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MARCH/APRIL 2021

18 COURTING SUCCESS Professional tennis player Katrina Scott

20 FACES OF THE FUTURE 10 of the Valley’s most accomplished teenagers

20

36 TRIAL OF THE CENTURY Teen vaccine trial volunteer

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48 SECOND HELPING

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92 REAL ESTATE COVER

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photographed by

LAST WORD

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A rite of passage in the time of pandemic


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PHOTOGRAPHED BY AMY NEUSINGER

EDITOR’S LETTER

Staying on Course While working on VB’s annual Faces of the Future issue, I thought

did the Buckley School grads know when they signed up that

about the impact of the pandemic on our kids. The plight of stu-

they’d be called on to work during the state’s worst wildfire

dents—on lockdown for a full year—has been daunting. Certainly

season in history. Mason also faced the most severe of conse-

the focus of school is academics, but so much more in the class-

quences from the coronavirus, traveling home over the holi-

room shapes our children: social interaction, hands-on experi-

days to enjoy some time off only to have his grandmother pass

ences and extracurricular activities, to name a few. I’ve heard

away from COVID shortly after he arrived. Jack and Mason’s

from so many parents about how the quarantine has affected their

account of the harrowing experience of being “on the line”

children: shifts in personality, changes in behavior, anxiety about

of a half dozen wildfires, plus their wise-beyond-their-years

economic hardships, and so on.

recollections about how it has impacted their lives makes for a

However, I’ve discovered that not all is negative. For some, having the luxury of time has led to newfound passions. In our

compelling read. While on the subject of teens who have risen to the occasion:

home feature (page 64), you’ll meet the Emiles and get a peek

We present you with the finalists for Faces of the Future, be-

inside their light-filled abode in Woodland Hills. The mid-

ginning on page 20. This year, we had twice as many submis-

century structure, which the couple renovated and designed

sions. During the selection process, the VB team struggled and

themselves, is filled with striking paintings—all the work of

yes, I’ll admit it, we argued. There were just so many talented,

their 14-year-old son, Aiden, who used the downtime to teach

accomplished, passionate kids who deserved recognition. For

himself to paint. His works caught the eye of some local de-

those not selected: We see you, we hear you, and please know

signers, who featured him in social posts, and now the teen has

you have our admiration. Our schools, along with deeply in-

a long list of people queued up for commissioned pieces.

volved parents, are cultivating some amazing young people.

On page 58, you’ll meet two other teenagers who have in-

As we start to see the light, my heart goes out to all the

disputably grown from the events of the past year. Jack Barrett

students who have carried on—amid what has certainly been

and Mason Lee postponed college to do a year of service with

one of the greatest challenges of their lives—with excellence

the California Conservation Corps, which, among other things,

and perseverance. This issue is a tribute to your strength and

puts young people to work during natural disasters. Little

resilience—and your future.

Linda Grasso Follow me on Instagram @she_sez

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MARCH/ APRIL 2021 FACES OF THE FUTURE Meet some extraordinary Valley teenagers who have the world at their fingertips.


Courting Success

PHOTOGRAPHED BY AL BELLO / STAFF, GETTY IMAGES NORTH AMERICA

AT 16, WOODLAND HILLS TENNIS PRO KATRINA SCOTT HOPES TO TURN HER SURPRISE WILD CARD SPOT AT LAST YEAR’S US OPEN INTO A TRIUMPHANT PROFESSIONAL CAREER.


Although she had an impressive junior career, Katrina Scott, ranked #637 by the WTA, certainly didn’t expect to play in the US Open last September. But after several players dropped out due to COVID restrictions, the 16-year-old got a late wild card invitation—and she didn’t disappoint. The Woodland Hills native made it to the second round and was just two points away from winning the match when she lost to Amanda Anisimova, who was ranked in the top 30. In November she turned pro, signing with Topnotch Management with representation by Meilen Tu, a Tarzana native and former player. VB editor Linda Grasso caught up with Katrina at her training base in Ohio to talk about the exciting experience—and the promising road from here.

“IN THE JUNIOR LEVEL I ALWAYS PLAYED HIGHER AGE GROUPS TO BE CHALLENGED. EVERYONE WAS BIGGER, STRONGER, FASTER, AND MORE EXPERIENCED. BUT I STUCK WITH IT.”

HOW DID YOU START PLAYING TENNIS? I was highly active as a child. One day after ice skating, a

MEET ANYBODY INTERESTING?

friend and I went to a tennis lesson and I continued—and

Because of COVID, the interaction restrictions were pretty

here we are now. I started competing in tournaments

tight, but I did get a chance to meet a few players. I also

shortly after turning 8. In the junior level I always played

got a chance to hit with Bernarda Pera, which was awe-

higher age groups to be challenged. Everyone was bigger,

some; she’s a really cool person.

stronger, faster, and more experienced. But I stuck with it. WHAT’S YOUR DAILY LIFE LIKE? SO HOW DID THE US OPEN WILD CARD COME ABOUT?

Prior to COVID-19 I was active, traveling a lot, play-

It was unbelievable because I was so far down the

ing tennis tournaments and practicing. Practice is three

wait-list. Several players dropped out because of COVID

hours of hitting and one hour of fitness, Monday through

restrictions, which moved me up the ladder. And then I

Saturday. Afterward I study (she is home schooled).

believe a few players in the main draw also pulled out,

Sundays are for recovery and resting, or maybe hanging

which moved players in the next position up. I got pushed

out with friends.

further up. When we found out that there was a chance I’d get in, we were checking the list several a day! Finally,

LAST YEAR YOU CHANGED YOUR TRAINING BASE TO

right before the deadline, one player pulled out and I got

COLUMBUS, OHIO, WHERE YOUR COACH IS LOCATED.

the wild card. We flew to New York the next morning and

MOVING TO A NEW CITY DURING A PANDEMIC MUST

began the testing and quarantine process.

HAVE BEEN CHALLENGING. The upside to the downside has to be no tournament

WHAT WAS THAT EXPERIENCE LIKE? ONE MINUTE

pressure. I’ve been a little more relaxed going into prac-

YOU ARE PRACTICING IN THE VALLEY AND

tices because the time clock for improvement has slowed

THE NEXT YOU ARE SHARING A LOCKER ROOM

down and given me more time to polish up the finer

WITH THE WILLIAMS SISTERS!

points of my game. It was also nice that I had both my

So many feelings: surprise, happiness, pride, and then fear,

parents for most of the pandemic. (She is an only child.)

worry, anxiety and million thoughts. Everything was sur-

My mom lives with me and my dad comes to visit every

real. I was so excited to play my first main-draw US Open.

couple of weeks. ■

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faces of the future MEET 10 OF THE MOST INSPIRING TEENAGERS IN THE VALLEY. THESE HIGH ACHIEVERS REPRESENT A DIVERSE ARRAY OF DEMANDING DISCIPLINES, FROM ROBOTICS TO PUBLIC SPEAKING, AND ALL HAVE OUTSTANDING ACADEMIC TRACK RECORDS. AS IF THAT’S NOT ENOUGH, THEY SOMEHOW MAKE TIME FOR CHARITY WORK, PART-TIME JOBS, AND EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES. THIS YEAR, THE STUDENTS SELECTED BY THE VB TEAM HAD THE ADDED CHALLENGE OF DEALING WITH A PANDEMIC. BUT AS YOU’LL SEE, THEY MET IT HEAD ON. NOTHING HOLDS THESE TEENS BACK. Written by Dakota Smith | Photographed by Michael Becker


Nadia Bradfield


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RAND MEYER, 17 VALLEY INTERNATIONAL PREPARATORY HIGH SCHOOL

NADIA BRADFIELD, 17 CHAMPS CHARTER HIGH SCHOOL OF THE ARTS (photo on previous spread)

It’s a surprise when the charming and wry Rand Meyer shares that he struggled on the speech team his fresh-

Nadia Bradfield started ballet dancing at the age of 4,

man year. “I wasn’t a performer or an actor, and it was

but it wasn’t until she visited a new dance studio at 9

a challenge because I wasn’t particularly great at it,”

that she got hooked.

Rand says. “Being given a platform to talk about real

“I was fascinated watching the dancers on point.

issues day to day in my life, being able to flip them to

Normally teachers want you to wait until your feet

a real positive and share that—that became a real ad-

and ankles are more developed and stronger. You are

dicting issue.”

basically standing on a cardboard box, balancing on the

By 2020, Rand had mastered the craft. Beating

circumference of your feet. But the teacher did a couple

out 200 of the best high school storytellers from all

exercises with me and thought I was ready. That was it

50 states, Rand won the National Speech and Debate

for me.”

Association’s storytelling competition. Because that

And so her life became a pattern that contin-

wasn’t enough, he also scored a sixth place in the

ued through high school. If Nadia wasn’t training at

expository category—no sweat. “It was wild. I’d been

Burbank Dance Academy, she was working on main-

doing speech and debate since freshman year. It was

taining her 4.0 GPA. The senior has more than 300

the first online tournament I’d competed in. I spent

total credits on her high school resume—exceeding

hours recording and re-recording videos. And then af-

CHAMPS’ requirement of 220.

ter a few days of stressing myself out, I won nationals from my bedroom!” he laughs.

Nadia has participated in several exclusive summer dance programs including one with the Bolshoi Ballet,

With his skills and successes at storytelling, Rand

and she has advanced to the second round of the clas-

decided to help several other students in writing their

sical ballet competition for the Music Center Spotlight

college essays. “It was a worthwhile and very fulfill-

Awards all four years of high school.

ing experience to try to help open up opportunities for

During practices, she often wears ankle weights. “I

people,” Rand says. “I helped my friend Jess work on

have a different physique than the typical classical bal-

her essay and she got into her top school. I want to see

lerina—and at times it has been challenging. I’ve had

her fulfill all her opportunities.”

several teachers tell me I need to go on a diet and lose

Rand has committed early-decision to Northwestern University in Illinois, wooed by the school’s top-

weight. But I know that is not right for me.” Last year Nadia was accepted to participate in a

flight communications program. He hopes to join

year-round intensive with the prestigious Joffrey

the school’s mock trial and speech & debate team,

Ballet, which could have resulted in an invitation

pursuing a career in law, public policy or government.

to join the dance company. When the program was

“The skills you learn in speech are applicable in almost

cancelled due to the pandemic, Nadia decided to pivot,

any situation,” Rand says. “You find your individual

making the decision to attend college. “I think going to

writer’s voice, write essays with the intent that you’re

college will give me more options. But I still have my

going to speak them to people, and learn to communi-

dream. I still want to go to a classical ballet company.

cate personality in presentation.”

And I want to dance ‘Swan Lake.’”

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23


RAYAN ANSARI, 18 SIERRA CANYON SCHOOL

Rayan is equally active at his high school, where he won the Sierra Canyon Community Service Leadership Award and has received the President’s Volunteer Service Award

Rayan Ansari managed to raise a 2.0 GPA to above 3.5—

each year. He also founded his school’s Muslim Student

not his own, but those of three siblings from a Syrian

Association and cofounded SC Voices for Change, a coali-

refugee family who attend his mosque. He began tutoring

tion that unites various clubs into one large community

the trio six hours a week while handling his own heavy

with the hopes of effecting real change by uniting students

course load. Buoyed by his success, he helped kicked off

and faculty members for large projects. Since its incep-

Canyon Tutoring, an all-volunteer peer organization as-

tion, SC Voices for Change has orchestrated charity events,

sisting lower and middle school students struggling with

student workshops and Zoom civil discourse discussions.

distance learning. “A lot of it is just bringing a human aspect to Zoom,”

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Outside of school, Rayan has given speeches at multifaith charity events sponsored by Congressman Brad

Rayan says. “I use the video game Fortnite as a metaphor

Sherman and bipartisan activist Mohammed Khan. He has

for a math problem, or I find other topics that interest

also worked with the African American Islamic Council

the kids.”

(AAIC) to conduct COVID relief food drives.

Rayan doesn’t just want peers to ace quizzes. He also

When asked about his charity work, Rayan is modest

wants them to question bias, so he serves as the editor in

and circumspect. “I really think this ties into my interest

chief at NoCap News, a student-led, inclusive news site

in biology. I’m always fascinated with how these tiny,

written by students around the world. “We want our readers

inner workings of life magnify into super complex social

to think critically, especially with the social media craze.”

workings. Altruism is a primal experience.”


ADRIANNA BEAN, 13 MILLIKAN MIDDLE SCHOOL Adrianna Bean is a straight-A student in the honors program at Millikan Middle School. But what she really wants you to know about herself goes beyond academics. “I like to ask myself what if? That eliminates boundaries. I have an imaginative spirit.” That spirit incented her in the fourth grade to make a documentary about the Fetty Food Pantry at the Church of the Valley in Van Nuys. “Eight of the girls in my Brownies troop went to preschool at the church. I wanted to show that there are many types of people in need. People think that pantries feed just homeless people, but some come to the pantry to keep from being homeless.” Also, in 2018 her 11-member Brownie troop (#6396 in Sherman Oaks) was awarded the Bronze Award, the highest award given by the Girl Scouts, for their service at the pantry. And during the pandemic, the troop continued with their monthly drives. “I don’t understand why human rights has to be a debated topic. Our differences aren’t an excuse to treat others in a bad way. We all share the same human code.” Adrianna’s second film, The Homework Headache, won Best Short Film in the 2019 Los Angeles Public Library Teens of LA Film Festival. “I’d done a homework assignment incorrectly. I completely freaked out. Ultimately, I made the experience into a monologue, incorporating animation.” An avid cartoonist, her work often features colorful characters that at times make political statements. She takes art classes after school from LA Mission College and thus far has earned nine college credits. Although just in the eighth grade, make no mistake, Adrianna Bean has a vision for her future. “Whether I’m working on a film or I’m the head of a record label, I want to send messages that are important to me. And I want to be the boss.”

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25


VASCO SINGH, 17 VIEWPOINT SCHOOL When Vasco Singh was just 12 years old, he took a trip to India and got sick due to the lead in the water. “Taking antibiotics for my sickness, my immune system got wiped out, leaving me with allergies. With no current proactive solutions for allergies, only reactive (i.e., EpiPens), I sought a better solution.” Teaching himself immunology and business fundamentals, Vasco, along with three friends, researched and developed their first product, Allergy Immunity, in 2018. The 17-year-old says the probiotic relieved him of his allergies. “For people who have developed allergies later in life to things like gluten and peanuts, I challenge them to think of the exact time in which the onset of their allergies occurred. Many people will realize that it coincides with a sickness. If you can track the origin of your allergies to a time, probiotics can be a useful way of suppressing and fully relieving your allergies.” Encouraged by his parents (his mom is a chemical engineer at the biopharmaceutical company Amgen, and his dad is a biotech entrepreneur), Vasco and friends founded Realign Therapeutics. Vasco says in its first year the online company had $10,000 in sales. The four students are currently focused on getting their first patent, a proactive oral-immunotherapy methodology to be administered with probiotics, aimed at relieving allergies. Of all his accomplishments, Vasco says filing for a patent is what he is most proud of. “In the world of medicine, many scientists and doctors carry skepticism about the nature and efficacy of probiotics. We had to go above and beyond to research, to self-study microbiology and immunology, to prove ourselves.” When not doing schoolwork (20 AP/honors classes; ranked near the top of his class), Vasco volunteers at the Westminster Free Clinic & Community Care Center in Oxnard. He also is a center midfielder for Viewpoint’s varsity soccer team (captain, CIF AllLeague). After an undergrad degree in biomedical engineering, he hopes to go on to medical school.


JAKE FUTTERMAN, 18 HARVARD-WESTLAKE SCHOOL

returned in 2019 for a second year. But when the coronavirus struck, Jake’s plans to return in 2020 were crushed. “I had planned to establish an EHA Robotics Academy

Jake Futterman wanted to do something meaningful with

outside of the village where we could get 50 to 60 stu-

his ninth-grade community service requirement. Inspired

dents from five or six schools,” Jake says. “That really

by his aunt’s work with Ethiopia Health Aid (EHA), he

hurt me. I know how much those kids enjoyed it.”

decided to teach robotics in Ethiopia. The chief designer,

With extra time during the lockdown, Jake decided

builder and drive coach of the Harvard-Westlake VEX

to found Global Educational Missions in Robotics (GEM

Robotics Competition team, “62A,” traveled to Ethiopia

Robotics). Built to reach underprivileged students outside

for a week to teach robotics to 20 kids by using Lego

of Ethiopia, Jake also worked with Paradise Games to

Mindstorms, a beginner robotics system employing

create a robotics program on the Ivory Coast. He then

Legos as the basic building materials. “Most of the kids

founded Bored of Boredom, a Zoom program to teach

had never even seen a computer and I had to teach them

Lego robotics worldwide.

through an interpreter. But it was incredible how smart

In 2019, Jake led the Harvard-Westlake team on an

they were. The kids constructed complex robots in less

undefeated run to the State Robotics Championship and

than a week—half the time I’d allotted. I learned that

quarterfinal finishes at both the National Championship

someone’s background does not define what they can and

and World Championship. But his mission isn’t winning

can’t do.”

competitions. “My life mission is to use robotics as a

And so the afterschool EHA Robotics Academy was born. Jake wrote a new curriculum, sent more kits, and

tool for social equity,” he shares. And as you might have guessed, he hopes to return to Ethiopia this summer.

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CORDELIA ZAWARSKI, 18 LOUISVILLE HIGH SCHOOL

hours but cannot due to COVID, so I kind of sneak in and participate also.” A competitive dancer at Degas Dance Studio in Encino

Cordelia Zawarski, who goes by “Cordy,” knew she want-

since age 7, Cordy has never been the prima ballerina. “I

ed to be a cardiothoracic surgeon after a doctor saved her

wasn’t the most naturally talented person, but I was so

godfather’s life.

headstrong in wanting to accomplish, so I worked as hard

“My godfather had an aortic dissection and multiple open-heart surgeries. His cardio surgeon somehow saved

little harder, I’m very understanding and aware of people

him, multiple times. Once that happened, I knew that was

who are struggling too.”

what I wanted to do.” To achieve her goal, she took initiative. Cordy joined

|

Empathy and gumption are important skills for a tutor, which is Cordy’s part-time job at a Kumon learning cen-

Louisville’s Medical Focus Program, shadowed doctors

ter. Cordy also finds time to volunteer with Louisville’s

at Providence Cedars-Sinai Tarzana Medical Center and

Empowerment Club for young women, as well as at food

participated in Brown University’s Two Weeks in the Life

banks, women’s shelters, a horse rescue sanctuary and

of a Medical Student. She hasn’t let COVID interrupt her

environmental cleanup groups. She cites her mom, a

quest for knowledge. “You just have to be creative with

teacher, as a role model, adding “Degas Dance Studio

opportunities. I participate in live physician shadowing

owner Anacia Weiskittel and teacher Danielle Towne

opportunities with doctors from varying specialties—with

taught me I can accomplish whatever I set my mind to do

Q&A sessions. These free programs are technically for

if I just put in the time and effort.”

university premed students who need to log shadowing

28

as possible,” she said. “Since I’ve always had to try a


JAMES BURCH, 18 BUCKLEY SCHOOL When James Burch, who goes by “Jem,” was in preschool, he became fascinated with the shapes of letters. At the age of 5 he started learning Russian though Rosetta Stone, and playing Scrabble with his parents. “I started beating them on a regular basis. Then I discovered competitive Scrabble.” Jem’s first competition was at age 9, when he placed fourth in his division. But it wasn’t long before he started dominating the game. The Buckley School senior is currently ranked in the top 25 players in California. He won the last National School Scrabble Competition he played in—during his sophomore year, before the pandemic. He also won twice in middle school. “I love learning about the history of words—how they’ve evolved over time. Scrabble is really a game of word memorization. My goal is not to win a tournament. It’s to see the luck that is in the bag [the letters] to create something.” Jem can easily recall his favorite victory. “It was the nationals, sophomore year. It was round 5 and I was behind. I stumbled upon the word ‘calisaya.’ It’s a plant that is grown in the Andes mountains. I had learned the word on the app Aerolith. That moment reaffirmed why I play Scrabble. You just find these incredible words.” In addition to continuing with his Russian studies at home, Jem also studies Latin at Buckley, where he has a 4.78 GPA and shows promise as a poet. This past year Jem won a national silver medal for poetry. Thus far, he’s been accepted to Yale University. “I want to major in linguistics with a minor in creative writing or maybe Russian. I envision a career as a professor of linguistics. Or maybe a translator. I think it would be interesting to do field work with environmental linguistics. The world has over 7,000 languages and 5,000 are in danger of dying. Or maybe I’ll be a code breaker for the CIA.”


XAVIER CHAN, 17 BRIDGES ACADEMY

something up from bare bones,” Xavier says. “You just see a bunch of metal, bolts, circuits and wires lying around, and there are infinite possibilities of putting it all

Xavier Chan isn’t waiting until college to start his en-

together, each with its own problems and advantages. It’s

gineering journey. The young inventor has applied for a

just amazing when it succeeds.”

provisional patent with the U.S. Patent and Trademark

Xavier maintains a full course load of humanities,

Office for a unique unidirectional sidekick thruster for

languages and STEM honors classes, as well as taking

remotely operated underwater vehicles. If you don’t know

AP courses in Chinese, physics and calculus BC. Through

what that is, you’re not alone. Bottom line: This 12th-

all his successes, Xavier remains humble and says he

grader wants to power the industrial Teslas of the water.

prefers cooperation over working alone. “I myself can

Xavier’s dream of developing electrically chargeable battery systems to propel large cargo ships and subma-

same amount of time that a team could come up with

rines was inspired by his work as a captain in Bridges

15 different ideas to solve a problem. Among those 15

Academy’s robotics club, Mechanical Paradise. The club

problems, there are many that are better than my own in

competes in the FIRST Robotics each year and Xavier was

a large pool of ideas.”

nominated for a Dean’s List Award for his work in this year’s competition. “Robotics is just like writing a story—it’s building

30

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only come up with one or two ideas max within the

In his spare time, Xavier runs on the school’s crosscountry and track-and-field teams and volunteers at the Animal Hope and Wellness Shelter.


NOI KERTIS-SELLA, 18 CHAMPS CHARTER HIGH SCHOOL OF THE ARTS Noi Kertis-Sella weighed only 3 pounds at birth, and doctors told her parents that she probably would never walk. But when the preemie spotted her twin brother crawling around, much to her parent’s surprise, she started mimicking him. Noi ultimately did walk, and much more. Today, she is ranked #13 nationally in archery, and she’s #5 in California. It is a sport that takes an extraordinary amount of strength. “My archery setup is 40 pounds when I draw back my bow with my three fingers. I am essentially holding 40 pounds with my fingers,” she says. The 5-foot 3 high school senior works out regularly with weights and does core exercises to help with strength and balance. Noi got introduced to archery when she joined a school club at 12 years old. “I felt a natural ability. I had a lot of strength in my arms and hands from doing monkey bars as a kid. When I took a class and I really felt like I could hit center, and then I did, it gave me confidence.” Noi clearly remembers her first big win. “It was my first time doing Olympic rounds. I won the match and shot 60 meters, shooting 29 out of 30 in the bull’s-eye.” But for her, the rewards of archery go beyond winning. “Every time I draw my bow back it is like a meditation because of my focus. It calms me and makes me feel in the present.” Practicing six days a week after school at the Woodley Park archery range with a coach (she also has a setup at home), Noi has managed to earn a 3.7 GPA as a student in the CHAMPS Digital Media Arts Academy. She aspires to win an Olympic medal at the 2024 games, and will attend college to study graphic design next year, tackling both those endeavors with her signature mindset. “I see a challenge and I want to prove to myself that I can do it. I want to overcome the labels and limitations put on me. I have what they call grit.” ■


S C H O O L S P OT L I G H T

32

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION


S P E C I A L A D V E R T I S I N G S E C T I O N

S C H O O L S P OT L I G H T

MOVING ON UP Local boutique high school celebrates a new campus of its own.

T

he past few years have led Valley International Prep (VIP), a public high school formed in 2018, down a somewhat winding road. Originally

operating under the umbrella of a charter management organization, VIP embraced its

“WE KNOW WHO WE ARE AND DELIVER WHAT WE PROMISE.”

curriculum that includes AP coursework as well as interesting electives.” VIP plans to cap their enrollment at 400 students, ensuring that faculty, staff and students know each other well and can focus on individualized college counseling and learning programs for each teen. This LAUSD-

independence and rebranded as a standalone charter high school—using Chatsworth

shares VIP’s principal Michael Horne. “Others

chartered high school offers college prep

High’s campus as a temporary location.

want heavy arts or sports, and others want

curriculum that includes a new two-year AP

killer-rigorous academics. Us? We designed

Capstone course.

Now the school is celebrating a recent

“Our four-year-college placements are

move to its own newly renovated and

our inquiry-based program to serve teens

upgraded campus on the southeast edge

who want to engage in thoughtfully chosen

unsurpassed among the Valley’s public high

of Northridge near Reseda—a walkable

coursework driven by faculty and staff who

schools,” Horne says, “with our grads matricu-

distance from public transportation. Designed

know their students’ names and what makes

lating to everything from UCs to Ivy League

with sustainability as a top priority, the

them tick. That’s what makes us ‘boutique.’”

schools, small liberal arts colleges and specialty schools throughout North America and

30,000-square-foot facility features newly

Kathryn Wilbert, VIP’s assistant principal,

furnished classrooms; a 175-seat perform-

agrees. “We’ve never intended to be a school

ing arts space for theatre and music perfor-

for everyone, but we are indeed a school for

mances; a music lab with live-concert and

anyone who wants what we offer. We know

include a music lab where students write,

recording capabilities; a state-of-the-art sci-

who we are and deliver what we promise. We

perform and produce their own music under

ence lab; counseling offices and a dedicated

provide a well-considered and well-designed

the mentorship of a longtime professional

parts of Europe.” The school’s extracurricular programs

college center; a small-group special events space; and a visual arts studio. “VIP is wrapping up its third successful year as a small charter high school focusing

Akwe McDaniels (Class of ’19) and Ciel McDaniels (Class of ’21) are brother-and-sister graduates of VIP. Akwe is a University of Chicago student and QuestBridge Scholar. Ciel will enter Northwestern University this fall as a Posse Scholar.

on college prep,” says Anne Cochran, VIP’s executive director. “We are happily operating within our third iteration at our new facility and are well poised to serve a small school population of teens in the center of the Valley.” Just who is the ideal Valley International Prep student? Teens who don’t match well with larger public-school choices for various reasons, Cochran explains. “Some kids belong in the highly structured setting of a large, district-style school,” |

33


S C H O O L S P OT L I G H T

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

songwriter. A thriving new student-run newspaper is overseen by a Northwestern University-graduated English teacher. VIP’s poetry group is passionate and chomping at the bit to get back to participating in live slams. And the theatre program is slated for marked growth and development starting in the fall. If you think VIP might be the right choice for your teen, check out VIPHS.org, where you’ll find information about the school, its currently open online enrollment and plenty of other tools. VALLEY INTERNATIONAL PREP 18827 ROSCOE BLVD., NORTHRIDGE 818-306-2136 VIPHS.ORG

Below: Maya Jacobs (senior) holds an internship with a NYC literary journal and designed her own independent study publishing course. She is currently receiving college admission decisions and has received a full-tuition Presidential Scholarship from Trinity College. She is a finalist for Davidson College’s Patricia Cornwell Creative Writing Scholarship.

Above: Kayla Acosta (senior) received a near-full-ride scholarship from her first-choice school, Kalamazoo College, to study studio art.

VIP’s graduates have been accepted at and/or attended many esteemed higher learning institutions, including the following:

34

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University of Chicago UCLA University of Pennsylvania UC Berkeley Carnegie Mellon University Vassar College Emory University Yale University Wellesley College Trinity College

Columbia University Northwestern University New York University Dartmouth College Tufts University Claremont McKenna College Cal Poly San Luis Obispo Bryn Mawr College University of Southern California Vanderbilt University


An Uncommon Perspective

Premium fine-art photography from the world’s best creators

Explore the collection at

driftward.com


Trial of the Century A CALABASAS TEENAGER VOLUNTEERS TO PARTICIPATE IN THE PFIZER COVID-19 VACCINE TRIAL. Written by Jean Trinh | Photographed by Shane O’Donnell

When Kearston Stepenosky walked into the National

Describing his daughter as a “force of nature,” Dan says

Research Institute last October to receive her first dose of

she persistently asked him and his wife, Sharon, for 10

the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine, she recalls being

days straight if she could participate in the study.

“by far the youngest person there.” The Calabasas High School junior and basketball team captain was only 16 at the time when she volunteered to

16, you’re still growing and hopefully have a long, won-

be part of the pharmaceutical companies’ phase 3 clinical

derful life ahead of you. I didn’t want to have any kind of

study. Initially, the trial was composed of participants 18

medical complications that would impact that. So I was

and older, but last September, it expanded to adolescents

nervous about it.”

as young as 16, and the following month to those 12 to 15 years old. “As soon as they started to allow minors in, I knew I wanted to be a part of it,” says Kearston, who’s now 17. Kearston says she has always been fascinated with

gave it the green light. Leading up to her first shot, Kearston went through phone screenings, got a physical exam and blood work done, and took a COVID-19 test. She says she wasn’t ner-

riophage therapy as part of her school’s AP Capstone pro-

vous because Pfizer outlined the risks carefully and was

gram. She was also inspired by her father, Dan Stepenosky,

extremely communicative about them. Kearston had also

superintendent of the Las Virgenes Unified School District.

seen her father go through it, and he didn’t have much of

He participated in the Pfizer trials last August.

a reaction, except for brief joint and muscle soreness.

“I just remember thinking how interesting it was and

On the morning of October 22, Kearston, accompa-

how much I wanted to be part of it and help in that small

nied by her father, went in to get her first dose. For the

way that I could,” Kearston shares. “I know it’s some-

following five days, she had chills and felt cold-like

thing that feels like just a tiny, tiny statistic, but obvi-

symptoms, though she says they weren’t severe. When

ously, people need to get involved.”

she received her second vaccine on November 5, she had

Dan, a colon cancer survivor, had similar reasons for

similar symptoms, but they lasted only a day. “It’s really far more important that the greater popula-

Obviously, we want our staff and students to be safe. We

tion be vaccinated so everything can get back to normal,

want to open up our schools and have kids on campus. I

because safety is much more important than that minor

like to solve stuff and move forward.”

reaction I had,” Kearston says.

However, it took some convincing to get Kearston’s parents on board regarding her getting the vaccine.

|

After seeing how passionate Kearston felt about participating, the family discussed it with doctors and then

medicine, an interest that grew when she studied bacte-

volunteering. “I’m the superintendent of a school district.

36

“I’m 52, so it’s one thing for me to be involved in something experimental,” Dan says. “But when you’re

As part of the trial, Kearston will be monitored for a total of 26 months. She fills out a health questionnaire


Xxxxxx Xxxxxx XXXXXXXXXXXXXXX Written & photographed by xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

xxxxxxx xxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxxx x xxx xxxx xx x x xxxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxx x x xx xxxxxxx xxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxxx x xxx xxxx xx x x xxxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxx x x xxxx xxxxxxx xxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxxx x xxx xxxx xx x x xxxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxx x x xxxx xxxxxxx xxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxxx x xxx xxxx xx x x xxxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxx x x xxxx xxxxxxx xxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxxx x xxx xxxx xx x x xxxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxx x x xxxx xxxxxxx xxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxxx x xxx xxxx xx x x xxxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxx x x xxxx xxx xxxx xxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxxx x xxx xxxx xx x x xxxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxx x x xxxx xxxxxxx xxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxxx x xxx xxxx xx x x xxxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxx x x xxxx xxxxxxx xxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxxx x xxx xxxx xx x x xxxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxx x x xxxx xxxxxxx xxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxxx x xxx xxxx xx x x xxxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxx x x xxxx xxxxxxx xxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxxx x xxx xxxx xx x x xxxx x x x xxxxxxxx x xxx x x xxxx xx ■

|

37


By the Numbers Pfizer-BioNTech Vaccine Phase 3 Clinical Trial

46,331 Participants enrolled worldwide

3,013 Adolescents enrolled

6

Months—duration of enrollment period

weekly and goes in to get an examination every couple months. She hasn’t had any negative reactions since her last shot. In December, when the results of the Pfizer trial revealed the vaccine to be 95% effective, Dan says he and Kearston did a happy high five because they “bet on the right horse.” Dan admits it might sound strange, but he found it to be a great father-daughter experience to go through the trial together. “She’ll tell her children and her grandchildren about it,” he says. “She’ll say, ‘My dad was so crazy he let me try out for a vaccine for that global pandemic from 50 years ago.’ So, it was a cool thing to do together to try and help.” ■

38

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95% Efficacy rate

<2% Severe reactions in vaccine recipients

12

Age of youngest participants


Going Here is Coming Home At Milken, we help students discover who they are and where they want to go. Now accepting applications for our new 6th grade for 2021-22. milkenschool.org/grade-6-launch

|

39


Kids Camps & Summer Programs CAMP

TYPE

GENDER

AGES

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AA: (626) 794-1000 LA: (323) 962-3075 MV: (949) 458-1776 WLA: (424) 293-3783

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yada.org/summer-camp-2021/

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I N PA RT N E R S H I P W I T H PA R K E R - A N D E R S O N E N R I C H M E N T

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D E TA I LS + R E G I S T E R

............................................................... campbellhall.org/spring 42

|


The Valley’s BEST Summer Camp Grades K-10

Traditional Day Camp

Jr. Chef Camp | Dance Camp | Cheer Camp For More Information & On-Line Enrollment Visit:

ValleyTrails.com Space is Limited! Reading, Writing, and Math Interventions Social/Emotional Skills Executive Functioning Camp Activities

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Join us for a memorable summer filled with new adventures and lasting friendships!

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It’s Happening! Summer @ Stratford

MORE OPTIONS THAN EVER BEFORE. Stratford has designed the perfect summer camp experience for your child, complete with all the fun, enriching activities they love, and the important safety measures you expect. From our Academic and Specialty Camps, to our all NEW Day Camps, you can build a one of a kind Summer@Stratford experience for your child!

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*Grades offered vary by location. Preschool State License: 198018949, 198018875, 197493889. Copyright © 2021 Stratford Schools, Inc.

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DO SOMETHING AWESOME THIS SUMMER www.hw.com/summer

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45


Now Open and Serving Under the Stars!

Come and enjoy our brand new outdoor patio! We’ve brought the Vibrato vibe & ambiance to an open air space behind the restaurant. More than just eating outside, it’s an entire experience. From the setting, to the new menu and new craft cocktails, to our service, you’re absolutely going to love what we’ve created for you.

LOCATED IN BEL AIR, LOS ANGELES • VIBRATOGRILLJAZZ.COM • 310.474.9400


THE SAUCE

RECIPE FOR SUCCESS Making culinary dreams come true–even during a pandemic. More on page 50.


THE SAUCE

Second Helping OSTERIA LA BUCA OPENS IN SHERMAN OAKS IN THE MIDDLE OF A PANDEMIC, DEFYING ODDS BY ESTABLISHING ITSELF AS A BREAKOUT HIT.

After 15 years of success with their restaurant Osteria La Buca, across from Paramount Studios on Melrose, owners

cacio pepe and bucatini carbonara, both of which don’t

Stephen Sakulsky and John Moezzi set their sights on a

disappoint. The pasta we had was cooked a perfect al dente

second outlet. They considered several locations, includ-

and doused in just the right amount of sauce (it seems so

ing the swanky new Caruso mall, Palisades Village in

often pasta is drowning in sauce or there isn’t enough).

Pacific Palisades, but ultimately zeroed in on the Valley. “Most of my friends growing up lived in the Valley

entrée is generously proportioned and fried to a flawless

found a space where the restaurant Fusion had been. The

crisp. A tomahawk pork chop with apples and chestnuts

landlord understood the dynamics of a pandemic and was

(enough for two) is clearly a premium cut of meat—

interested in partnering with us,” Stephen shares.

which becomes tastier with every bite. A grilled branzino is an elevated experience, served atop kale with pickled

at their most severe, the duo kicked off their second

pearl onions, chanterelle mushrooms and roasted pump-

outpost, offering just delivery and takeout. Much to their

kin seeds. Don’t miss the crispy brussels sprouts, which

surprise, business was brisk from the get-go. On week-

my entire family went bonkers over. The savory balls are

ends it could even be called booming. It’s not unusual for

roasted, tossed in a white anchovy vinaigrette and fin-

the kitchen to max out on Friday and Saturday nights,

ished off with a poached egg and pecorini cheese.

forcing them to stop taking new orders. Regulars have learned to order in early.

In February, the owners bought a mobile pizza oven and launched Buca Out Back, aka BOB, in the rear parking

“I am pinching myself,” says Stephen. “We knew a

lot. In addition to pizza, there are a few snacks, plus wine

lot of our guests were from the Valley and that they were

and beer available. Diners can grab their own fare and sit

getting on the 101 to get to the Melrose location. So we

at picnic tables under string lights.

definitely opened with a following here and word just spread,” the owner shares. Stephen describes the fare as “California Italian—

In the meantime, the interiors of the eatery are being built out in preparation for when restrictions are fully lifted. Eventually indoor seating—along with the patio

country Italian coupled with SoCal produce” and notes

tables out front—will offer dine-in service for 80 to 100

that everything used is organic and made from scratch,

people. It’s the next step to what has been an unexpect-

including the pasta. Produce is purchased at local farmers

edly smooth rollout.

markets or from a small farm Osteria La Buca runs in West LA. “We aren’t hoity-toity about food and we’re aren’t about celebrity chefs. We don’t have all that ego. Here, it’s just about the food,” he says.

|

At Osteria La Buca, you get a sense they aren’t cutting corners or zoning out in the kitchen. A chicken parmesan

and I’ve spent a lot of time here. And John lives here. We

So in October of last year, with COVID restrictions

48

The menu boasts traditional Italian fare like spaghetti

“It took us 10 years to get a second location. I’m elated that we’ve done this well during a pandemic. I figure we’re either geniuses or crazy. Or maybe a bit of both,” Stephen laughs. ■


THE SAUCE

On the Front Burner THE CAREERS THROUGH CULINARY ARTS PROGRAM (C-CAP) HAS BEEN FURTHERING THE CAREERS OF YOUNG CHEFS IN UNDERSERVED COMMUNITIES FOR OVER THREE DECADES. WHEN THE PANDEMIC HIT, THEY FACED A SERIOUS ROADBLOCK. BUT LA’S HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY, FACED WITH ITS OWN SERIOUS CHALLENGES, CAME TO THE RESCUE. Written by Karen Young | Photographed by Shane O’Donnell

Sixteen faces fill the computer screen amid an amalgam

for the preliminary round of the enrichment program’s

of backgrounds and name cards. In one view is Donald

annual scholarship cooking competition.

Wressell, head pastry chef at Guittard Chocolate. His wife,

Maneuvering around the professional kitchen at the

Lorri Wressell, C-CAP LA’s event planner and career ad-

Institute of Culinary Education (ICE) in Pasadena, Chef

visor, uses a phone to video his two-hour demo on vari-

Donald demonstrates knife skills—how to master five pre-

ous cooking skills. The high school students are prepping

cise cuts—as well as techniques to perfect a French omelet. “It takes practice, kids,” he says reinforcing that

“ABOVE ALL, OUR

For the first time, the competition for the scholarship

STUDENTS HAVE PROVEN TO BE

to document their process by uploading photos, videos,

provided with donated food and equipment and expected and personal evaluations. The Careers through Culinary Arts Program (C-CAP) is a nonprofit workforce development program founded in

MOTIVATED, DEDICATED

1990. It operates in six regions across the country, pro-

AND FEARLESS. C-CAP

ternships, college advising, product donations, corporate

KIDS ARE INSPIRING,

5,000 public school students, from Long Beach to Oxnard.

AND THEY KEEP US MOVING FORWARD.”

|

them hired. recipients will take place at home. The students will be

RESILIENT. THEY’RE

50

muscle memory is key to learning prep skills that will get

viding scholarships, job training and opportunities, insponsorships and more. The LA region serves more than Los Angeles program director Lisa Fontanesi says that the scholarships provide underserved students the opportunity to pursue education at prestigious cooking schools as well as community colleges. More than $6 million in scholarships, raised through donations and celebrity chef


C-CAP alumna, professional chef Tiana Gee


gala benefits, have been awarded to LA students over the past decade.

PANDEMIC PIVOT When the stay-at-home order hit last March, C-CAP pivoted to distance learning. The team reached out to chefs, friends and alumni for product donations and requests for Instagram Live and online demos. One program included a pizza dough lesson with James Beard-awardwinning pastry chef Sherry Yard and a class in handmade pasta with Rossoblu chef/owner Steve Samson. “It’s difficult, since the students, teachers and chefs haven’t physically seen each other for a very long time, but we’ve managed to make it work,” says culinary coordinator Gail Carney.

Chef Timothy Hollingsworth instructing students in 2019. Below: a C-CAP student

San Fernando High School culinary teacher Tina Hartounian explains the challenge for most students is “lack of space and privacy in their homes, taking care of their emotional well-being, and access to technology.” She praises C-CAP for the quick action, ensuring that 150 students had connectivity and Chromebooks, necessary food products, and supplementary lessons in such topics as mindfulness and urban farming. Melissa Paz, a senior at San Fernando High School, hopes to open a bakery or cafe after attending culinary school. “Learning it on my own was slow and overwhelming, as there’s so much to learn. C-CAP helps it feel not so overwhelming.” An example of C-CAP’s success is chef Tiana Gee, 24, a 2014 Glendale High graduate and scholarship awardee. A rising star, she is a featured chef for Bon Appétit, appearing in videos on social media and the magazine’s website. She also works as a private chef and caterer. Tiana credits the program for changing her life through hands-on guidance and the opportunity to work at an event where she met C-CAP co-chair, and six-time James Beard award winner, chef Marcus Samuelsson. He hired Tiana as a sous chef at his New York restaurant Red Rooster, and featured her in his book, The Rise, with a recipe he created inspired by her Filipino and Black heritage.


CURRIED CAULIFLOWER STEAKS WITH BLOOD ORANGE CHIMICHURRI & DANDELION GREENS Tiana Gee, C-CAP alumna and host of Cookin’ with Tee on YouTube, shares a savory, flavorful vegan recipe. 2 small heads of cauliflower

1 bunch dill

little bit of salt. Bring a large skillet to

1/8 cup curry powder

1 small shallot

medium-high heat; then add olive oil. Sear

1/4 cup curry paste

½ cup olive oil

cauliflower steaks until golden; then flip

2 small bunches dandelion greens

salt to taste

over and cook the other side. Takes 6 to 8 minutes. Season to taste.

1 leek, greens cut off

Prepare dandelion greens. Wash and

2 cloves garlic, minced

Prepare chimichurri: Rough-chop fresh

2 tablespoons sun-dried tomatoes

herbs and place in small bowl. Add olive oil

rough-chop the greens. Cut leek in half

2 tablespoons black olives, pitted & chopped  

until herbs are covered. Squeeze lime juice

lengthwise and thinly slice into half-

2 teaspoons Worcestershire

on herbs; add oil and mix. Add blood orange

moons. Add leeks to water and thoroughly

salt & pepper to taste

zest. Slice blood orange segments in half

clean. Bring a wok to medium-high heat

and add to mix. Season to taste. Set aside.

and add leeks and minced garlic; sweat for

Blood Orange Chimichurri 2 small blood oranges, zested and cut in

Cut cauliflower into steaks about 1 inch

2 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.

thick. Don’t worry if they crumble apart;

Add greens. Once they begin to wilt, add

you can still season the bits and cook them

Worcestershire sauce. Fold in sun-dried

2 limes, zested and juiced

with the steaks. Rub cauliflower with curry

tomatoes and olives. Season to taste.

1 bunch cilantro

paste, adding a thin layer to both sides.

1 bunch flat-leaf parsley

Sprinkle cauli with curry powder and a

segments, membrane removed

Follow Tiana on Instagram at @cheftianagee

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Students help cook at C-CAP’s 2020 Annual Winter Gala fundraiser at the Jonathan Club in LA.

“Marcus has given me tools to help me become a better person and chef. He’s the greatest mentor I could have ever asked for,” Tiana says.

with C-CAP. They have the best kids!” says Neal. Students also helped Faith & Flower executive chef Michael Hung prepare meals for Donate to Feed LA’s Homeless, and trained with World Central Kitchen to pro-

FULL CIRCLE Dozens of prominent LA chefs support C-CAP includ-

is chair of C-CAP’s LA Council and sits on the national

and Antonia Lofaso (Black Market Liquor Bar). DTLA chef

board. She believes that flexibility and adaptability have

Neal Fraser (Redbird) donated proceeds from the first

been key to C-CAP’s success and despite the challenges of

reopening evening of his eatery last June. In November,

COVID on their own restaurants, the non-profit’s partner

the organization worked with students to prepare

chefs have rallied to the cause. “Above all, our students

Thanksgiving meals for homebound seniors.

have proven to be resilient,” says Barbara. “They’re mo-

“We are always happy to help, but it’s really nice when

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Barbara Fairchild, former editor-in-chief of Bon Appétit,

ing Valley chef/owners Sandra Cordero (Gasolina Café)

you can see the results right in front of you like we do

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vide meals to underserved LAUSD students and families.

tivated, dedicated and fearless. C-CAP kids are inspiring, and they keep us moving forward.” ■


A master class for the modern woman. The SheSez Podcast Available wherever you listen

More at SheSez.com Follow @she_sez


Stay Classy, San Diego AN ITINERARY FOR A FAMILY SPRING BREAK GETAWAY TO A CITY THAT OFFERS SUNSHINE, EASY WAYS OF SOCIAL DISTANCING AND EVEN A GLIMPSE OF RON BURGUNDY. Written by Darren Elms

It’s not hard to crush on San Diego. With great weather,

classic Southern California influence with luxury ameni-

eclectic hotels and restaurants, and plenty of vibrant

ties embracing the art, music, design and culture of the

neighborhoods to wander, “America’s Finest City” knows

neighborhood. The stylish rooms offer ample space to live

a good time. If you’re looking to get away this spring and

and lounge. An elevated pool deck keeps sunbathing safe

want to skip the airport, we suggest packing the car and

with strict measures that won’t impede your zen. The

heading south.

property also features six restaurants and bars for your dining needs. Standouts include a craft cocktail served al-

STAY + EAT

fresco at Fifth & Rose, the Surf & Turf sushi roll at ocean-

In the heart of the historic Gaslamp Quarter, Pendry

forward Lionfish and a delicious brunch at the spacious

strikes a balance between modern and traditional, pairing

Provisional Kitchen, Café & Mercantile. The spa at Pendry

Pendry San Diego. Above right: Balboa Park


is currently open, including select outdoor treatments to melt away the stress. pendry.com Here’s an old favorite that got a major facelift. Great for families, the Town and Country Resort just underwent a multimillion-dollar renovation. The 60-year-old property amped up its mid-century vibe in the best way possible, with a swanky new lobby, hip room design and incredible pool scene (yes, there’s a waterslide). But one of the best additions is the new restaurant ARLO—a celebration of San Diego lifestyle and culinary culture serving scratch-made dishes using fresh local ingredients and a mosaic of flavors from both sides of the border. Chef Josh Mouzakes leads the way with tasty seasonal offerings to savor under the moonlight. And don’t forget to check out the homage to San Diego that unfolds on the bookcase inside. Anchorman Ron Burgundy even makes an appearance. towncountry.com

THINGS TO DO With the pandemic still among us, take advantage of the outdoor splendor San Diego has to offer. Start with a leisurely walk through bucolic Balboa Park, a 1,200-acre historic landmark right in the middle of the urban center. Highlights include the Desert Cactus Garden, Japanese Friendship Garden, and El Prado, a long promenade filled with Spanish Colonial Revival architecture. And the world-renowned San Diego Zoo and Safari Park have reopened for business. Make reservations (required) at zoo.sandiegozoo.org. Surf’s up in La Jolla, should you have your board in tow. You can also swim with leopard sharks in the shallow waters of La Jolla Shores Beach. The nonthreatening creatures hang out in groups in the waters near The Marine Room restaurant and La Jolla Tennis Club. Snorkeling rentals are available at local shops nearby. Another fun activity: jumping aboard the USS Midway down at the Embarcadero. It’s the most-visited naval ship museum in the world. Be sure to make your reservation at tickets.midway.org. ■

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Town & Country Resort. Top: Gaslamp Quarter

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on the line BUCKLEY SCHOOL GRADUATES MASON LEE AND JACK BARRETT PUT OFF COLLEGE TO BE ON THE FRONT LINES DURING THE STATE’S WORST WILDFIRE SEASON EVER. AS MEMBERS OF THE CALIFORNIA CONSERVATION CORPS, THEY LEARNED LESSONS ABOUT THE NATURE OF FIRE, HUMANS AND LIFE. Written by Linda Grasso | Photographed by Michael Becker


When Jack Barrett and Mason Lee

More!” the program aims to give young people skills and

graduated from The Buckley School

experience that lead to meaningful careers. The idea wasn’t terribly far-fetched for the two close

in the spring of 2020, they had big

friends. Mason lives near Culver City with his parents and

plans for college. Both had excelled

twin brother; Jack lives in Studio City with his parents

academically. Jack had been accepted

and siblings not far from Buckley’s campus. So over the

at Reed College; Mason was headed for Brown University. Then COVID hit. But rethinking the decision to attend college was about more than the pandemic.

years Mason’s parents came to realize that if Mason wasn’t home, he was probably at Jack’s. “Jack is like my second brother. We share that adventurous spirit and he’s always willing to put himself out there. We are kind of opposites in many ways as well. In terms of academic interests and political views we definitely argue a lot,” notes Mason. There was no debate, however, on the CCC. Jack and

“It wasn’t that I wanted a break from education. I wanted to experience education in a different way,”

dential center—base camp—in Placer County, north of

explains Jack.

Sacramento, in early July. They almost immediately started

Mason, on the other hand, did want an academic respite. Perhaps even more so, though, he wanted to do something related to helping the environment. Mason

training. The latter involved a grueling physical test. “You had to complete a 2-mile run in less than 18 minutes, do 25 push-ups, 25 sit-ups, five pull-ups,

healing the environment through technology. He also

and—the most challenging part—a 1-mile hike at 20%

won the LA Science Fair and got his first paper—on us-

grade. During the hike you have to carry 30 pounds and

ing bacteria to degrade industrial pollutants in ma-

a tool—while wearing full head-to-toe fire gear. All in

rine ecosystems—published in the Journal of Emerging

100-degree-plus heat,” recalls Jack, a physically fit, avid

Investigators. Currently he is working on new research

rock climber, who admits he threw up during the test.

burned houses using oyster mushrooms. “I aim to holistically heal the environment with nonin-

After they finished basic fire training, they left base camp for their first assignment, the Gold Fire in Lassen County. The teens quickly learned that fighting a rag-

vasive remediation techniques that build upon the native

ing wildfire was less about their training and more

knowledge of the land,” he says.

about learning on the job from California Department of

With their college acceptances hanging in the balance,

Forestry and Fire Protection (CAL FIRE) teams as well as

Mason came up with an idea. What about signing up with

experienced CCC members. Those corps members “come

the California Conservation Corps for a year? The CCC

from all walks of life,” says Jack. They include women,

provides young adults ages 18 to 25 a year of paid service

professionals who are seeking something different, and

to the state. Corps members work on environmental

young people who have come through the state’s juvenile

projects such as planting trees, building backcountry

justice system.

trails and improving fish habitat. They also respond to

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two weeks of basic job training and two weeks of basic fire

conducted research throughout high school focused on

that aims to remediate pollutants on land scarred by

60

Mason applied, were accepted, and arrived at the resi-

“As the new guy on the crew, you shut up and watch

natural disasters, from fires to earthquakes. With the

and learn from the others. You make mistakes, but that’s

motto “Hard Work, Low Pay, Miserable Conditions and

expected. You need to put your head down and work and


“WE WERE ON THE MOST ACTIVE PART OF THE FIRE AND HAD TO STOP THE SPREAD BEFORE IT RAN THROUGH THE CANYONS. WE STARTED CUTTING LINE. ABOUT AN HOUR INTO IT, A FLAMING BRANCH SHATTERED ON MY HEAD, KNOCKING ME DOWN. IT WAS A SCARY MOMENT.”

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Mason at the August Complex Fire. Right: a selfie that Jack sent to friends

you catch on fast,” says Mason. After the Gold Fire, the teens crisscrossed Northern California, working the Jones Fire in Yuba City, the Sheep

ing. We drove in and the forest began to get smokier and

Fire in Susanville, the Willow Fire in Placer County and

smokier. Eventually we reached our drop point, convened

finally the August Complex Fire in Humboldt County.

with regional commanders and got the briefing. We were

That last wildfire, which was caused by lightning, raged

on the most active part of the fire and had to stop the

over more than a million acres, killing one firefighter and

spread before it ran through the canyons. We started cut-

injuring two.

ting line. About an hour into it, a flaming branch shattered

Mason remembers the day they arrived at the site. The squad had driven five hours from base camp to get to the fire line.

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“We rolled over a mountain ridge and saw several huge smoke columns blocking out the sun. It was intimidat-

on my head, knocking me down. It was a scary moment.” Minutes later, firefighters in heavy-lifting Chinook helicopters started dropping water. “They were blind


dropping. You couldn’t see the tops of the trees because

their asses kicked for years. Looking into the program

of the fire. I looked up and saw a waterfall coming down.

online, I sort of expected this kind of experience. I feel

I took two steps and jumped to the ground. It felt like I

lucky that I got to work and be helpful this year.”

got hit by a car,” Mason recalls. For 18 hours, the squad maneuvered the steep canyons,

Mason says one of the most valuable things he’s gained from the experience is perspective. “Perspective allows

cutting line. When fire burned over their line, they were

you to look beyond your paradigms to see the struggle of

forced to evacuate.

others. You can understand someone’s struggle on the

For Jack, the most harrowing moment came during the Jones Fire. They were called out at 3:30 a.m. and didn’t have time to pack food. “That was my first time getting that close to wild-

surface, but you can’t internalize it until you are right there walking in their boots,” Mason says. As for Jack’s most important takeaway, “Somebody told me at the start of my fire training that I had to get

fire, so it was pretty exhilarating. However, on empty

comfortable being uncomfortable to succeed not just

stomachs and lacking water, many members on my crew

in firefighting, but life. I think that is some of the best

including myself started to exhibit symptoms of heat ex-

advice I have ever received.”

haustion. So we had to retreat maybe six or seven hours into our line cut.” With the worst wildfire season in state history, Mason

Jack says he highly encourages other high school students to consider the CCC for a gap year. “The experience will provide a level of perspective and

and Jack’s assignments were pretty much back-to-back

insight that is more educational than a year of college,

from July to October.

especially during COVID. It also can lead to a career with

“We were the first and one of the only resources on

CAL FIRE if you apply yourself. You can get a seasonal job

several fires. Having four crews on the initial attack

that pays $80,000 a year, with a pretty awesome work

phase of a 32,000-acre fire was unheard of before this

schedule—half a year of firefighting, half a year of travel.”

year, but it was a reality we had to deal with. We were

Both Jack and Mason are back at CCC base camp

more exposed at times when there were not enough en-

finishing out their year of service and making plans for

gine resources to lay hoses for us. We had to work longer

the future. Reed College would not allow Jack to defer,

and harder, cover more ground, and wait longer for relief

requiring him to reapply. However, he has decided to go

crews to come. We rarely saw other fire crews on the

in a different direction.

line,” says Mason. They’d work in 24-hour shifts and then get a day off. The grueling schedule began to take its toll. “Your body shuts down physically and mentally, increasingly, with each shift. Sleep deprivation is unavoid-

“I like Reed, but I think it fits my personal philosophy a bit too much. I think I would feel more challenged and engaged at a larger school that caters to a different ethos than my own,” Jack shares. Brown University, on the other hand, permitted Mason

able and it really messes up your cognition,“ says Mason.

to take a gap year, and he’ll attend the school in the fall.

“In that time frame you might get four to eight hours

He intends to study mycology and environmental engi-

of sleep (in shifts) if the fire is mostly out and in mop-up

neering. He says he will take what he has learned with

phase. But if the fire is at low containment, that means get-

the CCC with him.

ting from zero to four hours of sleep,” says Jack. Ask Jack whether he got more than he bargained for in

“Work hard. Have integrity in your life. And take extreme responsibility for it. There are people fighting for

signing up for the CCC and you’ll get a quick no. “Hand

every bit that they have. You can’t look at that and take

line crews have been doing this kind of work and getting

things for granted in your life.” ■

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designed in-house A SELF-TAUGHT INTERIOR DESIGNER AND HER HANDY HUSBAND—WITH THE HELP OF THEIR IMAGINATIVE KIDS— CREATE A UNIQUE HOME IN WOODLAND HILLS. Written by Dakota Kim | Photographed by Shane O’Donnell


Touring Karen and Shawn Emile’s home and hearing their detailed commentary on the how-to, one can’t help but envision them as hosts of an HGTV show. Though their home’s vibe is the definition of relaxed, the couple are masters of ambitious DIY projects. Their Charles DuBois-designed mid-century Woodland Hills ranch home emanates a soft, minimalist Scandinavian aesthetic, but its tranquil aura belies the elbow grease and ingenuity invested into it. Karen says the ranch home “had good bones” when they bought it in 2019. She was instantly attracted to the raw fireplaces, wood beams and high ceilings, but the space required several adjustments. At 2,000 square feet, it felt cozy, but the couple wanted an open-plan design where they could keep eyes on their three kids—especially 3-year-old River—from the common areas. That required removing a large wall with a pocket door that divided the kitchen and the dining room.  “That was a big project but, along with a helper, I knew I could do it. You can learn pretty much everything on YouTube,” says Shawn, a commercial real estate banker. Shawn also raised their 8-foot ceilings in the living area to 13 feet, following the interior roof line, and replaced a pass-through with a pantry in the kitchen, as well as various windows and doors. Single-socket pendant Edison lights were installed in the kitchen along with minimalist industrial light in the dining area. Trim was added to the bedrooms, and then the couple began designing custom woodwork to fit the home’s nooks and crannies. Both the master bathroom and the kids’ bathroom were

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Most of the wood in the house is pine. “I love the pattern in pine— that knottiness,” Karen says. “I’m very drawn to a completely bare look with no staining.” Below: the couple’s bedroom; hat rack by the Dutch door


Shawn made the center island island to shelter the Emiles’ pots and pans as well as their unique, often vintage ceramic dishes. Opposite page: one of Aiden’s paintings in the 68the | dining room kitchen;


gut-renovated. In the children’s Jack and Jill bathroom,

sterility. Only a few hues were chosen—white, coffee,

they installed vintage double-trough sinks. In the adults’

gray and warm brown. The white walls in the main areas

bathroom, the Emiles added a vintage-look bathtub, a

are offset by warmer tones, like the shades of coffee

brick marble shower, rustic wood shelves and antique

from the cupboard in the living room, or the deep brown

brass fixtures to warm up the space.

of a brasserie chair at the dining table. In the children’s

“A lot of people who buy these DuBois homes go very

bedrooms, the Emiles chose a peppered, textured white.

modern,” Karen says. “I spun it and did more of a ranch

Karen is a big fan of milky white, so much so that she

style, adding natural tones and a lot of pine in our build-

named her Instagram account @milkandhoneylife, noting

outs. I like to preserve what’s already there and work

that the honey refers to “the sweetness that my husband,

with what we have.”

Shawn, brings to our lives.”

The color scheme throughout the home is pleasingly Zen, maintaining warmth without succumbing to

“I pull in the tones from other things—a lot of items are vintage and have a natural patina already that brings

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in warmth,” Karen says. Karen had a long career in real estate and mortgage banking before becoming a full-time mom. She enjoys the process of collecting, and visibly brightens when she hears the phrase “flea market.” Her home is swathed in her brilliant finds from the Rose Bowl and Long Beach flea markets—from the antler chandelier in her living room to the candle holders and plates in the kitchen.   Shawn brings to reality not only Karen’s, but also their daughter Brooklyn’s, furniture designs. The 8-year-old sketched her dream loft bed for her room, complete with a fort-like nook for her desk, and her dad made it happen. Without using any computerized design tools, the couple works together in an intuitive process to design their wide array of custom wood furniture. “We just get each other,” she says. Shawn, in true minimalist Scandinavian style, then uses only a dozen woodworking tools to bring designs to fruition, mostly in pine wood.  For decor, the Emiles rely upon vintage ceramics like the one-of-a-kind pitchers and bowls placed on a leaning shelf in the dining room, the occasional minimalist plant artfully placed in a earth-hued vase, and the artwork of their 14-year-old son Aiden, a nascent painter who’s already received plaudits from Amber Interiors in Calabasas and according to Karen has a “wait list of 150 people” for commissioned works. “Aiden has been sketching since he was 7; however, the painting came about during COVID, when he needed an outlet,” Karen says. “He told me, ‘I’m going to teach myself how to paint.’ I didn’t realize at the time that it would be such a natural thing for him.” Whatever her family does, they do it together. “We are a sit-down family and we have breakfast and dinner together every single day at the dining table my husband built,” she says. On hot days, the backyard—which Karen says is “the only part of the property that we haven’t touched yet”—provides a canopied haven, resting against a hillside and featuring a pool and a hammock. “That’s our next project,” she says. ■

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71


ALL ABOUT KIDS Many sectors of our community had to pivot in a big way this past year, and among the most extreme of the pivots were those executed by Valley schools. Shifting to online learning, getting students connected and offering not just educational but in some cases emotional support, educators indisputably rose to the occasion. In this All About Kids profiles section, you’ll learn about some of these organizations and the people who carried on in the face of adversity throughout the pandemic. They remain firmly committed to their mission: cultivating bright, confident and capable young people—our legacy and our future.

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VIEWPOINT SCHOOL

76

OAKS CHRISTIAN SCHOOL

78

86

VALLEY BETH SHALOM HAROLD M. SCHULWEIS DAY SCHOOL

BERKELEY HALL

87

LAUREL HALL SCHOOL

80

STRATFORD SCHOOL

88

82

THE COUNTRY SCHOOL

CHAMINADE COLLEGE PREPARATORY

83

LOUISVILLE HIGH SCHOOL

89

SIERRA CANYON SCHOOL

84

THE WESLEY SCHOOL

90

HUNTINGTON LEARNING CENTER

85

THE BUCKLEY SCHOOL

WRITTEN BY LAURA L. WATTS PHOTOGRAPHED BY KRISTIN ANDERSON

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION


ALL ABOUT KIDS

VIEWPOINT SCHOOL

TELL US ABOUT THE CULTURE OF VIEWPOINT SCHOOL. “Viewpoint fosters a culture of innovation and continual improvement by building and refining programs that prepare students for lives of leadership, meaning and impact. This culture is powered by a faculty of the best teachers anywhere, who inspire students to ‘go beyond’ every day. Now more than ever, it’s a priority for Viewpoint’s teachers and staff to nurture the whole student, ensuring they receive the social, emotional and academic support they need to thrive as students in school and as adults in the world.” HOW DOES YOUR SCHOOL SUPPORT A HEALTHY LIFESTYLE FOR KIDS? “Our program focuses on the whole child and includes ‘Responsive Classroom’ in the primary, lower and middle schools, which involves a daily emotional check-in with the students. In the upper school human development discussion groups, students engage in regular conversations on resilience, active listening, body positivity and mental health. Our students in all four divisions have access to caring counselors, learning specialists, deans, teachers and coaches who serve as trusted adults to the children in our community. Viewpoint’s wellness coordinator and senior associate director of college counseling Rebecca Heller adds, ‘Wellness is a baseline for academic success and was a priority long before the pandemic struck. If our students

aren’t healthy and well, they cannot succeed in the classroom. The wellness program at Viewpoint aims to help students develop wellbeing skills that will last a lifetime.’ In addition to ongoing programs, we have introduced a student wellness group that meets bimonthly with the school counselor and wellness coordinator. This group also partners with the student council, Challenge Success student club and the student honor committee to create resources for students and fun wellness challenges for students and faculty. For the past five years, the middle and upper school students have led Diversity Leadership Day, where they present more than 40 workshops to their peers on a range of topics, offering students the opportunity to explore and discuss the issues that are of greatest concern to them. In order to get the word out to our community, we have introduced @viewpointwellness on both Instagram and Facebook, offering empowering messages and ideas for selfcare and for destigmatizing mental health issues. The Facebook page also offers articles and advice for parents and educators on navigating well-being during the pandemic. At Viewpoint we care deeply for our students. As we continue to amplify and expand our wellness program, we want to give our students the tools to flourish at Viewpoint and beyond.” WHAT FEEDBACK DO YOU GET FROM YOUR STUDENTS? “Viewpoint is in its third year of a partnership with Challenge Success, a nonprofit affiliated with the Stanford Graduate School of Education. Together, these two organizations implement a program dedicated to broadening the definition of success, using researchbased strategies that promote student wellbeing and engagement with learning. On an ongoing basis, faculty, students and parents participate in a variety of initiatives to better understand the student experience and to recommend potential changes and

refinements to the students’ lives at school. These initiatives include shadow days where teachers and trustees follow a student for a school day, and fishbowl conversations where students are asked to share freely their thoughts and opinions about a variety of topics ranging from diversity and sleep patterns to homework and testing. This has been especially important this past year to ensure students are getting the personal and academic support they need to thrive in a remote learning environment.” WHAT DO YOU SEE KIDS DOING TO MAKE THIS WORLD A BETTER PLACE? “Young people are eager to engage with the world and the challenges that we face now and will continue to be confronted by in the future. Despite the difficulty of volunteering in person, our students continue to engage in online community service activities with a focus on diversity, belonging, inclusion, and global and environmental awareness. The students are required to complete 40 hours of community service, which for many students is transformational—leading to a lifelong dedication to service. As a school, we are committed to cultivating the essential skill set, mindset and resilient identity of each Viewpoint student. Leadership includes the concepts of listening, service, excellence, passion and a desire to contribute beyond oneself. I am proud to say that I see this kind of leadership in our students every day, and I am confident that they are ready to make a difference in the world.”

Right: Viewpoint’s Ring Family Field allowed the Class of 2020 to experience a socially distanced, in-person graduation ceremony.

23620 MULHOLLAND HWY., CALABASAS | 818-591-6500 | VIEWPOINT.ORG

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

PHOTOGRAPHED BY ADAM GROSSMAN & BILL YOUNGBLOOD

F

ounded in 1961, Viewpoint School offers an enriched K-12 college preparatory program on a 40-acre campus located in the scenic foothills of the Santa Monica Mountains. Under the leadership of head of school Mark McKee, Viewpoint’s faculty and staff implement the school’s mission: to inspire a love of learning and to develop qualities in the students that provide strength and direction for a lifetime. McKee answered some questions about Viewpoint’s focus on cultivating a path to whole-life wellness and preparing its students to be world-ready.


ALL ABOUT KIDS

OAKS CHRISTIAN SCHOOL WHAT MAKES YOUR TEACHERS THE BEST IN THE BUSINESS? “Our world-class teachers are known as ‘The Living Curriculum.’ Beyond being well-qualified in their subject, they mentor students and care what is happening in their lives beyond the classroom. Teachers open their classrooms during lunch for heartfelt conversations, serve as chaperones on retreats, spend one-on-one time with students, and always value the person and heart of each student.”

TELL US ABOUT YOUR SCHOOL’S SIGNATURE PROGRAMS. “Oaks Christian offers three unique institutes with individual academic pathways for students: the Institute of Arts and Innovation, the Institute of Global Leadership and the Institute of Engineering. The Institute of Arts and Innovation develops ethical artists who are also savvy professionals and can market and promote their talents. It features pathways in film and television, songwriting, vocal performance, photography and dance. The Institute of Engineering is housed in our 10,000-square-foot IDEA Lab (Innovation, Design, Engineering and Aeronautics). Students learn how to analyze, model and design engineering systems in mechanical, aerospace, software and electrical engineering. The IDEA Lab houses metal and wood fabrication machines, 3D printers, and a variety of other useful tools, such as Haas tools that are typically reserved for college fabrication labs or industrial labs. The lab allows students to make basically anything out of anything, including robots, aerial and underwater drones, rockets and even basic prosthetics. At the Institute of Global Leadership, students have an opportunity to launch their own startups and learn about business and marketing. Students in all three institutes take master classes from industry professionals and are given internship opportunities.”

HOW DOES YOUR SCHOOL MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN OUR COMMUNITY? “Our motto is ‘Minds for Leadership and Hearts for Service,’ and it is not just a slogan! Our teachers and students helped lead the charge during the devastating Woolsey Fire by helping victims sort through rubble; filling sandbags; writing letters of encouragement; providing gift cards, meals and clothing; and raising thousands of dollars for those in need. We also partner annually with James Store House Foundation to help provide hope, comfort and gifts to children in foster care. Our middle school students help Children’s Hunger Fund. Our high school students have provided leadership for the Ventura County Special Olympics, hosting events on our campus and serving as coaches to the special-needs athletes.” TELL US ABOUT OAKS CHRISTIAN SCHOOL’S WELL-ROUNDED APPROACH. “Our three pillars are Academic Excellence, Artistic Expression and Athletic Distinction. These pillars are part of our Culture of Care, which encourages students to develop their potential in these areas, as well as spiritual formation in each of our students. We strive to foster critical thinking, intellectual curiosity, empathy for others and a lifelong love of learning. Our mission is: To dedicate ourselves to Christ in the pursuit of academic excellence, artistic expression and athletic distinction while growing in knowledge and wisdom through God’s abundant grace.”

HOW IS YOUR SCHOOL HELPING KIDS COPE WITH THE PANDEMIC AND SAFERAT-HOME ORDERS? “While our students are back on campus now and we adhere to strict safety protocols, when the pandemic first hit our academic and spiritual life teams quickly responded to student needs. We hired a new social and emotional wellness counselor, and students were given opportunities to meet with counselors and advisors to talk about how they were doing. We continue to provide counseling opportunities for students. Parents and students were surveyed, and adjustments to the schedule were made to include decreased screen time, longer lunch breaks and opportunities for community engagement and social interaction. Some of the changes included a later start of the school day, shorter class periods, longer lunch breaks, more teacher virtual hours to connect and special student engagement days. Wednesday engagement days included breakout sessions such as worship and prayer, physical fitness workouts, dance sessions, community assemblies, Bible studies, the Oaks News broadcast, coffee hangouts, art reflection, gardening, FemSTEM meetings, fun cooking classes, lunch-hour gatherings and healthy coping skills sessions.” WHAT ARE THE CHALLENGES OF HYBRID LEARNING? HOW IS YOUR SCHOOL HANDLING THAT SUCCESSFULLY? “Oaks Christian has been a model for successful hybrid and remote learning and has been featured on local and national media. For families whose student has an underlying health condition, who have aging adults living in the home or who are simply nervous about their child returning to the classroom, we have developed a state-of-the-art remote visual and audio platform (360º Owl cameras) that allows their student to virtually enter the classroom, engage with the teacher and collaborate with their on-campus peers in real time. We also continue to use livestream and video teaching for students who cannot attend class in person.”

31749 LA TIENDA DR., WESTLAKE VILLAGE | 818-575-9900 | OAKSCHRISTIAN.ORG

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY BLANCA SCHNOBRICH

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aks Christian School is a college preparatory day and boarding school serving grades 5–12. Centrally located on 25 acres between California’s coastline and mountains, the school opened in 2000 with 198 students in just three grades. Today its enrollment has grown to approximately 1,450 students. Recently, Oaks Christian opened a residential dorm facility that provides on-campus living for both domestic and international students.


L to R: Alexis Lorscheider, sophomore, and Anthony Angell, senior, in the Oaks Christian School IDEA Lab


ALL ABOUT KIDS

BERKELEY HALL

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ounded in 1911, Berkeley Hall is an independent, coeducational school for students in nursery (age 3) through eighth grade. Nestled in the Santa Monica Mountains, the 66-acre campus provides the latest classroom technology, rigorous academics, visual and performing arts opportunities, a competitive athletic program, and a variety of enrichment classes.   WHAT ARE SOME WAYS YOUR SCHOOL PROMOTES EQUALITY AND INCLUSIVITY? “Berkeley Hall is one of the most diverse independent schools in Los Angeles, and we strive to be the kind of community we want our world to be. Our classrooms are enriched by the variety of backgrounds and perspectives our students bring, and we work to create a community built upon relationships of awareness and trust. We address implicit bias, equip our community to fight racism, foster student intelligence in multiculturally sensitive ways, and offer a curriculum that is inclusive and equitable. But just as important are the less formal steps—the teachable moments we foster every day when teachers and students practice seeing and celebrating each individual’s unique differences.” WHAT DO YOU SEE KIDS DOING TO MAKE THIS WORLD A BETTER PLACE? “Berkeley Hall is known for its Difference Makers Series—a program that introduces our community to people addressing the pressing issues of our time. Our most recent speaker, a Berkeley Hall alumna who is now a junior in high school, was inspired by the program when she was a student here and started her nonprofit at 11 years old. While visiting family in India, she saw a need and now supplies shoes, warm clothing and school supplies to students in the slums of New Delhi. Most recently, she responded to the pandemic by fundraising to help disadvantaged children in Los Angeles obtain headphones to aid in distance learning. This alumna’s efforts show how Berkeley Hall students are positively impacting the world.”   

WHAT HAVE BEEN YOUR PROUDEST MOMENTS DURING THE RECENT CRISIS? “Our Depth of Study system, which allows teachers to collaborate and improve teaching and learning, allowed us to transition our focus quickly to create solutions in a remote and hybrid setting. We’ve never seen a faculty work more tirelessly and go above and beyond what was asked of them. Everyone pulled together—from faculty to staff to administrators to facilities personnel to parents and students. This became an enormous team effort. We are so proud of our dedicated teachers, who have continued to provide an exceptional education to our students even while remote. We are equally proud of our dedicated staff, who evaluate the changing landscape and implement measures that keep our students safe. We are also grateful for our families for helping ensure that their kids continue to grow and learn together in creative, fun and meaningful ways—even through this year’s difficult challenges.” HOW IS YOUR SCHOOL HELPING KIDS COPE WITH THE PANDEMIC AND SAFERAT-HOME ORDERS? “Berkeley Hall has an online library full of resources for parents and students to support social-emotional learning. Our teachers and administration have been highly involved in providing strategies and learning opportunities to help our students navigate this challenging year. Through daily Morning Meetings and advisory programs, students have regular opportunities to process all they are experiencing. Based on scientific data, we recognized in the early months of the pandemic that bringing students safely back to campus would be our #1 priority. Due to low positivity rates in early childhood education, our nursery and early kindergarten classes were able to start safely in September. With our rigorous safety protocols in place, they have been on campus all year without issue. When our L.A. County K–2 waiver was approved, we opened to kindergarten, first and second grades.

We have recently reopened for grades 3–6 and will soon have cohorts of seventh- and eighth-grade students back on campus for social-emotional learning activities, under the county’s 25% rule.” WHAT IS BERKELEY HALL’S MISSION? “Our mission is to empower children to fulfill their unlimited, God-given potential as fearless scholars and conscientious citizens.” WHAT MAKES YOUR TEACHERS THE BEST IN THE BUSINESS? “Our teachers believe in children’s extraordinary potential—not in limits or labels. When you start with the idea that children are endlessly capable, you find that they rise to your expectations in amazing ways. This view of children as unlimited is at the heart of teaching and learning at Berkeley Hall, and it closely relates to the psychological principle called growth mindset—now widely embraced in educational circles. With a growth mindset, we realize that our abilities are not fixed, but they are instead fluid. Through effort and practice, each of us can acquire new capabilities. We can turn weaknesses into strengths. We can discover and nurture unexpected talents. Guiding students to adopt this outlook is wonderfully empowering. It helps motivate them to take risks and try new things—to be fearless scholars. And it helps them persist even if success doesn’t come quickly.” WHAT ARE YOU ESPECIALLY GRATEFUL FOR TODAY? “We are grateful for everyone’s flexibility as Berkeley Hall adapts to the ever-changing path toward a safe reopening. We are grateful for our expansive campus, large classrooms with ample circulation and communication technology, and outdoor facilities. Most important, we are grateful for our dedicated, flexible, caring teachers who are working twice as hard during the pandemic to deliver an excellent education to their students.”

16000 MULHOLLAND DR., LOS ANGELES | 310-476-6421 | BERKELEYHALL.ORG

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ALL ABOUT KIDS

STRATFORD SCHOOL

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tratford School is an independent private school that was founded in Danville, California, in 1999. The school now has locations throughout the San Francisco Bay Area and Greater Los Angeles, including four campuses in Southern California. From drama to chess, sports to speech and debate, Stratford offers a variety of after-school clubs. It also features Mandarin Bilingual Preschool at two of its locations. DESCRIBE YOUR LEARNING ENVIRONMENT. “We believe high expectations lead to extraordinary results. Starting in preschool, we apply our innovative and intentionally balanced curriculum in order to inspire and nurture the minds and hearts of every student. We infuse this curriculum with sequential instruction in science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics (STEAM) to help students develop the diverse set of problem-solving skills and talents they’ll need in our changing world. Our passionate teachers also cultivate a physically and emotionally secure classroom environment where children feel safe and eager to try new things without fear of failing. This carefully designed approach challenges students, accelerates achievement and prepares them to become tomorrow’s creative problem-solvers, imaginative innovators and insightful, confident leaders.” HOW HAS THE SHIFT TO REMOTE SCHOOLING IMPACTED EDUCATION OVER THE PAST YEAR? “Last March, when schools closed on short notice and in response to the rapidly evolving COVID-19 health crisis, Stratford School teachers and curriculum specialists pivoted within days to a distance-learning model. We developed a rich array of online learning experiences and modified schedules in response to feedback from our students and parents. We adopted a growth mindset to improve our practice each week. As the new school year approached, we fully planned to return to campus, yet we also recognized that how we returned would be

different. We have designed flexible models around plausible scenarios to respond to external conditions and regulations. Recognizing that some of these scenarios would again require remote instruction, we improved our distance-learning capabilities and training of our educators to engage, nurture and inspire our students, whether they are in our classrooms or their living rooms.” HOW IS YOUR SCHOOL HELPING KIDS COPE WITH THE PANDEMIC AND SAFER-AT-HOME ORDERS? “While distance learning is an effective methodology when done well and when health and safety conditions leave no other option, it is not an ideal long-term substitute for the interpersonal, social and emotional benefits of traditional school. We have worked diligently to open our schools for in-person learning, with student and staff health and safety as our top priority and while following all state and local regulations. Our highest aspiration is to provide continuity and connection for our students—a sense of normalcy that comes from daily interactions among teachers and students. In this period when we must maintain social distancing, social-emotional learning is more relevant than ever.” HOW CAN WE BEST SUPPORT OUR KIDS DURING THESE CHALLENGING TIMES? “Preparing for school in the morning will likely take more time, and this is something that parents can help manage. Under normal circumstances, morning prep for school can be hectic as children are coaxed through the routine of breakfast, grooming and gathering school supplies. Added to that are retrieving face masks, packing hand sanitizer, filling water bottles, checking temperatures for fever, and locating and signing the latest set of school documents. Getting ready for school will take more time, but it doesn’t have to be more stressful. Manage the added workload by getting as much done the night before. Ask your child to make/assemble his/her lunch or

clean his/her backpack, returning only what they need for the next day. Then create a bedtime ritual of populating the staging area in the house where everything that needs to go to school the next morning is ready to grab on the way out the door.” WHAT ARE YOU ESPECIALLY GRATEFUL FOR TODAY? Jeanne Huybrechts, Stratford School’s chief academic officer: “The events of the past year, along with the continuing pandemic commentary, have turned some of us into armchair epidemiologists and reintroduced many of us to science principles last encountered in high school biology. I found some comfort in having a passing familiarity with terms common to nightly news reports—virus, RNA, antigen, antibody, exponential growth. I’m grateful that I knew enough science to follow the story, grateful to my high school biology teacher who regularly assured us of the relevance of what she was teaching. Especially this year, I am grateful to be a teacher. I am proud to have been part of our school’s teaching team, who conducted their fine work from a distance. From Zoom rooms and makeshift classrooms in their homes, they continued to nurture children, propagate knowledge, and develop skills and habits of mind to last a lifetime. As we plan for the balance of this school year and next, we are still driven by the mission and vision that attracted us to teaching in the first place, and we are reinvigorated by the creativity and inventiveness unleashed this year in response to extraordinarily challenging circumstances. At Stratford School, we continue to be grateful for the opportunity to teach and learn as we move onward to an excellent future!”

2046 ALLEN AVE., ALTADENA, 626-794-1000 | 1200 NORTH CAHUENGA BLVD., LOS ANGELES, 323-962-3075 24741 CHRISANTA DR., MISSION VIEJO, 949-458-1176 | 2000 STONER AVE., LOS ANGELES, 424-293-2783 STRATFORDSCHOOLS.COM

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY COURTNEY POLITANO

ALL ABOUT KIDS

THE COUNTRY SCHOOL

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he Country School was founded in 1948 as a revolutionary preschool program centered on identifying children’s developmental stages and the important milestones achieved at each level, with curriculum tailored to the specific needs of each child. Today the school includes elementary and middle school grades and focuses on a project-based curriculum and a variety of extracurricular activities. HOW DOES YOUR SCHOOL SUPPORT A HEALTHY LIFESTYLE FOR KIDS? “One of the ways The Country School (TCS) supports a healthy lifestyle for kids is having no homework until fifth grade. This leaves after-school time free for students to spend with their families and pursue personal interests. We meditate daily to promote the mindbody connection. Being present and having time to breathe and honor self and others are really important in raising mindful children. Laughter and joy are major components of the healthy lifestyle of a TCS student.”

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE WAYS THE COUNTRY SCHOOL PROMOTES EQUALITY AND INCLUSIVITY? “We have a multidimensional, school-wide commitment to dismantling racism in our communities and promoting equity and inclusivity at every level of our school. We work collaboratively with our staff, students and families to design professional development, parent education and curriculum that enhances the voices of people of color and other groups that are often marginalized in our society. In each classroom, teachers present a wide range of focus areas, books and novels that highlight a diverse array of cultures and backgrounds. Students engage in important conversations about celebrating their own identities and the identities of others. Middle school students take part in our Diversity Club, discussing identity, justice, navigating stereotypes and ways they can be change agents in their own communities. We are proud of our school’s efforts in creating actionable change and equitable outcomes for our community.”

WHAT MAKES YOUR TEACHERS THE BEST IN THE BUSINESS? “Our teachers possess a vast range of skills, knowledge, talents and abilities. They are experts in early child development. As lifelong learners, our teachers seek innovative ways to positively impact their students. They are passionate about their students and are authentically invested in ‘doing right’ by each child.” WHAT ARE YOU ESPECIALLY GRATEFUL FOR TODAY? “Today more than ever, we are grateful for our families. Through all of the twists, turns and struggles of the last year, our parents’ unyielding belief in the TCS mission and their constant trust and grace as we navigate this new and ever-changing educational landscape have been profoundly inspiring and deeply appreciated. We are so proud of our students and the incredible resilience they have shown this year. We are awestruck with all they have accomplished, given the very difficult circumstances in which they suddenly found themselves.”

5243 LAUREL CANYON BLVD., VALLEY VILLAGE | 818-769-2473 | COUNTRY-SCHOOL.ORG

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ALL ABOUT KIDS

LOUISVILLE HIGH SCHOOL

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ouisville High School is an all-girls Catholic high school in Woodland Hills, founded 60 years ago by the Sisters of St. Louis. Its Focus Program gives students the opportunity to explore one of five paths—journalism/media, STEM, law/social justice, medicine/health sciences and business/communications—through field trips, guest speakers and networking with successful alumnae. The school also offers a variety of extracurricular activities.

HOW IS YOUR SCHOOL HELPING KIDS COPE WITH THE PANDEMIC AND SAFERAT-HOME ORDERS? “We have been keenly observant of the effects of the pandemic on our students’ academic and social-emotional well-being. As we implemented academic changes throughout the past year, we used parent, student and faculty surveys to direct the delivery of our education. And we offered support for all students struggling with remote learning. We planned as many activities as possible to

build connections and community, including drive-in movie nights, virtual performances, a drive-through light show, and the continuation of club activity and programs such as our Big Sister/Little Sister tradition.” WHAT HAVE BEEN YOUR PROUDEST MOMENTS DURING THE RECENT CRISIS? “Our students continually astonish us with their grit and resiliency. In the midst of the challenges of remote learning, 13 of our young women participated in the Los Angeles County Mock Trial Competition, which included 110 schools and more than 1,800 students. They won the senior division of the 2020 Constitutional Rights Foundation competition. This program provides a wonderful opportunity for students to build critical-thinking skills as they analyze a case, build persuasive arguments, collaborate as a team, and present articulately and confidently. Louisville’s curriculum focuses on these areas as we encourage young women to explore interests and find their voices.”

HOW DOES YOUR SCHOOL MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN OUR COMMUNITY? “Louisville is very driven toward our vision of inspiring students to grow into women who shape the world. Our service program exposes our students to an array of local organizations and the life-changing work they do. We focus on high-need areas such as environmental stewardship, hunger, poverty and affordable housing needs. The implications of COVID-19 have not slowed us down, as our young women have found creative ways to serve the Union Rescue Mission’s Hope Gardens and the Guadalupe Center.” WHAT FEEDBACK DO YOU GET FROM STUDENTS? “A common theme from alumnae, students and even visitors is that Louisville is a home. We truly know each student and strive to provide individualized attention academically and socially so she may become the best version of herself.”

22300 MULHOLLAND DR., WOODLAND HILLS | 818-346-8812 | LOUISVILLEHS.ORG SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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ALL ABOUT KIDS

THE WESLEY SCHOOL

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he Wesley School is a coeducational K–8 independent day school in North Hollywood. Established in 1999, the school offers enrichment classes such as chess, robotics, sewing, yoga and dance; a competitive sports program; and middle school enrichment-elective classes in art, music, dance, technology, performance and design. WHY DO YOU BELIEVE IN THE K–8 SCHOOL MODEL? “It provides a safe space for children to come of age at an appropriate pace, where they can avoid some of the social pressures found in a secondary-school environment. As middle schoolers, students have the opportunity to be mentors to their younger peers and to be leaders on and around campus. The well-rounded academic program prepares our children for the best high schools, thanks to the extra two years we give them to blossom. Wesley provides students the foundation to be successful in the next step of their school journey.”

HOW DOES YOUR SCHOOL SUPPORT A HEALTHY LIFESTYLE FOR KIDS? “Physical education is a part of the Wesley curriculum beginning with our youngest students. Approximately 75% of our students sign up for our competitive after-school sports program, which says a lot about fitness at our school. We are inclusive and supportive, so even children who are not natural-born athletes feel comfortable giving sports a try. Mindfulness—such as a deep breathing exercise, a calming body movement, a story about peace, or a discussion on thoughts, emotions and feelings—is a fully integrated part of our daily lives and curriculum at Wesley.” WHAT ARE SOME OF THE WAYS THE WESLEY SCHOOL PROMOTES EQUALITY AND INCLUSIVITY? “We have philosophically placed importance on diversity, equity and inclusivity—whether it’s through the books we read with our students, the parent education we offer through our

weekly messages, the artwork and classroom lessons the children produce, or the events we engage in with one another. We believe that a community that recognizes and values all the ways that we as humans differ is a strong community. We know that flourishing as a community means creating an environment where all of our members are engaged, connected and feel respected.” WHAT HAVE BEEN YOUR PROUDEST MOMENTS DURING THE RECENT CRISIS? “All the ways our community has genuinely connected, strengthened partnerships and transformed some of our most beloved traditions into beautiful new ones—lots of which have been virtual. Our incredible faculty members have taken their teaching capabilities to new heights, all while finding ways to hold their students up when they’re down and encourage parents along the way.”

4832 TUJUNGA AVE., NORTH HOLLYWOOD | 818-508-4542 | WESLEYSCHOOL.ORG

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY ALBERT PARK

ALL ABOUT KIDS

THE BUCKLEY SCHOOL

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he Buckley School, founded in 1933 by Isabelle Buckley, boasts a tight-knit student body, strong academics and deep engagement in diversity, equity and inclusion. In addition to its academic curriculum for grades K–12, the school offers a variety of extracurricular activities including applied science, FIRST robotics, ceramics, metalwork, photography, theatre, dance, music, Model UN, a wide range of varsity athletics and the popular after-school program, Beyond the Bell. HOW HAS THE SHIFT TO REMOTE SCHOOLING IMPACTED EDUCATION OVER THE PAST YEAR? “Remote learning has been a transition for everyone and has impacted the way we live and teach tremendously. However, we are proud to say that our innovative teaching staff, with the help of our top-notch technology department, moved our entire school online seamlessly last spring—continuing to offer the same robust education Buckley is

known for. Classes meet all day every day, including P.E. and electives, club meetings and assemblies. Our signature, studentled Social Justice Symposia have been a two-time Zoom success, and we’ve created multiple opportunities online for parents, alumni, faculty and staff to gather, share ideas and socialize. This includes our annual fair and fall musical!” WHAT DO YOU SEE KIDS DOING TO MAKE THIS WORLD A BETTER PLACE? “Our students are encouraged to ‘make an impact in the world,’ as stated in our mission. They are inventors, activists and creative thinkers. Our signature applied science program in upper school puts forth the mandate that students ‘not only do science, they do it with a purpose.’ We ask our community, ‘How do we use our resources and talents to help improve the world around us?’ This is done individually and in groups, from studying how to grow food on Mars to developing an app to measure stress in teens. Every seventh-grade student

completes a Community Action Project that combines a student’s passion with an impactful service initiative, such as water, women’s rights and refugees.” WHAT ARE SOME WAYS YOUR SCHOOL PROMOTES EQUALITY AND INCLUSIVITY? “We are proud that the phrase ‘committed to equity and inclusion’ appears in the first sentence of our mission—rare for an independent school. It also shows up in our clubs, curriculum, reading lists and field trips.” WHAT MAKES YOUR TEACHERS THE BEST IN THE BUSINESS? “Our teachers are steeped in professional development. We have a robust training program for them in diversity, equity and inclusion. They also receive professional development grants to stay current on the best practices in their subjects and fields. This emphasis on continual learning directly benefits the student experience—in and out of the classroom.”

3900 STANSBURY AVE., SHERMAN OAKS | 818-783-1610 | BUCKLEY.ORG SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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ALL ABOUT KIDS

VALLEY BETH SHALOM HAROLD M. SCHULWEIS DAY SCHOOL

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alley Beth Shalom Harold M. Schulweis Day School has served the Greater Los Angeles community for more than 40 years. In partnership with Valley Beth Shalom Synagogue, the school serves students in grades K–6.

WHAT TRENDS ARE SHAPING EDUCATION TODAY? “Social-emotional learning is an integral part of VBS Day School’s curriculum—and has been even before there was an educational buzzword for it! The school experience goes far beyond academics, and brain research proves that how students feel and their ability to regulate emotions directly relates to a readiness to learn. We are proud to be four years into a partnership with the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence, using their RULER program—an approach for integrating social-emotional learning into schools. This program deepens students’ understanding and embodiment of emotional intelligence and provides parents with skills to build trusting relationships with their children. Our school also encourages an entrepreneurial mindset. Through our Shark Tank program, sixth graders work in teams to develop a venture capital project that solves a real-world problem. Ideas are then pitched to an Emmy Award-winning Shark Tank producer, who also happens to be a great friend of our school. This encourages students to think creatively and way outside the box!” HOW DO YOU SUPPORT A HEALTHY LIFESTYLE FOR KIDS? “VBS Day School focuses on educating the whole child—body, emotions and soul. This includes learning about food groups and what makes meals and snacks healthy; physical education three times a week; incorporating ‘brain breaks’ throughout the school day; and focusing on Judaic studies. Supporting a healthy lifestyle is artfully woven into so many aspects of our curriculum. This is something we are truly proud of.” HOW DOES VBS DAY SCHOOL MAKE A DIFFERENCE? “VBS Day School is a mensch-making machine! We are not only focused on providing an enriching academic experience, we create good people! Rooted in Jewish values, our students understand the importance of tzedakah (social justice/charity) and tikkun olam (repairing the world).” WHAT HAVE BEEN YOUR PROUDEST MOMENTS DURING THE RECENT CRISIS? “We are so proud of the resilience of our faculty, students and families. Despite the continuous curveballs, our community has risen to the occasion. We have not only survived, we have thrived! Our current enrollment number is higher than it has been in years, and we are thrilled to provide a diverse selection of learning options for all families. Our school has been a true pioneer in its commitment to providing families with ultimate choice when it comes to student learning format—whether virtual or on campus.”

15739 VENTURA BLVD., ENCINO | 818-788-2199 | VBSDS.ORG

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ALL ABOUT KIDS

LAUREL HALL SCHOOL

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aurel Hall School offers an inclusive faith setting for students of all religious backgrounds in transitional kindergarten through eighth grade. Founded 75 years ago, the school provides a curriculum based on experiential learning and enrichment opportunities that include technology, art, music, drama and athletics. WHAT TRENDS ARE SHAPING EDUCATION TODAY? “Even without the pandemic, technology needs have been shaping kids’ education for quite some time. Nothing is more critical now. Not only must we as educators live in their world as digital natives, but we must keep one step ahead of the current reality so they never lose their zeal to explore the latest advances. We also must teach in a manner that promotes exploration and simultaneous cooperative learning. Our kids are future problem-solvers who have the ability to be proactive as well as restorative.” WHAT HAVE BEEN YOUR PROUDEST MOMENTS RECENTLY? “We persevered as a team, constantly assessing the situation and evolving as necessary. That continued assessment included all staff, students and parents. Throughout the pandemic we have offered our full complement of courses, and we are confident that our students are extremely well prepared academically—despite the lack of in-person participation.” HOW CAN PARENTS INVEST IN THEIR KIDS’ FUTURE SUCCESS? “Parents and/or guardians need to be present, both physically and emotionally. Parents need to learn from their children and constantly evolve. We want teachers to live in the world of a child, to adapt to the needs of the child, so parents must also act accordingly. It is a fine line between protecting/guiding and emancipating—the ultimate goal of every parent. A parent—as a teacher—must ensure that no child loses the zest for learning nor the sense of their self-worth or potential. To invest in a child’s future is to invest in his or her education. Being a partner in a child’s education will lead to future success.” TELL US ABOUT YOUR SCHOOL’S VALUES. “Laurel Hall School has continuously evolved over our 75-year existence. As much as we value academic prowess, we treasure the arts, academics, social-emotional learning, the value of teamwork and community. We also value kindness, cooperation and citizenship. We seek problem-solvers and those who have an insatiable thirst for learning. Upon matriculation to high school, the Laurel Hall student will have been educated as a ‘whole,’ experiencing a wide range of activities that allow for the proficiency in academics, athletics and the arts and ensure success in his or her future endeavors.”

11919 OXNARD ST., NORTH HOLLYWOOD | 818-763-5434 | LAURELHALL.ORG SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY CLIFF FONG

ALL ABOUT KIDS

CHAMINADE COLLEGE PREPARATORY

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haminade College Preparatory is a coeducational Catholic school in the Marianist tradition, serving nearly 2,000 students in grades 6–12. Campus activities include various clubs, organizations, events and service opportunities. HOW DOES CHAMINADE SUPPORT KIDS? “Chaminade continues to meet students where they are, taking time to get to know them as students and people, giving them a loving place to share their story, and partnering with them academically, emotionally and spiritually along this journey to help them shine!” WHAT HAVE BEEN YOUR PROUDEST MOMENTS DURING THE RECENT CRISIS? “Since March 13, 2020, we have prioritized our students’ physical, social and emotional health. We used student and family feedback to guide us in meeting our community’s needs—not just for academics but also for socialization, service, school spirit and, of course, faith. Working together in this schoolto-home partnership, we have replicated

our on-campus sense of family spirit through a combination of online and drive-through campus activities. This reminds us that we are not alone. We are experiencing this historical moment together, celebrating its surprising joys and comforting each other in the wake of loss and tragedy.” WHAT ARE THE CHALLENGES OF HYBRID LEARNING? “Even under the best of circumstances, teaching well is both an art and a skill. It needs time, training and practice to develop. A hybrid environment requires highly skilled professionals who are intentional in designing lessons that simultaneously engage students in a virtual and face-to-face environment—all while maintaining a supportive, unified community of learners so everyone feels a sense of belonging. Chaminade has more than a decade of experience using educational technology to enhance instruction, combined with an even more extensive history of honing our specialized knowledge of development for middle schoolers and high schoolers. This has allowed

us to adeptly shift to distance learning and hybrid learning environments that integrate academics with student health and wellness.” WHAT MAKES YOUR TEACHERS THE BEST IN THE BUSINESS? “Research in education and adolescent development is clear: Teacher quality has the most significant impact on student academic success. Students learn best when they feel their teachers care about them. Our teachers exemplify that in their experience and expertise in their subjects and effective researchbased instructional practices. Even during the pandemic, our teachers continue to explore innovative ways to meet students’ cognitive, social and emotional needs. Chaminade teachers value our students as individuals, providing opportunities for them to take risks in using their intellect, creativity and courage—thus making the world a better place for all.”

10210 OAKDALE AVE., CHATSWORTH | 818-363-8127 | 7500 CHAMINADE AVE., WEST HILLS | 818-347-8300 | CHAMINADE.ORG

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY DANNY BAKER

ALL ABOUT KIDS

SIERRA CANYON SCHOOL

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ierra Canyon School is a private, independent, coeducational college preparatory school with a diverse and international student population in grades pre-kindergarten through 12th grade. The school’s alumni attend top colleges and universities such as Harvard, Columbia, Brown, NYU, Duke, Stanford and UC Berkeley. WHAT ARE THE CHALLENGES OF HYBRID LEARNING? HOW IS SIERRA CANYON HANDLING THOSE CHALLENGES? “During these unprecedented times, Sierra Canyon School has proudly offered one curriculum delivered two ways. Both on-campus and online students experience a full-day, five-day-a-week schedule, learning the same curriculum with identical materials taught by our expert faculty.” WHAT HAVE BEEN YOUR PROUDEST MOMENTS DURING THE RECENT CRISIS? “During this time of crisis, we are proud that we did not compromise who we are and

continued with our philosophy of ‘student first.’ All students continued to receive top academic programming from expert faculty. Lower School students were able to participate in after-school programming. Middle and Upper School students engaged in visual art opportunities, and theater productions were livestreamed virtually. Upper School student-athletes were given every possible opportunity to stay on top of their game. Our Parent Association hosted many communitybuilding events. Although the school year looks different, our students continue to gain momentum to learn and explore, propelling them toward a lifetime of success.” HOW IS YOUR SCHOOL HELPING KIDS COPE WITH THE PANDEMIC? “Over the past many months of the pandemic, it has been extremely important for Sierra Canyon School to keep our traditions alive for our students—no matter where and how they are engaging in learning. For 27 years, Sierra Canyon fourth graders have visited

La Purisima Mission. This year, they were able to visit the grounds and watch history come to life through a virtual field trip. Our academic teams have continued to thrive, with Upper Campus students participating virtually in high-ranking tournaments for both math and speech and debate.” WHAT MAKES YOUR TEACHERS THE BEST IN THE BUSINESS? “Sierra Canyon School equips students to rethink the familiar and embrace the unknown. It is a place where ingenious teachers, intrepid students and forward-thinking leaders work together to shape an education on the adventurous edge. Teachers create handson learning experiences in the classroom, on the stage, on the playing field and court, and on life-changing journeys. Through national searches, Sierra Canyon is able to attract and retain stellar faculty—58% of whom hold advanced degrees from top institutions across the country.”

11052 INDEPENDENCE AVE. | 20801 RINALDI ST. | CHATSWORTH | 818-882-8121 | SIERRACANYONSCHOOL.ORG SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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ALL ABOUT KIDS

HUNTINGTON LEARNING CENTER Greg Kulander, Owner

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untington Learning Center offers tutoring, test preparation and homework help by credentialed teachers for students in grades K-12. Subjects taught range from beginning phonics to advanced calculus. Prior to embarking on a career with Huntington Learning Center, owner Greg Kulander spent eight years working in China, focusing on educational reform. Back in the U.S., he led nonprofit organizations that provide work-based learning opportunities for youth. In addition to the local Encino location, Greg owns a learning center in Valencia and two more in the Portland, Oregon, area. HOW IS YOUR BUSINESS HELPING KIDS COPE WITH THE PANDEMIC? “The learning loss caused by the pandemic is nothing short of catastrophic. An emerging consensus among educational researchers has identified a clear solution: tutoring. A recent analysis of 100 studies in literacy and mathematics found that tutoring programs consistently produced larger improvements in

learning outcomes than any other intervention. Huntington offers online and in-person tutoring, strictly adhering to CDC and government guidelines. The health and safety of our students, teachers, staff and their families are our first priority.” WHAT QUALITIES ARE NEEDED TO BE THE BEST IN THIS BUSINESS? “A clear mission, capable and caring staff and teachers, and a laser focus on providing each student with the best education possible. Huntington has been in business for 43 years (almost 25 in Encino), so we know how students learn! We tailor our curriculum and teaching to each student, and the results show that our students improve an average of two grade levels in just a few months.” HOW DO YOU EARN THE TRUST OF KIDS? “By being present and focused on them and their needs. By demonstrating to them that hard work and persistence lead to results. For example, when our students work hard to

prep for the SAT and achieve their goal score or diligently practice reading comprehension skills until they find their homework is easier, it gives them a huge feeling of satisfaction and demonstrates that they are capable of more than they think and that hard work pays off—a tremendous self-confidence builder.” HOW CAN WE BEST SUPPORT OUR KIDS DURING THESE CHANGING TIMES?  “Spend time with them! One of the reasons I spent several years working in the nonprofit world creating experiential learning opportunities for students was because I sensed that our children were more and more disconnected from the world outside school, and that they did not understand the connection between their future and what they were learning in school. As a society, we need to do a better job of connecting those dots. It starts at home, where parents can talk to their kids about their jobs or even connect their children with other adults who work in areas in which the child has expressed interest.”

17200 VENTURA BLVD., SUITE 214, ENCINO | 818-907-5555 | HUNTINGTONHELPS.COM/CENTER/ENCINO

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION


CELEBRATING THE BEST OF CALIFORNIA

goldenstate.is

@ourgoldenstate


ACTIVE 20 TOLUCA ESTATES DRIVE, TOLUCA LAKE | $16,000 / MONTH

ACTIVE

ACTIVE

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4245 CLYBOURN AVE, TOLUCA LAKE $3,250,000

4747 FORMAN AVE, TOLUCA LAKE $2,999,000

10024 TOLUCA LAKE AVE, TOLUCA LAKE $18,500 / Month

ACTIVE

IN ESCROW

9565 CLYBOURN AVE, SHADOW HILLS $2,995,000

4918 AGNES AVE, VALLEY VILLAGE $1,799,000

SOLD 10433 KLING ST, TOLUCA LAKE $3,290,000

CRAIG STRONG DRE # 01450987 VP, Luxury Home Sales Top 1 % Nationwide #1 Individual Agent Companywide 1.3+ Billion Total Sales Volume strongrealtor.com

Compass does not guarantee the accuracy of square footage, lot size, or other information concerning the condition or features of the property provided by the seller or obtained from public records and other sources and the buyer is advised to independently verify the accuracy of that information. CalBRE 01450987


R E A L E S TAT E

Custom Gated Contemporary Estate Newly constructed sleek Contemporary set behind gates. An open concept floorplan is enhanced by a strong architectural aesthetic with clean lines, high ceilings, designer finishes and walls of nesting doors creating an amazing indoor/outdoor flow. Ideal for enjoying an active outdoor lifestyle, the landscaped grounds feature a sparkling pool/ spa, lanai, outdoor changing room & ¾ pool bath. 5173 Gaynor Ave, Encino, CA 91436 | $2,795,000 6 Bedroom, 8 bath | 4922 Sq Ft | 10,271 Sq Ft Lot Spitz | Cameron Group | www.SpitzCameronGroup.com | Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Andrew Spitz | 818.817.4284 | DRE 00924610 Harriet Cameron | 818.380.2151 | DRE 00675971 Fran Chavez | 818.517.1411 | DRE 01013357


Knock, Knock We’re Here A new door has opened in Studio City at The Agency’s third Valley office.

12080 VENTURA PLACE #D, STUDIO CITY, CA 91604


The numbers say it all. Our Calabasas and Sherman Oaks offices closed $889M in real estate among only 80 agents in 2020. That’s the power of The Agency.

2X MORE DEALS THAN THE AVERAGE AGENT AN AVERAGE OF $10M IN SALES PER AGENT 37+ OFFICES IN 4 COUNTRIES $1.75M AVERAGE SALES PRICE

REAL ESTATE WITHOUT BOUNDARIES AT THEAGENCYRE.COM


MVP

George Ouzounian

Congratulations Are in Order

SHERMAN OAKS “I’m invigorated by George closing a deal every single week, like clock-work. I admire and envy his productivity.” Craig Knizek

MVP

We’re taking a moment to brag about The Agency’s 2020 Valley real estate stars.

Danielle Peretz

CALABASAS

REAL ESTATE WITHOUT BOUNDARIES AT THEAGENCYRE.COM

“I’m inspired by Danielle’s incredible success for her clients and our firm, while I admire her calm personality and quiet confidence.” Craig Knizek


All Star

Rising Star

Rookie of the Year

Ingrid Sacerio

Nikki Joel

Sebastian Spader

SHERMAN OAKS

SHERMAN OAKS

SHERMAN OAKS

“As the linchpin of our Valley sales force, Ingrid embodies all the cultural values of The Agency. Hard work and smart collaboration leads to success.” Billy Rose

“Always a leading agent, we’re thrilled to have Nikki’s enormous talents and experience with us now.“ Michelle Schwartz

“With an impressive dedication to his clients, Sebastian smartly serves them by utilizing the array of tools we have for him. It’s exciting to see a young person gain command of their business.” Mauricio Umansky

All Star

Rising Star

Rookie of the Year

Gina Michelle

Christine Agopian

Camellia Yeroomian

CALABASAS

CALABASAS

CALABASAS

“I’m so proud of GIna’s incredible success with us at The Agency. Her transition from an independent broker to our All Star sets a shining example for our entire firm.” Emil Hartoonian

“Her meteoric success this past year is the product of a dedicated and smart salesperson. She’s built an incredible business in a short period of time, and we know it will continue for a long time.” Michelle Schwartz

“As a new agent, Camellia has hit the ground running, recording impressive sales with illustrious clients. We’re excited for her to build upon her success.” Emil Hartoonian


We’re Better Together

Emil Hartoonian MANAGING PARTNER

Michelle Schwartz MANAGING PARTNER

Craig Knizek MANAGING PARTNER

THE AGENCY IS A PLACE TO CALL HOME FOR SO MANY. WE DON’T JUST TEAM UP WITH ANYONE. WE CHOOSE QUALITY OVER QUANTITY, EACH AND EVERY TIME. AFTER ALL, WHEN YOU WORK WITH ONE OF US, YOU WORK WITH ALL OF US.

Thoughtful in nature, strategic in approach, bold in personality. Join the family. REAL ESTATE WITHOUT BOUNDARIES AT THEAGENCYRE.COM


5716 JED SMITH

HIDDEN HIL L S | S OL D | $9,999,50 0

14324 ROBL AR PL ACE

SHERM A N OA KS | S OL D | $ 6,199,90 0

6 BEDS | 8 BAT HS | 9,900 SQ . F T. | 1 ACRE LOT

5 BEDS | 6.5 BAT HS | 7, 249 SQ . F T. | 17, 26 4 SQ . F T. LOT

14582 VAL L E Y VIS TA BLVD.

4850 ANDA SOL AVENUE

SHERM A N OA KS | $ 5,975,0 0 0

V EN T UR A | $ 5, 499,0 0 0 OR $19,999/MO

5 BEDS | 8 BAT HS | 8,000 SQ . F T. | 17, 224 SQ . F T. LOT

5 BEDS | 5.5 BAT HS | 5,800 SQ . F T. | 14, 4 39 SQ . F T. LOT

5510 JED SMITH

839 N. OGDEN DRIVE

HIDDEN HIL L S | IN E S CR OW | $ 4 ,0 0 0,0 0 0

SUNSE T S T RIP | $ 3,850,0 0 0 OR $ 25,0 0 0/MO

5 BEDS | 3 BAT HS | 4,100 SQ . F T. | 1 ACRE LOT

5 BEDS | 4.5 BAT HS | 4,900 SQ . F T. | 6,500 SQ . F T. LOT

4069 KR AF T AVENUE

3820 RHODES AVENUE

C OL FA X ME A D OW | IN E S CR OW | $ 2,699,50 0

5 BEDS | 4.5 BAT HS | 3,673 SQ . F T. | 6,750 SQ . F T. LOT

S T UDIO CI T Y | $1,799,90 0

4 BEDS | 4 BAT HS | 2,650 SQ . F T.

DANIELLE PERE T Z

DANIELLE.PERE T Z@THE AGENCYRE.COM 818.644.1477 LIC. #01897529

THE AGENCYRE.COM

An international associate of Savills


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Photo by: Wayne Ford

HOME IS WHERE OUR DREAMS LIVE

ANDREW MANNING

$2 BILLION+

CLOSED SALES Lifetime Sales Volume

60+ SALES 2020 No. 8 AGENT 2019 for BHHSCP

SOLD $4,641,680 3816 Longridge l Sherman Oaks

SOLD $3,400,000 357 N Bonhill l Brentwood

SOLD $3,225,000 16231 Meadowridge Wy l Encino

SOLD $3,535,000 4700 Libbit l Encino

ANDREW MANNING l REALTOR® BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOMESERVICES CA PROPERTIES

818 380 2147 PH DRE LIC #: 00941825

andrew@andrewmanning.com © 2021 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices California Properties (BHHSCP) is a member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates LLC. BHHS and the BHHS symbol are registered service marks of Columbia Insurance Company, a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate. BHH Affiliates LLC and BHHSCP do not guarantee accuracy of all data including measurements, conditions, and features of property. Information is obtained from various sources and will not be verified by broker or MLS. Buyer is advised to independently verify the accuracy of that information.


THE LIVYATAN GROUP FEATURED PROPERTIES 16766 Bosque Drive | Encino 5 Bed | 9 bath Approx: 8,500 sqft | 25,607 lot Offered at: $7,495,000

ACTIVE

8 bed | 14 bath Approx: 13,000 sqft | 36,013 lot Offered at: $13,995,000

ACTIVE

ACTIVE

4848 Encino Ave | Encino 7 bed | 9 bath | Approx: 10,580 sqft | 26,835 lot Offered at: $11,495,000

3950 Royal Oak | Encino

1060 Woodland Drive | Beverly Hills 4 Bed | 4.5 Bath | Approx. 5,868 sqft | 20,250 sqft lot Offered at: $11,995,000

ACTIVE

5110 Whitsett Ave | Valley Village 2-3 bed | Approx: 1,720-2,463 sq ft Offered at: $899,000-$1,299,000

3951 Royal Oak | Encino 6 bed | 10 bath | Approx: 10,902 sqft | 23,296 lot Offered at: $10,995,000

ACTIVE

ACTIVE

ACTIVE

ACTIVE

12223 Gorham Ave | Brentwood 4 Bed | 4.5 Bath | Approx. 3,857 sqft | 7,500 sqft lot Offered at: $3,695,000

365 N Vista St | Los Angeles 5 Bed | 5.5 Bath | Approx. 5,017 sqft | 7,302 sqft lot Offered at: $3,799,000

9291 Flicker Way | Los Angeles 3 Bed | 3.5 Bath | Approx. 3,000 sqft | 6,072 sqft lot Offered at: $3,995,000

537 Alta Vista Blvd | Los Angeles 5 Bed | 6.5 Bath | Approx.4,312 Sqft | 7,716 sqft Lot Offered at: $3,995,000

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

15601 Meadowgate Rd | Encino 7 Bed | 10 Bath | Approx. 10,420 sqft | 15,751 Sold: $10,350,000

SOLD

15645 Woodvale Rd | Encino 7 Bed | 10 Bath | Approx. 7,481 sqft | 14,876 sqft Sold: $6,900,000

SOLD

OFF MARKET

SOLD

OFF MARKET

Magnolia St | Encino

17211 Rancho St | Encino 5 Bed | 7.5 Bath | Approx. 8,800 sqft | 34,278sqft Sold: $8,575,000

SOLD

OFF MARKET

Ostrom St | Encino

4926 Petit | Encino 5 bed | 7 bath | Approx: 4466 sqft | 8,249 lot Sold: $3,145,000 OFF MARKET

Margate St | Encino

Adi Livyatan

New Construction and Luxury Home Specialist Wall Street Journal Ranked #15 in CA | #28 in the Nation Mobile: 818.919.4060 • Office: 818.285.3220 Email: adilivyatan@yahoo.com

www.AdiLivyatan.com

DRE# 1892750

SOLD OVE R $25 0 M ILLION IN 2 0 2 0

Rubio St | Encino


MICHAEL BERGIN |

FOR SALE

4837 Laurelgrove Avenue, Valley Village $2,099,000 4 Beds 4 Baths 4,440± Sqft Incredible Opportunity on Large Corner Lot

FOR SALE

12407 Moorpark Street #302, Studio City $789,000 2 Beds 3 Baths 1,522± Sqft Prime Studio City Penthouse

JUST SOLD

12112 Laurel Terrace Drive, Studio City $1,899,900 3 Beds 2 Baths 1,700± Sqft Carpenter Ave School Pool

JUST SOLD

16184 Meadowcrest Road, Sherman Oaks 3 Beds 3 Baths 2,157± Sqft Royal Woods Sold Over Asking for $1,645,000

LUXURY ESTATES DIRECTOR

JUST LISTED

11538 Chiquita Street, Studio City $4,750,000 5 Beds 5 Baths 4,000± Sqft 16,000± Sqft Lot Colfax Meadows

JUST SOLD

FOR SALE

6002 Allott Avenue, Valley Glen $2,175,000 5 Beds 6 Baths 7,613± Sqft Media Room Huge Basement Wine Cellar

JUST SOLD

4546 Carpenter Avenue, Studio City $1,875,000 3 Beds 3 Baths 2,771± Sqft Colfax Charter District

4329 Lemp Avenue, Studio City $2,368,000 5 Beds 5 Baths 3,650± Sqft Colfax Meadows Pool

JUST SOLD

JUST SOLD

4256 Stern Avenue, Sherman Oaks $2,775,000 5 Beds 6 Baths 4,719± Sqft 6,997± Sqft Lot

JUST SOLD

13352 Valleyheart Drive, Sherman Oaks $1,670,000 3 Beds 5 Baths 2,416± Sqft 7,200± Sqft Lot

4518 Farmdale Avenue, Studio City $1,875,000 5 Beds 5 Baths 3,271± Sqft

JUST SOLD

4042 Denny Avenue, Studio City $1,810,000 3 Beds 3.5 Baths Yard Cul De Sac New Construction

Michael Bergin Luxury Estates Director 310.600.0715 Michael@MichaelBergin.com DRE 01845572

Your #1 Real Estate Expert Compass is a licensed real estate broker and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdraw without notice. No statement is made as to accuracy of any description. All measurements and square footages are approximate. Exact dimensions can be obtained by retaining the services of an architect or engineer. This is not intended to solicit property already listed.


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ratulations

MATTEPSTEIN.COM SOMATT@AOL.COM 818-681-2000

to

Matt Epstein #1 #2 #5

Agent San Fernando Valley Agent Los Angeles Agent Nationwide for

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices

Top one-half of 1 percent of more than 1,250,000 REALTORS® nationwide

Follow me on Facebook: MattEpsteinRealty Follow me on Twitter: @SoMattEpstein Follow me on Instagram: @MattEpsteinRealEstate

CalBRE# 01121162

With proven results from the market leader, why call anybody else?

Dreaming about getting away from it all, and yet it’s difficult during these unprecedented times. Just an hour away in Oxnard, Ventura and Santa Barbara the dream of long luxurious days by the ocean, kayaking through a harbor, bicycling near the beach and watching sea lions, dolphins and pelicans sounds pretty good - doesn’t it? I’ve been assisting many of our clients who are now buying weekend/ vacation homes in Ventura and Santa Barbara County. Call me if you’re interested, and I’ll show you how that feeling of vacation can be yours more than just once a year! Jane Kaplan Epstein Dre#01922991

3908 Ethel Ave. – SC- $3,995,000 6Br+7Ba in 5,548 SqFt on a 9,784 SqFt Lot- Longridge Estates: Elegant, Europeaninspired villa. The home features 5,500 sq ft approx. with 6 bd and 7 ba with an open floor plan, lots of natural light, chef’s kitchen, spacious master suite, and much more. The backyard has a nice sized patio area and a large grass yard.

14736 Greenleaf St.– SO - $2,995,0005Br+6Ba in 4,939 SqFt on a 10,742 SqFt LotStunning contemporary new construction south of the Blvd., in a prime Sherman Oaks area. This chic contemporary home features 5 bedrooms and 5 bathrooms, chef’s kitchen, huge master suite, pool house, pool, Jacuzzi, outdoor living room, and much more.

#KeepingItRealEstate

11958 Hartsook St. - VV- $2,750,000 5Br+6 Ba in 3,808 SqFt on a 8,051 SqFt Lot-New construction completed in 2019, one of a kind transitional modern home. It features high ceilings, chef’s kitchen, and floor to ceiling doors that open up to the backyard. The master bedroom is large with a balcony overlooking the backyard along with an extremely large master bathroom. All beautifully done. This house is walk-in ready, just bring your toothbrush! 15227 Valley Vista Blvd– SO- $2,995,000 5Br+7Ba in 4,219 SqFt on a 8,498 SqFt Lot – Sleek & stylish modern new construction home in Sherman Oaks! This 5 bed/7 bath two-story home offers a bright open floor plan, high ceilings, hardwood floors, chef’s kitchen & a 1,200 sq ft rooftop deck. The entertainer’s backyard offers a pool, spa, bbq, pool cabana and much more. 3910 Sumac Dr – SO- $1,499,999 3Br+4 Ba

in 3,200 SqFt on a 9,182 SqFt Lot– Beautiful contemporary home in Sherman Oaks. The home features very high vaulted ceilings, and ceiling to floor glass doors, a master suite with a balcony, and much more. Lots of storage space and closets throughout the house. Don’t miss this unique property which affords you the feeling of being away from it all yet only minutes away.

Call for your FREE market analysis! © 2019 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices California Properties (BHHSCP) is a member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates LLC. BHH Affiliates LLC and BHHSCP do not guarantee accuracy of all data including measurements, conditions, and features of property. Information is obtained from various sources and will not be verified by broker or MLS. Buyer is advised to independently verify the accuracy of that information.


Valley Real Estate Dream Team WE WANT TO SELL YOUR HOUSE! Local Valley experts with over 15 years of home sales experience Master Negotiators with your interest always top of mind Full home services available including staging, design, and construction support Passionate and hard-working husband & wife real estate team We make real esate fun & easy and our clients love us for that!

Follow us on Instagram @Redesign Properties www.R e d e s i g n R e s i d e n t i a l.com | See our reviews on Yelp!

$2,075,000

5155 Bellaire Ave, Valley Village

$999,000

10326 Weddington St, Toluca Terrace

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www.RedesignResidential.com

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$1,225,000

4835 Forman Ave, Toluca Woods

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$2,250,000

11601 Dona Alicia Pl, Studio City

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SO

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$3,300,000

4315 Arcola Ave, Toluca Lake

$995,000

17347 Bullock St, Encino Village

Douglas McFarland (BRE 01519642)

Ashley Fultz

Real Estate Broker/Owner

Director/Designer

Mobile: (323) 308-9494

Mobile: (323) 482-7250

Email: dmcfarland@redesignproperties.com

Email: afultz@redesignproperties.com


Oren David Mordkowitz ESTATES DIRECTOR | REALTOR ®

818-933-5866 IN ESCROW

CalDRE License #01246402

oren@orenestates.com IN ESCROW

SOLD

20047 Chapter Dr. | Woodland Hills | $2,225,000 18118 Tarzana St. | Tarzana | $1,225,000 15153 Hartsook St. | Sherman Oaks | $2,095,000

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

3718 Hayvenhurst Ave. | Encino | $3,189,000 4927 Hayvenhurst Ave. | Encino | $2,123,400 4520 Gloria Ave. | Encino | $2,389,000

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

4904 Rupert Ave. | Encino | $1,249,000 16323 Tudor Dr. | Encino | $2,399,000 4404 Gloria Ave. | Encino | $1,299,000

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

22233 Dardenne St. | Calabasas | $1,615,000 4915 Woodley Ave. | Encino | $2,389,000 4936 Ranchito Ave. | Sherman Oaks | $1,175,000

Curious what your home is worth? Contact Oren for a complimentary home analysis!

OrenEstates.com


GORGEOUS SHERMAN OAKS ESTATE

5,179 SF - EXQUISITELY REMODELED S. OF VENTURA - 2 ACRES WITH VIEWS

3686 Benedict Canyon Lane 5 BEDS | 4.5 BATHS | 5,179 SF | 2 ACRE LOT Located south of the Blvd. in one of Sherman Oaks finest neighborhoods, this stunning Mediterranean home offers the finest finishes and is part of the exclusive 7 estate ‘Benedict Collection.’

Offered at $4,500,000 www.3686Benedict.com

818.481.1602 znagy@kw.com

CalBRE# 01832306


CAROL Nobody does it better...

sold

15712 Sutton St., Encino $4,195,000 Brand New – Royal Oaks Adjacent

sold

20335 Howard Ct., Woodland Hills $2,499,000 Magnificent Woodland Hills Estate

sold

4908 Edgerton Ave., Encino $3,300,000 Encino Woods

sold

15620 Woodvale Rd., Encino $2,399,000 Royal Oaks

OLFE sold

17552 Margate St., Encino $2,799,000 Amestoy Estates

sold

16612 Oldham Pl., Encino $1,800,000 Encino Hills

sold

sold

3902 Woodfield Dr., Sherman Oaks $1,689,000 Royal Woods

17201 Weddington St., Encino $1,600,000 Amestoy Estates

in escrow

sold

16411 Otsego St., Encino $1,575,000 Encino Woods

12334 Longacre Ave., Granada Hills $1,350,000 Cagney Ranch Estates

TOP 250 INDIVIDUAL AGENTS IN THE NATION

sold

19212 Rosita St., Tarzana $2,699,000 Tarzana Gated Estate

sold

16657 Oldham St., Encino $1,605,000 Encino Hills

16201 Dickens St., Encino $1,249,000 Encino South of Ventura

sold

#160

818.285.3688

www.CarolWolfe.com

sold

25921 Voltaire Pl., Stevenson Ranch $1,000,000 Stevenson Ranch


Just Sold

Just Sold

Just Sold

3633 Longview Valley Road, Sherman Oaks | $1,180,000

4268 Hazeltine Avenue, Sherman Oaks | $1,310,000

3862 Sherview Drive, Sherman Oaks | $1,503,500

Just Sold

Just Sold

Just Sold

3747 Alomar Drive, Sherman Oaks | $3,725,000

5500 Vanalden Avenue, Tarzana | $2,100,000

14025 Riverside Drive, Sherman Oaks | $799,000

Just Sold

Just Sold

Just Listed

(Buyer Representative)

(Buyer Representative)

14624 Round Valley Drive, Sherman Oaks | $1,575,000

4205 Kester Avenue, Sherman Oaks | $1,5510,00

3518 Vista Haven Road, Sherman Oaks | $1,849,000

Just Listed

Just Listed

For Sale

3486 Woodcliff Road, Sherman Oaks | $1,595,000

3800 Weslin Avenue, Sherman Oaks | $1,495,000

4430 Haskell Avenue, Encino | $4,950,000

BARRY DANTAGNAN (818) 426-8677

barrydantagnan@gmail.com CalRE# 01020477 The property information herein is derived from various sources that may include, but not be limited to, county records and the Multiple Listing Service, and it may include approximations. Although the information is believed to be accurate, it is not warranted and you should not rely upon it without personal verification. Real estate agents affiliated with Coldwell Banker Realty are independent contractor sales associates, not employees. ©2021 Coldwell Banker. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker and the Coldwell Banker logos are trademarks of Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. The Coldwell Banker® System is comprised of company owned offices which are owned by a subsidiary of Realogy Brokerage Group LLC and franchised offices which are independently owned and operated. The Coldwell Banker System fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act.


A home that exceeds expectations deserves a mortgage to match

• Mortgage discounts with Relationship Pricing1 • Dedicated support every step of the way • Jumbo loan sizes up to $3 million; loan sizes up to $8 million available to well-qualified buyers who meet Citi’s High Net Worth2 requirements

We’ve got a mortgage to fit your needs. Call me today. John Musso Home Lending Officer 818-518-1008 john.musso@citi.com citi.com/johnmusso NMLS# 448606

Terms, conditions and fees for accounts, programs, products and services are subject to change. This is not a commitment to lend. All loans are subject to credit and property approval. Certain restrictions may apply on all programs. Offer cannot be combined with any other mortgage offer. This offer contains information about U.S. domestic financial services provided by Citibank, N.A. and is intended for use domestically in the U.S. 1

A Citibank deposit account and automated monthly transfers of the mortgage payment from a Citibank personal deposit account using automated drafting will be required to receive Citibank mortgage relationship pricing. Ask a mortgage representative for details on eligible balances and the qualifying closing cost credit or rate discount. Availability of the Citibank mortgage relationship pricing for Citibank account holders is subject to change without notice.

2

Available for clients with a minimum of $500,000 or more in investable post-close assets, and at least $50,000 in traditional assets must be on deposit with Citi at least 10 days prior to closing. This amount may be part of the $500,000 eligibility requirement. Real estate, loan proceeds, stock options, restricted stock and personal property will not be counted as part of the $500,000 or more investable post-close assets or the $50,000 in traditional assets. Net cash value of life insurance can be counted as part of the $500,000 but not part of the traditional assets. Investable assets are defined as deposit accounts (checking, savings, money market, Certificates of Deposit), unrestricted stocks, non-vested stock and restricted stock, bonds and retirement accounts held by the individual who is personally liable on the loan. These asset types held in revocable trust may be used provided the trust document meets the Trust Policy. 100% of the face value of all assets, except non-vested stock and restricted stock, may be used to calculate the amount of funds available to meet the eligibility criteria. For non-vested stock and restricted stock, the borrower must be 100% vested within 1 year of closing and a maximum of 70% of value may be used to calculate qualifying equity. Additional conditions apply. ©2020 Citibank, N.A. NMLS# 412915. Member FDIC and Equal Housing Lender. Citi, Citi and Arc Design and other marks used herein are service marks of Citigroup Inc. or its affiliates, used and registered throughout the world.


LAST WORD

Lost & Found A HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR AND BLACK LIVES MATTER ACTIVIST REFLECTS ON MAKING THE TRANSITION TO ADULTHOOD DURING THE PANDEMIC. Written by Taliiya Flemming | Illustrated by Nikki Smith

Being Gen-Z during a global pandemic feels like a curse—es-

free of judgment or shame. I have always identified myself as a

pecially if it’s your senior year of high school. We should be

dancer, actor and singer. Now I proudly add “activist.”

celebrating with parties and ceremonies. We should be looking

Everything took on greater intensity after the death of

forward to what’s ahead. We should be figuring out who we are

George Floyd. New stories constantly surfaced about Black

and what we want out of life. Instead, we are stuck on pause.

people dying at the hands of police brutality or white su-

I was 16 when I first heard of the coronavirus. Before it

premacy. Watching the protests around the country, I so

reached the U.S, a friend who lives in Italy, whose father is a

badly wanted to participate. Then some friends of mine held

doctor in Milan, was my source for all things COVID-related. A

a protest in Calabasas, where I’ve lived for almost 10 years

week after Italy’s lockdown, my friend’s parents contracted the

and where I’ve been a victim of racism more times than I can

virus, and word was that it had been discovered in the U.S. I

count. There is a history of complacency within these city

knew that everything was about to change.

limits. Despite being vulnerable to the virus (I have asthma),

March 13, 2020: the day the world stopped turning. I remember thinking that this “pandemic” was just going to be a two-

convinced me that there was hope for my city. Thousands

week break that we would all eventually laugh about. Little did I

of people gathered and marched to city hall with a sense of

know what I was about to face. And it wasn’t just COVID.

determination that was exhilarating.

Being a Black woman in America has never been easy. Being a

114

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I went to the protest. And I’m glad I did. What I saw that day

So now while I finish up senior year remotely and make

Black woman in America, in a global pandemic, amid social and

plans to attend Howard University in the fall, I am mindful

political upheaval, is an entirely different story. The resurgence

about making the transition to adulthood. I know I’ve grown

of the Black Lives Matter Movement sparked a dormant flame

from the events of the past year. And I’m grateful to under-

within me. As a member of the Viewpoint School Black Student

stand the importance of using my voice to make the world a

Union, I have always been an activist in my school community.

better place. I’m grateful for hope—and for life. Now more

But this past year, as an advocate for students of color, I got more

than ever, I really want to live. A quote from the singer Drake

involved than ever. I monitored and facilitated the BSU Instagram

sticks in my head: “I’m really trying to make it more than

account so that Black students’ voices could be heard on campus

what it is, ’cause everybody dies but not everybody lives.” ■


The Spitz | Cameron Group C A L L TO DAY TO F I N D O U T H OW O U R U N I Q U E M A R K E T I N G S T R AT E G I E S H E L P E D U S S E L L I N T H I S N E W N O R M A L JU

5173 Gaynor Ave Encino www.5173Gaynor.com JU

4644 Arriba Dr Tarzana www.4644Arriba.com

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$1,895,000

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4495 Libbit Ave Encino www.4495Libbit.com

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$1,899,000

Spitz | Cameron Group 2020 Sales 3919 Westfall Dr, Encino 17925 Medley Dr, Encino 17204 Rancho St, Encino 4107 Stansbury Ave, Sherman Oaks 16658 Adlon Rd, Encino 5685 White Cloud Circle, Westlake Village~ 3727 Winford Dr, Tarzana~ 17069 Oak View Dr, Encino* 4212 Costello Ave, Sherman Oaks 3949 Vista Linda Dr, Encino 4651 Louise Ave, Encino* 3835 Alomar Dr, Sherman Oaks 3553 Terrace View Dr, Encino 4310 Bergamo Dr, Encino* 4057 Hayvenhurst Ave, Encino*

$4,050,000 $3,958,750 $3,730,000 $3,718,000 $3,625,000 $3,210,000 $3,200,000 $2,955,000 $2,827,745 $2,715,000 $2,550,000 $2,498,000 $2,150,000 $2,098,570 $2,050,000

16301 Celinda Pl, Encino~ 18431 Tarzana Dr, Tarzana 17956 Lake Vista Dr, Encino 4955 Palomar Dr, Tarzana~ 16386 Mandalay Dr, Encino 14835 Jadestone Dr, Sherman Oaks 14021 Roblar Rd, Sherman Oaks ~ 2220 Avenue of the Stars #602, Los Angeles 2223 Ridgemont Dr, Los Angeles 17025 Cotter Pl, Encino 16905 Bosque Dr, Encino 3492 Clairton Pl, Encino 4601 White Oak Pl, Encino~ 4202 Benedict Canyon Dr, Sherman Oaks~ 4050 Contera Rd, Encino*

$1,999,000 $1,879,000 $1,850,000 $1,775,000 $1,770,000 $1,710,000 $1,660,000 $1,600,000 $1,574,390 $1,499,900 $1,445,000 $1,440,000 $1,380,000 $1,369,000 $1,315,000

2093 Bridgegate Ct, Westlake Village~ 17137 Escalon Dr, Encino~ 17003 Rancho St, Encino* 20200 Ruston Rd, Woodland Hills~ 3801 Benedict Cyn Lane, Sherman Oaks~ 14723 McCormick St, Sherman Oaks 14538 Benefit St. #304, Sherman Oaks~ 14560 Benefit St, #303, Sherman Oaks~ 6300 Jumilla Ave, Woodland Hills~ 8118 Valley Flores Dr, West Hills~* 6400 Primrose Ave #18, Los Angeles 17536 Runnymede St, Lake Balboa~ 70700 Frank Sinatra Dr #14, Rancho Mirage

$1,302,000 $1,240,000 $1,175,000 $1,113,000 $1,070,000 $1,012,000 $800,000 $755,000 $749,000 $725,000 $655,000 $615,000 $348,000

~Sold over list * Represented both Buyer(s) & Seller(s) in Transaction

Nearly $100,000,000 in closed transactions for 2020 AndrewSpitz.com

HarrietCameron.com

FranChavez.com

DRE#924610 Realtor®

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© 2021 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices California Properties (BHHSCP) is a member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates LLC. BHHS and the BHHS symbol are registered service marks of Columbia Insurance Company, a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate. BHH Affiliates LLC and BHHSCP do not guarantee accuracy of all data including measurements, conditions, and features of property. Information is obtained from various sources and will not be verified by broker or MLS. Buyer is advised to independently verify the accuracy of that information. DRE #01317331

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