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SOUTHBAY.GOLDENSTATE.IS

THE ARTS ISSUE

Shoot for the Sky PETER JONES PIVOTS HIS LENS SIX DOLLARS

FEB/MAR 2020

TO SOCAL’S AVIATION AGE


Expert cardiac care

TORRANCE MEMORIAL AND CEDARS-SINAI’S AFFILIATION BRINGS MORE EXPERT CARDIOLOGY CARE TO THE SOUTH BAY. More access to cardiac specialists and programs located within Torrance Memorial. More patient benefits from innovative cardiology research and the latest advancements in cardiac treatments. More expert care for our patients and the South Bay. Learn more at MoreCardiacExperts.org Left to right: Cedars-Sinai Smidt Heart Institute: Aamir Shah, MD, Aziz Ghaly, MD, Joanna Chikwe, MD; Torrance Memorial Lundquist Lurie Cardiovascular Institute: Victoria Shin, MD, Mark Lurie, MD.


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ADVANCED CARDIAC CARE

HAS ARRIVED. Providence Little Company of Mary and Keck Medicine of USC team up to bring world-renowned academic medicine to the South Bay.

Jashdeep S. Dhoot, MD, Nazanin Azadi, MD, Michele Del Vicario, MD, Raymond Lee, MD, Matthew Powers, MD, Murrad J. Abdelkarim, MD, Thi B. Dang, MD, Craig J. Baker, MD, Rishi Kaushal, MD, Jonathan Cash, MD (Not pictured: Vaughn A. Starnes, MD, Distinguished Professor and Chair, USC Department of Surgery )


The Del Vicario Cardiovascular Center of Excellence is leading the way when it comes to matters of the heart. Thanks to the Providence Little Company of Mary and Keck Medicine of USC’s partnership, our highly skilled cardiologists and surgeons offer the South Bay community the highest level of expert care and the latest in academic research. From diagnostic procedures to minimally invasive valve and open heart surgery, we are saving the hearts and lives of the South Bay.

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R R II C CH HS ST TO ON NE E F FA AM M II LL Y Y C CE EN NT TE ER R Ending Child Abuse. Strengthening Families Ending Child Abuse. Strengthening Families

Richstone uses the healing power of art in therapy to help children, adolescents and adults explore feelings Richstone uses the healing power of art in therapy to help children, adolescents and adults explore feelings and expand self-awareness of emotions. Art is a powerful medium that can inspire self-expression, forge and expand self-awareness of emotions. Art is a powerful medium that can inspire self-expression, forge connections, build resiliency, and transform lives. It is one of the tools Richstone uses in its comprehensive connections, build resiliency, and transform lives. It is one of the tools Richstone uses in its comprehensive approach to mend the hearts of those impacted by child abuse and family violence. approach to mend the hearts of those impacted by child abuse and family violence.

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The is dedicated to treating and The is dedicated to treating and preventing child abuse and trauma; strengthening and preventing child abuse and trauma; strengthening and educating families; and preventing violence in families, educating families; and preventing violence in families, schools and communities. schools and communities.

LEARN MORE: LEARN MORE:

www.richstonefamily.org www.richstonefamily.org

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Thank you to all our donating artists, ART310 sponsors and LA25 members for helping us raise over $250,000 to support children’s arts and education in the South Bay. We are thankful for your support and proud of our efforts together to give back to a community we love. LA25 Members Past & Present: Eric Formiller, John Capellaro, Eric Pritz, Amy Gimlen, Christopher Salling, KC Campbell, Lori Ford, Jennifer Buchsbaum, Christopher Yuhl, David Coe, Jolise Tracey, Jane Euler, Jill Brunkhardt, Sean Dinneen, Robin Curren, Mark Duncan, Mark Rubin, RJ Smith, Kate Lester, Michael Newman, Steven F. Carvel, Geoff Chait, Adam Deierling, Christopher Derosa, Ashley Magovern, Kyle Mealey, Dominique Scott, Paul Sargeant, Paul Chau and Brian Withers. ART310 Artists: Bo Bridges, Al Satterwhite, Tricia Strickfaden, Holly Socrates, Brian Kingston, Brent Broza, Lee Tunila, Anthony Friedkin, Alex Weinstein, Jeff & Siri Berting, Kathleen Keifer, Rob Waxman, Jason Olive, Carol Reach, Jennifer Olwig, Eden Jones, Anton Watts, Dan Janotta, Robert Ketchum, Kathey Bauer, Gerard Murphy, Lauren Frick, Gabe Fernandez, Augustus Francis, Diana Antoni, Jessica Alley, Tm Gratkowski, Lauren Pressey, John Cuento, Kathy Bauer, Anne Ewen, Rafael McMaster, Kristen Shaw, Tanya Monaghan, Paula Langstein, Amy Freidberg, Natalie Strong, Monica Orozco.

Lori Ford, Jen Buchsbaum, Chris Yuhl, Eric Pritz LA25 Foundation for The Arts Board: Christopher Salling, Eric Formiller, Amy Gimlen, Pictured: Artists Bo Bridges & Brent Broza, ART310, Tulita Elementary Art Project

Do WELL. Do GOOD.


34 PAINT THE TOWN Carrie Dietz Brown

38 HAIR APPARENT Katsumi Kasai

48 PALATE Mosa Coastal

74 BEST FOOT FORWARD Joie Shettler

88 OUTSIDE THE LINES KidWiseman

102 SEEN & THE BUBBLE Who’s who around town

162 LAST WORD Getting Creative

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COVER Documentary filmmaker Peter Jones in his office Photographed by Phillip Graybill

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52

40

66

ALSO...

ALL GOOD THINGS

FOREVER HOME

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As The LA25 Foundation for the Arts comes to

A Manhattan Beach artist and her husband adopt

PROFILES

an end, we take a look at their impact on arts

a mid-century fixer and make it their own.

Real Estate & Mortgage

education in the South Bay.

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REAL ESTATE

AGAINST THE CURRENT

LET IT BE

Spectacular local listings

Environmental activist, philosopher and

A South Bay musician lands the opportunity to

multimedia artist Katja Müller encourages the

record his album in Nashville. Just don’t make

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use of sustainably sourced materials through

big deal about it, OK?

AGENT SPOTLIGHT

her art.

Caskey & Caskey

92 58

WALK THE LINE

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NO FEAR OF FLYING

If nature is a mother, Patagonia is her drop-dead

ON THE MARKET

Peter Jones’ recent documentary, Blue Sky

gorgeous yet wildly temperamental progeny.

Terranea Real Estate

Metropolis, tells the story of how aviation—

Like moths to a flame, adventurers are drawn

with a strong dash of cinematic flair—helped

to this magnetic force of a region, complete

spur the growth of Southern California and

with turquoise waters, glaciers and—for the

its melting pot of pioneers, celebrities,

determined—pumas.

immigrants and dreamers.

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EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

GROUP PUBLISHER

Darren Elms

Jared Sayers ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER | Amy Tetherow

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

424-220-6338 | amy@goldenstate.is

Michelle Villas

MEDIA SOLUTIONS MANAGER | Erika Carrion

COPY EDITOR

310-897-2424 | erika@goldenstate.is

Laura Watts

MEDIA SOLUTIONS MANAGER | Marcie Gutierrez

SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

424-220-6337 | marcie@goldenstate.is

Yasmine Kahsai, Nikki Smith

MEDIA SOLUTIONS MANAGER | Jen Turquand

DEPUTY EDITORS Bonnie Graves (Food & Wine), Kara Mickelson, Tanya Monaghan, Jennie Nunn

424-220-6335 | jen@goldenstate.is DIGITAL CAMPAIGN SPECIALIST | Sam Lee 424-220-6318 | sam@goldenstate.is

WRITERS & CONTRIBUTORS Corry Cook, Sara Debevec, Ian Freshman,

DIRECTOR OF EVENTS | Danielle Price

Robert Earle Howells, Amber Klinck,

424-220-6332 | danielle@goldenstate.is

Rafael McMaster, Kat Monk

MARKETING MANAGER | Kimberly Caltagirone 424-220-6341 | kimberly@goldenstate.is

PHOTOGRAPHERS Phillip Graybill, Sarah King, Ben Meek, Kat Monk, Shane O’Donnell, Monica Orozco, Lauren Pressey

SOUTHBAY IS A DIVISION OF THE GOLDEN STATE COMPANY

MANAGING PARTNERS Charlie Koones

Todd Klawin

MARKETING & OPERATIONS PARTNER/BRAND PUBLISHER | Emily Stewart PARTNER/MANAGING DIRECTOR, MEDIA & ANALYTICS | Warren Schaffer DIRECTOR OF DIGITAL | Charles Simmons DIRECTOR OF FILM & VIDEO | Bryce Lowe-White OPERATIONS DIRECTOR | Allison Jeackjuntra COMMUNITY MANAGERS | Jenni Aceret, Natalie Long ACCOUNTING | Janet De La Cruz, Ljay Farris To learn more about us, visit thegoldenstatecompany.com.

No part of this periodical may be reproduced in any form or by any means without prior written consent from The Golden State Company, LLC. Any and all submissions to this or any of The Golden State Company, LLC publications become the property of The Golden State Company, LLC and may be used in any media. We reserve the right to edit. SUBSCRIPTIONS info@goldenstate.is or 310-376-7800. Subscriptions are $29 per year. TO OUR READERS: Southbay welcomes your feedback. Please send letters to Reader Response Department, Southbay magazine. Please include your name, address and email. Edited letters may be published. 200 N. Pacific Coast Highway, Suite 110, El Segundo, CA 90245 Tel 310-376-7800 | Fax 310-376-0200 | goldenstate.is | southbay.goldenstate.is

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A Stretch of the Imagination Before the New Year, a small gathering shared aspirations

studio and letting your body move freely. Or you used

they wished to fulfill in 2020. When my friend Katie’s

to play guitar yet watched it collect dust in the corner of

turn came up, she revealed she hopes to begin painting

your living room. What are you waiting for? Engaging

again. “Again?” I queried back. “I didn’t even know you

with your creative side can be a great way to let off some

painted to begin with!” Turns out my good friend, whom

steam, build confidence and even connect with others.

I always associated with science, medicine and “left

In this issue we bring you stories of individuals who

brain” smarts, is also secretly an artist … and has been

take their artistry to the next level with professional ca-

since she was very young. Somewhere in between school,

reers. We hope their undertakings inspire you to stir your

a master’s degree and launching her consulting career,

own creative juice.

her art simply took a back seat. Despite a long absence from her life, she hoped a canvas and a paintbrush would offer much-needed calm and joy—an opportunity to check out from the grind and let her instincts flow. How many of us have a creative urge budding inside that longs to be released? Perhaps you have a pining to get behind the potter’s wheel and throw your own ceramics. Maybe your idea of bliss is getting into a dance

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Darren Elms


PHILLIP GRAYBILL | Born in Atlanta, Phillip spent the last 20 years in NYC and now splits his time here. His work has been exhibited alongside artists such as Julian Schnabel, Peter Lindbergh and Nigel Barker. He was also the primary photographer for the Nine Inch Nails and Sigur Rós limited edition box set and numerous covers. His studio produces commissioned, custom-designed fine art for residential and commercial spaces. phillipgraybill.com

ROBERT EARLE HOWELLS | Bob, as we know him here at Golden State, writes travel stories for National Geographic Traveler and Westways magazines and is the copy editor of Ventura Blvd. He was the founding editor of the Outside Buyer’s Guide and also reviews outdoor gear for The New York Times’ Wirecutter.

SARA DEBEVEC | Sara is an internationally acclaimed multimedia artist, curator and writer. She enjoys exploring the hidden gems of cities around the globe. She is also a founder and on-camera host of her immersive live talk show that streams from art galleries, festivals and art parties in Los Angeles and beyond. Follow her @eyedreamtv.

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The North Star in the South Bay

City of Hope | South Bay and Providence Little Company of Mary join forces to deliver state-of-the-art cancer care. Cancer is challenging enough. You shouldn’t have to travel far from your community to receive leading-edge treatment. Now City of Hope | South Bay and Providence Little Company of Mary are partnering to focus on cancer care for patients right here in the South Bay. To find out more about this unique commitment to innovative treatment and unparalleled cancer care close to where you live, go to SouthBayCancerCare.org or call 310-750-1715.

5215 Torrance Blvd., Torrance


FEBRUARY/ MARCH 2020 Broad Strokes Palos Verdes multimedia artist Katja MĂźller circumvents subtlety with her personal message. For more, visit page 52.


Paint the Town WITH A MUSIC FOUNDATION, CARRIE DIETZ BROWN EXPANDS HER ARTISTRY WITH A STROKE OF THE BRUSH. Written by Tanya Monaghan | Photographed by Lauren Pressey

Carrie Dietz Brown’s beautiful, refined features perfectly match her gentle and playful nature. Upon meeting her, I got the same feeling as when I first saw her whimsical artwork at Suite 6 in Manhattan Beach a year ago. It’s easy to get transported by the beautiful, earthy tones of her watercolor paintings, but on closer look the extraordinary details also tell a story. In the cacophony of big, bold, abstract artwork out there, I found both her personality and her art refreshing and intriguing. Most South Bay residents will be familiar with Carrie’s maiden name. Her family owns and runs Dietz Brothers Music, established in 1976 in Manhattan Beach. Her father, uncle, mother and aunt operate the business, but Carrie started working there from age 10 through high school and college. Carrie still teaches ukulele, guitar, bass and banjo, as well as rock band classes for kids and adults. She even gives her students the opportunity to perform at venues such as Saint Rocke or South Bay Customs. For Carrie, it’s the best job in the world. “Dietz Brothers is a huge part of my community, and I get so much out of working there,” she says. “It definitely influences my painting too.” Growing up with such a strong musical background and community, it is no surprise that Carrie excelled in this arena. She toured with bands in high school and early college. Her first and most serious band was a folk-indie rock band named Food Foot, featuring Carrie and her sister Robin. They recorded a couple of records, and at that time Carrie met her future husband, Matt, who was a drummer. While she finds her music work fulfilling, painting is probably her greatest passion. Carrie got her college art degree in painting from Cal State Long Beach in 2013. After college she gained momentum by publishing a booklet featuring her pen-and-ink drawings, illustrating a song by her sister called “The Slow Center of the Spinning Earth.” The booklet was a hit at Skylight Books in Los Angeles, City Lights in San Francisco and a couple bookstores in New York. Later she had her first solo show in San Francisco at FORT Gallery. As a new struggling artist, she primarily worked with watercolor paints—purely for economic reasons, as they are affordable and last forever. After two years Carrie was hooked, and it became her go-to medium of expression. She continued to do some group art shows and took part in the El Segundo Art Walk

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on several occasions. When Carrie became pregnant with Francis (now 2 years old), she decided to switch from her preferred small format to large-scale paintings. As a new mother, she reduced her music teaching schedule to three days a week and set up a small studio in her 100-year-old Torrance home (nicknamed “tiny monster”). The studio gave her the freedom to do her artwork at home while Francis slept. She juggles it all with the help and loving support of her family. “Much of the L.A. art scene is about bold, abstract work with the objective to convey one big idea at a time,” she says. “I admire it and think it is very impactful, but my work is trying to get a lot of information in there. At school I was often at conflict with people because of our contrasting styles. My earlier work was promoting ideas of cultivating and empowering quiet practices. There are usually subjects or people in my painting who are engrossed in something. There is a quiet productivity that is really interesting to me.” Carrie thought she would have to slow down once Francis was born, but much to her surprise she found that having a baby inspired her to paint more. Bringing Francis into the world gave her so much confidence. She describes it as an intense time; she was caring for a newborn while recovering from a hectic C-section. However, she had never been more productive. She was able to produce enough work to get into Suite 6 for a solo show, and it was extremely successful. She has done a series of watercolor workshops and subsequent shows there as well. Being an artist and a musician has always been a huge part of Carrie’s identity and is deeply woven into her family life and her community. Like the subjects in her painting, she is always fully engrossed in her work, and through that her art reflects the beauty and joy she finds in her life of creativity. ■

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Hair Apparent MANHATTAN BEACH’S KATSUMI KASAI SPLICES JAPANESE TECHNIQUE AND AMERICAN INDIVIDUALITY. Written by Sara Debevec | Photographed by Monica Orozco

“You like your hair messy and low-maintenance, right?” asks Katsumi Kasai with a deep look of concentration in his eyes. His demeanor emanates the confidence of a true master. There is something very reassuring about the way he seems to understand his clients’ personalities through their hair. Kasai, raised in Japan, comes from a family of talented painters who valued working with their hands. If he hadn’t gone into the hair business, he says he probably would have taken up sculpting. He sees great similarities between the two arts. When he started cutting hair 36 years ago in Tokyo, Kasai was drawn to the idea of creating something light and beautiful, but he never anticipated that the business would require him to talk so much. “I was very shy, and I couldn’t keep talking to people all the time,” he shares. “But my boss kept telling me, ‘Hey Kasai, you need to talk.’ So with time I became better at it.” He worked tirelessly six to seven days a week, often from early morning until midnight. “The salon would close, but afterwards we practiced every night,” he remembers. “No extra pay, of course. We had to be very precise and cut hair exactly how our teacher told us—by the millimeter.” Kasai recalls the Japanese trend of everyone wearing the same kind of clothes and hair. “When you go to a salon over there, most of the clients tell stylists what to do,” he says. “They always bring a photo of what they want, regardless of whether the haircut is going to suit them or not.” While the rigorous Japanese schools taught him to cut by the book, he changed his approach when he moved to the States. He perfected his craft in New York at top salons like Momotaro, Frédéric Fekkai and Warren Tricomi. Eventually he moved west and opened his own shop in Manhattan Beach 10 years ago. “Here you have to have more creativity, look at a client’s face and hair type and design into it,” says Kasai. “The haircut is less precise and technical but there is an irregular part of the haircut that gives it a signature look. Back in Japan, I studied the precise techniques. In the U.S., I focused more on the creative methods. I combined two styles that are almost opposites and created my own way.” ■

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all good things AS THE LA25 FOUNDATION FOR THE ARTS COMES TO AN END, WE TAKE A LOOK AT THEIR IMPACT ON ARTS EDUCATION IN THE SOUTH BAY. Written by Amber Klinck


It started with a group of five friends: Amy Gimlen, Eric Pritz, Eric Formiller, KC Campbell and John

time,” points out Amy, who is a local orthodontist. With their sights on a common goal, TheLA25 established The LA25 Foundation for the Arts. The aim of the nonprofit, volunteer-based organization was to support

Capellaro. Sitting at Metlox, the

arts education where it was lacking. Through private

discussion focused on how they could

funding and corporate sponsorships, The LA25 Founda-

do more. All driven professionals and business owners, these South Bay residents were looking for a way to cultivate new relationships while making a constructive impact.

tion for the Arts continued to expand their reach and exceed expectations. The primary source of funding, however, came from the foundation’s annual art auction, ART310. With art donations from local artists including Bo Bridges, Tricia Strickfaden, Brian Kingston, Brent Broza, Al Satterwhite and Holly Socrates, the event was guaranteed to create a buzz—selling out every year. Included in the auction was

“The inception was for local small business owners to get together and network but more importantly to do good for our community,” explains Amy. The networking group TheLA25 was the result of those

With funds coming in, TheLA25 team was eager to put the money to work. “The first grant was awarded in 2013 to the Redondo Beach Unified School District to

Beach Cities’ most admired entrepreneurs. Altruism was

send every second and third grade student to visit LACMA

synonymous with professional achievement when consid-

for the day,” notes LA25’s director of giving, Jennifer

ering invitations for membership. Yet while the desire to

Buchsbaum. This grant alone offered an experience that

give back was the foundation of TheLA25’s story, exactly

benefited nearly 1,400 students in 2013 and 2014.

“Our first year we supported the Roundhouse Aquar-

In 2015 The LA25 Foundation for the Arts sent every fourth and fifth grader in Hermosa Beach to the Grammy

ium,” Amy notes. “We donated $1,000, and we were so

Museum. “We funded the string instrument program at

proud and excited.” Still, they wanted to expand their

El Segundo High School and supported multiple Hermosa

reach. TheLA25 was looking for a way to support kids lo-

Beach youth music programs and their Young at Art Pro-

cally, as well as in the surrounding communities.

gram,” Amy adds.

“Collectively we found a common interest in arts education,” Amy says. Research quickly revealed the lack of

In addition to supporting arts programs and experiences, The LA25 Foundation for the Arts believes there

art programs available to some of the South Bay’s youth.

is real value in spreading awareness. Room 19, a produc-

“We were shocked to find that Hermosa Beach didn’t

tion of Hollywood Shorts and TheLA25, is a documentary

have a music program. The only arts education they

showcasing the value of arts education for one third grade

received was Young at Art—once a month—and that was

class at Tulita Elementary School in Redondo Beach over

completely supported by either the Education Foundation

the span of a year.

or the local PTA.” TheLA25 members felt strongly about the value of arts education and its longstanding impact on students. “I’m a science person by nature, but I think the art part of my brain definitely comes into work in my office all the

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children and one or more of the professional artists.

early conversations. The group soon attracted some of the

how and where wouldn’t immediately come into focus.

42

at least one collaborative piece of artwork created by the

TheLA25 was making a difference, and it inspired more people to get involved. Jennifer’s initial connection to LA25 was as a guest at one of their annual ART310 events. “I loved the event and people behind the cause, so when they asked if I was able to help in 2017 there was no


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hesitation to say yes,” she says. “As the director of giv-

many of their initial goals. “I think it exceeded our

ing, I guided the organization’s reach beyond the Beach

expectations,” Amy says. “We had no idea how far our

Cities and into some surrounding neighborhoods that

reach would be. Meeting with local artists and business

have a significant need for funding arts education.”

owners, we discovered how much everyone really cared

“Once we were established in the South Bay, the more

The growth of the foundation has been fulfilling for

gan by reaching out to LAUSD’s Southern District office,

everyone involved. Current board members Amy Gimlen,

and the contact was welcomed.

Lori Ford, Jennifer Buchsbaum, Eric Pritz, Chris Yuhl and

“Many of the LAUSD’s arts and music education

time and heartfelt dedication to the cause. “Working with

and they desperately need the financial aid to keep these

the schools and nonprofits for this grant program was

educational programs alive,” Jennifer explains. “The

one of the most rewarding experiences in my life,” Jenni-

money from the 2017 ART310 event funded 25 differ-

fer says. “Each principal, program director or administra-

ent programs from Hermosa Beach, Redondo Beach,

tor was overcome with gratitude for LA25’s support.”

Lawndale and Los Angeles.” The scope of what they’ve been able to achieve has been truly meaningful for the team, even surpassing

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Christopher Salling have donated countless hours of their

programs have been suffering from massive budget cuts,

Torrance, Gardena, San Pedro, Wilmington, Hawthorne,

44

about art education for our children.”

we wanted to extend our reach,” Amy says. Jennifer be-

And while they are grateful to have been a part of this incredible journey, TheLA25 is saying farewell after giving their time and dedication over the past decade. “It’s been amazing, and we’re happy it’s ending on such a positive


“MEETING WITH

note,” Amy says.

LOCAL ARTISTS AND

Foundation, but I know that our impact over the years

BUSINESS OWNERS, WE DISCOVERED HOW MUCH EVERYONE REALLY CARED ABOUT ART EDUCATION FOR OUR CHILDREN.”

“I’m disappointed we will not be continuing The LA25 has been tremendous and will continue for years to come,” says Jennifer. The foundation as an entity may have come to an end, but the spirit of giving and the devotion to arts education has not. By connecting with the South Bay Artist Collective and sharing resources, The LA25 Foundation continues to make a lasting impact. “Overall LA25 has awarded over $155,000 to various schools and nonprofits in the South Bay to help pay for everything from classroom art supplies, a sousaphone for Banning High School’s Mighty Marching Pilots band, and field trips to LACMA and the Grammy Museum,” Jennifer says. TheLA25 sought to make a lasting impact in their community, and that’s exactly what they did. ■

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TICKETS ON SALE NOW! JESSICA FICHOT

“Song Board” Songwriter and accordionist Jessica Fichot draws from her multi-ethnic upbringing, fusing music styles and languages. She takes the listener on a twisting journey out of the French chanson tradition, into the lands of gypsy jazz, 1940s Chinese swing, international folk, and into the wilderness of her imagination.

MARCH 13 @ 8:00 p.m.

2°B DANCE COMPANY “Call Me ‘Ella”

Two worlds collide when a nononsense private investigator is hired to find a missing person following the Enchanted Empire’s annual Masquerade Ball. With a glass slipper as his only clue, what surprises will he uncover? Artistic direction by Jonathan Bryant and Hyosun Choi.

MARCH 21 @ 8:00 p.m.

JEREMY HUNTER, Guest Speaker “How Not to Lose Your Mind: Managing Yourself Through Crazy Times”

THE WHO’S TOMMY, Musical Music & Lyrics by Pete Townshend Book by Townshend and Des McAnuff Based on the iconic 1969 rock concept album, The Who’s Tommy tells the story of a young boy who triumphs over his adversities. After witnessing a violent murder, traumatized Tommy slips into a catatonic state, rendering him deaf, mute and blind. An uncanny knack for the game of pinball saves his life. He rises to international superstardom, and inspires people all over the world.

MARCH 13, 14, 20, 21, 27 & 28 @ 8:00 p.m. MARCH 15, 22 & 29 @ 3:00 p.m.

INNA FALIKS, Piano “Polonaise-Fantaisie: The Story of a Pianist” This hybrid of a piano recital and an autobiographical monologue is a story of immigration, of growing up a musician, of love, told by the artist herself, between performances of a varied program, including works by Shchedrin, Bach, Freidlin, Mozart, Chopin, Paganini, and Beethoven.

MARCH 29 @ 5:00 p.m.

WILLIAM KANENGISER, Guitar “The Diaspora Project”

Do you ever feel like there’s a little too much on your plate? Do you find yourself wondering, “How am I going to do all of this?” Mr. Hunter’s presentation will focus on the essentials of managing yourself. He will explore practical steps you can take to return to grounded action in the midst of a crazy world.

Grammy-winning guitarist William Kanengiser will present a recital of recently commissioned works, focusing on issues of scattered cultures and global migration. Pieces inspired by refugee experiences will take listeners for an emotional journey, exploring themes of lost homelands and cultural assimilation. The centerpiece of the program will be The Walls by Sergio Assad, performed with the ECC Guitar Ensemble.

APRIL 1 @ 7:00 p.m.

APRIL 2 @ 8:00 p.m.

PURCHASE TICKETS:

www.CenterForTheArts.org • 1-800-832-ARTS

El Camino College Center for the Arts: 16007 Crenshaw Boulevard, Torrance, CA 90506 (310) 329-5345 or 1-800-832-ARTS (toll-free)


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“M” is for Mosa NOTABLE SOUTH BAY CULINARY VETERANS EMBARK ON A NEW RESTAURANT VENTURE IN HERMOSA BEACH HIGHLIGHTING CALIFORNIA COASTAL CUISINE WITH AN ITALIAN BENT. Written by Jennie Nunn | Photographed by Sarah King

Last May, when Nancy Vrankovic and executive chef

caprese with burrata, herbs, crostini and olive oil; and

Anne Conness—partners at Sausal in El Segundo—got

seafood items such as octopus carpaccio with arugula,

wind of the closure of Serve On 2nd in Hermosa Beach,

basil and olive oil, and calamari salad served cold with

they knew they’d found the site of their next eatery.

fresh orange, harissa and arugula. Hearty, mouthwater-

“We felt like this neighborhood needed it,” says Nancy,

ing pasta spans lamb pappardelle (the dish takes two

who along with Anne teamed up with friend and builder

days to make) with Niman Ranch braised lamb, buttered

Bob Lombardo of RSI Group, Inc. to transform the prime

noodles and pecorino, and pumpkin ravioli with brown

cornerstone space replete with a rooftop garden in just

butter, sage and pomegranate.

three months. “Bob gets all the credit,” she continues. “He has

“I love our eggplant,” says Anne of the recipe inspired by traditional eggplant Parmesan—one her favorite

helped develop some of the best restaurants in the South

dishes. “However, we’re not always in the mood for all

Bay and the Greater Los Angeles area. He never gave up

that cheese, and it can feel a little heavy. So we char our

the dream of owning his own restaurant, and then he

eggplant and then place it on top of the best Greek yogurt

found Mosa Coastal.”

for that cheesy thing, and top it with our housemade pep-

But Anne and Nancy also knew they wanted a neigh-

peronata for a little twist. Our cioppino, or Fisherman’s

borhood spot they themselves would want to frequent.

Wharf seafood stew, is awesome. It has lots of fresh sea-

“We really love the South Bay,” says Nancy, an El Porto

food [you can choose pasta or bread to pair it with], and

resident. “I’ve lived here a long time and really do con-

we drizzle spicy aioli over the top for a little kick.”

sider it home and can’t imagine living anywhere else.

The interior design is equally as thoughtful and de-

When we were considering the type of restaurant we

liberate. Appointed with a tiled bar in blue and calming

would want to open in Hermosa, I really hoped it would

coastal tones (inherited from Serve on 2nd and the im-

be the kind of place I would want to eat at every day.”

petus for the restaurant’s logo), the restaurant features

The eatery—now open for breakfast, weekend brunch,

modern abstract artwork by Bob’s friend and artist Dean

happy hour and dinner—features handmade pastas and a

Gary, and an indoor/outdoor enclosed front patio with

plethora of fresh seafood selections and even housemade

garage-style retracting doors.

limoncello. “I come from a Croatian family, so Italian

Now, just a few months since opening, the pair is

food is something I’m really familiar with,” adds Nancy.

constantly scheming and brainstorming new things

“But we wanted it to feel California coastal and not be

in the kitchen and adding new activities such as wine

pigeonholed.” Anne agrees: “Who doesn’t love pasta?”

dinners with Italian and Californian wines paired with

On the dinner menu, starters include heirloom tomato

specific dishes created for each event. “We don’t take

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ourselves too seriously,” says Anne, who recounts a post-New Year’s “hangover brunch” they hosted and encouraged guests to wear pajamas. “We’re here to prepare seriously good food with seriously good service, and otherwise let’s just have a good time.” “It has been really fun watching this place develop,” adds Nancy. “I like that when I walk into Mosa, I always run into someone I know. And I think that’s true for our guests as well. It really has become a home away from home for a lot of our neighbors, and we love that.” ■ Mosa Coastal 190 Hermosa Avenue in Hermosa Beach 310-504-0381, mosacoastal.com

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“WE DON’T TAKE OURSELVES TOO SERIOUSLY.”

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against the current ENVIRONMENTAL ACTIVIST, PHILOSOPHER AND MULTIMEDIA ARTIST KATJA MÃœLLER ENCOURAGES THE USE OF SUSTAINABLY SOURCED MATERIALS THROUGH HER ART. Written by Sara Debevec | Photographed by Monica Orozco


“I DON’T WANT TO BE LIMITED TO ONE TYPE OF MEDIUM. THE WAY I AM GOING TO EXPRESS MYSELF IS GOING TO CHANGE, AND THAT IS JUST A PART OF ME.” 54

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Growing up in Mexico City, Katja Müller loved playing outdoors. Her parents often found her covered in mud with a bag full of frogs. Her curiosity about the world and passion for discovery only grew stronger with time as she found a way to fuel her art.

Thoughts that keep her up at night include low literacy rates of women, especially in Latin America, and our deteriorating relationship with the environment. She tries to address both issues through her art. Artistic Habitat, a Redondo Beach home goods business Katja started with her family, has given her the opportunity to use her creativity to reach out to a wider community and encourage conservation of our flora. “We wanted to offer products that are sustainable, and we are trying raise awareness about how you can have products

When I first met Katja, she was carrying a large

in your home that don’t necessarily have to be affect-

abstract painting entitled Microbiology across a parking

ing the environment. So our woods come from recovered

lot in preparation for a Manhattan Beach art show. The

trees, which means that they fell naturally—usually due

bold, four-by-eight-foot piece covered most of her body

to hurricanes.”

and depicted an ecosystem of tadpole-like organisms

Just like her art, Katja’s ideas are bigger than her.

otherwise invisible to the naked human eye. “I got myself

She wants to use her art as a voice to be an example for

a microscope and started looking at samples of swampy

younger women and talk about issues of inequality. “I

water, and that is what inspired a collection of my latest

want to constantly evolve and grow and try to reach a

paintings,” she explains.

potential of who I can become. I don’t want to be limited

Katja’s passion for visual art started when she was 10 years old, with the help of her father’s old 35mm Canon camera. She learned about composition, color and light

to one type of medium. The way I am going to express myself is going to change, and that is just a part of me.” When she is not painting, she practices jiujitsu and

through photography and developed a strong interest in

tries to get her hands on anything that will answer her

moving images.

questions on a specific subject—from science to space

In college Katja majored in film production and became

and cosmology. “I come from a family of engineers, ar-

particularly influenced by Invisible Children, a documentary

chitects and entrepreneurs,” she explains. “My ancestors

exploring the lives of children who were forced into being

came from Europe, Mexico and Argentina. They traveled

soldiers in Uganda in support of Joseph Kony’s Lord’s

across continents, and I think this is why my art always

Resistance Army. “It opened my eyes to the power of

goes back to exploration and traveling.” ■

storytelling because these directors really started a movement, and I had never experienced anything so authentic in filmmaking before,” she says. When Katja started painting, she was just curious to see what she could create on canvas as she did on film. “What I am genuinely trying to do with my art is to put into context something that I can’t necessarily articulate,” she shared. “I think words can only go so far, and my work is about trying to share my feelings and experiences with other people in a way that doesn’t necessarily need to be explained.”

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as seen in

Southbay is part of the Golden State network, a family of digital, social and print media brands celebrating the people, pursuits, lifestyles and ideas of California. In every issue, we are sharing one story across our network that explores topics beyond the limits of the South Bay. These California stories speak to the meaningful impact our state and its residents are making on the global stage. To learn more about Golden State and discover more stories like this, visit goldenstate.is.

no fear of flying PETER JONES’ RECENT DOCUMENTARY, BLUE SKY METROPOLIS, TELLS THE STORY OF HOW AVIATION—WITH A STRONG DASH OF CINEMATIC FLAIR—HELPED SPUR THE GROWTH OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA AND ITS MELTING POT OF PIONEERS, CELEBRITIES, IMMIGRANTS AND DREAMERS. Written by Robert Earle Howells | Photographed by Phillip Graybill


Very early in Blue Sky Metropolis, Peter Jones’ four-part documentary on the history of aviation in Southern

and the point is driven home: Southern California is more than the historic setting for the development of aviation. It is also the present and the future of aerospace. It is the

of a propeller-driven dirigible

vantage from which we gaze into the heavens and contin-

Los Angeles International Air Meet in Dominguez Hills. It looks utterly preposterous. No one watching— then or now—could hold any hope of it getting airborne. But fly it does, as a nattily attired and apparently

ue to realize the dreams portrayed by those magnificent flying machines and their makers in 1910. But Blue Sky Metropolis has even more to say than that. As we learn in the course of four hour-long episodes, the development of aviation didn’t just coincide with the development and growth of the Los Angeles metropolitan area. It essentially dictated it. By 1929 there were 53 landing fields within 30 miles of Los Angeles City Hall. Most were developed by aircraft manufacturers. Those sites determined population pat-

untethered pilot steers from an

terns in places like Hawthorne, Burbank and Lakewood

exposed framework underneath the

(touted as “Tomorrow’s City Today”), as workers settled

behemoth airship. The image says a great deal. It speaks to the audac-

in suburban clusters surrounding these scattered aviation hubs. All the while, another force was at work, perfectly

ity of early aviation pioneers—those magnificent men

coinciding with the burgeoning growth of L.A. and

and women in their flying machines. It speaks to the

aviation: the motion picture industry. As footage from

power of dreams and to the can-do spirit of a collection

that 1910 air show testifies, cameras were present from

of dreamers. And more specifically, it establishes Los

the moment of creation onward, and celebrity culture

Angeles—and all of Southern California—as the cynosure

overlapped both arenas. It’s no coincidence that the first

of a nascent movement to reach the sky, the heavens and

Academy Award for best picture went to the film Wings

beyond. The dreams and the dreamers belonged uniquely

in 1929, and that Jones titled the first episode of his

to Southern California.

series “Wings.”

Incidentally, that 10-day air show—only the second in

An intoxicating sense of showmanship permeated the

the world—drew 254,000 spectators at a time when the

early days of aviation, whose pioneers inevitably became

population of Los Angeles was 319,000.

celebrities. We see Amelia Earhart glammed up for pub-

“The ability to fly is the most coveted of superpowers

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of a dreamscape of nebula, stars and distant galaxies,

California, we see an old film clip attempting to take off during the 1910

60

Just about then, the visual shifts to telescope images

licity photos and endorsements. We see spectacular aerial

—more than immortality, superhuman strength, speed

footage from the 1930 film Hell’s Angels and learn that a

or intelligence,” says Jones through Blue Sky narrator

certain aircraft manufacturer and film director named

Tony Goldwyn, as we watch an aerobatic pilot loop-de-

Howard Hughes flew many of the stunt scenes himself.

looping in the sky, inscribing fantastic cursive contrails

Later we see Walt Disney devoting the resources of his

in the plane’s wake. “For more than a century, Southern

film studio to aid the war effort in the early 1940s, using

California has been a primary point of access to the heav-

cinema-style magic to disguise aircraft plants as towns

ens. First the skies, then space.”

and cities.


PHOTO COURTESY PETER JONES PHOTO COURTESY NASA (SERIES SIGNATURE IMAGE)

Interviewing stunt pilot Anthony Oshinuga, who is featured in Blue Sky Metropolis

A B-52 soars above a Northrup HL-10 and pilot Bruce Peterson after a test flight at Edwards Air Force Base, circa 1966.


“I GREW UP AROUND CREATORS OF FICTION, BUT I WANTED TO TELL STORIES ABOUT REAL PEOPLE.”

62

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BORN TO MAKE THIS MOVIE

on the phone late at night, and there were parties at the

It’s not a stretch to assert that Peter Jones was born and

house with generals, politicians and royalty. We got a

bred to make Blue Sky Metropolis, which he wrote, directed

pound of caviar every Christmas from the shah of Iran.”

and produced. Jones is a Los Angeles native and Stanford

As a young boy, he went snorkeling with rocketry wizard

grad who studied the art of biography and 20th-century

Wernher von Braun and as a teen once sat beside aviation

American history under Pulitzer Prize-winning historian

pioneer General Jimmy Doolittle at dinner.

David M. Kennedy and honed his journalistic chops as a television reporter in Virginia and Texas. When he returned to Los Angeles, it was to make

“My father was one of the first executives to have a Gulfstream—his pilot flew Air Force One for LBJ—so flying around in that was fun. But I was a kid. That was my

Hollywood celebrity documentaries that inevitably told

world. I only learned how different it was as I lived the

the story of the place as well as the people. Two of his

rest of my life.”

celebrity docs won Primetime Emmy awards: Judy Garland:

Did he ever have a desire to pilot airplanes? “Absolutely

Beyond the Rainbow (1997) and Stardust: The Bette Davis

not. I was right brain.” But like most kids of his genera-

Story (2006).

tion, Jones followed the space program. “I loved watching

His bio-documentary Johnny Carson: King of Late Night

the launches, loved astronauts.” Hanging on a wall in

(2012) for PBS remains the highest-rated film in the

his Brentwood office are autographs of Neil Armstrong,

network’s American Masters series. Jones dived even

Wally Schirra and Alan Shepherd—obtained by dint of his

deeper into L.A. history with his two-hour documentary

paternal connections.

Inventing LA: The Chandlers and Their Times (2009) about

All the while, showbiz hovered in the Jones household.

the history of the Los Angeles Times and the dynasty of its

His grandfather was actor Conrad Nagel, who was among

longtime owners, the Chandler family. That film won a

the founders of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and

Peabody Award.

Sciences. His step-grandfather was Sidney Franklin, who

So when PBS SoCal’s Juan Devis reached out to Jones about making a documentary on the history of aerospace for KCET, it was with that background in mind: L.A. na-

directed the film The Good Earth and produced Mrs. Miniver and Random Harvest. “I grew up around creators of fiction, but I wanted to

tive, a crack track record of documentary filmmaking and

tell stories about real people,” Jones recalls. He cites the

a deep sense of L.A. history. He didn’t realize that Jones

freshman-year seminar he took at Stanford with David

also had aviation and showbiz running through his veins.

M. Kennedy as particularly influential. “It was called

“It was only later,” recalls Jones, “that Juan found

Biography/Autobiography/History. I learned that you

out about my father. Having a name like Jones gives you

can absorb the history of an era through the life of an

great anonymity.”

individual who experienced it. Through someone’s life,

Peter Jones’ father was Thomas V. Jones, the CEO of

you can offer a view of life and understand the human

Northrop Corporation for 30 years and the man who

condition. How did Judy Garland or Otis Chandler respond

guided the manufacture of the T-38, which became one

to life? What does that say about the human experience?”

of the world’s most successful fighter jets. He pioneered the making of drones (initially for the motion picture

AVIATION AS A HUMAN EXPERIENCE

industry) and won the coveted contract to build the B-2

It’s not surprising, then, that much of the storytelling

stealth bomber.

in Blue Sky Metropolis focuses on individuals—and many

So aviation entered Jones’ consciousness somewhat by osmosis. “I would hear him [his father talking aviation]

of them you likely have not heard of. Among his favorite on-camera interviewees, who include a slew of

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63


academics, historians and engineers, was a former truck

currently working together on Mars 2020, a rover due to

driver from Downey: Bob Thompson, who drove for North

launch sometime this year.

American Rockwell. “Through the beginning of time, all the great leaders

Jones weaves other social-trend stories into Blue Sky Metropolis—never from a soapbox vantage but rather

of the world have seen the moon,” Thompson tells Jones.

by depicting human experiences of the time. He tells in

“Even Jesus Christ himself has seen that moon. And

Episode 1 how a shortage of white male labor in the air-

Downey was the place that built that vehicle that took

craft industry prompted the hiring of, first, light-skinned

that man to the moon for the first time, and I’m very

Hispanics, then women, then high school students—and

proud of that.”

yet North American wouldn’t hire African Americans

Jones introduces us to a Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) engineer named Sue Finley and returns to her several

except as janitors. Even President Franklin Roosevelt’s Executive Order

times. Finley began working for NASA in 1958 and was

8002 in 1941, banning discriminatory employment prac-

tasked with solving complex math equations using pencils,

tices in the nation’s defense industry, is depicted largely

paper and gigantic first-generation Friden calculators.

as an act of necessity rather than justice. “Sometimes

“She was a human computer,” says Jones. “She calculated rocket launch trajectories by hand. I loved having

change occurs this way,” says Jones. “It was: ‘We need these airplanes, so you’ve got a job.’”

a real human being speaking for generations of women who were supposed to be stay-at-home moms. It was OK

VISUAL STORYTELLING

to have a career and to be a professional.”

The war years visuals are as stunning as the statistics. As

We see early shots of Finley as a fresh-faced working gal, in the parlance of the time, and a shot of her

churn out 300,000 airplanes, we see blacks replacing

colleagues in a room filled with women at their desks—

Japanese Americans when the latter are sent to intern-

reminiscent of familiar images of clerical pools. But these

ment camps. We see more than 6,000 African Americans

women were not secretaries. They were rocket scientists.

a month streaming into Los Angeles for work during the

Finley still is one, though at one point she retired for

World War II years—and though their living conditions

six years to raise a family. She returned to JPL, where she

are shown as gruesomely crowded (apartments often oc-

remains an engineer for the NASA Deep Space Network

cupied in shifts), one of the workers tells a camera, “The

that she helped create. “Sue was a perfect example of

war made our lives better. It really did. Hitler got us out

telling history through an individual,” adds Jones.

of the white folks’ kitchen.”

Featured prominently in Episode 4 are two other

traditional houses” lining long, straight, right-angled

role immigrants have played in aviation—and Southern

streets—African Americans are greeted with signs read-

California—history. Diana Trujillo tells how she spoke

ing: “This tract is exclusive and restricted.” Jones’ archivist, Brian Tessier, accumulated some

drug violence in Colombia—then worked her way through

10,000 film clips for Blue Sky Metropolis, and they tell

college as a housekeeper to eventually became one of the

stories that are alternately eye-opening and delightful.

chief engineers on Curiosity, NASA’s vaunted Mars rover.

We see Formica tables, electric kitchens, duck-and-

Her colleague Vandi Verma recounts her journey

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Later, as suburbs spring up after the war—“minimal

aerospace women whose stories underscore the critical

no English when she came to the U.S. at age 17—fleeing

64

2 million people working in Southern California plants

cover drills, evolving hairstyles and fashions, Disney’s

from India to JPL, where she specializes in the robotic

Tomorrowland and, naturally, cinematic sci-fi projections

technology that controls the Mars rover. The women are

of the future. We see crazy contraptions plummeting to


earth in the 1910 Los Angeles Air Meet. We see Voyager photos of Saturn and Jupiter, and deep-space images of galaxies almost incomprehensively far away. The documentary is an extraordinary visual treat, and

popular with gay and straight men alike. “It’s a great way to tell a bigger story—the coming of age of the gay liberation movement and men’s fashion. Marky Mark. Gender fluidity and the spectrum of sexu-

we’re left grateful that the photographic and cinematic

ality.” Teaser: Jerry Seinfeld’s poufy pirate shirt makes

arts evolved concurrently with the science of aviation.

an appearance.

TO THE FUTURE

phenomenon hailed from Southern California—where,

While 2020 could well be a year of award-reaping for

as the final episode of Blue Sky Metropolis tells us over

Jones—Blue Sky has already been named a 2020 Golden

a clip of SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy rocket lifting off from

Mike winner for best documentary by the Radio &

Vandenberg Air Force Base, “reality and fantasy thrive in

Television News Association of Southern California—he

equal measure.” ■

It’s fitting, of course, that such an ahead-of-its-time

is deep into his next project. It’s called All Man: The International Male Story. “It centers around the San Diego-

All four episodes of Blue Sky Metropolis will re-air on

based International Male catalog that came out in 1976,”

KCET in Southern California on March 22, 1 to 5 p.m., and the

he explains.

documentary streams on the KCET website at kcet.org/shows/

Catalog founder Gene Burkard thought that strong

blue-sky-metropolis. Many of Jones’ celebrity documentaries

visuals and buff models could make men’s fashion more

are available on streaming services. For information, visit

interesting to men “than what they were seeing in Sears

peterjonesproductions.com.

or Brooks Brothers.” The catalog became phenomenally

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forever home A MANHATTAN BEACH ARTIST AND HER HUSBAND ADOPT A MID-CENTURY FIXER AND MAKE IT THEIR OWN. Written by Tanya Monaghan | Photographed by Lauren Pressey


Artist Lee Tunila grew up in a house that was over 100 years old in Savannah, Georgia, steeped in

The Tunilas looked for some design help from someone whose love and expertise is mid-century modern and found that in designer Arianna Sabra of Arianna Sabra Interiors. Arianna helped Lee make the home feel authen-

history. Whether big or small, many

tic. All their furniture is retro, with some vintage pieces

of the houses in her hometown were

like the sideboard lamp and magazine stand in the living

well preserved. So for Lee, caring for

room. The French decorative light fixture hanging over the dining table is also vintage, as well as the gorgeous

your home was simply a way of life.

double-crossed chairs perfectly situated around the table.

Shortly after they got married in 2001, Lee and hus-

own origin story. A massive Myoporum tree used to um-

On that table is a beautiful wooden bowl that carries its band Randy bought an original 1,800-square-foot mid-

brella the entrance to the house, and it was Lee’s favorite

century Manhattan Beach home built in 1963. Driving

view. Two years ago it uprooted and fell onto the house.

up to the property for the first time, they could not even

She was devastated that the tree had to be extracted, but

see the house from the street because it was completely

being sentimental she had the foresight to save a limb.

covered in shrubbery.

She didn’t know what she was going to do with it until she

The young couple saw the bones of the place were good and figured they could live in it for a while and slowly

him the freedom to make whatever he wanted from what

start making changes. But neither of them saw this old

was left of her beloved tree. Out came this exquisite bowl.

house as their forever home. After getting the keys on Christmas Eve and first walk-

her family that remind her of where she comes from. “Everything I have in the home is meaningful; it’s not

made a huge mistake. It had a funky living plan with par-

just for pure aesthetics,” she says. “It’s a home, and I

quet floors, blue shag carpet and animal print wallpaper.

want it to feel that way.” Being an artist herself, Lee is

The home was last remodeled in the ’80s, and although

extremely selective about the artwork that dons her walls.

Lee appreciated its eclecticism, big changes were needed.

In one way or another, they all have great meaning. The large abstract painting that hangs above the fire-

to make it more livable for them. Over time, they slowly

place is a main focal point of the home. It represents a

renovated different areas. “Things came together when

memoir done by one of her mentors, artist Joe Blaustein.

we decided to give a nod to what it was destined to be—a

The other painting in the living room she found and fell

mid-century house,” shares Lee. “Now I love my home,

in love with at a vintage store in Savannah. After doing

but it took me a few years to get to that.”

some research, she discovered that the artist of this

Lee and Randy maintained the original skeleton of the house but opened up the congested, partitioned living area into a wide-open space consisting of the kitchen,

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Lee’s house is filled with personal decor pieces from

ing into the house as owners, they both thought they had

They took out the carpet, painted and did minor things

68

found a woodworker named Jonathan Weaver. She gave

painting was the first African American professor at one of the colleges in Savannah. Another painting hanging above her bed was the first

dining room and living room. Originally Lee wanted to

given to her by Randy. Their bedroom is the couple’s

get rid of the fireplace but learned to love it. It’s now the

haven. The inviting king-size bed is centered between

main feature that centers the space. The long eaves of

two amazing mid-century hanging pendant lights. On the

the house are also classic mid-century, and they chose to

wall facing the bed hang two of her own personal favorite

keep it that way.

paintings that help unify the space. Lee’s guitar sits in


“THINGS CAME TOGETHER WHEN WE DECIDED TO GIVE A NOD TO WHAT IT WAS DESTINED TO BE—A MID-CENTURY HOUSE.” the corner begging to be played. They converted the fourth bedroom into a functional space for all. It operates as an office, laundry area and a place for the kids to hang out and watch TV or read a book in the nook. The floors showcase large-format tiles hand-designed by an artist who used Sharpies to draw the patterns. Light spills into the room from all directions and boasts a gorgeous view of their charming backyard. This room opens to their spectacular outdoor living space. The Tunilas chose to limit the house footprint so they could have an adequate open-air space specifically designed for entertaining. This area includes a charming courtyard with seating centered around a rustic outdoor fireplace. High hedges border the perimeters of the space, and creeping fig climb the brick walls—giving the area an old-world feel. The other side contains a built-in fire pit and seating area that can comfortably hold 16 people—perfect for entertaining both adults and children. Weather permitting, the Tunilas often dine outside at the table situated at the foot of the outdoor space and make s’mores around the communal pit. It took almost two decades, but the Tunila house has now become their forever home. Lee jokes, “We’re like toe-taggers. We are going to be buried in our front yard right next to the stump of that old tree.” ■

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Best Foot Forward FOR SINGER AND DANCER JOIE SHETTLER, IT’S OFTEN BEEN, “GET ME THAT REDHEAD!” Written & photographed by Kat Monk

When Joie Shettler was an ambitious, 19-year-old brunette living in Tempe, Arizona, she won a scholarship at a dance competition to attend Joe Tremaine’s dance school in Studio City. Determined to get her start in the business, Joie packed all her belongings and purchased her first car from an auction—a sketchy, lime green Chevy Nova for $200. Sporting a bouncy Paula Abdul hairstyle and boasting strong technical dance skills, she headed straight to the studio ready to take the dance world by storm. In Los Angeles she became a body double for British singer/songwriter Cathy Dennis, requiring Joie to bob her hair and go red. With her new vibrant color, she stood out amongst her fellow dancers and carved herself a niche. By the mid-’90s, she was a Laker Girl, performing with Prince at the American Music Awards and dancing in music videos for Michael Jackson, Beck and Smash Mouth. A big shift came when she started to sing. “Although I loved dancing, when I started singing it was like a whole new world opened up,” shares Joie. Her favorite gig was when she nailed a job as a backup vocalist for The Brian Setzer Orchestra with the former front man of the Stray Cats. After starting a family with husband Dave Birznieks, she teamed up with David Stark, guitar player from the punk band FEAR, and created an ’80s and ’90s tribute band called the Radio Rebels. The band is often on the rosters at Saint Rocke, The Standing Room and The Lighthouse Café. Now that her children are teenagers, she’s on the road singing backup vocals for Kind Heaven Orchestra, the band of Perry Farrell (also lead singer of Jane’s Addiction). They toured with Lollapalooza in Europe last year and will head to South America this spring. “Beyond being a multitalented, dynamic performer, Joie is one of the hardest-working, most ethical people in the entertainment business,” David says. “People trust what she says, and they should because she speaks from the heart.” ■

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let it be A SOUTH BAY MUSICIAN LANDS THE OPPORTUNITY TO RECORD HIS ALBUM IN NASHVILLE. JUST DON’T MAKE BIG DEAL ABOUT IT, OK? Written by Jared Sayers | Photographed by Ben Meek


Someone once told me that the players who average the most home runs in a season also lead the league in strikeouts. Ponder that for a second. If you lead the league in hitting a 90+ mph fastball 325 feet, doesn’t that translate to overall good ball contact? Not necessarily. Those who swing the bat the hardest also miss the hardest. Jeff Nelson is a contractor. His presence is large—one of those if-you-know-you-know type of individuals who always makes you feel better when you’ve been around them. I envy those people. He is a family man who purchased and remodeled his grandfather’s home in San Pedro, where he currently resides with his wife and four children. He leads a humble life: coffee, family, building homes and good bourbon. That’s it. But don’t mistake simple for slow. Life is full for Jeff. His family of five ensures there are no flat-footed moments. There are diapers to change, dishes to do, laundry to fold and bedtime stories to read. There is also a business to run: homes to build, clients to please, subs to pay and invoices to process. Jeff is in the arena—fighting the good fight—and a cold, timid soul he certainly is not. Once the phone stops ringing and the family begins to drift off for the evening, Jeff quietly slips out the back door and heads to the garage. Flip on the light, and you’ll see tools neatly on display, surfboards hung in the rafters, a beer fridge in one corner and a record player in the other. With the smell of sawdust permeating the room, it is seemingly the ultimate man cave. But Jeff’s man cave is not for ordering chicken wings, drinking a twelver and watching the big game while wearing sweatpants in his favorite team’s color. It’s a

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different kind of man cave. On the workbench is a notebook. With a coat of dust on it, one could easily assume it’s nothing. Next to the

the universe has a funny way of conspiring in your favor when you take the post-conventional creative process. In Nashville, Jeff was a long way from the garage back

notebook is a recording microphone. And next to the mi-

at home. Instead of contractors’ tools hung on the wall,

crophone is one of the most beautiful guitar displays you

there were cables, headphones, amps and microphones.

will ever set your eyes on. Each serves its own purpose.

Tools nonetheless, but these served a different purpose.

Some are tuned to a different key; some have six strings

The surfboards on display at home were replaced in

and some 12; some are in mint condition, and some look

Nashville by framed records. The workbench by a sound-

like Willie’s Trigger.

board. Jeff had entered the music-making mother ship

This is where Jeff goes every evening, putting his thoughts in his notebook and picking his guitars—giv-

and was once again ready to swing for the fences. The three days in Nashville consisted of early-to-rise,

ing a voice to the melodies that are already inside. A raw,

heavy studio time, track-lay after track-lay, coupled with

creative outpouring that flows through his fingers.

long, bourbon-infused evenings. Rest was not a part of

Western conventional wisdom would say, “Make something so it can be commoditized, distributed, in hopes of creating consumer demand, and thus financial

this equation, and Jeff drank deeply from what Nashville was able to provide. Only after he returned to the South Bay and I asked too

gain will be reaped.” The make-something-to-get-

many overly inquisitive questions did I hear names like

something approach. And to that approach I say, “More

Chris Stapleton and Sturgill Simpson, who both recorded

power to you.”

in the same studio Jeff had just visited. What?! That’s

However, Jeff’s songwriting takes a more post-conventional approach: “Create something simply because

kind of a big deal, right? How did that get overlooked? Certainly this means Jeff is on the brink of some sort

something needs to be created, with the only gain being

of musical “breakthrough,” and we need to really think

the actual creative process itself.” And once complete,

about how to leverage this for … Wait. No. Just make the

it must be shared for the simple reason that it can be.

music. Nothing else matters.

Relinquishing creative control to let it become whatever it was meant to be. Now do not mistake this post-conventional approach

I so easily slip into this opportunistic mindset of breaking down ways Jeff and all of us are able to benefit from our scenarios. It’s an exciting tension for me, but

for the easier alternative to songwriting. Quite the

Jeff seems ambivalent. He’s been down this road before.

contrary. It still demands the same quality and effort of

High expectations met with the white-knuckled grip,

someone who is driving for commodification: countless

convincing himself of the scarcity of the opportunity in

hours, multiple revisions with rigorous refinement yet

front of him. Turns out, that leaves you exhausted and is

shelving any expectations.

often followed by a strikeout.

It’s an odd interplay of worlds, but I don’t know any-

But does that mean you resign from what you love? For

one better at this approach than Jeff. Jeff is swinging the

many it does. Jeff, on the other hand, is now stepping up

bat, completely impervious to a potential strikeout.

to the plate clear. Well-intentioned. In full recognition

After months of sneaking out to the garage at night,

of his ability to rip the cover off the ball but completely

Jeff was picked up by a label that wanted to fly him to

aware that homerun hitters also have strikeouts and

Nashville to record some of his most recent tracks. How

plenty of them.

a label found Jeff—when Jeff was not trying to find a label—is something I can’t quite explain. But I do know

Have we lost this mindset? The creating-somethingbecause-we-can mentality. The proverbial swinging of

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“JEFF’S MAN CAVE IS NOT FOR ORDERING CHICKEN WINGS, DRINKING A TWELVER AND WATCHING THE BIG GAME WHILE WEARING SWEATPANTS IN HIS FAVORITE TEAM’S COLOR. IT’S A DIFFERENT KIND OF MAN CAVE.”

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the bat. Do we find joy in that process, as opposed to the reactionary mad dash to get it up and out the door—only to expect something in return? To a degree, I think we have. Jeff’s new album Hypebeast counteracts that commoditized rush. It’s pure artistry that is not on Facebook. And if you think for a second that Jeff has an Instagram account, think again. There is no brand in place, and no immediate distribution strategies have been discussed. For someone like me, at a glance it can seem frustrating. But it is also the very thing that draws me even closer to the music. I can hear the hum of the beer fridge and the smell of the sawdust in the music. It adds a layer of depth amongst a very noisy, topical time in humanity. People don’t always want the expedited click of a button to get what they want. Sometimes we want a process of discovery and a higher level of intention. Context. Essence. Subtle bass notes. To go a few layers deeper and take more time. And that is exactly what Jeff has done with this new album. Home run. Bravo! All this has happened amidst caring for and building a family. Home run. While owning and running a business. Home run. Being a son, friend, husband, etc. Home run, home run, home run. So go find a copy of Jeff’s new album, Hypebeast, where all major record labels are not sold. Or don’t. But if you do stumble on it by chance, listen carefully for the hum of the beer fridge. ■

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310-962-4597 312 Rosecrans Avenue Manhattan Beach www.TheRipeChoice.net


outside the lines STREET ARTIST KIDWISEMAN IS TEARING DOWN WALLS BY PAINTING THEM. Written & photographed by Kat Monk


There’s a quintessential project

working in my sketchbook on my next piece. I would

almost every art student has

skip school and go paint under bridges around the city.

experienced at least once in their lifetime: “OK, class, time to paint a bowl of fruit.” Artist KidWiseman has other ideas. He’s on a mission

Soon he realized that there were legal ways to do street art too. Street art comes in many forms: spray paint murals, graffiti, wheatpasting (poster art), moss art (succulent walls), yarn bombing (a telephone poll deco-

to make street art—not just the traditional fine art that is part of art

routine in public).

The word “kid” is universal for youth. KidWiseman

Art and creativity saved Evan’s life and offered him a fulfilling college experience at Savannah College of Art and Design, where he double-majored in performing arts

represents taking the knowledge you’ve gained as an

and graphic design. While in school he decided his future

adult and applying it to what you loved to do as a child.

would include helping underprivileged youth find oppor-

Combine the kid and the creative career, and you have

tunities to use their creative side to tackle their future.

KidWiseman—also known as Evan Farrell. As a multimedia street artist, KidWiseman sees every

After college he worked as an independent creative director, contracting for mostly global brands and music

blank wall as an opportunity for creative youth to express

festivals. He created large-scale murals for companies

themselves. The city of Manhattan Beach commissioned

such as Red Bull and TOMS Shoes and taught art and pro-

him to paint the two low-standing walls in the public

duction to high school students throughout Los Angeles

parking lot at 14th Street and Highland. Sticking to his

and San Diego. After work he would go home, eat and

belief system, he enlisted some local kids to help him

go back to use their facilities (with approval) to create

with the mural project.

KidWiseman.

The abstract mural reflects a day in the life of Manhat-

“Most students in public high schools don’t even

tan Beach residents from dawn to dusk. Triangles repre-

consider anything creative as a job opportunity. It is not

sent mountains, waves represent the ocean and lightning

on their horizons.” He believes showing them that they

bolts represent energy.

can use iPhones, cameras, lighting and drones to make

Grand View Elementary also commissioned KidWiseman to help their students paint a mural on the school’s

money is a terrific start. Tyler Paget, a producer from Red Bull who worked with

upper playground. Heather de Roos, president of the

Evan to curate a KidWiseman workshop, says he is “an

Grand View Elementary PTA, notes, “It was a project ev-

innovative artist who brings a state-of-the-art produc-

eryone had a hand in making happen. My son, Tate, still

tion for students whose art funding has been cut.”

remembers the section he and his friends painted.”

Tyler adds, “The workshops allowed the students to

Evan grew up in the inner city of Indianapolis, both

get informative insights from industry professionals. The

in and out of public and private school systems. One day

way Evan uses his passion isn’t just inspiring to those in

his buddy Patrick showed him how to write graffiti and

the same industry but also to those who dream to pursue

taught him: “If you can draw it, you can paint it.”

an arts-driven career.” ■

“From that day forward, my backpack was full of sharpies and spray paint,“ shares Evan. “I was always

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my soul.”

rated in yarn) and even a flash mob (an organized dance

curriculums nationwide.

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Even though it was illegal, I felt that I had to do it for


PHOTOGRAPHED BY LUCY BURKE

PHOTOGRAPHED BY EXPLORA PATAGONIA


walk the line IF NATURE IS A MOTHER, PATAGONIA IS HER DROP-DEAD GORGEOUS YET WILDLY TEMPERAMENTAL PROGENY. LIKE MOTHS TO A FLAME, ADVENTURERS ARE DRAWN TO THIS MAGNETIC FORCE OF A REGION, COMPLETE WITH TURQUOISE WATERS, GLACIERS AND—FOR THE DETERMINED—PUMAS. Written by Corry Cook Photographed by Lucy Burke,

PHOTOGRAPHED BY EXPLORA PATAGONIA

explora Patagonia and Quasar Expeditions


“PATAGONIA BECAME ASSOCIATED WITH THE LATIN

PHOTOGRAPHED BY EXPLORA PATAGONIA

LEGEND REGIO GIGANTUM, OR ‘REGION OF GIANTS.’”

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The bold winter in Chilean Patagonia is

intensely saturated with natural hues and jagged yet

a secret season void of crowds and rich

organic shapes.

with extraordinary scenery, wildlife sightings and blurred edges between one’s own sense of the rational and the insane. Flashes of doubt—“What if I fall short, lose my nerve or become unglued?”—have been known to keep the inner pioneer subdued and the

Rivaling any big-cat safari around the world, Quasar Expeditions—one of South America’s most celebrated adventure specialists—now provides up-close-andpersonal encounters with the majestic puma population in Patagonia. Better yet, they offer a coveted opportunity to shadow one of their renowned puma tracking teams within Torres del Paine National Park—a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve—as well as the surrounding private reserves and wilderness. This is about more than disconnecting; Quasar offers a

journey at bay. True adventure isn’t

chance to step outside the usual and take on an entirely

always neat and tidy, so embrace the

new persona. In addition to pre-dawn alarm settings,

unpredictable, the unexpected and, hell, even the accidental. Cut to me: cold, wet and in way over my head on an ambitious advanced trek with explora Patagonia.

puma-tracking demands laser focus, physical intensity and infinite patience and requires the right gear and unconditional love for a wild animal that could very well kill you. I couldn’t wait. In the winter in Chile (May through August),

An explora guide for more than 10 years, Chino is

Patagonia’s parks and private lands are delightfully

a professional force—a native Chilean trekker with

uncrowded. In addition to tracking puma by jeep, Quasar

thousands of hours conquering the formidable terrain and

specializes in on-foot puma encounters in the massive

unpredictable weather in the region. I had come to hang

Laguna Amarga Ranch. This means the freedom for tracker

on his every word.

and client to walk off-trail and get involved in the tracking

Slow and steady, he directed our group through each step in my own personal vertical nightmare: an obscure dirt trail now peppered with slushy potholes and slippery, concealed

process on foot—something that is not permitted within the nearby park. This is what we came here for. Me: a writer. Lucy: a photographer. Not here! Under

ice. Despite it all, 11 miles in I was a on a surprising high. Out

Quasar Expeditions’ tutelage, we were a budding

of nowhere, the sound and sight of the icy terrain cracking

puma-tracking team. Due to a habitat that spans

under Chino’s feet struck me to the core. Suddenly he fell—

many different countries and cultures, the puma

hard. In a flash he was on his back and whisked away. I was

has lots of names including mountain lion, cougar

absolutely terrified.

and panther. But no matter what you call it, it’s still

But first, let me rewind a bit. When the earliest European navigators charted the New World, they claimed to have

the same cat: Puma concolor. In the blackest of black of pre-dawn, Lucy and I were

witnessed a land inhabited by giants. Because of this,

whisked away in a jeep by our private tracking team with

Patagonia became associated with the Latin legend regio

specialized puma guide Cristian Asun and our expert puma

gigantum, or “region of giants.”

tracker Jorge Cardenas. Tracking teams like these have their

Today we know with certainty that Patagonia is indeed

work cut out for them. The puma has an extensive habitat,

the realm of giants—but not the human variety. Here, the

preferring dense underbrush and rocky areas for stalking,

awe-inspiring Torres del Paine massif, as well as one of the

but it can also live in open plains, coniferous and tropical

world’s largest mountain lions, the Patagonian puma, stand

forests, swamps and deserts. Further, pumas are naturally

tall in the sweeping expansiveness of a landscape that’s

camouflaged against the neutral hues of their environment,

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forms, including on foot, by vehicle, using radios and, in

needle in a haystack. Yet Quasar Expeditions’ guides and

certain cases, satellites. Here, sight, sound, smell, touch

puma-tracking experts are always up for the challenge.

and even taste rule.

Save the occasional crackle of the radio and hushed

been spotted—a female with her four cubs. Pumas are

carefully slowed the jeep to a stop. “Go!” he whispered

solitary animals, so it’s extraordinary to see more than one

at me with force. Jorge had disappeared like a ghost from

at a time unless it’s a mother with cubs or a pair mating.

the jeep. Keeping his body tight and low, he raced up the

As this elusive beauty stopped to sip from the river, her

steep terrain, almost catlike, dexterously blending into the

cubs bounded ahead and dragged behind like happy

jagged terrain. I blurted, “Oh, me? Right!” Barely awake,

offspring do.

my pack and raced up the mountain after him. There aren’t enough words in Spanish or English to

The locals’ nickname for her is Rupestre, a nod to the cave paintings in the park where she was first spotted (pinturas rupestres). A pretty name and misleadingly sweet

describe this badass. A biologist, naturalist guide and

for a powerful predator that is more than 100 pounds of

tracker since graduating university, Jorge Cardenas is a

death machine. Pumas have been recorded leaping 18 feet

Southern California native. He honed his skills in Africa

into the air and even farther horizontally.

under the tutelage of local professionals before moving on

Like its close relative the cheetah, the puma would

to pay his dues for years as a wildlife tracker specializing

rather flee than fight and rarely engages with humans.

in big cats in South America. Despite being a foreigner in

Jorge kept us close yet at just the right distance. She chose

a tight-knit community of expert native-Chilean wildlife

to tolerate him—and, by default, us. With Jorge blocking

guides and chasers, today Jorge is one of the most respected

the path between all females involved, Lucy and I took in

puma trackers in Patagonia.

this glorious specimen, this alpha female, in quiet awe.

Energized by fear and awe, I used his silhouette poised

We went on to spend two perfect days actively looking

on a high ridge in front a kaleidoscope of sunrise colors to

for pumas across a vast landscape, following and

guide me. Eventually I caught up and found Jorge skillfully

photographing them while strategizing where they would

tucked in at the top of a high ridge, protected from the

nap and feed in a vast graveyard littered with guanaco

elements, quietly puffing on his butterscotch cake-flavored

bones. These mammals, relatives of the Andean llama

vape. Not a word was spoken. His razor-sharp eyes and

and the African camel, congregate in this part of the park

powerful binoculars scanned the horizon for clues, signs of

during the winter for the protection that the hills and walls

puma in the distance.

of its valleys offer from the wind and snow at night—

The art of wildlife tracking dates back to prehistoric hunters, who used it principally to gather food. Today travel and tracking wildlife comes in many

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Back on the ridge, radio chatter came alive. A puma had

radio chatter in Spanish, the ride was a quiet one. Cristian

much less in my body, I exited far less gracefully, grabbed

96

PHOTOGRAPHED BY LUCY BURKE

PHOTOGRAPHED BY LUCY BURKE

so spotting one is like finding an eyelash in the eye of a

making them prime puma dinner. After each intoxicating puma encounter, Lucy and I reveled in the routine—travelers and trackers basking in


triumph together, with plenty of animated storytelling and individual vices to celebrate and keep us warm. As

Speaking of action, back to my brush with death … “Is there another way out of this?” Lucy screamed over

liquid nicotine and whiskey flowed, so too did maté—a

the sudden rabid snowstorm and frenetic wind, tossing us

delightfully caffeine-infused drink.

closer to choices between sheer drop or rock wall of ice.

Not all tales told are festive. Wildlife trackers navigate the terrain on behalf of discerning clients, but they are also on

“There must be an easier trail back down!” Our guide, Chino, yelled back in almost crazed delight,

the front lines of conservation, often putting themselves at

“This is the easy path!” I wondered if he had gone mad.

risk. This is more than a business; it is a way of life involving

“I can’t do this! I’m just a writer from California!” Chino

tremendous pride and passion for the survival of this now

was unfazed, having rebounded effortlessly—this was just

nearly endangered species.

another day in paradise, despite the fact that he was soaked,

The puma lives in 28 countries in the Americas. Despite

his eyebrows now one big icicle unibrow.

being more valuable than gold to both tourism in Chile

“NOT TODAY!” he bellowed enthusiastically. “You are

and the Patagonian ecosystem, a puma can be captured

a writer and a world-famous explorer! Add those spikes to

or killed as a preemptive or retaliatory punishment for

your shoes, grab your poles and let’s do this!”

livestock predation, legal and illegal sport hunting, and

Rather than avoiding the elements, explora guides want

bounty hunting. Walking in an expert puma tracker’s

things to happen. Come wind, rain, maybe snow or even

shoes for even a moment is an inspiring reminder of

blazing sunshine, you will be inspired and ready to venture

the fragility of these majestic creatures and the greater

out into a remarkable land, guided by specialists armed

struggle to protect big cats.

with world-class experience and training.

As it came into focus at the end of each thrill-seeking

Every evening, explora Patagonia’s guides meet with

day, the glorious sight of luxurious explora Patagonia

guests and explain all the available options for the next

Lodge made us exhale deeply. Explora architects German

day, helping them choose an exploration that matches

del Sol and José Cruz Ovalle have received the Chilean

their interests and abilities. For three more glorious days,

National Architecture Award, and the Patagonia Lodge, as

Lucy and I were pleasantly drunk on the explora Kool-

with all of their hotels, seamlessly blends into its remote

Aid as we enjoyed walks toward crystal clear lakes and

and rugged surroundings.

lenga tree forests, hikes to viewpoints and horseback

Anchored like a white ship on the shores of turquoise Lake Pehoé, explora Patagonia’s unique location sets travelers literally in the middle of Torres del Paine National

rides through the park’s pampas (grasslands) and along its rivers. And we were delightfully inspired by Chilean

Park while greeting them with award-winning architecture

chardonnay when we signed on for the advanced 13-mile

and breathtaking panoramic views of the Paine Ridge

trek with Chino on our final day. Just as I was ready to curl

and the granite towers. Conceived as an empowering and

into the fetal position and call for a helicopter evac, the

luxurious base, explora Patagonia features every amenity

adventure gods smiled on us from above. The sun emerged

needed to really relax and restore in between each epic

and with it, a magnificent male puma.

exploration. The 50-room lodge offers some of the most impressive views of any lodge in Patagonia.

Today these memories come back to me when I least expect it—when I find myself unsure ... vivid flashbacks of

Just steps away from the main building, the spa is a

my strongest self. Like a trust fall, don’t think too much;

perfect place to unwind—equipped with heated, covered

let go and have faith. Explora Patagonia’s team of expert

pool, sauna and four open-air Jacuzzis with views to the

“spotters” are certain to catch. ■

Paine River. A hot steam followed by the coldest plunges in the river is a guaranteed wake-up call and call to action.

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SEEN

Think Bing

Golden State and Southbay magazine teamed up with Bing Surfboards to host an evening that would bring the local surf community together for a once-ina-lifetime celebration—60 years of Bing Surfboards and a reunion of childhood best friends and local heroes Bing Copeland and Greg Noll. The evening included a moderated discussion between Bing and Greg, coupled with a Golden State film release on Bing’s 60 years—with live music provided by Tom Curren, Country Breakfast and the Royal Rats. Thank you to all our sponsors who made it happen: Outerknown, South Bay Boardriders Club, Beach Cities Orthopedics, KKC Fine Homes, B2 Insurance Services, Kyle Daniels Real Estate, Michael Lee Architects, Campsurf, Chad Heitzler Fahlbusch Real Estate, Eric Pritz of SEIA

PHOTOGRAPHED BY JP CORDERO

and Saint Rocke.

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SEEN

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SEEN

The Art of Giving Fundraiser This fundraiser to benefit the South Bay Artist Collective at Resin in Hermosa Beach supported programs for local artists, a youth creative lab with afterschool classes and collaborations with nonprofit partners.

Kerry Stitt, Allison Corteen, Jules Nemeth, Janice Schultz

Amelia Mcrae, Emmi Ayers, Aidan Morgan, Fiona Dowdee SBAC youth artist Alemnesh

Nick Arquette, Megan Arquette, Rafael McMaster, Roger Van Remmen, Barbara Van Remmen, Jayesh Patel, Nina Patel, Lisa May

Kat Hall

Rafael McMaster, Lisa May, Janet Solimon, Gary May, Sabrina Armitage

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Wendy Stillman, Drica Lobo, Diana Flynn, Robin Lebowe


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Stevens Nation Fundraiser The Stevens Nation Fundraiser, dedicated to Eric Stevens—a recently diagnosed LAFD firefighter with ALS,attracted upwards of 4,000 people. This event raised awareness for the ALS community and supported

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Eric in his mission to #axeALS.

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The California Great Santa Stroll The first annual event brought friends and supporters of Mychal’s Learning Place together in Hermosa Beach. This international competition, now part of the South Bay, raised awareness for the work of Mychal’s, a nonprofit that supports those with developmental disabilities.

Panda Express team

Kate’s Krew

K-Earth 101 and Laura Scott

South Bay Ford team

Latrice McGlothin of Kinecta

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Anna Garalde of Mychal’s with Santa


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Ribbon-Cutting at Compass South Bay The office celebrated joining the El Segundo Chamber of Commerce in December. This group of real estate industry pioneers has brought programs such as Concierge Capital, Bridge Loan Services and many more to the South Bay.

PHOTOGRAPHED BY JENNIE FIGUEROA

Marsha Hansen, Richard Lundquist, Scot Nicol, Kamini Lane, Mark Neuterman, Shiela Fowler, Drew Boyle, Sherry Kramer

Mark Neuterman, Drew Boyle, Kamini Lane

F45 Training Manhattan Beach Official Opening The South Bay community was invited to attend classes throughout the morning, and guests enjoyed giveaways, prizes and refreshments. F45 offers a 45-minute workout, combining elements of highintensity interval training (HIIT) and circuit training in a group environment.

Mike Reeves

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Ashley Smith and coach Jen Temperley


Brewing More Than Beer!

21770 Del Amo Circle E. | Torrance, CA 90503 | 310.294.9838 | thebrewshall.com

@thebrewshall


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Las Madrecitas Evergreen Ball Las Madrecitas, an auxiliary of the Charitable Children’s Guild of the Orthopædic Institute for Children (OIC), held its annual Evergreen Ball at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel. This event honored the Las Niñas 2020 senior class for their volunteer

Mike Reeves

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service to OIC and their community.

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Evening of Hope

The Pregnancy Help Center, offering free pregnancy testing and ultrasound exams, recently held its seventh annual fundraising banquet. Keynote speaker Shawn Carney, president/CEO of 40 Days for Life, and Adrienne Gross, center executive director, inspired the audience of 430 to support the center’s mission.

Byrne, June, Lucy and Sarah Bostick

Michael Tumanjian and Carla Tumanjian

Gail Marcone and John Marcone

PHOTOGRAPHED BY KIM WEST AND ERIN TOMANECK

Ann Nolan, Tom Nolan, Madonna Rose

Steve Krai, Caterina Krai, Dan Keenan

Carol Pfaff and Donald Pfaff

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TMMC Holiday Festival Gala Torrance Memorial Medical Center celebrated its 36th annual Holiday Festival by raising close to $1.7 million. More than 720 guests attended the dinner gala event. All funds raised go toward the new Hunt Cancer Center, a facility that consolidates Torrance Memorial’s cancer care and services into one

PHOTOGRAPHED BY DEIDRE DAVIDSON

location, which opened in December.

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PV Juniors Holiday Luncheon & Shopping Boutique The Palos Verdes Junior Women’s Club held its annual holiday luncheon and shopping boutique at the Palos Verdes Golf Club in December. This year’s seaside-themed fundraiser contributed to the organization’s 61-year mission to support women and children in crisis in the South Bay. Proceeds will be distributed to local philanthropies at the May disbursement ceremony.

Christine Petti, Linda Navarro-Snell, Tiffany Clarke

Debbie Sedlachek, Jean Christen, Heather Campbell, Margui Kohn

Maura Mizuguchi, Mary Kelliny, Eunice Sheng, Nadia McMahon, Julie Douglass

Nikki Lin, Maura Mizuguchi, Tanya Blomquist, Julie Hadley, Leslie Low

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Kristy Watson, Paul Lundstrom, Benjamin Lundstrom, Stephanie Lundstrom, Melissa Krise, Sarah Rener


PALOS VERDES JUNIOR WOMEN’S CLUB PRESENTS

PREPARE TO ENTER THE WORLD OF A ROCKSTAR!

Join the Palos Verdes Junior Women’s Club to celebrate 62 years of supporting women and children in crisis in the South Bay

SATURDAY, MARCH 21, 2020 6:00 PM - MIDNIGHT TRUMP NATIONAL GOLF CLUB RANCHO PALOS VERDES

DINNER, DANCING, ENTERTAINMENT, SILENT AND LIVE AUCTIONS. $250.00 PER PERSON ~ $275.00 AFTER MARCH 1 ~ LIMITED TO 280 GUESTS FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO PURCHASE TICKETS VISIT WWW.PVJUNIORS.ORG Program advertising and sponsorships also available


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27th Annual Holiday Homes Tour Sandpipers, a philanthropic organization in the South Bay, invited guests to tour four unique Manhattan Beach homes, each featuring distinctive holiday decor. A holiday market and cafe featured more than 30 artisanal vendors who each generously donated a percentage of

Tree Section Oasis home

The Sandpipers Holiday Homes Tour committee at the Coastal Classic home

their sales back to Sandpipers.

The Smoky Hollow Bluegrass band

Villa with a View home

Natalie Radtke, Leah Turano, Gloria Correa, Jamie Kahn

Above the Clouds: NYE Party Shade Hotel Manhattan Beach transported guests to a mountain chateau to welcome the New Year and

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celebrate the new decade.

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’80s Glam NYE Party

Shade Hotel Redondo Beach rang in the New Year with a flash to the past: an ’80s glam-themed party with multiple levels of live music and entertainment, hors d’oeuvres and a decadent dessert display

PHOTOGRAPHED BY JP CORDERO

with Champagne toast.

The Brews Hall Ribbon-Cutting The city of Torrance welcomed The Brews Hall in an official ribbon-cutting ceremony. The Brews Hall is the first multiconcept brewery and food court.

George Lopez, Colin Cowherd, Michael Zislis, Mayor Patrick Furey

Brandon, Jennifer, Lara, Elliott, Tanya

George Lopez, Colin Cowherd, Michael Zislis, Dave Furano, Dave Zislis

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Ride to Fly 25th Anniversary Ride to Fly, a therapeutic horsemanship program in Rancho Palos Verdes, celebrated its 25th year anniversary of serving the local special needs community at the Los Verdes Golf Course. Fundraiser guests enjoyed food, dancing, auctions and sharing wonderful memories.

Janice Hahn and Gail Grove

Tiffany Chiu, Melody Colbert, Gail Grove, Charlene O’Neil, Sharon Yarber

Cole Humiston, Tiffany Chiu, Meena Kopti

John Cruikshank and Gail Grove

discover southbay on instagram @ O U R SO U T H BAY

Scott Mesich, Clarissa Donnelly, Katie Warschefsky

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Café Pierre Pop-Up

Love & Salt in Manhattan Beach welcomed back beloved Café Pierre for a two-night special event. Guests enjoyed a menu filled with favorites from the

PHOTOGRAPHED BY SHANE O’DONNELL

now-closed restaurant.

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Blessing of the Garden of Healing Caregivers and community and business leaders joined Providence TrinityCare for the blessing of the Garden of Healing at the Douglas and J. Glass Family Center in Torrance. This garden, designed by

Dr. Glen Komatsu, Shayna Stiles, Scott Sharpe, Robert McNerney, Jacky Glass, Ed DeRenzis, Angela Park Sheldon, Gary Kuwahara

Dr. Glen Komatsu and Kohei Owatari

Kohei Owatari under the leadership of Dr. Glen Komatsu, was made possible by a very generous gift of philanthropy and has been designed as a special space for healing and meditation.

Shayna Stiles, Dr. Glen Komatsu, Robin Haney

YOGA ELEVATED

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“The market has started to slow, and the increase in pricing has slowed or even declined in some areas. That doesn’t mean the market is going to crash, but buyers need to exercise patience and be very picky.” — RICHARD HAYNES, OWNER/BROKER MANHATTAN PACIFIC REALTY


REAL ESTATE & MORTGAGE As we embark on spring—peak season for home sales—you may be entering the real estate market. Buying or selling a home can be one of the most impactful decisions we make in life. We count on these investments to ensure that we meet our financial goals and are provided for down the line. There is no better way to accomplish those objectives than having knowledgeable, accomplished professionals by your side. Hiring a highly skilled real estate agent who understands the market and can anticipate critical fluctuations will ensure a smooth, stress-free experience and, most importantly, excellent results. Read on to meet some of the leading Realtors® in the South Bay. They share their stories, including the skills and philosophies that have put them at the top of their field.

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RICHARD HAYNES Manhattan Pacific Realty, Inc.

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HARCOURTS HUNTER MASON REALTY

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CINDY SHEARIN The Shearin Group

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GEORGIANA ROSENKRANZ, JD The Rosenkranz | Friedman Group LLC

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HOFFMAN MURPHY REAL ESTATE TEAM

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THE KONDO GROUP

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JENNIFER CARAS Jennifer Caras Real Estate | Vista Sotheby’s International Realty

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CHHABRIA REAL ESTATE COMPANY

EDITED BY LAURA L. WATTS PHOTOGRAPHED BY SHANE O’DONNELL & LAUREN PRESSEY

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REAL ESTATE & MORTGAGE

RICHARD HAYNES

Owner/Broker, Manhattan Pacific Realty, Inc.

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tarting his real estate career at age 19, Richard Haynes today has a great deal of industry experience at 35. Other than his college years at USC, he has lived his entire life in Palos Verdes, Manhattan Beach and every Beach City in between. Richard is the owner of the boutique firm Manhattan Pacific Realty.

HOW MANY YEARS HAVE YOU BEEN WORKING IN REAL ESTATE? “Growing up in the South Bay, it feels like I’ve always indirectly worked in real estate— learning the local geography, culture and lifestyle details that are important to homeowners. That said, 2006 was the official launch of my professional real estate career. So for nearly 16 years I have had the privilege of working in every aspect of the business. During college I worked in real estate advertising, PR and mortgage lending. After that I worked in a variety of industry niches such as full-time mortgage broker, income property investor, property manager, home flipper, real estate agent and broker, and spec home developer. My focus has always been on the South Bay including Manhattan Beach, Hermosa Beach, Redondo Beach and Palos Verdes, but we do dip our toe into Greater Los Angeles for our investors.” WHAT IS THE #1 WAY YOU HELP CLIENTS SAVE MONEY? “There are a lot of ways we help clients save money. With my unique experience as an investor—I have facilitated the acquisition and disposition of 30 properties personally—I have experienced many of the pitfalls that can happen in a transaction. But the biggest way I save our clients’ money is by not being afraid to tell them ‘no.’ When my clients are looking at investing in a property and trusting me for my direction and opinion, I will clearly warn them when I believe a home is overpriced or could easily become a money pit. Often I feel

the need to tell my client to offer less when they want to offer more, which in the end saves them a lot of money.” DESCRIBE ONE OF YOUR FAVORITE REAL ESTATE PROJECTS. “One of my favorite projects was the home we developed and sold on 9th Place in the Manhattan Beach Sand Section a few years ago. I had my hands on every aspect of the transaction: locating the land, raising capital, purchasing the property, designing and developing the home, and ultimately earning a solid return on the investment dollars. The whole process allowed me to express myself in many different varieties of the business and, more importantly, learn many aspects of real estate that I can share with my clients today.” IS THE SOUTH BAY REAL ESTATE BOOM OVER? “The answer is multifaceted, as it depends on how you define ‘boom.’ In the South Bay from 2012 to 2015, we experienced an awesome boom. But since then, yes, it has slowed, and the ‘boom’—or significant growth—has been over for about a year or two. The market has started to slow, and the increase in pricing has slowed or even declined in some areas. That doesn’t mean the market is going to crash, but buyers need to exercise patience and be very picky.” IF THE BOOM IS SLOWING, IS REAL ESTATE STILL A GOOD INVESTMENT? “Well, that is a bit of a loaded question. Sometimes it is, and sometimes it isn’t. Timing in real estate is a huge factor. Real estate has had a great run as an investment over the last five to seven years, but presently in Greater L.A. it’s getting harder to make appropriate short-term or mid-term real estate returns for the risk taken these days. The easy money has already been made. If you have the wherewithal, investing over the

very long term will still prove to be an excellent investment in my opinion. As a result, I have sold some of my investment properties and invested in the equities market, which is proving a better return in the short term.” WHAT ARE SOME OF THE STEPS YOU TAKE TO EARN YOUR CLIENTS’ TRUST? “I take the time to underwrite property and its valuation for my clients. They are looking to me for expertise, and I am known for my pragmatic approach. My opinion is what they come to me for, and they trust that it is based on data and almost two decades of experience in many facets of real estate coupled with a lifetime of personal experience in the South Bay.” WHAT HAVE BEEN THE BIGGEST CHANGES YOU’VE SEEN IN THE SOUTH BAY MARKET? “The emergence of Manhattan Beach as a luxury market is for sure the biggest change we’ve seen. Due to access from the ‘new’ 105 freeway, it became a major commuter thoroughfare. That and the advent of social media put the city on the map for many of Los Angeles’ elite. Manhattan Beach is not the sleepy beach surf town it was just 20 years ago; it is a destination. Population growth, upscale properties and high society moving in have affected not only the real estate prices but the landscape and beautification of the city itself. It’s been amazing to be a part of the growth and change.” SHARE A BIT ABOUT YOUR JOB. WHAT DOES IT ENTAIL? “In a nutshell, we are high-level real estate advisors to our clients. Through data and unmatched quality of service, we establish ourselves as experts in market knowledge and then flawlessly execute contracts and transactions. We’re like that old friend you go to for big life decisions such as family and career (only it’s real estate)!”

2615 PACIFIC COAST HIGHWAY, SUITE 100, HERMOSA BEACH | 310-379-1724 | MANHATTANPACIFICREALTY.COM | DRE #01779425

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The Harcourts Hunter Mason team of accredited auction agents and Beowulf the dog

HARCOURTS HUNTER MASON REALTY

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ourtney and Tony Self opened Hunter Mason Realty in 2010 and eventually joined Harcourts, one of the largest real estate companies in the world, to offer greater support and training to their agents and more choices for their clients through the Harcourts auction process. TELL US ABOUT YOUR AUCTION PROCESS. “While we sell real estate like most traditional companies, we also offer an auction process to our sellers that is unique to Harcourts. This is one of the many reasons we partnered with Harcourts and bought our franchise in 2017. We wanted the opportunity to offer more ways for our clients to buy and sell homes. Auction offers more choice and transparency to both sellers and buyers and gives our agents a huge advantage to get homes sold for the best price and terms. While auction seems like a new concept here in the U.S. market, it is practiced

throughout the world. Harcourts has been offering it since 1888, so they have refined the process. While auction may not be for everyone, there are many benefits to the process. It tends to generate the most possible activity on a property, which leads to the best price for sellers and more transparency for the buyers. Overall, it’s a cleaner, more straightforward process, and buyers and sellers really seem to like it.” WHAT IS YOUR BACKGROUND IN THE REAL ESTATE INDUSTRY? “Courtney started selling real estate full-time in 1987 and left the industry briefly to work with Pan American as a flight attendant from 1988 to 1991. Tony not only sold real estate but is also very involved with technology and the real estate community. He served as the 2019 president of the Palos Verdes Association of Realtors. As a broker and licensed auctioneer, he sold more than 4,000

properties using the auction process while working with Auction.com and Hubzu. He also worked with the California Association of Realtors to help start Realtor.com.” WHAT ARE SOME OF THE STEPS YOU TAKE TO EARN YOUR CLIENTS’ TRUST? “Absolute honesty and clear communication are essential to building trust with our clients as well as our fellow real estate professionals. Our seamless and straightforward auction process is crafted so our clients feel complete peace of mind from start to finish. This is achieved through complete transparency whether we’re representing clients in a traditional sale or through our unique auction process.” WHAT IS YOUR ADVICE FOR SOMEONE STARTING A CAREER IN REAL ESTATE? “Get a great mentor and choose a company that offers support and growth opportunities.”

1617 S. PACIFIC COAST HWY., SUITE D, REDONDO BEACH | 310-350-6205 | AUCTIONISANOPTION.COM

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CINDY SHEARIN

Realtor®/Owner, The Shearin Group

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indy Shearin has spent 30 years as a real estate professional in the South Bay. Her company, The Shearin Group, is affiliated with Strand Hill | Christie’s International Real Estate. In addition to being a Realtor®, Cindy is also a designer and a developer.

WHAT MAKES YOU A SOUTH BAY REAL ESTATE EXPERT? “In my 30-year career, I have acquired comprehensive knowledge of all aspects of the industry. I raised a family here and learned the unique characteristics of the various South Bay communities, especially the school systems. In addition, I can evaluate value on a block-by-block basis— something no algorithm can do.” WHAT ARE SOME WAYS YOU GAIN THE TRUST OF YOUR CLIENTS? “Our clients are our #1 priority. My success depends upon always having my client’s best interest at heart. I will definitely recommend that my client walks away from a contract or negotiation that does not adequately serve his or her needs. Over the years, I have earned the trust of many people whom I have represented throughout their lives; I become the ‘family’ Realtor. As a result, after three decades my network is immense.” WHAT IS THE #1 WAY YOU SAVE YOUR CLIENTS MONEY? “My unique combination of skills provides numerous opportunities for me to save my clients money and maximize their returns: design, real estate marketing, ground-up construction, development and financing. I have an eye for staging a home to sell or evaluating the pros and cons that are key when a client is buying a home. I have subs and contractors who are available to assist with small to large rehabs and can help a client see the potential in a contemplated purchase.”

PHOTOGRAPHED BY LINDA COTTER

WHAT ELSE SETS YOU APART AS A REALTOR? “We are consistently in the Top 1% of Realtors in the nation, while I locally rank #2 in transactions through our parent firm Strand Hill | Christie’s International, giving me a global reach in 47 countries and 1,350s office worldwide. Also, The Shearin Group generates staggering numbers on social media through our exclusive platforms Haute Residence, The Fourhundred and Luxury Realtor. We boost monthly viewership and exposure to upwards of 3 million viewers/subscribers. We design the most effective marketing program for all the homes we represent, and we personally expend an unmatched effort to understand, identify and then find the types of homes our clients desire to purchase.”

1131 N. MORNINGSIDE DR., MANHATTAN BEACH | 310-200-8318 | CINDYSHEARIN.COM SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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GEORGIANA ROSENKRANZ, JD Managing Partner, The Rosenkranz | Friedman Group LLC

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onsistently recognized as one of the top-producing teams at Keller Williams Palos Verdes Realty, The Rosenkranz | Friedman Group is a full-service real estate team of experienced professionals with more than 40 years of industry experience. WHEN DID YOU FIRST CONSIDER WORKING IN THE REAL ESTATE INDUSTRY? “Real estate has been a part of my life for as long as I can remember. My father is a local real estate investor, so I have always been passionate about real estate. As a broker, I have been blessed to help people turn their home ownership dreams into reality while also earning a living doing what I love!” IS REAL ESTATE STILL A GOOD INVESTMENT? “Absolutely!! Real estate is a tangible investment that historically increases in value over time and consistently outperforms other forms of investments. Our excellent schools, proximity to the beach, mountain resorts, airports, great shopping, dining, entertainment, educational institutions and museums ensures demand for housing in the South Bay will continue to outpace the housing supply for many years to come.” TELL US ABOUT THE IMPORTANCE OF PRACTICING THE GOLDEN RULE IN BUSINESS. “Particularly in such a relationship-based profession as real estate, it is critical for clients to know they can trust our professional judgment and personal advice. We earn that trust through consistent and strict adherence to ethical standards and constantly putting ourselves in our clients’ position. By implementing the Golden Rule, we anticipate our clients’ questions, concerns, desires and needs. This translates into strong, long-lasting relationships with highly successful outcomes for everyone involved.” WHAT MAKES YOU A SOUTH BAY EXPERT? “The South Bay is and always has been my backyard. I was born, raised and educated here and have been fortunate enough to live, work and raise my own family in the South Bay. As a result, I have an in-depth knowledge of our unique community.” HOW DO YOU GIVE BACK TO YOUR COMMUNITY? “I am pleased to serve as a trustee for the Peninsula Education Foundation and to serve on the Palos Verdes Estates Traffic Safety Committee. I’m a member of Vistas for Children and an avid supporter of various PTAs and booster clubs. I am so proud to be able to give back to the communities that mean so much to me and my family.”

550 DEEP VALLEY DRIVE, SUITE 359, ROLLING HILLS ESTATES | 310-717-8767 | GEORGE@GEORGESELLSTHESOUTHBAY.COM | THERFGROUP.COM

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HOFFMAN MURPHY REAL ESTATE TEAM

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eginning their real estate careers in the Beach Cities more than 30 years ago, Realtors® Marie Hoffman and Sue Murphy established the Hoffman Murphy Real Estate Team in 2006. Their prior work in education, corporate finance, and small business development set the stage for them to assist buyers and sellers in a variety of residential and investment transactions. DESCRIBE ONE OF YOUR FAVORITE REAL ESTATE PROJECTS. “The Hoffman Murphy team specializes in getting the most money for our sellers, and we start with a comprehensive analysis to determine if a home is a candidate for an ‘as-is’ sale, or if the bottom-line profit will increase by making small improvments or even a mini-makeover. One of our favorite projects was a Manhattan Beach home that sat on the market, unsold for weeks and weeks with another company. The sellers hired us to design and manage a makeover for

the seriously dated home. The sellers lived out of town; they gave us a key and approved the project, which came in at $75,000. The Hoffman Murphy Team sold the home after only a week on the market, and our sellers netted more than $250,000 additional on their $75,000 investment.” WHAT IS THE #1 WAY YOU HELP YOUR CLIENTS SAVE MONEY? “Our #1 money-saving tip is what not to spend money on before you put your home on the market. Our HMTransformation Team has the resources to take on any project. We do all the work, often with no upfront cost to the seller— saving our sellers both time and money.” WHAT TOUCH DOES YOUR TEAM ADD TO MAKE A HOUSE A HOME? “Every home sale is special, and our job is to create an emotional connection between the buyer and the home. It is that emotional connection—the ‘I have to have this house!’

feeling—that creates urgency in buyers and results in a faster sale at a higher price. Our team is expertly trained to create this emotion in the home-preparation process, and we walk through the process step-by-step with every seller to ensure their house feels like ‘home’ to the right buyer.” IS SOUTH BAY REAL ESTATE STILL A GOOD INVESTMENT? “Having grown up in the South Bay, we have seen exponential growth and change in the local real estate market. Although prices have gone up and down through the years, the 10-year price appreciation trajectory has always been up, and we do not see that changing in the future. Buying and holding real estate for long-term appreciation and cash flow remains a smart investment strategy, both for primary residence and investment properties.”

1500 PACIFIC COAST HIGHWAY, HERMOSA BEACH | 310-939-9393 | HOFFMANMURPHY.COM SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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L to R: Victoria Brown Paullin, Meg Puccinelli, Mora Sepehrnia, Chrissy Karasavas, Michelle Nishide, Tadashi Kondo, Aly Bassanelli Hill, Noelle Hofmann, Lorena Andrade, Poul Erik Norgaard, Shima Razipour

THE KONDO GROUP

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he Kondo Group is a full-service real estate team with Movoto Real Estate. Led by Tadashi Kondo, the team is comprised of 11 agents and administrative staff with more than 60 years of combined experience. WHAT ARE SOME STEPS YOU TAKE TO EARN YOUR CLIENTS’ TRUST? “We aim to be a valuable resource for our clients as our #1 priority. So our motivation is to help clients with their real estate needs, from giving advice to helping them buy or sell property. Our greatest pleasure is not only the process behind each fundamental detail but the relationship that lasts for years to come.” WHAT IS THE #1 WAY YOU HELP YOUR CLIENTS SAVE MONEY? “Every dollar counts. Besides having a list of great lenders with amazing rates, the majority of money-saving efforts are through tough

negotiations and keeping our clients’ needs as the top priority. For sellers, we price the home correctly and then make it clear to the buyer’s agent from the get-go what can be expected. For buyers, we try to get them the best price and prepare a strong offer by leveraging terms.” DESCRIBE ONE OF YOUR FAVORITE REAL ESTATE PROJECTS. “This past year we had the pleasure of working with a family to sell their childhood home. It was a special listing for our team because they were longtime neighbors of one of our agents. We worked together and made the transition as easy as possible for our clients by facilitating an estate sale, cleaning the property out and finding vendors to get it ready for the market. We sold it for more than 10% above asking price, and the sellers didn’t have to worry about maintaining their home during the process. The joy of seeing our

clients happy with their new owners made it all worthwhile!” WHAT IS YOUR ADVICE FOR SOMEONE JUST STARTING A CAREER IN REAL ESTATE? “A career in real estate takes a lot of hard work and discipline! You have to treat it like a 50-hour work week and stay motivated, as you are the CEO, CFO, COO every day. Finding a mentor is key for all new agents; a guiding hand can help you significantly the first few years. Remember that great service and exceptional experiences are more valuable than compensation.” TELL US ABOUT YOUR TEAM. “We pride ourselves on being a unique, dynamic team knowledgeable about architecture, the mortgage industry and commercial real estate. We are deeply involved in our community and the real estate industry.”

445 SILVER SPUR ROAD, ROLLING HILLS ESTATES | 310-740-5742 | THEKONDOGROUP.COM

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JENNIFER CARAS

Realtor®, Jennifer Caras Real Estate | Vista Sotheby’s International Realty

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ealtor® Jennifer Caras, a Los Angeles native, has worked in real estate since 2004. She attended Marymount High School and continued her education at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She has been married to her husband, Chris, for 17 years and they live in Manhattan Beach with their son, CJ, twin daughters, Julianne and Grace, and dog Woody. In 2019 Jen was the #2 Top Producing Agent at Vista Sotheby’s. She was the largest producer of Beach Cities sales, totaling more than $40 million of real estate sold last year. WERE YOU INTERESTED IN HOMES WHEN YOU WERE YOUNG? “Yes, my parents tell me I was always extremely detail-oriented, even as a young child. I was so intrigued with the details of homes that I initially wanted to go to architecture school. I landed in glorious Santa Barbara and went for a psychology degree instead. It was a brilliant move in the end, as my degree truly plays a critical role in every aspect of my career.” WHAT ARE SOME OF THE STEPS YOU TAKE TO EARN YOUR CLIENTS’ TRUST? “Since I have been in the business for 15 years as a top-producing agent, I thoroughly understand our South Bay market as well as the importance of exceptional client service. I am upfront and open with my clients, and they are grateful for that candor. I pride myself on being highly collaborative and have strong bonds with other real estate industry colleagues. I am a fierce client advocate, highly accessible and a proven performer during stressful situations. As a result, the majority of my clients are repeat and referral business.” DESCRIBE ONE OF YOUR FAVORITE REAL ESTATE PROJECTS. “There are so many favorites, but if I had to pick one from this past year, it was a beautiful new construction walk street home on 10th Street. I was involved in the development of the home and was the listing agent and the selling agent. It was so unique to be dynamically involved in so many aspects—from the building, construction and design details to the selling. It was extremely rewarding to be so intricately involved and truly successful, as all sides were so pleased with the outcome.” WHAT IS THE BEST PART OF YOUR DAY? “Getting my cherished Peet’s latte with my husband, Chris, after we drop our kids off at school. Our mornings are always adventurous with three children, but having that few minutes together to take a breath, recollect and start our day together is always revitalizing. I owe so much of my success in my career to my husband’s unwavering support and love.”

1144 HIGHLAND AVENUE, MANHATTAN BEACH | 310-367-9129 | INSTAGRAM: @JENNIFERCARASREALESTATE SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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L to R: Philo Chhabria, Neil Chhabria, Raju Chhabria, Anand Chhabria

CHHABRIA REAL ESTATE COMPANY

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hhabria Real Estate Company specializes in luxury residential real estate sales on the Palos Verdes Peninsula and throughout the Beach Cities. CEO/ principal broker Raju Chhabria started the company in 2016. His real estate career spans more than 30 years with experience in sales, construction and development. Prior to founding CREC, Raju was an associate broker with Shorewood Realtors for 21 years. Raju was born in Bangalore, India, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in business and commerce from St. Joseph’s College and a bachelor’s degree in law/legal studies from RC College. In 1984 he moved to Los Angeles and pursued his real estate license. His team includes his wife, Philo, who has more than 25 years of sales experience, as well as their two sons, Neil and Anand. Neil has 10 years of sales experience and became a broker associate in 2019. Anand has eight years of sales experience and is currently pursuing his contractors license.

DESCRIBE ONE OF YOUR FAVORITE REAL ESTATE PROJECTS. “Our upcoming listing at 17 Crest Road East in Rolling Hills is one of the finest properties we’ve had the privilege to work with. It’s a brand new, 8,900-square-foot Spanish Revival style home on more than seven acres with panoramic ocean views in one of the best locations in Rolling Hills. The style, quality and grounds are like none we’ve ever worked with before.” WHAT IS THE #1 WAY YOU HELP YOUR CLIENTS SAVE MONEY? “By being in tune with the market and guiding our clients most efficiently in terms of pricing, marketing strategy and time. Also being proactive and thinking several steps ahead to remove potential obstacles before they happen.” WHAT ARE SOME OF THE STEPS YOU TAKE TO EARN YOUR CLIENTS’ TRUST? “Being brutally honest and going above and beyond what other agents will do.”

IS REAL ESTATE STILL A GOOD INVESTMENT? “Absolutely, as long as you can afford it, have a long-term view and are prepared to maintain the property.” WHAT MAKES YOU A SOUTH BAY EXPERT? “Our network, reach and years of experience in sales and construction/development in the South Bay community.” SHARE A BIT ABOUT YOUR JOB. WHAT EXACTLY DOES IT ENTAIL? “Constantly viewing and seeking properties; networking with people; and lots of following up with all the different parties involved in a transaction (lots of people).” WHAT HAVE BEEN THE BIGGEST CHANGES YOU’VE SEEN IN THE SOUTH BAY MARKET OVER THE YEARS? “The increased prices.”

717 YARMOUTH ROAD, PALOS VERDES ESTATES | 310-902-7227 | CHHABRIARE.COM

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BREWERY

WATERFRONT

VILLAGE

2907 182nd Street Redondo Beach, CA 90278 (310) 542-8657

132 International Boardwalk Redondo Beach, CA 90277 (310) 370-1400

1719 South Catalina Avenue Redondo Beach, CA 90277 (424) 452-6063

HOURS

HOURS

HOURS

Mon/Tues 4PM-9PM Wed/Thurs 4PM-10PM Fri 2PM-10PM Sat Noon-10PM Sun Noon-6PM

Mon-Wed 3PM-8:30PM Thurs 3PM-10PM Fri/Sat Noon-11PM Sun Noon-8PM

Mon-Wed 3PM-9PM Thurs 3PM-10PM Fri 2PM-12AM Sat Noon-12AM Sun Noon-8PM


DRE#00967574

Palos Verdes Estates This brand new, state-of-the-art home features breathtaking ocean and coastline views from Malibu to downtown and beyond! Over 7100 square feet with 5 bedroom suites, movie theatre, wine cellar, elevator, expansive living spaces, soaring ceilings, a large grassy backyard, infinity pool, spa, and more! $9,999,000.


R E A L E S TAT E

Grand Tuscan Villa Within a near 1-acre privately gated compound is a grand Tuscan Villa estate offering breathtaking ocean & sunset views. Built with no expense spared & attention to detail, this home offers approx. 9,500 SF of luxury living, 5 BDs, 8BAs, library, media room, gym, wine cellar and office. Highlights include extensive use of French imported limestone & wood floors, natural stone columns, arched hallways and coffered ceilings. 1701PaseoLaCresta.com 1701 Lower Paseo La Cresta, Palos Verdes Estates | $12,700,000 Chhabria Real Estate Company | ChhabriaRE.com Neil Chhabria & Anand Chhabria | BRE# 01821437 & 01908741 310.902.7227 | 310.704.1395


AG E N T S P OT L I G H T

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ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE SOUTH BAY Local real estate couple values friendships and community—and shares both with their clients. PHOTOGRAPHED BY SIRI BERTING & LAUREN PRESSEY

O

nce upon a time in the South

the reason why they are frequently named

Bay, Caskey met Caskey. They

Top Producers by Strand Hill | Christie’s

married, worked together,

International Real Estate.

started a company, built a fam-

ily and grew deep roots into the sandy South

A HIGHER LEVEL OF LOCALNESS

Bay soil. But let’s not get too ahead of our-

To Jen and Dave, being local isn’t something

selves. Rather, let’s go back to the beginning.

that makes them more qualified or even bet-

Because this South Bay story actually began

ter than other agents. Local is simply who they

with Jen as a young girl growing up just blocks

are, how they act and what drives them to

from where she works today.

do what they do. Local comes from a lifetime

As a child, Jen attended Robinson Elemen-

“OUR CLIENTS BECOME OUR FRIENDS, AND OUR FRIENDS BECOME OUR CLIENTS.”

of living here and raising three boys here. It’s

tary and Mira Costa High School. She also

never leaving … never wanting to leave. It’s

Beach or Palos Verdes is so much more than

attended a real-life version of real estate

welcoming newcomers to the beachcomber

just finding a “finer” home. Moving here

school taught by her mother, who sold homes

way of life with open arms, a smile and a

means falling in love with a truly one-of-a-

throughout Jen’s childhood. To say real estate

recommendation of where to grab a good

kind piece of coastline.

was in her blood would be an understate-

drink with friends. (Fishing With Dynamite in

ment. Mom encouraged daughter to get into

Manhattan Beach, by the way).

the business. Daughter took Mom’s advice

Their commitment to the community goes

To put it in perspective, try taking a walk around town with Jen or Dave. You won’t be alone for long. The South Bay just won’t let it

well beyond love, respect and an intimate

happen. It’s just that kind of place: friendly,

knowledge of every single business in town.

caring ... home. “Our clients become our

freeway away from the South Bay. Originally

In fact, Jen and Dave support more than

friends, and our friends become our clients,”

from Orange County, it was only natural

40 nonprofit organizations and events in

shares Dave.

that Dave would fall deeply in love with the

the South Bay each year. They even have

South Bay lifestyle: the sun, the sea and, most

a baseball team … go Caskey & Caskey

Caskey & Caskey has chops. You probably

importantly, the vibe created by a mixture of

Sharks! To the Caskeys, giving back to the

won’t hear it from them, but they are the #1

salty air and salt-of-the-earth people.

community that’s given them their lives

team for sales volume—$244 million as of

simply makes sense.

2019. But what you will hear from them are

and got her first job in 1991. Jen met Dave at USC—a hop, skip and a 110

While pursuing his MBA at USC, Dave’s

In terms of selling and marketing homes,

things like: “We’re going to take care of every-

general contracting business naturally translated into a successful real estate career.

FINER HOME SPECIALISTS

thing.” “We’ve got your back. “We have some

And for more than 30 years, that’s been

As founders of Caskey & Caskey, Jen and

unique homes to share with you.” “Our team

his focus. Dave and Jen founded Caskey

Dave let the community speak for itself and

is here for you.” And once you’re all settled,

& Caskey in 1991 and have since built a

always make sure it has a voice. Moving to

“You’ve got to check out El Sombrero and

team of agents and support staff that are

Manhattan Beach, Hermosa Beach, Redondo

Love & Salt. So good!”

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AG E N T S P OT L I G H T

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Dave, Jen and their three sons

business. It’s who they are, and they wouldn’t

CASKEY & CASKEY AT STRAND HILL |

tion. It’s a life transaction. It takes patience,

do it any other way. But it’s also the South Bay

CHRISTIE’S INTERNATIONAL REAL ESTATE

trust and the ability to rely on your real estate

way. Give them a call, and you’ll see exactly

DAVE CASKEY & JENNIFER CASKEY

agents for more than just the best listings.

what we mean.

1117 5TH STREET, SUITE A

Buying a home isn’t a business transac-

Jen and Dave have made a lot of friends in

MANHATTAN BEACH

the area because their friendships drive their

310-374-1800 | CASKEYANDCASKEY.COM

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1706 MANHATTAN AVENUE

AND

1705 BAYVIEW DRIVE • HERMOSA BEACH

NEW LUXURY OCEAN VIEW TOWNHOMES Offered at $3,500,000 & $3,700,000

Dave & Jennifer Caskey (310) 200-1960 www.CaskeyAndCaskey.com CalBRE #01198999


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THE T N O RKE MA

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MAKE TERRANEA YOUR OWN What’s better than being a guest at Terranea? Owning a piece of this luxurious paradise. PHOTOGRAPHED BY PAUL JONASEN & MIKE ROBINSON

S

et on a secluded promontory

gourmet kitchen with Viking appliances,

overlooking stunning vistas of the

custom cabinetry and quartz counters. The

here, owners and staff foster a strong sense

Pacific and nearby Catalina Island,

living/dining room boasts a beamed ceiling,

of community shrouded in ocean club com-

Terranea Resort offers endless

While privacy is valued and abundant

fireplace and French doors. There is plenty of

forts and ease. The Terranea lifestyle encour-

opportunities to enjoy the California lifestyle

room for friends and family: three bedrooms

ages a full life rich in celebration—one where

year-round. An all-encompassing sense of

and bathroom suites—each with access to

unforgettable moments and milestone

peace radiates throughout Terranea’s collec-

outdoor living areas—plus a powder room,

events are shared year after year alongside

tion of masterly crafted seaside homes, where

laundry room, two-car garage and owner’s

family and friends.

open interiors bathed in warm natural light

storage closet.

flow seamlessly to outdoor spaces enveloped by gentle ocean breezes.

Owning at Terranea is uncomplicated and

The opportunity to own a Villa at Terranea means less time traveling and more moments

deeply fulfilling. Upon arrival, all worries

spent on what matters most. Each villa pro-

melt away as your needs are met by highly

vides a luxurious refuge for the entire family.

few have the luxury of calling Terranea their

personalized concierge services. Enjoy the

It is a jumping-off point for endless adven-

second home. As an owner, you’ll want

far-reaching ocean views, dine on gourmet

tures and a place to create memories over

to escape to Terranea for years to come.

dishes prepared by world-class chefs and

over a lifetime. This is an opportunity that

Stunning seaside cliffs, whales breaching just

indulge in the award-winning spa. With

combines the truest luxuries of being with

off the coast, coves with surfers and pad-

your home expertly maintained year-round,

family, spending time outdoors and enjoying

dlers, horseback riding, and miles of hiking

all you have to do is simply show up and

one-of-a-kind wellness opportunities with an

and biking trails are all complemented by

enjoy. This is luxurious California living at its

unrivaled California setting. When you can’t

well-appointed comforts and amenities.

most effortless.

be on property to enjoy this seaside escape

While many guests simply visit Terranea,

Experience the soul-stirring rejuvenation that comes with time spent at Terranea, and you’ll easily understand why so many are eager to claim it as their own. Situated on 102 acres, 14 of which are a California coastal preserve, Terranea’s collection of second homes makes ownership a true honor—one that is quickly narrowing with the sales of the available Oceanfront Villas. Terranea Villa #11-301 is a fully furnished second home with a private, gated courtyard and an outdoor living room warmed by a gas fireplace plus adjacent private Jacuzzi-type spa. Perfect for entertaining, this seaside sanctuary features a stocked |

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yourself, you can invite guests or clients to use it in your absence. Terranea was developed with the highest environmental standards in cooperation with the California Coastal Commission—an organization committed to protecting everyone’s access to the coast. That is why, although the Villas are offered as whole ownership (not timeshare or fractional), there are threemonth usage guidelines for Villas owners. Under this unique condition, owners may come and go as they please up to 90 days per year, and rental of the vacation homes when owners are not in residence is required. As an owner, you can take advantage of the professional rental program and let Terranea handle the details or rent out the Villa yourself during the times you are away from your home on the Peninsula. Perched on the bluffs in Palos Verdes, Terranea Resort’s amenities keep guests coming back: four swimming pools, spa and fitness center with workout classes, eight restaurants, a nine-hole golf course, family events and a host of outdoor activities. Luxuries are not limited to the adults; kids’ activities include fireside s’mores, drive-in movies (seasonal at the resort pool) and daily nature walks exploring the native flora, fauna and animals that live around this protected coastal reserve. To learn more about the current inventory of fully furnished Terranea vacation homes, please contact Marika Kalogerakis at 310-265-2888.

The Villas at Terranea 100 Terranea Way #11-301

ON THE MARKET

Rancho Palos Verdes Offered at $1,795,000 Marika Kalogerakis | Terranea Real Estate 310-265-2888 | terranearealestate.com info@terranearealestate.com BRE #01774333

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Representing Palos Verdes’ Finest Homes & Estates for Over 30 Years!

Oceanfront Estates, Rancho Palos Verdes

785 Via Del Monte, Palos Verdes Estates

50 Saddleback, Rolling Hills

25 Chuckwagon, Rolling Hills

$6,789,000 | www.elegantvillabythesea.com 4 Bd | 6 Ba | 8,320 sq.ft | 24,377 sq,ft lot | 3 car garage

$5,999,999 | www.785viadelmonte.com 6 Bd | 7 Ba | 5,640 sq.ft | 20,570 sq.ft lot

$3,599,000 | www.25chuckwagon.com 5 Bd | 6 Ba | 5,487 sq.ft | 1.17 acre lot | 5 car garage—Car Collector’s Delight Plus guest house & room for a boat

FO R

LI NE ST W IN G

LE AS E

$3,399,000 | www.50saddleback.com 5 Bd | 4.5 Ba | 4,397 sq.ft | 1.34 acre lot | 4 car garage

2824 Victoria Place, Palos Verdes Estates

$1,998,000 | Vacant Lot for Sale With Approved Plans 5 Bd | 7 Ba | 5,700 sq.ft | 18,016 sq.ft lot | 4 Car Garage

605 Paseo Del Mar, Palos Verdes Estates

$25,000/month | 6 Bd | 7 Ba | 6,872 sq.ft | 32,943 sq.ft lot | 3 Car Garage

LILY LIANG

+1 310 373 3333 | lily@lilyliang.com | www.lilyliang.com 550 Silver Spur Road, Suite 240, Rolling Hills Estates, CA 90274 BRE# 00837794

HOME TO THE FINEST COLLECTION OF REAL ESTATE EXPERTS IN THE SOUTH BAY.

STRANDHILL.COM

STRAND HILL | CHRISTIE’S INTERNATIONAL REAL ESTATE LICENSE #01968431. THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS DOCUMENT, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, SQUARE FOOTAGE AND/OR ACREAGE, HAS BEEN PROVIDED BY VARIOUS SOURCES WHICH MAY INCLUDE THE SELLER, PUBLIC RECORDS, THE MULTIPLE LISTING SERVICE OR OTHER SOURCES. BROKER HAS NOT AND WILL NOT INVESTIGATE OR VERIFY THE ACCURACY OF THIS INFORMATION.


LD SO

REDONDO BEACH TOWN HOME 4 BEDS I 3 BATHS I 1,831 SQ. FT. I $1,089,000

RICHARD HAYNES Real Estate Broker 310.379.1724 DRE: 01779425


IT’S YOUR SOUTH BAY. OWN IT.

M a n h a tt a n P a c i fi c R e a l t y . c o m 310.379.1724

DRE: 01909107


Taya DiCarlo 310.431.8251 taya@tayadicarlo.com DRE 01751317

2211 Vista Drive Manhattan Beach

@tayadicarlo tayadicarlo.com

Call for Price 3 Bed 4 Bath 2,250 Sq Ft


709 North Valley Drive Manhattan Beach $2,575,000 3 Bed 3 Bath 1,356 Sq Ft

Nick Schneider 310.809.4875 nick@schneiderproperties.com DRE 01867363

@schneiderproperties schneiderproperties.com


12 San Miguel Rolling Hills Estates $3,199,000 5 Bed 6 Bath 4,511 Sq Ft

Tony Accardo 310.855.3557 tony.accardo@compass.com DRE 01863340

@accardo_realestate accardorealestate.com


Lauren Forbes 310.901.8512 lauren@forbescorrales.com DRE 01295248

John Corrales 310.346.3332 john@forbescorrales.com DRE 01263687

@ForbesCorrales forbescorrales.com

Rancho Palos Verdes

$12,995,000 7 Bed 9 Bath 7,700 Sq Ft

Compass is a real estate broker licensed by the State of California and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. License Number 01991628. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only and is compiled from sources deemed reliable but has not been verified. Changes in price, condition, sale or withdrawal may be made without notice. No statement is made as to accuracy of any description. All measurements and square footages are approximate.


7301 Vista Del Mar, A102 Playa Del Rey $1,325,000 2 Bed 2.5 Bath 1,817 Sq Ft

Will Passavia 310.752.3023 wp@compass.com DRE 01953672

@wp.realestate wgphomes.com


Our neighborhood, your home. 23 Sorrel Lane, Rolling Hills Estates

4 Bedrooms, 5 Bathrooms | 4,136 sq. ft. Home, 19,048 sq. ft. Lot (TAX) | $2,350,000

*Property also co-listed with Kitty Edler of Vista Sotheby’s International Realty

DARIN DERENZIS 310.418.6210 DRE# 01760239 darin@vistasir.com

MEREDITH L DERENZIS 310.600.7973 DRE# 01907722 meredith@vistasir.com

Each office is independently owned and operated.


CO

Coveted street in Palos Verdes Estates with coastline views One of the earliest built on the Peninsula, this Spanish style home with original, intact details speaks of another time. Timeless stonework, wood ceilings and thick, plaster walls give a substantial feeling of quality craftsmanship. With their pick of locations, early builders had a choice in where to build, and this prime location reflects that freedom. Unsurpassed coastline views are abundant from the interior of this well-laid out home and are equally as dramatic from the patios and terraces. Only two families have owned this special piece of history. In March, we will make it available to you.

310-704-4014 cariandbritt.com BRITT: BRE# 01799654 CARI: BRE# 00850678

MI

NG

SO

ON


1.1 Acre Enchanted World

29 Strawberry Lane, Rolling Hills Estates $5,950,000 | 5 BD + 10 BA | 8,004 SF

Welcome to the “Enchanted World” of 29 Strawberry Lane; a rare opportunity to own a one of a kind estate. The home was built high end with no expense spared. It boasts 8,004 SF, featuring 5 en-suite BDs, 10 BAs, spa w/steam + sauna, basement with polished concrete floors, a bar, state of the art private theatre w/ 2.35 projection screen & Dolby atmos, home automation system, 724 SF covered outdoor living room, along w/a 500 SF guest house w/full kitchen, all within an approx. 1.1 acre lot.  

Beachfront New Construction

212 The Strand, Hermosa Beach

NEW construction in prime beachfront location. Another fabulous build by developer Demetrius Doukoullos of Acropolis/Delphi Properties, architecture by Tomaro Design Group. Stunning new contemporary tri-level home on the Hermosa Beach Strand. Gorgeous property with high-end, designer finishes with 5 bedrooms, 5.5 bathrooms and approx. 4,403 SF of luxury living space. Entry level features open floor plan with gourmet kitchen, dining room and great room with fireplace (marble tile hearth).   

$9,999,999 | 5 BD + 6 BA | 4,400 SF

Raju Chhabria | Philo Chhabria | Neil Chhabria | Anand Chhabria BRE: 00874072

BRE: 00897605

BRE: 01821437

ChhabriaRE.com (310) 902-7227 Information deemed reliable but not guaranteed. Buyer is advised to conduct their own investigations.

BRE: 01908741


Exclusive opportunity to build your dream home at the beach! CONTACT KYLE DANIELS FOR DETAILS



Each franchise is independently owned and operated. If your property is listed with a real estate broker, please disregard. It is not our intention to solicit the offerings of other real estate brokers. We are happy to work with them and cooperate fully. Information herein is deemed reliable but not guaranteed. DRE# 01843670


READY TO GROW? WE MAKE IT OUR BUSINESS TO HELP YOUR BUSINESS EXPAND

The key to all your commercial sales, leasing & management needs STARTS WITH US! Deborah Naumovski 310.999.1203 deborah@rpmres.com DRE #01889637 2019 South Bay Assoc. of Realtors; Commercial Realtor of the Year

Gulshen Kaur 562.225.9260 gulshen@rpmres.com DRE#01889843 WWW.RPMRES.COM


JUST LISTED FRENCH PROVINCIAL ESTATE 974 PASEO LA CRESTA, PALOS VERDES ESTATES | OFFERED AT $10,200,000 4 bedrooms | Office | 5 bathrooms | 5,500 SQ FT (btv) In Montemalaga on nearly an acre, this private gated estate is situated down a scenic canyon road on a quiet cul de sac. Enter the home to unobstructed, panoramic views of the Pacific ocean, Bluff Cove, Channel Islands, Malibu, Santa Monica mountains and the Los Angeles Basin. Breathtaking views, including the Queen’s necklace! Watch the waves as they touch the shore. In the dining room,

JOANN DEFLON Realtor®, DRE# 01943409

joann.deflon@vistasir.com 310.508.3581 1801 S. Catalina Avenue Redondo Beach, CA 90277

relax with guests to the soothing sounds of the water fountains just outside the French doors.

CALL JOANN AT 310.508.3581 TO SCHEDULE YOUR SHOWING TODAY. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated


THINKING OF UPGRADING YOUR LIFESTYLE? CALL US TODAY! 310.740.5742

310.740.5742 | HELLO@THEKONDOGROUP.COM |

WWW.THEKONDOGROUP.COM

DRE #01438455 | DRE #01969527 | DRE #01965939 | DRE #02013555 | DRE #01958495 | DRE #01928661 | DRE #01953697 | DRE #01963711 | DRE #01972569 | DRE #02026278 | DRE #02013555

TOP RANKED REAL ESTATE TEAM


HOME FILMS

HOME FILMS

C R E AT I N G V I D E O F O R YO U R L I S T I N G S I S O N LY E X P E N S I V E I F N O O N E I S WAT C H I N G . H o m e F i l m s i s t h e o n l y f u l l y i n t e g r a t e d , r e a l e s t a t e v i d e o p ro d u c t i o n a n d d i g i t a l distribution package. Our talented filmmaking team artistically tells the story of w h a t m a k e s yo u r l i s t i n g u n i q u e . A n d o u r t a r g e t e d d i g i t a l d i s t r i b u t i o n e n s u r e s t h a t t h e r i g h t p o t e n t i a l b u y e r s a r e s e e i n g yo u r p ro p e r t y i n t h e m o s t b e a u t i f u l l i g h t .

BEST IN CLASS FILMMAKERS

+

S M A RT D I S T R I B U T I O N

Fo r m o r e i n f o r m a t i o n : Ro b i n S a n d e r s a t 8 1 8 . 4 2 7. 2 0 5 0 o r ro b i n @ g o l d e n s t a t e . i s .


Getting Creative RESIN’S RAFAEL MCMASTER BELIEVES ART PROVIDES KIDS WITH TOOLS EVEN GREATER THAN THE PAINTBRUSH. Illustrated by Yasmine Kahsai

“Its a good thing that you are teaching my kids how to

of bright, imaginative and wildly creative teenagers, all

do art,” the mom said while dropping off her two boys at

dressed in art-splattered lab coats. These are our teach-

Resin, adding, “because I’m not creative.” It’s that last

ers and volunteers, like Fiona Dowdee, a Mira Costa High

part—the limiting belief of “I am not creative” buried in

School graduate about to embark on an international artist

her subconscious—that makes me realize the importance

study in Florence in May. “Giving these kids the gift of

of giving our local youth creative confidence while they are

art—it’s so fulfilling, and this studio environment is just

young. And so I started Resin, a creative workshop in Her-

magical,” she says. “We’ve seen so many kids learn so

mosa Beach, where local youth ages 5 to 20 learn everything

much and just come to life. They connect to their creative

from spray painting to photography to hydro dipping. Don’t

selves. And they have fun doing it.”

know what hydro dipping is? Just ask your kids … But it’s actually not about teaching art. It’s about developing the creative self and getting connected—to yourself,

with something hard,” shares the youth program’s Aydyn

your crew and the plane of subtle energy that resides just

Morgan. “They just want to escape those feelings. Shut off.

beneath the surface of everyday life. And over the last

Numb out. Run away. Through art, they’ve been able to

three years, our Resin workshop—a gallery, creative lab,

process the pain, express it and connect to that bright light

classroom and studio space—has been a safe space for

inside. They become inspired.”

young minds to blossom. Ava Fielder (then a fourth grader)

|

By developing our kids’ creative selves, we are investing

wrote for a school project, “I am a rock star at art.” Boom!

in a tool kit for our youth, whose strands of culture are be-

Creative confidence.

ing woven into a tapestry of sand, sea, pigments and pixels

Come any weekday and you’ll find a gregarious crew

162

“I’ve seen amazing transformations firsthand where a student comes in and they’re really suffering, really dealing

in this beautiful place we call home. ■


We are excited to announce that throughout the month of March, Terranea will participate as a partner in the fifth annual Make March Matter campaign! This important annual campaign rallies the community in support of our local Children’s Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) and brings focus to the healthcare needs of children. The goal is to raise $1 million in the month of March to support programs and services at CHLA that build healthier futures for children. As part of the campaign, guests and locals can help give back by participating in resort Make March Matter activities.

8 5 5 . 41 6. 39 28 | T E R R A N E A .CO M | # T E R R A N E A D I S C O V E R Y | E P I C U R E A N | W E L L N E S S | C E L E B R AT I O N | C O M M U N I T Y | S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y


FIND THE FREEDOM TO FLOURISH WE ARE HERE TO HELP EVERY STEP OF THE WAY ON YOUR JOURNEY OF RECOVERY The Thelma McMillen Recovery Center for alcohol and drug treatment at Torrance Memorial is making lasting changes in the lives of South Bay adults and adolescents as well as their families. Providing outpatient treatment services to help clients find sobriety within the framework of their daily lives is at the core of what we do. TAKE THE FIRST STEP • CALL US FOR A FREE CONSULTATION AT 310.910.9747 VISIT US AT T helmaMcMillenRecoveryCenter.com

Profile for Moon Tide Media

Southbay February/March 2020  

Southbay February/March 2020