketball legend at a book signing for his book, The Wizenard Series: Training Camp, and she also worked at his Mamba Sports Academy in Newbury Park last summer, where she met Kobe and his 13-year-old daughter.

Vanessa DeJesus

“He impacted all of us, and I think what he did for women’s sports was just the beginning,” she says. While the trio may just be starting out in their own basketball careers, the three players have carved out something of a reputation among younger players. “They’ll come up to some of us after the games and ask for pictures,” Ashley says of the team’s young fans. “It’s kind of like, wow. They’re already looking up to you at this point and there’s so much more to be done in terms of our career and who we are as basketball players.” All three are toying with the possibility of playing in the WNBA someday, but they aren’t limiting themselves. Vanessa is aiming for a career in medicine; Alexis and Ashley are interested in broadcasting. Regardless of what endeavor they pursue, their coach is convinced they can handle whatever comes their way. “I’m pleasantly surprised at how well they’ve matured over the course of four years, how well they’ve handled success for four years, because those are really all hard things to do—not to get a big head when you’re getting

Alexis Mark

media attention, or if you’re ranked,” Alicia says. “It’s really hard to handle at a young age. I’m so impressed with who they are as people and that they’ve handled that really, really well.” ■

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43


KIDS CAMPS & SUMMER PROGRAMS CAMP

TYPE

GENDER

AGES

LO C AT I O N

CAMP FUNTIME

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TEAM G TENNIS

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Satellite Group: Ages 7 to 11; High Performance: Ages 12+

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M/F

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Football, basketball, lacrosse, soccer, softball, cheer, dance, tennis, volleyball, waterpolo 30+ activities including 2 pools, go karts, bungee jumping, and 10 water slides

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oakssportscamps.com

(818) 575-9155

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(818) 882-8121

viewpoint.org/summer

(818) 591-6591

westmarkschool.org/ SummerSMARTS

(818) 986-5045

stratfordschools.com/summer

AA: (626) 794-1000 LA: (323) 962-3075 MV: (949) 458-1776 WLA: (424) 293-3783

teamGtennis.com

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buckley.org/summercamp

(818) 783-1610

valleytrails.com

(818) 345-3002 (661) 257-0266

wevillage.com

(818) 233-8218

wesleyschool.org/extracurricular/summer-camp

(818) 508-4542

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323-655-9232


KIDS CAMPS & SUMMER PROGRAMS

SUMMER S.M.A.R.T.S. COLLEGE PREP PROGRAM open to both westmark and nonwestmark students in grades 10-12

MA S SUMMER ACADEMIC PROGRAM

June 29 – July 24

8:00 am-12:30 pm grAdes 2-12 Small class sizes Reading Writing Math Electives

MATH FOUNDATIONS

Students further develop and strengthen their algebraic and math foundation skills.

WRITERS WORKSHOP

Students further develop and strengthen their written expression skills.

Individualized curriculum based on each student’s needs and learning profile

COLLEGE APPLICATION WORKSHOP

Students are guided through the Common Application including the personal narrative essay. Rising seniors looking for a scaffolded and strategic approach to completing the application should enroll in this workshop.

register Online www.westmarkschool.org/summersmarts


KIDS CAMPS & SUMMER PROGRAMS

SUMMER DAY CAMP June 15 - August 7 Ages 3-17 25+ Activities Field Trips Extended Care

creating lifelong memories since 1958!

OPen HOuse dAte April 19

10:00 am – 1:00 pm

register now www.campfuntime.org

(818) 789-8405 www.campfuntime.org @campfuntime

5461 Louise Avenue, Encino, CA 91316 (818) 986-5045 | www.westmarkschool.org

©2020 Westmark School. All Rights Reserved.


KIDS CAMPS & SUMMER PROGRAMS

THE BUCKLEY SCHOOL

JUNE 8–JULY 17, 2020 GRADES K–8

ART • DANCE • THEATRE ROBOTICS • BAKING … and much more!

WWW.BUCKLEY.ORG/SUMMERCAMP

Summer EXPLORE! EXPLORE! EXPLORE! @ Stratford EXCEL! EXCEL! EXCEL! ENGAGE! ENGAGE! ENGAGE! Stay Curious.

Stay Sharp.

Keep Discovering.

Discover where the Extraordinary begins Stratford School infuses its STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math) curriculum into an innovative and enriching summer camp experience for children in Preschool through Middle School.

Camp Sessions June 8 – August 7 Altadena

2046 Allen Avenue | (626) 794-1000

Los Angeles

1200 N. Cahuenga Blvd. | (323) 962-3075

West Los Angeles

2000 Stoner Avenue | (424) 293-2783

Sign-up Today! StratfordSchools.com/summer Our other Southern California campus Mission Viejo

48

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Preschool State Licenses: 198018949, 198018875, 197493889. Copyright © 2020 Stratford Schools, Inc.


KIDS CAMPS & SUMMER PROGRAMS

Sum

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MAKING OVER MOMMY WITH TWO RECENT PREGNANCIES AND A BRAND-NEW NURSING DEGREE, A BUSY VALLEY MOM SOUGHT HELP TO UP HER GAME—WITH STUNNING RESULTS. WRITTEN BY LAURA L. WATTS | PHOTOGRAPHED BY MATTHEW COOKE & TAMEKA JACOBS

W

A busy mom of two young children,

hen he was a young boy,

popular Mommy Makeover. He and his staff

Andrew Cohen would often

take time with each patient to listen to their

Linda had recently finished nursing school.

accompany his father, a

concerns and help them achieve their goals.

Unhappy with her appearance and the toll

general surgeon, on his

“Patients always tell us that they love coming

two pregnancies had taken on her body—a

weekend medical rounds. As a teen he had

to my office, and that is the best compliment

flabby tummy, droopy breasts and stretch

the opportunity to view his father perform a

of all! This is thanks to my staff—Jamie, Isabel

marks—she was feeling the burden of low

mastectomy surgery. “When the plastic

and Jill—who are involved in all aspects of

self-esteem. She asked around and heard

surgeon completed the surgery and made

each procedure and the healing process.”

about Dr. Cohen—and liked what she heard.

everything look beautiful, at that moment I

Linda, a recent patient, agrees. “I love Dr.

was hooked,” Dr. Cohen shares about how

Cohen!” she exclaims. “I’m eternally grateful

he chose his career as a board-certified

for his amazing work, his care and his staff. I

cosmetic and reconstructive plastic surgeon. Today Dr. Cohen specializes in breast surgery, body contouring, facial surgery and the

52

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At her initial consultation with the doctor, she knew she wanted him to be her surgeon. “His bedside manner was great, and his

was grateful that all the staff were comfort-

work was exactly what I was looking for,”

ing and gave me peace of mind with any

she shares. “I knew I could trust him with my

concerns I had.”

Mommy Makeover because he was extremely


S P E C I A L A D V E R T I S I N G S E C T I O N

I N G O O D H E A LT H

“FOR ANYONE OUT THERE WANTING TO GET A MOMMY MAKEOVER, I HIGHLY RECOMMEND YOU GO TO DR. COHEN.”

knowledgeable, and I could sense the passion he has for his work.” “She clearly had been wanting this surgery for quite some time, and it was just about finding the office and surgeon who was the right fit for her,” explains Dr. Cohen. “I’m glad she chose us to bring on the change she has been wanting.” The doctor and his team went above and beyond to prepare Linda for the procedure. “Dr. Cohen was always transparent with me,” she says. “He explained to me my expected results, how the surgery would go, how long it would be. He provided plenty of reading material and let me know that I could reach him or his staff any time if I had any questions or concerns.” Dr. Cohen’s comprehensive, holistic approach addresses the whole body—with the goal of achieving a natural look no mat-

friends and family. “I was very emotional;

expecting the process to be a lot tougher, but

ter what the procedure. “Surgery is just one

I was in disbelief for a little while initially.

my recovery is going great. For anyone out

component of our approach,” says the doctor,

I couldn’t believe I had a super nice, flat

there wanting to get a Mommy Makeover, I

who exercises daily and often runs 10K races,

tummy! I was so happy and excited.”

highly recommend you go to Dr. Cohen.”

half-marathons and sprint triathlons. “Food,

As it does for so many of Dr. Cohen’s

exercise and vitamins are part of the preop-

patients, the Mommy Makeover made a tre-

erative plan for all of my patients. All of these

mendous impact on Linda’s life. She no longer

factors play an equally important part in the

dreads shopping for new clothes or looking in

healing process. We have great nutrition and

the mirror, and her self-esteem has skyrock-

ANDREW T. COHEN, MD, FACS

exercise resources for our patients.”

eted. “I actually feel great about my body and

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Linda’s surgery went smoothly, and she was immediately in love with her results—proudly displaying her before-and-after photos to

Several months post-surgery, her praise for Dr. Cohen and his team is glowing. “I was

ANDREWCOHENMD.COM INSTAGRAM: @BEVERLYHILLSSURGEON |

53


Let’s Talk SOME FORWARD-THINKING STUDENTS LAUNCH A CONDOM COMPANY AIMED AT PROVOKING THOUGHTFUL CONVERSATION BEFORE MAKING A MOVE. Written by Heather David | Photographed by Shane O’Donnell

Talking about sex isn’t exactly in the comfort zone of

crystal clear. The students created the website and a short

most teenagers. Luca Wheeler, Charlotte Sedaka and Jed

promotional film themselves.

Siegel are exceptions. They want to talk about sex and

change how it should or shouldn’t be perceived, but in-

trio isn’t old enough to legally have sex, they’ve formed

stead just provoke the conversation,” explains Charlotte,

a condom company aimed at provoking conversation

who attends Viewpoint School.

among their peers. Luca came up with the idea for Condom with a Conver-

whether or not to have safe, consensual sex, the condoms

at the end of his freshman year of high school.

they’re sourcing are 100% FDA-approved. To kick off their endeavor, they’re selling the condoms

headlines were filled with accusations of sexual harassment

online and they’re donating 50,000 of them to college

and sexual assault against numerous high-profile people.

campuses across the United States.

“I just didn’t understand where everything stood in the

“Most will be going to fraternities, where there’s been

era of #MeToo,” says Luca, who attends Oakwood School.

problems with consent in the past. Our hope is to promote

“A lot of light was being shed on the negatives and con-

a new dialogue,” shares Jed, who also goes to Oakwood.

sequences of consent. Nobody was offering up a solution

While the three founders are having provocative dis-

or an explanation of how to go about it that makes every-

cussions about sex, they willingly share their own truth—

body comfortable and happy. I started doing research and

all are virgins.

realized that the best way to make everyone comfortable about what was happening was just by communicating.” He called up his two longtime friends, Charlotte and Jed, to suss out his idea. They liked it, and the trio joined

“I never thought it was something I would broadcast, but it felt personally important that people knew where I was coming from,” explains Luca. He adds, “Maybe people can understand our fears and

forces for Condom with a Conversation.To fund their

start having their own discussions. If I have to tell people

start-up, the high school juniors pitched friends and

I’m a virgin to do that, I’m OK with that.” ■

family and sold stake in the company. The condoms, with eye-catching packaging emblazoned with phrases like, YES?, LET’S TALK and ARE YOU GOOD? make the message

|

While the philosophy behind the company encourages people to have meaningful dialogue before deciding

sation after a meaningful talk with his grandma and mom It was the height of the #MeToo movement when the

54

“Our goal isn’t to change the definition of consent or

they want others to as well. Although under state law the


Charlotte Sedaka, Luca Wheeler and Jed Siegel


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THE SAUCE

Class Act A swanky new supper club with a well-pedigreed chef opens in Toluca Lake. More on the next page.


THE SAUCE

First Verse A MICHELIN-STAR CHEF PARTNERS WITH A GRAMMY AWARD-WINNING SOUND ENGINEER TO CREATE A NEW DESTINATION SUPPER CLUB IN TOLUCA LAKE. Written by Karen Young

You’d never guess it, but around the bend from Universal

at the touch of an iPad. The result: a buzzy ambiance that

Studios on a dimly lit stretch of Lankershim Boulevard lies a

permits conversation among patrons.

restaurant demonstrating culinary ingenuity and glamorous

Music-wise, Verse is developing an eclectic program

flair. Look for a single gold “V” against a blue exterior with

featuring live performances, curated playlists and surprise

a doorman in tow—you’ve arrived at Verse.

guests. Considering Manny has worked with such artists

After a four-year build-out, the space that formerly housed Firenze Osteria is unrecognizable. A shimmering

Helming the kitchen is chef Paul Shoemaker, whose

the other end: a grand bookcase that serves as the backdrop

fine-dining pedigree includes Providence, French Laundry

for live music. Well-spaced seating includes a plush ban-

and the former Bastide, where Paul earned a highly coveted

quette, a few high-tops, and wood tables of varying sizes

Michelin star. At Verse, the chef blends traditional classic

accompanied by jewel-toned velvet chairs.

French techniques with progressive methods such as liquid nitrogen, a process used to magically chill and creatively

partners. Overseeing the entire operation is general man-

enhance dishes. A private chef’s table in the kitchen with a

ager Rob Ciancimino (formerly at The Sayers Club), a hospi-

prix fixe menu for parties of 10 can be reserved.

tality veteran who circulates throughout the room greeting guests with genuine finesse. Manny Marroquin, a nine-time Grammy-winning sound

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Mars, you never know who might show up.

backlit bar sits at one end of the 140-seat dining room. On

The music-driven supper club is the brainchild of three

58

as Lizzo, Post Malone, John Mayer, Alicia Keys and Bruno

Known for combining savory and sweet ingredients into exciting flavor bombs, the chef plates his dishes beautifully and playfully without pretention. A complimentary amuse-

engineer who owns the adjacent Larrabee Studios, installed

bouche is brought to each table and may include his signature

the state-of-the-art fiber optics sound system whereby the

edible brown-butter “dime bag” filled with cocoa nibs, coco-

sound level in the room can be adjusted by management

nut and nuts accompanied by a wasabi pea-soy marshmallow,


or a petite olive oil panna cotta with a dab of caviar. Bite-size snacks include crispy salmon skin topped with cured salmon, citrus crème fraîche and smoked steelhead roe; skewered chorizo-and-squid “lollipops;” and deliciously stinky Époisses de Bourgogne cheese served on spoons and topped with honeycomb. Amberjack crudo is a standout cold starter marrying the sweetness of candy kumquats with pickled Fresno chili, while the big-eye tuna tartare tantalizes with pickled plum and avocado served in a jar. Among the hot starters, the Bouchot mussels with nduja (red pepper sausage) sauce is generous enough for sharing. The pork chop is succulent—sliced and served with green lentils and bacon, and topped with maple-whipped pumpkin butter. The perfectly seasoned beef tenderloin, prepared on a Josper Grill using almond wood, is spot-on tender. A 6-ounce Maine lobster tail majestically placed atop handmade bucatini is a decadent treat. Vegan options include a comforting warm grain salad. Among the whimsical desserts: carrot cake topped with carrot ice cream. The wine list, curated by the sommelier behind Augustine Wine Bar, features global varietals. Classic craft cocktails include theatrical presentations such as a Smoked Old Fashioned delivered tableside in a lantern, and absinthe on a bar cart. Verse marks another step forward for the growing culinary landscape in the Valley. It will be interesting to see how the menu and music calendar evolves, but in the meantime, it is destination dining worth the drive. ■

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59


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THE SAUCE

Fired Up NOHO’S PITFIRE PIZZA UNDERGOES A DRAMATIC EXPANSION, CREATING A SEAMLESS INDOOR/OUTDOOR EXPERIENCE AND TAKING “DINING IN” TO A NEW LEVEL. Written by Joshua Lurie

You might say that Pitfire Pizza has come full circle. The

marinated flank steak and rosy seared Pacific albacore loin,

trict in 1998 after Paul Hibler and his co-founder catered for

both dressed with chermoula, a smoky, chunky North Afri-

the blockbuster Titanic from a neighborhood commissary. Six

can sauce crafted with red peppers, cumin and garlic. Vivid

more SoCal outposts followed. Now his American Gonzo Food

“chips and dip” are more unexpected, letting customers dip

Corporation (also behind Westside hits like Superba Food

crispy beet chips and kale leaves in chive-showered onion

+ Bread and American Beauty) is reimagining the chain’s

dip. Bucatini highlights hearty, high-value pasta dishes,

concept, starting with its original NoHo location, which the

tossing thin, toothsome tubes with zesty tomato sauce and

company has transformed into a sun-soaked, fun-filled Cali-

braised chicken meatballs.

fornia beer garden with a more robust food program. “We are based around pizza, but we’re not an Italian

pizza, roasted fingerling potatoes with romesco, and pea

lin Leaver explains. They achieve that equilibrium by buying

toast with burrata. Their bountiful “farmers plate” entrée

seasonal ingredients and encouraging collaboration. “It’s a

packages a choice of three vegetable preparations. Architect Barbara Bestor’s eye-catching design stars a

Although pizza has generated solid business for the

sprawling, light-strung gravel patio and square bar backed

company, their philosophy discourages resting on laurels.

with Daniel Johnston’s iconic “Hi, How Are You” frog mu-

Collin says they are constantly refining the dough, sourcing

ral. Group-friendly picnic tables transition into a spacious

new flours and tweaking hydration levels. For the NoHo

70-seat dining room. The Pitfire 3.0 rebrand extends from

revamp, they invested in a dual-burner, rotating deck Marra

pizza boxes to uniforms and a new motto that graces the

Forni pizza oven that really impressed Collin, who is a cer-

dining room wall: “Pizza Forever.” A white-and-yellow-

tified pizzaiolo. He earned his credential through Vera Pizza

striped Superba Snacks + Coffee kiosk outside in front of the

Napoletana, an organization that holds pizzaiolos to strict

restaurant resembles a circus tent, but serves sandwiches,

Neapolitan standards. He says, “Everything you’d expect to

pastries, and caffeinated beverages for breakfast and lunch.

get from a wood-fired oven, this oven’s able to produce it.” Playful new pizzas include the PB&J, which may be the

An expanded craft beer program encourages lingering. So do family-friendly patio games like Ping-Pong, cornhole,

furthest thing possible from peanut butter and jelly. “The

and Jenga. “Doing food and friends and family is really im-

staff always gets pepperoni pizza with pineapple and jala-

portant to us,” Collin says. “We want to bring people out of

peños,” Collin says, so they added Hawaiian pizza. The final

their homes, to get away from DoorDash and delivery ser-

version sports thin-shaved, caramelized pineapple, savory

vice, so you can have a conversation with your family and

Canadian bacon, spicy jalapeños, mozzarella and tomato

sit around a table like this and enjoy the atmosphere.” ■

sauce on a pliable crust.

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Pitfire Pizza also runs seasonal specials. Spring has ushered in vibrant preparations like artichoke and spinach

restaurant, so we’re finding a balance,” corporate chef Col-

team effort at Pitfire,” he adds.

62

Other NoHo exclusives center on the grill, including

local, family-friendly chain got started in the NoHo Arts Dis-


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63


instruments of change A GROUP OF HISTORIC HOLOCAUST-ERA VIOLINS IS HELPING SPREAD THE MESSAGE OF “NEVER AGAIN” TO A NEW GENERATION IN THE VALLEY. Written by Anne M. Russell


If you talk to Holocaust survivors and

ing teachers prepare classroom content about the Holocaust

their families, it will inevitably come

suited for various grade levels, starting with elementary

up. It is by far their most pressing concern. As the passage of time silences the voices of Holocaust survivors, who will speak for them? Who will keep the

schoolers. The teachers then provide historical context for what the students will experience during the visit from the Violins of Hope team. Culminating in six daytime performances at the Soraya in March, the Violins of Hope school program will ultimately serve as many as 4,000 students from Valley, Glendale and

memory of the Third Reich’s atrocities

Compton schools. The school arts outreach is an annual

alive as a warning to future generations

effort, but, says Soraya education director Anthony Cantrell,

about the consequences of hate?

“This is the longest and most ambitious program we’ve ever run. And we’re hoping it’s the most impactful.”

The Weinstein family is hoping their family’s collection of historic violins will help fill that void. The Weinsteins’ ambi-

HOPE FOR THE FUTURE

tious program, known as Violins of Hope, features 87 violins,

On a sunny day in January, just three days shy of the 75th

violas and cellos that survived the Final Solution; many of

anniversary of the liberation of the Auschwitz-Birkenau

their owners did not. Sixty of the instruments are in playable

death camp in Poland, about 50 teens gather in the cavern-

condition. The three-generation family of luthiers—skilled

ous band room at Cleveland Charter High School in Reseda.

craftspeople who build and repair stringed instruments—still

Cantrell and the Soraya’s artist in residence, violinist Niv

run a shop in Tel Aviv, Israel. The shop was founded in 1938

Ashkenazi, are visiting. Ashkenazi carries with him one of the

by Moshe and Golda Weinstein after the couple emigrated

recovered violins, a beautiful instrument crafted in the early

from an increasingly hostile Eastern Europe.

1900s in what was then Yugoslavia. On its back: a shining

In March and April, California State University North-

Star of David inlaid in iridescent abalone shell. The violin’s

ridge’s performance center, the Soraya, will host three con-

previous owner escaped Nazi Germany to Israel, bringing the

certs featuring the best of the instruments. The first concert,

instrument with him where eventually it found its way into

on March 22, will be led by Los Angeles Jewish Symphony

the Weinsteins’ collection.

conductor and founder Noreen Green, and will feature soloist

The students sit silent and solemn as Cantrell and Ashke-

Lindsay Deutsch on one of the restored violins. “Hearing

nazi talk and play songs, including “Tradition” from Fiddler

music played on these violins will have a hugely emotional

on the Roof (which only a handful of students acknowledge

impact,” says the conductor of her concert, which will in-

having previously heard) and the true story of a Jewish boy’s

clude selections from the score of Schindler’s List. “But I don’t

heroism from the book Violins of Hope. Ashkenazi comple-

want people to only feel sad; I want them to say, ‘We’re alive.

ments Cantrell’s reading of the tale of how Ukrainian

We’re still here.’”

teenager Motele Schlein used his violin case to smuggle explosives into a Nazi officers’ club with a poignant composi-

EDUCATING THE NEXT GENERATION

tion by Julius Chajes, a Jewish composer who fled Austria for

At the same time, CSUN’s Soraya Arts Education Program

the U.S. in 1938.

is reaching thousands of local schoolchildren. The program

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At the end of the performance, Cantrell tells the students,

kicked off last summer with some 40 workshops for teachers

“You are the hope for the future to make sure those ideas

in conjunction with the Holocaust education nonprofit Facing

[of the Nazis] don’t take hold. Celebrate the idea that there’s

History and Ourselves. The workshops were aimed at help-

a humanity connecting you.” Some of the music students


After Shimon Krongold died during the Holocaust, a survivor brought Krongold’s instrument to his brother in Jerusalem. The violin and a picture of Shimon holding the instrument are the only items of Shimon’s legacy that survived the Holocaust.

Zvi Haftel, the first concertmaster of the Palestine Orchestra, later to become the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra. He was one of about 100 musicians gathered by Bronislav Huberman all over Europe in 1936 and brought to Palestine. Haftel’s violin is one of the best in the Violins of Hope collection.

“HEARING MUSIC PLAYED ON THESE VIOLINS WILL HAVE A HUGELY EMOTIONAL IMPACT… BUT I DON’T WANT PEOPLE TO ONLY FEEL SAD; I WANT THEM TO SAY, ‘WE’RE ALIVE. WE’RE STILL HERE.’”


VIolinist and Soraya artist in residence Niv Ashkenazi

come up to thank Ashkenazi, while others hurry on to their

found it was too painful a reminder of the Third Reich, and

next class. Did the words and music make an impression on

sold it to Moshe.

them? Music teacher Cameron Yassaman is certain that they

That owner’s experience is by no means unique. Says

did. “When the bell rings and nobody moves, that’s as pow-

Thor Steingraber, executive director of the Soraya, “Most of

erful as you can get. They were pretty locked in,” he says.

the people who escaped with their violins never played them

And that, in a nutshell, is the Weinsteins’ goal, as third-

again,” due to a complex mix of survivor’s guilt and bad

generation luthier Avshalom Weinstein explains: “I want

associations. Some owners owed their lives directly to their

people not to forget the stories and the people and our very,

instruments, since they survived Auschwitz by playing in one

very recent history.” Avshalom and his father, Amnon, still

of the Nazi-approved bands or orchestras there, even making

repair and restore violins and other stringed instruments

music to drown out the cries of victims in the gas chambers

in their Tel Aviv shop, although the extensive U.S. tour, of

at the demand of the camp guards.

which the LA visit is part, is taking up considerable amounts

What is it like to play an instrument connected to so much

of their time. Avshalom hopes that his son will follow the

tragedy? Ashkenazi, who has spent two and a half years with

family trade for a fourth generation, but says, “He’s only 6

his entrusted violin, says that there’s a give and take—that it

years old right now, so it’s going to take a while.”

isn’t only the artist who changes in response to the historic instrument, but that the instrument changes too. “There’s a

BEYOND THE CHORDS

different connection with this instrument,” he says thought-

Although grandfather Moshe was the one who began the

fully. “Constant playing keeps the violin alive. You hear the

collection of the historic violins, it was Avshalom’s father,

voice of the instrument open up. I try to put myself aside and

Amnon, who conceived the notion that the violins should

let the voice of the instrument come through.”

spread the message of “never again.” The very first violin

68

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Steingraber says that being aware of the violins’ history,

in the collection came from a Jewish refugee who could no

and hearing their voices, is “very powerful and very memo-

longer bear owning a German-made instrument emblazoned

rable. When you’re in a concert hall, there’s a collective reac-

with the name “Wagner.” Although the Wagner who crafted

tion, there’s a strong community bonding.” Adds Green, “I

the violin and Richard Wagner—Adolf Hitler’s favorite com-

always say Jewish music is the universal language. It hits you

poser and a vocal anti-Semite—were unrelated, its owner

in the kishkes; it hits you in the guts.” ■


Spreading Hope in the Valley—and Beyond THE SORAYA ON CSUN’S NORTHRIDGE CAMPUS WILL HOST THREE CONCERTS THAT FEATURE VIOLINS AND A CELLO FROM THE WEINSTEINS’ COLLECTION. VIOLINS WILL BE ON DISPLAY, AND AVSHALOM WEINSTEIN, GRANDSON OF MOSHE WEINSTEIN, WILL BE ON HAND TO TALK WITH ATTENDEES.

March 22 The Los Angeles Jewish Symphony, conducted by Noreen Green, featuring soloist Lindsay Deutsch. The repertoire includes John Williams’ “Schindler’s List Suite,” Ernest Bloch’s “Baal Shem Suite” and Sid Robinovitch’s “Suite for Klezmer Band and Orchestra.”

March 25 The Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Lahav Shani, featuring concertmaster Igor Gruppman on one of the historic violins. They will perform Ludwig van Beethoven’s “Piano Concerto No. 5 in E-flat Major, Op. 73” (aka the “Emperor Concerto”) and Bela Bartok’s “Concerto for Orchestra.”

April 5 The award-winning Jerusalem Quartet will perform Joseph Haydn’s “Op. 76, Quartet No. 2 in D Minor” (aka, “Fifths”), Dmitri Shostakovich’s “Quartet No. 9 in E-flat Major, Op. 117,” and Johannes Brahms’ “Quartet No. 1 in C Minor, Op. 51.” Some pieces will be performed on the instruments from Violins of Hope. The Los Angeles Violins of Hope tour includes performances at other SoCal venues with the New West Symphony, the Los Angeles Lawyers Philharmonic and the Long Beach Symphony. The Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust will display some of the violins with the stories of their owners. The exhibit opens March 18 with a musical performance at 7 p.m. and discussion by Avshalom Weinstein and Violins of Hope LA County chair Susan Reyto, a Holocaust survivor from Hungary. A CD, Niv Ashkenazi: Violins of Hope (Albany Records), will be available in late March. It features Ashkenazi playing works by composers who were affected by the Holocaust, including Julius Chajes.

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69


I N G O O D H E A LT H

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

THE HOSPITAL OF THE FUTURE PROVIDENCE AND CEDARS-SINAI EXPAND HEALTH CARE IN THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY. WRITTEN BY LAURA L. WATTS | PHOTOGRAPHED BY TIM SULLENS

P

rovidence St. Joseph Health has

patient experience and expanded specialty

Tarzana Medical Center and will offer

joined forces with Cedars-Sinai,

programs and services here in the Tarzana

expanded hospital services, as well as other

a distinguished academic medi-

community. Formerly known as Providence

specialty programs such as cancer, neurosci-

cal center, to create a center of

Tarzana Medical Center, the medical center’s

ences, orthopedics and women’s services.

high-quality medical care, exceptional

70

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new name will be Providence Cedars-Sinai

“This unique partnership brings together


S P E C I A L A D V E R T I S I N G S E C T I O N

I N G O O D H E A LT H

two mission-focused organizations that will

neonatal ICU, pediatric ICU and general

work together to build the hospital of the

pediatrics programs and will make leading

future on the Providence Tarzana campus

pediatric specialists available to patients.

and provide high-quality care close to

The senior leadership team at Providence

home,” says Erik G. Wexler, chief executive

Tarzana will remain, and Dale Surowitz will

of Providence St. Joseph Health Southern

continue to serve as chief executive. The

California. Providence St. Joseph Health is a

hospital will have a new fiduciary board with

national, not-for-profit Catholic health system

representatives from both Providence and

that includes 51 hospitals, 829 physician clin-

Cedars-Sinai, and several board subcommit-

ics, senior services and supportive housing

tees will review and oversee hospital areas

across seven states. The organization has 13

such as quality, finance and construction.

hospitals in Los Angeles, Orange and San Bernardino counties. By combining the resources and talent of

While Cedars-Sinai is a Jewish hospital, Providence Cedars-Sinai Tarzana Medical Center will retain its Catholic identity while

the two organizations, the partnership pro-

embracing the diversity of all faiths. The

vides access to high-quality care during every

hospital will continue to support patients by

phase of the healing process and enhances

offering services in both Jewish and Catholic

the continuum of care offered throughout the

faith traditions.

area. “Our joint vision is driven by a dedica-

As the medical center continues to

tion to provide residents of the San Fernando

embrace changes for the good of patients

Valley with convenient access to an expert

and the community, it will embark on and

community of physicians who deliver the

complete exciting new enhancements

highest-quality clinical care,” says Thomas

across the Tarzana campus—supported

M. Priselac, president and CEO of Cedars-

by both Providence and Cedars-Sinai.

Sinai, which is renowned for developing new

Redevelopment includes a new patient care

approaches to medical treatment, education

tower with all-private rooms, an expanded

and research. “We’re delighted that this part-

emergency department, new diagnostic and

nership will have such a meaningful impact

treatment services, and enhanced outpatient

on the health of our region.”

and ambulatory services. The upgrades are

Through the joint venture, Providence and

scheduled to be complete in two years, mak-

Cedars-Sinai will continue to operate as

ing the new hospital a destination medical

separate, independent health care organiza-

center for the area.

tions. Both will maintain their distinct identi-

The Reimagined Project will continue to

ties and respect one another’s philosophy of

raise funds for the new patient care tower. As

health care practices.

part of the joint venture, Cedars-Sinai also will

Providence will retain controlling interest

“WE’RE DELIGHTED THAT THIS PARTNERSHIP WILL HAVE SUCH A MEANINGFUL IMPACT ON THE HEALTH OF OUR REGION.”

invest in the Reimagined Project.

in the medical center and will have primary

“By early 2023, the Greater San Fernando

responsibility for operational oversight, sub-

Valley community will see the completion of

ject to input by Cedars-Sinai. The employ-

a best-in-class medical center campus,” says

ment of hospital staff who provide services on

Surowitz. “This is an exciting time as we usher

behalf of Providence Cedars-Sinai Tarzana

in a new era in health care for the communi-

PROVIDENCE CEDARS-SINAI

Medical Center will not be affected by the

ties we serve.”

TARZANA MEDICAL CENTER

joint venture, and there will be no change for

To support the Reimagined Project please

18321 CLARK STREET, TARZANA

the physicians on staff. Children’s Hospital Los

call the Foundation at 818-757-4344 or visit

818-881-0800

Angeles will continue to oversee the hospital

TarzanaReimagined.org.

PROVIDENCE.ORG/TARZANA |

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yours, mine, ours THE FAMILY OF THE ACTOR ED ASNER RUNS AN INNOVATIVE SUPPORT CENTER IN RESEDA, AIMED AT HELPING PEOPLE—AND THEIR FAMILIES—WITH THE CHALLENGES OF LIVING WITH SPECIAL NEEDS. Written by Karen Jordan Photographed by Shane O’Donnell


The Ed Asner Family Center may look like any other nondescript commercial property in Reseda, but

stamps. I was struggling mightily through a terrible divorce that ruined me financially, and I had terrible anxi-

and Matt’s wife, Navah Paskowitz-

ety from it. My two youngest were autistic. My youngest

and humanity. It is the embodiment of a dream come true—not just for the couple’s family, but for other locals who have family members with special needs. “This is our cooking class area,” Navah proudly points out while walking into the center’s big kitchen. The center takes a holistic approach, offering arts

was three. I had really little kids and working all the time and had horrible anxiety.” Navah and Matt met when one of her brothers introduced them after her son was diagnosed with autism. Matt was working raising funds for the nonprofit Autism Speaks at the time. His younger son is autistic. Navah soon began volunteering at Autism Speaks, and in an effort to figure out how she could help her son, started exploring surfing as a means of therapy for him. She was also working at that time as the executive director of the Friendship Circle, designed for Jewish children with special needs, which was run by Chabad

and career advancement programs as well as counseling

of Pacific Palisades. Many of the single mothers she met

and mindfulness classes—all aimed at promoting self-

would call her in the wee hours of the morning just to

confidence and life balance. Serving all ages, the center

vent. Navah decided to get trained as a life coach so she

opened on Lindley Avenue a year and a half ago, but the

could help them even more.

innovative concept was years in the making. The challenges of living with special needs are some-

“That kind of spurred me into talking my boss into having family retreats,” Navah says. “I’d have these

thing the couple is very familiar with. Three out of the

conferences, and I’d bring in specialists from the Autism

six children in their blended family have autism, sparking

Speaks world, different people who could support these

some to call them “The Brady Bunch of Autism.” A docu-

families, and I’d like to think the Ed Asner Family Center

mentary was made about the family a few years ago, and

was created out of that.”

they even have T-shirts bearing the moniker.

Both Matt and Navah are proud of the center’s mental

Navah says, “We’re in the trenches with our clients,

health component, recalling how Navah, as a single moth-

and we really understand what they’re going through on

er, could not afford mental health support and counseling.

a daily basis.”

The center has therapists and support groups, in-

That includes the anxiety that can arise on simple trips

cluding one for the LGBTQIA community, and keeping

to the grocery store or during extended family gatherings.

costs low is a priority. Counseling services are offered

“As special needs parents, you’re constantly on guard

on a sliding scale, and they work with counselors from

or on defense,” Navah explains. “‘Oh, is he going to touch something? Is he going to flip out? Is he going to knock into that woman at the grocery store?’”

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“When Matt and I got together, I was a single mom,” Navah remembers. “I had three jobs. I was on food

founders Matt Asner—Ed’s son— Asner, view it as a hub of healing

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of the single mothers at the center are experiencing.

California State University, Northridge. “I felt like mental health was paramount,” Navah says. “To me, to have had that support then would have

After a divorce from her first husband, Navah recalls

been life-changing. When Matt and I were first discuss-

facing a tough time. She says she can relate to what many

ing an idea for a facility I said, ‘If we can support these


fractured families, if we can support the single moms— who are the majority of my families—then we’re supporting the children.’” The center also operates Camp Ed, an all-inclusive summer and winter expressive-arts camp that costs $500 a week. Navah says 75% of participants receive scholarships. Enrichment classes are offered throughout the year, including voiceover, acting and improv. Nearby de Toledo High School sends students to volunteer at Camp Ed in exchange for community service hours. “We have a wonderful community that provides volunteers,” Navah adds. Some single moms, who are getting full scholarships for their children, also volunteer. At the couple’s home in nearby Tarzana, Navah thrives on being organized, making school lunches and laying out outfits for Willy, 17; Wolf, 16; and Eddy, 11. (The three other children are grown.) Navah says her determination to keep things orderly stems from her unique childhood. She is the daughter of the late Dorian Paskowitz, a physician trained at the Stanford University School of Medicine. He was also a surfer who decided to forgo a lucrative career as a physician and instead live a nomadic life with his wife, eight sons and Navah, living in a camper and surfing full time. A documentary, Surfwise, was even made about the family. “When you are raised in a 21-foot camper with 11 people, you get a hyper focus about orderliness and unclutter,” Navah says. “I’m a little bit obsessive in my planning and having everything prepared.” The Ed Asner Family Center has become Matt and Navah’s home away from home, since as Navah points out, they are usually there seven days a week. Matt says their hope is that other families view the center the same way they do. “We wanted to create a place that we wanted to go,” Matt says. “We wanted to create a place that was missing when our oldest was beginning to get services. We want to see families come together and have a place they can call home, a second place they can call home and feel comfortable.” While Navah says they are grateful to be able to use

On a wall at the center: a mural painted by the couple’s daughter, Avivah, depicting the movie Up, which Ed Asner starred in.


Navah and Matt with three of their sons at home in Tarzana; 76 | three other children are grown.


“WE WANT TO SEE FAMILIES COME TOGETHER AND HAVE A PLACE THEY CAN CALL HOME, A SECOND PLACE THEY CAN CALL HOME AND FEEL COMFORTABLE.” Ed Asner’s name, all of the money to create and fund the center has come from donors. “Every penny has been because Matt and I have been on the phone for the past three years or made presentations or created these fundraisers,” she says. “He has the name that famous people want to donate to, and they like the cause. But without his name we wouldn’t even be able to get our feet in the door of those places.” Fundraising comes naturally to Matt. He’s done it pretty much his entire life. “I was a producer and a director for 25 years before I got into the world of nonprofit,” he says. “So I was going with my hand out to different people for 25 years. Then everyone said, ‘You’re doing something different now. Isn’t that difficult?’ I said, ‘No, it’s really easy because I’m doing the same thing I always did, but now it’s for a righteous cause.’” Ed Asner, who has a son in his 30s who is autistic, says he strongly believes in the center’s mission. “I only wish my own autistic son, Charlie, could have benefited from the center,” says Ed, who is 90 years old and lives in Tarzana near the family. “We all could use this support. I know I could have. I am very proud to have this center named after me by my son and daughter-inlaw. Its creation was visionary. They are visionary.” ■

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as seen in

In every issue, we are sharing one story across our network that explores topics beyond the limits of the Valley. These California stories speak to the meaningful impact our state and its residents are making on the global stage. To learn more about Golden State and discover more stories like this, visit goldenstate.is.

hive mentality JAKE REISDORF HAS AN IMPRESSIVE RESUMÉ. THE FOUNDER AND CEO OF CARMEL HONEY COMPANY IS ALSO A PHILANTHROPIST, A PUBLIC SPEAKER AND A BEEKEEPING EDUCATOR. OH, AND JAKE IS A JUNIOR AT CARMEL HIGH SCHOOL. THE TEEN ENTREPRENEUR SHARES HOW HIS PASSION FOR POLLINATORS HAS INSPIRED HIM TO LAUNCH A BUZZING FAMILY BUSINESS. Written by Michele Garber | Photographed by Carol Oliva


It’s often said that someone discovering his or her passion has been “bitten by the bug.” In Jake Reisdorf’s case, it’s fair to say he was “stung by the bee.” Throughout his youth, Jake was fascinated with all insects—especially pollinators. When he was 11, he took a beekeeping course with his father that would have a lasting impact on him. “I just thought it would be something fun to do with my dad,” he shares.

beekeeping expert. “When I first started off, I realized very quickly that bees are not like dogs or cats,” he says. “It actually takes a lot of knowledge to do it. They’re not like a goldfish where you put them in a tank, feed them and they live. They have their own way of doing things, and you need to learn this and learn how to take care of them.” Jake started going to classes, conferences, taking online courses, and reading books and online articles about bees and beekeeping to figure out what to do. “Some people think that they are going to get into bees, then they get stung and think, ‘Never mind,’” he says. “The first hive I went out to take a look at, I got stung behind the ear. But that didn’t deter me.” It was through his local beekeeping group that Jake finally got his own hive. Jack, a fellow member in the group,

A couple months later, Jake’s fifth grade class em-

has a bee removal business and offered Jake his first hive

barked on a project-based educational assignment. Each

if he’d help him remove a hive from the floors of a shed.

student was assigned a real-world occupation. Jake was

Jack and Jake extracted the hive, secured the honeycombs

given the career of web designer. Always a dedicated

and frames, and placed the hive in Jake’s backyard. He was

student, Jake wanted to create a killer website that would

officially a beekeeper with his own hive.

earn him an A and make a strong impression on his teacher and classmates. Fresh off his beekeeping experience, he thought, “What

Jake’s enthusiasm for beekeeping wouldn’t have gone far had he not had an exceptionally supportive family. Not many moms would allow their adolescent child to

if I make a website inspired by the beekeeping course and

accompany a beekeeper on a hive removal, let alone agree

share my newly acquired knowledge with my peers?” Jake

to having a hive in the family yard. Well aware that he

used GoDaddy to establish a domain name and build a

has extremely cool parents, Jake muses, “My mom was

site. Then he infused his website with his newly acquired

hoping for something else, but she got bees.”

robust knowledge of all things honeybee. When Jake presented his project, his classmates were

After starting his first hive, Jake and his family started building Carmel Honey Company. Not only did Jake have

indeed impressed. They wanted to know how he knew so

to become a beekeeping expert, he also had to develop his

much about bees, if he had a hive and where they could

business acumen. With no prior experience in web sales,

get his honey.

wholesale or retail, Jake got on-the-job education. By

Though only a fifth grader, Jake sensed the buzz

the time he was 14, the success of their website led to the

around his beekeeping passion and decided to pursue it

opening of the first Carmel Honey Company retail store in

further. With his parents’ blessing, he started his first

Carmel-by-the-Sea.

hive in the family backyard. With their support, Carmel Honey Company was born. Before he could start a hive, Jake realized he would need to learn much more. In fact, he wanted to become a

Jake’s boundless enthusiasm for beekeeping has led to continued growth and success for his company. From his humble start with just one hive, Jake now has 175 hives— enabling Carmel Honey Company to produce and market

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four types of honey: wildflower, sage, orange blossom and meadowfoam. In late 2019 Carmel Honey Company opened its second store on Cannery Row in Monterey. The business also sells directly to specialty stores and local chefs. Along with beekeeping, running a successful family business, carrying a full academic load including AP courses, and finding time to enjoy the pursuits of an average teenager, Jake has also become an accomplished public speaker and educator. His comprehensive knowledge of honeybees and his infectious personality wow crowds wherever he goes. Through Jake Gives Back, the philanthropic arm of Carmel Honey Company, Jake volunteers his time to educate others on the vital importance of honeybees. He addresses groups both large and small—from Girl Scout troops, Kiwanis, and garden clubs to an audience of 750 attendees at an agricultural conference in Anaheim. Jake has spoken multiple times at UC Davis—the gold standard of agricultural universities. His first speaking appearance there was when he was just 12 years old. Since 2014 Jake has also given an annual financial donation through Jake Gives Back to a variety of organizations that promote and support honeybee research and education. Now a junior at Carmel High School, Jake looks to his future. “I’m going to stick with my company. Bees have been good to me. And I’ll be a lifelong learner,” he says.

“EVERYONE KEEPS CONGRATULATING ME ON OUR SUCCESS, EVEN THOUGH I’VE BARELY MADE A MARK. I HOPE TO KEEP EXPANDING THE BUSINESS.”

“I will probably take some courses at my local community college, but I will stay focused on my company.” He adds humbly, “Everyone keeps congratulating me on our success, even though I’ve barely made a mark. I

butterflies,” he explains of his vision. “We will have

hope to keep expanding the business.”

experts from around the world speak about different pol-

At 17 Jake has many adventures ahead of him. His most ambitious aspiration, or BHAG (Big Hairy Audacious Goal)

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linators and have exhibits featuring pollinators.” As one bite in every three of the food we eat is the re-

as he refers to it, is to someday open Pollination World.

sult of a pollinator, scientists agree that their critical role

Living near Monterey, Jake envisions a state-of-the-art,

cannot be overemphasized. “We’ve found very quickly

interactive educational facility that will be to pollinators

that a big part of the business is education,” says Jake.

what the Monterey Aquarium is to marine life.

“People can learn about the vital role pollinators play in

“Pollination World will be a place where we will

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educate the public about all pollinators: birds, bats, bees,

the economy and actually putting food on your plate.” ■


Fascinating WOMEN on the things that matter most.

Available on all podcast platforms. Learn more at SheSez.com.


SEEN

It Takes Two Providence and Cedars-Sinai Health System celebrated their partnership with a groundbreaking ceremony for the joint operation of the newly renamed Providence Cedars-Sinai Tarzana Medical Center. The pair are working to transform the former Providence Tarzana Medical Center into a destination hospital with a growing range of expertise. The expansion is expected to be complete in early 2023.

Dale Surowitz, Victor Jordan, Bob Blumenfield, Jeffrey Smith, Thomas M. Priselac, Lisa Weaver, Edward Prunchunas, Erik G. Wexler, Jeff Work

Dale Surowitz, Robin Kashani, Soheyla Kashani, Yousef Kashani, Danny Kashani, Josh Kashani and Erik G. Wexler

Erik Wexler, Jeffrey Smith, Edward Prunchunas, Victor Jordan

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Dale Surowitz, Bob Blumenfield, Thomas M. Priselac

Jackie and Paul Pepperman


SEEN

Shall We Dance? The National League of Young Men (NLYM), West Valley chapter class of 2021, hosted their annual Etiquette Dinner at the Woodland Hills Country Club. For the event, the nonprofit partnered with the National Charity League, San Fernando Valley Chapter.

Painting the Town

PHOTOGRAPHS BY STANLEY APPLEMAN

The Sherman Oaks Chamber Foundation held an art show and reception fundraiser at Art Rebel, whose owner, Ponti Lambros, is on the foundation’s board of directors. Some of the artists who have painted 60 utility boxes on display around the Valley were on hand with works of their art, which were auctioned that night. Proceeds go back to the foundation’s efforts to keep beautifying Sherman Oaks.

Ponti Lambros, Vicki Nussbaum, Fran Kerzner, Karen Sarrow, Whitney Rosenson, Sandy Rosenholz

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“I highly value the uniquely communal ambience this school provides, where learning is a process in which students feel supported and nourished by teachers. This approach creates opportunities for students to constantly be heard, take risks and make mistakes as part of our learning process.� — Ann Mizrahi, Class of 2020, de Toledo High School


ALL ABOUT KIDS Many of us chose the Valley because it is a terrific place to raise kids. Sure, there’s more space to live and play, and it also has that relaxed, almost small-town feel that you just can’t get on the Westside. But equally as importantly—from charter to private–the Valley is home to some of the best schools in Los Angeles. Here we share a curated selection of some of these schools and the people who are making them great.

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STRATFORD SCHOOL

90

BERKELEY HALL SCHOOL

91

DE TOLEDO HIGH SCHOOL

92

VALLEY BETH SHALOM HAROLD M. SCHULWEIS DAY SCHOOL

93

VIEWPOINT SCHOOL

94

VALLEY INTERNATIONAL PREPARATORY HIGH SCHOOL

95

THE WESLEY SCHOOL

96

ADAT ARI EL DAY SCHOOL

97

THE BUCKLEY SCHOOL

98

MILKEN COMMUNITY SCHOOLS

99

CHAMINADE COLLEGE PREPARATORY

100

LOUISVILLE HIGH SCHOOL

101

SIERRA CANYON SCHOOL

EDITED BY LAURA L. WATTS PHOTOGRAPHED BY MATTHEW COOKE, TAMEKA JACOBS & MONICA OROZCO

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION


ALL ABOUT KIDS

STRATFORD SCHOOL

S

tratford School is an independent private school founded by educator Sherry Adams in 1999. Since then Stratford has expanded to four campuses throughout Southern California, serving early preschool through middle school—including a new Mandarin bilingual preschool program.

to develop their skills in critical reasoning, problem-solving and creative expression.” HOW DO YOU AND YOUR STAFF PROMOTE A POSITIVE SCHOOL CULTURE FOR STUDENTS? “Balanced learning requires a nurturing environment—one that both challenges student intellect and encourages creativity. Our passionate teachers cultivate a fun classroom atmosphere where children feel safe and have the confidence to participate and try new things.”

DESCRIBE YOUR LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AT STRATFORD SCHOOL. “At Stratford School, we believe high expectations lead to extraordinary results. Beginning as early as preschool, we apply our innovative and intentionally balanced curriculum in order to inspire and nurture the minds and hearts of every student. We infuse this curriculum with sequential instruction in science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics—or STEAM—to help students develop the diverse set of problem-solving skills and talents they’ll need in our changing world. Our passionate teachers also cultivate a physically and emotionally secure classroom environment where children feel safe and eager to try new things without the fear of failing. This carefully designed approach challenges students, accelerates achievement and prepares them to become tomorrow’s creative problem-solvers, imaginative innovators and insightful, confident leaders.”

TELL US MORE ABOUT YOUR EDUCATIONAL APPROACH. “Stratford School began with a passion for learning and a desire to bring back excellence in education through a balanced approach. Our goal is to prepare and mentor students for admission to competitive high schools and colleges, and our students achieve outstanding results. Our purpose statement speaks for all of us: ‘Stratford School—connecting students to their unique futures.’ We know that each child has a unique set of skills, passions and dreams. We encourage our students to pursue their curiosities, and we are committed to supporting them in achieving those dreams.”

HOW DO YOU ENSURE YOUR SCHOOL STANDS OUT? “We build our academic curriculum in a way that intentionally instills STEAM principles from preschool through eighth grade. We accomplish this through a unique cross-disciplinary approach that enhances critical thinking, integrates ideas from multiple subjects and ultimately expands student learning. We also incorporate both fine arts and performing arts as essential components of our STEAM curriculum. Arts education complements the traditional STEM approach to foster creative thinking and promote balanced development in young minds. By approaching the arts and sciences in this unique way, we provide the hands-on learning experiences students need

DO YOU ENCOURAGE STUDENTS TO DEVELOP AN ENTREPRENEURIAL MINDSET? “Our curriculum is innovative, challenging and ever evolving. We focus on core academic subjects and the fundamental skills of collaboration, creativity, communication and critical thinking to inspire children. At the middle school level, we expand our STEAM program with advanced instruction and project-based learning. We want our students to not only consume technology but to also understand how technology works … and ultimately question how it could work better. At this stage our teachers also take on a mentor role, cultivating strong relationships with students that last far beyond their time together at Stratford. Our unique approach empowers students to be self-reliant and to take responsibility for their own learning. In short, we

prepare students for life beyond Stratford.” WHAT EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES DO YOU OFFER? “From drama to chess, sports to speech and debate, Stratford offers a variety of after-school clubs taught in a fun and engaging environment. This year’s offerings have included soccer, gymnastics, basketball, chess club, tennis, guitar, dance and Lego engineering.” WHAT FEEDBACK DO YOU GET FROM YOUR STUDENTS? “Our students love that we balance learning with fun to spark their curiosity, challenge their mind, prepare them for their future and ultimately instill a lifetime love of learning. From Vardhaan Ambati, a Stratford School alumnus: ‘My time at Stratford helped shape the person I am today. Academically, Stratford’s preparation was second to none. I cultivated my passion for the sciences. I developed a sense of self-confidence that served me well throughout high school. I enrolled in the most advanced classes possible. As I prepare for college, I am able to reflect back and appreciate the monumental impact Stratford had on my growth as a student and as a productive member of society.’ From a family: ‘Stratford has been a delightful experience for both our child and for us as parents. Our son has really blossomed and grown into an intelligent and sensitive boy who has been guided carefully by his wonderful teachers. The kindergarten program is stellar; I would go as far as saying it may be the best in the Pasadena area right now. After talking to many friends with children in both private and public schools around Pasadena and Altadena, I can say we are getting a unique experience.’” WHAT MAKES YOUR SCHOOL A GREAT PLACE TO WORK? “Joyful learning, paired with strong academics, allows teachers the freedom to teach and support individual students’ needs.”

2046 ALLEN AVE., ALTADENA | 1200 N. CAHUENGA BLVD., LOS ANGELES | 24741 CHRISANTA DR., MISSION VIEJO | 2000 STONER AVE., LOS ANGELES STRATFORDSCHOOLS.COM

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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ALL ABOUT KIDS

BERKELEY HALL SCHOOL

F

ounded in 1911, Berkeley Hall is an independent, coeducational school for students in nursery (age 3) through eighth grade. Nestled in the Santa Monica Mountains, the 66-acre campus provides students ample room to play and learn outside. They also enjoy the latest classroom technology, rigorous academics, visual and performance arts opportunities, a competitive athletic program and a variety of enrichment classes. DESCRIBE THE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AT BERKELEY HALL SCHOOL. “Our mission is to empower children to fulfill their unlimited, God-given potential as fearless scholars and conscientious citizens. But you can’t improve student learning unless you improve teaching. Berkeley Hall teachers engage in weekly professional meetings to analyze, evaluate and systematically improve their lessons. This process positively affects our students—not only does their

learning improve, but they see their teachers model a growth mindset.” HOW DOES YOUR SCHOOL STAND OUT? “At 51% ethnic diversity, Berkeley Hall is one of the most diverse independent schools in Los Angeles. We are also diverse culturally, religiously, socioeconomically and internationally (about 8%). In celebration of our diversity, we create opportunities to connect and learn together, including a series of cultural events.” HOW DO YOU PROMOTE A POSITIVE SCHOOL CULTURE FOR STUDENTS? “Each student is encouraged to be mindful of others and how their actions affect their community. They are taught the Berkeley Hall core values of respect, responsibility, honesty and compassion. This is modeled by our parents, who are extremely committed to the school and lend their time generously to Berkeley Hall events.

Because our school goes from nursery through eighth grade, our students are able to remain children for longer because they are free from social pressure from older peers. Parents remain engaged with their children longer, creating a stronger bond within the family and within the community.” ARE YOU HOPEFUL FOR THE FUTURE WHEN IT COMES TO OUR KIDS? “Absolutely! Berkeley Hall empowers each student to fulfill their unlimited potential by embracing a growth mindset. Our students go into the world believing that they—and everyone around them—can and will make a positive difference. They persist in the face of setbacks because they know that this is part of learning. Berkeley Hall creates resilient, poised, well-adjusted individuals who are confident in themselves and their unique abilities and who respect the contributions of others.”

16000 MULHOLLAND DR., LOS ANGELES | 310-476-6421 | BERKELEYHALL.ORG

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ALL ABOUT KIDS

Top, L to R: Jack Bromberg, Ann Mizrahi, Max Melcer Bottom: Dr. Raymond Marcus, Jillian Weintraub, Shani Wald-Cohain

dE TOLEDO HIGH SCHOOL

F

ormerly named New Community Jewish High School, de Toledo High School is an independent, Jewish, coed college preparatory high school founded in 2002. The school offers honors and Advanced Placement courses, performing arts, athletics, STEAM, robotics, a speech and debate team, senior internships, extracurricular activities, a four-year college counseling program and global education opportunities. Here, student Ann Mizrahi (Class of 2020) shares about her experience at de Toledo High School. WHAT BROUGHT YOU TO THE SCHOOL IN THE FIRST PLACE? “I remember when I toured de Toledo and the immediate love and belonging I felt on campus. Everyone was so welcoming and willing to help. I knew that this place was special.”

DO YOU FIND THE CURRICULUM TO BE ACADEMICALLY RIGOROUS? “Yes. I am a driven person and am so thankful that I have teachers/mentors here at school who see my passion and constantly further it. I was eager to take six AP courses this year, making scheduling almost impossible. The school staff worked with me to find practical solutions so we could make this happen. Also, with the multiple opportunities the school offers, students are intrinsically motivated to work hard and do more than the typical, standard requirements. For instance, the science department noticed the growing interest of mine and other students in research-based learning and as a result founded the Medical Science Academy to offer these types of opportunities for interested students. Each student feels they can progress at their own pace and with their individual path. The school balances a motivated and rigorous environment with a healthy, nonjudgmental, noncompetitive culture.”

WHAT ARE YOUR FAVORITE THINGS ABOUT YOUR SCHOOL? “The possibilities at de Toledo are endless. School administration, teachers and college counselors work with each student to guide them while tailoring the student’s curriculum to match his or her interests— providing endless opportunities for students to be involved in and outside the school’s community. For example, my involvement in speech and debate led me to be elected to the West Hills Neighborhood Council, where I currently serve on the Education and Health Committee and the Homelessness Committee. In such a supportive environment, strong meaningful relationships are organically formed. It is common to see a senior spending time with and supporting a freshman or vice versa. I am happy I had this experience of a school that I could call home.”

22622 VANOWEN ST., WEST HILLS | 818-348-0048 | DTHS.ORG SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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ALL ABOUT KIDS

VALLEY BETH SHALOM HAROLD M. SCHULWEIS DAY SCHOOL

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alley Beth Shalom Harold M. Schulweis Day School is a K–6 Jewish school that has served the Los Angeles area for more than 40 years. In addition to offering an interdisciplinary curriculum, the school gives students the opportunity to practice social justice (tzedakah) and engage in mitzvot (ranging from volunteering at local homeless shelters to advocating at the state Capitol). Students also participate in programs such as athletics, robotics, musical theatre, chess, ceramics, invention club and visual arts.

friend of our school. This project complements our sixth grade ‘Innovators, Changemakers, Visionaries and Heroes’ curriculum.”

HOW DO YOU ENCOURAGE STUDENTS TO DEVELOP AN ENTREPRENEURIAL MINDSET? “One way we encourage an entrepreneurial mindset is through our Shark Tank project. Our sixth graders spend a week working in teams to develop a venture capital project that solves a real-world problem. The presentation is then pitched to an Emmy award-winning producer on ABC’s Shark Tank, who is also a

WHAT FEEDBACK DO YOU GET FROM STUDENTS? “One of our graduates who recently won the sportsmanship award at his middle school told us that our athletics program transformed the way he understood competition, and it inspires his leadership daily. Another says, ‘I learned how to fail safely, which led me to succeed!’ Students are given a solid

TELL US HOW FAMILIES GET INVOLVED AT YOUR SCHOOL. “Our active Parent Organization continues to be the backbone of community-building at our school. Parents love volunteering and making lifelong friends with other families while planning programs, fundraisers and more. A VBS Day School experience is for the entire family. At our school, parents are true partners.”

academic foundation and take risks without fear of failure. They form meaningful and lifelong friendships with peers. VBS helps students stay grounded in their Jewish identity and their love for Israel in order to cultivate the responsibility and leadership to help others. They tell us that VBS Day School is like a second home.” HOW DOES YOUR SCHOOL EMBRACE SOCIAL EMOTIONAL LEARNING? “VBS Day School is proud to be three years into our partnership with the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence using their RULER program—an approach for integrating social and emotional learning into schools. Parents are also provided with educational opportunities to learn ways of using the skills of emotional intelligence to build trusting relationships at home, which creates an even stronger home and school partnership.”

15739 VENTURA BLVD., ENCINO | 818-788-2199 | VBSDS.ORG

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ALL ABOUT KIDS

VIEWPOINT SCHOOL

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ounded in 1961, Viewpoint School offers an enriched college preparatory program on a 40-acre campus located in the scenic foothills of the Santa Monica Mountains. Under the leadership of head of school Mark McKee, Viewpoint’s faculty and staff implement the school’s mission: to inspire a love of learning and to develop qualities in the students that provide strength and direction for a lifetime. WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE KIDS AND PARENTS TO KNOW ABOUT VIEWPOINT SCHOOL? “Serving 1,215 students allows us to go beyond the boundaries of a traditional independent school. We offer a wide breadth of courses and abundant opportunities for our students to stretch themselves in their academics, athletics, the arts, service to the community and to shape their own unique paths in life. As a K–12 school, the culture of extraordinary learning and compassion begins with our youngest students and sets a warm, intellectually vibrant tone for the entire community. Whether a student’s passion is for oceanography, documentary filmmaking, ancient languages, designing self-driving cars or community service, Viewpoint’s expert teachers challenge their students to pursue their interests to the greatest possible extent—thus discovering their capacity for curiosity and hard work. This approach instills within the students a lifelong love of learning and a confidence in their own abilities.”

PHOTOGRAPHED BY BILL YOUNGBLOOD/VIEWPOINT SCHOOL

HOW DOES YOUR SCHOOL PREPARE STUDENTS FOR SUCCESS IN THE 21ST CENTURY? “In order to prepare our students for success in the 21st century and careers that have yet to be invented, Viewpoint offers a program with an emphasis on collaboration, creativity, communication and critical thinking. With an understanding of the latest developments in neuroscience, child development and the brain, we offer learning environments equipped with the technology, tools and space needed for students to create and to explore in all areas of the curriculum. As global citizens it is imperative for our students to be engaged with the world—locally, nationally and internationally— and our teachers are dedicated to making these connections at every opportunity. Whether in film or orchestra, team sports or Model UN, AP physics or world literature, Viewpoint prepares our graduates to live happy and fulfilled lives as lifelong learners and productive, active citizens who serve their communities.”

23620 MULHOLLAND HWY., CALABASAS | 818-591-6500 | VIEWPOINT.ORG SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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ALL ABOUT KIDS

VALLEY INTERNATIONAL PREPARATORY HIGH SCHOOL

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alley International Preparatory High School (VIP) was formed in 2018 and is temporarily located on the Chatsworth High campus. The charter school plans to move to its own 30,000-square-foot facility in the Northridge/Reseda area in early 2021, where it will cap its enrollment at 400 students. VIP features small classes and curriculum that includes a new two-year AP Capstone course, as well as individualized college counseling and learning programs. DESCRIBE YOUR LEARNING ENVIRONMENT. “VIP offers a melding of rigorous standards with progressive approaches that include project-based and constructivist learning. Our mission is to prepare students for college through a variety of stimulating and challenging instructional methodologies, an extensive college counseling process that focuses on finding the right fit for every student, and an advisory program that fosters self-reflection, self-expression and self-actualization.” HOW DOES YOUR SCHOOL SUPPORT STUDENTS’ PASSIONS? “For a small program, our young school has garnered noteworthy accolades and college placements. Our speech and debate team has earned numerous titles at the local, state and national levels, being named for the last two years as a Top 10 Speech and Debate Program in America at the National Speech and Debate Association Finals. We are the 2018 Los Angeles County Mock Trial Champions and two-time Los Angeles County Get Lit poetry slam champions. Our theatre group is a Drama Teachers Association of Southern California winner, and we have a unique contemporary music singer-songwriter/production program. Also, among our students are a female barrel racing/rodeo champion as well as an aspiring large-scale themed-entertainment designer.” WHAT MAKES YOUR SCHOOL A GREAT PLACE TO WORK? “Some education professionals recently toured VIP during school hours and offered the following comment: ‘Students were engaged in a high level of academic discussion. In every room we saw students interacting positively with each other and with their teacher. We felt an electricity of creativity and a vibe that was extremely warm and positive, which the kids responded to in kind.’” TELL US ABOUT YOUR SCHOOL’S HISTORY. “VIP was granted its charter on December 12, 2018, by Los Angeles Unified School District. Although VIP technically opened as a new school in August 2018, its administration and the majority of its teachers and students comprised the school iLEAD North Hollywood, which closed in June 2018. Fall 2018 marked the entity’s new beginning as a stand-alone charter school—without the oversight of a charter management organization.”

10027 LURLINE AVE., CHATSWORTH | 818-306-2136 | VIPHS.ORG

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY ANINA DENOVE

ALL ABOUT KIDS

THE WESLEY SCHOOL

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stablished in 1999 by a group of parents after the closing of St. Michael’s in Studio City, The Wesley School is a coeducational K-8 independent day school now located in North Hollywood. The school offers a variety of arts and afterschool enrichment classes and a competitive sports program. HOW DO YOU ENSURE YOUR SCHOOL STANDS OUT? “We place importance on diversity, equity and inclusivity, and we take pride in our community. We believe that a community that recognizes and values all the ways that we differ is a strong community. We know that flourishing as a community means creating an environment where all of our members are engaged, connected and feel respected.”

HOW DOES YOUR SCHOOL SUPPORT STUDENTS’ PASSIONS? “Feeling known and valued in a community breeds self-confidence in young people. And a strong sense of self is often a

launchpad for expanding one’s independence and seeking one’s passions. Our school offers a variety of opportunities for students to further their personal and social development, all while exploring and finding their own passions. For instance, on Saturday, May 16, Wesley will host our annual talent show and outdoor festival, Wesley Palooza, and all are invited.”

plays an integral role in our school’s daily life. Composed of every family at Wesley, the association allows parents to experience firsthand the ‘family feeling’ that makes Wesley so special. More than 25 active committees operate under the umbrella of the Parents’ Association, and all parents are strongly encouraged to become involved with at least one committee.”

DO YOUR TEACHERS ENCOURAGE TEAMWORK IN STUDENTS’ LIVES? “You can walk into any classroom at Wesley and see students collaborating with one another or using problem-solving skills to complete group projects. Students are encouraged to work together; through teamwork we teach them the big skills that transfer across disciplines—skills such as communication, problem-solving, collaboration and critical thinking.”

WHY DO YOU BELIEVE IN THE K–8 SCHOOL MODEL? “We truly believe that the K–8 model is the best choice for children. It provides a safe space for children to come of age at an appropriate pace—a place where they can avoid some of the social pressures found in a secondary school environment, have the opportunity to be mentors to their younger peers and be leaders on and around campus. This allows us to provide them the academic foundation to be very successful in the next step of their academic journey.”

TELL US HOW FAMILIES GET INVOLVED AT YOUR SCHOOL. “The Wesley School Parents’ Association

4832 TUJUNGA AVE., NORTH HOLLYWOOD | 818-508-4542 | WESLEYSCHOOL.ORG SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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ALL ABOUT KIDS

ADAT ARI EL DAY SCHOOL

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dat Ari El Labowe Family Day School was founded in 1979 and offers a Jewish and secular education to students from transitional kindergarten to sixth grade. It pursues its mission—”to raise up students who know themselves, serve others and act to improve the world”—through an education model rooted in project-based learning and Design Thinking methodologies. HOW DOES YOUR SCHOOL SUPPORT STUDENTS’ PASSIONS? “In addition to our core curriculum, we take a student-centered approach to all aspects of the students’ learning. Supporting their interests and passions is at the core of who we are and what we do. Throughout the year and across grade levels, projects and units are explored in greater depth as a result of the students’ passions on a given subject.”

WHAT DO YOU SEE KIDS DOING TO MAKE THIS WORLD A BETTER PLACE? “Last year our fourth graders went to the board of directors with the goal of making change. What resulted was an initiative that today addresses food, waste and landscape and connects values of environmental stewardship to Jewish teachings. We have a community composting program, we created gardens that grow organic vegetables, we recycle and ultimately we hope to have a sustainable campus. At the core of the Green ADAT initiative is the idea that when the students make it their own, their leadership is what will affect institutional change.” HOW DO YOUR TEACHERS ENCOURAGE TEAMWORK IN STUDENTS’ LIVES? “Every day at ADAT, students are engaged in project-based learning and collaborative work with partners, teams and even across grade

levels. This year our kindergarten, third grade and sixth grade are working together to design a new play yard on campus. They are using the Design Thinking process, along with their individual and collective creativity, to create the ideal outdoor environment to meet the needs of students of all ages. The school as a whole is a close-knit community, and mini-communities are created in every grade as well.” DO YOU HELP STUDENTS DEVELOP AN ENTREPRENEURIAL MINDSET? “Developing an entrepreneurial mindset is woven into the Design Thinking process. At the conclusion of this process, each student is asked to evaluate, refine and oftentimes restart. In this way, students might see many iterations of a given project or idea. These ‘failures’ yield the best chance for eventual success. We encourage students to follow their passions and persevere even in the face of perceived failure.”

12020 BURBANK BLVD., VALLEY VILLAGE | 818-766-4992 | AAEDS.ORG

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ALL ABOUT KIDS

THE BUCKLEY SCHOOL

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he Buckley School was founded in 1933 by Dr. Isabelle Buckley, who started the school as a kindergarten on Doheny Drive. After expanding to four locations across the city, Buckley was consolidated on one campus in Sherman Oaks in 1967, where today it is a K–12 coed day school. HOW DO YOU ENSURE YOUR SCHOOL STANDS OUT? “When we wrote our mission statement three years ago, we chose to make diversity, equity and inclusion prominent. This commitment permeates every aspect of our school, from our hiring practices and admission priorities to our curriculum. Our new head of school, Alona Scott, is deeply passionate about this commitment and seeing it become one of Buckley’s defining aspirations.” HOW DOES YOUR SCHOOL SUPPORT STUDENTS’ PASSIONS? “Buckley supports student passions at every

stage of development, from the kindergarten play yard all the way up to the high school research lab. Whether someone has a passion for intense academic study through highlevel coursework, or for developing their own invention, business, project or artwork, Buckley supports that student. We are fortunate to have the resources and dedicated faculty to lift up everyone, no matter their interest. One student this year developed wearable GPS jewelry that can track missing children, with a patent pending. Another became a four-year wrestling league champion. An eighth grader built a modular cello from scratch. Buckley is a place where students can dream and dream big.” WHAT DO YOU SEE KIDS DOING TO MAKE THIS WORLD A BETTER PLACE? “Our students are encouraged to, as stated in our mission, ‘make an impact in the world.’ This is done individually and in groups— whether studying how to grow food in soil

on Mars or developing an app to measure stress in teens. Every seventh grade student completes a Community Action Project that combines a student’s individual passion with an impactful service initiative. Past years’ themes have included water, women’s rights and refugees.” WHAT MAKES THE BUCKLEY SCHOOL A GREAT PLACE TO WORK? “Buckley’s administrative team believes in supporting teachers, just as our teachers support students. We know that teachers are lifelong learners, so we’ve prioritized a robust professional development budget that stokes teachers’ curiosity, keeps their skills and knowledge current, and allows for collaboration, travel and leadership opportunities as speakers and presenters across the country. We want our employees to be a close-knit community, so we also provide daily catered lunches for them to enjoy together.”

3900 STANSBURY AVE., SHERMAN OAKS | 818-783-1610 | BUCKLEY.ORG SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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ALL ABOUT KIDS

MILKEN COMMUNITY SCHOOLS

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ilken Community Schools is a private, community Jewish day school that serves students from across Los Angeles. Founded nearly 30 years ago, Milken offers academic curriculum rooted in Jewish values, as well as a variety of extracurricular programs, to students in grades 7–12. ARE YOU HOPEFUL FOR THE FUTURE WHEN IT COMES TO OUR KIDS? “Our mission says it best: We want our children to surpass us. The Milken experience provides opportunities and tools for our students to think well, take positive action and be part of something greater than themselves. Milken alumni go into the world and make a difference by doing things like working for the city of Los Angeles, launching a start-up that gives nonprofits the technology to run their business, and being published in medical journals for their work on vaping and its effects on teens. With a strong academic

foundation and a Jewish perspective on life, our children are well on their way to surpassing us.” DOES MILKEN COMMUNITY SCHOOLS SUPPORT STUDENTS’ PASSIONS? “The breadth and depth of what Milken offers is astounding. We have students who compete in competitive gymnastics outside school while taking a full load of classes, singing in our Milken Honeys a cappella group, starring in a musical and being present for our experiential learning, like trips to Washington, D.C. Students can truly explore their passions—from a course in photography to sculpture, digital fabrication and global Jewish leadership.” HOW DO YOU ENSURE YOUR SCHOOL STANDS OUT? “Our signature programs, pedagogy and spaces truly set us apart. Our spaces include The Guerin Family Institute and Fab Lab, an MIT-inspired fabrication makerspace that

allows our students to make anything they can dream. Our X-Learning pedagogy is an innovative approach to teaching and learning with student-centered, design-based instruction that encourages creativity, academic risktaking, collaboration and empowerment. Our Architecture+Design Institute (pictured above) offers students advanced architecture and design courses. Our Tiferet Israel Fellowship gives 10th graders the opportunity to live and learn in Israel for a semester.” IN WHAT WAYS DOES MILKEN CREATE SOCIAL IMPACT IN OUR COMMUNITY? “The faculty at Milken inspire students by leading. Recently, during a fire in the Los Angeles area, students and faculty came together to reflect on the damage and devastation to the community and the environment. As a result, teachers, rabbis and students volunteered to train as fire department cadets. We have many programs where students and teachers give back to positively impact our community.”

15800 ZELDINS’ WAY, LOS ANGELES | 310-440-3500 | MILKENSCHOOL.ORG

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY PATRICIA FERNANDEZ

ALL ABOUT KIDS

CHAMINADE COLLEGE PREPARATORY

C

haminade College Preparatory is a coeducational Catholic school in the Marianist tradition, serving nearly 2,000 students in grades 6–12. Students explore their interests through a variety of clubs, organizations, events and service opportunities. HOW DO YOU PROMOTE A POSITIVE SCHOOL CULTURE? “Family spirit is strong at Chaminade. We strive to build a community where every student can be involved in campus activities through a variety of clubs, organizations, events and service opportunities. Our students consider Chaminade more than just a school community. It is a home away from home.” IN WHAT WAYS DO YOU CREATE SOCIAL IMPACT IN YOUR COMMUNITY? “We work toward deepening the faith of our students through spiritual retreats and community service opportunities to foster relationshipbuilding with God, self and others. Chaminade

students exemplify the Marianist values of service, justice and peace. They learn to become contributing citizens who are compassionate and informed about social issues and are committed to addressing and resolving injustices.” TELL US ABOUT YOUR TEACHERS. “Throughout the seven-year experience, our teachers encourage students to explore their interests and discover new talents in an engaging, nurturing environment. Our dedicated teachers take pride in nurturing, mentoring and preparing students for academic success.” WHAT STEPS IS YOUR SCHOOL TAKING TO EMBRACE TECHNOLOGY? “Students at Chaminade are actively engaged in their learning through a curriculum that emphasizes student-centered learning. Collaboration among students is facilitated through projectbased learning and the use of our one-to-one, tablet-based technology—enabling students to take an active role in their learning.”

Chaminade also supports the maker mindset and gives students the essential skills for adapting to a technology-driven future. Our comprehensive approach centers on hands-on applications of academic concepts, creative use of technology and integration of humanities to support students in becoming the creative problem-solvers of tomorrow regardless of their chosen path. We have designed innovative spaces that allow our students to invent, share ideas and be creative.” DO YOU ENCOURAGE STUDENTS TO FOLLOW THEIR PASSIONS? “At Chaminade, learning isn’t just limited to the classroom. Whether it’s through our vibrant visual and performing arts program or through our outstanding athletics program, Chaminade inspires students to explore their passions and pursue their talents and interests across many dimensions. Our extensive extracurricular and cocurricular offerings include Live Stream Crew, Eagle Business, Eagle Engineering (robotics), speech and debate, mock trial, band, Chaminade Players (drama), C-Notes choir, concert choir and many more.”

10210 OAKDALE AVE., CHATSWORTH | 818-363-8127 | 7500 CHAMINADE AVE., WEST HILLS | 818-347-8300 | CHAMINADE.ORG SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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ALL ABOUT KIDS

LOUISVILLE HIGH SCHOOL

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ouisville High School is an all-girls Catholic high school founded 60 years ago by the Sisters of St. Louis. Set amid century-old oaks and picturesque mountains, Louisville offers challenging academics paired with service opportunities, an athletic program spanning 13 sports and an award-winning performing arts department that includes dance, vocal and drama groups.

provide individualized attention academically and socially so that she may become the best version of herself. We blend individual dreams with common purpose, and the resulting sisterhood inspires learning, growing and lifelong friendships. Louisville is a school for four years and a family for life.”

DESCRIBE LOUISVILLE HIGH SCHOOL’S LEARNING ENVIRONMENT. “Louisville is not merely a school with girls. It is a school for girls. This unique environment allows our young women to discover their interests, build their self-confidence and take healthy risks. At Louisville, opportunities for girls don’t happen by chance. They happen on purpose.”

WHAT DO YOU SEE KIDS DOING TO MAKE THIS WORLD A BETTER PLACE? “Our students have been the driving force behind our upgraded environmental stewardship program. While we have been recycling for years, they are working on a system that includes composting and an informational component to ensure proper usage. They also led the charge to use compostable materials in our campus food service. This young generation truly is our future!”

HOW DO YOU ENSURE YOUR SCHOOL STANDS OUT? “A common theme from alumnae, students and even visitors is that Louisville is a home. We truly know each student and strive to

HOW DOES YOUR SCHOOL SUPPORT STUDENTS’ PASSIONS? “Louisville High School’s unique Focus Program gives students extraordinary opportunities to connect their passions with their goals for the

future. This program helps students gain work experience, network with successful alumnae, listen to guest speakers, attend career-oriented field trips, learn professional skills and take courses that support their area of focus. Overall, students receive real-world exposure that influences decisions about future college majors and work environments.” HOW DO YOU EMBRACE A DIGITAL APPROACH TO LEARNING? “Louisville will introduce an Innovation Lab this spring—a collaborative working area with 3D printers, laser cutters, a plotter, a drop-down green screen and more. Teachers will use the Innovation Lab to demonstrate curricular ideas, encourage concept adaptation and challenge thinking. In this inspirational environment our young women will engage and succeed in complex problem-solving, be visionary, take risks and become innovators as they dream, design and do.”

22300 MULHOLLAND DR., WOODLAND HILLS | 818-346-8812 | LOUISVILLEHS.ORG

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY CRANE METAMARKETING

ALL ABOUT KIDS

SIERRA CANYON SCHOOL

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ierra Canyon School is a private, independent, coeducational college preparatory boarding school serving students in prekindergarten through grade 12. The school’s alumni attend top colleges such as Harvard, Columbia, Brown, NYU, Duke, Stanford and UC Berkeley. TELL US ABOUT YOUR EDUCATIONAL APPROACH. “Sierra Canyon School equips students to rethink the familiar and embrace the unknown. It is a place where ingenious teachers, intrepid students and forward-thinking leaders work together to shape an education on the adventurous edge. Teachers create hands-on learning experiences in the classroom, on the stage, on the playing field and court, and on life-changing journeys.” WHAT DO STUDENTS AND PARENTS LOVE ABOUT YOUR SCHOOL? “On the sheltering green grounds of our Lower

Campus, our expert early childhood teachers nurture our young learners’ intellectual and moral development in equal measure, giving them an unusual firm foundation for learning and growing. Our students connect academic studies to real life from day one. We have designed our Middle School program to help our students effectively direct their energy while building their academic, social and emotional skills to thrive as learners and individuals. By the end of their Middle School journey, our students become impressively self-aware, self-advocating and self-directed young individuals—primed to succeed in our Upper School. Upper School students consistently transform original ideas into real solutions. From chasing down leads for our award-winning Standard newspaper to developing new technologies to increase independence for disabled individuals, our students come to deeply know and respect their own interests and capabilities—and those of others.”

WHAT IS ONE OF YOUR SCHOOL’S MOST POPULAR PROGRAMS? “Our Middle School and Upper School students enjoy an adventure of a lifetime every year with Peak Week. Students choose from dozens of local and international experiences that take their learning beyond the classroom and into new territory. No matter which journey our students select, they will come back overflowing with fresh ideas, skills and confidence.” HOW DOES SIERRA CANYON SCHOOL PREPARE GRADUATES FOR THE FUTURE? “Equipped with exceptional understanding and guided by attentive teachers and college counselors, our students confidently determine their own path to college and career success. Our alumni are primed to excel at the next level, forge purposeful careers and employ their unshakable optimism to improve the wider world.”

11052 INDEPENDENCE AVE. & 20801 RINALDI ST., CHATSWORTH | 818-882-8121 | SIERRACANYONSCHOOL.ORG SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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16564 Acadamia Drive ENCINO, CA 91436

6

BEDS

7

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8,558

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DENNIS CHERNOV CHERNOVTEAM.COM 818.432.1524 DRE# 01850113

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Each office is independently owned and operated. If your property is listed with another broker, this is not a solicitation. Keller Williams Realty does not guarantee the accuracy of square footage, lot size, or other information concerning the condition or features of the property provided by the seller or obtained from public records or other sources and the buyer is advised to independently verify the accuracy of that information through personal inspection with appropriate licensed professionals.


R E A L E S TAT E

Contemporary Masterpiece Your brand new custom contemporary masterpiece with panoramic views eagerly awaits your arrival. Gated and located at the end of the cul-de-sac of beautiful Academia Drive—privacy is the utmost experience you become immersed in. Enjoy a morning cup of coffee on your wood deck while gazing at the lush greenery and end your evening soaking in the infinity pool & spa while wishing upon the stars. 16564 Academia Dr, Encino | Please Call For Pricing 6 bed | 7 bath + media room + office + 2nd floor family room/loft 8,558 sqft | 26,097 sqft lot Listed by: Dennis Chernov | Chernov Team | Keller Williams dennis@chernovteam.com | Chernovteam.com | 818-432-1524


Oren David Mordkowitz ESTATES DIRECTOR | REALTOR ®

818-933-5866

CalDRE License #01246402

oren@orenestates.com IN ESCROW

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4230 Valley Meadow Rd. | Encino | $6,995,000 6250 Hollywood Bl. #6A | Los Angeles | $1,445,000 17437 Oak Creek Ct. | Encino | $1,999,000

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4545 Balboa Ave. | Encino | $1,389,000 4338 Bergamo Dr. | Encino | $2,499,000 16725 Oak View Dr. | Encino | $1,199,000

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12985 Galewood St. – SC - $3,500,000- 4Br+2.5Ba in 3,916 SqFt on a 22,287 SqFt Lot- FEATURED- Fabulous gated farmhouse in the Longridge Estates. This home offers an open floor with two bedrooms downstairs. In addition to the main house, there is a recording studio/ guest house, pool, spa, and putting green.

15227 Valley Vista Blvd. – SO$2,750,000 5Br+7Ba in 4,180 SqFt on a 8,498 SqFt Lot – New construction home in Sherman Oaks! It features a bright open floor plan, chef’s kitchen & a 1,200 sq ft rooftop deck. The entertainer’s backyard offers a pool, spa, bbq, pool cabana, & much more.

15023 Encanto Dr. – SO- $2,250,000 5Br+4.5 Ba in 4,272 SqFt on a 6,276 SqFt Lot– Beautiful traditional yet modern Spanish 3-story home in the foothills of Sherman Oaks. The home features open beam ceilings, an updated kitchen, and a spacious master suite with views of the hills. The private backyard oasis that features king palm trees and a large grassy area.

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3835 Alomar Dr. – SO- $2,750,000 4Br+4.5 Ba in 4,000 SqFt on a 16,641 SqFt Lot- Contemporary modern home with amazing views is located in the highly exclusive Longridge Estates and designed by the famed Southern California architects, Buff & Hensman. This two-story modernist custom-built home features a chef’s kitchen, wine room, and much more. The backyard has a grassy area and a sitting area. 15934 Morrison St. – EN- $1,500,000 4Br+4 Ba in 3,253 SqFt on a 7,600 SqFt LotFabulous traditional home in Encino with a grassy backyard and a pool. It features lots of natural light, an open floor plan, and a living room with large picture windows. The newly-remodeled pool house offers an additional bonus ~1,000 square feet, including a full kitchen, separate bedroom, bathroom, and living room, which may be converted to an Accessory Dwelling Unit for rent, or used as a studio, or office.

Call for your FREE market analysis! © 2019 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices California Properties (BHHSCP) is a member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates LLC. BHH Affiliates LLC and BHHSCP do not guarantee accuracy of all data including measurements, conditions, and features of property. Information is obtained from various sources and will not be verified by broker or MLS. Buyer is advised to independently verify the accuracy of that information.


16231 Meadowridge Way l Encino Encino Hills! 6 Bds | 5 Ba | Apx 4,615 SqFt | Guest Hse I 21,716 SqFt Lt I Lanai Rd Elementary

OFFERED AT: $3,295,000

2019 TOP 10 AGENTS

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3610 Dixie Canyon l Sherman Oaks VIEWS! 5 Beds | 5.5 Baths | 6,911 Sq Ft I Tennis Court | 1+ Acre Lot OFFERED AT: $5,750,000

These Fine Estates Presented By:

ANDREW MANNING LUXURY PROPERTIES DIRECTOR I REALTOR® Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices CA Properties DRE Lic #: 00941825

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3816 Longridge Ave l Sherman Oaks

4640 Petit Ave l Encino

Longridge Estates! 5 Beds | 4.5 Baths | 4,203 Sq Ft | Apx 14,388 Sq Ft Lot OFFERED AT: $4,995,000

6 Bds | 6.5 Ba | Apx 7,828 SqFt | Apx 1.135 Ac Lot I Tennis Court OFFERED AT: $4,600,000 Co-Listed with Cynthia Miller; BHHSCal, DRE#: 00950049

©2020 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices California Properties (BHHSCP) is a member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates LLC. BHH Affiliates LLC and BHHSCP do not guarantee accuracy of all data including measurements, conditions, and features of property. Information is obtained from various sources and will not be verified by broker or MLS. Buyer is advised to independently verify the accuracy of that information. DRE# 01317331.


Nobody does it better...

active

16908 Bosque Dr., Encino $5,500,000 Encino South Brand New Modern

sold

17515 Embassy Dr., Encino $2,349,000 Amestoy Tennis Estate

sold

17516 Margate St., Encino $4,100,000 Amestoy Estates

sold

3937 Vista Linda Dr., Encino $1,999,000 English Manor View Estate

active

4670 Encino Ave., Encino $3,999,000 Rancho Estates

sold

3623 Green Vista Dr., Encino $1,999,000 Encino Hills Mid-Century w/View

sold

sold

4926 Louise Ave., Encino $2,669,000 Encino South

sold

10430 Wilshire Blvd., #904, Los Angeles $1,800,000 The Mirabella - Wilshire Corridor

coming soon

4734 White Oak Ave., Encino $1,799,000 Rancho Estates

4688 Alonzo Ave., Encino $1,799,000 Encino South of Boulevard

just listed

sold

15525 High Knoll Rd., Encino $1,599,000 Royal Oaks Mid Century Modern

4212 Grimes Pl., Encino $1,399,000 Lake Encino

818.285.3688 www.CarolWolfe.com sold

19050 Wells Dr., Tarzana $1,299,000 Tarzana Gem with Privacy

#1 AGENT RODEO REALTY ENCINO OFFICE

just listed

18451 Jonah Ct., Tarzana $1,100,000 Tarzana South of Boulevard


ENCINO

4511 Hayvenhurst Ave $6,490,000

Renee Ogiens 818.404.7440 DRE 01829777 Stunning newly constructed gated modern SMART farmhouse.

ENCINO

4717 Encino Ave $5,449,000

ENCINO

Eric Lieberman 310.849.4900 DRE 01008206

5359 Oak Park Ave $3,999,000

Arman Grigoryan 818.444.7700 DRE 01711745

STUDIO CITY

4338 Laurelgrove Ave $2,295,000 STUDIO CITY

4540 Beck Ave $3,495,000

SHERMAN OAKS

Craig Strong 818.930.4050 DRE 01450987

15000 Sunstone Pl $2,499,000

Eric Lieberman 310.849.4900 DRE 01008206

15024 Hesby St $2,069,000

STUDIO CITY

3001 Dona Nenita Pl $2,195,000

Craig Strong 818.930.4050 DRE 01450987

Alan Taylor 818.650.1603 DRE 01369255

Elegant Cape Cod Estate with hardwood floors, coffered + beadboard ceilings and panel wainscoting.

Anita Rich 818.632.2258 DRE 02067686

4228 Hazeltine Ave $1,499,000

SHERMAN OAKS

SHERMAN OAKS

Gina Covello 310.251.8280 DRE 01323543

Compass is a real estate broker licensed by the State of California and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. License Number 01991628. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only and is compiled from sources deemed reliable but has not been verified. Changes in price, condition, sale or withdrawal may be made without notice. No statement is made as to accuracy of any description. All measurements and square footages are approximate.


COMING SOON

3601 Viewcrest Drive, Burbank | $4,750,000

ACTIVE

ACTIVE

SOLD

ACTIVE

3768 Berry Drive, Studio City | $3,995,000

10415 Sarah Street, Toluca Lake | $4,195,000

4540 Beck Avenue, Studio City | $3,495,000

10161 Valley Spring Lane, Toluca Lake | $16,500 / month

CRAIG STRONG VP, Luxury Home Sales Top 1 % Nationwide

ACTIVE

#1 Individual Agent Companywide Sold Over $125 Million in 2018

4338 Laurelgrove Avenue, Studio City | $2,295,000

ACTIVE

10060 Toluca Lake Avenue, Toluca Lake | $18,000 / month Compass does not guarantee the accuracy of square footage, lot size, or other information concerning the condition or features of the property provided by the seller or obtained from public records and other sources and the buyer is advised to independently verify the accuracy of that information. CalBRE 01450987


Over $1/3 Billion SOLD Helping our clients find their place in the world. Alan Taylor | 818.650.1603 | info@alantaylorrealestate.com Compass is a real estate broker licensed by the State of California and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. License Number 01866771. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only and is compiled from sources deemed reliable but has not been verified. Changes in price, condition, sale or withdrawal may be made without notice. No statement is made as to accuracy of any description. All measurements and square footage are approximate. DRE 01369255.


MICHAEL BERGIN |

LUXURY ESTATES DIRECTOR

JUST SOLD

4226 LEMP AVENUE, STUDIO CITY, COLFAX MEADOWS 5 BEDS | 6 BATHS | 5,500± SQFT | 11,000± SQFT LOT | MEDIA ROOM | GYM | POOL & SPA | COLFAX MEADOWS | LISTED AT $4,500,000

FOR SALE

FOR SALE

FOR SALE

IN ESCROW

JUST SOLD

JUST SOLD

1909 Lakota Street, Simi Valley $949,000 5 Beds 4 Baths 3,909± Sqft Views Big Sky Community

6014 Greenbush Avenue, Valley Glen $1,399,000 5 Beds 6 Baths 4,200± Sqft Guest House Pool

11923 Susan Drive, Granada Hills $1,149,000 5 Beds 3 Baths 2,800± Sqft Golf Course Views

5833 Tobias Avenue, Sherman Oaks $855,000 3 Beds 3 Baths 1,781± Sqft Oasis Pool Remodeled Kester Elementary

3450 Cahuenga Blvd #804, Los Angeles $1,350,000 3 Beds 3 Baths 2,361± Sqft Enclave Live/Work Townhome

4370 Beck Avenue, Studio City $1,600,000 5 Beds 4 Baths 2,600± Sqft Completely Remodeled Colfax Meadows

Michael Bergin Luxury Estates Director 310.600.0715 BerginHomes@gmail.com DRE 01845572

Your #1 Real Estate Expert Compass is a licensed real estate broker and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdraw without notice. No statement is made as to accuracy of any description. All measurements and square footages are approximate. Exact dimensions can be obtained by retaining the services of an architect or engineer. This is not intended to solicit property already listed.


Exclusive Luxury Listings

5824 JED SMITH ROAD ENCINO

EMIL HARTOONIAN

818.924.2806 | LIC. # 01796925

14547 VALLEY VISTA SHERMAN OAKS

CRAIG KNIZEK

818.618.1006 | LIC. # 01377932

4727 ALONZO AVENUE ENCINO

CRAIG KNIZEK

818.618.1006 | LIC. # 01377932

4352 FORMAN AVENUE TOLUCA LAKE

KEVIN DEES

424.281.6848 | LIC. # 01915567

your move.

$26,500,000 6 BEDS 11 BATHS 18,183 SQ. FT. 2.9 ACRE LOT

2800 WHITE STALLION ROAD WESTLAKE VILLAGE

EMIL HARTOONIAN

818.924.2806 | LIC. # 01796925

$6.725,000 5 BEDS 7 BATHS 6,741 SQ. FT. 23,399 SQ. FT. LOT

3931 OESTE AVENUE

$5,295,000 5 BEDS 7 BATHS 6,087 SQ. FT. 18,752 SQ. FT. LOT

11817 MACODA LANE

$ 4,495,000 5 BEDS 6 BATHS 6,425 SQ. FT. 19,502 SQ. FT. LOT

5317 ANDASOL AVENUE

STUDIO CITY

ANDRÉ WARREN

818.379.7783 | LIC. # 02053004

INDIAN HILLS

EMIL HARTOONIAN

818.924.2806 | LIC. # 01796925

ENCINO

DENISE SNANOUDJ

323.646.8866 | LIC. # 01101684

$9,990,000 7 BEDS 10 BATHS 12,656 SQ. FT. 1,022,788 SQ. FT. LOT

9928 TOLUCA LAKE AVENUE

$5,999,000 7 BEDS 11 BATHS 10,015 SQ. FT. 46,005 SQ. FT. LOT

17173 STRAWBERRY DRIVE

TOLUCA LAKE

ANDREW MORTAZA

818.458.2218 | LIC. # 01470043

ENCINO

DANIELLE PERETZ

818.644.1477 | LIC. # 01897529

$4,999,000 6 BEDS 8 BATHS 10,825 SQ. FT. 76,080 SQ. FT. LOT

4648 ALONZO AVENUE

$4,495,000 5 BEDS 7 BATHS 6,400 SQ. FT. 18,251 SQ. FT. LOT

25451 PRADO DE AZUL

ENCINO

EMIL HARTOONIAN

818.924.2806 | LIC. # 01796925

CALABASAS

NIKKI JOEL

310.428.2248 | LIC. # 01784589

$8,495,000 5 BEDS 7 BATHS 6,500 SQ. FT. 16,122 SQ. FT. LOT

$5,699,000 7 BEDS 8.5 BATHS 7,520 SQ. FT. 16,000 SQ. FT. LOT

$4,699,000 6 BEDS 8 BATHS 8,000 SQ. FT. 18,513 SQ. FT. LOT

$3,895,000 4 BEDS 6 BATHS 6,745 SQ. FT. 15,381 SQ. FT. LOT


in the San Fernando Valley

5266 VANALDEN AVENUE TARZANA

JOHN TASHTCHIAN

818.968.2822 | LIC. # 01453364

12112 HOLLYGLEN PLACE STUDIO CITY

INGRID SACERIO

323.333.7018 | LIC. # 01905431

4739 VENTURA CANYON AVENUE SHERMAN OAKS

GUY AZAR

818.339.4192 | LIC. # 01882376

380 BOX CANYON ROAD CHATSWORTH

GUY AZAR

818.339.4192 | LIC. # 01882376

$2,999,999 6 BEDS 7 BATHS 6,093 SQ. FT. 19,458 SQ. FT. LOT

3960 PRADO DEL MAIZ

$2,450,000 4 BEDS 6 BATHS 3,415 SQ. FT. 5,849 SQ. FT. LOT

18001 KAREN DRIVE

$1,699,000 4 BEDS 3.5 BATHS 2,775 SQ. FT. 7,280 SQ. FT. LOT

4233 ALLOTT AVENUE

$839,000 3 BEDS 3 BATHS 2,586 SQ. FT. 6,300 SQ. FT. LOT

23777 MULHOLLAND HIGHWAY #173

CALABASAS

EMIL HARTOONIAN

818.924.2806 | LIC. # 01796925

ENCINO

GEORGE OUZOUNIAN

818.900.4259 | LIC. # 01948763

$2,799,000 4 BEDS 5 BATHS 4,546 SQ. FT. 11,288 SQ. FT. LOT

21 COOLWATER ROAD

$2,439,000 5 BEDS 5.5 BATHS 4,485 SQ. FT. 20,249 SQ. FT. LOT

5325 COLLINGWOOD CIRCLE

SHERMAN OAKS

LINDSAY HECKER

818.379.7117 | LIC. # 02050425

CALABASAS

DANIEL OHANA

818.633.5521 | LIC. # 01941646

BELL CANYON

EMIL HARTOONIAN

818.924.2806 | LIC. # 01796925

CALABASAS

DANIELLE PERETZ

818.644.1477 | LIC. # 01897529

$1,379,000 5 BEDS 4 BATHS 4,000 SQ. FT.

4125 EMPIS STREET

$299,500 3 BEDS 3.5 BATH 1,680 SQ. FT.

4921 AZUCENA ROAD

WOODLAND HILLS

GUY AZAR

818.339.4192 | LIC. # 01882376

WOODLAND HILLS

EMIL HARTOONIAN

818.924.2806 | LIC. # 01796925

$2,500,000 5 BEDS 5 BATHS 5,217 SQ. FT. 43,560 SQ. FT. LOT

$2,299,000 5 BEDS 4.5 BATHS 5,300 SQ. FT. 14,966 SQ. FT. LOT

$989,000 3 BEDS 2.5 BATHS 2,464 SQ. FT. 10,959 SQ. FT. LOT

$17,000/ MO 5 BEDS 6 BATHS 6,600 SQ. FT. 49,223 SQ. FT. LOT

THEAGENCYRE.COM


THE A GENC Y WELC OM ES

Nikki Joel D I R E C TO R O F E S TAT E S DIV I SI ON, THE A GENC Y SHERM A N OA KS

Founder and CEO Mauricio Umansky and Sherman Oaks Managing Partners Emil Hartoonian, Craig Knizek and Michelle Schwartz are proud to welcome Nikki Joel, a versatile agent with more than a decade of real estate experience to The Agency’s growing team. “Our valley offices have grown organically over the years and as managing partners we have strategically identified pillars of the community to join our family. Nikki has always been an agent that is highly respected, tremendously ethical and an absolute force to be reckoned with. We are beyond proud that she has selected The Agency as her new home.“ - Michelle Schwartz Managing Partner, Sherman Oaks & Calabasas An L.A. native, Nikki attended the University of California at Berkeley and worked as a talent agent at ICM before her real estate career took center stage.

Nikki Joel Director of Estates Division Nikki.Joel@TheAgencyRE.com 310.428.2248 LIC # 01784589


1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6. 1. 17173 STRAWBERRY DRIVE

2. 813 N SPAULDING AVENUE

3. 5325 COLLINGWOOD CIRCLE

4. 4850 ANDASOL

5. 5100 SOPHIA AVENUE

6. 5205 WHITE OAK #2

Active | Encino | $ 5,299,900 7 Beds | 8.5 Baths | 7,600 Sq. Ft. | 16,000 Sq. Ft. Lot

Coming Soon | Calabasas | $2,299,000 5 Beds | 4.5 Baths | 5,300 Sq. Ft. | 14,966 Sq. Ft. Lot

For Lease | Encino | $19,999/Month 6 Beds | 6.5 Baths | 5,000 Sq. Ft. | 11,000 Sq. Ft. Lot

New Listing | West Hollywood | $3,999,999 6 Beds | 6.5 Baths | 5,300 Sq. Ft. | 6,500 S q. Ft. Lot

Active and For Lease | Encino | $19,999/Month 5 Beds | 5 Baths | 5,800 Sq. Ft. | 14,439 Sq. Ft. Lot

In Escrow | Encino | $695,000 3 Beds | 2.5 Bath | 1,907 Sq. Ft.

DANIELLE PERETZ | Danielle.Peretz@theagencyre.com | 818.644.1477 | Lic. # 01897529 LUXURY REAL ESTATE AT THEAGENCYRE.COM


h 15053 Rayneta Drive Sherman Oaks Offered at $1,699,000 • 5 Bedrooms • 5.5 Bathrooms • 5,263 Sq. Ft. Home • 6,208 Sq. Ft. Lot • City Light and Canyon Views

www.15053Rayneta.com

JUST SOLD

FOR SALE

Guard Gated Silver Hawk Ridge

JUST SOLD

South of the Blvd.

3831 Hilton Head Way, Tarzana | $1,899,000

4029 Sumac Drive, Sherman Oaks | $1,475,000

4151 Colbath Avenue, Sherman Oaks | $1,450,000

JUST SOLD

JUST SOLD

FOR SALE

5126 Balboa Blvd. Encino | $1,070,000

5924 Vananden Avenue, Tarzana | $925,000

South of the Blvd. 4223 Murietta Ave., Sherman Oaks | $1,362,000

BARRY DANTAGNAN 818.426.8677

barrydantagnan@gmail.com

COLDWELL BANKER RESIDENTIAL BROKERAGE

©2020 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Owned By a Subsidiary of NRT LLC. Broker does not guarantee the accuracy of square footage, lot size or other information concerning the condition or features of property provided by seller or obtained from public records or other sources, and the buyer is advised to independently verify the accuracy of that information through personal inspection and with appropriate professionals. If your property is currently listed for sale, this is not intended as a solicitation. Cal RE #01020477


A home that exceeds expectations deserves a mortgage to match.

• Up to 89.99% financing on a primary residence may be available on loan sizes up to $2 million1 • 80% financing on loan sizes up to $3 million-loan sizes up to $8 million available to well-qualified buyers who meet Citi’s High Net Worth2 requirements • Dedicated support every step of the way

Let’s find a mortgage that fits your needs. Call me today. John Musso Home Lending Officer 818-518-1008 john.musso@citi.com citi.com/johnmusso NMLS# 448606 Terms, conditions and fees for accounts, programs, products and services are subject to change. This is not a commitment to lend. All loans are subject to credit and property approval. Certain restrictions may apply on all programs. Offer cannot be combined with any other mortgage offer. This offer contains information about U.S. domestic financial services provided by Citibank, N.A. and is intended for use domestically in the U.S. 1

A minimum FICO score of 740 required. Must be primary residence. 1-unit properties only including condos, co-ops and PUDs. Borrowers must have a minimum of 12 months reserves. Mortgage insurance required. The property must be located in a stable market. Refinances are limited to rate/term refinances of an existing CitiMortgage loan. Refinances can result in cash back to the borrower. Properties in any MSA depreciating 5.01% or more per the Citi seriously declining market list or information found on the appraisal are not eligible. A Citibank deposit account is required for this action. A minimum of $50,000 in eligible post-close balances must be in place no later than 10 days prior to your scheduled closing loan. The anticipated post-close Citi eligible balances are based upon the balances you are anticipated to have following the closing of the mortgage loan and taking into account any down payment and/or closing costs you will be paying out of pocket at closing. Citi eligible balances include your personal account balance in your Citibank deposits accounts (checking, savings, certificate of deposit and money market). Balances from Citibank N.A. business accounts and retirement accounts other than IRAs and Keoughs (except Keough Plans with participants other than the account owner and spouses, or partners and their spouses) are excluded. Conforming loans are loans that are up to $510,400 or up to $765,600 in certain high cost markets. Jumbo loans are loans that exceed those conforming loan amounts. A Citibank Mortgage Representative can inform you what the conforming loan amount is in the area where your property is located. A minimum FICO score of 720 required. Available for clients with a minimum of $500,000 or more in investable post-close assets, and at least $50,000 in traditional assets must be on deposit with Citi at least 10 days prior to closing. This amount may be part of the $500,000 eligibility requirement. Real estate, loan proceeds, stock options, restricted stock and personal property will not be counted as part of the $500,000 or more investable post-close assets or the $50,000 in traditional assets. Net cash value of life insurance can be counted as part of the $500,000 but not part of the traditional assets. Investable assets are defined as deposit accounts (checking, savings, money market, certificates of deposit), unrestricted stocks, non-vested stock and restricted stock, bonds and retirement accounts held by the individual who is personally liable on the loan. These asset types held in revocable trust may be used provided the trust document meets the Trust Policy. 100% of the face value of all assets, except non-vested stock and restricted stock, may be used to calculate the amount of funds available to meet the eligibility criteria. For non-vested stock and restricted stock, the borrower must be 100% vested within 1 year of closing and a maximum of 70% of value may be used to calculate qualifying equity. Additional conditions apply.

2

©2020 Citibank, N.A. NMLS# 412915. Member FDIC and Equal Housing Lender. Citi, Citi and Arc Design and other marks used herein are service marks of Citigroup Inc. or its affiliates, used and registered throughout the world.


LAST WORD

Dark Night AN EVENING OUT ON THE TOWN WITH COLLEGE FRIENDS TAKES AN UNEXPECTED TWIST—CHANGING ONE YOUNG MAN’S LIFE FOREVER. Written by Price Stephens | Illustrated by Yasmine Kahsai

My eyes opened to bright industrial ceiling lights overhead.

millimeter away from my spinal cord. Essentially, I came

I was being wheeled on a stretcher. “He’s waking up,” a

within hairs of not being able to walk for the rest of my life.

young man uttered to a nearby woman, whom I later found

My blood alcohol showed I was legally drunk, but that

out was the lead ER doctor. “We are taking you to get some

didn’t explain my bizarre behavior. Hospital workers thought

X-rays,” she said. Before I could muster a reply, I fainted.

I might have been “roofied.” That is, at some point that

That is the first memory I have before my body soberly

night someone slipped the so-called date rape drug into my

awakened at 2:30 p.m. later that day—15 hours after my last

drink. I wasn’t the first person to come into the ER after a

memory of an evening out with some friends. It would take

night in the LoDo district that went awry. That explanation

me another 24 hours to tell my parents, who were 800 miles

befuddled me. I always felt that roofies were something for

away, that I lay limp in a hospital bed, unable to walk.

women to worry about; who’s going to drug a dude? Why?

It was October 2016 and I was cruising through my first semester of college at the University of Colorado in Boulder. One night I was convinced by friends to make the one-hour trip to Denver. After a few drinks at one of the Denver clubs, I got bored.

When you’re a guy, and you share that you got roofied, you can see eyeballs roll. Once my parents arrived, I underwent a spinal fusion: two plates and six screws. This inhibited movement in my lower vertebrae so that I could walk without pain. The screws are

The crowd and atmosphere of Club Beta didn’t meet my

now gone, but the lessons of that night are intact. And have

expectations. So I took off alone and walked the streets of

changed the way I socialize—forever.

the LoDo district. I saw some cute girls dressed in Halloween

These days I only drink with friends I trust, and I always

costumes walk into a nearby bar and I followed behind them,

listen to my gut. When a creepy vibe or suspicious characters

flashed my fake ID and breezed inside. That’s the last normal

emerge, I am out. No need to take risks. I have scars on my

moment I remember.

back—literally—from being naive and, quite frankly, arro-

The rest of the evening was something out of a horror film. I recall suddenly feeling paranoid and I started frantically running. Somehow I managed to break into the

gant. Yes, sometimes trouble finds you, but that’s no excuse for being careless. Ultimately it could have been much worse. Today I love

downtown Denver trainyard and then started sprinting along

the sanctity in life that comes from friends and family, and

the tracks. As the paramedics later told my family, I climbed

I understand that sometimes we have to experience some

on top of one of the train cars and leaped between them until

darkness to appreciate the light. ■

I jumped off. I hit the ground and was knocked out. I woke up in the hospital with a fractured spine—just a

122

|

Price Stephens is a 21-year-old aspiring writer based in Studio City.


The Spitz | Cameron Group Selling A Lifestyle S P E C TA C U L A R E N C I N O H O M E S

17925 Medley Dr, Encino - Price Available Upon Request

3949 Vista Linda Dr, Encino $2,775,000

17069 Oak View Dr, Encino $3,649,000

3919 Westfall Dr, Encino $4,499,995

4265 Bonavita Pl Encino $1,599,000

The Spitz | Cameron Group,

your Luxury Real Estate Specialists AndrewSpitz.com

HarrietCameron.com

FranChavez.com

DRE#924610 Realtor®

DRE#675971 Realtor®

DRE#01013357 Realtor®

818-817-4284

818-380-2151

818-517-1411

©2019 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices California Properties (BHHSCP) is a member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates LLC. BHH Affiliates LLC and BHHSCP do not guarantee accuracy of all data including measurements, conditions, and features of property. Information is obtained from various sources and will not be verified by broker or MLS. Buyer is advised to independently verify the accuracy of that information. DRE #01317331


Not every decision is this complicated.

Choosing a Facey doctor for your care is easy. Deciding whether to rescue the princess or your waistline isn’t always easy, but choosing a doctor at Facey Medical Group couldn’t be simpler. It doesn’t matter if you have PPO, HMO, MAPD or any other acronym on your insurance card. We’ll still give you the same convenient, compassionate, team-based care. We accept most health plans, including Medicare and individual/family plans. And here’s an even better reason to choose Facey: People love our doctors. Daily News readers have voted us L.A.’s best medical group since 2009. We accept most PPO and HMO health plans, including Medicare and individual/family plans. And thanks to our affiliation with Providence, chosing a Facey doctor means a seamless experience at our clinics and Providence’s award-winning hospitals. Ask your insurance company or broker how you can switch today. For a list of the health plans we currently accept, give us a call or visit our website at: facey.com/insurance

Mina Moussavian-Assadi, M.D. Board-Certified Pediatrician Facey Tarzana

Tarzana Primary Care & Women’s Health 18133 Ventura Blvd • Tarzana, CA 91505 • 818-466-7700 FA C E Y. C O M/T A R Z A N A

1-844-MY-FACEY

@FACEYMEDI CAL

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